WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation-effects studies biomedical

  1. Modification of carcinogenic and antitumor radiation effects (biomedical aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilenchik, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    In the book the data on modification of carcinogenic radiation effects by physiologicaly active compounds (caffeine, hormones, promoters and others) as well as on potentiation of antitumor radiation effects by means of hyperthermia are systematized. It is shown that as a basis of synergetic (superadditive) carcinogenic or antitumor radiation effects combined with other factor can be the inhibiting effects of the latter on the reparation process of radiation-induced DNA injuries. The results of experimental investigations and the data on quantitative analysis can be used as a theoretical basis for improvement of the ways and means of the prophylaxis of tumor diseases as well as for increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy

  2. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental radiation effects studies in the US Fusion Materials Program generally fall under the aegis of the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. In a narrow sense, the problem addressed by the DAFS program is the prediction of radiation effects in fusion devices using data obtained in non-representative environments. From the onset, the program has had near-term and long-term components. The premise for the latter is that there will be large economic penalties for uncertainties in predictive capability. Fusion devices are expected to be large and complex and unanticipated maintenance will be costly. It is important that predictions are based on a maximum of understanding and a minimum of empiricism. Gaining this understanding is the thrust of the long-term component. (orig.)

  3. Study on effects of vitamin E on radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Sumihiko

    1974-01-01

    The effect of Vitamin E on radiation effect was studied. The X-ray (190 kV, 25 mA, 0.7 mmCu + 0.5 mmAl filter, dose rate 78 R/min) was irradiated to the whole body one hour after the administration of 1.0 g/kg of Vitamin E. The LD 50 (30) was larger in the group receiving Vitamin E than in the group which did not receive it. The rate at which tumor cells were killed was smaller in Vitamin E-treated group than in untreated group. The anoxic cell proportion in the tumor was 13% in the untreated group, and 35% in the treated group. The LD 50 (30) was largest in the group receiving 1.0 g/kg of Vitamin E. (Serizawa, K.)

  4. Experimental study on the radiation effects to the bone growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiko

    1980-01-01

    The radiation effects on growing bone were studied using immature rabbits. The irradiation was done with telecobalt to the right knee joint. The rabbits were divided into six groups according to the dose, such as 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, 4,000, 6,000 and 8,000 rad respectively. The effects of irradiation were investigated by RI-scintigraphy, X-ray photography and pathohistological examination. The following results were obtained. 1. In RI-scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, the change of accumulation ratio of the irradiated side was investigated. In terms of chronological observation, the accumulation ratio decreased most 5 weeks after irradiation and subsequently increased in the group irradiated with less than 4,000 rad. In the 6,000 rad group, the accumulation ratio decreased rapidly until 5 weeks after irradiation, and subsequently increased slightly. In the 8,000 rad group, the accumulation ratio progressively decreased unabated during the time observed. 2. X-ray findings of irradiated bones were as follows: In the group irradiated with more than 3,000 rad, sclerosis of the metaphysis and unclearness of the trabecula, thickening of the compact bone, bending, fissure and fracture of the bone appeared early with increased frequency with an increased in radiation doses. Also, according to an increase in radiation doses, growth inhibition in the length of the tibia was conspicuous. 3. In the histopathological findings, disturbances of the epiphyseal cartilage, the blood vessel system, trabecula, and medullary tissue becomes intense with increasing radiation doses. (author)

  5. NASA FACILITY FOR THE STUDY OF SPACE RADIATION EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David R.

    1963-04-15

    Information on the energies andd fluxes of trapped electrons and protons in space is summarized, and the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory being constructed to simulate most of the space particulate-energy spectrum is described. A 600-Mev proton synchrocyclotron of variable energy and electron accelerators of 1 to 10 Mev will be included. The accelerator characteristics and the arrangement of the experimental and support buildings, particularly the beam facilities, are discussed; and the planned activities of the laboratory are given. (D.C.W.)

  6. Gamma radiation effect study in polycarbonate optical and mechanics properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, E.S. de.

    1991-02-01

    Polycarbonates (PC) are used in different industrial applications due to their excellent dielectric characteristics, impact resistance, and high temperature resistance. In some of these applications, the polycarbonates are exposed to gamma radiation which produces molecular scissions, causing changes in the polycarbonate properties. To estimate the radiation effects in the Durolon polycarbonate, samples were irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays with doses between 0,2 kGy and 300 kGy. The results obtained showed that the PC mechanical properties are not changed due to the gamma radiation. However the results showed an expressive variation in the yellowness index for doses above 1 kGy. The results showed that it is possible to use the gamma sterilization of PC in applications where the coloration of PC is not critical. (author). 21 refs, 25 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Design and analysis of biomedical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær

    been allocated this field. It is utterly important to utilize these ressources responsibly and efficiently by constantly striving to ensure high-quality biomedical studies. This involves the use of a sound statistical methodology regarding both the design and analysis of biomedical studies. The focus...... have conducted a literature study strongly indicating that this structure commonly is neglected in the statistical analysis. Based on this closed-form expressions for the approximate type I error rate are formulated. The type I error rates are assessed for a number of factor combinations as they appear...... in practice and in all cases the type I error rates are demonstrated to be severely inflated. Prior to conducting a study it is important to perform power and sample size determinations to ensure that reliable conclusions can be drawn from the statistical analysis. We have formulated closed-form expressions...

  8. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Y.; Aoki, K.; Matsudaira, H.

    1982-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  9. Study of ionizing radiation effect on human spermatozoa chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseaux, S.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the radio-induced chromosomal aberrations in spermatozoa. After a brief recall on ionizing radiations, the author reviews the radio-induced chromosomal anomalies on somatic cells and on germinal line cells and spermatozoa. The author presents the technical aspects of human spermatozoa karyotype and finally studies the radio induced chromosomal anomalies of sperm to patients undergoing a radiotherapy. 13 tabs., 28 figs., 28 photos

  10. Studies of radiation effects on allopathic formulations for cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, L; Choughule, S V; Dodke, P B; Jothish, P K [International Standard Orthopedic Measurements Education and Development (ISOMED), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2005-07-01

    In the present study, two anticancer drugs, Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubucin Hydrochloride have been investigated. The results of various physico-chemical tests on unirradiated and irradiated drugs indicate possibility of use of lower radiation doses and cryo-irradiation in case of sterilization of Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubcin Hydrochloride could be sterilized at 25 kGy without any significant changes in its physico-chemical properties. HPLC studies reveal formation of several trace level degradation products in irradiated cyclophosphamide. HPLC/MS studies revealed that higher and lower molecular weight products of the original molecules are formed on irradiation. Although, no significant changes are observed in absolute purity values, a little discolouration and formation of degradation products in Cyclophosphamide are the main impediments in acceptability of radiation sterilization. On the other hand, orange-red coloured Doxorubicin Hydrochloride did not show any such changes and could be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy. (author)

  11. Studies of radiation effects on allopathic formulations for cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, L.; Choughule, S.V.; Dodke, P.B.; Jothish, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, two anticancer drugs, Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubucin Hydrochloride have been investigated. The results of various physico-chemical tests on unirradiated and irradiated drugs indicate possibility of use of lower radiation doses and cryo-irradiation in case of sterilization of Cyclophosphamide. Doxorubcin Hydrochloride could be sterilized at 25 kGy without any significant changes in its physico-chemical properties. HPLC studies reveal formation of several trace level degradation products in irradiated cyclophosphamide. HPLC/MS studies revealed that higher and lower molecular weight products of the original molecules are formed on irradiation. Although, no significant changes are observed in absolute purity values, a little discolouration and formation of degradation products in Cyclophosphamide are the main impediments in acceptability of radiation sterilization. On the other hand, orange-red coloured Doxorubicin Hydrochloride did not show any such changes and could be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy. (author)

  12. Study of neutron radiation effects on MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, Sangeeta J.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied charge trapping in the oxide and generation of interface states due to neutrons. It is observed that neutrons, though uncharged, are capable of causing ionization and interface damage and it is significant under biased irradiation conditions. One of the important features of this work is that neutron irradiation was carried out in a nuclear reactor (swimming pool type) itself in contrast to the earlier reported work which used separate neutron sources for similar studies. To simulate real life situations, all our devices were biased during irradiation. In our belief, both of these facts gave credence to our observed experimental results. (author)

  13. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion-materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1981-10-01

    Some examples of progress being made in DAFS studies are given. The primary parameters in which most damage models are expressed are total displacements per atom (dpa), total helium concentration (appm), and the helium-to-dpa ratio. The concentrations of other transmutation products than helium have assumed significance in certain cases as will be seen below. The number of dpa is generally taken proportional to the damage energy, the total energy deposited in a material, corrected for the fraction dissipated in electronic excitation and ionization

  14. Study of the radiation effect in breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno T, L. R.; Ramirez R, A., E-mail: lumor2000@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    This breast cancer is one of the most important death causes in women. Among the more frequently medical treatment for advanced breast cancer is the mastectomy. This situation leads to silicone implants as an esthetic option. There have been cases in patients with implants where cancer was frequently detected, in which a conventional radiotherapy is required. In this work is presented a study of the probable adverse effects caused by the application of high power X-rays (6-10 MV) to the silicone implants and to the surrounding tissues. In the research carried out at the clinic, none Bolus effect was detected in patients with implants. Our results prescribe that in the case of patients with implants and frequent breast cancer, the removal of implants is not necessary due radiotherapy works directly in the damaged tissues. (Author)

  15. Study of the radiation effect in breast implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno T, L. R.; Ramirez R, A.

    2013-01-01

    This breast cancer is one of the most important death causes in women. Among the more frequently medical treatment for advanced breast cancer is the mastectomy. This situation leads to silicone implants as an esthetic option. There have been cases in patients with implants where cancer was frequently detected, in which a conventional radiotherapy is required. In this work is presented a study of the probable adverse effects caused by the application of high power X-rays (6-10 MV) to the silicone implants and to the surrounding tissues. In the research carried out at the clinic, none Bolus effect was detected in patients with implants. Our results prescribe that in the case of patients with implants and frequent breast cancer, the removal of implants is not necessary due radiotherapy works directly in the damaged tissues. (Author)

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of radiation effects in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Caturla, M.J.; Tobin, M.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss results of molecular dynamics computer simulation studies of 3 keV and 5 keV displacement cascades in β-SIC, and compare them to results of 5 keV cascades in pure silicon. The SiC simulations are performed with the Tersoff potential. For silicon we use the Stillinger-Weber potential. Simulations were carried out for Si recoils in 3 dimensional cubic computational cells With periodic boundary conditions and up to 175,616 atoms. The cascade lifetime in SiC is found to be extremely short. This, combined with the high melting temperature of SiC, precludes direct lattice amorphization during the cascade. Although large disordered regions result, these retain their basic crystalline structure. These results are in contrast with observations in pure silicon where direct-impact amorphization from the cascade is seen to take place. The SiC results also show anisotropy in the number of Si and C recoils as well as in the number of replacements in each sublattice. Details of the damage configurations obtained will be discussed

  17. Characteristics of rotating target neutron source and its use in radiation effects studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Barschall, H.H.; Booth, R.; Wong, C.

    1975-07-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is currently the most intense source of DT fusion neutrons available for the study of radiation effects in materials. This paper will present a brief description of the machine, outline the history of its development and discuss its performance characteristics and its application to CTR materials research. (U.S.)

