WorldWideScience

Sample records for radio-faint gamma-ray pulsar

  1. PSR J1907+0602: A Radio-Faint Gamma-Ray Pulsar Powering a Bright TeV Pulsar Wind Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A

    2010-01-01

    We present multiwavelength studies of the 106.6 ms gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+06 near the TeV source MGRO J1908+06. Timing observations with Fermi result in a precise position determination for the pulsar of R.A. = 19h07m547(2), decl. = +06:02:16(2) placing the pulsar firmly within the TeV source extent, suggesting the TeV source is the pulsar wind nebula of PSR J1907+0602. Pulsed gamma-ray emission is clearly visible at energies from 100 MeV to above 10 GeV. The phase-averaged power-law index in the energy range E > 0.1 GeV is = 1.76 \\pm 0.05 with an exponential cutoff energy E_{c} = 3.6 \\pm 0.5 GeV. We present the energy-dependent gamma-ray pulsed light curve as well as limits on off-pulse emission associated with the TeV source. We also report the detection of very faint (flux density of ~3.4 microJy) radio pulsations with the Arecibo telescope at 1.5 GHz having a dispersion measure DM = 82.1 \\pm 1.1 cm^{-3}pc. This indicates a distance of 3.2 \\pm 0.6 kpc and a pseudo-luminosity of L_{1400} ~ 0.035 mJy kpc...

  2. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  3. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting, INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. Today we are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known of gamma-ray-emitting neutron stars. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011 and we are now appr...

  4. Gamma-ray pulsars: a gold mine

    CERN Document Server

    Grenier, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to gamma rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of gamma-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic gamma rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing gamma-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail.

  5. Gamma Rays From Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2002-01-01

    The seven known gamma-ray pulsars represent a very small fraction of the more than 1000 presently known radio pulsars, yet they can give us valuable information about pulsar particle acceleration and energetics. Although the theory of acceleration and high-energy emission in pulsars has been studied for over 25 years, the origin of the pulsed gamma rays is a question that remains unanswered. Characteristics of the pulsars detected by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory could not clearly distinguish between an emission site at the magnetic poles (polar cap models) and emission from the outer magnetosphere (outer gap models). There are also a number of theoretical issues in both type of model which have yet to be resolved. The two types of models make contrasting predictions for the numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars and of their spectral characteristics. GLAST will probably detect at least 50 radio-selected pulsars and possibly many more radio-quiet pulsars. With this large sample, it will b...

  6. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  7. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Expected in the Outer Gap Model of Gamma-Ray Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 吴杰; 姜泽军; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    We study the possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the known 1130 radio pulsars based on the outer gap model of high-energy emission from pulsars. We estimate the fractional size of outer gap, the integrated flux, the gamma-ray luminosity for each known radio pulsar, and find that only 14% of the known radio pulsars are gamma-ray emitters according to the outer gap model. In the sample of possible 156 gamma-ray pulsars, our statistical analysis indicates that the distributions of the spin-down powers and the ages of these pulsars concentrate mainly on 1033.5-1039 erg/s and 103-107 y, respectively. The predictions of gamma-ray pulsars detected by the AGILE and GLAST missions are given.

  8. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, Matthew G

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are powerful sources of radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper highlights some theoretical insights into non-thermal, magnetospheric pulsar gamma-ray radiation. These advances have been driven by NASA's Fermi mission, launched in mid-2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on Fermi has afforded the discrimination between polar cap and slot gap/outer gap acceleration zones in young and middle-aged pulsars. Altitude discernment using the highest energy pulsar photons will be addressed, as will spectroscopic interpretation of the primary radiation mechanism in the LAT band, connecting to both polar cap/slot gap and outer gap scenarios. Focuses will mostly be on curvature radiation and magnetic pair creation, including population trends that may afford probes of the magnetospheric accelerating potential.

  9. Gamma-ray binaries: pulsars in disguise ?

    CERN Document Server

    Dubus, G

    2006-01-01

    LS 5039 and LSI +61 303 are unique amongst high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) for their spatially-resolved radio emission and their counterpart at >GeV gamma-ray energies, canonically attributed to non-thermal particles in an accretion-powered relativistic jet. The only other HMXB known to emit very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays, PSR B1259-63, harbours a non-accreting millisecond pulsar. I investigate whether the interaction of the relativistic wind from a young pulsar with the wind from its stellar companion, as in PSR B1259-63, constitutes a viable scenario to explain the observations of LS 5039 and LSI +61 303. Emission would arise from the shocked pulsar wind material, which then flows away to large distances in a comet-shape tail, reproducing on a smaller scale what is observed in isolated, high motion pulsars interacting with the ISM. Simple expectations for the SED are derived and are shown to depend on few input parameters. Detailed modelling of the particle evolution is compared to the observations from ...

  10. Possible distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Distance measurement of gamma-ray pulsars is a current challenge in pulsar studies. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi gamma-ray observatory discovered more than 70 gamma-ray pulsars including 24 new gamma-selected pulsars with almost no distance information. We study the relation between gammaray emission efficiency (η = Lγ/E) and pulsar parameters for young radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars with known distance information in the first gamma-ray pulsar catalog reported by Fermi/LAT. We have introduced three generation-order parameters to describe the gamma-ray emission properties of pulsars, and find a strong correlation of rη- ζ3, a generation-order parameter which reflects γ-ray photon generation in the pair cascade processes induced by magnetic field absorption in a pulsar's magnetosphere.A good correlation of η- BLC, the magnetic field at the light cylinder radius, is also found. These correlations are the distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars used to evaluate distances for gamma-selected pulsars. Distances of 25 gamma-selected pulsars are estimated, which could be tested by other distance measurement methods. The physical origin of the correlations may also be interesting for pulsar studies.

  11. How promising is the search for gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1985-03-01

    Radiopulsars are rotating neutron stars. At present more than 330 of these objects are known. From two of them (Crab and Vela) pulsed emission has been observed at ..gamma..-ray energies, too. Because both of these pulsars have their maximum of luminosity at ..gamma..-ray energies and not in the radio range, it is supposed that the key for an understanding of the pulsar phenomenon will be found in the ..gamma..-ray range. In spite of intensive searches in the ..gamma..-ray range no further pulsars have been found yet. Indeed, theoretical estimates on the ..gamma..-ray luminosity indicate that only the next generation of ..gamma..-ray telescopes will be sufficiently sensitive to see more of them.

  12. On the difference between gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rookyard, Simon C; Johnston, Simon; Kerr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We compare radio profile widths of young, energetic gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars. We find that the latter typically have wider radio profiles, with the boundary between the two samples exhibiting a dependence on the rate of rotational energy loss. We also find that within the sample of gamma-ray-detected pulsars, radio profile width is correlated with both the separation of the main gamma-ray peaks and the presence of narrow gamma-ray components. These findings lead us to propose that these pulsars form a single population where the main factors determining gamma ray detectability are the rate of rotational energy loss and the proximity of the line of sight to the rotation axis. The expected magnetic inclination angle distribution will be different for radio pulsars with and without detectable gamma rays, naturally leading to the observed differences. Our results also suggest that the geometry of existing radio and outer-magnetosphere gamma-ray emission models are at least qualitative...

  13. Public List of LAT-Detected Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following is a compilation of all publicly-announced gamma-ray pulsars detected using the Fermi LAT. Each of the detections has been vetted by the LAT team,...

  14. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  15. Pulsar Timing for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Dumora, D; Espinoza, C; Freire, P C C; Gotthelf, E V; Harding, A K; Hobbs, G B; Johnston, S; Kaspi, V M; Krämer, M; Livingstone, M A; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Marshall, F E; McLaughlin, M A; Noutsos, A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Romani, R W; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Wang, N; Weltevrede, P

    2008-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive pulsar monitoring campaign for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the {\\em Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} (formerly GLAST). The detection and study of pulsars in gamma rays give insights into the populations of neutron stars and supernova rates in the Galaxy, into particle acceleration mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres, and into the ``engines'' driving pulsar wind nebulae. LAT's unprecedented sensitivity between 20 MeV and 300 GeV together with its 2.4 sr field-of-view makes detection of many gamma-ray pulsars likely, justifying the monitoring of over two hundred pulsars with large spin-down powers. To search for gamma-ray pulsations from most of these pulsars requires a set of phase-connected timing solutions spanning a year or more to properly align the sparse photon arrival times. We describe the choice of pulsars and the instruments involved in the campaign. Attention is paid to verifications of the LAT pulsar software, using for example giant radio pulses from the Cra...

  16. Pulsar Populations and Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Grenier, I A; Perrot, C A

    2003-01-01

    The EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected over 200 sources and the majority of these are still unidentified. At least three subpopulations of EGRET sources have been associated with the Galaxy: bright sources lying along the Galactic plane, weaker sources spatially correlated with the Gould Belt and a high-latitude, halo population. Many of these sources may be pulsars and there are more than two-dozen radio pulsars in or near EGRET source error boxes, most of them recently discovered in the Parkes Multibeam Survey. We present results from several population synthesis studies of pulsars in the Galaxy, which predict the number of pulsars detected by gamma-ray and radio surveys assuming models for the high-energy emission beam and its relation to the radio beam. Future gamma-ray pulsar detections by AGILE and GLAST together with the recent large rise in the radio pulsar population will give greatly improved statistics. The relative numbers of radio and gamma-ray pulsars detected in the p...

  17. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hartog, P R den; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schulz, A; Sgro, C; Silva, E do Couto e; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; 10.1126/science.1229054

    2012-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs), old neutron stars spun-up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  18. Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lupin Chun-Che

    2016-09-01

    A radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar is a neutron star that has significant γ-ray pulsation but without observed radio emission or only limited emission detected by high sensitivity radio surveys. The launch of the Fermi spacecraft in 2008 opened a new epoch to study the population of these pulsars. In the 2nd Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog of γ-ray pulsars, there are 35 (30 % of the 117 pulsars in the catalog) known samples classified as radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars with radio flux density (S1400) of less than 30 μJy. Accompanying the observations obtained in various wavelengths, astronomers not only have the opportunity to study the emitting nature of radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars but also have proposed different models to explain their radiation mechanism. This article will review the history of the discovery, the emission properties, and the previous efforts to study pulsars in this population. Some particular cases known as Geminga-like pulsars (e.g., PSR J0633+1746, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026, and so on) are also specified to discuss their common and specific features.

  19. Multi-wavelength emission region of gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota

    2011-01-01

    Recent obserbations by Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of gamma-ray pulsars have revealed further details of the structure of the emission region. We investigate the emission region for the multi-wavelength light curve using outer gap model. We assume that gamma-ray and non-thermal X-ray photons are emitted from a particle acceleration region in the outer magnetosphere, and UV/optical photons originate above that region. We also assume that gamma-rays are radiated only by outwardly moving particles, whereas the other photons are produced by particles moving inward and outward. We parametrize the altitude of the emission region. We find that the outer gap model can explain the multi-wavelength pulse behavior. From observational fitting, we also find a general tendency for the altitude of the gamma-ray emission region to depend on the inclination angle. In particular, the emission region for low inclination angle is required to be located in very low altitude, which corresponds to the inner region within the la...

  20. The anatomy of $\\gamma$-ray pulsar light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Johnson, T J; Harding, A K

    2015-01-01

    We previously obtained constraints on the viewing geometries of 6 Fermi LAT pulsars using a multiwavelength approach (Seyffert et al., 2011). To obtain these constraints we compared the observed radio and $\\gamma$-ray light curves (LCs) for those 6 pulsars by eye to LCs predicted by geometric models detailing the location and extent of emission regions in a pulsar magnetosphere. As a precursor to obtaining these constraints, a parameter study was conducted to reinforce our qualitative understanding of how the underlying model parameters effect the LCs produced by the geometric models. Extracting useful trends from the $\\gamma$-ray model LCs proved difficult though due to the increased complexity of the geometric models for the $\\gamma$-ray emission relative to those for the radio emission. In this paper we explore a second approach to investigating the interplay between the model parameters and the LC atlas. This approach does not attempt to understand how the set of model parameters influences the LC shapes ...

  1. The pulsar contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Kanbach, G.; Hunter, S.D.;

    1997-01-01

    There is active interest in the extent to which unresolved gamma-ray pulsars contribute to the Galactic diffuse emission, and in whether unresolved gamma-ray pulsars could be responsible for the excess of diffuse Galactic emission above 1 GeV that has been observed by EGRET. The diffuse gamma-ray...... for a reasonable number of directly observable gamma-ray pulsars (similar to 14). The latitude distribution of the diffuse emission caused by unresolved pulsars is narrower than that of the observed diffuse emission. While the excess above 1 GeV gamma-ray energy is observed up to at least 6 degrees-8 degrees off...... the plane, the pulsar contribution would be small there. Thus, pulsars do significantly contribute to the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission above 1 GeV, but they cannot be made responsible for all the discrepancies between observed intensity and model predictions in this energy range....

  2. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources as Ancient Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C; Djannati-Ataï, A; Dalton, M; Deil, C; Kosack, K; Renaud, M; Schwanke, U; Tibolla, O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we explore the evolution of a PWN while the pulsar is spinning down. An MHD approach is used to simulate the evolution of a composite remnant. Particular attention is given to the adiabatic loss rate and evolution of the nebular field strength with time. By normalising a two component particle injection spectrum (which can reproduce the radio and X-ray components) at the pulsar wind termination shock to the time dependent spindown power, and keeping track with losses since pulsar/PWN/SNR birth, we show that the average field strength decreases with time as $t^{-1.3}$, so that the synchrotron flux decreases, whereas the IC gamma-ray flux increases, until most of the spindown power has been dumped into the PWN. Eventually adiabatic and IC losses will also terminate the TeV visibility and then eventually the GeV visibility.

  3. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  4. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  5. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. I. Search Methods, Sensitivity, and Discovery of New Young Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. J.; Wu, J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the results of a recent blind search survey for gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data being carried out on the distributed volunteer computing system, Einstein@Home. The survey has searched for pulsations in 118 unidentified pulsar-like sources, requiring about 10,000 years of CPU core time. In total, this survey has resulted in the discovery of 17 new gamma-ray pulsars, of which 13 are newly reported in this work, and an accompanying paper. These pulsars are all young, isolated pulsars with characteristic ages between 12 kyr and 2 Myr, and spin-down powers between 1034 and 4 × 1036 erg s‑1. Two of these are the slowest spinning gamma-ray pulsars yet known. One pulsar experienced a very large glitch {{Δ }}f/f≈ 3.5× {10}-6 during the Fermi mission. In this, the first of two associated papers, we describe the search scheme used in this survey, and estimate the sensitivity of our search to pulsations in unidentified Fermi-LAT sources. One such estimate results in an upper limit of 57% for the fraction of pulsed emission from the gamma-ray source associated with the Cas A supernova remnant, constraining the pulsed gamma-ray photon flux that can be produced by the neutron star at its center. We also present the results of precise timing analyses for each of the newly detected pulsars.

  6. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. I. Search Methods, Sensitivity and Discovery of New Young Gamma-ray Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C J; Wu, J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a recent blind search survey for gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data being carried out on the distributed volunteer computing system, Einstein@Home. The survey has searched for pulsations in 118 unidentified pulsar-like sources, requiring about 10,000 years of CPU core time. In total, this survey has resulted in the discovery of 17 new gamma-ray pulsars, of which 13 are newly reported in this work, and an accompanying paper. These pulsars are...

  7. Gamma ray pulsars emission from extended polar cap cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, J K; Daugherty, Joseph K; Harding, Alice K

    1995-01-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo simulation of a Polar Cap (PC) model of gamma-ray pulsars to estimate light curves and phase-resolved spectra for sources whose rotational and magnetic axes are oriented so that only one of the magnetic poles produces emission directed at the Earth. In this Single Polar Cap (SPC) scenario, even sources whose light curves have two distinct peaks (Crab, Vela, Geminga, PSR B1951+32) are due to emission concentrated near the rim of a single PC. If the inclination alpha is comparable to the half-width of the PC gamma-beam, alpha ~ theta_{b}, the peak-to-peak phase separation can have the large values (0.4 - 0.5) observed from these sources. In the model presented here we attribute the observed interpeak emission to pair cascades above the PC interior. Our simulation assumes the physics of conventional PC models, in which the gamma rays are due to photon-pair cascades initiated by curvature radiation from the acceleration of electrons above the PCs. In this work we assume that the acceler...

  8. The second FERMI large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  9. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  10. The second fermi large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  11. Theory and Modeling of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadigaroglu, Ion-Alexis George

    Newborn neutron stars from supernovae explosions radiate brightly in γ rays, outshining all other objects in the Galaxy. The γ rays are emitted in a beam, and a flash of emission is observed at every rotation of the star; hence these objects are called γ-ray pulsars. A great amount of energy is radiated in this form (~ 1035 erg/s), originating from the kinetic energy associated with the rapid (~100 ms) rotation of the neutron star. As this energy is sapped and converted to γ rays, the star slows down, to ~1 s period after a million years. At this time, the γ-ray emission suddenly stops. Driven by the explosion in number and quality of γ-ray pulsar observations with the launch of the EGRET instrument aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in 1991, we have revisited the theory and modeling of γ-ray pulsars. We adopt a particular point of view in our efforts, refraining from detailed computations of the radiation spectra and looking instead to establish a number of important features of the magnetosphere and emission zones. Building on previous efforts, I have developed an outer gap model of the emission geometry and physics which is successful in explaining many of the key features of the observations. In particular the complex light curves find a natural explanation in this model. Several important puzzles remain and are presented as a challenge for future investigations. If one can successfully model the γ-ray emissions, γ-ray pulsars as a group can be used to explore general properties of our Galaxy. Initial applications of this idea are presented. We enlarge the sample of γ-ray pulsars by searching for associations of unidentified Galactic plane EGRET sources with tracers of massive stars. The characteristics of the candidate identifications are compared to detailed Galactic population syntheses using our pulsar emission model. We find good agreement with model predictions. A constraint is derived on the minimum mass a star must have in order to form

  12. Analysis of the COS B data for evidence of linear polarization of Vela pulsar gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, John R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, Hans A.; Strong, Andy W.

    1990-01-01

    The COS B spark chamber telescope observations of the Vela pulsar were analyzed for gamma-ray polarization. No significant quadrupole moment is found in the azimuthal distribution of the electron-positron pair production planes. However, analysis of the sensitivity indicates that even 100-percent polarization would not be detected. Therefore, the null result does not constrain the polarization of the Vela pulsar gamma-ray emission. This result contradicts the report of Caraveo et al. (1988) of possible evidence for polarization of the Vela pulsar gamma rays.

  13. X-ray observations and the search for Fermi-LAT gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz; Caraveo, P; De Luca, A; Marelli, M

    2013-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi has detected ~150 gamma-ray pulsars, about a third of which were discovered in blind searches of the $\\gamma$-ray data. Because the angular resolution of the LAT is relatively poor and blind searches for pulsars (especially millisecond pulsars, MSPs) are very sensitive to an error in the position, one must typically scan large numbers of locations. Identifying plausible X-ray counterparts of a putative pulsar drastically reduces the number of trials, thus improving the sensitivity of pulsar blind searches with the LAT. I discuss our ongoing program of Swift, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observations of LAT unassociated sources in the context of our blind searches for gamma-ray pulsars.

  14. Dynamos, Super-pulsars and Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rosswog, S; Rosswog, Stephan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    The remnant of a neutron star binary coalescence is expected to be temporarily stabilised against gravitational collapse by its differential rotation. We explore the possibility of dynamo activity in this remnant and assess the potential for powering a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). We analyse our three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star mergers with respect to the flow pattern inside the remnant. If the central, newly formed super-massive neutron star remains stable for a good fraction of a second an efficient low-Rossby number $\\alpha-\\Omega$-dynamo will amplify the initial seed magnetic fields exponentially. We expect that values close to equipartition field strength will be reached within several tens of milliseconds. Such a super-pulsar could power a GRB via a relativistic wind, with an associated spin-down time scale close to the typical duration of a short GRB. Similar mechanisms are expected to be operational in the surrounding torus formed from neutron star debris.

  15. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey I: Search Methods, Sensitivity and Discovery of New Young Gamma-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Pletsch, H J; Guillemot, L; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Beer, C; Bock, O; Cuéllar, A; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Nieder, L

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a recent blind search survey for gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data being carried out on the distributed volunteer computing system, Einstein@Home. The survey has searched for pulsations in 118 unidentified pulsar-like sources, requiring about 10,000 years of CPU core time. In total, this survey has resulted in the discovery of 17 new gamma-ray pulsars, of which 13 are newly reported in this work, and an accompanying paper. These pulsars are all young, isolated pulsars with characteristic ages between 12 kyr and 2 Myr, and spin-down powers between $10^{34}$ and $4\\times10^{36}$ erg/s. Two of these are the slowest spinning gamma-ray pulsars yet known. One pulsar experienced a very large glitch $\\Delta f/f \\approx 3.5\\times10^{-6}$ during the Fermi mission. In this, the first of two associated papers, we describe the search scheme used in this survey, and estimate the sensitivity of our search to pulsations in unidentified Fermi-LAT sources. One such estimate ...

  16. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  17. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  18. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVE AND PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTRA FROM GEMINGA PULSAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LI; BIAN XIA; MEI DONG-CHENG

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of Geminga in a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model. The light curve of gamma-rays is consistent with that observed if the magnetic inclination and viewing angle are~50° and~86° respectively. We also model the phase-resolved spectra of the Geminga pulsar.

  19. EINSTEIN@HOME DISCOVERY OF FOUR YOUNG GAMMA-RAY PULSARS IN FERMI LAT DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Papa, M. A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Guillemot, L.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Ng, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hammer, D.; Siemens, X. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Keith, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (Australia); Ray, P. S., E-mail: holger.pletsch@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: lucas.guillemot@cnrs-orleans.fr [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422–6138, J1522–5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range 6 × 10{sup 34}—10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.

  20. Einstein@Home Discovery of Four Young Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi LAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Champion, D. J.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ng, C.; Papa, M. A.; Ray, P. S.; Siemens, X.

    2013-12-01

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422-6138, J1522-5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range 6 × 1034—1036 erg s-1. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray pulsars found by volunteer computing, motivate continued blind pulsar searches of the many other unidentified LAT gamma-ray sources.

  1. The Braking Index of Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Camilo, F; Johnson, T J; Kerr, M; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Beer, C; Bock, O; Cuéllar, A; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Nieder, L

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 $\\mu$Jy. By timing this pulsar's gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be $n = 2.598 \\pm 0.001 \\pm 0.1$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2,700 yr, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its you...

  2. A population of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbet, R; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; Desvignes, G; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hobbs, G; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Manchester, R N; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; McLaughlin, M A; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Starck, J L; Striani, E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Venter, C; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Watters, K; Webb, N; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are born with subsecond spin periods and slow by electromagnetic braking for several tens of millions of years, when detectable radiation ceases. A second life can occur for neutron stars in binary systems. They can acquire mass and angular momentum from their companions, to be spun up to millisecond periods and begin radiating again. We searched Fermi Large Area Telescope data for pulsations from all known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) outside of globular clusters, using rotation parameters from radio telescopes. Strong gamma-ray pulsations were detected for eight MSPs. The gamma-ray pulse profiles and spectral properties resemble those of young gamma-ray pulsars. The basic emission mechanism seems to be the same for MSPs and young pulsars, with the emission originating in regions far from the neutron star surface.

  3. Ground-based Gamma-Ray Observations of Pulsars and their Nebulae: Towards a New Order

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C

    2005-01-01

    The excellent sensitivity and high resolution capability of wide FoV ground-based imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes allow us for the first time to resolve the morphological structures of pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) which are older and more extended than the Crab Nebula. VHE gamma-ray observations of such extended nebulae (with field strengths below ~ 20 micro Gauss) probe the electron component corresponding to the unseen extreme ultraviolet (EUV) synchrotron component, which measures electron injection from earlier evolutionary epochs. VHE observations of PWN therefore introduce a new window on PWN research. This review paper also identifies conditions for maximal VHE visbility of PWN. Regarding pulsar pulsed emission, it is becoming clear that the threshold energies of current telescopes are not sufficient to probe the pulsed gamma-ray component from canonical pulsars. Theoretical estimates of pulsed gamma-ray emission from millisecond pulsars seem to converge and it becomes clear that such detections w...

  4. Modelling the $\\gamma$-ray and radio light curves of the double pulsar system

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2014-01-01

    Guillemot et al. recently reported the discovery of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations from the 22.7ms pulsar (pulsar A) in the famous double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. The $\\gamma$-ray light curve (LC) of pulsar A has two peaks separated by approximately half a rotation, and these are non-coincident with the observed radio and X-ray peaks. This suggests that the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates in a part of the magnetosphere distinct from where the radio and X-ray radiation is generated. Thus far, three different methods have been applied to constrain the viewing geometry of pulsar A (its inclination and observer angles $\\alpha$ and $\\zeta$): geometric modelling of the radio and $\\gamma$-ray light curves, modelling of the position angle sweep in phase seen in the radio polarisation data, and independent studies of the time evolution of the radio pulse profile of pulsar A. These three independent, complementary methods have yielded consistent results: pulsar A's rotation axis is likely perpendicular to the orbital pla...

  5. The gamma-ray millisecond pulsar deathline, revisited - New velocity and distance measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemot, L; Laffon, H; Janssen, G H; Cognard, I; Theureau, G; Desvignes, G; Ferrara, E C; Ray, P S

    2016-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) represent nearly half of the more than 160 currently known $\\gamma$-ray pulsars detected by the Large Area Telescope on the \\textit{Fermi} satellite, and a third of all known MSPs are seen in $\\gamma$ rays. The least energetic $\\gamma$-ray MSPs enable us to probe the so-called deathline for high-energy emission, i.e., the spin-down luminosity limit under which pulsars (PSRs) cease to produce detectable high-energy radiation. Characterizing the MSP luminosity distribution helps to determine their contribution to the Galactic diffuse $\\gamma$-ray emission. We made use of the high-quality pulsar timing data recorded at the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope over several years to characterize the properties of a selection of MSPs. For one of the pulsars, the dataset was complemented with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations. The rotation ephemerides derived from this analysis were also used to search the LAT data for new $\\gamma$-ray MSPs. For the MSPs considered in this study, we ...

  6. Eight gamma-ray pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of Fermi LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Ray, P S; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Baring, M G; Belfiore, A; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; de Luca, A; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Gwon, C; Harding, A K; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Reimer, O; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Thompson, D J; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT, onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Five of the eight pulsars are young (tau_c10^36 erg/s), and located within the Galactic plane (|b|<3 deg). The remaining three are older, less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the LAT bright gamma-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age (tau_c=4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (Edot=1.1E37 erg/s) of all gamma-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages (tau_c~1 Myr) and are the least energetic (Edot~5E33 erg/s) of the newly-discovered pulsars. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. In ...

  7. Constraints on the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution of Gamma-ray Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, T J; Harding, A K; Guillemot, L; Smith, D A; Kramer, M; Celik, O; Hartog, P R den; Ferrara, E C; Hou, X; Lande, J; Ray, P S

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Cl...

  8. New Neighbours: Modelling the Growing Population of gamma-ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnson, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope, in collaboration with several groups from the radio community. have had marvelous success at uncovering new gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs). In fact, MSPs now make up a sizable fraction of the total number of known gamma-ray pulsars. The MSP population is characterized by a variety of pulse profile shapes, peak separations, and radio-to-gamma phase lags, with some members exhibiting nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). The MSPs' short spin periods underline the importance of including special relativistic effects in LC calculations, even for emission originating from near the stellar surface. We present results on modelling and classification of MSP LCs using standard pulsar model geometries.

  9. Off-Beam Gamma-Ray Pulsars and Unidentified EGRET Sources in the Gould Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Zhang, Bing

    2001-01-01

    We investigate whether gamma-ray pulsars viewed at a large angle to the neutron star magnetic pole could contribute to the new population of galactic unidentified EGRET sources associated with the Gould Belt. The faint, soft nature of these sources is distinctly different from both the properties of unidentified EGRET sources along the galactic plane and of the known gamma-ray pulsars. We explore the possibility, within the polar cap model, that some of these sources are emission from pulsars seen at lines of sight that miss both the bright gamma-ray cone beams and the radio beam. The off-beam gamma-rays come from high-altitude curvature emission of primary particles, are radiated over a large solid angle and have a much softer spectrum than that of the main beams. We estimate that the detectability of such off-beam emission is about a factor of 4-5 higher than that of the on-beam emission. At least some of the radio-quiet Gould Belt sources detected by EGRET could therefore be such off-beam gamma-ray pulsars...

  10. Effect of Gamma-Ray Beaming on the Fluxes of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ze-Jun; ZHANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the effect ofγ-ray beaming on γ-ray emission of the pulsars in a self-sustained outer gap model. In this model, averaged γ-ray flux is a function of period, magnetic field, magnetic inclination angle and solid angle of γ-ray beaming for a γ-ray pulsar. We generate a sample of γ-ray pulsars with their ages less than 106 years by using the Monte Carlo method, and then study the γ-ray beaming effect. The comparison of distributions of periods, magnetic fields, distances, γ-ray energy fluxes and period derivatives of the simulated γ-ray pulsars with those of observed γ-ray pulsars by the detector EGRET shows that γ-ray beaming has an important role on the detection ofγ-ray pulsars. Furthermore, possible γ-ray pulsars observed by the detector GLAST are predicted.PACS: 97. 60. Gb, 95. 85. Pw, 97. 10. Yp

  11. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C J; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit a...

  12. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 μJy. By timing this pulsar’s gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be n = 2.598 ± 0.001 ± 0.1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2700 years, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its young age, the pulsar is not associated with any known supernova remnant or pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar’s inferred dipolar surface magnetic field strength is 3.8 × 1013 G, almost 90% of the quantum-critical level. We investigate some potential physical causes of the braking index deviating from the simple dipole model but find that LAT data covering a longer time interval will be necessary to distinguish between these.

  13. PSR J1906+0722: An Elusive Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Ackermann, M; Allen, B; de Angelis, A; Aulbert, C; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bock, O; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Champion, D J; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cuéllar, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Desiante, R; Drell, P S; Eggenstein, H B; Favuzzi, C; Fehrmann, H; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Jóhannesson, G; Kramer, M; Krauss, F; Kuss, M; Laffon, H; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Machenschalk, B; Manfreda, A; Marelli, M; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torne, P; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yassine, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top ten most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of $8.9$ Hz, a characteristic age of $49$ kyr, and spin-down power $1.0 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar ($\\Delta f / f \\approx 4.5\\times10^{-6}$). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the pr...

  14. Differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars as revealed by Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Takata, J; Ng, C W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    By comparing the properties of non-recycled radio-loud $\\gamma-$ray pulsars and radio-quiet $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, we have searched for the differences between these two populations. We found that the $\\gamma-$ray spectral curvature of radio-quiet pulsars can be larger than that of radio-loud pulsars. Based on the full sample of non-recycled $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, their distributions of the magnetic field strength at the light cylinder are also found to be different. We notice that this might be resulted from the observational bias. In re-examining the previously reported difference of $\\gamma-$ray-to-X-ray flux ratios, we found the significance can be hampered by their statistical uncertainties. In the context of outer gap model, we discuss the expected properties of these two populations and compare with the possible differences identified in our analysis.

  15. GAMMA-RAY SIGNAL FROM THE PULSAR WIND IN THE BINARY PULSAR SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangulyan, Dmitry [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Aharonian, Felix A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bogovalov, Sergey V. [National Research Nuclear University-MEPHI, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ribo, Marc, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie, E-mail: svbogovalov@mephi.ru, E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Binary pulsar systems emit potentially detectable components of gamma-ray emission due to Comptonization of the optical radiation of the companion star by relativistic electrons of the pulsar wind, both before and after termination of the wind. The recent optical observations of binary pulsar system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 revealed radiation properties of the companion star which differ significantly from previous measurements. In this paper, we study the implications of these observations for the interaction rate of the unshocked pulsar wind with the stellar photons and the related consequences for fluxes of high energy and very high energy (VHE) gamma rays. We show that the signal should be strong enough to be detected with Fermi close to the periastron passage, unless the pulsar wind is strongly anisotropic or the Lorentz factor of the wind is smaller than 10{sup 3} or larger than 10{sup 5}. The higher luminosity of the optical star also has two important implications: (1) attenuation of gamma rays due to photon-photon pair production and (2) Compton drag of the unshocked wind. While the first effect has an impact on the light curve of VHE gamma rays, the second effect may significantly decrease the energy available for particle acceleration after termination of the wind.

  16. TeV Gamma Ray Emission from Nearby Pulsar Wind Nebulae with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Salesa Greus, Francisco; López-Coto, Rubén; Benzvi, Segev; Casanova, Sabrina; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae are considered efficient electron/positron accelerators in our Galaxy. It has been suggested that particles accelerated by nearby pulsar wind nebulae, such as Geminga, would possibly account for the observed multi-GeV positron excess. The Geminga pulsar is one of the closest middle-aged pulsars and its pulsations were first discovered in X-rays. Milagro reported an extended TeV source spatially coincident with the Geminga pulsar, but IACT observations using standard analysis techniques have only provided upper limits. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located in central Mexico at 4100 m above sea level, is sensitive to gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. With a field of view of 2 steradians, HAWC has a good sensitivity to extended sources such as pulsar wind nebulae. Early data collected with HAWC reveals an extended source coincident with the Geminga pulsar, similar to what Milagro has reported. We will present results of spectral and morphological analyses on extended TeV gamma-ray emission from Geminga and other nearby pulsar wind nebulae with HAWC data. The interpretation of whether positrons from nearby pulsar wind nebulae can explain the observed positron excess will be discussed as well.

  17. Detection of Pulsed Gamma Rays Above 100 GeV from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Şentürk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar at energies above 100 Gigaelectronvolts (GeV) with the VERITAS array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The detection cannot be explained on the basis of current pulsar models. The photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 Megaelectronvolts (MeV) and 400 GeV is described by a broken power law that is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cutoff. It is unlikely that the observation can be explained by invoking curvature radiation as the origin of the observed gamma rays above 100 GeV. Our findings require that these gamma rays be produced more than 10 stellar radii from the neutron star.