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design

  19. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  20. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it\\'s also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Biomedical Visual Computing: Case Studies and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Johnson, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computational geometric modeling, imaging, and simulation let researchers build and test models of increasing complexity, generating unprecedented amounts of data. As recent research in biomedical applications illustrates, visualization will be critical in making this vast amount of data usable; it's also fundamental to understanding models of complex phenomena. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. X radiation effects on the wound healing process after tooth extraction. Histological study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel, R.M.; Santos Pinto, R. dos; Okamoto, T.; Santos Pinto, M.C. dos

    1988-01-01

    The X radiation effects on the wound healing process after teeth extractions are studied histologically. Albino rats are employed. After their right upper incisors were extracted, they were divided into groups of 20 animals each. With exception of the group I (control), 24 hours after teeth extractions the groups II, III and IV received X radiation, respectively, in the dosage of 75,125 and 175 R. The rats were sacrificed in group of 4, at 3, 6, 9,15 and 21 postoperative days and a histological study is done. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Studies of radiation effects on the indicator of behavior and learning of the nematode caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Michiyo

    2011-01-01

    Radiation effects on the essential behavior and its higher level of learning are described mainly on authors' studies of the title nematode (N), a unique model of which, in a whole, genome is mapped, genealogy of cells is defined, and anatomical distribution and linkage of nervous cells are known. N exhibits various behaviors such as meandering on the culture agar/swimming in water responding to given stimuli like touch, temperature, and chemical. Authors have found that the locomotive activity of N is reduced by gamma-irradiation. Their subsequent irradiation study of 60 Co gamma ray at 300-900 Gy (32 Gy/sec) to wild type and cat-2 mutant lacking tyrosine hydroxylase in the presence/absence of N's food has revealed that dopaminergic nerves do not participate in the mechanism of the reduction unexpectedly. Rather, participation of an active oxygen species is suggested by their following study with H 2 O 2 , but exact nervous system responsible to the reduction is still to be elucidated in future. For radiation effect on N's associative learning, authors have used the reversal of salt preference, where Ns cultured on NaCl-containing agar covered by E. coli (food), being chemotactic to the salt, are conditioned by food removal: salt preference is reversed after learning. The gamma ray irradiation at the conditioning stage but neither before nor after learning, is found to lead to reduction of the chemotaxis (promotion of learning), and this radiation response is found to occur in N lacking gpc-1 gene coding G-protein gamma-subunit which is localized in a part of sensory nerves. Authors think this radiation effect is a modulation of nervous circuit for chemotaxis of N, but of which relation with the complicated nervous functions in higher animals is further to be elucidated in aspects of learning and memory. (T.T.)

  4. View of environmental radiation effects from the study of radiation biology in C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans is a non-parasitic soil nematode and is well-known as a unique model organism, because of its complete cell-lineage, nervous network and genome sequences. Also, C. elegans can be easily manipulated in the laboratory. These advantages make C. elegans as a good in vivo model system in the field of radiation biology. Radiation effects in C. elegans have been studied for three decades. Here, I briefly review the current knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing irradiation in C. elegans with a scope of environmental radiation effects. Firstly, basic information of C. elegans as a model organism is described. Secondly, historical view is reported on the study of radiation biology in C. elegans. Thirdly, our research on learning behavior is presented. Finally, an opinion of the use of C. elegans for environmental radiation protection is referred. I believe that C. elegans may be a good promising in vivo model system in the field of environmental radiation biology. (author)

  5. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  6. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-01-01

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H - , H + , and D + ). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H - cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes

  7. Study on radiation effect of poly (vinyl alcohol) films irradiated by tritium decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hairong; Peng Shuming; Zhou Xiaosong; Yu Mingming; Xia Lidong; Chen Xiaohua; Liang Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    The radiation effect of poly(vinyl alcohol) films used as a kind of gas-barrier material for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets was studied under the different conditions of β-ray from tritium decay. The changes of physical and chemical properties of the irradiated material samples were analyzed by FTIR, XRD and AFM. The tritium-hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction of the irradiated samples mainly occurs at C-H bond and the IR absorption peak of C-T bond obviously increases with the irradiation dose. For strong hydrogen bonding interaction, the isotopic exchange reaction doesn't occur at O-H bond. The crystallinity degree and surface morphology of the irradiated samples were changed. The tensile properties of irradiated poly(vinyl alcohol) films were measured by universal material testing machine. The results show that the change trend of mechanical properties is in accordance with the microstructures of the irradiated samples. (authors)

  8. Study on aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in cloudy weather in the Guangzhou region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Tao, E-mail: tdeng@grmc.gov.cn [Institute of Tropical and Marine Meteorology/Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Regional Numerical Weather Prediction, China Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Deng, XueJiao; Li, Fei [Institute of Tropical and Marine Meteorology/Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Regional Numerical Weather Prediction, China Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Wang, ShiQiang [Zhuhai Meteorological Administration, Zhuhai 519000 (China); Wang, Gang [Haizhu Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou, 510000 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Currently, Guangzhou region was facing the problem of severe air pollution. Large amount of aerosols in the polluted air dramatically attenuated solar radiation. This study investigated the vertical optical properties of aerosols and inverted the height of boundary layer in the Guangzhou region using the lidar. Simultaneously, evaluated the impact of different types of clouds on aerosol radiation effects using the SBDART. The results showed that the height of the boundary layer and the surface visibility changed consistently, the average height of the boundary layer on the hazy days was only 61% of that on clear days. At the height of 2 km or lower, the aerosol extinction coefficient profile distribution decreased linearly along with height on clear days, but the haze days saw an exponential decrease. When there was haze, the changing of heating rate of atmosphere caused by the aerosol decreased from 3.72 K/d to 0.9 K/d below the height of 2 km, and the attenuation of net radiation flux at the ground surface was 97.7 W/m{sup 2}, and the attenuation amplitude was 11.4%; when there were high clouds, the attenuation was 125.2 W/m{sup 2} and the attenuation amplitude was 14.6%; where there were medium cloud, the attenuation was 286.4 W/m{sup 2} and the attenuation amplitude was 33.4%. Aerosol affected mainly shortwave radiation, and affected long wave radiation very slightly. - Highlights: • Large amount of aerosols dramatically attenuated solar radiation in Guangzhou region. • Investigated the aerosol extinction coefficient profile distribution and inverted the height of boundary layer using the lidar • Evaluated the impact of different types of clouds on aerosol radiation effects.

  9. DOE life-span radiation effects studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.C.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.; Sanders, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Major life-span radiation effects studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory fall into three categories: (1) studies with beagle dogs exposed to plutonium compounds via a single inhalation; (2) studies with dogs and rats exposed chronically via inhalation to various combinations and concentrations of radon, radon daughters, and other components of uranium mine atmospheres; and (3) a study in which rats are exposed via single inhalation, in very large numbers, to very low concentrations of 239 PuO 2 . Exposure of beagles currently on study was initiated in 1970 with 239 PuO 2 , in 1973 with 238 PuO 2 , and in 1976 with 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 . These experiments involve more than 500 animals, many of them still alive. Experiments seeking to explain the increased incidence of lung cancer in uranium miners have been in progress since 1966. Present emphasis is on studies with rats, in an attempt to define dose-effect relationships at the lowest feasible radon-daughter exposure levels. Our very-low-level experiment with inhaled 239 PuO 2 in rats, with exposures still under way, includes 1000 rats in the control group and 1000 rats in the lowest-exposure group, where life-span lung doses of <5 rads are anticipated

  10. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the life span study cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, K.; Ozasa, K.; Katayama, H.; Shore, R. E.; Okubo, T.

    2012-01-01

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93 000 atomic bomb survivors and 27.000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35 % per Gy for men and 58 % per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years. (authors)

  11. Numerical Study on Radiation Effects to Evaporator in Natural Vacuum Solar Desalination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, R. E. T.; Ronowikarto, A. D.; Setyawan, E. Y.; Ambarita, H.

    2018-01-01

    The need for clean water is increasing day by day due to the increasing factor of living standard of mankind, hence designed natural vacuum solar desalination. The natural vacuum Solar desalination is studied experimentally. A small-scale natural vacuum desalination study consists of evaporator and condenser as the main components designed and manufactured. To transfer heat from the solar collector into the evaporator, the fluid transfer system uses a pump powered by a solar cell. Thus, solar collectors are called hybrid solar collectors. The main purpose of this exposure is to know the characteristics of the radiation effects on incoming energy on the evaporator during the process. This system is tested by exposing the unit to the solar radiation in the 4th floor building in Medan. The experiment was conducted from 8.00 to 16.00 local time. The results show that natural vacuum solar desalination with hybrid solar collectors can be operated perfectly. If the received radiation is high, then the incoming energy received by the evaporator will also be high. From measurements with HOBO microstation, obtained the highest radiation 695.6 W/m2, and the calculation result of incoming energy received evaporator obtained highest result 1807.293 W.

  12. Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H.

    1990-01-01

    This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual

  13. A new sensitive technique for study of radiation effects in amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Buchan, G.; Ettinger, K.V.; Mallard, J.R.; Takavar, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for the study of radiation induced free radicals in amino acids based on their reactions when untrapped by dissolution in water is reported. The light emission or lyoluminescence response of various amino acids to gamma radiation ( 60 Co) measured 4 hr after irradiation are shown. The sensitivities vary over three orders of magnitude, but there is little or no correlation between the lyoluminescent response and the structural type of amino acid. Dose-reponse curves indicate that the useful range extends from a few krad to a few hundred krad. Methods of extending the lower limits are discussed. Storage of irradiated material over a period of 4 months at 20 0 C showed changes of the order of 10%. Exposure to daylight has no effect on the light yield of amino acids. It is stated that the lyoluminescence technique is more sensitive than ESR in detecting radiation effects in amino acids. Lyoluminescence of irradiated proteins, RNA and DNA, has been observed. It appears that the new method may be particularly useful in providing information on the nature and magnitude of direct radiation damage in biologically important compounds and find applications in radiation dosimetry. (U.K.)

  14. Radiosensitivity study and radiation effects on morphology characterization of grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Rosnani Abdul; Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamad, Azhar; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Maskom, Mohd Meswan [Bioprocess Group, Agrotechnology and Biosciences Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Radiosensitive dosage and morphology characterization of irradiated grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju by gamma rays was investigated due to effects of irradiation. In order to establish the effect, mycelium of P. sajor-caju was irradiated by gamma rays at dose 0.1 to 8.0 kGy with dose rate 0.227 Gy sec{sup −1}. The irradiation of mycelia was carried out at the radiation facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The radiosensitivity study was performed by evaluating the percentage of survival irradiated mycelia. The lethal dose of the mycelium P. sajor-caju was determined at 4.0 kGy and LD{sub 50} to be equal at 2.2 kGy. The radiation effects on morphology were evaluated based on growth rate of irradiated mycelia, mycelia types, colonization period on substrate, morphology of fruit bodies and yields. The results shown growth rate of irradiated mycelium was slightly lower than the control and decreased as the dose increased. Irradiation was found can induced the primordia formation on PDA and the BE of irradiated seed is higher than to control. The irradiation is proven to be useful for generating new varieties of mushroom with commercial value to the industry.

  15. Applications of advanced electron microscopy techniques to the studies of radiation effects in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes some recent results from the application of several advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to the studies of radiation effects in insulators with the main focus on radiation-induced amorphization. These techniques include in situ TEM during ion-beam irradiation at cryogenic and elevated temperatures, cross-sectional TEM, high-resolution TEM, and image simulation on partially damaged materials, as well as digital TEM with image processing and analysis. The combination of these techniques may often provide very detailed information about the microstructure evolution during energetic particle irradiation, especially at the early stages, which is unobtainable with any other analytical methods. These techniques have been successfully applied to the analysis of a large group of ion-beam-irradiated ceramics, including quartz, silicon carbides, uranium oxide, apatite, spinel and other complex mineral phases. The advantages and limitations of each technique, as well as some important technical details for the analysis of radiation damage in ceramics are presented. (orig.)

  16. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    and Berns. Mi. W. User pitotora- 26. Kestel. D.. And Chou. T. C. Tumer -localizing components of the ptirph% rin diation therapy of cancer following... cancer , (2) laser tissue interactions for the study of atherosclerosis, (3) pulsed laser effects on the eye, (4) laser application in genetic...these studies. Please refer to the appropriate article/abstract for further detail. 1. Dye plus laser photosensitization of cancer . Significant

  17. Revisit of Machine Learning Supported Biological and Biomedical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang-Tian; Wang, Lu; Zeng, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Generally, machine learning includes many in silico methods to transform the principles underlying natural phenomenon to human understanding information, which aim to save human labor, to assist human judge, and to create human knowledge. It should have wide application potential in biological and biomedical studies, especially in the era of big biological data. To look through the application of machine learning along with biological development, this review provides wide cases to introduce the selection of machine learning methods in different practice scenarios involved in the whole biological and biomedical study cycle and further discusses the machine learning strategies for analyzing omics data in some cutting-edge biological studies. Finally, the notes on new challenges for machine learning due to small-sample high-dimension are summarized from the key points of sample unbalance, white box, and causality.