  18. The Gamma-Ray Pulsar Population of Globular Clusters: Implications for the GeV Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Dan

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the GeV excess, observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, might originate from a population of millisecond pulsars that formed in globular clusters. With this in mind, we employ the publicly available Fermi data to study the gamma-ray emission from 157 globular clusters, identifying a statistically significant signal from 25 of these sources (ten of which are not found in existing gamma-ray catalogs). We combine these observations with the predicted pulsar formation rate based on the stellar encounter rate of each globular cluster to constrain the gamma-ray luminosity function of millisecond pulsars in the Milky Way's globular cluster system. We find that this pulsar population exhibits a luminosity function that is quite similar to those millisecond pulsars observed in the field of the Milky Way (i.e. the thick disk). After pulsars are expelled from a globular cluster, however, they continue to lose rotational kinetic energy and become less luminous, causing their l...

  19. Einstein@Home discovery of four young gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Allen, B; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Champion, D J; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Hammer, D; Karuppusamy, R; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Ng, C; Papa, M A; Ray, P S; Siemens, X

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422-6138, J1522-5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the range $6\\times10^{34}$ - $10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. They are located in the Galactic plane and have rotation rates of less than 10 Hz, among which the 2.1 Hz spin frequency of PSR J0554+3107 is the slowest of any known gamma-ray pulsar. For two of the new pulsars, we find supernova remnants coincident on the sky and discuss the plausibility of such associations. Deep radio follow-up observations found no pulsations, suggesting that all four pulsars are radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. These discoveries, the first gamma-ray ...

  20. Photon Splitting Cascades in $\\gamma$-Ray Pulsars and the Spectrum of PSR1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Gonthier, P L; Harding, Alice K.; Baring, Matthew G.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic photon splitting, a QED process that becomes important only in magnetic fields approaching the quantum critical value, B_cr = 4.41 X 10^13 Gauss, is investigated as a mechanism for attenuation of gamma-rays emitted near the surface of strongly-magnetized pulsars. We model photon splitting attenuation and subsequent splitting cascades in gamma-ray pulsars, including the dipole field and curved spacetime geometry of the neutron star magnetosphere. We focus specifically on PSR1509-58, which has the highest surface magnetic field of all the gamma-ray pulsars (B_0 = 3 X 10^13 Gauss). We find that splitting will not be important for most gamma-ray pulsars, i.e. those with B_0 ~ 0.3 B_cr, where the splitting attenuation lengths and escape energies become comparable to or less than those for pair production. We compute Monte Carlo spectral models for PSR1509-58. We find that photon splitting, or combined splitting and pair production, can explain the unusually low cutoff energy (between 2 and 30 MeV) of PSR1...

  1. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of additional data from SAS-2 experiment and improvements in the orbit-attitude data and analysis procedures have produced revised values for the flux from the Vela gamma-ray source. The pulsar phase plot shows two peaks, neither of which is in phase with the single radio pulse.

  2. Establishing a connection between high-power pulsars and very-high-energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, S; Hofmann, W; Kosack, K; Lohse, T; Reimer, O

    2007-01-01

    In the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray wave band, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) represent to date the most populous class of Galactic sources. Nevertheless, the details of the energy conversion mechanisms in the vicinity of pulsars are not well understood, nor is it known which pulsars are able to drive PWNe and emit high-energy radiation. In this paper we present a systematic study of a connection between pulsars and VHE gamma-ray sources based on a deep survey of the inner Galactic plane conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). We find clear evidence that pulsars with large spin-down energy flux are associated with VHE gamma-ray sources. This implies that these pulsars emit on the order of 1% of their spin-down energy as TeV gamma-rays.

  3. Fluxes and Death Lines of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 姜泽军

    2003-01-01

    We study the fluxes and the death lines of γ-ray emission of the pulsars with outer gaps. In a self-sustained outer gap, we derive that the fractional size of the outer gap is a function of period, period derivative, radial distance and magnetic inclination angle for a pulsar. Our results indicate that (i) averaged typical γ-ray energy and γ-ray flux of a pulsar with an outer gap increase with the magnetic inclination angle; we estimate the averaged γ-ray fluxes for observed canonical pulsars with outer gaps and compare them with the sensitivities of AGILE and GLAST, and (ii) ff the fractional size of the outer gap at the inner boundary of the outer gap is not greater than unity, then an outer gap exists; such a condition gives the death lines of the pulsars with outer gaps.

  4. A model for gamma-ray binaries, based on the effect of pair production feedback in shocked pulsar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Derishev, E

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the model of gamma-ray binaries, consisting of a massive star and a pulsar with ultrarelativistic wind. We consider radiation from energetic particles, accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock, and feedback of this radiation on the wind through production of secondary electron-positron pairs. We show that the pair feedback limits the Lorentz factor of the pulsar wind and creates a population of very energetic pairs, whose radiation may be responsible for the observed gamma-ray signal.

  5. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  6. SAX J1808.4-3658, an accreting millisecond pulsar shining in gamma rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Li, J; Rea, N; Torres, D F; Burderi, L; Di Salvo, T; Iaria, R; Riggio, A; Sanna, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of a possible gamma-ray counterpart of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658. The analysis of ~6 years of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi-LAT) within a region of 15deg radius around the position of the pulsar reveals a point gamma-ray source detected at a significance of ~6 sigma (Test Statistic TS = 32), with position compatible with that of SAX J1808.4-3658 within 95% Confidence Level. The energy flux in the energy range between 0.6 GeV and 10 GeV amounts to (2.1 +- 0.5) x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 and the spectrum is well-represented by a power-law function with photon index 2.1 +- 0.1. We searched for significant variation of the flux at the spin frequency of the pulsar and for orbital modulation, taking into account the trials due to the uncertainties in the position, the orbital motion of the pulsar and the intrinsic evolution of the pulsar spin. No significant deviation from a constant flux at any time scale was found, ...

  7. Observations of three young gamma-ray pulsars with the Gran Telescopio Canarias

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Testa, V; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Pierbattista, M; Shearer, A; Torres, D F; Wilhelmi, E De Ona

    2016-01-01

    We report the analysis of the first deep optical observations of three isolated $\\gamma$-ray pulsars detected by the {\\em Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope}: the radio-loud PSR\\, J0248+6021 and PSR\\, J0631+1036, and the radio-quiet PSR\\, J0633+0632. The latter has also been detected in the X rays. The pulsars are very similar in their spin-down age ($\\tau \\sim$40--60 kyrs), spin-down energy ($\\dot{E} \\sim10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$), and dipolar surface magnetic field ($B \\sim 3$--$5\\times10^{12}$ G). These pulsars are promising targets for multi-wavelength observations, since they have been already detected in $\\gamma$ rays and in radio or X-rays. None of them has been detected yet in the optical band. We observed the three pulsar fields in 2014 with the Spanish 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We could not find any candidate optical counterpart to the three pulsars close to their most recent radio or {\\em Chandra} positions down to $3 \\sigma$ limits of $g'\\sim27.3$, $g'\\sim27$, $g'\\sim27.3$ for PSR\\, J0248+602...

  8. Einstein@Home discovery of four young gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi LAT data

    OpenAIRE

    Pletsch, H.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Champion, D; Eggenstein, H.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ng, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of four gamma-ray pulsars, detected in computing-intensive blind searches of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found using a novel search approach, combining volunteer distributed computing via Einstein@Home and methods originally developed in gravitational-wave astronomy. The pulsars PSRs J0554+3107, J1422-6138, J1522-5735, and J1932+1916 are young and energetic, with characteristic ages between 35 and 56 kyr and spin-down powers in the ...

  9. 1FGL J0523.5-2529: A New Probable Gamma-ray Pulsar Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, Jay; Sonbas, Eda; Sokolovsky, Kirill; Sand, David J; Moskvitin, Alexander S; Cheung, C C

    2014-01-01

    We report optical photometric and SOAR spectroscopic observations of an X-ray source found within the localization error of the Fermi-LAT unidentified gamma-ray source J0523.5-2529. The optical data show periodic flux modulation and radial velocity variations indicative of a binary with a 16.5-hr period. The data suggest a massive non-degenerate secondary (~> 0.8 M_sun), and we argue the source is likely a pulsar binary. The radial velocities have good phase coverage and show evidence for a measurable eccentricity (e=0.04). There is no clear sign of irradiation of the secondary in either photometry or spectroscopy. The spatial location out of the Galactic plane and gamma-ray luminosity of the source are more consistent with classification as a recycled millisecond pulsar than as a young pulsar. Future radio timing observations can confirm the identity of the primary and further characterize this interesting system.

  10. Gamma-ray Emission from the Vela Pulsar Modeled with the Annular Gap and Core Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Y J; Qiao, G J; Chou, C K

    2011-01-01

    The Vela pulsar represents a distinct group of {\\gamma}-ray pulsars. Fermi {\\gamma}-ray observations reveal that it has two sharp peaks (P1 and P2) in the light curve with a phase separation of 0.42 and a third peak (P3) in the bridge. The location and intensity of P3 are energy-dependent. We use the 3D magnetospheric model for the annular gap and core gap to simulate the {\\gamma}-ray light curves, phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra. We found that the acceleration electric field along a field line in the annular gap region decreases with heights. The emission at high energy GeV band is originated from the curvature radiation of accelerated primary particles, while the synchrotron radiation from secondary particles have some contributions to low energy {\\gamma}-ray band (0.1 - 0.3 GeV). The {\\gamma}-ray light curve peaks P1 and P2 are generated in the annular gap region near the altitude of null charge surface, whereas P3 and the bridge emission is generated in the core gap region. The intensity and loc...

  11. PSR J1906+0722: An Elusive Gamma-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Ackermann, M.; Allen, B.; de Angelis, A.; Aulbert, C.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bock, O.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Champion, D. J.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cuéllar, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Desiante, R.; Drell, P. S.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Favuzzi, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, A. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kramer, M.; Krauss, F.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Machenschalk, B.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; de Palma, F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torne, P.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top 10 most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of 8.9 Hz, a characteristic age of 49 kyr, and spin-down power 1.0× {10}36 erg s-1. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar ({{Δ }}f/f≈ 4.5× {10}-6). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the presence of an additional nearby source, which may be emission from the interaction between a neighboring supernova remnant and a molecular cloud. We discuss possible effects which may have hindered the detection of PSR J1906+0722 in previous searches and describe the methods by which these effects were mitigated in this survey. We also demonstrate the use of advanced timing methods for estimating the positional, spin and glitch parameters of difficult-to-time pulsars such as this.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Smith, D. A.; Hou, X. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Den Hartog, P. R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lande, J. [Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street 900, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States); Ray, P. S., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: ahardingx@yahoo.com [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  13. Constraints On the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution Of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Kramer, M.; Celik, O.; den Hartog, P. R.; Ferrara, E. C.; Hou, X.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using amaximum likelihood technique.We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  14. SAS-2 High energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The second Small Astronomy Satellite high-energy (35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks, one following the radio peak by about 13 msec, and the other 0.4 period after the first. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0004 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission and the double peak structure, compared to the single pulse in the radio emission, suggests that the high energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those found at lower energies.

  15. Emission mechanism of GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsars; A case for peculiar geometry?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Takata, J; Leung, Gene C K; Cheng, K S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing new class of young spin-down powered pulsars called GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsar; (1) spectral turnover appears around~10MeV, (2) the X-ray spectra of below 20 keV can be described by power law with photon index around 1.2 and (3) the light curve in X-ray/soft gamma-ray bands shows single broad pulse. Their emission properties are distinct from the normal gamma-ray pulsars, for which the spectral peak in $\

  16. TeV Gamma Rays From Galactic Center Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP

    2017-05-25

    Measurements of the nearby pulsars Geminga and B0656+14 by the HAWC and Milagro telescopes have revealed the presence of bright TeV-emitting halos surrounding these objects. If young and middle-aged pulsars near the Galactic Center transfer a similar fraction of their energy into TeV photons, then these sources could dominate the emission that is observed by HESS and other ground-based telescopes from the innermost ~10^2 parsecs of the Milky Way. In particular, both the spectral shape and the angular extent of this emission is consistent with TeV halos produced by a population of pulsars. The overall flux of this emission requires a birth rate of ~100-1000 neutron stars per Myr near the Galactic Center, in good agreement with recent estimates.

  17. Gamma-Ray Light Curves from Pulsar Magnetospheres with Finite Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has provided an unprecedented database for pulsar emission studies that includes gamma-ray light curves for over 100 pulsars. Modeling these light curves can reveal and constrain the geometry of the particle accelerator, as well as the pulsar magnetic field structure. We have constructed 3D magnetosphere models with finite conductivity, that bridge the extreme vacuum and force-free solutions used in previous light curves modeling. We are investigating the shapes of pulsar gamma-ray light curves using these dissipative solutions with two different approaches: (l) assuming geometric emission patterns of the slot gap and outer gap, and (2) using the parallel electric field provided by the resistive models to compute the trajectories and . emission of the radiating particles. The light curves using geometric emission patterns show a systematic increase in gamma-ray peak phase with increasing conductivity, introducing a new diagnostic of these solutions. The light curves using the model electric fields are very sensitive to the conductivity but do not resemble the observed Fermi light curves, suggesting that some screening of the parallel electric field, by pair cascades not included in the models, is necessary

  18. Simulated gamma-ray pulse profile of the Crab pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovoi, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-Ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ˜3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 h). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large Size Telescopes. CTA will provide a significant improvement in determining the VHE pulse shape parameters necessary to constrain theoretical models of the gamma-ray emission of the Crab pulsar. One of such parameters is the shift in phase between peaks in the pulse profile at VHE and in other energy bands that, if detected, may point to different locations of the emission regions.

  19. Search for Pulsed TeV $\\gamma$-ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, R W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Burdett, A M; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; D'Vali, M; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T; Hillas, A M; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Masterson, C; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using the Whipple Observatory's 10 m gamma-ray telescope. The direction of the Crab pulsar was observed for a total of 73.4 hours between 1994 November and 1997 March. During this period the Whipple 10 m telescope was operated at its lowest energy threshold to date. Spectral analysis techniques were applied to search for the presence of a gamma-ray signal from the Crab pulsar over the energy band 250 GeV to 4 TeV. We do not see any evidence of the 33 ms pulsations present in other energy bands from the Crab pulsar. The 99.9% confidence level upper limit for pulsed emission above 250 GeV is derived to be 4.8x10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1 or <3% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula. These results imply a sharp cut-off of the power-law spectrum seen by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. If the cut-off is exponential, it must begin at 60 GeV or lower to accommodate these upper limits.

  20. A Search for Pulsed TeV $\\gamma$ Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Burdett, A M; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; D'Vali, M; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Lessard, R W; Masterson, C; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using the Whipple Observatory's 10m gamma-ray telescope. The direction of the Crab pulsar was observed for a total of 73.4 hours between 1994 November and 1997 March. Spectral analysis techniques were applied to search for the presence of a gamma-ray signal from the Crab pulsar over the energy band 250GeV to 4TeV. At these energies we do not see any evidence of the 33ms pulsations present at lower energies from the Crab pulsar. The 99.9% confidence level upper limit for pulsed emission above 250GeV is derived to be 4.8 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1 or <3% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula. These results imply a sharp cut-off of the power-law spectrum seen by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. If the cut-off is exponential, it must begin at 60GeV or lower to accommodate these upper limits.

  1. Search for VHE gamma-ray emission from Geminga pulsar and nebula with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2016-06-01

    The Geminga pulsar, one of the brighest gamma-ray sources, is a promising candidate for emission of very-high-energy (VHE > 100 GeV) pulsed gamma rays. Also, detection of a large nebula has been claimed by water Cherenkov instruments. We performed deep observations of Geminga with the MAGIC telescopes, yielding 63 h of good-quality data, and searched for emission from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula. We did not find any significant detection, and derived 95% confidence level upper limits. The resulting upper limits of 5.3 × 10-13 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the Geminga pulsar and 3.5 × 10-12 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the surrounding nebula at 50 GeV are the mostconstraining ones obtained so far at VHE. To complement the VHE observations, we also analyzed 5 yr of Fermi-LAT data from Geminga, finding that the sub-exponential cut-off is preferred over the exponential cut-off that has been typically used in the literature. We also find that, above 10 GeV, the gamma-ray spectra from Geminga can be described with a power law with index softer than 5. The extrapolation of the power-law Fermi-LAT pulsed spectra to VHE goes well below the MAGIC upper limits, indicating that the detection of pulsed emission from Geminga with the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes is very difficult.

  2. Search for VHE gamma-ray emission from Geminga pulsar and nebula with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Bil, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de O na; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinovic, N; Muñoz, A González; Guberman, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Mira, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpaa, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R

    2016-01-01

    The Geminga pulsar, one of the brighest gamma-ray sources, is a promising candidate for emission of very-high-energy (VHE > 100 GeV) pulsed gamma rays. Also, detection of a large nebula have been claimed by water Cherenkov instruments. We performed deep observations of Geminga with the MAGIC telescopes, yielding 63 hours of good-quality data, and searched for emission from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula. We did not find any significant detection, and derived 95% confidence level upper limits. The resulting upper limits of 5.3 x 10^{-13} TeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} for the Geminga pulsar and 3.5 x 10^{-12} TeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} for the surrounding nebula at 50 GeV are the most constraining ones obtained so far at VHE. To complement the VHE observations, we also analyzed 5 years of Fermi-LAT data from Geminga, finding that the sub-exponential cut-off is preferred over the exponential cut-off that has been typically used in the literature. We also find that, above 10 GeV, the gamma-ray spectra from Geminga can be describ...

  3. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  4. PSR J2021+3651: A New Gamma-Ray Pulsar Candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Kaspi, V M; Lorimer, D R; Ransom, S M; Crawford, Fronefield; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory S.E.

    2004-01-01

    The COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716, has avoided identification with a low energy counterpart for over twenty years. We present a likely identification with the discovery and subsequent timing of a young and energetic pulsar, PSR J2021+3651, with the Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor at the Arecibo Observatory. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104ms and Pdot = 9.6 x 10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age T_c = 17kyr and a spin-down luminosity Edot = 3.4 x 10^{36} erg s^{-1}. The pulsar is also coincident with the ASCA source AX J2021.1+3651. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emission is dominated by a pulsar wind nebula unresolved by ASCA. The pulsar's unexpectedly high dispersion measure DM = 371 pc cm^{-3} and the d > 10kpc DM distance pose a new question: is PSR J2021+3651 an extremely efficient gamma-ray pulsar at the edge of the Galaxy? This is a question for AGILE and GLAST to answer.

  5. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  6. Searching for the optical counterparts of two young gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first deep optical observations of two $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, both among the very first discovered by the {\\em Fermi} Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The two pulsars are the radio-loud PSR\\, J1907+0602 in the TeV pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MGRO\\, J1908+06 and the radio-quiet PSR\\, J1809$-$2332 in the "Taz" radio/X-ray PWN. They are relatively young, with spin-down ages of 19.5 and 67.6 kyr, respectively and energetic, with spin-down energies $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 2.8 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1907+0602) and $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 4.3 \\times 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1809$-$2332). Both pulsars have been detected in the X-rays by \\xmm, which makes them viable targets for optical observations. We observed the pulsar fields in the B and V bands with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in June/July 2015. Neither of the two pulsars has been detected down to $3\\sigma$ limiting magnitudes of $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 26.9$ and $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 27.6$ for PSR\\, J1907+0602 and PSR\\, J1809$-$2332, respectively. We d...

  7. VHE $\\Gamma$-Ray Observation of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Armada, A; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Böck, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Coarasa, J A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Curtef, V; Danielyan, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; Delgado, C; De los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; Domingo-Santamaria, E; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fern, E; Firpo, R; Flix, J; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fuchs, M; Galante, N; Garcia-Lopez, R; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giller, M; Göbel, F; Hakobyan, D; Hayashida, M; Hengstebeck, T; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Jacon, P; Jogler, T; Kosyra, R; Kranich, D; Kritzer, R; Laille, A; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, J; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Mansutti, O; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Merck, C; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Ona-Wilhelmi, E; Otte, N; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Poller, M; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rugamer, S; Saggion, A; Sánchez, A; Sartori, P; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tonello, N; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wibig, T; Wittek, W; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2007-01-01

    We report about very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations of the Crab Nebula with the MAGIC telescope. The gamma-ray flux from the nebula was measured between 60 GeV and 9 TeV. The energy spectrum can be described with a curved power law dF/dE=f0 (E/300 GeV)^(a+b*log10(E/300 GeV)) with a flux normalization f0 of(6.0+-0.2)*10^-10 1/(cm^2 s TeV), a=-2.31+-0.06 and b=-0.26+-0.07. The position of the IC-peak is determined at (77+-47) GeV. Within the observation time and the experimental resolution of the telescope, the gamma-ray emission is steady and pointlike. The emission's center of gravity coincides with the position of the pulsar. Pulsed gamma-ray emission from the pulsar could not be detected. We constrain the cutoff energy of the spectrum to be less than 27 GeV, assuming that the differential energy spectrum has an exponential cutoff. For a super-exponential shape, the cutoff energy can be as high as 60 GeV.

  8. High-Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Observations of Two Young, Energetic Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M; Mattox, J R; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Pace, R

    1999-01-01

    We present results of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory EGRET observations of the unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources 2EG J1049-5847 (GEV J1047-5840, 3EG J1048-5840) and 2EG J1103-6106 (3EG J1102-6103). These sources are spatially coincident with the young, energetic radio pulsars PSRs B1046-58 and J1105-6107, respectively. We find evidence for an association between PSR B1046-58 and 2EG J1049-5847. The gamma-ray pulse profile, obtained by folding time-tagged photons having energies above 400 MeV using contemporaneous radio ephemerides, has probability of arising by chance of 1.2E-4 according to the binning-independent H-test. A spatial analysis of the on-pulse photons reveals a point source of equivalent significance 10.2 sigma. Off-pulse, the significance drops to 5.8 sigma. Archival ASCA data show that the only hard X-ray point source in the 95% confidence error box of the gamma-ray source is spatially coincident with the pulsar within the 1' uncertainty (Pivovaroff, Kaspi & Gotthelf 1999). The doub...

  9. Fermi Detection of a Luminous gamma-ray Pulsar in a Globular Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, P. C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Celik, O.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A.; Johnson, T. J.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2011-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of gamma -ray (>100 mega-electron volts) pulsations from pulsar J1823--3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (approx 7 sigma). Its gamma-ray luminosity L (sub 3) = (8:4 +/- 1:6) X 10(exp 34) ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The non-detection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that its contains < 32 gamma-ray MSPs, not approx 100 as previously estimated. The gamma -ray luminosity indicates that the unusually large rate of change of its period is caused by its intrinsic spin-down. This implies that J1823--3021A has the largest magnetic field and is the youngest MSP ever detected, and that such anomalous objects might be forming at rates comparable to those of the more normal MSPs.

  10. Pulsar X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Pulse Profiles Constraint on Obliquity and Observer Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    We model the thermal X-ray profiles of Geminga, Vela and PSR 0656+14, which have also been detected as gamma-ray pulsars, to constrain the phase space of obliquity and observer angles required to reproduce the observed X-ray pulsed fractions and pulse widths. These geometrical constraints derived from the X-ray light curves are explored for various assumptions about surface temperature distribution and flux anisotropy caused by the magnetized atmosphere. We include curved spacetime effects on photon trajectories and magnetic field. The observed gamma-ray pulse profiles are double peaked with phase separations of 0.4 - 0.5 between the peaks. Assuming that the gamma-ray profiles are due to emission in a hollow cone centered on the magnetic pole, we derive the constraints on the phase space of obliquity and observer angles, for different gamma-ray beam sizes, required to produce the observed gamma-ray peak phase separations. We compare the constraints from the X-ray emission to those derived from the observed ga...

  11. The Attenuation of $\\gamma$-Ray Emission in Strongly-Magnetized Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Gonthier, P L; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from pulsars can be efficiently attenuated in their magnetospheres via the mechanism of single-photon pair production and also the exotic QED process of photon splitting, which become prolific in fields approaching the quantum critical value of $B_{cr}=4.41\\times 10^{13}$ Gauss. Recently we have published results of our modelling of strongly-magnetized $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, which focused on the escape or attenuation of photons emitted near the pole at the neutron star surface in dipole fields, in a Schwarzschild metric. We found that pair production and splitting totally inhibit emission above around 10--30 MeV in PSR1509-58, whose surface field is inferred to be as high as $0.7B_{cr}$. Our model pulsar spectra are consistent with the EGRET upper limits for PSR1509-58 for a wide range of polar cap sizes. Here we review the principal predictions of our attenuation analysis, and identify how its powerful observational diagnostic capabilities relate to current and future gamma-ray experiments. Diagnos...

  12. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  13. Modulated Gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    A significant amount of the millisecond pulsars has been discovered within binary systems. In several such binary systems the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing to distinguish two classes of objects, called the Black Widow and the Redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds which, colliding with stellar winds, create conditions for acceleration of electrons. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing gamma-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system. We consider the interaction of a millisecond pulsar (MSP) wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the Black Widow and Redback types. It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and also strong radiation from the companion star producing ...

  14. The Effect of Different Magnetospheric Structures on Predictions of Gamma-ray Pulsar Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2015-01-01

    The second pulsar catalogue of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) will contain in excess of 100 gamma-ray pulsars. The light curves (LCs) of these pulsars exhibit a variety of shapes, and also different relative phase lags with respect to their radio pulses, hinting at distinct underlying emission properties (e.g., inclination and observer angles) for the individual pulsars. Detailed geometric modelling of the radio and gamma-ray LCs may provide constraints on the B-field structure and emission geometry. We used different B-field solutions, including the static vacuum dipole and the retarded vacuum dipole, in conjunction with an existing geometric modelling code, and constructed radiation sky maps and LCs for several different pulsar parameters. Standard emission geometries were assumed, namely the two-pole caustic (TPC) and outer gap (OG) models. The sky maps and LCs of the various B-field and radiation model combinations were compared to study their effect on the resulting LCs. As an application, we compa...

  15. Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata:, A; Domainko, W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Olive, J P; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2007-01-01

    We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees < l < 30 degrees, -2 degrees < b < 2 degrees is performed. For the resulting candidates, the standard H.E.S.S. analysis was applied and a search for multi-wavelength counterparts was performed. We present the discovery of two new candidate gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

  16. Detection of radio emission from the gamma-ray pulsar J1732-3131 at 327 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Yogesh; Krishnakumar, M. A.; Naidu, Arun K.; Roy, Subhashis; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Kerr, Matthew; Manoharan, P. K.

    2017-10-01

    Although originally discovered as a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar, J1732-3131 has exhibited intriguing detections at decameter wavelengths. We report an extensive follow-up of the pulsar at 327 MHz with the Ooty radio telescope. Using the previously observed radio characteristics, and with an effective integration time of 60 h, we present a detection of the pulsar at a confidence level of 99.82 per cent. The 327 MHz mean flux density is estimated to be 0.5-0.8 mJy, which establishes the pulsar to be a steep spectrum source and one of the least luminous pulsars known to date. We also phase-aligned the radio and gamma-ray profiles of the pulsar, and measured the phase-offset between the main peaks in the two profiles to be 0.24 ± 0.06. We discuss the observed phase-offset in the context of various trends exhibited by the radio-loud gamma-ray pulsar population, and suggest that the gamma-ray emission from J1732-3131 is best explained by outer magnetosphere models. Details of our analysis leading to the pulsar detection, and measurements of various parameters and their implications relevant to the pulsar's emission mechanism are presented.

  17. Deep optical observations of the gamma-ray pulsar J0357+3205

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, Aida; Shibanov, Yury; Shternin, Peter; Zharikov, Sergey; Zyuzin, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged radio-quiet pulsar J0357+3205 was discovered in gamma-rays with $Fermi$ and later in X-rays with $Chandra$ and $XMM$-$Newton$ observatories. It produces an unusual thermally-emitting pulsar wind nebula observed in X-rays. Deep optical observations were obtained to search for the pulsar optical counterpart and its nebula using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The direct imaging mode in the Sloan $g'$ band was used. Archival X-ray data were reanalysed and compared with the optical data. No pulsar optical counterpart was detected down to $g'\\geq~28_{\\cdotp}^{\\text{m}}1$. No pulsar nebula was either identified in the optical. We confirm early results that the X-ray spectrum of the pulsar consists of a nonthermal power-law component of the pulsar magnetospheric origin dominating at high energies and a soft thermal component from the neutron star surface. Using magnetised partially ionised hydrogen atmosphere models in X-ray spectral fits we found that the thermal component can come from entire sur...

  18. Multi-wavelength emission region of gamma-ray emitting pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota

    2011-01-01

    Using the outer gap model, we investigate the emission region for the multi-wavelength light curve from energetic pulsars. We assume that gamma-ray and non-thermal X-ray photons are emitted from a particle acceleration region in the outer magnetosphere, and UV/optical photons originate above that region. We assume that gamma-rays are radiated only by outwardly moving particles, whereas the other photons are produced by particles moving inward and outward. We parameterize the altitude of the emission region as the deviation from the rotating dipole in vacuum and determine it from the observed multi-wavelength pulse profile using the observationally constrained magnetic dipole inclination angle and viewing angle of the pulsars. We find that the outer gap model can explain the multi-wavelength pulse behavior by a simple distribution of emissivity, and discuss the possibility of further improvement. From observational fitting, we also find a general tendency for the altitude of the gamma-ray emission region to de...

  19. Near Infrared Activity Close to the Crab Pulsar Correlated with Giant Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Alexander R.; Max, Claire E.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe activity observed in the near-infrared correlated with a giant gamma-ray flare in the Crab Pulsar. The Crab Pulsar has been observed by the Fermi and AGILE satellites to flare for a period of 3 to 7 days, once every 1-1.5 years, increasing in brightness by a factor of 3-10 between 100MeV and 1GeV. We used Keck NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics imaging to observe the Crab Pulsar and environs before and during the March 2013 flare. We discuss the evidence for the knot as the location of the flares, and the theoretical implications of these observations. Ongoing target-of-opportunity programs hope to confirm this correlation for future flares.

  20. Experimental Constraints on {\\gamma}-ray Pulsar Gap Models and the Pulsar GeV to Pulsar Wind Nebula TeV Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U

    2015-01-01

    The pulsar emission mechanism in the gamma-ray energy band is poorly understood. Currently, there are several models under discussion in the pulsar community. These models can be constrained by studying the collective properties of a sample of pulsars, which became possible with the large sample of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). In this paper we develop a new experimental multi-wavelength technique to determine the beaming factor $\\left( f_\\Omega \\right)$ dependance on spin-down luminosity of a set of GeV pulsars. This technique requires three input parameters: pulsar spin-down luminosity, pulsar phase-averaged GeV flux and TeV or X-ray flux from the associated Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN). The analysis presented in this paper uses the PWN TeV flux measurements to study the correlation between $f_\\Omega$ and $\\dot{E}$. The measured correlation has some features that favor the Outer Gap model over the Polar Cap, Slot Gap and One Pole Caustic models for pulsar emission i...

  1. Pulsar wind model of close massive gamma-ray binaries: The influence of geometry in the pulsar wind zone processes

    CERN Document Server

    Sierpowska-Bartosik, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Several gamma-ray binaries have been recently detected by the High-Energy Stereoscopy Array (H.E.S.S.) and the Major Atmospheric Imaging Cerenkov (MAGIC) telescope. In at least two cases, their nature is unknown, since a distinctive, final observational feature for a black hole or a pulsar compact object companion is still missing. In this paper we aim to provide the details of a theoretical model of close gamma-ray binaries containing a young energetic pulsar as compact object. This model includes a detailed account of the system geometry, the angular dependence of processes such as Klein-Nishina inverse Compton and gamma-gamma absorption, and a Monte Carlo simulation of cascading. We present and derive the used formulae and give all details about their numerical implementation, particularly, on the computation of cascades. In this model, emphasis is put in the processes occurring in the pulsar wind zone of the binary, i.e., the region between the pulsar and the shock in between of the two stars, since as we...

  2. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  3. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  4. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Kndlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin*, N; Kühn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepé, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sánchez, D; Sander, A; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-01-01

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  5. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Millisecond Pulsar J0030+0451 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

    2011-11-17

    We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second millisecond pulsar to be detected in gamma-rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The spin-down power {dot E} = 3.5 x 10{sup 33} ergs s{sup -1} is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, respectively 0.07 {+-} 0.01 and 0.08 {+-} 0.02 wide, separated by 0.44 {+-} 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 {+-} 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the 'normal' gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cut-off power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 {+-} 1.05 {+-} 1.35) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with cut-off energy (1.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 {+-} 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency L{sub {gamma}}/{dot E} {approx_equal} 15% for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

  6. Investigating the magnetic inclination angle distribution of $\\gamma$-ray-loud radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rookyard, S C; Johnston, S

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the distribution of pulsars' magnetic inclination angles to be skewed towards low values compared with the distribution expected if the rotation and magnetic axes are placed randomly on the star. Here we focus on a sample of 28 $\\gamma$-ray-detected pulsars using data taken as part of the Parkes telescope's \\emph{FERMI} timing program. In doing so we find a preference in the sample for low magnetic inclination angles, $\\alpha$, in stark contrast to both the expectation that the magnetic and rotation axes are orientated randomly at the birth of the pulsar and to $\\gamma$-ray-emission-model-based expected biases. In this paper, after exploring potential explanations, we conclude that there are two possible causes of this preference, namely that low $\\alpha$ values are intrinsic to the sample, or that the emission regions extend outside what is traditionally thought to be the open-field-line region in a way which is dependent on the magnetic inclination. Each possibility is expected to...

  7. Six Faint Gamma-ray Pulsars Seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope -- Towards a Sample Blending into the Background

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, X; Guillemot, L; Cheung, C C; Cognard, I; Craig, H A; Espinoza, C M; Johnston, S; Kramer, M; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Shannon, R; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P

    2014-01-01

    Context: GeV gamma-ray pulsations from over 140 pulsars have been characterized using the Fermi Large Area Telescope, enabling improved understanding of the emission regions within the neutron star magnetospheres, and the contributions of pulsars to high energy electrons and diffuse gamma rays in the Milky Way. The first gamma-ray pulsars to be detected were the most intense and/or those with narrow pulses. Aims: As the Fermi mission progresses, progressively fainter objects can be studied. In addition to more distant pulsars (thus probing a larger volume of the Galaxy), or ones in high background regions (thus improving the sampling uniformity across the Galactic plane), we detect pulsars with broader pulses or lower luminosity. Adding pulsars to our catalog with inclination angles that are rare in the observed sample, and/or with lower spindown power, will reduce the bias in the currently known gamma-ray pulsar population. Methods: We use rotation ephemerides derived from radio observations to phase-fold ga...