  18. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Zaveri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The US Department of Energy (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites – one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area – were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and "aged" urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: (a the scientific background and motivation for the study, (b the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, (c an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and (d a roadmap

  19. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Baidar, S.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, B.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Erickson, M. H.; Fast, J. D.; Floerchinger, C.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Gaffney, J. S.; Gilles, M. K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, W. I.; Gyawali, M.; Hair, J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, S.; Hiranuma, N.; Hostetler, C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, B. T.; Kassianov, E. I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, C.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, C.; Kubátová, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, A.; Laulainen, N.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mei, F.; Moffet, R. C.; Nelson, D.; Obland, M. D.; Oetjen, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Ortega, I.; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, M.; Prather, K. A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, R. R.; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, A.; Senff, C. J.; Senum, G.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J. E.; Shrivastava, M.; Song, C.; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, K.; Tomlinson, J.; Volkamer, R.; Wallace, H. W.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X. -Y.; Zelenyuk, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites – one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area – were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and “aged” urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of

  20. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  1. Ionizing radiation effect study by electron beam on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene - ABS terpolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, Tania Regina Lourenco

    2003-01-01

    The great advantage in the researches involving development has as objective to increase significantly the quality of the products. The ABS (acrylonitrile, butadiene, styrene) resins are terpolymers formed by an elastomer and two thermoplastics amorphous components. The three different monomeric units from the terpolymer ABS contribute separately to the material characteristics exhibited. The molecular stiffness originating from polystyrene and the benzene ring hanging on the chain is responsible for the flexion module ABS. The acrylonitrile and the styrene incorporated butadiene exercises strong influence in the resistance to the impact because it reduces the bonding among them. The engineering use of this terpolymer became important due their mechanical properties and mainly, for the responses of this to tensions or deformations applied. The polymeric materials, when submitted to the ionizing radiation are modified by the transference of energy to these materials, introducing excitation and ionization of the molecules, generating chemical reactions that can produce permanent modifications in the polymeric physicochemical structure. The induced modifications can result in the polymeric material degradation or crosslinking, which can result in the improvement of some properties. This work has, as objective, to study the electron beam ionizing radiation effect, at different doses, in the properties of the polymer ABS. The studied properties were: tensile strength at break, elongation at break, Izod impact strength, flexural strength, melt flow index, Vicat softening temperature and the thermic distortion temperature. Also researches on Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analyses (TGA) were accomplished. From the experimental results, it was showed that for doses until 500 kGy, at 22.6 kGy/s dose rate, in the presence of air, the crosslinking process of ABS prevails. (author)

  2. Radiation effects in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in the studies of radiation effects in gases are discussed. By means of ionization- excitation- and electron-capture yields various applications are characterized: ionization detectors, X-ray detectors, radionuclide battery, and radiation-induced chemical gas-phase reactions. Some new results of basic research in respect to the SO 2 oxidation are discussed. (author)

  3. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  4. Radiation effects and metalloproteins studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzbach, J.A.

    1975-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study the bonding structure at the iron site of cytochrome c and the bonding of rare earth ions to the phosphate oxygens of ATP. Radiation effects are studied on several amino acid and simple peptide model systems. The emission spectrum of the x-ray source is calculated from literature references. The distributions of photon energy as a function of photon frequency and as a function of take-off angle are obtained. From these distributions, the radiation dose absorbed by an organic sample is found to be 10/sup 6/ rads/sec. The C 1s and N 1s spectra of amino acids and peptides are studied to characterize an internal reference standard for protein XPS spectra. Samples of native cytochrome c prepared from solutions of pH 1.5, 3, 7, and 11 are studied. Control samples include porphyrin cytochrome c (PCC), the metal free analogue of the native protein, and microperoxidase (MP), a mixture of heme peptides derived from the peptic digestion of cytochrome c. These samples show two S 2p peaks. The first peak has a binding energy (BE) of 163 eV, which corresponds to the S containing amino acids; the second peak is shifted to 167 eV. This large shift may be the result of Fe-S binding, or oxidation, or both. Low spin ferricytochrome c and ferri-MP were found to have Fe 3p BE's that are unusually low (51 eV) compared to other ferric compounds (54 to 58 eV) and even Fe metal (53 eV). X-ray crystal structures of these compounds show that low spin heme Fe lies in the porphyrin plane; while, high spin heme Fe is displaced above the plane. The N 1s and P 2p spectra of ATP show no change except slight broadening when Nd/sup 3 +/ is substituted for Na/sup +/. Thus, there is no inconsistency with proposals that rare earth ions might be useful as substitutes for alkali metal ions and alkaline earth ions in proteins.

  5. Radiation effects and metalloproteins studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurzbach, J.A.

    1975-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study the bonding structure at the iron site of cytochrome c and the bonding of rare earth ions to the phosphate oxygens of ATP. Radiation effects are studied on several amino acid and simple peptide model systems. The emission spectrum of the x-ray source is calculated from literature references. The distributions of photon energy as a function of photon frequency and as a function of take-off angle are obtained. From these distributions, the radiation dose absorbed by an organic sample is found to be 10 6 rads/sec. The C 1s and N 1s spectra of amino acids and peptides are studied to characterize an internal reference standard for protein XPS spectra. Samples of native cytochrome c prepared from solutions of pH 1.5, 3, 7, and 11 are studied. Control samples include porphyrin cytochrome c (PCC), the metal free analogue of the native protein, and microperoxidase (MP), a mixture of heme peptides derived from the peptic digestion of cytochrome c. These samples show two S 2p peaks. The first peak has a binding energy (BE) of 163 eV, which corresponds to the S containing amino acids; the second peak is shifted to 167 eV. This large shift may be the result of Fe-S binding, or oxidation, or both. Low spin ferricytochrome c and ferri-MP were found to have Fe 3p BE's that are unusually low (51 eV) compared to other ferric compounds (54 to 58 eV) and even Fe metal (53 eV). X-ray crystal structures of these compounds show that low spin heme Fe lies in the porphyrin plane; while, high spin heme Fe is displaced above the plane. The N 1s and P 2p spectra of ATP show no change except slight broadening when Nd 3+ is substituted for Na + . Thus, there is no inconsistency with proposals that rare earth ions might be useful as substitutes for alkali metal ions and alkaline earth ions in proteins

  6. Study on the radiation preservation of apples and the radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Kejian; Lu Dunzhu; Wan Hong; Zhu Zhaonan; Xu Shanmei

    1987-01-01

    The radiation effects on respiration and ethylene production in apple and its radiation preservation were reported in this paper. It shows that, when irradiation was applied immediately after harvest, the respiratory rate and ethylene production increase with the increasing of irradiation dose. When irradiation was applied after 7-10 days of storage, the respiratory rate still rises with the dose, while there is a decrease in ethylene production with the increasing of dose. If the irradiation dose is less than 800 Gy the rise of respiratory rate of irraadiated apple returns to the level of the control within 5 days, but ethylene production of irradiated apple keeps a lower level. According to the above results, dose of 300-500 Gy may be recommended for radiation preseration of apple. Ascorbic acid is unstable and sensitive to radiation. The radiation effects on ascorbic acid in apple is very small because the saccharides and some organic acid in apple, especially malic acid, are able to protect ascorbic acid from radiation damage. From measuring the saccharides and acids in apple, it is obvious that there is no significant difference between irradiated and non-irradiated apple. Long-life free radical in apple was not detected after irradiation. The scald of apple is reduced from 60% to less than 15% after cold storage for 8 monthes. The taste results indicated, tasting them without knowing which is irradiated or not, that the irradiated apple is superior to controlled sample

  7. Study on the radiation effect of polyether-urethane in the γ radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Xu, Y.S.; Chen, X.J.; Gao, X.L.; Tang, Y.M.; Wang, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Polyether-urethane (ETPU) is made up of hard and soft sections. The hard section which is mainly in crystalline state is carbamate, and soft section which is in amorphous state is polyether. Reference reports in detail the degradation of polyurethane deduced by thermal oxidation. The result shows that the thermal degradation begins with the caramate group. The polyalcohol is the weak point of polyurethane degradation in the presence of oxygen. Similarly, the anti-radiation of carbamate (hard section) is superior to that of polyether (soft section) In our former work, we have discussed the degradation of ETPU foam deduced by electron beam. And we have studied the composition and yields of gas products from the radiation degradation, and the changes of the thermal property, micro-phase separation and the microscopic form of irradiated samples. In this article, the radiation effect of γ-ray on polyether-urethane foam was studied. The gas products from irradiated samples were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively by gas chromatography. Compared with the standard gas, the gas products are H 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 , C 2 H 6 and so on. Among these gases, the gas yield of CO 2 is the most, that of H 2 is less, and those of CH 4 and C 2 H 6 are the least. The yields of different sorts of gases increase with the dose raising. Furthermore, the radiation degradation of the sample is the most serious in the oxygen atmosphere, less in air, and the least in vacuum. ESR of ETPU sample irradiated by γ ray in vacuum is shown in figurel, which is determined at the room temperature, and ESR of polyester-urethane (ESPU) irradiated by UV light is shown in figure 2. It can be seen from these two figures that the spectral shape is different. The radical peak in the sample irradiated by UV light is symmetrical, which indicates that there is only one sort of radical; but that is not the truth to the sample irradiated by gamma ray for its asymmetrical radical peak. According to the results of

  8. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed [pt

  9. Study on ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistor with BPSG films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Man; Zhang Xiaoling; Xie Xuesong; Sun Jiangchao; Wang Pengpeng; Lu Changzhi; Zhang Yanxiu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because of the damage induced by ionizing radiation, bipolar transistors in integrated voltage regulator could induce the current gain degradation and increase leakage current. This will bring serious problems to electronic system. Purpose: In order to ensure the reliability of the device work in the radiation environments, the device irradiation reinforcement technology is used. Methods: The characteristics of 60 Co γ irradiation and annealing at different temperatures in bipolar transistors and voltage regulators (JW117) with different passive films for SiO 2 +BPSG+SiO 2 and SiO 2 +SiN have been investigated. Results: The devices with BPSG film enhanced radiation tolerance significantly. Because BPSG films have better absorption for Na + in SiO 2 layer, the surface recombination rate of base region in a bipolar transistor and the excess base current have been reduced. It may be the main reason for BJT with BPSG film having a good radiation hardness. And annealing experiments at different temperatures after irradiation ensure the reliability of the devices with BPSG films. Conclusions: A method of improving the ionizing irradiation hardness of bipolar transistors is proposed. As well as the linear integrated circuits which containing bipolar transistors, an experimental basis for the anti-ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistors is provided. (authors)

  10. Radiative effects of black carbon aerosols on Indian monsoon: a study using WRF-Chem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Pramod; Tripathi, Sachchida Nand; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is utilized to examine the radiative effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the Indian monsoon, for the year 2010. Five ensemble simulations with different initial conditions (1st to 5th December, 2009) were performed and simulation results between 1st January, 2010 to 31st December, 2010 were used for analysis. Most of the BC which stays near the surface during the pre-monsoon season gets transported to higher altitudes with the northward migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during the monsoon season. In both the seasons, strong negative SW anomalies are present at the surface along with positive anomalies in the atmosphere, which results in the surface cooling and lower tropospheric heating, respectively. During the pre-monsoon season, lower troposphere heating causes increased convection and enhanced meridional wind circulation, bringing moist air from Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal to the North-East India, leading to increased rainfall there. However, during the monsoon season, along with cooling over the land regions, a warming over the Bay of Bengal is simulated. This differential heating results in an increased westerly moisture flux anomaly over central India, leading to increased rainfall over northern parts of India but decreased rainfall over southern parts. Decreased rainfall over southern India is also substantiated by the presence of increased evaporation over Bay of Bengal and decrease over land regions.

  11. Study on the anti-radiation effect of soyisoflavone and soyasaponins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Weiqi; Guo Ying; Zhang Yiquan; Yuan Xiaojie; Jing Xueyan; Chen Qiuli

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-γ radiation effect of soyisoflavone and soyasaponins. Methods: Three batches in the experiment In every batch, clean rank of Kunming male mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group, radiated group, soyisoflavone group and soyasaponins group according to their weight. The mice in soy- isoflavone group and soyasaponins group were fed with soyisoflavone and soyasaponins for 30 days successively, then the mice were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays in the whole body except those in the normal control group. After radiation, these two groups were fed equally as before. WBC contents, the Granulocytes and the Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in bone-marrow, SOD activities and MDA contents in the blood and liver were measured. Results: On the third and the fourteenth day after radiation, the number of WBC in the blood and the number of the Granulocytes in bone-marrow, the activities of SOD in the blood and liver in soyisoflavone group and soyasaponins group were significantly higher than that of radiated group (P<0.05). The number of the Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in bone - marrow and MDA contents in the blood were significantly lower than that of radiated group( P<0.05). Conclusion: Soyisofiavone and soyasaponins could prevent the WBC in distal blood and the Granuloeytes in bone-marrow decreasing in number after radiation, restrain the production of the Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, improve the antioxidant ability of radiated mice, and release the irradiation injury from γ-rays. (authors)

  12. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  13. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Dumas-Mallet

    Full Text Available To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers.We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk. Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses.Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8% and subsequent (58/600 9.7% lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1% than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%. Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48 than subsequent ones (29/45 and than lifestyle studies (31/63. Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38 than the neurological (26/41 or somatic (40/77 ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim.Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  14. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  15. Radiation effects on vasoproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Hirotsugu; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1975-01-01

    The authors quantitatively examined radiation effects on vascular proliferarion, using the rat transparent chamber technique to observe the living microcirculation. We studied the process of vasoproliferation and revascularization from the surrounding pre-existing vessels into the surgically avascularized area in the chamber, by measuring the vascular lenght photographically. A hyper-vascularized zone, about 0.5 mm in with, was formed on the vascularizing frontier, the significance of which is so far not known. When the chambers were irradiated with various doses of 60 Co γ-rays, a dose dependent inhibition of vasoproliferation was observed. (auth.)

  16. Radiation effects on vasoproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, H; Matsuzawa, T [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer

    1975-06-01

    The authors quantitatively examined radiation effects on vascular proliferarion, using the rat transparent chamber technique to observe the living microcirculation. We studied the process of vasoproliferation and revascularization from the surrounding pre-existing vessels into the surgically avascularized area in the chamber, by measuring the vascular lenght photographically. A hyper-vascularized zone, about 0.5 mm in with, was formed on the vascularizing frontier, the significance of which is so far not known. When the chambers were irradiated with various doses of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, a dose dependent inhibition of vasoproliferation was observed.

  17. Hereditary radiation effects in offspring of the second and third generations after irradiation of both grandparents. Experimental studies and Hereditary radiation effects in offspring of the first generation after irradiation of one and both parents. Experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefyodova, I.; Nefyodov, I [Medical Radiological Research Centre RAMS, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The parent study has investigated hereditary radiation effects in progeny of the second and third generations of Wistar rats after irradiation of both grandparents with doses of 2-4 Gy. Attention was focused on the relationship between stages of gametogenesis in grandparents at the moment of radiation exposure and death of progeny in embryogenesis and early postnatal ontogenesis. Totals of 4207 mature males and females Wistar rats, 13539 offspring of the second generation (F2) and 746 offspring of the third generation (F3) were the subjects of investigation. Male and female rat grandparents (P) of 220-250 g were exposed to an external single irradiation by gamma rays to doses of 2,3 and 4 Gy at a dose rate of 0.003 Gy.s{sup -1} ({sup 60}Co source). The animals were mated at different times after irradiation so that different stages in gametogenesis were studied. When F1 sexual maturity was achieved, F1 males of each experimental group were mated with intact females to produce F2 descendants from the father's line and conversely F1 females use mated with intact males to produce F2 descendants from the mother's line. Embryogenesis F2 was studied after euthanasia of some females by ether on the 20th day of pregnancy. The fetuses were scored for size and mass, pathology of viscera and skeleton and the total, pre- and postimplantation death of embryos was calculated. In addition development of young rats was observed for 30 days after the birth. The numbers surviving on the 1st and 30th days after the birth were calculated, giving the death rate for this period of time. It was stated: for F2; radiation effects depend upon a dose stage of gametogenesis of both P at the time of radiation exposure; F2 death in embryogenesis occurred only after irradiation of P with a dose of 4 Gy; ossification disorder of the skeleton in F2 embryogenesis was found in all experimental groups; high F2 death is observed after birth which depends much more on the stage of

  18. Hereditary radiation effects in offspring of the second and third generations after irradiation of both grandparents. Experimental studies and Hereditary radiation effects in offspring of the first generation after irradiation of one and both parents. Experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefyodova, I.; Nefyodov, I

    2000-01-01

    The parent study has investigated hereditary radiation effects in progeny of the second and third generations of Wistar rats after irradiation of both grandparents with doses of 2-4 Gy. Attention was focused on the relationship between stages of gametogenesis in grandparents at the moment of radiation exposure and death of progeny in embryogenesis and early postnatal ontogenesis. Totals of 4207 mature males and females Wistar rats, 13539 offspring of the second generation (F2) and 746 offspring of the third generation (F3) were the subjects of investigation. Male and female rat grandparents (P) of 220-250 g were exposed to an external single irradiation by gamma rays to doses of 2,3 and 4 Gy at a dose rate of 0.003 Gy.s -1 ( 60 Co source). The animals were mated at different times after irradiation so that different stages in gametogenesis were studied. When F1 sexual maturity was achieved, F1 males of each experimental group were mated with intact females to produce F2 descendants from the father's line and conversely F1 females use mated with intact males to produce F2 descendants from the mother's line. Embryogenesis F2 was studied after euthanasia of some females by ether on the 20th day of pregnancy. The fetuses were scored for size and mass, pathology of viscera and skeleton and the total, pre- and postimplantation death of embryos was calculated. In addition development of young rats was observed for 30 days after the birth. The numbers surviving on the 1st and 30th days after the birth were calculated, giving the death rate for this period of time. It was stated: for F2; radiation effects depend upon a dose stage of gametogenesis of both P at the time of radiation exposure; F2 death in embryogenesis occurred only after irradiation of P with a dose of 4 Gy; ossification disorder of the skeleton in F2 embryogenesis was found in all experimental groups; high F2 death is observed after birth which depends much more on the stage of gametogenesis P than radiation

  19. Biomedical Engineering and Cognitive Science Secondary Science Curriculum Development: A Three Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stacy S.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on a multi-year effort to create and evaluate cognitive-based curricular materials for secondary school science classrooms. A team of secondary teachers, educational researchers, and academic biomedical engineers developed a series of curriculum units that are based in biomedical engineering for secondary level students in…

  20. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  1. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  2. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roozen, K.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel's Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization

  3. Can informetrics shape biomedical research? A case study of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical research is burgeoning as new dangerous diseases and healing methods emerge. Informetrics defined as methods or a research field that uses mathematical and statistical techniques and/or models to examine patterns that show up not only in publications but also in many aspects of life, as long as the patterns ...

  4. Biomedical techniques in translational studies: The journey so far ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical techniques have wide clinical application in many fields of medicine such as oncology, rheumatology, immunology, genomics, cardiology and diagnostics; among others. This has been made possible with the use of genetic engineering and a number of techniques like Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Fluorescent ...

  5. Radiation effects on polyethylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Oki, Y.; Numajiri, M.; Miura, T.; Kondo, K.; Tanabe, Y.; Ishiyama, M.; Ito, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on four kinds of polyethylenes were studied from the viewpoints of mechanical properties, free radicals and free volumes. The samples were irradiated using a cobalt 60 gamma source to give doses up to 3MGy. The degradation of mechanical strength due to gamma-irradiation was evaluated by the elongation at break and its tensile strength. Radiation induced free radicals were measured by ESR. Free volumes observed by the o-Ps component of the positron annihilation spectrum are normally the large ones located in the amorphous regions and after irradiation these are created in crystalline regions, too. The sizes and the relative numbers of free volumes were evaluated by lifetimes and intensities of a long-lived component of positronium, respectively. Using these data, the properties of polyethylenes before and after irradiation are discussed. (author)

  6. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Cain, O.; Gray, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) represents a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Computer calculations have been used to simplify the evaluation of problems associated with the applications of the CRE-system in radiotherapy. In a general appraisal of the applications of computers to the CRE-system, the various problems encountered in clinical radiotherapy have been categorised into those involving the evaluation of a CRE at a point in tissue and those involving the calculation of CRE distributions. As a general guide, the computer techniques adopted at the Glasgow Institute of Radiotherapeutics for the solution of CRE problems are presented, and consist basically of a package of three interactive programs for point CRE calculations and a Fortran program which calculates CRE distributions for iso-effect treatment planning. Many examples are given to demonstrate the applications of these programs, and special emphasis has been laid on the problem of treating a point in tissue with different doses per fraction on alternate treatment days. The wide range of possible clinical applications of the CRE-system has been outlined and described under the categories of routine clinical applications, retrospective and prospective surveys of patient treatment, and experimental and theoretical research. Some of these applications such as the results of surveys and studies of time optimisation of treatment schedules could have far-reaching consequences and lead to significant improvements in treatment and cure rates with the minimum damage to normal tissue. (author)

  7. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs

  8. The use of ion beams to study radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Particle accelerators are finding increasing use in the study of materials. This review concentrates on their application to study radiation damage effects. The first section deals with the basic interaction of particle beams with solids, the production of defects and their agglomeration, and phenomena such as irradiation-enhanced diffusion and precipitation. The second part of the review which complements a recent article (Mathews. Contemp. Phys.; 18:(6)571 (1977)), deals with the behaviour of materials in fast reactors. It discusses in some detail the application of particle accelerators to technological problems such as void formation in fast reactor materials and irradiation enhanced creep. (author)

  9. Life-span radiation effects studies in animals: what can they tell us

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.C.

    1984-05-01

    Results from life-span studies in a variety of animal species have found relatively little application in the development of radiation risk factors for various organs of man. This paper discusses possible reasons for this situation and presents recommendations to correct it

  10. Morpho-functional study of ionizing radiation effects on the rabbits' femoral vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakiyama, Mauro Yoshimitsu

    1995-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the effects of the ionizing radiation on the rabbits femoral vein. The samples of femoral vein were obtained from 56 New Zealand rabbits, male with ageing from 90 to 120 days, that were divided into 4 groups of 14 animals: one control group non-irradiated and three animal groups sacrificed 2 days, 14 days and 90 days after irradiation. In the three irradiated rabbits groups, each animal received the total dose 4000 cGy (rads) divided in 10 sessions of 400 cGy, a dose equivalent that utilized on clinical therapeutic. A morpho functional study of vein samples was carried out with: light microscopy: stained by hematoxin - eosin, Masson's tricromic, and Verhoeff. Immunohistochemical: reactions of immunoperoxidase with monoclonal mouse anti-human endothelial cell factor CD-31 and anti-human Von Willebrand factor (factor VIII), to study the vein endothelium. Histomorphometry of elastic fiber system stained by Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin with and without prior oxidation with oxone; for the study of mature, elaunin or pre-mature and oxytalan or young elastic fibers. Electronic microscopy: transmission and scanning. With the methodology utilized we observe changes in the femoral vein of the animals submitted to irradiation in relation to the control group, thus described: there is formation of vacuoles between the endothelium and the basal membrane, called sub endothelial vacuoles, in focal areas. The factor VIII and CD-31 endothelial antigens are preserved with no changes in their functions. Focal alterations are present in the endothelial surface with disorder in the setting and orientation of the endothelial cells. there is degeneration of the elastic fibers with significant decrease in their quantity in the stage, 2 days and 14 days after irradiation. There is increase in the quantity of elastic fibers in the late stage, 90 days after irradiation, tending to normality. In this present study, the changes described are not accompanied by venous

  11. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.

    1977-03-01

    A summary is given of studies on radiation effects in light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, detectors, optical isolators and optical fibers. It is shown that the study of radiation damage in these devices can provide valuable information concerning the nature of the devices themselves, as well as methods of hardening these devices for applications in radiation environments

  12. Study of the cell cycle control for human malignant mesothelioma lines. Interferon and radiations effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivo, C.

    1999-01-01

    In order to better understand the inhibition mechanisms of the IFN-R-HU on tumoral development, the IFN-R-U effect on MM lines has been studied. Three groups of lines has been distinguished: eight sensitive lines, two intermediate and three resistant. The sensitive lines showed a triple locking of the cell cycle: in phases S, G1 and G2. The study of the cell cycle control points function, realized by the MM lines radiation exposure showed the points function on G1/S and-or on G2/M and the dependence or non dependence of the cycle stop of the protein P53 and P21 W at F1/CIP1. (A.L.B.)

  13. Study of the initial processes of radiation effects using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Katsumi

    1990-01-01

    Necessity for the research of production mechanisms of molecular damages in biological system and usefulness of monochromatic soft X-ray in these studies are described. Synchrotron radiation are introduced as a strong light source with continuous spectrum. Practically, it is the only light source in soft X-ray and vacuum UV region. Development of irradiation apparatus for radiation biology and recent results using various biological systems are reviewed. (author)

  14. Radiation effects-prevalence of contributory risk factors a pilot study in Visakhapthnam steel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshman rao, K. V.