  8. Emission of extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, George

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper a theoretical interpretation of observational characteristics of the pulsar PSR J0540-6919 is suggested. In particular, we provide a theoretical model explaining the presence of two peaks in the radio domain and the brooding of these peaks at higher frequencies. The model also explains the pulse-phase coincidence of emission peaks at different frequencies and shows the physical, 'genetic' connection between the radio remission at frequencies of the order of GHz with gamma-ray emission up to GeV energies.

  9. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We show that the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) can be explained as recently proposed highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are perfectly adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. While the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the magnetized white dwarfs, yet following Chandrasekhar's theory (C-WDs), exhibit large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit.

  10. Observations of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae at gamma-ray energies

    CERN Document Server

    Hewitt, John W

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age thanks to two major breakthroughs: Cherenkov telescopes on the ground and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) detected at gamma-ray energies is now much larger: it goes from evolved supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds up to young shell-type supernova remnants and historical supernova remnants. Studies of SNRs are of great interest, as these analyses are directly linked to the long standing issue of the origin of the Galactic cosmic rays. In this context, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) need also to be considered since they evolve in conjunction with SNRs. As a result, they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs and they could also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current results and thinking on SNRs and PWNe and their connection to cosmic ray product...

  11. THE ORBIT AND COMPANION OF PROBABLE {gamma}-RAY PULSAR J2339-0533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romani, Roger W. [Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (United States); Shaw, Michael S. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We have measured dramatic flux and spectral variations through the 0.193 day orbit of the optical counterpart of the unidentified {gamma}-ray source 0FGL J2339.8-0530. This compact object companion is strongly heated, with T{sub eff} varying from {approx}6900 K (superior conjunction) to <3000 K at minimum. A combined fit to the light curve and radial velocity amplitudes imply M{sub 1} Almost-Equal-To 0.075 M{sub Sun }, M{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 1.4M{sub Sun }, and inclination i Almost-Equal-To 57 Degree-Sign . Thus, this is a likely 'black widow' system with a E-dot {approx}10{sup 34-34.5} erg s{sup -1} pulsar driving companion mass loss. This wind, also suggested by the X-ray light curve, may prevent radio pulse detection. Our measurements constrain the pulsar's reflex motion, increasing the possibility of a pulse detection in the {gamma}-ray signal.

  12. SIX NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM ARECIBO SEARCHES OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cromartie, H. T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kerr, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Deneva, J. S.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Michelson, P. F., E-mail: thankful@virginia.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We have discovered six radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a search with the Arecibo telescope of 34 unidentified gamma-ray sources from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) four year point source catalog. Among the 34 sources, we also detected two MSPs previously discovered elsewhere. Each source was observed at a center frequency of 327 MHz, typically at three epochs with individual integration times of 15 minutes. The new MSP spin periods range from 1.99 to 4.66 ms. Five of the six pulsars are in interacting compact binaries (period ≤ 8.1 hr), while the sixth is a more typical neutron star-white dwarf binary with an 83 day orbital period. This is a higher proportion of interacting binaries than for equivalent Fermi-LAT searches elsewhere. The reason is that Arecibo's large gain afforded us the opportunity to limit integration times to 15 minutes, which significantly increased our sensitivity to these highly accelerated systems. Seventeen of the remaining 26 gamma-ray sources are still categorized as strong MSP candidates, and will be re-searched.

  13. Modeling of Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves with Force-Free Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) Gamma-ray emission from pulsars has long been modeled using a vacuum dipole field. This approximation ignores changes in the field structure caused by the magnetospheric plasma and strong plasma currents. We present the first results of gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling using the more realistic field taken from 3D force-free magnetospheric simulations. Having the geometry of the field, we apply several prescriptions for the location of the emission zone, comparing the light curves to observations. We find that the conventional two-pole caustic model fails to produce double-peak pulse profiles, mainly because the size of the polar cap in force-free magnetosphere is larger than the vacuum field polar cap. The conventional outer-gap model is capable of producing only one peak under general conditions, because a large fraction of open field lines does not cross the null charge surface. We propose a novel "annular gap" model, where the high-energy emission originates from a thin layer on the open fi...

  14. VHE gamma-ray Emitting Pulsar Wind Nebulae Discovered by H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallant, Y.A.; /Montpellier U.; Carrigan, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Djannati-Atai, A.; /APC, Paris; Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.; Hoppe, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; de Jager, O.C.; /Potchefstroom U.; Khelifi, B.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Komin, Nu.; /Montpellier U.; Kosack, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Lemiere, A. /APC, Paris; Masterson, C.; /Dublin Inst.

    2008-06-05

    Recent advances in very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new observational window on the physics of pulsars. The high sensitivity of current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, and in particular of the H.E.S.S. array, has already led to the discovery of about a dozen VHE-emitting pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and PWN candidates. These include the plerions in the composite supernova remnants MSH 15-52, G21.5-0.9, Kes 75, and Vela, two sources in the Kookaburra, and the nebula of PSR B1823-13. This VHE emission is generally interpreted as inverse Compton emission from the relativistic electrons and positrons accelerated by the pulsar and its wind; as such, it can yield a more direct spatial and spectral view of the accelerated particles than can be inferred from observations of their synchrotron emission. The VHE-emitting PWNe detected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes are reviewed and the implications for pulsar physics discussed.

  15. Blind search for radio-quiet and radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, G I

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed more than a hundred of gamma-ray pulsars, about one third of which are radio-quiet, i.e. not detected at radio frequencies. The most of radio-loud pulsars are detected by Fermi LAT by using the radio timing models, while the radio-quiet ones are discovered in a blind search. The difference in the techniques introduces an observational selection bias and, consequently, the direct comparison of populations is complicated. In order to produce an unbiased sample, we perform a blind search of gamma-ray pulsations using Fermi-LAT data alone. No radio data or observations at optical or X-ray frequencies are involved in the search process. We produce a gamma-ray selected catalog of 25 non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars found in a blind search, including 16 radio-quiet and 9 radio-loud pulsars. This results in the direct measurement of the fraction of radio-quiet pulsars $\\varepsilon_{RQ} = 64\\pm 10\\%$, which is in agreement with the existing estimates from the population ...

  16. Radio-quiet and radio-loud pulsars: similar in Gamma-rays but different in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Salvetti, D; Hartog, P R Den; Wolff, M T

    2015-01-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  17. Discovery of the Optical/Ultraviolet/Gamma-ray Counterpart to the Eclipsing Millisecond Pulsar J1816+4510

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Kotulla, R; Archibald, A M; Biwer, C M; Boyles, J; Dartez, L; Day, D F; Ford, A J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Karako, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R S; McLaughlin, M A; Rohr, M D W; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; van Leeuwen, J

    2012-01-01

    The energetic, eclipsing millisecond pulsar J1816+4510 was recently discovered in a low-frequency radio survey with the Green Bank Telescope. With an orbital period of 8.7 hr and minimum companion mass of 0.16 Msun it appears to belong to an increasingly important class of pulsars that are ablating their low-mass companions. We report the discovery of the gamma-ray counterpart to this pulsar, and present a likely optical/ultraviolet counterpart as well. Using the radio ephemeris we detect pulsations in the unclassified gamma-ray source 2FGL J1816.5+4511, implying an efficiency of ~25% in converting the pulsar's spin-down luminosity into gamma-rays and adding PSR J1816+4510 to the large number of millisecond pulsars detected by Fermi. The likely optical/UV counterpart was identified through position coincidence (15,000 K it would be among the brightest and hottest of low-mass pulsar companions, and appears qualitatively different from other eclipsing pulsar systems. In particular, current data suggest that it ...

  18. Cosmic-Ray Positrons Produced by Pulsar Winds from Mature Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the γ-ray pulsar outer gap model, e± pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere are produced by the cascade of e+ pairs through synchrotron radiation of the return current from the outer gap. These pairs are accelerated mono-energetically to relativistic energies in the pulsar wind driven by low-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate a sample of the mature γ-ray pulsars in our Galaxy and calculate the positron production rate from these pulsars. With a simple leaky box model, we calculate the ratio of cosmic-ray positron to total electrons. Our result indicates that the pulsar contribution to the cosmic-ray positron peaks at about 40 GeV and the observed e+ / (e- + e+) ratio can be explained by this model.

  19. Pulsar-Driven Jets in Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Middleditch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bipolarity of Supernova 1987A can be understood through its very early light curve from the CTIO 0.4 m telescope and IUE FES and following speckle observations of the “Mystery Spot”. These indicate a beam/jet of light/particles, with initial collimation factors >104 and velocities >0.95 c, involving up to 10−5 M⊙ interacting with circumstellar material. These can be produced by a model of pulsar emission from polarization currents induced/(modulated faster than c beyond the pulsar light cylinder by the periodic electromagnetic field (supraluminally induced polarization currents (SLIP. SLIP accounts for the disruption of supernova progenitors and their anomalous dimming at cosmological distances, jets from Sco X-1 and SS 433, the lack/presence of pulsations from the high-/low-luminosity low-mass X-ray binaries, and long/short gamma-ray bursts, and it predicts that their afterglows are the pulsed optical-/near-infrared emission associated with these pulsars. SLIP may also account for the TeV e+/e− results from PAMELA and ATIC, the WMAP “Haze”/Fermi “Bubbles,” and the r-process. SLIP jets from SNe of the first stars may allow galaxies to form without dark matter and explain the peculiar nongravitational motions between pairs of distant galaxies observed by GALEX.

  20. Polarized synchrotron emission from the equatorial current sheet in gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a powerful diagnostic tool to constrain the site of the high-energy pulsed emission and particle acceleration in gamma-ray pulsars. Recent particle-in-cell simulations of pulsar magnetosphere suggest that high-energy emission results from particles accelerated in the equatorial current sheet emitting synchrotron radiation. In this study, we re-examine the simulation data to compute the phase-resolved polarization properties. We find that the emission is mildly polarized and that there is an anticorrelation between the flux and the degree of linear polarization (on-pulse: ~15%, off-pulse: ~30%). The decrease of polarization during pulses is mainly attributed to the formation of caustics in the current sheet. Each pulse of light is systematically accompanied by a rapid swing of the polarization angle due to the change of the magnetic polarity when the line of sight passes through the current sheet. The optical polarization pattern observed in the Crab can be well-reproduced for a pulsar inclinat...

  1. Simulated Gamma-Ray Pulse Profile of the Crab Pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Burtovoi, A

    2016-01-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the MAGIC telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ~3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 hours). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large ...

  2. A 350-MHz GBT Survey of 50 Faint Fermi Gamma-ray Sources for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, Jason W T; McLaughlin, Maura A; Ray, Paul S; Bangale, Priyadarshini; Ransom, Scott M; Kerr, Matthew; Camilo, Fernando; DeCesar, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.

  3. Implications on the X-ray emission of evolved pulsar wind nebulae based on VHE gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Michael J; Jung, Ira; Valerius, Kathrin; Stegmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Energetic pulsars power winds of relativistic leptons which produce photon nebulae (so-called pulsar wind nebulae, PWNe) detectable across the electromagnetic spectrum up to energies of several TeV. The spectral energy distribution has a double-humped structure: the first hump lies in the X-ray regime, the second in the gamma-ray range. The X-ray emission is generally understood as synchrotron radiation by highly energetic electrons, the gamma-ray emission as Inverse Compton scattering of energetic electrons with ambient photon fields. The evolution of the spectral energy distribution is influenced by the time-dependent spin-down of the pulsar and the decrease of the magnetic field strength with time. Thus, the present spectral appearance of a PWN depends on the age of the pulsar: while young PWNe are bright in X-rays and gamma-rays, the X-ray emission of evolved PWNe is suppressed. Hence, evolved PWNe may offer an explanation of the nature of some of the unidentified VHE gamma-ray sources not yet associated ...

  4. Discovery of Nine Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi-Lat Data Using a New Blind Search Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik-Tinmaz, Ozlem; Ferrara, E. C.; Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Barr, E. D.; Champion, D. J.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Reich, W.; Lyne, A. G.; Ray, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs Jl803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6 x 10(exp 35) ergs per second and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J010622+3749, Jl620-4927, Jl746-3239, J2028+3332,J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| greater than 10 degrees). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2x 10(exp 11)G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3 x l0(exp 33) erg per second) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  5. Discovery of an ultracompact gamma-ray millisecond pulsar binary candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Hui, C Y; Tam, P H T; Hu, C P; Takata, J; Lin, L C C; Cheng, K S; Yen, T -C; Park, S M; Kim, C L

    2014-01-01

    We report multi-wavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi object 2FGL J1653.6-0159. With the help of high-resolution X-ray observation, we have identified an X-ray and optical counterpart of 2FGL J1653.6-0159. The source exhibits a periodic modulation of 74.93 min in optical and possibly also in X-ray. We suggest that 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 74.93 min. Combining the gamma-ray and X-ray properties, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is potentially a black widow/redback type gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP). The optical and X-ray lightcurve profile shows that the companion is mildly heated by the high-energy emission and the X-rays are from intrabinary shock. Although no radio pulsation has been detected yet, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is ~2 ms based on a theoretical model. If pulsation can be confirmed in the future, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 will become the first ultracompact rotation-powered MSP.

  6. A Search for sub-TeV Gamma-rays from the Vela Pulsar Region with CANGAROO-III

    CERN Document Server

    Enomoto, R; Edwards, P G; Kabuki, S; Tsuchiya, K

    2006-01-01

    We made stereoscopic observations of the Vela Pulsar region with two of the 10 m diameter CANGAROO-III imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in January and February, 2004, in a search for sub-TeV gamma-rays from the pulsar and surrounding regions. We describe the observations, provide a detailed account of the calibration methods, and introduce the improved and bias-free analysis techniques employed for CANGAROO-III data. No evidence of gamma-ray emission is found from either the pulsar position or the previously reported position offset by 0.13 degree, and the resulting upper limits are a factor of five less than the previously reported flux from observations with the CANGAROO-I 3.8 m telescope. Following the recent report by the H.E.S.S. group of %We also obtained indication TeV gamma-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula, which is $\\sim$0.5 degree south of the pulsar position, we examined this region and found supporting evidence for emission extended over $\\sim$0.6 degree.

  7. A Search for Very High Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Lang, M. J.; Loo, A.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Chernyakova, M.; Roberts, M. S. E.

    2016-11-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy nonthermal emission. It has been the subject of multiwavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray observations carried out by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that VHE gamma rays are produced via an inverse Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than ˜2 G before the disappearance of the radio pulsar and greater than ˜10 G afterward.

  8. High-Resolution Timing Observations of Spin-Powered Pulsars with the AGILE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Pellizzoni, A; Possenti, A; Fornari, F; Caraveo, P; Del Monte, E; Mereghetti, S; Tavani, M; Argan, A; Trois, A; Burgay, M; Chen, A; Cognard, I; Costa, E; D'Amico, N; Esposito, P; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fuschino, F; Giuliani, A; Halpern, J; Hobbs, G; Hotan, A; Johnston, S; Krämer, M; Longo, F; Manchester, R N; Marisaldi, M; Palfreyman, J; Weltevrede, P; Barbiellini, G; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Harding, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mauri, F; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Preger, B; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Salotti, L

    2008-01-01

    AGILE is a small gamma-ray astronomy satellite mission of the Italian Space Agency dedicated to high-energy astrophysics launched in 2007 April. Its 1 microsecond absolute time tagging capability coupled with a good sensitivity in the 30 MeV-30 GeV range, with simultaneous X-ray monitoring in the 18-60 keV band, makes it perfectly suited for the study of gamma-ray pulsars following up on the CGRO/EGRET heritage. In this paper we present the first AGILE timing results on the known gamma-ray pulsars Vela, Crab, Geminga and B 1706-44. The data were collected from 2007 July to 2008 April, exploiting the mission Science Verification Phase, the Instrument Timing Calibration and the early Observing Pointing Program. Thanks to its large field of view, AGILE collected a large number of gamma-ray photons from these pulsars (about 10,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in only few months of observations. The coupling of AGILE timing capabilities, simultaneous radio/X-ray monitoring and new tools aimed at precise photon phasing,...

  9. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, ...

  10. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  11. Constraining viewing geometries of pulsars with single-peaked gamma-ray profiles using a multiwavelength approach

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Johnson, T J; Harding, A K

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi spacecraft in June 2008, the number of observed gamma-ray pulsars has increased dramatically. A large number of these are also observed at radio frequencies. Constraints on the viewing geometries of 5 of 6 gamma-ray pulsars exhibiting single-peaked gamma-ray profiles were derived using high-quality radio polarization data (Weltevrede et al., 2010). We obtain independent constraints on the viewing geometries of 6 by using a geometric emission code to model the Fermi LAT and radio light curves (LCs). We find fits for the magnetic inclination and observer angles by searching the solution space by eye. Our results are generally consistent with those previously obtained (Weltevrede et al., 2010), although we do find small differences in some cases. We will indicate how the gamma-ray and radio pulse shapes as well as their relative phase lags lead to constraints in the solution space. Values for the flux correction factor corresponding to the fit...

  12. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: a case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemot, L; Venter, C; Kerr, M; Pancrazi, B; Livingstone, M; Janssen, G H; Jaroenjittichai, P; Kramer, M; Cognard, I; Stappers, B W; Harding, A K; Camilo, F; Espinoza, C M; Freire, P C C; Gargano, F; Grove, J E; Johnston, S; Michelson, P F; Noutsos, A; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Smith, D A; Theureau, G; Thorsett, S E; Webb, N

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival \\emph{RXTE} and \\emph{XMM-Newton} X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence ($\\sim 4\\sigma$) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions...

  13. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.; Theureau, G.; Thorsett, S. E.; Webb, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nançay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (~4σ) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  14. Implementation of a goodness-of-fit test for finding optimal concurrent radio and {\\gamma}-ray pulsar light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Allison, J; Schutte, W D

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2008 the number of known ${\\gamma}$-ray pulsars has increased immensely to over 200, many of which are also visible in the radio and X-ray bands. Seyffert et al. (2011) demonstrated how constraints on the viewing geometries of some of these pulsars could be obtained by comparing their observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves by eye to light curves from geometric models. While these constraints compare reasonably well with those yielded by more rigorous single-wavelength approaches, they are still a somewhat subjective representation of how well the models reproduce the observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves. Constructing a more rigorous approach is, however, made difficult by the large uncertainties associated with the ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves as compared to those associated with the radio light curves. Naively applying a ${\\chi}^{2}$-like goodness-of-fit test to both bands invariably results in constraints dictated by the radio light curv...

  15. New millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, C M; Celik, O; Weltevrede, P; Stappers, B W; Smith, D A; Kerr, M; Zavlin, V E; Cognard, I; Eatough, R P; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Hewitt, J W; Hou, X; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A; Manchester, R N; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Theureau, G; Webb, N

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and 2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While the latter is firmly detected, we an only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of the former. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other 3 objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs which is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We ...

  16. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival RXTE and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (approx. 4(sigma)) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034..0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission pro les suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  17. A recent change in the optical and {\\gamma}-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Paul; Gouiffes, Christian; 3,; Laurent, Philipe; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and {\\gamma}-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (Integral). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and {\\gamma}-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 \\pm 0.7\\deg in 2005 to 85.3 \\pm 1.4 \\deg in 2012. On the other hand, the {\\gamma}-ray polarization angle changed from 115 \\pm 11 \\deg in 2003-2007 to 80 \\pm 12 \\deg in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high energy {\\gamma}-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical...

  18. The Massive Pulsar PSR J1614-2230: Linking Quantum Chromodynamics, Gamma-ray Bursts, and Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Ransom, Scott; Demorest, Paul; Alford, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The recent measurement of the Shapiro delay in the radio pulsar PSR J1614-2230 yielded a mass of 1.97 +/- 0.04 M_sun, making it the most massive pulsar known to date. Its mass is high enough that, even without an accompanying measurement of the stellar radius, it has a strong impact on our understanding of nuclear matter, gamma-ray bursts, and the generation of gravitational waves from coalescing neutron stars. This single high mass value indicates that a transition to quark matter in neutron...

  19. PSR J2021+3651 A Young Radio Pulsar Coincident with an Unidentified EGRET Gamma-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Freire, P C C; Crawford, F; Lorimer, D R; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Crawford, Fronefield; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a deep search for radio pulsations toward five unidentified ASCA X-ray sources coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. This search has led to the discovery of a young and energetic pulsar using data obtained with the new Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor. PSR J2021+3651 is likely associated with the X-ray source AX J2021.1+3651, which in turn is likely associated with the COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104 ms and P_dot = 9.6x10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age ~17 kyr and a spin-down luminosity E_dot ~ 3.4x10^{36}ergs/s. The dispersion measure DM ~ 371 pc cm^{-3} is by far the highest of any observed pulsar in the Galactic longitude range 55 10 kpc, and a high gamma-ray efficiency of \\~15%, but the true distance may be closer if there is a significant contribution to the DM from excess gas in the Cygnus region. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emis...

  20. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  1. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, Matthew G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 {+-} 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 {+-} 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known {gamma}-ray pulsars. The measured {gamma}-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of {approx}10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  2. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  3. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, T. J. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  4. Search for a correlation between very-high-energy gamma rays and giant radio pulses in the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Lee, K; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nelson, T; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Kondratiev, V

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ($E_{\\gamma} >$ 150 GeV) and Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hours of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in December 2008 and in November and December 2009. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, 8 different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Further, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pu...

  5. Central compact objects, superslow X-ray pulsars, gamma-ray bursts: do they have anything to do with magnetars?

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetars and many of the magnetar-related objects are summarized together and discussed. It is shown that there is an abuse of language in the use of "magnetar". Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters are well-known magnetar candidates. The current so called anti-magnetar (for central compact objects), accreting magnetar (for superslow X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries), and millisecond magnetar (for the central engine of some gamma-ray bursts), they may not be real magnetars in present understandings. Their observational behaviors are not caused by the magnetic energy. Many of them are just neutron stars with strong surface dipole field. A neutron star plus strong dipole field is not a magnetar. The characteristic parameters of the neutron stars for the central engine of some gamma-ray bursts are atypical from the neutron stars in the Galaxy. Possible signature of magnetic activities in accreting systems are discussed, including repeated bursts and a hard X-ray tail. China's future har...

  6. X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray Studies of the Millisecond Pulsar and PossibleX-ray Binary/Radio Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1723-2837

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Crawford, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A; Freire, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray observations of the ``redback'' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ~2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar millisecond pulsar binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a $\\gamma$-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at i...

  7. Discovery of a Pulsar Candidate Associated with the TeV Gamma-ray Source HESS J1813-178

    CERN Document Server

    Gotthelf, E V

    2007-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray observation of G12.82-0.02, a shell-like radio supernova remnant coincident with the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1813-178. We resolve the X-ray emission from the co-located ASCA source into a compact object surrounded by structured diffuse emission that fills the interior of the radio shell. The morphology of the diffuse emission strongly resembles that of a pulsar wind nebula. The spectrum of the compact source is well-characterized by a power-law with index approx. 1.3, typical of young and energetic rotation-powered pulsars. For a distance of 4.5 kpc, consistent with the X-ray absorption, the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity of the putative pulsar and nebula is L(PSR) = 3.2E33 erg/s and L(PWN) = 1.4E34 erg/s, respectively. Both the flux ratio of L(PWN)/L(PSR) = 4.3 and the total luminosity of this system imply a pulsar spin-down power greater then 1E37 erg/s, on a par with the top ten most energetic young pulsars in the Galaxy. We associate the putative pulsar with the radio remnant and ...

  8. Observations of the Crab Nebula and pulsar in the optical and gamma-ray bands with STACEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pascal

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope that detects cosmic gamma-rays using the wavefront-sampling technique. STACEE uses the large mirror area of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) to achieve an energy threshold below 200 GeV. This telescope was used to search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and pulsar. A statistical excess of 4.07sigma in the number of on-source events compared to off-source events was detected in 15 hours of on-source observing time, corresponding to an integral flux above the energy threshold (Ethr = 185 +/- 35 GeV) of I(E > Ethr) = (2.5 +/- 0.6) x 10-10 photons cm -2 s-1. The observed flux is in agreement with the previous result obtained by STACEE-32 and consistent with the power law spectrum seen at higher energies. A special instrument was developed to make simultaneous observations of the Crab in the optical and gamma-ray bands. Pulsed emission was detected in the optical band, demonstrating the accuracy of the barycentering and epoch folding analysis tools. After barycentering the arrival times and calculating the rotational phases of gamma-ray events, no evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar was found. The upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the signal was 16.4% at the 99.9% confidence level. Unfortunately, neither the polar cap model, nor the outer gap model is excluded by this new upper limit.

  9. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    López-Coto, R; Bednarek, W; Blanch, O; Cortina, J; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Martín, J; Pérez-Torres, M A

    2015-01-01

    The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) 3C 58 has been proposed as a good candidate for detection at VHE (VHE; E>100 GeV) for many years. It is powered by one of the highest spin-down power pulsars known (5\\% of Crab pulsar) and it has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to its morphology. This object was previously observed by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (Whipple, VERITAS and MAGIC), and upper limit of 2.4\\% Crab Unit (C.U.) at VHE. It was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65\\% C.U. above 1 TeV. We report the first significant detection of PWN 3C 58 at TeV energies. According to our results 3C 58 is the least luminous VHE gamma-ray PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. We compare our results with the expectations of time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fiel...

  10. X-ray Measurement of the Spin-Down of Calvera: a Radio- and Gamma-ray-Quiet Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, J P; Gotthelf, E V

    2013-01-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot = (3.19+/-0.08)e-15, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot = 6.1e35 erg/s, characteristic age tau_c = P/2P-dot = 2.9e5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B_s = 4.4e11 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy gamma-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a gamma-ray luminosity limit of < 3.3e32 erg/s, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot. Calvera sha...

  11. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Pérez-Torres, M A

    2014-01-01

    The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) 3C 58 is one of the historical very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source candidates. It is energized by one of the highest spin-down power pulsars known (5% of Crab pulsar) and it has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was previously observed by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (Whipple, VERITAS and MAGIC), although not detected, with an upper limit of 2.4% Crab Unit (C.U.) at VHE. It was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. The differential energy spectrum between 400 GeV and 10 TeV is well described by a power-law function d\\phi/dE=f_0(E/1TeV)^{-Gamma} with f_0=(2.0\\pm0.4_{stat}\\pm0.6_{sys})\\times10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1} and Gamma=2.4\\pm0.2_{stat}\\pm0.2_{sys}. The skymap is compatible with an unre...

  12. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 +- 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 +- 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known $\\gamma$-ray pulsars. The measured gamma-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of 10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT ena...

  13. Exploring the X-ray and gamma-ray properties of the redback millisecond pulsar PSR J1723-2837

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Takata, J; Kong, A K H; Cheng, K S; Wu, J H K; Lin, L C C; Wu, E M H

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray properties of the redback millisecond pulsar PSR J1723-2837 with XMM-Newton, Chandra and Fermi. We have discovered the X-ray orbital modulation of this binary system with the minimum that coincides with the phases of radio eclipse. The X-ray emission is clearly non-thermal in nature which can be well described by a simple power-law with a photon index of $\\sim1.2$. The phase-averaged luminosity is $\\sim9\\times10^{31}$ erg/s in 0.3-10 keV which consumes $\\sim0.2\\%$ of the spin-down power. We have detected the $\\gamma-$ray emission in $0.1-300$ GeV from this system at a significance of $\\sim6\\sigma$ for the first time. The $\\gamma-$rays in this energy range consumes $\\sim2\\%$ of the spin-down power and can be modeled by a power-law with a photon index of $\\sim2.6$. We discuss the high energy properties of the new redback in the context of a intrabinary shock model.

  14. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Coto, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) 3C 58 is one of the historical very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source candidates. It has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission for the first time at TeV energies with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. According to our results 3C 58 is the least luminous PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. We compare our results with the expectations of time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fields. The best representation favors a distance to the PWN of 2 kpc and Far Infrared (FIR) comparable to CMB photon fields. Hadronic contribution from the hosting supernova remnant (SNR) requires unrealistic energy budget given the density of the medium, disfavoring cosmic ray acceleration in the SNR as origin of the VHE gamma-ray emission.

  15. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Coto Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsar wind nebula (PWN 3C 58 is one of the historical very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV gamma-ray source candidates. It has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission for the first time at TeV energies with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. According to our results 3C 58 is the least luminous PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. We compare our results with the expectations of time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fields. The best representation favors a distance to the PWN of 2 kpc and Far Infrared (FIR comparable to CMB photon fields. Hadronic contribution from the hosting supernova remnant (SNR requires unrealistic energy budget given the density of the medium, disfavoring cosmic ray acceleration in the SNR as origin of the VHE gamma-ray emission.

  16. X-ray investigation of the diffuse emission around plausible gamma-ray emitting pulsar wind nebulae in Kookaburra region

    CERN Document Server

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results from {\\it Suzaku} X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV $\\gamma$-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The {\\it Suzaku} observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible PWN Rabbit with elongated sizes of $\\sigma_{\\rm X}=1^{\\prime}.66$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm X}=1^{\\prime}.49$, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the $\\gamma$-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the $\\gamma$-ray peaks are $2^{\\prime}.8$ for PSR J1420-6048 and $4^{\\prime}.5$ for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with $\\Gamma=1.7-2.3$. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one zone electron emission model as the first order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimate...

  17. Probing the Pulsar Wind in the gamma-ray Binary System PSR B1259-63/SS 2883

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, Jumpei

    2009-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution from the X-ray to the very high energy regime ($>100$ GeV) has been investigated for the $\\gamma$-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/SS2883 as a function of orbital phase within the framework of a simple model of a pulsar wind nebula. The emission model is based on the synchrotron radiation process for the X-ray regime and the inverse Compton scattering process boosting stellar photons from the Be star companion to the very high energy (100GeV-TeV) regime. With this model, the observed temporal behavior can, in principle, be used to probe the pulsar wind properties at the shock as a function of the orbital phase. Due to theoretical uncertainties in the detailed microphysics of the acceleration process and the conversion of magnetic energy into particle kinetic energy, the observed X-ray data for the entire orbit are fit using two different methods.

  18. POST-PERIASTRON GAMMA-RAY FLARE FROM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 AS A RESULT OF COMPTONIZATION OF THE COLD PULSAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangulyan, Dmitry [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Aharonian, Felix A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bogovalov, Sergey V. [Department of Molecular Physics, National Research Nuclear University (MEPHI), Kashirskoe shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ribo, Marc, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie, E-mail: svbogovalov@mephi.ru, E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-06-10

    We argue that the bright flare of the binary pulsar PSR B1259-63/LS2883 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is due to the inverse Compton scattering of the unshocked electron-positron pulsar wind with a Lorentz factor {Gamma}{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}. The combination of two effects both linked to the circumstellar disk (CD) is a key element in the proposed model. The first effect is related to the impact of the surrounding medium on the termination of the pulsar wind. Inside the disk, the 'early' termination of the wind results in suppression of its gamma-ray luminosity. When the pulsar escapes the disk, the conditions for termination of the wind undergo significant changes. This would lead to a dramatic increase of the pulsar wind zone, and thus to the proportional increase of the gamma-ray flux. On the other hand, if the parts of the CD disturbed by the pulsar can supply infrared photons of density high enough for efficient Comptonization of the wind, almost the entire kinetic energy of the pulsar wind would be converted to radiation, thus the gamma-ray luminosity of the wind could approach the level of the pulsar's spin-down luminosity as reported by the Fermi Collaboration.

  19. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  20. High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Oser, S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schuette, D R; Theoret, C G; Tumer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies...

  1. The effect of an offset-dipole magnetic field on the Vela pulsar's gamma-ray light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past six years, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has detected more than 150 gamma-ray pulsars, discovering a variety of light curve trends and classes. Such diversity hints at distinct underlying magnetospheric and/or emission geometries. We implemented an offset-dipole magnetic field, with an offset characterised by parameters epsilon and magnetic azimuthal angle, in an existing geometric pulsar modelling code which already includes static and retarded vacuum dipole fields. We use these different magnetic field solutions in conjunction with standard emission geometries, namely the two-pole caustic and outer gap models (the latter only for non-offset dipoles), and construct intensity maps and light curves for several pulsar parameters. We compare our model light curves to the Vela data from the second pulsar catalogue of Fermi. We use a refined chi-square grid search method for finding best-fit light curves for each of the different models. Our best fit is for the retarded vacuum dipole field and the o...

  2. A candidate optical counterpart to the middle-aged gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We carried out deep optical observations of the middle-aged $\\gamma$-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054 with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We identified two objects, of magnitudes $m_v=23.10\\pm0.05$ and $m_v=25.32\\pm0.08$, at positions consistent with the very accurate Chandra coordinates of the pulsar, the faintest of which is more likely to be its counterpart. From the VLT images we also detected the known bow-shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054. The nebula is displaced by $\\sim 0\\farcs9$ (at the $3\\sigma$ confidence level) with respect to its position measured in archival data, showing that the shock propagates in the interstellar medium consistently with the pulsar proper motion. Finally, we could not find evidence of large-scale extended optical emission associated with the pulsar wind nebula detected by Chandra, down to a surface brightness limit of $\\sim 28.1$ magnitudes arcsec$^{-2}$. Future observations are needed to confirm the optical identification of PSR J1741-2054 and characterise the spectrum of its co...

  3. On the Light Curve and Spectra of X-Rays and Gamma-Rays from the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; K. S. Cheng; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2000-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model to study the light curve and spectra of x-rays and gamma-rays from the Crab pulsar. In this model, the vertical size of the outer gap is first determined by a self-consistent model in which the outer gap is limited by pair production from collisions of thermal photons produced by polar cap heating of backflow outer gap current and curvature photons emitted by gap accelerated charged particles. The transverse size of the outer gap is determined by local pair production conditions. In principle, there are two topologically disconnected outer gaps present in the magnetosphere of a pulsar, and both incoming and outgoing particle flows are allowed. However, double-peak light curves with strong bridges are most common, Making use of the three-dimensional structure of the outer gap and its local properties, we compare the results of our model with the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of the Crab pulsar.