    2004-01-01

    Integrated Steel Plants contribute significant air pollution, water pollution and solid waste generation. Diverse occupational health hazards present is steel industry pose ill effects to the industrial workers. Occupational health services and research center (OHS and RC) of this plant established in the year 1992 to protect the health and well-being of all the employees working in different occupations. the primary role OHS and RC is to conduct periodical medical examinations, monitoring of the working environments, suggest the suitable personal protective equipment to the workers, evaluate risk factors, work practices, risk management and industrial toxicological studies. Dissemination of information related to occupational health and safety to the working population through regular educational sessions at the workplaces as at training and development center (T and DC) is also part of our services. The proneness for effects of exposure to ionizing radiation is enhanced by various factors related to the family history of chronic diseases, nutritional status of the individuals, the lifestyle factors apart from psycho-social factors like illiteracy, ignorance, negligence and inadequate utilization of personal protective equipment (PPE) at workplace. To evaluate the prevalence of such contributory risk factors, a pilot study has been conducted in Visakhapatnam Steel Plant. The data is obtained through routine periodical medical examination of workers at the Occupational Health Services Center through standard format. The study revealed statistically high prevalence of the risk factors and indicated the necessity of intensifying primary prevention methods in addition to environmental control and usage of PPE. (Author)

  15. Study by dislocation dynamics simulations of radiation effects on the plasticity of ferrite at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    This study is a contribution to the multi-scale modeling of hardening and embrittlement of the vessel steel in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) under irradiation conditions. Dislocation Dynamics simulations (DD) were conducted to describe the plasticity of irradiated iron at grain scale. Quantitative information about the pinning strength of radiation-induced loops was extracted and can be transferred at crystal plasticity scale. Elementary interactions between an edge dislocation and different types of loops were first analyzed. A new model of DD was identified and validated, both qualitatively in terms of interaction mechanisms and quantitatively in terms of critical stress, using Molecular Dynamics results available in the literature. The influence of the size of the loops and of the strain rate was particularly studied. Elementary simulations involving a screw dislocation and the same radiation-induced defects were conducted and carefully compared to available MD results, extending the range of validity of our model. Finally, a set of massive simulations involving an edge dislocation and a large number of loops was performed and allowed a first estimation of the obstacle strength for this type of defects (α≅0.26). This value is in a good agreement with previous experimental and numerical studies, and gives us confidence in future work based on this new DD model. (author) [fr

  16. Radiation effects-prevalence of contributory risk factors a pilot study in Visakhapthnam steel plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshman rao, K. V.

    2004-07-01

    Integrated Steel Plants contribute significant air pollution, water pollution and solid waste generation. Diverse occupational health hazards present is steel industry pose ill effects to the industrial workers. Occupational health services and research center (OHS and RC) of this plant established in the year 1992 to protect the health and well-being of all the employees working in different occupations. the primary role OHS and RC is to conduct periodical medical examinations, monitoring of the working environments, suggest the suitable personal protective equipment to the workers, evaluate risk factors, work practices, risk management and industrial toxicological studies. Dissemination of information related to occupational health and safety to the working population through regular educational sessions at the workplaces as at training and development center (T and DC) is also part of our services. The proneness for effects of exposure to ionizing radiation is enhanced by various factors related to the family history of chronic diseases, nutritional status of the individuals, the lifestyle factors apart from psycho-social factors like illiteracy, ignorance, negligence and inadequate utilization of personal protective equipment (PPE) at workplace. To evaluate the prevalence of such contributory risk factors, a pilot study has been conducted in Visakhapatnam Steel Plant. The data is obtained through routine periodical medical examination of workers at the Occupational Health Services Center through standard format. The study revealed statistically high prevalence of the risk factors and indicated the necessity of intensifying primary prevention methods in addition to environmental control and usage of PPE. (Author)

  17. Numerical Study of Thermal Radiation Effect on Confined Turbulent Free Triangular Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyan Parham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the effects of thermal radiation on turbulent free triangular jets. Finite volume method is applied for solving mass, momentum, and energy equations simultaneously. Discrete ordinate method is used to determine radiation transfer equation (RTE. Results are presented in terms of velocity, kinetic energy, and its dissipation rate fields. Results show that thermal radiation speeds the development of velocity on the jet axis and enhances kinetic energy; therefore, when radiation is added to free jet its mixing power, due to extra kinetic energy, increases.

  18. Determining the infrared radiative effects of Saharan dust: a radiative transfer modelling study based on vertically resolved measurements at Lampedusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Daniela; di Sarra, Alcide; Brogniez, Gérard; Denjean, Cyrielle; De Silvestri, Lorenzo; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Formenti, Paola; Gómez-Amo, José L.; Gröbner, Julian; Kouremeti, Natalia; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Mallet, Marc; Pace, Giandomenico; Sferlazzo, Damiano M.

    2018-03-01

    Detailed measurements of radiation, atmospheric and aerosol properties were carried out in summer 2013 during the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) campaign in the framework of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) experiment. This study focusses on the characterization of infrared (IR) optical properties and direct radiative effects of mineral dust, based on three vertical profiles of atmospheric and aerosol properties and IR broadband and narrowband radiation from airborne measurements, made in conjunction with radiosonde and ground-based observations at Lampedusa, in the central Mediterranean. Satellite IR spectra from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) are also included in the analysis. The atmospheric and aerosol properties are used as input to a radiative transfer model, and various IR radiation parameters (upward and downward irradiance, nadir and zenith brightness temperature at different altitudes) are calculated and compared with observations. The model calculations are made for different sets of dust particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index (RI), derived from observations and from the literature. The main results of the analysis are that the IR dust radiative forcing is non-negligible and strongly depends on PSD and RI. When calculations are made using the in situ measured size distribution, it is possible to identify the refractive index that produces the best match with observed IR irradiances and brightness temperatures (BTs). The most appropriate refractive indices correspond to those determined from independent measurements of mineral dust aerosols from the source regions (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco) of dust transported over Lampedusa, suggesting that differences in the source properties should be taken into account. With the in situ size distribution and the most appropriate refractive index the estimated dust IR radiative forcing

  19. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  20. Experimental Studies of Some Physical Properties of Some Chalcogenide Materials and Its Response to Radiation Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnagar, D.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Se 100-x Bi x system with (x = 0, 5, and 10) amorphous alloys were prepared by the standard melt quenching technique. Homogenous thin films for optical and electrical measurements were prepared using thermal evaporation method with heating substrates at constant temperature ∼ 150 degree C. D.C. conductivity at different temperatures was measured for thin films of the system. The obtained results were found to be reproducible for the different films of the same composition which indicate their stability and homogeneity. More than one region of temperature-dependence of conductivity was clearly observed. The conduction of activation energy was determined for all compositions. The sample with x = 5 exhibits the smallest activation energy and this may be attributed to shift of the Fermi level through the gap. Another possibility can be related to the local order which plays a major role in determining the semiconducting properties of materials. The density of the localized states at the Fermi level N(Ef) was calculated. It increases with the incorporation of Bi in the Se glassy network from 1021 to 1023 eV -1 cm -3 respectively. It was found that the values of the hopping energy (W) and the degree of disorder (To) decrease with increasing Bi concentration. Optical absorption of the films under study was measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm at room temperature. Optical absorption edge was found to shift towards the lower energy side of the spectrum. The optical absorption data follow a law of the form: αhv=b(hv-E T ) 2 where (α) is the absorption coefficient, (hν) is the photon energy, (B) is the slope of Tauc edge called band tailing parameter, and (E T ) is the optical band gap energy. This indicates that the dominant type of electronic transitions for the system of compositions under study is the indirect electronic transition. The (E T ) value obtained by extrapolating the square-law dependence of the absorption Abstract coefficient (α) data to

  1. Study of radiation effects on the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM), 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishikawa, Masao; Iseki, Masachika; Kondo, Hisayoshi

    1989-01-01

    The study of age-related changes in the central nervous system due to irradiation is being carried out in our laboratory. The senescence accelerated mouse (SAM P/1, male) was used for this investigation concerning the one-trial passive avoidance reaction. The experimental group of SAM P/1 was irradiated with 4 Gy at 8 weeks old, and passive avoidance reaction (PAR) was measured for 180 seconds as a learning task. At the age of 7 months, statistical analysis of PAR was conducted using the life time analysis method. The passive avoidance reaction of the irradiated group was more impaired than that of the control group. The results of this investigation suggested that the learning and/or memory disturbance of irradiated SAM P/1 is similar to the changes of more aged SAM P/1. (author)

  2. Electron microscope studies of methotrexate and radiation effects in human squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Martino, C.

    1974-01-01

    Serial biopsy specimens from two squamous cell carcinomas of the mouth were studied by electron microscopy. This report described the ultrastructural changes in the cells produced by treatment with methotrexate followed by irradiation. The main ultrastructural findings after treatment are: numerous autophagic lysosomes and residual bodies are visible in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells; mitochondria are swollen. The mitochondrial cristae are distorted and disrupted, and mitochondrial matrix disappears; the nucleolus shows a series of morphological changes such as development of a compact nucleolus, aggregation of granular elements, atrophy, dissolution and fragmentation of the nucleolar mass; infiltration of lymphocytes, granulocytes and macrophages in the tumor. The significance of these ultrastructural findings is discussed. (U.S.)

  3. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Maria Cristina Franco de

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  4. Application of a Pelletron accelerator to study total dose radiation effects on 50 GHz SiGe HBTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen, K.C.; Pushpa, N.; Naik, P.S. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Cressler, John D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tripathi, Ambuj [Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi 110 067 (India); Gnana Prakash, A.P., E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total dose effects of 50 MeV Li3+ ion on 50 GHz SiGe HBTs is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ion irradiated results were compared with Co-60 gamma results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 50 MeV Li ions create more damage in E-B spacer oxide when compared to Co-60 gamma radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-60 gamma radiation create more damage in STI oxide when compared to 50 MeV Li ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Worst case total dose radiation effects can be studied using Pelletron accelerator facilities. - Abstract: We have investigated the effects of 50 MeV lithium ion irradiation on the DC electrical characteristics of first-generation silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors (50 GHz SiGe HBTs) in the dose range of 600 krad to 100 Mrad. The results of 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion irradiation on the SiGe HBTs are compared with 63 MeV proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation results in the same dose range in order to understand the damage induced by different LET species. The radiation response of emitter-base (EB) spacer oxide and shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide to different irradiation types are discussed in this paper. We have also focused on the efficacy in the application of a Pelletron accelerator to study total dose irradiation studies in SiGe HBTs.

  5. Utilization of rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Waldir Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the dimensional stability, as well as, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of polymers, new filler to this purpose has been developed. The mos applied filler to propitiate the features previously mentioned are the glass and carbon fibers, the mineral filler as the calcium carbonate, the talc and the micro glass sphere. The main aim of this work was to study the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite, irradiated by electron beam at different doses, since it is constituted of at least 90% of silicon dioxide, and compared with the talc which is the most applied mineral filler. This comparison was made from a compound made through the refined rice husk ash and the polyamide 6 (PA 6), which is one of the main engineering plastic with applications in several productive areas. The samples were injected and irradiated in a electron accelerator. Afterwards, their mechanical and thermal properties were measured. It was also inject automotive parts to verify the processing of the PA 6 with CCA. The results showed that the use of the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 composite is technically and economically viable. The irradiation of the studied composite (PA 6 with 30% of rice husk ash) did not provide any improvement for the mechanical and thermal properties previously appraised. (author)

  6. A functional and chemical study of radiation effects on rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissink, A.; S-Gravenmade, E.J.; Ligeon, E.E.; Konings, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor composition and rate of secretion of rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva following local single doses of X-rays ranging from 5 to 20 Gy. Pilocarpine-stimulated samples of parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva were simultaneously collected with miniaturized Lashley cups before and 1-30 days after irradiation. The lag phase (period between injection of pilocarpine and start of the secretion) and flow rate were recorded and the concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, and amylase were measured. With increasing dose and time, the salivary flow rate as well as sodium concentration decreased, while potassium concentrations increased throughout the follow-up period. The lag phase and the concentration of amylase reached their maximum at 3 and 10 days after irradiation, respectively. The changes in lag phase and flow rate were most obvious after doses of 15 or 20 Gy and showed a great similarity for parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva. No dose-response relationship was observed for the changes in concentrations of calcium and phosphate. It is concluded that for radiation doses of 10 Gy and above, irreversible changes (lag phase, flow rate, potassium, sodium) were observed. A saturation of the irradiation effects (lag phase, flow rate) seems to exist at doses larger than 15 Gy. No significant differences were observed between the radiation-induced functional changes in parotid and submandibular/sublingual salivary gland tissue