  4. PSR J1856+0245: Arecibo Discovery of a Young, Energetic Pulsar Coincident with the TeV Gamma-ray Source HESS J1857+026

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Gaensler, B M; Kaspi, V M; Lorimer, D R; Champion, D J; Lyne, A G; Krämer, M; Cordes, J M; Freire, P C C; Camilo, F; Ransom, S M; Deneva, J S; Bhat, N D R; Cognard, I; Crawford, F; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Lazarus, P; Van Leeuwen, J; McLaughlin, M A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Venkataraman, A

    2008-01-01

    We present the discovery of the Vela-like radio pulsar J1856+0245 in the Arecibo PALFA survey. PSR J1856+0245 has a spin period of 81ms, a characteristic age of 21kyr, and a spin-down luminosity Edot = 4.6 x 10^36 ergs/s. It is positionally coincident with the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1857+026, which has no other known counterparts. Young, energetic pulsars create wind nebulae, and more than a dozen pulsar wind nebulae have been associated with very-high-energy (100GeV-100TeV) gamma-ray sources discovered with the HESS telescope. The gamma-ray emission seen from HESS J1857+026 is potentially produced by a pulsar wind nebula powered by PSR J1856+0245; faint X-ray emission detected by ASCA at the pulsar's position supports this hypothesis. The inferred gamma-ray efficiency is epsilon_gamma = L_gamma/Edot = 3.1% (1-10TeV, for a distance of 9kpc), comparable to that observed in similar associations.

  5. Investigating the X-ray Emission from the Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Source MGRO J1908+06

    CERN Document Server

    Pandel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    MGRO J1908+06 is a bright, extended TeV gamma-ray source located near the Galactic plane. The TeV emission has previously been attributed to the pulsar wind nebula of the radio-faint gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+0602 discovered with Fermi. However, studies of the TeV morphology with VERITAS have shown that MGRO J1908+06 is somewhat larger than other pulsar wind nebulae of similar age and that the TeV spectrum does not soften with distance from the pulsar as is observed for other pulsar wind nebulae. Although MGRO J1908+06 is very bright in gamma rays with a flux corresponding to ~80% of the Crab Nebula flux at 20 TeV, no extended emission at other energies has so far been detected. We report on our analysis of X-ray data obtained with XMM-Newton of the region near MGRO J1908+06. We searched the data for point-like sources and detected several hard-spectrum X-ray sources that could be associated with the TeV emission, including the gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+0602. We also performed an extended source analysis to...

  6. Search for differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar populations with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Observations by Fermi LAT enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with the set of 89 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than radio-quiet one and is located at smaller galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most of radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio-band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi LAT data alone using all point sources from 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike preceding blind search, the present catalog is constructed with novel semi-coherent method and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in the catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 26 of which are radio-quiet. There are no statistically si...

  7. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bigas, O Blanch; Carmona, E; Pérez-Torres, M A

    2015-01-01

    The Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) 3C 58 is energized by one of the highest spin-down power pulsars known (5% of Crab pulsar) and it has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission for the first time at TeV energies with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. The differential energy spectrum between 400 GeV and 10 TeV is well described by a power-law function $d\\Phi/dE=f_{o}(E/1TeV)^{-\\Gamma}$ with $f_{o}=(2.0\\pm0.4stat\\pm0.6sys) 10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\\Gamma=2.4\\pm0.2sta\\pm0.2sys$. This leads 3C 58 to be the least luminous PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. According to time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fields, the best representation favors a distance to the PWN of 2 kpc and FIR comparable...

  8. Fermi-LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-rays Above 50 GeV from the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Gene C K; Ng, C W; Kong, A K H; Tam, P H T; Hui, C Y; Cheng, K S

    2014-01-01

    The First \\fermi-LAT Catalog of Sources Above 10 GeV reported evidence of pulsed emission above 25 GeV from 12 pulsars, including the Vela pulsar, which showed evidence of pulsation at $>37$ GeV energy bands. Using 62 months of \\fermi-LAT data, we analyzed the gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar and searched for pulsed emission above 50 GeV. Having confirmed the significance of the pulsation in 30-50 GeV with the H-test (p-value $\\sim10^{-77}$), we extracted its pulse profile using the Bayesian block algorithm and compared it with the distribution of the 5 observed photons above 50 GeV using the likelihood ratio test. Pulsation was significantly detected for photons above 50 GeV with p-value $=3\\times10^{-5}$ ($4.2\\sigma$). The detection of pulsation is significant above $4\\sigma$ at $>79$ GeV and above $3\\sigma$ at $>90$ GeV energy bands, making this the highest energy pulsation significantly detected by the LAT. We explore non-stationary outer gap scenario of the very high-energy emissions from the Vela...

  9. A Search for Gamma-ray Emission from Wind-Wind Interactions in Black Widow and Redback Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyrel J.; Ray, Paul S.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Recent radio surveys, particularly those targeting unassociated Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources with pulsar-like characteristics, have greatly increased the number of known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in binary systems with short orbital periods (less than a day) and low-mass companions (of order 0.2 Solar masses for redbacks and less than 0.08 Solar masses for black widows). These systems are likely laboratories for studying wind-wind interactions, and we here describe a search for unpulsed gamma-ray emission, possibly arising from these interactions, in the off-peak intervals. We will also search the off-peak and phase-averaged data for evidence of modulation at the orbital periods, correcting for exposure variations, and stack the off-peak intervals in the event that the emission is below threshold in any given source. Studying this emission will allow us to better understand the pulsar wind and how these systems evolve. Portions of this research performed at the US Naval Research Laboratory are sponsored by NASA DPR S-15633-Y and Fermi GO proposal 061103.

  10. Nature vs. Nurture The Origin of Soft $\\gamma$-ray Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, D C; Rothschild, R E; Higdon, J C

    1999-01-01

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous x-ray pulsars (AXPs) are young and radio-quiet x-ray pulsars which have been rapidly spun-down to slow spin periods clustered in the range 5-12 s. If the unusual properties of SGRs and AXPs were due to an innate feature, such as a superstrong magnetic field, then the pre-supernova environments of SGRs and AXPs should be typical of neutron star progenitors. This is not the case, however, as we demonstrate that the interstellar media which surrounded the SGR and AXP progenitors and their SNRs were unusually dense compared to the environments around most young radio pulsars and SNRs. Thus, if these SNR associations are real the SGRs and AXPs can not be the result of a purely innate property. We suggest instead that the environments surrounding SGRs and AXPs play a key role in their development, and we explore a scenario in which the SGRs and AXPs are high velocity neutron stars spun-down by propeller effect winds driven by their interactions with co-moving ejecta fro...

  11. A Radio Pulsar Search of the Gamma-ray Binaries LS I +61 303 and LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    McSwain, M Virginia; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Dougherty, Sean M; Pooley, Guy G

    2011-01-01

    LS I +61 303 and LS 5039 are exceptionally rare examples of HMXBs with MeV-TeV emission, making them two of only five known or proposed "gamma-ray binaries". There has been disagreement within the literature over whether these systems are microquasars, with stellar winds accreting onto a compact object to produce high energy emission and relativistic jets, or whether their emission properties might be better explained by a relativistic pulsar wind colliding with the stellar wind. Here we present an attempt to detect radio pulsars in both systems with the Green Bank Telescope. The upper limits of flux density are between 4.1-14.5 uJy, and we discuss the null results of the search. Our spherically symmetric model of the wind of LS 5039 demonstrates that any pulsar emission will be strongly absorbed by the dense wind unless there is an evacuated region formed by a relativistic colliding wind shock. LS I +61 303 contains a rapidly rotating Be star whose wind is concentrated near the stellar equator. As long as th...

  12. Discovery of gamma-ray emission from the extragalactic pulsar wind nebula N157B with the High Energy Stereoscopic System

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi1, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    We present the significant detection of the first extragalactic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) detected in gamma rays, N157B, located in the large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Pulsars with high spin-down luminosity are found to power energised nebulae that emit gamma rays up to energies of several tens of TeV. N157B is associated with PSRJ0537-6910, which is the pulsar with the highest known spin-down luminosity. The High Energy Stereoscopic System telescope array observed this nebula on a yearly basis from 2004 to 2009 with a dead-time corrected exposure of 46 h. The gamma-ray spectrum between 600 GeV and 12 TeV is well-described by a pure power-law with a photon index of 2.8 \\pm 0.2(stat) \\pm 0.3(syst) and a normalisation at 1 TeV of (8.2 \\pm 0.8(stat) \\pm 2.5(syst)) \\times 10^-13 cm^-2s^-1TeV^-1. A leptonic multi-wavelength model shows that an energy of about 4 \\times 10^49erg is stored in electrons and positrons. The apparent efficiency, which is the ratio of the TeV gamma-ray luminosity to the pulsar's spindown lum...

  13. Discovery of Pulsations from the Pulsar J0205 6449 in SNR 3C 58 with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, Roger D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bouvier, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from the young radio and X-ray pulsar PSR J0205 + 6449 located in the Galactic supernova remnant 3C 58. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST), while the radio rotational ephemeris used to fold {gamma}-rays was obtained using both the Green Bank Telescope and the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank. The light curve consists of two peaks separated by 0.49 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01 cycles which are aligned with the X-ray peaks. The first {gamma}-ray peak trails the radio pulse by 0.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, while its amplitude decreases with increasing energy as for the other {gamma}-ray pulsars. Spectral analysis of the pulsed {gamma}-ray emission suggests a simple power law of index -2.1 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.2 with an exponential cutoff at 3.0{sub -0.7}{sup +1.1} {+-} 0.4 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral {gamma}-ray photon flux above 0.1 GeV is (13.7 {+-} 1.4 {+-} 3.0) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which implies for a distance of 3.2 kpc and assuming a broad fan-like beam a luminosity of 8.3 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and an efficiency {eta} of 0.3%. Finally, we report a 95% upper limit on the flux of 1.7 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for off-pulse emission from the object.

  14. The Radiative X-ray and Gamma-ray Efficiencies of Rotation-powered Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Bamba, A.; Yamazaki, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars and their surrounding nebulae using the sample of Kargaltsev & Pavlov, and we complement this with an analysis of the γ -ray emission of Fermi-detected pulsars. We report a strong trend in the efficiency with which

  15. A Tale of Two Pulsars and the Origin of TeV Gamma Rays from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kistler, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Center (GC) has been long known to host gamma-ray emission detected to >10 TeV. HESS data now points to two plausible origins: the supermassive black hole (perhaps with >PeV cosmic rays and neutrinos) or high-energy electrons from the putative X-ray pulsar wind nebula G359.95-0.04. We show that if the magnetic field experienced by PWN electrons is near the several mG ambient field strength suggested by radio observations of the nearby GC magnetar SGR J1745-29, synchrotron losses constrain the TeV gamma-ray output to be far below the data. Accounting for the peculiar geometry of GC infrared emission, we also find that the requisite TeV flux could be reached if the PWN is ~1 pc from Sgr A* and the magnetic field is two orders of magnitude weaker, a scenario that we discuss in relation to recent data and theoretical developments. Otherwise, Sgr A* is left, which would then be a PeV link to other AGN.

  16. Electron Acceleration in Pulsar-Wind Termination Shocks: An Application to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kroon, John J; Finke, Justin; Dermer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi-LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated ...

  17. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63. Echoes in x-ray novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    This grant covers work on the Compton phase 3 investigation, 'Shock High Energy Emission from the Be- Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63' and cycle 4 investigations 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' and 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae'. Work under the investigation 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' has lead to the publication of a paper (attached), describing gamma-ray emissivity variations in the northern galactic hemisphere. Using archival EGRET data, we have found a large irregular region of enhanced gamma-ray emissivity at energies greater 100 MeV. This is the first observation of local structure in the gamma-ray emissivity. Work under the investigation 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae' is proceeding with analysis of data from OSSE from the transient source GRO J1655-40. The outburst of this source last fall triggered this Target of Opportunity investigation. Preliminary spectral analysis shows emission out to 600 keV and a pure power low spectrum with no evidence of an exponential cutoff. Work is complete on the analysis of BATSE data from the Be-Star/Pulsar Sustem PSR 1259-63.

  18. Identification of HESS J1303-631 as a Pulsar Wind Nebula through gamma-ray, X-ray and radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    The previously unidentified very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) \\gamma-ray source HESS J1303-631, discovered in 2004, is re-examined including new data from the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope array. Archival data from the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite and from the PMN radio survey are also examined. Detailed morphological and spectral studies of VHE \\gamma-ray emission as well as of the XMM-Newton X-ray data are performed. Significant energy-dependent morphology of the \\gamma-ray source is detected with high-energy emission (E > 10 TeV) positionally coincident with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305 and lower energy emission (E <2 TeV) extending \\sim 0.4^{\\circ} to the South-East of the pulsar. The spectrum of the VHE source can be described with a power-law with an exponential cut-off N_{0} = (5.6 \\pm 0.5) X 10^{-12} TeV^-1 cm^-2 s^-1, \\Gamma = 1.5 \\pm 0.2) and E_{\\rm cut} = (7.7 \\pm 2.2) TeV. The PWN is also detected in X-rays, extending \\sim 2-3' from the pulsar position towards the center of the \\gamma-ray emission ...

  19. PSRs J0248+6021 and J2240+5832: Young Pulsars in the Northern Galactic Plane. Discovery, Timing, and Gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Theureau, G; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Smith, D A; Casandjian, J M; Cheung, C C; Craig, H A; Donato, D; Foster, R; Guillemot, L; Harding, A K; Lestrade, J -F; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Thompson, D J; Tian, W W; Watters, K

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars PSR J0248+6021 (rotation period P=217 ms and spin-down power Edot = 2.13E35 erg/s) and PSR J2240+5832 (P=140 ms, Edot = 2.12E35 erg/s) were discovered in 1997 with the Nancay radio telescope during a northern Galactic plane survey, using the Navy-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (NBPP) filter bank. GeV gamma-ray pulsations from both were discovered using the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Twelve years of radio and polarization data allow detailed investigations. The two pulsars resemble each other both in radio and in gamma-ray data. Both are rare in having a single gamma-ray pulse offset far from the radio peak. The high dispersion measure for PSR J0248+6021 (DM = 370 pc cm^-3) is most likely due to its being within the dense, giant HII region W5 in the Perseus arm at a distance of 2 kpc, not beyond the edge of the Galaxy as obtained from models of average electron distributions. Its high transverse velocity and the low magnetic field along the line-of-sight favor this small distance. Neither gamma-ray, X-ray,...

  20. Thermal properties of the $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J1741$-$2054

    CERN Document Server

    Karpova, A; Shibanov, Yu; Shternin, P; Zyuzin, D

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the spectral analysis of the X-ray emission from the middle-aged Fermi pulsar J1741$-$2054 using all Chandra archival data collected in 2010 and 2013. We confirm early findings by Romani et al. 2010 that the pulsar spectrum contains a thermal emission component. The component is best described by the blackbody model with the temperature $\\approx$ 60 eV and the emitting area radius $\\approx$ 17 $D_{\\rm kpc}$ km. The thermal emission likely originates from the entire surface of the cooling neutron star if the distance to the pulsar is $\\approx$0.8 kpc. The latter is supported by a large absorbing column density inferred from the X-ray fit and empirical optical extinction--distance relations along the pulsar line of sight. The neutron star surface temperature and characteristic age make it similar to the well studied middle-aged pulsar B1055$-$52. Like the latter PSR J1741$-$2054 is hotter than the standard cooling scenario predicts.

  1. Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, M.G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Trieste /Arecibo Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  2. Compactified pulsar wind nebula model of gamma-ray loud binary LSI +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A

    2007-01-01

    We show that radio-to-TeV properties of the binary system LSI +61 303 can be explained by interaction of the compact object (a young pulsar) with the inhomogeneities of the wind from companion Be star. We develop a model scenario of "compactified" pulsar wind nebula formed in result of such interaction. To test the model assumptions about geometry of the system we re-analyze the available X-ray observations to study in more details the variations of the hydrogen column density on long (orbital) and short (several kilosecond) time scales.

  3. The rotation-powered nature of some soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Jaziel G.; Cáceres, D. L.; de Lima, R. C. R.; Malheiro, M.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slow rotating isolated pulsars whose energy reservoir is still matter of debate. Adopting neutron star (NS) fiducial parameters; mass M = 1.4 M⊙, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia, I = 1045 g cm2, the rotational energy loss, Ėrot, is lower than the observed luminosity (dominated by the X-rays) LX for many of the sources. Aims: We investigate the possibility that some members of this family could be canonical rotation-powered pulsars using realistic NS structure parameters instead of fiducial values. Methods: We compute the NS mass, radius, moment of inertia and angular momentum from numerical integration of the axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium. We then compute the entire range of allowed values of the rotational energy loss, Ėrot, for the observed values of rotation period P and spin-down rate Ṗ. We also estimate the surface magnetic field using a general relativistic model of a rotating magnetic dipole. Results: We show that realistic NS parameters lowers the estimated value of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency, LX/Ėrot, with respect to estimates based on fiducial NS parameters. We show that nine SGRs/AXPs can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the NS rotational energy, for LX computed in the soft (2-10 keV) X-ray band. We compute the range of NS masses for which LX/Ėrotgroup of nine potentially rotation-powered NSs. This additional hard X-ray component dominates over the soft one leading to LX/Ėrot > 1 in two of them. Conclusions: We show that 9 SGRs/AXPs can be rotation-powered NSs if we analyze their X-ray luminosity in the soft 2-10 keV band. Interestingly, four of them show radio emission and six have been associated with supernova remnants (including Swift J1834.9-0846 the first SGR observed with a surrounding wind nebula). These observations give additional support to our results of a natural explanation of these

  4. Galactic gamma ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1982-05-01

    During the last decade the exploration of the sky in the light of gamma rays has begun by means of satellite-and balloon-borne instruments. Like in other ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum the Milky Way clearly stands out against the rest of the sphere. Part of the galactic ..gamma..-ray emission is due to discrete sources, part is diffuse in origin and is produced in interstellar space. Some of the discrete ..gamma..-ray sources are radio pulsars, the nature of the other sources is still unknown. The intensity distribution of the diffuse galactic ..gamma..-ray component is consistent with a decrease of the cosmic-ray intensity towards the outer part of the galaxy. The identification of the cosmic-ray sources will be one of the main objectives of the next generation of ..gamma..-ray telescopes.

  5. Discovery of extended VHE gamma-ray emission from the asymmetric pulsar wind nebula in MSH 15-52 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Atai, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    The Supernova Remnant MSH 15-52 has been observed in very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays using the H.E.S.S. 4-telescope array located in Namibia. A gamma-ray signal is detected at the 25 sigma level during an exposure of 22.1 hours live time. The image reveals an elliptically shaped emission region around the pulsar PSR B1509-58, with semi-major axis 6' in the NW-SE direction and semi-minor axis 2' approximately. This morphology coincides with the diffuse pulsar wind nebula as observed at X-ray energies by ROSAT. The overall energy spectrum from 280 GeV up to 40 TeV can be fitted by a power law with photon index Gamma = 2.27 +/- 0.03(stat.) +/- 0.20(syst.). The detected emission can be plausibly explained by inverse Compton scattering of accelerated relativistic electrons with soft photons.

  6. A Search for Very High-Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Håkansson, N; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Lang, M J; Loo, A; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rulten, C; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Chernyakova, M; Roberts, M

    2016-01-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259--63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy non-thermal emission. It has been the subject of multi-wavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high-energy gamma-ray observations carried out by VERITAS before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that very high-energy gamma rays are produced via an inverse-Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than $\\si...

  7. Search for pulsed multi-TeV gamma rays from the Crab pulsar using the Tibet-III air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2007-01-01

    We searched for pulsed gamma-ray emissions from the Crab pulsar using data of the Tibet-III air shower array from November 1999 through November 2005. No evidence for the pulsed emissions was found in our analysis. Upper limits at different energies were calculated for a $3 \\sigma$ confidence level in the energy range of multi-TeV to several hundred TeV.

  8. Fermi Study of gamma-ray Millisecond Pulsars: the Spectral Shape and Pulsed 25--200 GeV Emission from J0614-3329

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We report our analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for 39 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) listed in the second $\\gamma$-ray pulsar catalog. Spectra of the pulsars are obtained. We fit the spectra with a function of a power law with exponential cutoff, and find the best-fit parameters of photon index $\\Gamma = 1.54^{+0.10}_{-0.11}$ and cutoff energy $E_{c} = 3.70^{+0.95}_{-0.70}$ GeV. This spectral shape, which includes the intrinsic differences in the spectra of the MSPs, can be used for finding candidate MSPs and unidentified types of sources detected by Fermi at high Galactic latitudes. In one of the MSPs PSR J0614-3329, we find significant pulsed emission upto 200 GeV. The result has thus added this MSP to the group of the Crab and Vela pulsars that have been detected with >50 GeV pulsed emission. Comparing the $\\gamma$-ray spectrum of PSR J0614-3329 with those of the Crab and Vela pulsars, we discuss possible emission mechanisms for the very high-energy component.

  9. An X-ray Pulsar with a Superstrong Magnetic Field in the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater SGR1806-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Dieters, S.; Strohmayer, T.; vanParadijs, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Hurley, K.; Kommers, J.; Smith, I.; Frail, D.; Murakami, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) emit multiple, brief (approximately O.1 s) intense outbursts of low-energy gamma-rays. They are extremely rare; three are known in our galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Two SGRs are associated with young supernova remnants (SNRs), and therefore most probably with neutron stars, but it remains a puzzle why SGRs are so different from 'normal' radio pulsars. Here we report the discovery of pulsations in the persistent X-ray flux of SGR1806-20, with a period of 7.47 s and a spindown rate of 2.6 x 10(exp -3) s/yr. We argue that the spindown is due to magnetic dipole emission and find that the pulsar age and (dipolar) magnetic field strength are approximately 1500 years and 8 x 10(exp 14) gauss, respectively. Our observations demonstrate the existence of 'magnetars', neutron stars with magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those of radio pulsars, and support earlier suggestions that SGR bursts are caused by neutron-star 'crust-quakes' produced by magnetic stresses. The 'magnetar' birth rate is about one per millenium, a substantial fraction of that of radio pulsars. Thus our results may explain why some SNRs have no radio pulsars.

  10. Full polar cap cascade scenario $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray luminosities from spin-powered pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We modify polar cap cascade picture to include the ICS of the higher generation pairs. In such a ``full-cascade'' scenario, not only the perpendicular portion of the energy of the pairs goes to high energy radiation via SR, but the parallel portion of the energy of the pairs can also contribute to high energy emission via ICS with the soft thermal photons from either the full neutron star surface or the hot polar cap. An important output of such a scenario is that the soft tail of the ICS spectrum can naturally result in a non-thermal X-ray component which can contribute to the luminosities observed by ROSAT and ASCA. Here we present an analytic description of such a full polar cap cascade scenario within the framework of Harding & Muslimov acceleration model. We present the theoretical predictions of the $\\gamma$-ray luminosities, the thermal and non-thermal X-ray luminosities for the known spin-powered X-ray pulsars. Our results show that the observed different dependences of the high energy luminositie...

  11. To understand the X-ray spectrum of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yan-Jun; Li, Zhao-Sheng; Liu, Yuan; Tong, Hao; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Hard X-rays above 10 keV are detected from several anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), and different models have been proposed to explain the physical origin within the frame of either magnetar model or fallback disk system. Using data from $\\it Suzaku$ and INTEGRAL, we study the soft and hard X-ray spectra of four AXPs/SGRs, 1RXS J170849-400910, 1E 1547.0-5408, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 0501+4516. It is found that the spectra could be well reproduced by bulk-motion Comptonization (BMC) process as was first suggested by Tr$\\"u$mper et al., showing that the accretion scenario could be compatible with X-ray emission of AXPs/SGRs. HXMT simulations for BMC model show that the spectra would have discrepancies from power-law, especially the cutoff at $\\sim$ 200 keV. Thus future observations are promising to distinguish different models for the hard tail and may help us understand the nature of AXPs/SGRs.

  12. The $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J0633+0632 in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Danilenko, Andrey; Karpova, Anna; Zyuzin, Dima; Shibanov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    We analysed Chandra observations of the bright Fermi pulsar J0633+0632 and found evidence of an absorption feature in its spectrum at $804^{+42}_{-26}$ eV (the errors here and below are at 90% confidence) with equivalent width of $63^{+47}_{-36}$ eV. In addition, we analysed in detail the X-ray spectral continuum taking into account correlations between the interstellar absorption and the distance to the source. We confirm early findings by Ray et al. (2011) that the spectrum contains non-thermal and thermal components. The latter is equally well described by the blackbody and magnetised atmosphere models and can be attributed to the emission from the bulk of the stellar surface in both cases. The distance to the pulsar is constrained in a range of 1--4 kpc from the spectral fits. We infer the blackbody surface temperature of $108^{+22}_{-14}$ eV, while for the atmosphere model, the temperature, as seen by a distant observer, is $53^{+12}_{-7}$ eV. In the latter case J0633+0632 is one of the coldest middle-ag...

  13. Study of the high energy gamma-ray emission from the crab pulsar with the MAGIC telescope and Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takayuki

    2010-12-06

    My thesis deals with a fundamental question of high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Namely, I studied the cut-off shape of the Crab pulsar spectrum to distinguish between the leading scenarios for the pulsar models. Pulsars are celestial objects, which emit periodic pulsed electromagnetic radiation (pulsation) from radio to high energy gamma-rays. Two major scenarios evolved in past 40 years to explain the pulsation mechanism: the inner magnetosphere scenario and the outer magnetosphere scenario. Both scenarios predict a high energy cut-off in the gamma-ray energy spectrum, but with different cut-off sharpness. An exponential cut-off is expected for the outer magnetosphere scenario while a super-exponential cut-off is predicted for the inner magnetosphere scenario. Therefore, one of the best ways to confirm or refute these scenarios is to measure the energy spectrum of a pulsar at around the cut-off energy, i.e., at energies between a few GeV and a few tens of GeV. All past attempts to measure pulsar spectra with ground-based instruments have failed while satellite-borne detectors had a too small area to study detailed spectra in the GeV domain. In this thesis, the gamma-ray emission at around the cut-off energy from the Crab pulsar is studied with the MAGIC telescope. The public data of the satellite-borne gamma-ray detector, Fermi-LAT, are also analyzed in order to discuss the MAGIC observation results in comparison with the adjacent energy band. In late 2007, a new trigger system (SUM trigger system) allowed to reduce the threshold energy of the MAGIC telescope from 50 GeV to 25 GeV and the Crab pulsar was successfully detected during observations from October 2007 and January 2009. My analysis reveals that the energy spectrum is consistent with a simple power law between 25 GeV to 100 GeV. The extension of the energy spectrum up to 100 GeV rules out the inner magnetosphere scenario. Fermi-LAT started operation in August 2008. The Fermi-LAT data reveal that a power

  14. Discovery of gamma-ray emission from the extragalactic pulsar wind nebula N 157B with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Atäı, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; G´rard, L.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; K´ski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; K´lifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; K´niak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; M´hault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Lstrok; .; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2012-09-01

    We present the significant detection of the first extragalactic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) detected in gamma rays, N 157B, located in the large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Pulsars with high spin-down luminosity are found to power energised nebulae that emit gamma rays up to energies of several tens of TeV. N 157B is associated with PSR J0537-6910, which is the pulsar with the highest known spin-down luminosity. The High Energy Stereoscopic System telescope array observed this nebula on a yearly basis from 2004 to 2009 with a dead-time corrected exposure of 46 h. The gamma-ray spectrum between 600 GeV and 12 TeV is well-described by a pure power-law with a photon index of 2.8 ± 0.2stat ± 0.3syst and a normalisation at 1 TeV of (8.2 ± 0.8stat ± 2.5syst) × 10-13 cm-2 s-1 TeV-1. A leptonic multi-wavelength model shows that an energy of about 4 × 1049 erg is stored in electrons and positrons. The apparent efficiency, which is the ratio of the TeV gamma-ray luminosity to the pulsar's spin-down luminosity, 0.08% ± 0.01%, is comparable to those of PWNe found in the Milky Way. The detection of a PWN at such a large distance is possible due to the pulsar's favourable spin-down luminosity and a bright infrared photon-field serving as an inverse-Compton-scattering target for accelerated leptons. By applying a calorimetric technique to these observations, the pulsar's birth period is estimated to be shorter than 10 ms. Data set is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/545/L2

  15. Identification of the High-Energy Gamma-Ray Source 3FGL J1544.6-1125 as a Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Binary in an Accreting State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    We present X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations of 1RXS J154439.4-112820, the most probable counterpart of the unassociated Fermi LAT source 3FGL J1544.6-1125. The optical data reveal rapid variability, which is a feature of accreting systems. The X-ray data exhibit large-amplitude flux variations in the form of fast switching (within ~10 s) between two distinct flux levels that differ by a factor of $\\approx$10. The detailed optical and X-ray behavior is virtually identical to that seen in the accretion-disk-dominated states of the transitional millisecond pulsar binaries PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, which are also associated with $\\gamma$-ray sources. Based on the available observational evidence, we conclude that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 and 3FGL J1544.6-1125 are the same object, with the X-rays arising from intermittent low-luminosity accretion onto a millisecond pulsar and the $\\gamma$-rays originating from an accretion-driven outflow. 1RXS J154439.4-112820 is only the fourth $\\gamma$-ray emi...

  16. Discovery of the Binary Pulsar PSR B1259-63 in Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays around Periastron with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Johnston, S; Khelifi, B; Kirk, J G; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Martineau-Huynh, O; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Skjraasen, O; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission of the binary system PSR B1259-63/SS 2883 of a radio pulsar orbiting a massive, luminous Be star in a highly eccentric orbit. The observations around the 2004 periastron passage of the pulsar were performed with the four 13 m Cherenkov telescopes of the H.E.S.S. experiment, recently installed in Namibia and in full operation since December 2003. Between February and June 2004, a gamma-ray signal from the binary system was detected with a total significance above 13 sigma. The flux was found to vary significantly on timescales of days which makes PSR B1259-63 the first variable galactic source of VHE gamma-rays observed so far. Strong emission signals were observed in pre- and post-periastron phases with a flux minimum around periastron, followed by a gradual flux decrease in the months after. The measured time-averaged energy spectrum above a mean threshold energy of 380 GeV can be fitted by a simple power law F_0(E/1 TeV)^-Gamma with a phot...

  17. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lico, R; Orienti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2016-01-01

    The first Fermi-LAT High-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing gamma-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample to characterize the physical properties of the most extreme gamma-ray sources. We investigate the pc scale properties of a sub-sample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim to confirm the proposed blazar associations, by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and gamma rays at E >10 GeV. We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of High Synchrotron Peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high resolution radio observations and have at least one NVSS counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA...

  18. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J1813$-$1246

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; Pizzocaro, D; De Luca, A; Wood, K S; Caraveo, P; Salvetti, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Acero, F

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the new deep {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of bo...

  19. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  20. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  1. NuSTAR Discovery Of A Young, Energetic Pulsar Associated with the Luminous Gamma-Ray Source HESS J1640-465

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Halpern, J. P.; Gelfand, J. D.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, J. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Stern, D. K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 206 ms pulsar associated with the TeV gamme-ray source HESS J1640-465 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray observatory. PSR J1640-4631 lies within the shelltype supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0, and coincides with an X-ray point source and putative pulsar wind nebula (PWN) previously identified in XMM-Newton and Chandra images. It is spinning down rapidly with period derivative P = 9.758(44) × 10(exp -13), yielding a spin-down luminosity E = 4.4 × 10(exp 36) erg s(exp -1), characteristic age tau(sub c) if and only if P/2 P = 3350 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B(sub s) = 1.4×10(exp 13) G. For the measured distance of 12 kpc to G338.3-0.0, the 0.2-10 TeV luminosity of HESS J1640-465 is 6% of the pulsar's present E. The Fermi source 1FHL J1640.5-4634 is marginally coincident with PSR J1640-4631, but we find no gamma-ray pulsations in a search using five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The pulsar energetics support an evolutionary PWN model for the broadband spectrum of HESS J1640-465, provided that the pulsar's braking index is n approximately equal to 2, and that its initial spin period was P(sub 0) approximately 15 ms.

  2. The nonlinear-electrodynamic bending of the x-ray and gamma-ray in the magnetic field of pulsars and magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Yu; Svertilov, S I; Denisov, Victor I.; Denisova, Irene P.; Svertilov, Sergey I.

    2001-01-01

    It was shown that according to the non-linear electrodynamics of vacuum electromagnetic rays should bend in the field of magnetic dipole. The angles of ray bending in the gravitational and magnetic fields of pulsars and magnetars were obtained. In the case of pulsars with $b\\sim R\\sim $ 100 km, $B_0\\sim 10^{13} G$ the value of the angle of non-linear electrodynamic bending of a ray in the Heisenberg-Euler theory will reach the value of $\\delta \\psi_{NED}\\sim 30'',$ and in the case of a magnetar with $B_0\\sim 10^{15} G$ the angle $\\delta \\psi_{NED}$ will increase to $\\delta \\psi_{NED}\\sim 1 rad\\sim 60^\\circ .$ The angle of gravitational bending of a ray at neutron star with $r_g$ = 3 km in the same conditions will be equal to $\\delta \\psi_g\\sim 0.06$ rad $\\sim 4^\\circ >.$ Observations can only be made in X- rays and gamma-rays, for which the agnetosphere is quite opaque. Because the distance from the Earth to the well-known pulsars and magnetars is too large to observe the pure effect of a ray bending. The non...

  3. High Resolution X-ray Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Associated with the Gamma-ray Source HESS$ $J1640-465

    CERN Document Server

    Lemiere, A; Gaensler, B M; Murray, S

    2009-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray observation of the very high energy $\\gamma$-ray source HESS$ $J1640-465. We identify a point source surrounded by a diffuse emission that fills the extended object previously detected by XMM Newton at the centroid of the HESS source, within the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0. The morphology of the diffuse emission strongly resembles that of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and extends asymmetrically to the South-West of a point-source presented as a potential pulsar. The spectrum of the putative pulsar and compact nebula are well-characterized by an absorbed power-law model which, for a reasonable $N_{\\rm H}$ value of $14\\times 10^{22} \\rm cm^{-2}$, exhibit an index of 1.1 and 2.5 respectively, typical of Vela-like PWNe. We demonstrate that, given the H$ $I absorption features observed along the line of sight, the SNR and the H$ $II surrounding region are probably connected and lie between 8 kpc and 13 kpc. The resulting age of the system is between 10 and 30 kyr. ...

  4. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as clusters of galaxies. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance violation derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure in the direction of the center of our Galaxy, and strong constraints on some Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) models for dark matter.

  5. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  6. An Analytic Particle Acceleration Model in Pulsar Wind Termination Shocks Applied to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Justin, Finke; Dermer, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The Crab nebula is a persistent source of gamma-rays up to about 100 MeV due to synchrotron radiation from electrons/positrons emitting in an ambient magnetic field thought to be of magnitude B~200 μG. The radiating electrons are limited by radiation-reaction forces which place an upper limit of about 100 MeV on the gamma-ray photons it can produce. This normally quiescent nebula has been observed by AGILE and Fermi to undergo bright transients lasting about a week and characterized by a significant increase in gamma-ray flux far above the classical radiation-reaction limit, with energies often reaching 3 GeV. The flares imply a population of PeV electrons accelerated on sub-day timescales. The very short acceleration timescales and the observed emission above the radiation-reaction limit place severe constraints on contemporary shock acceleration models such as diffusive shock acceleration which cannot account for the temporal and energetic properties of the gamma-ray flares. In this component of my dissertation research, I revisit the problem and find an analytic solution to the Fokker-Planck equation which incorporates a variety of acceleration and loss terms. I find that the model can reproduce the various Fermi-LAT flare spectra well and that electrostatic acceleration is the most significant contributor to the underlying mechanisms responsible for the most energetic astrophysical particle population ever observed. I find that the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT flares from the Crab nebula can be reproduced with this model using magnetic fields that are in agreement with multi-wavelength observations.

  7. Implications of the pulsar wind nebula scenario for a TeV gamma-ray source VER J2016+371

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Lab

    2016-01-01

    We present multiwavelength studies of a TeV gamma-ray source VER J2016+371 suggested to be associated with a supernova remnant CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2) and based on X-ray and radio morphologies, CTB 87 is identified as an evolved pulsar wind nebula. A source in the vicinity of VER J2016+371 is also detected at GeV energies by Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope suggesting a likely counterpart at GeV energies. We find that a broken power-law (BPL) distribution of electrons can explain the observed data at radio, X-ray and TeV energies, however, is not sufficient to explain the data at MeV--GeV energies. A Maxwellian distribution of electrons along with the BPL distribution of electrons in low magnetic fields can explain the observed multiwavelength data spanned from radio to TeV energies suggesting this as the most likely scenario for this source. We also find that although the hadronic model can explain the observed GeV--TeV data for the ambient matter density of $\\sim 20~ \\rm cm^{-3}$, no observational support for suc...

  8. PSR J2021+4026 in the Gamma Cygni region: the first variable gamma-ray pulsar seen by the Fermi LAT

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of PSR J2021+4026 in the heart of the Cygnus region with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) unveiled a sudden decrease in flux above 100 MeV over a time scale shorter than a week. The "jump" was near MJD 55850 (2011 October 16), with the flux decreasing from $(8.33\\pm0.08) \\times 10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ to $(6.86\\pm0.13) \\times 10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Simultaneously, the frequency spindown rate increased from $(7.8\\pm 0.1) \\times 10^{-13}$ Hz s$^{-1}$ to $(8.1\\pm 0.1) \\times 10^{-13}$ Hz s$^{-1}$. Significant changes in the pulse profile and marginal changes in the emission spectrum occurred at the same time. There is also evidence for a small, steady flux increase over the three years preceding MJD 55850. This is the first observation at gamma-ray energies of mode changes and intermittent behavior, observed at radio wavelengths for other pulsars. We argue that the change in pulsed gamma-ray emission is due to a change in emission beaming and we speculate that it is p...

  9. RADIO-QUIET AND RADIO-LOUD PULSARS: SIMILAR IN GAMMA-RAYS BUT DIFFERENT IN X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Luca, A. De; Salvetti, D. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Parkinson, P. M. Saz [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hartog, P. R. Den [Stanford University HEPL/KIPAC, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Wolff, M. T., E-mail: marelli@iasf-milano.inaf.it [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet (RQ) γ-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from γ-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for a ∼10″-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. and confirm that, on average, the γ-ray-to-X-ray flux ratios (F{sub γ}/F{sub X}) of RQ pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud (RL) ones. Furthermore, while the F{sub γ}/F{sub X} distribution features a single peak for the RQ pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the RL ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  10. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  11. PSR J2030+364I: Radio Discovery and Gamma-ray Study of a Middle-aged Pulsar in the Now Identified Fermi-LAT Source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Parent, D.; Decesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Donato, D.; SazParkinson, P. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with IFGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.28, spin-down luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 34) erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1 % that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc/cu cm. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive - PSR J2030+364 I would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only > or approx. 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  12. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  13. Five new millisecond pulsars from a radio survey of 14 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kerr; F. Camilo; T.J. Johnson; E.C. Ferrara; L. Guillemot; A.K. Harding; J. Hessels; S. Johnston; M. Keith; M. Kramer; S.M. Ransom; P.S. Ray; J.E. Reynolds; J. Sarkissian; K.S. Wood

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephem

  14. PSR J2021+4026 in the Gamma Cygni Region: The First Variable Gamma-Ray Pulsar Seen by the Fermi LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; D’Ammando, F.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.; Thompson, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of PSR J2021+4026 in the heart of the Cygnus region with the Fermi Large Area Telescope unveiled a sudden decrease in flux above 100 MeV over a timescale shorter than a week. The "jump" was near MJD 55850 (2011 October 16), with the flux decreasing from (8.33 plus or minus 0.08)×10(exp -10) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) to (6.86 plus or minus 0.13)× 10 (exp -1)0 erg cm (exp -2) s(exp -1). Simultaneously, the frequency spindown rate increased from (7.8 plus or minus 0.1) × 10(exp -13) Hz s(exp -1) to (8.1 plus or minus 0.1) × 10(exp -1)3 Hz s(exp -1). Significant (greater than 5 sigma) changes in the pulse profile and marginal (less than 3 sigma) changes in the emission spectrum occurred at the same time. There is also evidence for a small, steady flux increase over the 3 yr preceding MJD 55850. This is the first observation at gamma-ray energies of mode changes and intermittent behavior, observed at radio wavelengths for other pulsars. We argue that the change in pulsed gamma-ray emission is due to a change in emission beaming and we speculate that it is precipitated by a shift in the magnetic field structure, leading to a change of either effective magnetic inclination or effective current.

  15. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  16. $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray luminosities from spin-powered pulsars in the full polar cap cascade model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We modify the conventional curvature radiation (inverse Compton scattering) + synchrotron radiation polar cap cascade model by including the inverse Compton scattering of the higher generation pairs. Within the framework of the space-charge-limited-flow acceleration model with frame-dragging proposed by Harding & Muslimov (1998), such a full polar cap cascade scenario can well reproduce the $L_\\gamma \\propto (L_{\\rm sd})^{1/2}$ and the $L_x \\sim 10^{-3} L_{\\rm sd}$ dependences observed from the known spin-powered pulsars. According to this model, the ``pulsed'' soft ROSAT-band X-rays from most of the millisecond pulsars might be of thermal origin, if there are no strong multipole magnetic components near their surfaces.

  17. Discovery of a faint X-ray counterpart and of a parsec-long X-ray tail for the middle-aged, gamma-ray only pulsar PSR J0357+3205

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Mignani, R P; Caraveo, P A; Hummel, W; Collins, S; Shearer, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Belfiore, A; Bignami, G F

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting gamma-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, ~40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged (tau_C ~0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (Erot ~6x10^33 erg/s), indeed the lowest among non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index Gamma=2.53+/-0.25). The absorbing column (NH=8+/-4x10^20 cm^-2) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from...

  18. Gamma-ray observations of the Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 during a giant X-ray outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Araya, M; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Saxon, D B; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Weng, S; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    Giant X-ray outbursts, with luminosities of about $ 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are observed roughly every 5 years from the nearby Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262. In this article, we present observations of the source with VERITAS at very-high energies (VHE; E$>$100 GeV) triggered by the X-ray outburst in December 2009. The observations started shortly after the onset of the outburst, and they provided comprehensive coverage of the episode, as well as the 111-day binary orbit. No VHE emission is evident at any time. We also examined data from the contemporaneous observations of 1A 0535+262 with the Fermi/LAT at high energy photons (HE; E$>$0.1 GeV) and failed to detect the source at GeV energies. The X-ray continua measured with the Swift/XRT and the RXTE/PCA can be well described by the combination of blackbody and Comptonized emission from thermal electrons. Therefore, the gamma-ray and X-ray observations suggest the absence of a significant population of non-thermal particles in the system. This distinguishes 1A~...

  19. Constraint on the pulsar wind nebula scenario of origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Lab

    2014-01-01

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, we find that within the synchrotron self-compton mechanism of production of TeV photons by electrons within the nebula, the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux upper limits impose upper limits of O($10^{-4}$ pc) on the effective characteristic size of the emission region within the PWN for an assumed distance of $\\sim$ few kpc to the source. This is about four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission from a "standard" PWN such as the Crab Nebula.

  20. Electron Acceleration in Pulsar-wind Termination Shocks: An Application to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-12-01

    The γ-ray flares from the Crab Nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi-LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar-wind nebulae because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated γ-ray synchrotron spectrum. We find that in our model the γ-ray flares are mainly powered by electrostatic acceleration, but the contributions from stochastic and shock acceleration play an important role in producing the observed spectral shapes. Our model can reproduce the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT and AGILE flares from the Crab Nebula, using magnetic field strengths in agreement with the multi-wavelength observational constraints. We also compute the spectrum and duration of the synchrotron afterglow created by the accelerated electrons, after they escape into the region on the downstream side of the pulsar-wind termination shock. The afterglow is expected to fade over a maximum period of about three weeks after the γ-ray flare.

  1. Discovery of the INTEGRAL X/Gamma-ray transient IGR J00291+5934: a Comptonised accreting ms pulsar ?

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, S E; Rodríguez, J; Ubertini, P; Capitanio, F; Ebisawa, K; Eckert, D; Courvoisier, Thierry L; Produit, N; Walter, R; Falanga, M

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high-energy transient with the IBIS/ISGRI detector on board the INTEGRAL observatory. The source, namely IGR J00291+5934, was first detected on 2nd December 2004 in the routine monitoring of the IBIS/ISGRI 20--60 keV images. The observations were conducted during Galactic Plane Scans, which are a key part of the INTEGRAL Core Programme observations. After verifying the basic source behaviour, the discovery was announced on 3rd December. The transient shows a hard Comptonised spectrum, with peak energy release at about 20 keV and a total luminosity of ~ 0.9E36 erg/s in the 5--100 keV range, assuming a distance of 3 kpc. Following the INTEGRAL announcement of the discovery of IGR J00291+5934, a number of observations were made by other instruments. We summarise the results of those observations and, together with the INTEGRAL data, identifiy IGR J00291+5934 as the 6th member of a class of accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars.

  2. Very-high-energy gamma-ray observations of pulsar wind nebulae and cataclysmic variable stars with MAGIC and development of trigger systems for IACTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Coto, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The history of astronomy is as ancient as the reach of our written records. All the human civilizations have been interested in the study and interpretation of the night sky and its objects and phenomena. These observations were performed with the naked eye until the beginning of the 17th century, when Galileo Galilei started to use an instrument recently developed called telescope. Since then, the range of accessible wavelengths has been increasing, with a burst in the 20th century with the developing of instruments to observe them: antennas (radio and submillimeter), telescopes (optical, IR) and satellites (UV, X-rays and soft gamma rays). The last wavelength range accessed was the Very-High-Energy (VHE) gamma rays. At this range fluxes are so low that it is not possible to use space-based instruments with typical collection areas of O(1) m2. We must resort to the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique, which is based on the detection of the flashes of Cherenkov light that VHE gamma rays produce when they interact with the Earth's atmosphere. The field is very young, with the first source discovered in 1989 by the pioneering Whipple telescope. It is very dynamic with more than 150 sources detected to date, most of them by MAGIC, HESS and VERITAS, that make up the current generation of instruments. Finally, the field is also very promising, with the preparation of a next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes: CTA, that is expected to start full operation in 2020. The work presented in this thesis comprises my efforts to take the ground-based γ-ray astronomy one step forward. Part I of the thesis is an introduction to the non- thermal universe, the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique and the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) MAGIC and CTA. Part II deals with several ways to reduce the trigger threshold of IACTs. This includes the simula- tion, characterization and test of an analog trigger especially designed to achieve the

  3. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  4. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  5. X- and γ-ray pulsations of the nearby radio-faint PSR J1741–2054

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saz Parkinson, P. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Sarazin, C.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Camilo, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ∼35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  6. X- and γ-Ray Pulsations of the Nearby Radio-faint PSR J1741-2054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Sarazin, C.; Salvetti, D.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Camilo, F.

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741-2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ~35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  7. Gamma-ray triangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez-Gehler, Sergio; Molinaro, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of gamma-ray spectral feature, which we denominate gamma-ray triangle. This spectral feature arises in scenarios where dark matter self-annihilates via a chiral interaction into two Dirac fermions, which subsequently decay in flight into another fermion and a photon. The r...

  8. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The conference included papers on ..gamma..-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included. (JFP)

  9. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V., E-mail: jules@astro.columbia.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  10. High Energy Gamma-rays from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, W B J

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that specific globular clusters can contain up to a hundred of millisecond pulsars. These pulsars can accelerate leptons at the shock waves originated in collisions of the pulsar winds and/or inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Energetic leptons diffuse gradually through the globular cluster comptonizing stellar and microwave background radiation. We calculate the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra for different models of injection of leptons and parameters of the globular clusters assuming reasonable, of the order of 1%, efficiency of energy conversion from the pulsar winds into the relativistic leptons. It is concluded that leptons accelerated in the globular cluster cores should produce well localized $\\gamma$-ray sources which are concentric with these globular clusters. The results are shown for four specific globular clusters (47 Tuc, Ter 5, M13, and M15), in which significant population of millisecond pulsars have been already discovered. We argue that the best candidates, which might be potenti...

  11. NuSTAR discovery of a young, energetic pulsar associated with the luminous gamma-ray source Hess J1640-465

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Halpern, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 206 ms pulsar associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1640-465 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray observatory. PSR J1640-4631 lies within the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0, and coincides with an X-ray point source....... For the measured distance of 12 kpc to G338.3-0.0, the 0.2-10 TeV luminosity of HESS J1640-465 is 6% of the pulsar's present . The Fermi source 1FHL J1640.5-4634 is marginally coincident with PSR J1640-4631, but we find no γ-ray pulsations in a search using five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data....... The pulsar energetics support an evolutionary PWN model for the broadband spectrum of HESS J1640-465, provided that the pulsar's braking index is n ≈ 2, and that its initial spin period was P ~ 15 ms....

  12. Fermi LAT Detection of Early Post-Periastron Increased GeV Gamma-Ray Emission From The Be-Pulsar Binary System PSR B1259-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Wood, K. S.; Ray, P. S.; K, M. T.

    2017-10-01

    Using data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, we have detected > 100 MeV flux enhancement from PSR B1259-63, in a 3.4 yr binary orbit with a Be star, on three consecutive days (2017-10-01 06:24:04 UTC through 2017-10-04 06:37:41 UTC), with approximate significances of 4.7, 3.0, and 3.8 sigma and photon fluxes (from 100 MeV to 300 GeV) of (13.6 +/- 3.4), (8.4 +/- 3.3), and (10.0 +/- 3.0) x 10^-7 ph/cm^2/s, respectively.

  13. NuSTAR Discovery of a Young, Energetic Pulsar Associated with the Luminous Gamma-Ray Source HESS J1640-465

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Halpern, J. P.; Gelfand, J. D.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, J. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Stern, D. K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of a 206 ms pulsar associated with the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1640-465 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray observatory. PSR J1640-4631 lies within the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0, and coincides with an X-ray point source and putative pulsar wind nebula (PWN) previously identified in XMM-Newton and Chandra images. It is spinning down rapidly with period derivative \\dot{P} = 9.758(44) × 10-13, yielding a spin-down luminosity \\dot{E} = 4.4 × 1036 erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c \\equiv P/2\\dot{P} = 3350 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 1.4 × 1013 G. For the measured distance of 12 kpc to G338.3-0.0, the 0.2-10 TeV luminosity of HESS J1640-465 is 6% of the pulsar's present \\dot{E}. The Fermi source 1FHL J1640.5-4634 is marginally coincident with PSR J1640-4631, but we find no γ-ray pulsations in a search using five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The pulsar energetics support an evolutionary PWN model for the broadband spectrum of HESS J1640-465, provided that the pulsar's braking index is n ≈ 2, and that its initial spin period was P 0 ~ 15 ms.

  14. Constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism of TeV gamma ray emission from the Milagro TeV source MGRO J2019+37 within the pulsar wind nebula scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lab; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    2015-03-01

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) mechanism of origin of the observed TeV gamma rays within the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, for the SSC mechanism to explain the observed TeV flux from MGRO J2019+37 without violating the GMRT and/or Swift/XRT flux upper limits in the radio and x-ray regions, respectively, the emission region must be extremely compact with the characteristic size of the emission region restricted to ≲ O (10-4 pc) for an assumed distance of ˜ few kpc to the source. This is at least four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission through the SSC mechanism within the PWN scenario. On the other hand, inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the nebular high energy electrons on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons can, for reasonable ranges of values of various parameters, explain the observed TeV flux without violating the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux bounds.

  15. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  17. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  18. Fermi pulsar revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2010-01-01

    2009 has been an extraordinary year for gamma-ray pulsar astronomy and 2010 promises to be equally good. Not only have we registered an extraordinary increase in the number of pulsars detected in gamma rays, but we have also witnessed the birth of new sub-families: first of all, the radio-quiet gamma pulsars and later an ever growing number of millisecond pulsars, a real surprise. We started with a sample of 7 gamma-ray emitting neutron stars (6 radio pulsars and Geminga) and now the Fermi-LAT harvest encompasses 24 "Geminga-like" new gamma-ray pulsars, a dozen millisecond pulsars and about thirty radio pulsars. Moreover, radio searches targeted to LAT unidentified sources yielded 18 new radio millisecond pulsars, several of which have been already detected also in gamma rays. Thus, currently the family of gamma-ray emitting neutron stars seems to be evenly divided between classical radio pulsars, millisecond pulsars and radio quiet neutron stars.

  19. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on external matter: high-energy gamma-ray flares and implications for fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta; Meszaros, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tenuous wind bubble, which are formed by spin-down activities of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and super-luminous supernovae. In this work, we study the role of such pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly-rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. We calculate the nebular emission and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of >10-100 yr. In the rapidly-rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at submm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. An impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the unshocked nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward sho...

  20. A COMPACT RADIO COUNTERPART TO THE ENERGETIC X-RAY PULSAR ASSOCIATED WITH THE TEV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE J1813-178

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Dzib

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportamos la detección de una fuente de radio compacta y variable coinci- dente con CXOU J181335.1{174957, el pulsar de rayos-X localizado cerca del cen- tro de la remanente de supernova joven G12.82{0.02, la cual traslapa con la fuente TeV compacta HESS J1813{178. La fuente de radio compacta, que llamamos VLA J181335.1{174957, fue detectada en observaciones hechas a 4.86 GHz con el VLA en 2006. Nuevas observaciones hechas con el VLA en 2009 no detectan la fuente a un nivel 1.9+-0.7 veces (2.8o más bajo que el de 2006. Sugerimos que VLA J181335.1{ 174957 podría estar relacionada con alguna de las recientemente detectadas clases de pulsares de radio variables, pero no podemos alcanzar una conclusión más sólida.

  1. SVOM Gamma Ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yongwei; Li, Yanguo; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2009-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection, localization and broad-band study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena. The Gamma Ray Monitor (GRM) onboard is designed to observe the GRBs up to 5 MeV. With this instrument one of the key GRB parameter, Epeak, can be easily measured in the hard x-ray band. It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  2. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  3. Discovery of an Energetic 38.5 ms Pulsar Powering the Gamma-ray Source IGR J18490-0000/HESS J1849-000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Terrier, R.; Mattana, F.

    2011-03-01

    We report the discovery of a 38.5 ms X-ray pulsar in observations of the soft γ-ray source IGR J18490-0000 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). PSR J1849-0001 is spinning down rapidly with period derivative 1.42 × 10-14 s s-1, yielding a spin-down luminosity \\dot{E} = 9.8 × 1036 erg s-1, characteristic age τ_c ≡ P/2\\dot{P} = 42.9 kyr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 7.5 × 1011 G. Within the INTEGRAL/IBIS error circle lies a point-like XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray source that shows evidence of faint extended emission consistent with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The XMM-Newton spectrum of the point source is well fitted by an absorbed power-law model with photon index ΓPSR = 1.1 ± 0.2, N H = (4.3 ± 0.6) × 1022 cm-2, and F PSR(2-10 keV) = (3.8 ± 0.3) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, while the spectral parameters of the extended emission are roughly ΓPWN ≈ 2.1 and F PWN(2-10 keV) ≈ 9 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. IGR J18490-0000 is also coincident with the compact TeV source HESS J1849-000. For an assumed distance of 7 kpc in the Scutum arm tangent region, the 0.35-10 TeV luminosity of HESS J1849-000 is 0.13% of the pulsar's spin-down energy, while the ratio F(0.35-10 TeV)/F PWN(2-10 keV) ≈ 2. These properties are consistent with leptonic models of TeV emission from PWNe, with PSR J1849-0001 in a stage of transition from a synchrotron X-ray source to an inverse Compton γ-ray source.

  4. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Observations with the SAS-2 high energy ( 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope show evidence of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46. When the arrival times of gamma-rays from the region of the pulsar were converted to pulsar phases using the radio period and period derivative, a single peak was found in the phase plot, with a Poisson probability of occurring by chance of .00008. Independently, the time-averaged data for the PSR 1747-46 region show an enhancement over the surrounding region of the sky at the same galactic latitude, with a Poisson probability of chance occurrence of less than .008. The probability that these results are chance is the product of these two probabilities times the number of radio pulsars examined (73). This overall probability is sufficiently small (.00005) to suggest an identification of a new gamma-ray pulsar. In the gamma-ray pulsar plot, the peak falls 0.16 + or - 0.03 period after the radio pulsar peak. This phase shift is, within uncertainties, the same as that observed between the single radio peak and the first of the two gamma-ray peaks seen in the phase plot for PSR-0833-45 (the Vela pulsar).

  5. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope: Highlights of the GeV Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomspon, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays can be produced by processes that also produce neutrinos. the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of potenl ial targds for neutrino observations. Gamma-ray bursts. active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants are all sites where hadronic, neutrino-producing interactions are plausible. Pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and binary sources are all phenomena that reveal leptonic particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. \\Vhile important to gamma-ray astrophysics. such sources are of less interest to neutrino studies. This talk will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  6. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  7. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Itoh, R; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Khangulyan, D; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-02-11

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 × 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  8. Status of space-based gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations give us a direct view into the most extreme environments of the universe. They help us to study astronomical particle accelerators as supernovae remnants, pulsars, active galaxies or gamma-ray bursts and help us to understand the propagation of cosmic rays through our Milky Way. This article summarizes the status of gamma-ray observations from space; it is the write-up of a rapporteur talk given at the 34th ICRC in The Hague, The Netherlands. The primary instrument used in the presented studies is the Large Area Telescope on-board the Fermi Spacecraft, which images the whole gamma-ray sky at photon energies between 20 MeV and 2 TeV. The Fermi mission is currently in its 8th year of observations. This article will review many of the exciting discoveries made in this time, focusing on the most recent ones.

  9. Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Trois, A; Giuliani, A; Tavani, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Bulgarelli, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Del Monte, E; Moretti, E; Trifoglio, M; Costa, E; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.128501

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of 5-10 degrees at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the sub-satellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

  10. Classifying Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, David

    2016-01-01

    During its first 2 years of mission the Fermi-LAT instrument discovered more than 1,800 gamma-ray sources in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Despite the application of advanced techniques to identify and associate the Fermi-LAT sources with counterparts at other wavelengths, about 40% of the LAT sources have no a clear identification remaining "unassociated". The purpose of my Ph.D. work has been to pursue a statistical approach to identify the nature of each Fermi-LAT unassociated source. To this aim, we implemented advanced machine learning techniques, such as logistic regression and artificial neural networks, to classify these sources on the basis of all the available gamma-ray information about location, energy spectrum and time variability. These analyses have been used for selecting targets for AGN and pulsar searches and planning multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In particular, we have focused our attention on the search of possible radio-quiet millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates in the sample of...

  11. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  12. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  13. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  14. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  16. TeV Gamma-Ray Emission Observed from Geminga with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    Baughman, B M

    2015-01-01

    Geminga is a radio-quiet pulsar ~250 parsecs from Earth that was first discovered as a GeV gamma-ray source and then identified as a pulsar. Milagro observed an extended TeV source spatially consistent with Geminga. HAWC observes a similarly extended source. Observations of Geminga's flux and extension will be presented.

  17. COS-B observations of localised sources of gamma-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H.

    1976-01-01

    In October 1975 the high energy gamma ray flux from the Vela pulsar was measured by COS-B to be 1.6 to 2.1 times higher than the flux measured by SAS-2 in 1973. The existence is confirmed of a second region of enhanced radiation in the galactic anticenter in addition to that from the Crab pulsar.

  18. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Huang, H.H. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  19. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  20. Gamma-ray-selected AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giommi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The gamma-ray band is the most energetic part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As such it is also where selection effects are most severe, as it can only be reached by the most extreme non-thermal AGN. Blazars, with their emission dominated by non-thermal blue-shifted radiation arising in a relativistic jet pointed in the direction of the observer, naturally satisfy this though requirement. For this reason, albeit these sources are intrisically very rare (orders of magnitude less abundant than radio quiet AGN of the same optical magnitude) they almost completely dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray and very high energy sky. I will discuss the emission of different types of blazars and the selection effects that are at play in the gamma-ray band based on recent results from the current generation of gamma-ray astronomy satellites, ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, and Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  2. Multiwavelength Studies of gamma-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, Christina

    2011-01-01

    High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) consist of an O or B star orbited by either a neutron star or a black hole. Of the 114 known Galactic HMXBs, a handful of these objects, dubbed gamma-ray binaries, have been observed to produce MeV-TeV emission. The very high energy emission can be produced either by accretion from the stellar wind onto a black hole or a collision between the stellar wind and a relativistic pulsar wind. Both these scenarios make gamma-ray binaries valuable nearby systems for studying the physics of shocks and jets. Currently, the nature of the compact object and the high energy production mechanism is unknown or unconfirmed in over half of these systems. My goal for this dissertation is to constrain the parameters describing two of these systems: LS 5039 and HD 259440. LS 5039 exhibits gamma-ray emission modulated with its orbital period. The system consists of an ON6.5V((f)) star and an unidentified compact companion. Using optical spectra from the CTIO 1.5m telescope, we found LS 5039 to have an orbital period of 3.90608 d and an eccentricity of 0.337. Spectra of the Halpha line observed with SOAR indicate a mass loss rate of ˜ 1.9x10 -8 M yr-1. Observations taken with ATCA at 13 cm, 6 cm, and 3 cm indicate radio fluxes between 10--40 mJy. The measurements show variability with time, indicating a source other than thermal emission from the stellar wind. HD 259440 is a B0pe star that was proposed as the optical counterpart to the gamma-ray source HESS J0632+057. Using optical spectra from the KPNO CF, KPNO 2.1m, and OHP telescopes, we find a best fit stellar effective temperature of 27500--30000 K, a log surface gravity of 3.75--4.0, a mass of 13.2--19.0 Msolar, and a radius of 6.0--9.6 Rsolar. By fitting the spectral energy distribution, we find a distance between 1.1--1.7 kpc. We do not detect any significant radial velocity shifts in our data, ruling out orbital periods shorter than one month. If HD 259440 is a binary, it is likely a long

  3. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  4. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marisaldi, Martino, E-mail: marisaldi@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, Marco [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Argan, Andrea [INAF, Viale del Parco Mellini 84, 00136 Roma (Italy); Del Monte, Ettore [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Trieste and INFN Trieste, via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Giuliani, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, Via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Trois, Alessio [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, loc. Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

  5. Zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Klaiber, Michael; Keitel, Christoph H

    2007-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in the relativistic regime is employed to obtain zeptosecond pulses of $\\gamma$-rays. The harmonics are generated from atomic systems in counterpropagating strong attosecond laser pulse trains of linear polarization. In this setup recollisions of the ionized electrons can be achieved in the highly relativistic regime via a reversal of the commonly deteriorating drift and without instability of the electron dynamics such as in a standing laser wave. As a result, coherent attosecond $\\gamma$-rays in the 10 MeV energy range as well as coherent zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses of MeV photon energy for time-resolved nuclear spectroscopy become feasible.

  6. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  7. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  8. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  9. PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xin; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from $\\gtrsim$10 MeV to $\\gtrsim$1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating f...

  10. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  11. Modeling Gamma-ray Flares in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yajie; Blandford, R. D.; Simeon, P.

    2013-04-01

    The gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula shows variations on a wide range of time scales, with the most dramatic events being the flares observed by Fermi and AGILE: the flux can increase by a factor of ~10 within ~10 hours; the spectrum is characterized by a peak energy ~300 MeV, while no variation in other wavebands was detected. These variations present a great challenge to particle acceleration mechanisms. We consider two possible explanations of these flares. Firstly, we consider emission from a moving relativistic shock terminating the pulsar wind. Secondly, we treat the pulsar and its wind as a current generator and suppose that the current filaments into individual pinches that can undergo radial collapse and become strongly dissipative when the electric field becomes as strong as the magnetic field and Larmor radius of the highest energy particles becomes comparable with the radius. The application of these models to pulsar wind nebulae and relativistic jets will be outlined.

  12. Novae in gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission (511 keV line and a continuum below this energy, with a cut-off at 20-30 keV). The analysis of gamma-ray spectra and light curves is a potential unique and powerful tool both to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope determining its transparency. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected in some particular novae, in symbiotic binaries, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main ...

  13. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  14. Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

  15. Europe's space camera unmasks a cosmic gamma-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The new-found neutron star is the visible counterpart of a pulsating radio source, Pulsar 1055-52. It is a mere 20 kilometres wide. Although the neutron star is very hot, at about a million degrees C, very little of its radiant energy takes the form of visible light. It emits mainly gamma-rays, an extremely energetic form of radiation. By examining it at visible wavelengths, astronomers hope to figure out why Pulsar 1055-52 is the most efficient generator of gamma-rays known so far, anywhere the Universe. The Faint Object Camera found Pulsar 1055-52 in near ultraviolet light at 3400 angstroms, a little shorter in wavelength than the violet light at the extremity of the human visual range. Roberto Mignani, Patrizia Caraveo and Giovanni Bignami of the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan, Italy, report its optical identification in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters (1 January 1997). The formal name of the object is PSR 1055-52. Evading the glare of an adjacent star The Italian team had tried since 1988 to spot Pulsar 1055-52 with two of the most powerful ground-based optical telescopes in the Southern Hemisphere. These were the 3.6-metre Telescope and the 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope of the European Southern Observatory at La Silla, Chile. Unfortunately an ordinary star 100,000 times brighter lay in almost the same direction in the sky, separated from the neutron star by only a thousandth of a degree. The Earth's atmosphere defocused the star's light sufficiently to mask the glimmer from Pulsar 1055-52. The astronomers therefore needed an instrument in space. The Faint Object Camera offered the best precision and sensitivity to continue the hunt. Devised by European astronomers to complement the American wide field camera in the Hubble Space Telescope, the Faint Object Camera has a relatively narrow field of view. It intensifies the image of a faint object by repeatedly accelerating electrons from photo-electric films, so as to produce

  16. Gamma rays from dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bringmann, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    A leading hypothesis for the nature of the elusive dark matter are thermally produced, weakly interacting massive particles that arise in many theories beyond the standard model of particle physics. Their self-annihilation in astrophysical regions of high density provides a potential means of indirectly detecting dark matter through the annihilation products, which nicely complements direct and collider searches. Here, I review the case of gamma rays which are particularly promising in this respect: distinct and unambiguous spectral signatures would not only allow a clear discrimination from astrophysical backgrounds but also to extract important properties of the dark matter particles; powerful observational facilities like the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope or upcoming large, ground-based Cherenkov telescope arrays will be able to probe a considerable part of the underlying, e.g. supersymmetric, parameter space. I conclude with a more detailed comparison of indirect and direct dark matter searches, showing...

  17. Discovery of VHE gamma-ray emission from the direction of the globular cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W; Brun, F; Eger, P; Jamrozy, M; Dyrda, M; Komin, N; Schwanke, U

    2011-01-01

    Globular clusters are old stellar systems which exhibit very-high stellar densities in their cores. The globular cluster Terzan 5 is characterized by a high stellar encounter rate and hosts the largest detected population of millisecond pulsars. It also features bright GeV gamma-ray emission and extended X-ray radiation. However, no globular clusters have been detected in very-high-energy gamma rays (VHE, E> 100 GeV) so far. In order to investigate this possibility Terzan 5 has been observed with the H.E.S.S. telescope array in this energy band. The discovery of a source of VHE gamma rays from the direction of this globular cluster will be reported. The results of the VHE analysis and a multi-wavelength view of Terzan 5 will be presented in this contribution. No counterpart or model can fully explain the observed morphology of the detected VHE gamma-ray source.

  18. Helios-2 Vela-Ariel-5 gamma-ray burst source position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Trainor, J. H.; Desai, U. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Ricketts, M.; Heluken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of 28 January 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios-2, was also observed with the Vela-5A, -6A and the Ariel-5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios-2 and Vela-5A and -6A with the source region independently found with the Ariel-5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO-A nor any previously catalogued X-ray, radio or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs or high energy gamma-ray sources. The region is however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974, which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  19. Recent findings about the galactic gamma-ray sky by MAGIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzys, Marcel C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The TeV sky currently consists of around 150 sources, about half of them situated within our galaxy. This group comprises various types of cosmic accelerators such as supernova remnants, pulsars, pulsar wind nebula, and binaries. From what we have observed in gamma rays so far, these sources can accelerate particles up to several hundred TeV. In this talk I will present recent results from the observation of galactic gamma-ray sources by MAGIC. This includes, among others, latest findings about the brightest, galactic gamma-ray source in the sky, the Crab nebula, results about one of the rare binary systems at TeV energies, insights into a not yet identified enigmatic source, and the discovery of the, so far, faintest PWN.