  7. Studies on the synthesis and anti-radiation effect of 16-β-epiestriol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Zengshou; Zheng Sixin; Wang Peiren; Li Lu; Huang Mingxin

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis and radioprotective effect of 16 - β - epiestriol(2) are reported. The key intermediate, 16-ketoestradiol(7) was prepared by the reaction of 16α, 17α-epoxide estradiol diacetate(4) and methanolic potassium hydroxide. Epiestriol(2) was obtained by reduction of compound(7). Pharmacological study showed that the radioprotective effect of epiestriol at 9.0 Gy was higher than that of estriol(1) with 0.1 mg per mouse injected peritoneally 24 hr before irradiation, the survival rate with epiestriol was 85% higher than the control group, while estriol only elevated it by 50% under the same conditions. The slope of the survival-radiation dose curve with epiestriol was less steep than that with estriol. The structure-activity relationship and radioprotective effect of epiestriol and estriol suggest that the 16β-effect of steric factors on the receptor is one of the main effects. The 16β-hydroxyestriol appears to have the optimal radioprotective potency, in comparison with the 16β-hydroxyestriol

  8. Study of the ionizing radiation effect on the polyamide 6,6 mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2004-01-01

    Polyamide 6,6 due to its excellent mechanical, thermal and electrical properties and its great performance in multiple industrial applications is considered one of the most important engineering polymers. However, in specific applications, some of its properties need to be improved by means additives or fillers to reach the required properties increasing its final cost. By these considerations, the aim of this work was to apply the ionizing radiation to improve the natural mechanical properties of polyamide 6,6. Also, to evaluate the irradiation parameters, and the mechanical performance of the irradiated polymer in order to use the cross-linking, induced by ionizing radiation, as substitute of additives and fillers. Row polyamide 6,6 samples, for mechanical tests, were prepared by injection molded and then irradiated with high energetic electrons to reach doses of 70, 100, 150, and 200 kGy. The mechanical performance, of non-irradiated and irradiated samples, was evaluated by tensile strength, impact, hardness and wear measurements. Furthermore, hardness and wear tests were carried out with samples, which were immersed in petroleum and sea water for 6 months. The experimental results have shown that, in the studied dose range, the tensile strength increases 25%, the hardness Shore D 15%, the impact values diminished by 80% and the wear values decreased 20 times between 0 and 200 kGy. The effect of the petroleum and sea water were shown mainly in the nonirradiated samples. (author)

  9. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiqing; Yan Heping

    1995-01-01

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  10. Study of radiation effects on some glasses and their applications in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, A.El.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis comprises a study of the X-ray diffraction, thermal, electrical, ESR and optical properties of lead lithium tetra borate glass. The objective of this thesis is to prepare glass dosimeter and study the effect of several gamma-irradiation doses on Lead lithium tetra borate glasses doped with Cu O. The two glasses were prepared from chemical reagents; Li 2 B 4 O 7 from ready package, lead and copper oxide were added in fixed Proportions. The glass melting was made in porcelain crucibles, using electrically heated furnace at temperature of 1000 -1100 degree C. The melts rapidly quenched in air by pressing between two stainless-steel plates mould kept at room temperature. The resultant glasses were colorless for LPTB and transparent greenish sheet of LPTB Cu glass about 0.8 mm thick and where polished to meet the requirements for optical and electrical measurements. The obtained results can be summarized as follows:- Density It is observed that, for unirradiated samples, the addition of copper to LPTB leads to the increase of the number of ions in the sample which decreases the inter-ionic distance. As a result, the molar volume of LPTB Cu decreased and consequently its density increased in the range of 10 ± 1 %. Irradiation with gamma rays is assumed to create displacements, electronic defects and /or breaks in the network bonds. Irradiation can cause the compaction of B 2 O 3 by breaking of the bonds between trigonal elements, allowing the formation of different configuration. Irradiating the LPTB glass with growing gamma doses up to 25 kGy decreased its molar volume with in 4.07 % and consequently increased the density with the same percentage. For the glass LPTB Cu, the effect of gamma rays appeared as a decrease in the molar volume and increase in density with the same percentage (12.9%). The addition traces of copper (0.01 weight %) to LPTB enhanced the effect of gamma radiation on it. Crystallization Behavior: - X-ray diffraction The results show

  11. A sem study of radiation effects on the rat molar enamel formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ho; Park, Tae Won

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of radiation on the formation of rat molar enamel at the developmental stages. The experimental animals were divided into five groups and were irradiated single dose of 396 cGy; 1st group on 14th day of gestation, 2nd group on 19th day of gestation, 3rd group on 3 days after birth, 4th group on 8 days after birth, 5th group on 28 days after birth. The control and 1, 2, 3 and 4th experimental groups were sacrificed on 2, 4, and 6 weeks and the 5th groups were sacrificed on 1 day and 2 weeks after irradiation. Distal 1/2 and occlusal 1/3 enamel surface of lingual side of lingual cusp, and fractured surface of lingual side of lingual cusp in a longitudinal direction of the mandibular first molar were examined using scanning electron microscope. The following results were obtained: 1. The roughness of enamel surface and enamel hypoplsia were increased in a sequence of 4th, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd experimental group, and the enamel cracks were increased in the 1st and 2nd experimental group. 2. The pattern of enamel hypoplasia had a network from on the 1st and 2nd experimental group, and appeared a linear shape on the 3rd experimental group, and then the crator-like enamel defects were observed in all experimental groups(especially 1st and 2nd experimental group) except 5th. 3. Dentinoenamel junction showed the clear-cut and straight appearance except 5th experimental group. 4. There was no significant difference between 5th experimental and control group.

  12. The study of the radiation protection of propolis to the radiation effects in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.H.; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Muto, H. [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan); Yanagisawa, Takaharu; Iwasa, Toshihiro; Bamen, K.

    2000-05-01

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. Therefore, even an effects to this fetus is grasped precisely, and protection criterion and resource are decided from the viewpoint of the protection of radiation as well. If it does so, a child and maturitas aren't so difficult as in the protection of radiation and the managerial side. It was examined about control group, propolis administration chisels for medical use group, 1.5 Gy independent exposure group and propolis pluse 1.5 Gy group in this study. It was examined about the protection of radiation of propolis which to malformation, fetal death, arrested development, and so on in the organogenesis (8 days post conception) being done when sensibility is the highest against the teratogenesis. Preimplantation death rate was compared with the control group and the sham control group, and statistical significant difference wasn't recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group, propolis administration 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5 Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It has a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5 Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so

  13. The study of the radiation protection of propolis to the radiation effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y.H.; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Muto, H.; Yanagisawa, Takaharu; Iwasa, Toshihiro; Bamen, K.

    2000-01-01

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. Therefore, even an effects to this fetus is grasped precisely, and protection criterion and resource are decided from the viewpoint of the protection of radiation as well. If it does so, a child and maturitas aren't so difficult as in the protection of radiation and the managerial side. It was examined about control group, propolis administration chisels for medical use group, 1.5 Gy independent exposure group and propolis pluse 1.5 Gy group in this study. It was examined about the protection of radiation of propolis which to malformation, fetal death, arrested development, and so on in the organogenesis (8 days post conception) being done when sensibility is the highest against the teratogenesis. Preimplantation death rate was compared with the control group and the sham control group, and statistical significant difference wasn't recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group, propolis administration 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5 Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It has a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5 Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so long as there was

  14. Rules and management of biomedical waste at Vivekananda Polyclinic: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Boojh, Ram; Mishra, Ajai; Chandra, Hem

    2009-01-01

    Hospitals and other healthcare establishments have a 'duty of care' for the environment and for public health, and have particular responsibilities in relation to the waste they produce (i.e., biomedical waste). Negligence, in terms of biomedical waste management, significantly contributes to polluting the environment, affects the health of human beings, and depletes natural and financial resources. In India, in view of the serious situation of biomedical waste management, the Ministry of Environment and Forests, within the Government of India, ratified the Biomedical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, in July 1998. The present paper provides a brief description of the biomedical waste (Management and Handling) Rules 1998, and the current biomedical waste management practices in one of the premier healthcare establishments of Lucknow, the Vivekananda Polyclinic. The objective in undertaking this study was to analyse the biomedical waste management system, including policy, practice (i.e., storage, collection, transportation and disposal), and compliance with the standards prescribed under the regulatory framework. The analysis consisted of interviews with medical authorities, doctors, and paramedical staff involved in the management of the biomedical wastes in the Polyclinic. Other important stakeholders that were consulted and interviewed included environmental engineers (looking after the Biomedical Waste Cell) of the State Pollution Control Board, and randomly selected patients and visitors to the Polyclinic. A general survey of the facilities of the Polyclinic was undertaken to ascertain the efficacy of the implemented measures. The waste was quantified based on random samples collected from each ward. It was found that, although the Polyclinic in general abides by the prescribed regulations for the treatment and disposal of biomedical waste, there is a need to further build the capacity of the Polyclinic and its staff in terms of providing state

  15. Study of the rice husk ash utilization as filler polypropylene matrix and ionization radiation effect on this composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Eduardo de Faria

    2010-01-01

    In the first step of this work, it was evaluated the possibility of using rice husk ash as a filler in polypropylene (PP) making a comparison with talc which is the most used mineral filler in polymers. This comparison was made by using polypropylene with 20% rice husk ash as well as polypropylene with 20% talc measuring their properties. Despite the properties of the PP with 20% rice husk ash decreased compared with the composite of polypropylene with 20% talc it can be said that the rice husk ash can be used as filler for or other utilization less noble of PP . This way it is being given a destination for this residue that it is disposable in the environment contributing to its preservation, moreover reducing the product cost. This work had also as an aim to study the ionizing radiation effect in the properties of these composites. It was used the coupling agent, maleic anhydride , to verify a best sample homogenization. According to the results it can be said that PP is a semicrystalline polymer, and so it has its morphology modified when exposed to the irradiation process. This fact is due to the scission mechanisms of the polymeric chains which it is in compliance to the literature. (author)

  16. Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Y.

    1990-01-01

    This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered

  17. [Literature cited in a study of Yugoslav biomedical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, S; Pejić, M; Cikić, B

    1995-01-01

    The paper reviews results of a research on literature cited in papers published in two most remarkable Yugoslav biomedical journals, Medicinski Pregled and Srpski arhiv za celokupno lekarstvo, in 1985 and 1992. The analysis included the following parameters: the amount of published papers, the quantity of cites out of the literature that has been used, frequency of citation of foreign and domestic literature as well as the quantity of self citations. According to the gathered results, foreign literature is remarkably more often cited than the domestic references, mostly in English, but the percentage of citing one's own papers is also high.

  18. Report of the APS summer study on physics problems relating to energy technologies: radiation effects on materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.; Birnbaum, H.K.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1974-06-01

    The status of research and development programs related to radiation effects on materials is reviewed. Information is included on point defects in metals, dislocations, radiation damage, simulation of neutron damage, H and He in metals, insulators, semiconductors, and superconductors. (U.S.)

  19. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  20. Radiation effects in ice: New results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M.J.; Raut, U.; Shi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of radiation effects in ice are motivated by intrinsic interest and by applications in astronomy. Here we report on new and recent results on radiation effects induced by energetic ions in ice: amorphization of crystalline ice, compaction of microporous amorphous ice, electrostatic charging and dielectric breakdown and correlated structural/chemical changes in the irradiation of water-ammonia ices

  1. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  2. Are we studying what matters? Health priorities and NIH-funded biomedical engineering research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jessica B; Paltiel, A David; Saltzman, W Mark

    2010-07-01

    With the founding of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 1999, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) made explicit its dedication to expanding research in biomedical engineering. Ten years later, we sought to examine how closely federal funding for biomedical engineering aligns with U.S. health priorities. Using a publicly accessible database of research projects funded by the NIH in 2008, we identified 641 grants focused on biomedical engineering, 48% of which targeted specific diseases. Overall, we found that these disease-specific NIH-funded biomedical engineering research projects align with national health priorities, as quantified by three commonly utilized measures of disease burden: cause of death, disability-adjusted survival losses, and expenditures. However, we also found some illnesses (e.g., cancer and heart disease) for which the number of research projects funded deviated from our expectations, given their disease burden. Our findings suggest several possibilities for future studies that would serve to further inform the allocation of limited research dollars within the field of biomedical engineering.