  20. All-Sky Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently monitoring the transient hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi. The twelve GBM NaI detectors span 8 keV to 1MeV, while the two GBM BGO detectors span about 150 keV to 40 MeV. With GBM, we detect transient events on multiple timescales. Brief events, such as Gamma Ray Bursts, Solar flares, and magnetar bursts are detected with on-board triggers. On longer timescales, we use the Earth occultation technique to monitor a number of sources, including X-ray binaries, AGN, and solar flaring activity. To date we have detected 7 sources above 100 keV. Transient activity from accretion-powered pulsars is monitored using epoch-folding techniques. With GBM we track the pulsed flux and frequency for a number of pulsars. We will present highlights of GBM observations on various timescales.

  1. DUAL Gamma-Ray Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Boggs, S; von Ballmoos, P; Takahashi, T; Gehrels, N; Tueller, J; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Diehl, R; Greiner, J; Grove, E; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Jean, P; Johnson, N; Kanbach, G; Kippen, M; Knödlseder, J; Leising, M; Madejski, G; McConnell, M; Milne, P; Motohide, K; Nakazawa, K; Oberlack, U; Phlips, B; Ryan, J; Skinner, G; Starrfield, S; Tajima, H; Wulf, E; Zoglauer, A; Zych, A

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. In order to take full advantage of this potential, the next generation of instrumentation for this domain will have to achieve an improvement in sensitivity over present technologies of at least an order of magnitude. The DUAL mission concept takes up this challenge in two complementary ways: a very long observation of the entire sky, combined with a large collection area for simultaneous observations of Type Ia SNe. While the Wide-Field Compton Telescope (WCT) accumulates data from the full gamma-ray sky (0.1-10 MeV) over the entire mission lifetime, the Laue-Lens Telescope (LLT) focuses on 56Co emission from SNe Ia (0.8-0.9 MeV), collecting gamma-rays from its large area crystal lens onto the WCT. Two separated spacecraft flying in formation will maintain the DUAL payloads at the lens' focal distance.

  2. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  3. DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE TRANSITIONAL REDBACK PSR J1227-4853

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Roy, J.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pletsch, H. J.; Fort, S. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Deneva, J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Kerr, M., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: jayanta.roy@manchester.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2015-06-10

    The 1.69 ms spin period of PSR J1227−4853 was recently discovered in radio observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270−4859 following the announcement of a possible transition to a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar state, inferred from decreases in optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray flux from the source. We report the detection of significant (5σ) gamma-ray pulsations after the transition, at the known spin period, using ∼1 year of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve of PSR J1227−4853 can be fit by one broad peak, which occurs at nearly the same phase as the main peak in the 1.4 GHz radio profile. The partial alignment of light-curve peaks in different wavebands suggests that at least some of the radio emission may originate at high altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere, in extended regions co-located with the gamma-ray emission site. We folded the LAT data at the orbital period, both pre- and post-transition, but find no evidence for significant modulation of the gamma-ray flux. Analysis of the gamma-ray flux over the mission suggests an approximate transition time of 2012 November 30. Continued study of the pulsed emission and monitoring of PSR J1227−4853, and other known redback systems, for subsequent flux changes will increase our knowledge of the pulsar emission mechanism and transitioning systems.

  4. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, Francesco

    2012-08-03

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  5. Modifications of a method for low energy gamma-ray incident angle reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Egorov, A. E.; Glushkov, N. A.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Longo, F.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Picozza, P.; Runtso, M. F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zverev, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the gamma-ray fluxes in the energy range from ∼20 MeV to ∼1 TeV, performing a sensitive search for high-energy gamma-ray emission when annihilating or decaying dark matter particles. Such measurements will be also associated with the following scientific goals: searching for new and studying known Galactic and extragalactic discrete high-energy gamma-ray sources (supernova remnants, pulsars, accreting objects, microquasars, active galactic nuclei, blazars, quasars). It will be possible to study their structure with high angular resolution and measuring their energy spectra and luminosity with high-energy resolution; identify discrete gamma-ray sources with known sources in other energy ranges. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolutions for gamma rays above 10 GeV. The gamma-ray telescope angular and energy resolutions for the main aperture at 100-GeV gamma rays are ∼0.01% and ∼1%, respectively. The motivation of presented results is to improve physical characteristics of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope in the energy range of ∼20-100 MeV, most unexplored range today. Such observations are crucial today for a number of high-priority problems faced by modern astrophysics and fundamental physics, including the origin of chemical elements and cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the applicability range of the fundamental laws of physics. To improve the reconstruction accuracy of incident angle for low-energy gamma rays the special analysis of topology of pair-conversion events in thin layers of converter performed. Choosing the pair-conversion events with more precise vertical localization allows us to obtain significantly better angular resolution in comparison with previous and current space and ground-based experiments. For 50-MeV gamma rays the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope angular resolution is better than 50.

  6. Gamma ray sources observation with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, S., E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it [IFSI-INAF, Corso Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Since November 2007 the air shower detector ARGO-YBJ is continuously monitoring the gamma ray sky in the declination band from -10 Degree-Sign to +70 Degree-Sign at energies E>0.5TeV. In this work we present the results of our observations of galactic and extragalactic sources during more than 3 years, focusing our attention on the Crab Nebula, the blazar Mrk 421 and the galactic extended source MGRO J1908+06, probably associated to the Fermi pulsar PSR J1907+0602.

  7. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  8. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  9. Gamma ray observatory productivity showcase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. L.; Molgaard, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) Program has been proclaimed to be the showcase productivity program for NASA and TRW. Among the multiple disciplines of a large-scale program, there is opportunity and need for improved efficiency, effectiveness, and reduction in the cost of doing business. The efforts and tools that will or have been implemented to achieve this end are described. Since the GRO Program is mainly an engineering program with the build of one satellite, the primary emphasis is placed on improving the efficiency and quality of management and engineering.

  10. TeV Gamma Rays from Geminga and the Origin of the GeV Positron Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Yuksel, Hasan; Stanev, Todor

    2008-01-01

    The Geminga pulsar has long been one of the most intriguing MeV-GeV gamma-ray point sources. We examine the implications of the recent Milagro detection of extended, multi-TeV gamma-ray emission from Geminga, finding that this reveals the existence of an ancient, powerful cosmic-ray accelerator that also can plausibly account for the multi-GeV positron excess that has evaded explanation. We explore a number of testable predictions for gamma-ray, electron/positron, and neutrino experiments that can confirm the first direct detection of a cosmic-ray source.

  11. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... the temporal evolution of the gamma-ray magnification for sources moving in a caustic pattern field, where the combined effects of thousands of stars are taken into account using a numerical technique. We propose that some of the unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources (particularly some of those lying at high...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  12. Radio and Gamma-Ray Constraints on the Emission Geometry and Birthplace of PSR J2043+2740

    CERN Document Server

    Noutsos, A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Drell, P S; Dumora, D; Espinoza, C M; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grandi, P; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knoedlseder, J; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Lyne, A G; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Persic, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vilchez, N; Villata, M; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ziegler, M

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first year of Fermi gamma-ray observations of pulsed high-energy emission from the old PSR J2043+2740. The study of the gamma-ray efficiency of such old pulsars gives us an insight into the evolution of pulsars' ability to emit in gammma rays as they age. The gamma-ray lightcurve of this pulsar above 0.1 GeV is clearly defined by two sharp peaks, 0.353+/-0.035 periods apart. We have combined the gamma-ray profile characteristics of PSR J2043+2740 with the geometrical properties of the pulsar's radio emission, derived from radio polarization data, and constrained the pulsar-beam geometry in the framework of a Two Pole Caustic and an Outer Gap model. The ranges of magnetic inclination and viewing angle were determined to be {alpha,zeta}~{52-57,61-68} for the Two Pole Caustic model, and {alpha,zeta}~{62-73,74-81} and {alpha,zeta}~{72-83,60-75} for the Outer Gap model. Based on this geometry, we assess possible birth locations for this pulsar and derive a likely proper motion, sufficiently high t...

  13. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  14. Beyond the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Xian; Reposeur, Thierry; Rousseau, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Over thirteen times more gamma-ray pulsars have now been studied with the Large Area Telescope on NASA's Fermi satellite than the ten seen with the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the nineteen-nineties. The large sample is diverse, allowing better understanding both of the pulsars themselves and of their roles in various cosmic processes. Here we explore the prospects for even more gamma-ray pulsars as Fermi enters the 2nd half of its nominal ten-year mission. New pulsars will naturally tend to be fainter than the first ones discovered. Some of them will have unusual characteristics compared to the current population, which may help discriminate between models. We illustrate a vision of the future with a sample of six pulsars discovered after the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog was written.

  15. Magnetars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, evidences for a long-lived and sustained engine in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have increased the attention to the so called millisecond-magnetar model, as a competitive alternative to the standard collapsar scenario. I will review here the key aspects of the {\\it millisecond magnetar} model for Long Duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs). I will briefly describe what constraints, present observations put on any engine model, both in term of energetic, outflow properties, and the relation with the associated Supernova (SN). For each of these I will show how the millisecond magnetar model satisfies the requirements, what are the limits of the model, how can it be further tested, and what observations might be used to discriminate against it. I will also discuss numerical results that show the importance of the confinement by the progenitor star in explaining the formation of a collimated outflow, how a detailed model for the evolution of the central engine can be built, and show that a wide varie...

  16. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  17. The e-ASTROGAM gamma-ray space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatischeff, V.; Tavani, M.; von Ballmoos, P.; Hanlon, L.; Oberlack, U.; Aboudan, A.; Argan, A.; Bernard, D.; Brogna, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Bykov, A.; Campana, R.; Caraveo, P.; Cardillo, M.; Coppi, P.; De Angelis, A.; Diehl, R.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Giuliani, A.; Grenier, I.; Grove, J. E.; Hamadache, C.; Hartmann, D.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Kanbach, G.; Kiener, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Labanti, C.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Mereghetti, S.; Mirabel, F.; Morselli, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Peyré, J.; Piano, G.; Pittori, C.; Sabatini, S.; Stawarz, L.; Thompson, D. J.; Ulyanov, A.; Walter, R.; Wu, X.; Zdziarski, A.; Zoglauer, A.

    2016-07-01

    e-ASTROGAM is a gamma-ray space mission to be proposed as the M5 Medium-size mission of the European Space Agency. It is dedicated to the observation of the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity in the energy range 0.2 { 100 MeV, extending up to GeV energies, together with a groundbreaking polarization capability. It is designed to substantially improve the COMPTEL and Fermi sensitivities in the MeV-GeV energy range and to open new windows of opportunity for astrophysical and fundamental physics space research. e-ASTROGAM will operate as an open astronomical observatory, with a core science focused on (1) the activity from extreme particle accelerators, including gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei and the link of jet astrophysics to the new astronomy of gravitational waves, neutrinos, ultra-high energy cosmic rays, (2) the high-energy mysteries of the Galactic center and inner Galaxy, including the activity of the supermassive black hole, the Fermi Bubbles, the origin of the Galactic positrons, and the search for dark matter signatures in a new energy window; (3) nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution, including the life cycle of elements produced by supernovae in the Milky Way and the Local Group of galaxies. e-ASTROGAM will be ideal for the study of high-energy sources in general, including pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae, accreting neutron stars and black holes, novae, supernova remnants, and magnetars. And it will also provide important contributions to solar and terrestrial physics. The e-ASTROGAM telescope is optimized for the simultaneous detection of Compton and pair-producing gamma-ray events over a large spectral band. It is based on a very high technology readiness level for all subsystems and includes many innovative features for the detectors and associated electronics.

  18. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of a population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of gigaelectronvolts from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as super-symmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  19. Pulsar Polar Cap and Slot Gap Models: Confronting Fermi Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. I will review acceleration and gamma-ray emission from the pulsar polar cap and slot gap. Predictions of these models can be tested with the data set on pulsars collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope over the last four years, using both detailed light curve fitting and population synthesis.

  20. Origin of $\\gamma$ Ray Bursters

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    1999-01-01

    The successful discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows of GRB hasmade possible the identification of host galaxies at cosmological distances.The energy release inferred in these outbursts place them among the mostenergetic and violent events in the Universe. They are thought to be theoutcome of a cataclysmic stellar collapse or compact stellar merger, leading toa relativistically expanding fireball, in which particles are accelerated atshocks and produce nonthermal radiation. The substantial agreement betweenobservations and the theoretical predictions of the fireball shock modelprovide confirmation of the basic aspects of this scenario. Among recent issuesare the collimation of the outflow and its implications for the energetics, theproduction of prompt bright flashes at wavelenghts much longer than gamma-rays,the time structure of the afterglow, its dependence on the central engine orprogenitor system behavior, and the role of the environment on the afterglow.

  1. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  2. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  3. Gamma ray spectroscopy with PPM resolving power

    CERN Document Server

    Börner, H; Mutti, P

    2002-01-01

    Applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy with ppm resolving power are presented. The extraordinary resolution allows via the Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening (GRID) technique to determine lifetimes of excited nuclear levels. This has contributed to important nuclear structure information. We report on the current status of the technique

  4. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  5. Gamma ray astronomy from satellites and balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of gamma ray astronomy topics presented at the Cosmic Ray Conference. The major conclusions at the Cosmic Ray Conference in the field of gamma ray astronomy are given. (1) MeV-emission of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. Variations in duration and energy spectra from burst to burst may explain the discrepancy between the measured log N - log S dependence and the observed isotropy of bursts. (2) The gamma-ray line at 1.809 MeV from Al(26) is the first detected line from a radioactive nucleosynthesis product. In order to understand its origin it will be necessary to measure its longitude distribution in the Milky Way. (3) The indications of a gamma-ray excess found from the direction of Loop I is consistent with the picture that the bulk of cosmic rays below 100 GeV is produced in galactic supernova remnants. (4) The interpretation of the large scale distribution of gamma rays in the Milky Way is controversial. At present an extragalactic origin of the cosmic ray nuclei in the GeV-range cannot be excluded from the gamma ray data. (5) The detection of MeV-emission from Cen A is a promising step towards the interesting field of extragalactic gamma ray astronomy.

  6. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  7. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  8. CANGAROO-III observation of TeV gamma rays from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518

    CERN Document Server

    Mizukami, T; Yoshida, T; Nakamori, T; Enomoto, R; Tanimori, T; Akimoto, M; Bicknell, G V; Clay, R W; Edwards, P G; Gunji, S; Hara, S; Hara, T; Hayashi, S; Ishioka, H; Kabuki, S; Kajino, F; Katagiri, H; Kawachi, A; Kifune, T; Kiuchi, R; Kunisawa, T; Kushida, J; Matoba, T; Matsubara, Y; Matsuzawa, I; Mizumura, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Mori, M; Muraishi, H; Naito, T; Nakayama, K; Nishijima, K; Ohishi, M; Otake, Y; Ryoki, S; Saito, K; Sakamoto, Y; Stamatescu, V; Suzuki, T; Swaby, D L; Thornton, G; Tokanai, F; Toyota, Y; Tsuchiya, K; Yanagita, S; Yokoe, Y; Yoshikoshi, T; Yukawa, Y

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection, with the CANGAROO-III imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, of a very high energy gamma-ray signal from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518, which was discovered in the H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey. Diffuse gamma-ray emission was detected above 760 GeV at the 8.9 sigma level during an effective exposure of 54 hr from 2008 May to August. The spectrum can be represented by a power-law: 8.2+-2.2_{stat}+-2.5_{sys}x10^{-12}x (E/1TeV)^{-Gamma} cm^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1} with a photon index Gamma of 2.4+-0.3_{stat}+-0.2_{sys}, which is compatible with that of the H.E.S.S. observations. By combining our result with multi-wavelength data, we discuss the possible counterparts for HESS J1614-518 and consider radiation mechanisms based on hadronic and leptonic processes for a supernova remnant, stellar winds from massive stars, and a pulsar wind nebula. Although a leptonic origin from a pulsar wind nebula driven by an unknown pulsar remains possible, hadronic-origin emission ...

  9. Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

  10. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  11. Fermi-LAT confirmation of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis confirms the recent enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula detected by AGILE (ATel #9586). The daily-averaged gamma-ray fluxes (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula were (4.8 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Sep 30), (3.3 +/- 0.4) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 1), and (4.5 +/- 0.5) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 (Oct 2). These are up to a factor of ~1.8 greater than the average gamma-ray flux of (2.71 +/- 0.02) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). All fluxes given are the sums of the pulsar and nebular emission, and with statistical uncertainties only.

  12. Disrupted Globular Clusters Can Explain the Galactic Center Gamma Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi satellite has recently detected gamma ray emission from the central regions of our Galaxy. This may be evidence for dark matter particles, a major component of the standard cosmological model, annihilating to produce high-energy photons. We show that the observed signal may instead be generated by millisecond pulsars that formed in dense star clusters in the Galactic halo. Most of these clusters were ultimately disrupted by evaporation and gravitational tides, contributing to a spherical bulge of stars and stellar remnants. The gamma ray amplitude, angular distribution, and spectral signatures of this source may be predicted without free parameters, and are in remarkable agreement with the observations. These gamma rays are from fossil remains of dispersed clusters, telling the history of the Galactic bulge.

  13. DISRUPTED GLOBULAR CLUSTERS CAN EXPLAIN THE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY EXCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Kocsis, Bence [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Dr., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-10

    The Fermi satellite has recently detected gamma-ray emission from the central regions of our Galaxy. This may be evidence for dark matter particles, a major component of the standard cosmological model, annihilating to produce high-energy photons. We show that the observed signal may instead be generated by millisecond pulsars that formed in dense star clusters in the Galactic halo. Most of these clusters were ultimately disrupted by evaporation and gravitational tides, contributing to a spherical bulge of stars and stellar remnants. The gamma-ray amplitude, angular distribution, and spectral signatures of this source may be predicted without free parameters, and are in remarkable agreement with the observations. These gamma-rays are from fossil remains of dispersed clusters, telling the history of the Galactic bulge.

  14. VHE Gamma-rays from Galactic X-ray Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M

    2008-01-01

    The detection of TeV gamma-rays from LS 5039 and the binary pulsar PSR B1259-63 by HESS, and from LS I +61 303 and the stellar-mass black hole Cygnus X-1 by MAGIC, provides a clear evidence of very efficient acceleration of particles to multi-TeV energies in X-ray binaries. These observations demonstrate the richness of non-thermal phenomena in compact galactic objects containing relativistic outflows or winds produced near black holes and neutron stars. I review here some of the main observational results on very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from X-ray binaries, as well as some of the proposed scenarios to explain the production of VHE gamma-rays. I put special emphasis on the flare TeV emission, suggesting that the flaring activity might be a common phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  15. Bursts of the Crab Nebula gamma-ray emission at high and ultra-high energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidvansky A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the flares of gamma rays detected from the Crab Nebula by the AGILE and Fermi-LAT satellite instruments are compared with those of a gamma ray burst recorded by several air shower arrays on February 23, 1989 and with one recent observation made by the ARGO-YBJ array. It is demonstrated that though pulsar-periodicity and energy spectra of emissions at 100 MeV (satellite gamma ray telescopes and 100 TeV (EAS arrays are different, their time structures seem to be similar. Moreover, maybe the difference between “flares” and “waves” recently found in the Crab Nebula emission by the AGILE team also exists at ultra-high energies.

  16. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, Milan; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASI, Rome /NRAO, Charlottesville /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2011-11-30

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 {+-} 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 {+-} 3 {+-} 11) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE{sup -{Gamma}}e{sup (-E/E{sub c})} where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is {Gamma} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E{sub c} = 2.4 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is < 10% of the pulsed emission at the 95% confidence level. Radio polarization measurements yield a rotation measure of RM = 524 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  17. Characterization of the Inner Knot of the Crab: the Site of the Gamma-ray Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing recent discoveries has been the detection of powerful gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. Such events, with a recurrence time of about once per year, can be so dramatic to make the system the brightest source in the gamma-ray sky as occurred, e.g. in April 2011. These flares challenge our understanding of how pulsar wind nebulae work and defy current astrophysical models for particle acceleration. We present here our study of the inner knot located within a fraction of an arcsecond from the pulsar with the aim of characterizing the feature and asking if this might be the site of the origin of the gamma-ray flares. We took data using Keck, HST, and Chandra obtained as part of our multi-wavelength campaign to identify the source of the enigmatic flares. We set an upper limit as to the gamma-ray flux from the knot. We also find that the dimensions, surface brightness, flux, etc. of the optical and infrared knot are all correlated with distance from the pulsar. This distance, in turn, varies with time. In addition to this most thorough characterization of the inner knot's properties, we examine the hypothesis that the knot may be the site of the flares by examining the knot separation versus the Fermi/LAT gamma-ray flux. Finally, as part of this research, we make use of a new approach employing singular value decomposition (SVD) for analyzing time series of images and compare the approach to more traditional methods. Our conclusions are only refined but not impacted by using the new approach.

  18. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  19. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  20. Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, Andrew; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, ii) parameters derived from modeling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous an...

  1. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  2. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  3. Atmospheric Cherenkov Gamma-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    The stereoscopic imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique, developed in the 1980s and 1990s, is now used by a number of existing and planned gamma-ray observatories around the world. It provides the most sensitive view of the very high energy gamma-ray sky (above 30 GeV), coupled with relatively good angular and spectral resolution over a wide field-of-view. This Chapter summarizes the details of the technique, including descriptions of the telescope optical systems and cameras, as well as the most common approaches to data analysis and gamma-ray reconstruction.

  4. The exceptionally powerful TeV gamma-ray emitters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker-Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; de Wilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; ling, M Füß; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Sahakian, C B Rulten V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2015-01-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, has been observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) above an energy of 100 billion electron volts for a deep exposure of 210 hours. Three sources of different types were detected: the pulsar wind nebula of the most energetic pulsar known N 157B, the radio-loud supernova remnant N 132D and the largest non-thermal X-ray shell - the superbubble 30 Dor C. The unique object SN 1987A is, surprisingly, not detected, which constrains the theoretical framework of particle acceleration in very young supernova remnants. These detections reveal the most energetic tip of a gamma-ray source population in an external galaxy, and provide via 30 Dor C the unambiguous detection of gamma-ray emission from a superbubble.

  5. CHANDRA, KECK, AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA DURING THE 2011-APRIL GAMMA-RAY FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O' Dell, Stephen L. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Office (ZP12), Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Arons, Jonathan [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blandford, Roger; Funk, Stefan; Romani, Roger W. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Buehler, Rolf [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Caraveo, Patrizia; De Luca, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cheung, Chi C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Costa, Enrico [INFN Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ferrigno, Carlo [ISDC, Data Center for Astrophysics of the University of Geneva, chemin d' cogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Habermehl, Moritz; Horns, Dieter [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Linford, Justin D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Lobanov, Andrei [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Max, Claire [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Mignani, Roberto [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-03-01

    We present results from our analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) images of the Crab Nebula that were contemporaneous with the {gamma}-ray flare of 2011 April. Despite hints in the X-ray data, we find no evidence for statistically significant variations that pinpoint the specific location of the flares within the Nebula. The Keck observations extend this conclusion to the 'inner knot', i.e., the feature within an arcsecond of the pulsar. The VLA observations support this conclusion. We also discuss theoretical implications of the {gamma}-ray flares and suggest that the most dramatic {gamma}-ray flares are due to radiation-reaction-limited synchrotron emission associated with sudden, dissipative changes in the current system sustained by the central pulsar.

  6. Demystifying an unidentified EGRET source by VHE gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, O; Reimer, Olaf; Funk, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    In a novel approach in observational high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, observations carried out by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide necessary templates to pinpoint the nature of intriguing, yet unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources. Using GeV-photons detected by CGRO EGRET and taking advantage of high spatial resolution images from H.E.S.S. observations, we were able to shed new light on the EGRET observed gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex, whose previous coverage in the literature is somewhat contradictory. 3EGJ1420-6038 very likely accounts for two GeV gamma-ray sources (E>1 GeV), both in positional coincidence with the recently reported pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) by HESS in the Kookaburra/Rabbit complex. PWN associations at VHE energies, supported by accumulating evidence from observations in the radio and X-ray band, are indicative for the PSR/plerionic origin of spatially coincident, but still unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources from EGRET. This not only supports the already s...

  7. The star forming region Monoceros R2 as a gamma-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J; Sánchez-Ayaso, Estrella; Munar-Adrover, Pere; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R; Romero, Gustavo E; Paredes, Josep M; Combi, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Context. After the release of the gamma-ray source catalog produced by the Fermi satellite during its first two years of operation, a significant fraction of sources still remain unassociated at lower energies. In addition to well-known high-energy emitters (pulsars, blazars, supernova remnants, etc.) theoretical expectations predict new classes of gamma-ray sources. In particular, gamma-ray emission could be associated with some of the early phases of stellar evolution, but this interesting possibility is still poorly understood. Aims. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibility of the Fermi gamma-ray source 2FGL J0607.5-0618c being associated with the massive star forming region Monoceros R2. Methods. A multi-wavelength analysis of the Monoceros R2 region is carried out using archival data at radio, infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths. The resulting observational properties are used to estimate the physical parameters needed to test the different physical scenarios. Results. We confirm the 2FG...

  8. Observations with the High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) telescope array in the Indian Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, R. J.; Acharya, B. S.; Anupama, G. C.; Bhatt, N.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Chitnis, V. R.; Cowsik, R.; Dorji, N.; Duhan, S. K.; Gothe, K. S.; Kamath, P. U.; Koul, R.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mitra, A.; Nagesh, B. K.; Parmar, N. K.; Prabhu, T. P.; Rannot, R. C.; Rao, S. K.; Saha, L.; Saleem, F.; Saxena, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Shukla, A.; Singh, B. B.; Srinivasan, R.; Srinivasulu, G.; Sudersanan, P. V.; Tickoo, A. K.; Tsewang, D.; Upadhya, S.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yadav, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    For several decades, it was thought that astrophysical sources emit high energy photons within the energy range of the gamma-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum also. These photons originate from interactions of high energy particles from sources involving violent phenomena in the Universe (supernovae, pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei, etc.) with gas and radiation fields. Since the first reliable detections of cosmic gamma rays in the 1970's, improvements in instrumentation have led gamma-ray astronomy to an established branch of modern Astrophysics, with a constant increase in the number of detected sources. But the 30-300 GeV energy range remained sparsely explored until the launch of the Fermi space telescope in June 2008. The ground-based gamma-ray telescope array HAGAR is the first array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes established at a so high altitude (4270 m a.s.l.), and was designed to reach a relatively low energy threshold with quite a low mirror area (31 m^2). It is located at Hanle in India, in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas. Regular source observations have begun with the complete setup of 7 telescopes on Sept. 2008. We report and discuss our estimation of the systematics through dark region studies, and present preliminary results from gamma-ray sources in this paper.

  9. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  10. Supernova remnants and gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Combi, J A; Butt, Y M; Torres, Diego F.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Dame, Thomas M.; Combi, Jorge A.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the possible relationship between $\\gamma$-ray sources and supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the observational status of the problem of cosmic ray acceleration at SNR shock fronts. All positional coincidences between SNRs and unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources listed in the Third EGRET Catalog at low Galactic latitudes are discussed on a case by case basis. For several coincidences of particular interest, new CO(J=1-0) and radio continuum maps are shown, and the mass content of the SNR surroundings is determined. The contribution to the $\\gamma$-ray flux observed that might come from cosmic ray particles (particularly nuclei) locally accelerated at the SNR shock fronts is evaluated. We discuss the prospects for future research in this field and remark on the possibilities for observations with forthcoming $\\gamma$-ray instruments.

  11. Zapping Mars Rocks with Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-12-01

    Because we do not know what deadly microorganisms might be lurking inside samples returned from Mars, the samples will either have to be sterilized before release or kept in isolation until biological studies declare them safe. One way to execute microorganisms is with radiation, such as gamma rays. Although quite effective in snuffing out bacteria and viruses, gamma rays might also affect the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of the zapped rocks and soils. Carl Allen (Lockheed Martin Space Operations, Houston) and a team of 18 other analysts tested the effect of gamma rays on rock and mineral samples like those we expect on Mars. Except for some darkening of some minerals, high doses of gamma rays had no significant effect on the rocks, making gamma radiation a feasible option for sterilizing samples returned from Mars.

  12. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

  13. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  14. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J; Aharonian, F; Ajello, M; Balasz, L G; Barbiellini, G; Bellazzini, R; Bishop, S; Bisnovatij-Kogan, G S; Boggs, S; Bykov, A; DiCocco, G; Diehl, R; Elsässer, D; Foley, S; Fransson, C; Gehrels, N; Hanlon, L; Hartmann, D; Hermsen, W; Hillebrandt, W; Hudec, R; Iyudin, A; Jose, J; Kadler, M; Kanbach, G; Klamra, W; Kiener, J; Klose, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kuiper, L M; Kylafis, N; Labanti, C; Langanke, K; Langer, N; Larsson, S; Leibundgut, B; Laux, U; Longo, F; Maeda, K; Marcinkowski, R; Marisaldi, M; McBreen, B; McBreen, S; Meszaros, A; Nomoto, K; Pearce, M; Peer, A; Pian, E; Prantzos, N; Raffelt, G; Reimer, O; Rhode, W; Ryde, F; Schmidt, C; Silk, J; Shustov, B M; Strong, A; Tanvir, N; Thielemann, F -K; Tibolla, O; Tierney, D; Trümper, J; Varshalovich, D A; Wilms, J; Wrochna, G; Zdziarski, A; Zoglauer, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. G...

  15. Polarization measurements of proton capture gamma rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suffert, M.; Endt, P.M.; Hoogenboom, A.M.

    1959-01-01

    The linear polarization has been measured of eight different gamma rays of widely differing energies (Eγ = 0.8 - 8.0 MeV) emitted at resonances in the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al, 30Si(p, γ)31P, and 32S(p, γ)33Cl reactions. The gamma rays emitted at 90° to the proton beam were Compton scattered in a 2″ NaI scint

  16. Soft gamma rays from heavy WIMPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Manuel Ernst; Opferkuch, Toby; Staub, Florian; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    We propose an explanation of the galactic center gamma ray excess by supersymmetric WIMPs as heavy as 500 GeV. The lightest neutralino annihilates into vector-like leptons or quarks which cascade decay through intermediate Higgs bosons. Due to the long decay chains, the gamma ray spectrum is much softer than naively expected and peaks at GeV energies. The model predicts correlated diboson and dijet signatures to be tested at the LHC.

  17. The nature of plerions surrounding soft gamma-ray repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    1995-01-01

    Compact steady sources of X-ray emission have been detected at the positions of at least two soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). These sources have been interpreted as synchrotron nebulae powered by the neutron star that is causing the bursts. We explore a plerion model for the sources surrounding SGRs where the steady observed emission is powered by the SGR bursts rather than by the spin-down of a pulsar. In this case there is no limit on the neutron star magnetic field. We find that the synchrotron lifetime of the particles injected into the plerion around SGR1806-20 is long enough to smear out nebular emission from individual bursts. Transient nebular emission would therefore not be detected following an SGR burst. The combined radio emission from multiple burst injections is expected to have a steeper spectrum than that of a typical plerion.

  18. Status of Identification of VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    With the recent advances made by Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. the field of very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray astronomy has recently entered a new era in which for the first time populations of Galactic sources such as e.g. Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) or Supernova remnants (SNRs) can be studied. However, while some of the new sources can be associated by positional coincidence as well as by consistent multi-wavelength data to a known counterpart at other wavelengths, most of the sources remain not finally identified. In the following, the population of Galactic H.E.S.S. sources will be used to demonstrate the status of the identifications, to classify them into categories according to this status and to point out outstanding problems.

  19. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  20. Supernova Remnants and Plerions in the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory Era

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C; Jager, Ocker C. de; Baring, Matthew G.

    1997-01-01

    Due to observations made by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory over the last six years, it appears that a number of galactic supernova remnants may be candidates for sources of cosmic gamma-rays. These include shell-type remnants such as IC443 and $\\gamma$ Cygni, which have no known parent pulsars, but have significant associations with unidentified EGRET sources, and others that appear to be composite, where a pulsar is embedded in a shell (e.g. W44 and Vela), or are purely pulsar-driven, such as the Crab Nebula. This review discusses our present understanding of gamma-ray production in plerionic and non-plerionic supernova remnants, and explores the relationship between such emission and that in other wavebands. Focuses include models of the Crab and Vela nebulae, the composite nature of W44, the relationship of shell-type remnants to cosmic ray production, the relative importance of shock-accelerated protons and electrons, constraints on models placed by TeV, X-ray and radio observations, and the role of el...

  1. COS-B observations of localized sources of gamma-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    In October 1975, the high-energy gamma-ray flux from the Vela pulsar measured by COS-B was found to be 1.6 to 2.1 times higher than the flux measured by SAS-2 in 1973. This factor is too large to be accounted for by error in the COS-B calibration or analysis. This is supported by a comparison of the COS-B measurement of the narrow-line component from the galactic center region with the flux derived from the measurements of SAS-2; the COS-B flux comes out about 15 percent lower than the SAS-2 figure. It is interesting to note that a glitch in the pulsar period took place about 1 month prior to the COS-B observation; the previous glitch occurred about 1.5 years before the SAS-2 observation. The increased rotational energy loss after the glitch cannot simply explain the increased gamma-ray luminosity. If the two phenomena are related, the gamma-ray emission, absorption, or beaming process must be extremely sensitive to changes in rotational parameters. The existence is confirmed of a second region of enhanced radiation in the galactic anticenter in addition to that from the Crab pulsar.

  2. CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF FERMI LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES FROM THE 3FGL CATALOG USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Falcone, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies.

  3. Classification and Ranking of Fermi LAT Gamma-ray Sources from the 3FGL Catalog using Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H.; Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M.; Falcone, A. D.

    2016-03-01

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies.

  4. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  5. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  6. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles...... are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. While Fermi will take......, albeit at much more modest sensitivities. There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Lane diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques...

  7. The Infrared-Gamma-Ray Connection: A WISE View of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the WISE all-sky survey we discovered that the non-thermal infrared (IR) emission of blazars, the largest known population of extragalactic gamma-ray sources, has peculiar spectral properties. In this work, we confirm and strengthen our previous analyses using the latest available releases of both the WISE and the Fermi source catalogs. We also show that there is a tight correlation between the mid-IR colors and the gamma-ray spectral index of Fermi blazars. We name this correlation "the infrared--gamma-ray connection". We discuss how this connection links both the emitted powers and the spectral shapes of particles accelerated in jets arising from blazars over ten decades in energy. Based on this evidence, we argue that the infrared--gamma-ray connection is stronger than the well known radio--gamma-ray connection.