  3. A long-term study of aerosol–cloud interactions and their radiative effect at the Southern Great Plains using ground-based measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Sena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical estimates of the microphysical response of cloud droplet size distribution to aerosol perturbations are commonly used to constrain aerosol–cloud interactions in climate models. Instead of empirical microphysical estimates, here macroscopic variables are analyzed to address the influence of aerosol particles and meteorological descriptors on instantaneous cloud albedo and the radiative effect of shallow liquid water clouds. Long-term ground-based measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program over the Southern Great Plains are used. A broad statistical analysis was performed on 14 years of coincident measurements of low clouds, aerosol, and meteorological properties. Two cases representing conflicting results regarding the relationship between the aerosol and the cloud radiative effect were selected and studied in greater detail. Microphysical estimates are shown to be very uncertain and to depend strongly on the methodology, retrieval technique and averaging scale. For this continental site, the results indicate that the influence of the aerosol on the shallow cloud radiative effect and albedo is weak and that macroscopic cloud properties and dynamics play a much larger role in determining the instantaneous cloud radiative effect compared to microphysical effects. On a daily basis, aerosol shows no correlation with cloud radiative properties (correlation = −0.01 ± 0.03, whereas the liquid water path shows a clear signal (correlation = 0.56 ± 0.02.

  4. Radiation effects on lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, B.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the ontogeny of lymphocyte populations concentrates on sites of production, rates of production, and the factors governing the differentiation and longevity of the various lymphocyte pools. The physiology of the lymphocyte pools is described with particular emphasis on recirculation from blood to lymph through lymphoid tissues. The separate routes of recirculation of both thymus-derived and nonthymus-derived lymphocytes and the possible anatomical sites and mechanisms of lymphocyte cooperation are discussed. Radiation effects on lymphocyte populations are divided into two sections. First, the effects of whole-body irradiation on the total lymphocyte pools are discussed including the differential effects of irradiation on T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, lymphoblasts, and plasma cells. The differential sensitivity of various types of immune response is correlated, where possible, with the differential sensitivity of the lymphocyte types involved. Second, experimental attempts to selectively deplete discrete subpopulations of the total lymphocyte pools, e.g., recirculating cells, are briefly discussed with particular emphasis on studies on the effects of the localization of radionuclides in lymphoid tissue

  5. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  6. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchem, L.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps

  8. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. (ed.); Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  9. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchem, L. [ed.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  10. A Case Study: Data Management in Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R. Gaudette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a biomedical engineering lab at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, co-author Dr. Glenn R. Gaudette and his research team are investigating the effects of stem cell therapy on the regeneration of function in damaged cardiac tissue in laboratory rats. Each instance of stem cell experimentation on a rat yields hundreds of data sets that must be carefully captured, documented and securely stored so that the data will be easily accessed and retrieved for papers, reports, further research, and validation of findings, while meeting NIH guidelines for data sharing. After a brief introduction to the bioengineering field and stem cell research, this paper focuses on the experimental workflow and the data generated in one instance of stem cell experimentation; the lab’s data management practices; and how Dr. Gaudette teaches data management to the lab’s incoming graduate students each semester. The co-authors discuss the haphazard manner by which engineering and science students typically learn data management practices, and advocate for the integration of formal data management instruction in higher education STEM curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion of the Frameworks for a Data Management Curriculum developed collaboratively by the co-authors’ institutions -- the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute -- to teach data management best practices to students in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering.

  11. Knowledge, attitude, and practices about biomedical waste management among healthcare personnel: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesh Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The waste produced in the course of healthcare activities carries a higher potential for infection and injury than any other type of waste. Inadequate and inappropriate knowledge of handling of healthcare waste may have serious health consequences and a significant impact on the environment as well. Objective: The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians, and sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted among hospitals (bed capacity >100 of Allahabad city. Participants: Medical personnel included were doctors (75, nurses (60, laboratory technicians (78, and sanitary staff (70. Results: Doctors, nurses, and laboratory technicians have better knowledge than sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Knowledge regarding the color coding and waste segregation at source was found to be better among nurses and laboratory staff as compared to doctors. Regarding practices related to biomedical waste management, sanitary staff were ignorant on all the counts. However, injury reporting was low across all the groups of health professionals. Conclusion: The importance of training regarding biomedical waste management needs emphasis; lack of proper and complete knowledge about biomedical waste management impacts practices of appropriate waste disposal.

  12. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given

  13. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  14. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book covers all aspects of biological radiation effects. The physical basis is dealt with in some detail, and the effects at the subcellular and the cellular level are discussed, taking into account modern developments and techniques. The effects on the human organism are reviewed, both from the point of view of applications in medicine as well as with regard to radiation hazards (teratogenic, gonadal and carcinogenic effects)

  15. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengfelder, E.; Forst, D.; Feist, H.; Pratzel, H.

    1988-01-01

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix [de

  16. Suitability of customer relationship management systems for the management of study participants in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanke, J; Rienhoff, O; Schulze, T G; Nussbeck, S Y

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal biomedical research projects study patients or participants over a course of time. No IT solution is known that can manage study participants, enhance quality of data, support re-contacting of participants, plan study visits, and keep track of informed consent procedures and recruitments that may be subject to change over time. In business settings management of personal is one of the major aspects of customer relationship management systems (CRMS). To evaluate whether CRMS are suitable IT solutions for study participant management in biomedical research. Three boards of experts in the field of biomedical research were consulted to get an insight into recent IT developments regarding study participant management systems (SPMS). Subsequently, a requirements analysis was performed with stakeholders of a major biomedical research project. The successive suitability evaluation was based on the comparison of the identified requirements with the features of six CRMS. Independently of each other, the interviewed expert boards confirmed that there is no generic IT solution for the management of participants. Sixty-four requirements were identified and prioritized in a requirements analysis. The best CRMS was able to fulfill forty-two of these requirements. The non-fulfilled requirements demand an adaption of the CRMS, consuming time and resources, reducing the update compatibility, the system's suitability, and the security of the CRMS. A specific solution for the SPMS is favored instead of a generic and commercially-oriented CRMS. Therefore, the development of a small and specific SPMS solution was commenced and is currently on the way to completion.

  17. Advisory group meeting on stable isotope labelled compounds in biomedical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Ruiz, H.; Parr, R.M.

    1985-11-01

    The programme of the meeting was restricted to topics involving applications of stable isotopes of the lighter elements (H, C, N, O). The current status of stable isotope techniques and applications in nutritional and biomedical studies, the applicability of these techniques in developing countries and the IAEA's future programmes on this topic were discussed

  18. Indicators for the dynamics of research organizations: A biomedical case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.; van den Besselaar, P.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results on a bibliometric case study of the long-term development of research organizations, using an internationally leading biomedical institute as example. Using scientometric concepts, small group theory, organizational ecology, and process-based organizational theory, we

  19. PASSIM – an open source software system for managing information in biomedical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neogi Sudeshna

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial aspects of day-to-day laboratory information management is collection, storage and retrieval of information about research subjects and biomedical samples. An efficient link between sample data and experiment results is absolutely imperative for a successful outcome of a biomedical study. Currently available software solutions are largely limited to large-scale, expensive commercial Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS. Acquiring such LIMS indeed can bring laboratory information management to a higher level, but often implies sufficient investment of time, effort and funds, which are not always available. There is a clear need for lightweight open source systems for patient and sample information management. Results We present a web-based tool for submission, management and retrieval of sample and research subject data. The system secures confidentiality by separating anonymized sample information from individuals' records. It is simple and generic, and can be customised for various biomedical studies. Information can be both entered and accessed using the same web interface. User groups and their privileges can be defined. The system is open-source and is supplied with an on-line tutorial and necessary documentation. It has proven to be successful in a large international collaborative project. Conclusion The presented system closes the gap between the need and the availability of lightweight software solutions for managing information in biomedical studies involving human research subjects.

  20. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.; Gray, W.M.; Watson, E.R.

    1977-01-01

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  1. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Milo A; Akl, Elie A; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-02-23

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty) and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of manuscripts.

  2. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies- the need for more transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being unable to publish their work. Currently, too few papers in the medical literature frankly discuss how limitations could have affected the study findings and interpretations. The goals of this commentary are to review how limitations are currently acknowledged in the medical literature, to discuss the implications of limitations in biomedical studies, and to make suggestions as to how to openly discuss limitations for scientists submitting their papers to journals. This commentary was developed through discussion and logical arguments by the authors who are doing research in the area of hedging (use of language to express uncertainty and who have extensive experience as authors and editors of biomedical papers. We strongly encourage authors to report on all potentially important limitations that may have affected the quality and interpretation of the evidence being presented. This will not only benefit science but also offers incentives for authors: If not all important limitations are acknowledged readers and reviewers of scientific articles may perceive that the authors were unaware of them. Authors should take advantage of their content knowledge and familiarity with the study to prevent misinterpretations of the limitations by reviewers and readers. Articles discussing limitations help shape the future research agenda and are likely to be cited because they have informed the design and conduct of future studies. Instead of perceiving acknowledgment of limitations negatively, authors, reviewers and editors should recognize the potential of a frank and unbiased discussion of study limitations that should not jeopardize acceptance of

  3. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zackary Suleiman

    A publication of the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences, University of Sierra Leone ... Case Study ... Peri-operative management of patients with significant cardio-respiratory disease ... contribute to patient safety by preventing any.

  4. Role of dust direct radiative effect on the tropical rainbelt over Middle East and North Africa: A high resolution AGCM study

    KAUST Repository

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu

    2015-04-25

    To investigate the influence of direct radiative effect of dust on the tropical summer rainbelt across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the present study utilizes the high resolution capability of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM),the High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM). Ensembles of Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project (AMIP)-style simulations have been conducted with and without dust radiative impacts, to differentiate the influence of dust on the tropical rainbelt. The analysis focuses on summer season. The results highlight the role of dust induced responses in global and regional scale circulations in determining the strength and the latitudinal extent of the tropical rainbelt. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet (AEJ) and West African Monsoon (WAM) circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rainbelt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Importantly, the summer precipitation over the semi-arid strip south of Sahara, including Sahel, increases up to 20%. As this region is characterized by the “Sahel drought" , the predicted precipitation sensitivity to the dust loading over this region has a wide-range of socioeconomic implications. Overall, the study demonstrates the extreme importance of incorporating dust radiative effects and the corresponding circulation responses at various scales, in the simulations and future projections of this region\\'s climate.

  5. The status of the seventh report in the series Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and a revised dosimetry for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's A-bomb studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douple, Evan; Jostes, Rick

    2002-01-01

    Results of a National Academies workshop and feasibility study led US Governmental agencies to request the Board on Radiation Effects Research of the National Research Council to commence a risk assessment study in 1998 as the seventh report in the series Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR VII). Originally targeted for completion in the autumn of 2001, the study Potential Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose, Low-LET Ionizing Radiation was extended until the autumn of 2003 at the request of the sponsors. Two factors contributing to this decision are discussed: a revised dosimetry to update DS86 for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's A-bomb-survivor studies and the potential for new information to become available from low-dose studies that are under way. Epidemiological and biological data since BEIR V are being considered by a BEIR VII committee composed of 17 members. The committee's statement of task is reviewed along with the major recommendations of the recent National Research Council report on the status of DS86 - recommendations that are being implemented by US and Japan dosimetry working groups. (author)

  6. Biomedical and health studies with the new Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Isles, K.; Hill, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on clinical patients who had malnutrition, cystic fibrosis and other related electrolyte disorders. A stable activable tracer technique has been developed to determine the extracellular fluid volume (ECV) of infants. A regulated dose of sodium bromide is injected into the patient and, following short-term equilibration and dilution of this sample, a small blood sample is taken, yielding 50 μl of plasma. The plasma bromide concentration is determined by 80 Br (T=18 m) activation. Some samples were cross-checked by a microdiffusion method. The technique has been applied to 230 patients and controls, and has proved to be simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive for determining ECV to +-6%. Patients with cystic fibrosis (C.F.) were studied with respect to their growth and their sodium and electrolyte balance. In related clinical studies, hair and nail clippings from 50 C.F. patients and control children of the same age groups were activated at SLOWPOKE and Cu, Ca, Br, Cl, K, Na and I determined for use in differentiating C.F., along with a number of other elements including Zn, Mn, Al, Ti and Ni which showed little difference. A fairly good correlation of hair and nail concentrations was found for a number of the elements determined, suggesting that either tissue may be used in future studies. (T.G.)