  8. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  9. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, D

    2016-01-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately $10^{11}$ eV and $10^{13}$ eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as $\\approx 10^{-13}$ erg\\,cm$^{-2}\\,$s$^{-1}$. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudo-scalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarised briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  10. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  11. Gamma-ray limits on neutrino lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.; Weniger, Christoph [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik,Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam, Netherland (Netherlands)

    2016-05-23

    Monochromatic neutrinos from dark matter annihilations (χχ→νν-bar) are always produced in association with a gamma-ray spectrum generated by electroweak bremsstrahlung. Consequently, these neutrino lines can be searched for not only with neutrino detectors but also indirectly with gamma-ray telescopes. Here, we derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section into neutrinos based on recent Fermi-LAT and HESS data. We find that, for dark matter masses above 200 GeV, gamma-ray data actually set the most stringent constraints on neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and, therefore, an upper bound on the dark matter total annihilation cross section. In addition, we point out that gamma-ray telescopes, unlike neutrino detectors, have the potential to distinguish the flavor of the final state neutrino. Our results indicate that we have already entered into a new era where gamma-ray telescopes are more sensitive than neutrino detectors to neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation.

  12. A blind search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts of fast radio bursts with Fermi-LAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kawanaka, Norita

    2016-08-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a mysterious flash phenomenon detected in radio wavelengths with a duration of only a few milliseconds, and they may also have prompted gamma-ray flashes. Here, we carry out a blind search for ms-duration gamma-ray flashes using the 7-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope all-sky gamma-ray data. About 100 flash candidates are detected, but after removing those associated with bright steady point sources, we find no flash events at high Galactic latitude region (|b| > 20°). Events at lower latitude regions are consistent with statistical flukes originating from the diffuse gamma-ray background. From these results, we place an upper limit on the GeV gamma-ray to radio flux ratio of FRBs as ξ ≡ (νLν)γ/(νLν)radio ≲ (4.2-12) × 107, depending on the assumed FRB rate evolution index β = 0-4 [cosmic FRB rate ΦFRB ∝ (1 + z)β]. This limit is comparable with the largest value found for pulsars, though ξ of pulsars is distributed in a wide range. We also compare this limit with the spectral energy distribution of the 2004 giant flare of the magnetar SGR 1806-20.

  13. A Blind Search for Prompt Gamma-ray Counterparts of Fast Radio Bursts with Fermi-LAT Data

    CERN Document Server

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Kawanaka, Norita

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a mysterious flash phenomenon detected in radio wavelengths with a duration of only a few milliseconds, and they may also have prompt gamma-ray flashes. Here we carry out a blind search for msec-duration gamma-ray flashes using the 7-year Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) all-sky gamma-ray data. About 100 flash candidates are detected, but after removing those associated with bright steady point sources, we find no flash events at high Galactic latitude region (|b|>20 deg). Events at lower latitude regions are consistent with statistical flukes originating from the diffuse gamma-ray background. From these results, we place an upper limit on the GeV gamma-ray to radio flux ratio of FRBs as xi \\equiv (nu L_nu)_gamma / (nu L_nu)_radio < 10^8, depending on the assumed FRB rate evolution. This limit is comparable with the largest value found for pulsars, though xi of pulsars is distributed in a wide range. We also compare this limit with the spectral energy distribution of the ...

  14. No-Hair Theorem for Weak Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that there exists a class of pulsars, called weak pulsars, for which the large-scale magnetosphere, and hence the gamma-ray emission, are independent of the detailed pattern of plasma production. The weak pulsar magnetosphere and its gamma-ray emission are uniquely determined by just three parameters: spin, dipole, and the spin-dipole angle. We calculate this supposedly unique pulsar magnetosphere in the axisymmetric case. The magnetosphere is found to be very close to (although interestingly not fully identical with) the magnetosphere we have previously calculated, explaining the phenomenological success of the old calculation. We offer only a highly tentative proof of this "Pulsar No-Hair Theorem". Our analytics, while convincing in its non-triviality, is incomplete, and counts only as a plausibility argument. Our numerics, while complete, is dubious. The plasma flow in the weak pulsar magnetosphere turns out to be even more intricate than what we have previously proposed: some particles, aft...

  15. TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ribó, M

    2008-01-01

    The window of TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics was opened less than two decades ago, when the Crab Nebula was detected for the first time. After several years of development, the technique used by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like HESS, MAGIC or VERITAS, is now allowing to conduct sensitive observations in the TeV regime. Water Cherenkov instruments like Milagro are also providing the first results after years of integration time. Different types of extragalactic and galactic sources have been detected, showing a variety of interesting phenomena that are boosting theory in very high energy gamma-ray astrophysics. Here I review some of the most interesting results obtained up to now, making special emphasis in the field of X-ray/gamma-ray binaries.

  16. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  17. Gamma-Ray Imaging for Explosives Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    deNolfo, G. A.; Hunter, S. D.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a gamma-ray imaging camera (GIC) for active interrogation of explosives being developed by NASA/GSFC and NSWCICarderock. The GIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approx.0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of gamma rays, E, > 6 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the electron-positron pair resulting from interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The optimization of the 3-DTI technology for this specific application and the performance of the GIC from laboratory tests is presented.

  18. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  19. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  20. Modelling the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries using numerical relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dubus, Guillaume; Fromang, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Detailed modeling of the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries has been propounded as a path to pulsar wind physics. Fulfilling this ambition requires a coherent model of the flow and its emission in the region where the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind of its companion. We developed a code that follows the evolution and emission of electrons in the shocked pulsar wind based on inputs from a relativistic hydrodynamical simulation. The code is used to model the well-documented spectral energy distribution and orbital modulations from LS 5039. The pulsar wind is fully confined by a bow shock and a back shock. The particles are distributed into a narrow Maxwellian, emitting mostly GeV photons, and a power law radiating very efficiently over a broad energy range from X-rays to TeV gamma rays. Most of the emission arises from the apex of the bow shock. Doppler boosting shapes the X-ray and VHE lightcurves, constraining the system inclination to $i\\approx 35^{\\rm o}$. There is a tension between th...

  1. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  2. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  3. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  5. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  6. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  7. Relativistic feedback models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic feedback discharges, also known as dark lightning, are capable of explaining many of the observed properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and gamma-ray glows, both created within thunderstorms. During relativistic feedback discharges, the generation of energetic electrons is self-sustained via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays, resulting in very larges fluxes of energetic radiation. In addition, ionization produces large electric currents that generate LF/VLF radio emissions and eventually discharge the electric field, terminating the gamma-ray production. In this presentation, new relativistic feedback model results will be presented and compared to recent observations.

  8. Electrodynamics of pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  9. Exploring Galactic TeV {gamma}-ray sources with H.E.S.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eger, Peter A., E-mail: peter.eger@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Physikalisches Institut, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-11

    The H.E.S.S. array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes continues to observe the southern sky with unprecedented sensitivity at very-high-energy (VHE, E>100GeV){gamma}-rays. This leads to a steady increase in the number of detected VHE {gamma}-ray sources as well as the discovery of sources with fluxes even below 1% of the flux of the Crab nebula. Up to now, well more than 100 VHE {gamma}-ray sources are known, which allow to study not only individual objects, but also whole populations of source classes, such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs). This paper focuses on Galactic sources, highlighting some aspects of the recent progress in this field. After discussing the general status and the future of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane survey, four individual sources related to recent discoveries are presented in detail in this contribution: (a) the PWNe HESS J1825-137 and HESS J1303-631 which show intriguing energy-dependent morphologies, (b) the formerly unidentified source HESS J1626-490 which is most likely associated to a molecular cloud illuminated with hadronic cosmic rays by a nearby SNR, and (c) Terzan 5 which is the first Galactic globular cluster that features a VHE {gamma}-ray source in direct vicinity.

  10. Imaging the Crab nebula when it is flaring in gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    One of the most intriguing results of the gamma-ray instruments currently in orbit has been the detection of powerful flares from the Crab Nebula. Such events, with a recurrence time of about once per year, can be so dramatic to make the system the brightest source in the gamma-ray sky, as it occurred in April 2011. Such a discovery challenges our understanding of how pulsar wind nebulae work and defies current astrophysical models for particle acceleration. With the aim of locating the site(s) of the flares, an ad hoc HST strategy have been put in place to be prepared and react promptly in case of a new brightening in gamma rays. We ask here for a triggered TOO observation of the Crab Nebula with ACS/WFC in case a gamma-ray flare is announced by the Agile and/or the Fermi missions. This TOO is crucial part of a multiwavelength program that we have organized, based on lessons learnt from our follow-up observations of previous flares, including a regular (quarterly) monitoring of the source both in X-rays and optical through a joint Chandra-HST proposal.

  11. Detection of Extended VHE Gamma Ray Emission from G106.3+2.7 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Ergin, T; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Gotthelf, E V; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B; 10.1088/0004-637X/703/1/L6

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant (SNR) G106.3+2.7. Observations performed in 2008 with the VERITAS atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope resolve extended emission overlapping the elongated radio SNR. The 7.3 sigma (pre-trials) detection has a full angular extent of roughly 0.6deg by 0.4deg. Most notably, the centroid of the VHE emission is centered near the peak of the coincident 12CO (J = 1-0) emission, 0.4deg away from the pulsar PSR J2229+6114, situated at the northern end of the SNR. Evidently the current-epoch particles from the pulsar wind nebula are not participating in the gamma-ray production. The VHE energy spectrum measured with VERITAS is well characterized by a power law dN/dE = N_0(E/3 TeV)^{-G} with a differential index of G = 2.29 +/- 0.33stat +/- 0.30sys and a flux of N_0 = (1.15 +/- 0.27stat +/- 0.35sys)x 10^{-13} cm^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1}. The integral flux above 1 TeV corresponds to ~5 percent of the steady Crab Nebula emission a...

  12. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  13. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  14. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach; and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  15. Gamma-Rays from Intergalactic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, U; Loeb, A; Springel, V; Hernquist, L E; Keshet, Uri; Waxman, Eli; Loeb, Abraham; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Structure formation in the intergalactic medium (IGM) produces large-scale, collisionless shock waves, where electrons can be accelerated to highly relativistic energies. Such electrons can Compton scatter cosmic microwave background photons up to gamma-ray energies. We study the radiation emitted in this process using a hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a LCDM universe. The resulting radiation, extending beyond TeV energies, has roughly constant energy flux per decade in photon energy, in agreement with the predictions of Loeb & Waxman (2000). Assuming that a fraction \\xi_e=0.05 of the shock energy is transferred to the relativistic electrons, as inferred from collisionless non-relativistic shocks in the interstellar medium, we find that the radiation energy flux, e^2 (dJ/de) ~ 50-160 eV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1}, constitutes ~10% of the extragalactic gamma-ray background flux. The associated gamma-ray point-sources are too faint to account for the ~60 unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources, but GLAST s...

  16. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  17. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  18. Gamma-ray emission from nova outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission, with the 511 keV line and a continuum. Gamma-ray spectra and light curves are potential unique tools to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected with the Fermi satellite in V407 Cyg, a nova in a symbiotic binary, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Two more nov...

  19. HAWC observatory catches first gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías Villegas, Gabriela

    2013-06-01

    The world's largest and most modern gamma-ray observatory has carried out its first successful observations. Located inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in the Mexican state of Puebla, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a collaboration between 26 Mexican and US institutions.

  20. Gamma-ray Novae: Rare or Nearby?

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Paul J; Brown, Anthony M; Chadwick, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Novae were revealed as a surprise source of gamma-rays in Fermi LAT observations. During the first 8 years since the LAT was launched, 6 novae in total have been detected to > 5 sigma in gamma-rays, in contrast to the 69 discovered optically in the same period. We attempt to resolve this discrepancy by assuming all novae are gamma-ray emitters, and assigning peak one-day fluxes based on a flat distribution of the known emitters to a simulated population. To determine optical parameters, the spatial distribution and magnitudes of bulge and disc novae in M31 are scaled to the Milky Way, which we approximate as a disc with a 20 kpc radius and elliptical bulge with semi major axis 3 kpc and axis ratios 2:1 in the xy plane. We approximate Galactic reddening using a double exponential disc with vertical and radial scale heights of r_d = 5 kpc and z_d = 0.2 kpc, and demonstrate that even such a rudimentary model can easily reproduce the observed fraction of gamma-ray novae, implying that these apparently r...

  1. Chandra Imaging of Gamma-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Hare, Jeremy; Pavlov, George G

    2013-01-01

    We review the multiwavelength properties of the few known gamma-ray binaries, focusing on extended emission recently resolved with Chandra. We discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of compact objects and for physical processes operating in these systems.

  2. Effects of Shielding on Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-13

    The interaction of gamma rays with matter results in an effect we call attenuation (i.e. ‘shielding’). Attenuation can dramatically alter the appearance of a spectrum. Attenuating materials may actually create features in a spectrum via x-ray fluorescence

  3. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  4. Observation and Simulation of the Variable Gamma-ray Emission from PSR J2021+4026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. W.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.

    2016-07-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning and highly magnetized neutron stars, with highly stable rotational periods and a gradual spin-down over a long timescale due to the loss of radiation. Glitches refer to events that suddenly increase the rotational speed of a pulsar. The exact causes of glitches and the resulting processes are not fully understood. It is generally believed that couplings between the normal matter and superfluid components, and starquakes, are the common causes of glitches. In this study, one famous glitching pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, is investigated. PSR J2021+4026 is the first variable gamma-ray pulsar observed by Fermi. From gamma-ray observations, it is found that the pulsar experienced a significant flux drop, an increase in the spin-down rate, a change in the pulse profile and a shift in the spectral cut-off to a lower energy, simultaneously around 2011 October 16. To explain these effects on high-energy emissions by the glitch of PSR J2021+4026, we hypothesized the glitch to be caused by the rearrangement of the surface magnetic field due to crustal plate tectonic activities on the pulsar, which was triggered by a starquake. In this glitch event, the inclination angle of the magnetic dipole axis was slightly shifted. This proposition is then tested by numerical modeling using a three-dimensional two-layer outer gap model. The simulation results indicate that a modification of the inclination angle can affect the pulse profile and the spectral properties, which can explain the observation changes after the glitch.

  5. Systematic Study of Gamma-ray bright Blazars with Optical Polarization and Gamma-ray Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T; Kawabata, Koji S; Madejski, Grzegorz M; Schinzel, Frank K; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Miho; Moritani, Yuki; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Ohsugi, Takashi; Sasada, Mahito; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei which emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between Jul. 2008 and Dec. 2014 to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), thi...

  6. $\\gamma$-Ray Absorption at High Redshifts and the $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1997-01-01

    We present results of a calculation of absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high- redshift evolution of the full spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic photon field. For this, we have primarily followed the recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We then give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and also extend our results on the background from unresolved blazars to an energy of 500 GeV. Absorption effects are predicted to significantly steepen the background spectrum above 20 GeV. Our absorption calculations can be used to place limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. Our background calculations can be used to determine the observability of multi-GeV lines from dark matter neutralino particles.

  7. European team gauges a gamma-ray star

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Italian astrophysicists have pushed the Hubble Space Telescope to the limit of its powers in finding the distance of Geminga, a pointlike object 500 light-years from the Earth. It is the prototype of a novel kind of star, a radio-silent neutron star, which may be much more common in the Universe than previously supposed. Geminga is so weak in visible light that Hubble had to stare at the spot for more than an hour to register it adequately. The object is nevertheless one of the brightest sources of gamma-rays in the sky, and its output of this very energetic form of radiation can now be accurately ganged. Neutron stars, first discovered as radio pulsars in 1967, are fantastic creations of exploding stars, just one step short of a black hole. They are heavier than the Sun yet only about twenty kilometres wide. Made of compressed nuclear matter, they have gravity and magnetic fields many billions of times stronger than on the Earth. With the first direct measurement of the distance of a radio-silent neutron star, astrophysicists can assess Geminga's power and speed of motion. The astronomical task was like judging the width of a one- franc piece in Paris, seen from the distance of Sicily. Geminga's low brightness greatly aggravated the difficulties. Patrizia Caraveo and her colleagues at the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan arranged for Hubble's wide-field camera (WFPC2) to make its prolonged observations of Geminga three times. Their findings will be published in Astrophysical Journal Letters on 20 April 1996. Caraveo's co-authors are Giovanni Bignami and Roberto Mignani of Milan, and Laurence Taff of Johns Hopkins University, Maryland. The Italians took advantage of the European Space Agency's collaboration with NASA in the Hubble mission, which gives European astronomers privileged access to the Space Telescope. Shifts of millionths of a degree The three sightings of Geminga, made at intervals of six months, revealed small shifts in the position of the faint

  8. Multiwavelength analysis of four millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2011-08-01

    Radio timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in support of Fermi LAT observations of the gamma-ray sky enhance the sensitivity of high-energy pulsation searches. With contemporaneous ephemerides we have detected gamma-ray pulsations from PSR B1937+21, the first MSP ever discovered, and B1957+20, the first known black-widow system. The two MSPs share a number of properties: they are energetic and distant compared to other gamma-ray MSPs, and both of them exhibit aligned radio and gamma-ray emission peaks, indicating co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere of the pulsars. However, radio observations are also crucial for revealing MSPs in Fermi unassociated sources. In a search for radio pulsations at the position of such unassociated sources, the Nançay Radio Telescope discovered two MSPs, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, increasing the sample of known Galactic disk MSPs. Subsequent radio timing observations led to the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from these two MSPs as well. We describe multiwavelength timing and spectral analysis of these four pulsars, and the modeling of their gamma-ray light curves in the context of theoretical models.

  9. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  10. Very-High-Energy Solar Gamma Rays From Cosmic-Ray Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bei; Ng, Kenny; Beacom, John; Peter, Annika; Rott, Cartsen

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic-ray induced gamma rays from the Sun has been observed up to 100 GeV. However, there are no theoretical predictions beyond 10 GeV. We provide the first calculation of the hadronic disk component in TeV-PeV, where solar magnetic fields can be ignored. We also consider the leptonic gamma-ray halo, taking into account electrons from local pulsars. With Fermi and soon HAWC & LHAASO observations, our results provide new insights on local cosmic rays, solar magnetic fields, and solar dark matter studies. BZ is supported by OSU Fowler Fellowship. KN and FB are supported by NSF Grant PHY-1404311. AK is supported by NSF GRFP Grant No. DGE-1321846. CR is supported by the Korea Neutrino Research Center. KN is also supported by the OSU Presidential Fellowship.

  11. Focusing of Alfvenic wave power in the context of gamma-ray burst emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1993-01-01

    Highly dynamic magnetospheric perturbations in neutron star environments can naturally account for the features observed in gamma-ray burst spectra. The source distribution, however, appears to be extragalactic. Although noncatastrophic isotropic emission mechanisms may be ruled out on energetic and timing arguments, MHD processes can produce strongly anisotropic gamma rays with an observable flux out to distances of about 1-2 Gpc. Here we show that sheared Alfven waves propagating along open magnetospheric field lines at the poles of magnetized neutron stars transfer their energy dissipationally to the current sustaining the field misalignment and thereby focus their power into a spatial region about 1000 times smaller than that of the crustal disturbance. This produces a strong (observable) flux enhancement along certain directions. We apply this model to a source population of 'turned-off' pulsars that have nonetheless retained their strong magnetic fields and have achieved alignment at a period of approximately greater than 5 sec.

  12. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  13. ESA's Integral solves thirty-year old gamma-ray mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    sources towards the direction of the Galactic centre. Lebrun's team includes Ubertini and seventeen other European scientists with long-standing experience in high-energy astrophysics. Much to the team's surprise, almost half of these sources do not fall in any class of known gamma-ray objects. They probably represent a new population of gamma-ray emitters. The first clues about a new class of gamma-ray objects came last October, when Integral discovered an intriguing gamma-ray source, known as IGRJ16318-4848. The data from Integral and ESA's other high-energy observatory XMM-Newton suggested that this object is a binary system, probably including a black hole or neutron star, embedded in a thick cocoon of cold gas and dust. When gas from the companion star is accelerated and swallowed by the black hole, energy is released at all wavelengths, mostly in the gamma rays. However, Lebrun is cautious to draw premature conclusions about the sources detected in the Galactic centre. Other interpretations are also possible that do not involve black holes. For instance, these objects could be the remains of exploded stars that are being energised by rapidly rotating celestial 'powerhouses', known as pulsars. Observations with another Integral instrument (SPI, the Spectrometer on Integral) could provide Lebrun and his team with more information on the nature of these sources. SPI measures the energy of incoming gamma rays with extraordinary accuracy and allows scientist to gain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms that generate them. However, regardless of the precise nature of these gamma-ray sources, Integral's observations have convincingly shown that the energy output from these new objects accounts for almost ninety per cent of the soft gamma-ray background coming from the centre of the Galaxy. This result raises the tantalising possibility that objects of this type hide everywhere in the Galaxy, not just in its centre. Again, Lebrun is cautious, saying, "It is

  14. Limits on the TeV gamma-ray afterglow of fast radio bursts with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, F.; Brun, F.; Pühlhofer, G.; Rowell, G.; Wagner, R.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Keane, E.; Petroff, E.; SUPERB Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We here present the H.E.S.S. follow-up of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), millisecond-long, very strong radio pulses of yet unknown origin. The SUPERB (SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts) project at the Parkes radio observatory is able to detect these enigmatic events almost in real-time which allows triggering follow-up observations covering the full electromagnetic spectrum. The H.E.S.S. gamma-ray observatory is taking active part in this endeavor. Here we focus on data taken within hours of FRB 150418, which allow us to derive the first limits on gamma-ray afterglow emission of FRBs. Based on the identification of the potential host galaxy of this burst we are able to discuss absorption effects due to the extragalactic background light (EBL) and derive intrinsic, energy dependent limits on the gamma-ray afterglow.

  15. BL Lacertae Objects and the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Fan

    2011-01-01

    A tight correlation between gamma-ray and radio emission is found for a sample of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects detected by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray emission of BL Lac objects exhibits strong variability, and the detection rate of gamma-ray BL Lac objects is low, which may be related to the gamma-ray duty cycle of BL Lac objects. We estimate the gamma-ray duty cycle ~ 0.11, for BL Lac objects detected by EGRET and Fermi. Using the empirical relation of gamma-ray emission with radio emission and the estimated gamma-ray duty cycle, we derive the gamma-ray luminosity function (LF) of BL Lac objects from their radio LF. Our derived gamma-ray LF of BL Lac objects can almost reproduce that calculated with the recently released Fermi bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) sample. We find that about 45% of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) is contributed by BL Lac objects. Combining the estimate of the quasar contri...

  16. NEW GAMMA RAYS FROM DECAY OF 189W

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维凡; 赵之正; 等

    1995-01-01

    Radioactivities of 189W are produced through an 192Os(n,α189W reaction.Gamma ray spectroscopy from chemically separated tungsten sources using HPGe detector has revealed the presence of 22 gamma rays assigned to the decay of 189W,of them,18 gamma rays are new ones unreported until now.

  17. Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

  18. The cosmic-ray and gas content of the Cygnus region as measured in gamma rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The Cygnus region hosts a giant molecular-cloud complex which actively forms massive stars. Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields make it shine at gamma-ray energies. Several gamma-ray pulsars and other energetic sources are seen in this direction. In this paper we analyse the gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV in order to probe the gas and cosmic-ray content over the scale of the whole Cygnus complex. The signal from bright pulsars is largely reduced by selecting photons in their off-pulse phase intervals. We compare the diffuse gamma-ray emission with interstellar gas maps derived from radio/mm-wave lines and visual extinction data, and a global model of the region, including other pulsars and gamma-ray sources, is sought. The integral HI emissivity and its spectral energy distribution are both consistent within the systematics with LAT measurements in the interstellar space near the solar system. The ave...

  19. Discovery of powerful gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, M; Bulgarelli, A; Vittorini, V; Pellizzoni, A; Striani, E; Caraveo, P; Weisskopf, M C; Tennant, A; Pucella, G; Trois, A; Costa, E; Evangelista, Y; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Del Monte, E; Campana, R; Pilia, M; De Luca, A; Donnarumma, I; Horns, D; Ferrigno, C; Heinke, C O; Trifoglio, M; Gianotti, F; Vercellone, S; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A W; Contessi, T; D'Ammando, F; DePris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Galli, M; Giuliani, A; Giusti, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Fuschino, F; Marisaldi, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Vallazza, E; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Lucarelli, F; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Salotti, L; Bignami, G F

    2011-02-11

    The well-known Crab Nebula is at the center of the SN1054 supernova remnant. It consists of a rotationally powered pulsar interacting with a surrounding nebula through a relativistic particle wind. The emissions originating from the pulsar and nebula have been considered to be essentially stable. Here, we report the detection of strong gamma-ray (100 mega-electron volts to 10 giga-electron volts) flares observed by the AGILE satellite in September 2010 and October 2007. In both cases, the total gamma-ray flux increased by a factor of three compared with the non-flaring flux. The flare luminosity and short time scale favor an origin near the pulsar, and we discuss Chandra Observatory x-ray and Hubble Space Telescope optical follow-up observations of the nebula. Our observations challenge standard models of nebular emission and require power-law acceleration by shock-driven plasma wave turbulence within an approximately 1-day time scale.

  20. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  1. TeV Gamma Ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this review, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play to advance this young but exciting field.

  2. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  3. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  4. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  5. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  6. Measuring cosmology with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Z.G.; Xu, D.; Liang, W. [Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (Switzerland). Department of Astronomy

    2005-07-15

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are becoming more and more standardizable candles. Different methods have been proposed to measure cosmology with the relation between the {gamma}-ray energy E{sub {gamma}} of a GRB jet and the peak energy E{sub p} of the {nu}F{nu} spectrum in the burst frame. We compare the procedures and results of these methods. Using the present sample of 17 GRBs, we obtain a constraint on the mass density {omega}M 0.22{sub -0.07}{sup +0.42} (1{sigma}) for a flat ACDM universe with the median circumburst density n {approx_equal} 3.0 cm{sup -3}. Theoretical investigations of the E{sub {gamma}} {alpha} E{sub p}{sup a} relation reach a {approx} 1.5. A larger sample in the Swift era is expected to provide further constraints on the GRB cosmography.

  7. TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this re-view, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play in advancing this young but exciting field.

  8. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades.

  9. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  11. Unveiling the origin of gamma-ray emission towards the W41 region with H.E.S.S. data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méhault, Jérémie; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Fuessling, Matthias; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlühr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Conrad, J.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Domainko, A. Djannati-Ataü W.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernan-Des, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fürster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füssling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Güring, D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jung, I.; Katarzynski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khálifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Klochkov, D.; Kluzniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Mau-Rin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Ona Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Orford, K. J.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schück, F. M.; Schünwald, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sushch, I.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Venter, L.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Vülk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    Both H.E.S.S. and MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes have observed very-high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from W41, a 105 years-old supernova remnant (SNR). The origin of this emission is still uncertain. Different scenarios, notably interaction with a molecular cloud or pulsar wind nebulae, have been proposed, in relation to 13 CO emission and X-ray pulsar candidates spatially coincident with the VHE excess. The improvement in event reconstruction and selection developed by the H.E.S.S. collaboration allows us to analyse this source with an unprecedented gamma-ray angular resolution. Furthermore, thanks to 5 time more H.E.S.S. data since the discovery paper, it is now possible to examine more precisely the spatial distribution of the VHE gamma-rays from W41 in com-parison with radio data. Informations provided by the 1-year Fermi-LAT catalogue will be included in the discussion of possible scenarios. The nearby SNR G22.7-0.2 (˜0.6° from W41, well within the H.E.S.S. field of view) appears to coincide with CO emission and is thus another potential VHE gamma-ray emitter.

  12. Very high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arqueros, F; Berenguel, M; Borque, D M; Camacho, E F; Díaz, M; Gebauer, H J; Enriquez, R P; Plaga, R

    2001-01-01

    The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field at the ``Plataforma Solar de Almeria'' (PSA) to collect Cherenkov light from air showers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. A comparison between the results of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and data is presented. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar, the active galaxy 3C 454.3, the unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG 1835+35 and a ``pseudo source'' were analyzed for high energy gamma-ray emission.Evidence for a gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) ^+1.7_-1.3 (syst) x 10^-9 cm^-2 sec^-1 above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total measuring time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No eviden...

  13. Modeling High-energy and Very-high-energy gamma-rays from the Terzan 5 Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Kopp, A; Büsching, I

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has recently detected a population of globular clusters (GCs) in high-energy (HE) gamma-rays. Their spectral properties and energetics are consistent with cumulative emission from a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) hosted by these clusters. For example, the HE spectra exhibit fairly hard power-law indices and cutoffs around a few GeV, typical of pulsed spectra measured for the gamma-ray pulsar population. The energetics may be used to constrain the number of visible MSPs in the cluster (N_vis), assuming canonical values for the average gamma-ray efficiency and spin-down power. This interpretation is indeed strengthened by the fact that the first gamma-ray MSP has now been identified in the GC NGC 6624, and this MSP is responsible for almost all of the HE emission from this cluster. On the other hand, it has been argued that the MSPs are also sources of relativistic leptons which may be reaccelerated in shocks originating in collisions of stellar winds in the cluste...

  14. MODELING THE MULTIWAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM G73.9+0.9: GAMMA RAYS FROM AN SNR–MC INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.araya@ucr.ac.cr [Centro de Investigaciones Espaciales (CINESPA) and Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2015-11-01

    G73.9+0.9 has been classified as a probable shell-type supernova remnant, though it has also been suggested that it could have a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Here, a broadband model of the non-thermal emission of G73.9+0.9 from radio to gamma rays is presented. The model includes a new gamma-ray observation obtained by the analysis of seven years of data from the Fermi/LAT telescope. Above 200 MeV, the source is detected with a significance of 13σ and the spectrum of the radiation is best described by a power law with an index of ∼2.5. The leptonic mechanisms are hard to reconcile with the measured radio and gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. A PWN origin for the high-energy emission is also not very likely, due to the lack of detection of pulsars and of X-ray emission in the region, as well as from the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum. Given the possibility that the object is interacting with molecular clouds, a hadronic origin of the high-energy emission is more likely, and the spectral properties of the cosmic rays responsible for this radiation are derived.

  15. Future astrophysics space missions in gamma ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik)

    1990-04-01

    An overview about presently approved space missions in gamma ray astronomy is given. Special emphasis is devoted to the Gamma Ray Observatory GRO of NASA - a multi-instrument observatory which covers more than 5 orders of magnitude in photon energy from about 100 keV to 30 GeV. Significant progress in the exploration and understanding of the gamma ray sky can be expected in the very near future. The next generation of gamma ray missions will have to focus on high resolution spectroscopy, on high resolution imaging and on broad band studies of gamma ray burst sources. (orig.).

  16. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  17. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  18. Gamma ray tracking with the AGATA demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Hess, Herbert; Lewandowski, Lars; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David; Vogt, Andreas [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The performance of the AGATA demonstrator will be discussed based on data taken from a multi-nucleon transfer experiment at the AGATA PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce a multitude of nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 136}Xe and corresponding reaction partners in the actinide region. The obtained results for in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy allow for a critical assessment of the novel gamma ray tracking technique and comparison with standard procedure. High resolution spectroscopy of both reaction products after multi-nucleon transfer reaction in the presence of a high background from excited fission fragments is based on pulse-shape analysis (PSA) and gamma-ray tracking (GRT). The quality of the position information is crucial for the final energy resolution after Doppler correction. The impact of the calculated PSA libraries and the initial detector characterization for the PSA and GRT are summarized. Details of the achieved position and energy resolution, peak-to-background optimization are presented and illustrated with results from the neutron-transfer products in Xe and U-isotopes.

  19. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  20. Bremsstrahlung gamma rays from light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the often-neglected role of bremsstrahlung processes on the interstellar gas in computing indirect signatures of Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in the Galaxy, particularly for light DM candidates in the phenomenologically interesting O(10) GeV mass range. Especially from directions close to the Galactic Plane, the expected gamma-ray spectrum is altered via two effects: directly, by the photons emitted in the bremsstrahlung process on the interstellar gas by energetic electrons which are among the DM annihilation byproducts; indirectly, by the modification of the same electron spectrum, due to the additional energy loss process in the diffusion-loss equation (e.g. the resulting inverse Compton emission is altered). We quantify the importance of the bremsstrahlung emission in the GeV energy range, showing that it is the dominant component of the gamma-ray spectrum for some cases. We also find that, in regions in which bremsstrahlung dominates energy losses, the related gamma-ray emission is only moder...

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  2. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  3. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, G C

    2002-01-01

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce ...

  4. Hadronic Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalenko, I V; Malkov, M A; Diamond, P H

    2007-01-01

    A gas cloud near a supernova remnant (SNR) provides a target for pp-collisions leading to subsequent gamma-ray emission through neutral pion decay. The assumption of a power-law ambient spectrum of accelerated particles with index near -2 is usually built into models predicting the spectra of very-high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from SNRs. However, if the gas cloud is located at some distance from the SNR shock, this assumption is not necessarily correct. In this case, the particles which interact with the cloud are those leaking from the shock and their spectrum is approximately monoenergetic with the injection energy gradually decreasing as the SNR ages. The gamma-ray spectrum resulting from particle interactions with the gas cloud will be flatter than expected, with the cutoff defined by the pion momentum distribution in the laboratory frame. We evaluate the flux of particles escaping from a SNR shock and apply the results to the VHE diffuse emission detected by the HESS at the Galactic centre.

  5. Research and development of a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range in Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, José-Manuel; Galvez, José-Luis; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Cabruja, Enric; Ullán, Miguel

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics in the MeV energy range plays an important role for the understanding of cosmic explosions and acceleration mechanisms in a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Through the development of focusing telescopes in the MeV energy range, it will be possible to reach unprecedented sensitivities, compared with those of the currently operating gamma ray telescopes. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is required. It will be also desirable that the detector could detect polarization of the source. Our research and development activities in Barcelona aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range suited for the focal plane of a gamma-ray telescope mission, based on CdTe pixel detectors arranged in multiple layers with increasing thicknesses, to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We have developed an initial prototype based on several CdTe module detectors, with 11x11 pixels, a pixel pitch of 1mm and a thickness of 2mm. Each pixel is stud-bump bonded to a fanout board and routed to a readout ASIC to measure pixel position, pulse height and rise time information for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report on the results of an optimization study based on simulations, to select the optimal thickness of each CdTe detector within the module to get the best energy resolution of the spectrometer.

  6. Search for Very-high-energy \\gamma-ray emission from Galactic globular clusters with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are established emitters of high-energy (HE, 100 MeV100 GeV) \\gamma-ray regime, judging from the recent detection of a signal from the direction of Terzan 5 with the H.E.S.S. telescope array. We searched for point-like and extended VHE \\gamma-ray emission from 15 GCs serendipitously covered by H.E.S.S observations and also performed a stacking analysis combining the data from all GCs to investigate the hypothesis of a population of faint emitters. Assuming IC emission as the origin of the VHE \\gamma-ray signal from the direction of Terzan 5, we calculated the expected \\gamma-ray flux from each of the 15 GCs, based on their number of millisecond pulsars, their optical brightness and the energy density of background photon fields. We did not detect significant VHE \\gamma-ray emission from any of the 15 GCs in either of the two analyses. Given the uncertainties related to the parameter determinations, the obtained flux upper limits allow to rule out the simple IC/msPSR scaling model for N...

  7. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  8. Measurement of fast neutrons and secondary gamma rays in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarious, A.S.; El-Asyd Abdo, A.; Kansouh, W.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Centre; Bashter, I.I. [Zagazig Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    1996-05-01

    The spatial fluxes and energy distributions of fast neutrons, total gamma rays and secondary gamma rays transmitted through different thicknesses of graphite have been measured. The graphite samples were arranged in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Gamma ray measurements were carried out for bare, cadmium filtered and boron carbide filtered reactor beams. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectrum of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to distinguish the proton pulses from the electron pulses. The total fast neutrons macroscopic cross section and the linear attenuation coefficient for gamma rays were derived both for the whole energy range and at different energies. The obtained values were used to calculate the relaxation lengths for fast neutrons and gamma rays. (Author).

  9. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma~rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma~rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of $^{56}$Ni, $^{56}$Co, and $^{44}$Ti. The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioa...

  10. JITTER RADIATION MODEL OF THE CRAB GAMMA-RAY FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraki, Yuto; Takahara, Fumio, E-mail: teraki@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    The gamma-ray flares of the Crab nebula detected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites challenge our understanding of the physics of pulsars and their nebulae. The central problem is that the peak energy of the flares exceeds the maximum energy E {sub c} determined by synchrotron radiation loss. However, when turbulent magnetic fields exist with scales {lambda}{sub B} smaller than 2{pi}mc {sup 2}/eB, jitter radiation can emit photons with energies higher than E {sub c}. The scale required for the Crab flares is about two orders of magnitude less than the wavelength of the striped wind. We discuss a model in which the flares are triggered by plunging the high-density blobs into the termination shock. The observed hard spectral shape may be explained by the jitter mechanism. We make three observational predictions: first, the polarization degree will become lower in flares; second, no counterpart will be seen in TeV-PeV range; and third, the flare spectrum will not be harder than {nu}F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 1}.

  11. The gamma-ray sky as seen with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüntemeyer, Petra

    2015-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory located at a site about two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l.) was inaugurated in March 2015. The array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously and, with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV, is currently one of the most sensitive instruments capable of probing particle acceleration near PeV energies. HAWC has already started science operation in the Summer of 2013 and preliminary sky maps have been produced from 260 days of data taken with a partial array. Multiple > 5 σ (pre-trials) hotspots are visible along the galactic plane and some appear to coincide with known TeV sources from the H.E.S.S. catalog, SNRs and molecular cloud associations, and pulsars wind nebulae (PWNe). The sky maps based on partial HAWC array data are discussed as well as the scientific potential of the completed instrument especially in the context of multi-wavelengths studies.

  12. Classification and Ranking of Fermi LAT Gamma-ray Sources from the 3FGL Catalog using Machine Learning Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz; Yu, P L H; Salvetti, D; Marelli, M; Falcone, A D

    2016-01-01

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGN (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a sub-sample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (~90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providi...

  13. Observation and Simulation of the Variable Gamma-ray Emission from PSR~J2021+4026

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning and highly magnetized neutron stars, with highly stable rotational period and gradual spin-down over a long timescale due to the loss of radiation. Glitches refer to the events that suddenly increase the rotational speed of a pulsar. The exact causes of glitches and the resulting processes are not fully understood. It is generally believed that couplings between the normal matter and the superfluid components, and the starquakes, are the common causes of glitches. In this study, one famous glitching pulsar, PSR~J2021+4026, is investigated. PSR~J2021+4026 is the first variable gamma-ray pulsar observed by Fermi. From the gamma-ray observations, it is found that the pulsar experienced a significant flux drop, an increase in the spin-down rate, a change in the pulse profile and a shift in the spectral cut-off to a lower energy, simultaneously around 2011 October 16. To explain these effects on the high-energy emissions by the glitch of PSR~J2021+4026, we hypothesized the glitch to be...

  14. High energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts -- before GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft gamma-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high energy gamma-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  15. Radio Searches of Fermi LAT Sources and Blind Search Pulsars: The Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, P S; Parent, D; Bhattacharya, D; Bhattacharyya, B; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Theureau, G; Ferrara, E C; Harding, A K; Thompson, D J; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Gupta, Y; Roy, J; Hessels, J W T; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Shannon, R; Kerr, M; Michelson, P F; Romani, R W; Kramer, M; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Smith, D A; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2012-01-01

    We present a summary of the Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium (PSC), an international collaboration of radio astronomers and members of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, whose goal is to organize radio follow-up observations of Fermi pulsars and pulsar candidates among the LAT gamma-ray source population. The PSC includes pulsar observers with expertise using the world's largest radio telescopes that together cover the full sky. We have performed very deep observations of all 35 pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of the LAT data, resulting in the discovery of radio pulsations from four of them. We have also searched over 300 LAT gamma-ray sources that do not have strong associations with known gamma-ray emitting source classes and have pulsar-like spectra and variability characteristics. These searches have led to the discovery of a total of 43 new radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and four normal pulsars. These discoveries greatly increase the known population of MSPs in the Galactic disk...

  16. Magnetars and white dwarf pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, Manuel; Coelho, Jaziel G.

    2016-07-01

    The anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely B ≳ 1014G, and for that reason are known as magnetars. However, in the last years, some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields B ˜ (1012-1013)G have been detected, challenging the magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on WDs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized WDs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107-1010 G and rotate very fast with frequencies Ω ˜ 1rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods P ˜ (2-12)s.

  17. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  18. Estimate of the Fermi Large Area Telescope sensitivity to gamma-ray polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Giomi, Matteo; Sgrò, Carmelo; Longo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although not designed primarily as a polarimeter, the \\textit{Fermi}-Large Area Telescope (LAT) has the potential to detect high degrees of linear polarization from some of the brightest gamma-ray sources. To achieve the needed accuracy in the reconstruction of the event geometry, low-energy ($\\leq200$ MeV) events converting in the silicon detector layers of the LAT tracker have to be used. We present preliminary results of the ongoing effort within the LAT collaboration to measure gamma-ray polarization. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties affecting such a measurement. We show that a $5\\sigma$ minimum detectable polarization (MDP) of $\\approx30-50\\%$ could be within reach for the brightest gamma-ray sources as the Vela and Crab pulsars and the blazar 3C 454.3, after 10 years of observation. To estimate the systematic uncertainties, we stack bright AGN, and use this stack as a test source. LAT sensitivity to polarization is estimated comparing the data to a simulation of the expected unpol...

  19. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  20. Landau level-superfluid modified factor and effective X/$\\gamma$-ray coefficient of a magnetar

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Z F; Wang, N; Chou, C K; Huo, W S

    2013-01-01

    As soon as the energy of electrons near the Fermi surface are higher than $Q$, the threshold energy of inverse $\\beta-$ decay, the electron capture process will dominate. The resulting high-energy neutrons will destroy anisotropic ${}^3P_2$ neutron superfluid Cooper pairs. By colliding with the neutrons produced in the process $n+ (n\\uparrow n\\downarrow)\\longrightarrow n+ n+ n$, the kinetic energy of the outgoing neutrons will be transformed into thermal energy. The transformed thermal energy would transported from the star interior to the star surface by conduction, then would be transformed into radiation energy as soft X-rays and gamma-rays. After a highly efficient modulation within the pulsar magnetosphere, the surface thermal emission (mainly soft X/$\\gamma$-ray emission) has been shaped into a spectrum with the observed characteristics of magnetars. By introducing two important parameters: Landau level-superfluid modified factor and effective X/$\\gamma$-ray coefficient, we numerically simulate the proc...

  1. Rapid Gamma-ray flux variability during the 2013 March Crab Nebula flare

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, M; Hays, E; Dutka, M; Cheung, C C; Dutka, M S; Grove, J E; Kerr, M; Ojha, R

    2013-01-01

    We report on a bright flare in the Crab Nebula detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The period of significantly increased luminosity occurred in 2013 March and lasted for approximately 2 weeks. During this period, we observed flux variability on timescales of approximately 5\\,hours. The combined photon flux above 100 MeV from the pulsar and its nebula reached a peak value of $(12.5\\pm 0.8)\\cdot 10^{-6}$\\,cm$^{-2}$\\,s$^{-1}$ on 2013 March 6. This value exceeds the average flux by almost a factor of 6 and implies a $\\sim20$ times higher flux for the synchrotron component of the nebula alone. This is the second brightest flare observed from this source. Spectral and temporal analysis of the LAT data collected during the outburst reveal a rapidly varying synchrotron component of the Crab Nebula while the pulsar emission remains constant in time.

  2. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energ...

  3. Properties of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Classes

    CERN Document Server

    Hakkila, J; Roiger, R J; Mallozzi, R S; Pendleton, G N; Meegan, C A; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The three gamma-ray burst (GRB) classes identified by statistical clustering analysis (Mukherjee et al. 1998) are examined using the pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 (Quinlan 1986). Although the statistical existence of Class 3 (intermediate duration, intermediate fluence, soft) is supported, the properties of this class do not need to arise from a distinct source population. Class 3 properties can easily be produced from Class 1 (long, high fluence, intermediate hardness) by a combination of measurement error, hardness/intensity correlation, and a newly-identified BATSE bias (the fluence duration bias). Class 2 (short, low fluence, hard) does not appear to be related to Class 1.

  4. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  5. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  6. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collap...

  7. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  8. Material recognition using fission gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: giuseppe.viesti@pd.infn.it; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-07-21

    Material recognition is studied by measuring the transmission spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission gamma rays in the energy range E{sub {gamma}}=0.1-5.5 MeV for 0.1-MeV-wide energy bins through a number of elementary samples. Each transmitted spectrum is compared with a library of reference spectra for different elements providing the possibility of material identification. In case of elemental samples with known thickness, this procedure allows the identification of the sample Z with uncertainty typically lower than 3 Z-units over a wide range of elements. Applications to composite materials are also reported.

  9. Nucleosynthetic Yields from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    The "collapsar" engine for gamma-ray bursts invokes as its energy source the failure of a normal supernova and the formation of a black hole. Here we present the results of the first three-dimensional simulation of the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole, including the subsequent accretion and explosion. The explosion differs significantly from the axisymmetric scenario obtained in two-dimensional simulations; this has important consequences for the nucleosynthetic yields. We compare the nucleosynthetic yields to those of hypernovae. Calculating yields from three-dimensional explosions requires new strategies in post-process nucleosynthesis; we discuss NuGrid's plan for three-dimensional yields.

  10. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  11. Relation between $\\gamma$-rays and emission lines for the $\\gamma$-ray loud blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, J H

    2000-01-01

    The relation between the $\\gamma$-ray and the emission line luminosities for a sample of 36 $\\gamma$-ray loud blazars is investigated; an apparent correlation between them, $L_{\\gamma} \\propto L_{Line}^{0.69\\pm0.11}$, with a correlation coefficient $r=0.741$ and a chance probability of $p = 1.9\\times10^{-6}$, is found. It is found, however, that there is no intrinsic correlation between them: the apparent correlation is due to the redshift dependence in a flux-limited sample. Thus no evidence is found to support the argument that the up-scattered soft photons are from the broad emission lines. Our analysis does not conflict with the SSC model. The disk-jet symbiosis and radio/$\\gamma$-ray correlation found in the literature are also discussed. The radio/$\\gamma$-ray correlation may be an apparent correlation caused by the boosting effect since both bands are strongly beamed.

  12. Gamma-ray Polarimetry with the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2017-08-01

    The All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO) is a next-generation Compton and pair-production telescope. It will allow us to perform sensitive polarimetric observations in the 200keV to 3MeV energy range. Due to its wide field of view it will survey the entire sky every 3 hours, enabling polarization measurements not only of persistent, but also of transient sources such as gamma-ray bursts. The polarization of gamma-rays carries geometric information about compact emission regions that are too small to be imaged at any wavelength, and will thus provide qualitatively new insights. In this paper we discuss AMEGO's polarization sensitivity based on detailed simulations of the instrument. We will use these results to discuss the scientific potential of AMEGO to search for violations of Lorentz invariance. Finally, we present predictions for possible observations based on theoretical models of bright gamma-ray bursts, blazar jets, and the high-energy tail of the galactic black hole binary Cygnus X-1. These predictions will demonstrate AMEGO's ability to distinguish different theoretical models.

  13. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  14. Gamma ray bursts, neutron star quakes, and the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, C; Pérez-Mercader, J; Carlson, C; Goldman, T; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into \\gamma--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  15. Pulse Summing in the gamma-Ray Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gromov, K Ya; Samatov, Zh K; Chumin, V G

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that the peaks formed at the summing of the cascade gamma-rays pulses can be used for the determination of gamma-ray source activity and gamma-ray registration efficency. Possible sources of the determined quantities errors have been investigated. Such a method can be useful at the nuclear reaction cross section measurements, at background analysis in looking for rare decays and so on.

  16. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for AGILE, Fermi (GLAST) and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies of gamma-ray pulsars languished in recent years, while theoretical studies made significant strides. Now, with new and improved gamma-ray telescopes coming online, opportunities present themselves for dramatic improvements in our understanding of these objects. The new facilities and better modeling of processes at work in high-energy pulsars should address a number of important open questions, some of which are summarized.

  17. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  18. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  19. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  20. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2006-01-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from few GeV to >10^{20} eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) "afterglows" provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars, and their "afterglows," delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of gamma-rays, are produced by relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Some of the striking characteristics of these shocks include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ...

  2. Long Gamma-Ray Transients from Collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2011-01-01

    In the collapsar model for common gamma-ray bursts, the formation of a centrifugally supported disk occurs during the first $\\sim$10 seconds following the collapse of the iron core in a massive star. This only occurs in a small fraction of massive stellar deaths, however, and requires unusual conditions. A much more frequent occurrence could be the death of a star that makes a black hole and a weak or absent outgoing shock, but in a progenitor that only has enough angular momentum in its outermost layers to make a disk. We consider several cases where this is likely to occur - blue supergiants with low mass loss rates, tidally-interacting binaries involving either helium stars or giant stars, and the collapse to a black hole of very massive pair-instability supernovae. These events have in common the accretion of a solar mass or so of material through a disk over a period much longer than the duration of a common gamma-ray burst. A broad range of powers is possible, $10^{47}$ to $10^{50}\\,$erg s$^{-1}$, and t...

  3. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  4. Gamma ray tests of Minimal Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirelli, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hambye, Thomas [Service de Physique Theórique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Panci, Paolo [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France); Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-12

    We reconsider the model of Minimal Dark Matter (a fermionic, hypercharge-less quintuplet of the EW interactions) and compute its gamma ray signatures. We compare them with a number of gamma ray probes: the galactic halo diffuse measurements, the galactic center line searches and recent dwarf galaxies observations. We find that the original minimal model, whose mass is fixed at 9.4 TeV by the relic abundance requirement, is constrained by the line searches from the Galactic Center: it is ruled out if the Milky Way possesses a cuspy profile such as NFW but it is still allowed if it has a cored one. Observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also relevant (in particular searches for lines), and ongoing astrophysical progresses on these systems have the potential to eventually rule out the model. We also explore a wider mass range, which applies to the case in which the relic abundance requirement is relaxed. Most of our results can be safely extended to the larger class of multi-TeV WIMP DM annihilating into massive gauge bosons.

  5. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Burst Investigation via Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J

    2008-01-01

    The primary scientific goal of the GRIPS mission is to revolutionize our understanding of the early universe using gamma-ray bursts. We propose a new generation gamma-ray observatory capable of unprecedented spectroscopy over a wide range of gamma-ray energies (200 keV--50 MeV) and of polarimetry (200--1000 keV). Secondary goals achievable by this mission include direct measurements of supernova interiors through gamma-rays from radioactive decays, nuclear astrophysics with massive stars and novae, and studies of particle acceleration near compact stars, interstellar shocks, and clusters of galaxies.

  6. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  7. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  10. A Survey of Fermi Catalog Sources using data from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi LAT has released a list of the most significant 205 sources with three months of Fermi data (Bright Source List). The Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays above 100 GeV with a peak sensitivity between 10 and 30 TeV, overlapping and extending the energy range of Fermi. Of the 34 Galactic LAT sources in the field of view of Milagro, 6 are observed with significance greater than 5 sigma and 14 are observed at greater than 3 sigma. Of these 14 sources, 9 are pulsars. Since the VHE emission detected by Milagro is often found to be extended and likely un-pulsed, the VHE component presumably arises from the pulsar winds. Six of the 14 sources have not been previously detected at TeV energies. The details of the Milagro survey will be presented. We will also present the energy spectra of the high-significance detections. Should the full 1-year source list be available prior to the symposium, we will expand our analysis to include the larger Fermi catalog.

  11. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  12. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  13. X-ray observations of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula with JEM-X on INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Lund, Niels;

    2003-01-01

    The Crab pulsar is the best studied rotation powered pulsar. We report the results obtained in the 3-35 keV energy band with the X-ray monitor, JEM-X, on ESAs recently launched gamma-ray mission, INTEGRAL.......The Crab pulsar is the best studied rotation powered pulsar. We report the results obtained in the 3-35 keV energy band with the X-ray monitor, JEM-X, on ESAs recently launched gamma-ray mission, INTEGRAL....

  14. 1FGL J1417.7-4407: A gamma-ray bright binary with a massive neutron star and a giant secondary

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, Jay; Cheung, C C; Sand, David J; Donato, Davide; Corbet, Robin; Koeppe, Dana; Edwards, Philip G; Stevens, Jamie; Petrov, Leonid; Salinas, Ricardo; Peacock, Mark; Finzell, Thomas; Reichart, Daniel; Haislip, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the persistent Fermi-LAT unidentified gamma-ray source 1FGL J1417.7-4407, showing it is likely to be associated with a newly discovered X-ray binary containing a massive neutron star (nearly 2 M_sun) and a ~ 0.4 M_sun giant secondary with a 5.4 day period. SOAR optical spectroscopy at a range of orbital phases reveals variable double-peaked H-alpha emission, consistent with the presence of an accretion disk. The lack of radio emission and evidence for a disk suggests the gamma-ray emission is unlikely to originate in a pulsar magnetosphere, but could instead be associated with a pulsar wind, relativistic jet, or could be due to synchrotron self-Compton at the disk/magnetosphere boundary. Assuming a wind or jet, the high ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity (~ 20) suggests efficient production of gamma-rays, perhaps due to the giant companion. The system appears to be a low-mass X-ray binary that has not yet completed the pulsar recycling process. This system is a g...

  15. 1FGL J1417.7-4407: A Likely Gamma-Ray Bright Binary with A Massive Neutron Star and A Giant Secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Cheung, C. C.; Sand, David J.; Donato, Davide; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Koeppe, Dana; Edwards, Philip G.; Stevens, Jamie; Petrov, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the persistent Fermi-Large Area Telescope unidentified gamma-ray source 1FGL J1417.7-4407, showing it is likely to be associated with a newly discovered X-ray binary containing a massive neutron star (nearly 2 solar mass) and a approximately 0.35 solar mass giant secondary with a 5.4 day period. SOAR optical spectroscopy at a range of orbital phases reveals variable double-peaked H alpha emission, consistent with the presence of an accretion disk. The lack of radio emission and evidence for a disk suggests the gamma-ray emission is unlikely to originate in a pulsar magnetosphere, but could instead be associated with a pulsar wind, relativistic jet, or could be due to synchrotron self-Compton at the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Assuming a wind or jet, the high ratio of gamma- ray to X-ray luminosity (approximately 20) suggests efficient production of gamma-rays, perhaps due to the giant companion. The system appears to be a low-mass X-ray binary that has not yet completed the pulsar recycling process. This system is a good candidate to monitor for a future transition between accretion-powered and rotational-powered states, but in the context of a giant secondary.

  16. Characterization of the Inner Knot of the Crab: The Site of the Gamma-ray Flares?

    CERN Document Server

    Rudy, A; DeLuca, A; Kolodziejczak, J; Tennant, A; Yuan, Y; Buehler, R; Arons, J; Blandford, R; Caraveo, P; Costa, E; Funk, S; Hays, E; Lobanov, A; Max, C; Mayer, M; Mignani, R; O'Dell, S L; Romani, R; Tavani, M; Weisskopf, M C

    2015-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results from the gamma-ray instruments in orbit has been the detection of powerful flares from the Crab Nebula. These flares challenge our understanding of pulsar wind nebulae and models for particle acceleration. We report on the portion of a multiwavelength campaign using Keck, HST, and Chandra concentrating on a small emitting region, the Crab's inner knot, located a fraction of an arcsecond from the pulsar. We find that the knot's radial size, tangential size, peak flux, and the ratio of the flux to that of the pulsar are correlated with the projected distance of the knot from the pulsar. A new approach, using singular value decomposition for analyzing time series of images, was introduced yielding results consistent with the more traditional methods while some uncertainties were substantially reduced. We exploit the characterization of the knot to discuss constraints on standard shock-model parameters that may be inferred from our observations assuming the inner knot lies near ...

  17. Simulating gamma-ray binaries with a relativistic extension of RAMSES

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Astrid; Dubus, Guillaume; Teyssier, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are composed of a massive star and a rotation-powered pulsar with a highly relativistic wind. The collision between the winds from both objects creates a shock structure where particles are accelerated, resulting in the observed high energy emission. We study the impact of special relativity on the structure and stability of the colliding wind region and highlight the differences with colliding winds from massive stars. We focus on evolution with increasing values of the Lorentz factor of the pulsar wind, keeping in mind that current simulations are unable to reach the expected values of the pulsar wind Lorentz factors by orders of magnitude. We use high resolution numerical simulations with a relativistic extension to the hydrodynamics code RAMSES we have developed. Using 2D simulations, we focus on the region close to the binary, neglecting orbital motion. We use different values of the Lorentz factor of the pulsar wind, up to 16. We find analytic scaling relations between stellar wind co...

  18. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, GuoQiang; Li, Chen; Tan, ChengJun; Ge, LiangQuan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energy calibration. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, effectively measuring energy from 20keV to 10MeV is possible.

  19. Digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Li, Chen; Tan, Cheng-Jun; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-07-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. After energy calibration, the spectrometer can clearly distinguish photopeaks at 239, 352, 583 and 609 keV in the low-energy spectral sections. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, it is possible to effectively measure energy from 20 keV to 10 MeV.

  20. Gamma-ray burst afterglow theory

    CERN Document Server

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    It is by now fairly well established that gamma-ray burst afterglows result from initially relativistic outflows interacting with the medium surrounding the burster and emitting non-thermal radiation ranging from radio to X-rays. However, beyond that, many big and small questions remain about afterglows, with the accumulating amount of observational data at the various frequencies raising as many questions as they answer. In this review I highlight a number of current theoretical issues and how they fit or do not fit within our basic theoretical framework. In addition to theoretical progress I will also emphasize the increasing role and usefulness of numerical studies of afterglow blast waves and their radiation.

  1. Balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The physical processes postulated to explain the high-energy emission mechanisms of compact astrophysical sources often yield polarised soft gamma rays (X-rays). PoGOLite is a balloon-borne polarimeter operating in the 25-80 keV energy band. The polarisation of incident photons is reconstructed using Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption in an array of phoswich detector cells comprising plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by a BGO side anticoincidence shield. The polarimeter is aligned to observation targets using a custom attitude control system. The maiden balloon flight is scheduled for summer 2011 from the Esrange Space Centre with the Crab and Cygnus X-1 as the primary observational targets.

  2. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  3. Gamma-ray Production in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1997-01-01

    Supernova remnants are widely believed to be a principal source of galactic cosmic rays, produced by diffusive shock acceleration in the environs of the remnant's expanding shock. This review discusses recent modelling of how such energetic particles can produce gamma-rays via interactions with the remnants' ambient interstellar medium, specifically via neutral pion decay, bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton emission. Predictions that relate to the handful of associations between EGRET unidentified sources and known radio/optical/X-ray emitting remnants are summarized. The cessation of acceleration above 1 TeV - 10 TeV energies in young shell-type remnants is critical to model consistency with Whipple's TeV upper limits; these observations provide important diagnostics for theoretical models.

  4. Black Holes, Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in our understanding of the nature of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and in particular, of the relationship between short GRBs and long GRBs. The first example of a short GRB is described. The coincidental occurrence of a GRB with a supernova (SN) is explained within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm, following the sequence: 1) an initial binary system consists of a compact carbon-oxygen (CO) core star and a neutron star (NS); 2) the CO core explodes as a SN, and part of the SN ejecta accretes onto the NS which reaches its critical mass and collapses to a black hole (BH) giving rise to a GRB; 3) a new NS is generated by the SN as a remnant. The observational consequences of this scenario are outlined.

  5. Search for Gamma Ray Bursts at Chacaltaya

    CERN Document Server

    Vernetto, S

    2001-01-01

    A search for Gamma Ray Bursts in the GeV-TeV energy range has been performed by INCA, an air shower array working at 5200 m of altitude at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia). The altitude of the detector and the use of the "single particle technique" allows to lower the energy threshold up to few GeVs. No significant signals are observed during the occurrence of 125 GRBs detected by BATSE, and the obtained upper limits on the energy fluence in the interval 1-1000(100) GeV range from 3.2(8.6) 10^-5 to 2.6(7.0) 10^-2 erg/cm^2 depending on the zenith angle of the events. These limits, thanks to the extreme altitude of INCA, are the lowest ever obtained in the sub-TeV energy region by a ground based esperiment.

  6. The Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Dainotti, M G; De Laurentis, M; Izzo, L; Perillo, M

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to their enormous energy release, Gamma Rays Bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted a lot of interest to probe the Hubble diagram (HD) deep into the matter dominated era and hence complement Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa). We consider here three different calibration methods based on the use of a fiducial LCDM model, on cosmographic parameters and on the local regression on SNeIa to calibrate the scaling relations proposed as an equivalent to the Phillips law to standardize GRBs finding any significant dependence. We then investigate the evolution of these parameters with the redshift to obtain any statistical improvement. Under this assumption, we then consider possible systematics effects on the HDs introduced by the calibration method, the averaging procedure and the homogeneity of the sample arguing against any significant bias.

  7. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  8. Three types of $\\gamma$-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, S; Babu, G J; Murtagh, F; Fraley, C; Raftery, A E; Mukherjee, Soma; Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh; Murtagh, Fionn; Fraley, Chris; Raftery, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    A multivariate analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) bulk properties is presented to discriminate between distinct classes of GRBs. Several variables representing burst duration, fluence and spectral hardness are considered. Two multivariate clustering procedures are used on a sample of 797 bursts from the Third BATSE Catalog: a nonparametric average linkage hierarchical agglomerative clustering procedure validated with Wilks' $\\Lambda^*$ and other MANOVA tests; and a parametric maximum likelihood model-based clustering procedure assuming multinormal populations calculated with the EM Algorithm and validated with the Bayesian Information Criterion. The two methods yield very similar results. The BATSE GRB population consists of three classes with the following Duration/Fluence/Spectrum bulk properties: Class I with long/bright/intermediate bursts, Class II with short/hard/faint bursts, and Class III with intermediate/intermediate/soft bursts. One outlier with poor data is also present. Classes I and II correspond...

  9. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) were among the greatest mysteries in modern astrophysics. They were first observed 50 years ago but it took three decades before optical counterparts could be found and the underlying physical phenomena studied in detail. GRB research represents currently one of the most rapidly growing areas in extragalactic astronomy. This is due in large part to the numerous connections that GRBs have with other disciplines like cosmology, supernovae, stellar evolution, nuclear physics, astroparticle and gravitational wave astronomy. Therefore, their study is of great importance to understand various astrophysical phenomena such as the formation of the first stars, the chemical evolution and the expansion of the Universe. Since gamma radiation can travel along cosmological distances without being affected by any possible intervening absorption, GRBs can be detected from the most distant universe, reaching redshifts up to z = 10 or more.

  10. Relativistic Outflows in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Aloy, M A

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were not isotropic emissions was devised theoretically as a way to ameliorate the huge energetic budget implied by the standard fireball model for these powerful phenomena. However, the mechanism by which after the quasy-isotropic release of a few $10^{50} $erg yields a collimated ejection of plasma could not be satisfactory explained analytically. The reason being that the collimation of an outflow by its progenitor system depends on a very complex and non-linear dynamics. That has made necessary the use of numerical simulations in order to shed some light on the viability of some likely progenitors of GRBs. In this contribution I will review the most relevant features shown by these numerical simulations and how they have been used to validate the collapsar model (for long GRBs) and the model involving the merger of compact binaries (for short GRBs).

  11. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmi, Lekshmi

    2017-09-01

    This review focuses on the physics of Gamma Ray Bursts probed through their radio afterglow emission. Even though radio band is the least explored of the afterglow spectrum, it has played an important role in the progress of GRB physics, specifically in confirming the hypothesized relativistic effects. Currently radio astronomy is in the beginning of a revolution. The high sensitive Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is being planned, its precursors and pathfinders are about to be operational, and several existing instruments are undergoing upgradation. Thus, the afterglow results from detection statistics and follow up programs are expected to improve in the coming years. We list a few avenues unique to radio band which if explored to full potential have the promise to greatly contribute to the future of GRB physics.

  12. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  14. Discovery of the two wings of the Kookaburra complex in VHE gamma -rays with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2006-01-01

    Aims. Search for Very High Energy gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex through observations with the H.E.S.S. array. Methods. Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov light emission of the gamma-ray showers in the atmosphere is used for the reconstruction and selection of the events to search for gamma-ray signals. Their spectrum is derived by a forward-folding maximum likelihood fit. Results. Two extended gamma-ray sources with an angular (68%) radius of 3.3-3.4' are discovered at high (>13sigma) statistical significance: HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609. They exhibit a flux above 1 TeV of (2.97+/-0.18stat +/-0.60sys)x10-12 and (2.17+/-0.17stat +/-0.43sys)x10-12 cm-2 s-1, respectively, and similar hard photon indices ~2.2. Multi-wavelength comparisons show spatial coincidence with the wings of the Kookaburra. Two pulsar wind nebulae candidates, K3/PSR J1420-6048 and the Rabbit, lie on the edge of the H.E.S.S. sources. Conclusions. The two new sources confirm the non-thermal nature of at least parts of the ...

  15. The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Belczynski, K; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F; Taam, R; Bulik, T

    2007-01-01

    Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter and the conversion of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst. Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a majority of short gamma-ray bursts originate in double neutron star mergers. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2--2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude double neutron star mergers as short gamma-ray burst pr...

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Pulses and Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hakkila, J. E.; Broadbent, M.; Wasserman, I. M.; Wolpert, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    We describe ongoing work on two projects that are enabling more thorough and accurate use of archival BATSE data for elucidating the nature of GRB sources; the methods and tools we are developing will also be valuable for analyzing data from other missions. The first project addresses modeling the spectro-temporal behavior of prompt gamma ray emission from GRBs by modeling gamma ray count and event data with a population of pulses, with the population drawn from one or more families of single-pulse kernels. Our approach is built on a multilevel nonparametric probabilistic framework we have dubbed "Bayesian droplets," and offers several important advances over previous pulse decomposition approaches: (1) It works in the pulse-confusion regime, quantifying uncertainty in the number, locations, and shapes of pulses, even when there is strong overlap. (2) It can self-consistently model pulse behavior across multiple spectral bands. (3) It readily handles a variety of spatio-temporal kernel shapes. (4) It reifies the idea of a burst as a population of pulses, enabling explicit modeling and estimation of the pulse population distribution. We describe the framework and present analyses of prototypical simple and complex GRB light curves. The second project aims to enable accurate demographic modeling of GRBs using the BATSE catalog. We present new calculations of the BATSE sky exposure, encompassing the full duration of the BATSE catalog for the first time, with many improvements over the currently available exposure map. A similar calculation of the detection efficiency is in progress. We also describe public Python software enabling access and accurate modeling of BATSE GRB data. The software enables demographic studies (e.g., modeling log N - log S distributions) with accurate accounting of both selection effects and measurement errors. It also enables spectro-temporal modeling of detailed data from individual GRBs. These projects are supported by NASA through the AISR

  17. Pulsars: Progress, Problems and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Arons, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    I survey recent successes in the application of relativistic MHD and force-free electrodynamics to the modeling of the pulsars' rotational energy loss mechanism as well as to the structure and emission characteristics of Pulsar Wind Nebulae. I suggest that unsteady reconnection in the current sheet separating the closed from the open zones of the magnetosphere is responsible for the torque fluctuations observed in some pulsars, as well as for departures of the braking index from the canonical value of 3. I emphasize the significance of the boundary layer between the closed and open zones as the active site in the outer magnetopshere. I elaborate on the conflict between the models currently in use to interpret the gamma ray and X-ray pulses from these systems with the electric current flows found in the spin down models. Because the polar cap ``gap'' is the essential component in the supply of plasma to pulsar magnetospheres and to pulsar wind nebulae, I emphasize the importance of high sensitivity gamma ray o...

  18. Enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, R.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis indicates enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula. The daily-averaged gamma-ray emission (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula has surpassed 4.0 x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 five times in the last 12 days.

  19. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  20. Wolf-Rayet stars as gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, N.; van Marle, A. -J; Yoon, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    It became clear in the last few years that long gamma-ray bursts are associated with the endpoints of massive star evolution. They occur in star forming regions at cosmological distances (Jakobsson et al., 2005), and are associated with supernova-type energies. The collapsar model explains gamma-ray