  7. Linking biomedical engineering ethics case study approach and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrell, William; Dobie, Elizabeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we link bioengineering case study methods to the development of policy. The case study approach to ethics is an excellent way to show the complex nature of practical/moral reasoning. This approach can, however, lead to a kind of overwhelming complexity. The individual nature of each case makes it difficult to identify the most important information and difficult to see what moral considerations are most relevant. In order to make the overwhelming complexity less debilitating, we present a framework for moral decision making derived from suggestions made by W.D. Ross and Virginia Held. Ross articulates the multiple sources of morality and Held deepens the discussion by reminding us of the foundational importance of care and sympathy to our moral natures. We show how to use the notion of prima facie duty and discuss moral conflict. In doing this, we show how the framework, applied to cases, can be of assistance in helping us develop policies and codes of ethics with sufficient plasticity to be useful in the complex world of the bioengineer.

  8. Consumer nueroscience: a new area of study for biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In scientific literature, the most accepted definition of consumer neuroscience or neuromarketing is that it is a field of study concerning the application of neuroscience methods to analyze and understand human behavior related to markets and marketing exchanges. First, it might seem strange that marketers would be interested in using neuroscience to understand consumer's preferences. Yet in practice, the basic goal of marketers is to guide the design and presentation of products in such a way that they are highly compatible with consumer preferences. To understand consumers preferences, several standard research tools are commonly used by marketers, such as personal interviews with the consumers, scoring questionnaries gathered from consumers, and focus groups. The reason marketing researchers are interested in using brain imaging tools instead of simply asking people for their preferences in front of marketing stimuli, arises from the assumption that people cannot (or do not want to) fully explain their preference when explicitly asked. Researchers in the field hypothesize that neuroimaging tools can access information within the consumer's brain during the generation of a preference or the observation of a commercial advertisement. The question of will this information be useful in further promoting the product is still up for debate in marketing literature. From the marketing researchers point of view, there is a hope that this body of brain imaging techniques will provide an efficient tradeoff between costs and benefits of the research. Currently, neuroscience methodology includes powerful brain imaging tools based on the gathering of hemodynamic or electromagnetic signals related to the human brain activity during the performance of a relevant task for marketing objectives. These tools are briefly reviewed in this article.

  9. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 ± 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 ± 0.08 kHz with associated T 2 * values 780 ± 20 micros and 523 ± 24 micros, respectively. The previously unreported ν - line for urea-d 4 was detected at 2,381 ± 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant χ (3,548.74 ± 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter η (0.31571 ± 0.00007) for urea-d 4 . The inverse linewidth parameter T 2 * for ν + was measured at 928 ± 23 micros and for ν - at 721 ± 12 micros. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d 4 exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T 2 and T 2 * and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T 2 and T 2 * values for ν - and ν - as a function of temperature

  10. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  11. Biomedical solid waste management in an Indian hospital: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Gayathri V.; Pokhrel, Kamala

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the waste handling and treatment system of hospital bio-medical solid waste and its mandatory compliance with Regulatory Notifications for Bio-medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1998, under the Environment (Protection Act 1986), Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Govt. of India, at the chosen KLE Society's J. N. Hospital and Medical Research Center, Belgaum, India and (ii) to quantitatively estimate the amount of non-infectious and infectious waste generated in different wards/sections. During the study, it was observed that: (i) the personnel working under the occupier (who has control over the institution to take all steps to ensure biomedical waste is handled without any adverse effects to human health and the environment) were trained to take adequate precautionary measures in handling these bio-hazardous waste materials, (ii) the process of segregation, collection, transport, storage and final disposal of infectious waste was done in compliance with the Standard Procedures, (iii) the final disposal was by incineration in accordance to EPA Rules 1998 (iv) the non-infectious waste was collected separately in different containers and treated as general waste, and (v) on an average about 520 kg of non-infectious and 101 kg of infectious waste is generated per day (about 2.31 kg per day per bed, gross weight comprising both infectious and non-infectious waste). This hospital also extends its facility to the neighboring clinics and hospitals by treating their produced waste for incineration

  12. An analytical method for estimating the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    The use of 14 N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing 14 N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The 14 N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation

  13. An analytical method for estimating the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iselin, Louis Henry [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The use of 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing 14N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The 14N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  14. Biomedical waste management: Study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  15. Biomedical waste management: study on the awareness and practice among healthcare workers in a tertiary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, L; Paul, H; Premkumar, J; Paul, R; Michael, J S

    2015-01-01

    Bio-medical waste has a higher potential of infection and injury to the healthcare worker, patient and the surrounding community. Awareness programmes on their proper handling and management to healthcare workers can prevent the spread of infectious diseases and epidemics. This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to assess the impact of training, audits and education/implementations from 2009 to 2012 on awareness and practice of biomedical waste segregation. Our study reveals focused training, strict supervision, daily surveillance, audits inspections, involvement of hospital administrators and regular appraisals are essential to optimise the segregation of biomedical waste.

  16. Radiation effects on microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Applications of radiation-hardened microelectronics in nuclear power systems include (a) light water reactor (LWR) containment building, postaccident instrumentation that can operate through the beta and gamma radiation released in a design basis loss-of-coolant accident; (b) advanced LWR instrumentation and control systems employing distributed digital integrated circuit (IC) technology to achieve a high degree of artificial intelligence and thereby reduce the probability of operator error under accident conditions; (c) instrumentation, command, control and communication systems for space nuclear power applications that must operate during the neutron and gamma-ray core leakage environments as well as the background electron, proton, and heavy charged particle environments of space; and (d) robotics systems designed for the described functions. Advanced microelectronics offer advantages in cost and reliability over alternative approaches to instrumentation and control. No semiconductor technology is hard to all classes of radiation effects phenomena. As the effects have become better understood, however, significant progress has been made in hardening IC technology. Application of hardened microelectronics to nuclear power systems has lagged military applications because of the limited market potential of hardened instruments and numerous institutional impediments

  17. Characterizing semantic mappings adaptation via biomedical KOS evolution: a case study investigating SNOMED CT and ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Julio Cesar; Pruski, Cédric; Da Silveira, Marcos; Reynaud-Delaître, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Mappings established between Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS) increase semantic interoperability between biomedical information systems. However, biomedical knowledge is highly dynamic and changes affecting KOS entities can potentially invalidate part or the totality of existing mappings. Understanding how mappings evolve and what the impacts of KOS evolution on mappings are is therefore crucial for the definition of an automatic approach to maintain mappings valid and up-to-date over time. In this article, we study variations of a specific KOS complex change (split) for two biomedical KOS (SNOMED CT and ICD-9-CM) through a rigorous method of investigation for identifying and refining complex changes, and for selecting representative cases. We empirically analyze and explain their influence on the evolution of associated mappings. Results point out the importance of considering various dimensions of the information described in KOS, like the semantic structure of concepts, the set of relevant information used to define the mappings and the change operations interfering with this set of information.

  18. The role of biomedical knowledge in echocardiographic interpretation expertise development: a correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Gøtzsche, Ole; Eika, Berit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about factors of relevance for achieving knowledge of echocardiography (TTE); one of the essential skills defined by the European Society of Cardiology Core Curriculum. Recent research in other fields suggests that biomedical knowledge plays a more prominent role in profe......Purpose: Little is known about factors of relevance for achieving knowledge of echocardiography (TTE); one of the essential skills defined by the European Society of Cardiology Core Curriculum. Recent research in other fields suggests that biomedical knowledge plays a more prominent role...... in professional practice than previously assumed. This study investigates the role of biomedical knowledge represented by physiology knowledge in the development of echocardiographic expertise. Methods: Forty-five physicians (15 novices, 15 intermediates and 15 experts) were evaluated on echocardiography...... interpretation skills. An anatomical focused checklist was developed based on Danish Cardiology Society guidelines for a standard echocardiography of adults. A TTE case of a common and complex clinical presentation was recorded and presented to participants on a portable computer using EchoPac software...

  19. Nationwide survey on pediatric CT among children of public health and school nurses to examine a possibility for a follow-up study on radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Ban, N.; Ojima, M.; Yoshinaga, S.; Akahane, K.; Fujii, K.; Toyota, M.; Hamada, F.; Kouriyama, C.; Akiba, S.; Kunugita, N.; Shimada, Y.; Kai, M.

    2011-01-01

    A nationwide survey was conducted in Japan on paediatric CT among children of public health and school nurses to examine a possibility for a follow-up study on radiation effects. A survey questionnaire was sent out to 3173 public primary and junior high schools and 317 public health centres during October to December in 2009. According to the collected responses, 410 (16.2 %) children received the CT scans and the total number of CT scans was 585. Most of respondents expressed a high interest in radiation health effects and an intent to participate in the epidemiological study that will follow-up the health conditions of children. This study provides information to discuss the feasibility of the epidemiological study on health effects in children who received CT scans. (authors)

  20. Is Effective and Structured Training Key to Successful Biomedical Waste Management in Hospital : A Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Shishir Basarkar

    2014-01-01

    Background The study is interventional in nature because the training has been done as an intervention. The study was done to find out the impact of training on knowledge level of the hospital staff who is dealing with biomedical waste on day to day basis. Methodology The study was conducted on 184 staff members during July – Sept 2012 in multispecialty tertiary care hospital. The survey form was prepared and was applied to all participants in person before and after the training was condu...

  1. A study to assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The proper handling and disposal of bio-medical waste is very imperative. Unfortunately, laxity and lack of adequate knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste disposal leads to staid health and environment apprehension. Aim: To assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste management ...

  2. Sensitivity of mesoscale modeling of smoke direct radiative effect to the emission inventory: a case study in northern sub-Saharan African region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Ge, Cui; Ichoku, Charles; Hyer, Edward J; Da Silva, Arlindo; Su, Shenjian; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Kondragunta, Shobha; Kaiser, Johannes W; Wiedinmyer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    An ensemble approach is used to examine the sensitivity of smoke loading and smoke direct radiative effect in the atmosphere to uncertainties in smoke emission estimates. Seven different fire emission inventories are applied independently to WRF-Chem model (v3.5) with the same model configuration (excluding dust and other emission sources) over the northern sub-Saharan African (NSSA) biomass-burning region. Results for November and February 2010 are analyzed, respectively representing the start and end of the biomass burning season in the study region. For February 2010, estimates of total smoke emission vary by a factor of 12, but only differences by factors of 7 or less are found in the simulated regional (15°W–42°E, 13°S–17°N) and monthly averages of column PM 2.5 loading, surface PM 2.5 concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD), smoke radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere and at the surface, and air temperature at 2 m and at 700 hPa. The smaller differences in these simulated variables may reflect the atmospheric diffusion and deposition effects to dampen the large difference in smoke emissions that are highly concentrated in areas much smaller than the regional domain of the study. Indeed, at the local scale, large differences (up to a factor of 33) persist in simulated smoke-related variables and radiative effects including semi-direct effect. Similar results are also found for November 2010, despite differences in meteorology and fire activity. Hence, biomass burning emission uncertainties have a large influence on the reliability of model simulations of atmospheric aerosol loading, transport, and radiative impacts, and this influence is largest at local and hourly-to-daily scales. Accurate quantification of smoke effects on regional climate and air quality requires further reduction of emission uncertainties, particularly for regions of high fire concentrations such as NSSA. (paper)

  3. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  4. [Biomedical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Daniel; Soto, Mauricio; Vivent, Macarena; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical Informatics is a new discipline that arose from the need to incorporate information technologies to the generation, storage, distribution and analysis of information in the domain of biomedical sciences. This discipline comprises basic biomedical informatics, and public health informatics. The development of the discipline in Chile has been modest and most projects have originated from the interest of individual people or institutions, without a systematic and coordinated national development. Considering the unique features of health care system of our country, research in the area of biomedical informatics is becoming an imperative.

  5. A Pilot Study of Biomedical Text Comprehension using an Attention-Based Deep Neural Reader: Design and Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongsoon; Park, Donghyeon; Choi, Yonghwa; Lee, Kyubum; Kim, Byounggun; Jeon, Minji; Kim, Jihye; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2018-01-05

    With the development of artificial intelligence (AI) technology centered on deep-learning, the computer has evolved to a point where it can read a given text and answer a question based on the context of the text. Such a specific task is known as the task of machine comprehension. Existing machine comprehension tasks mostly use datasets of general texts, such as news articles or elementary school-level storybooks. However, no attempt has been made to determine whether an up-to-date deep learning-based machine comprehension model can also process scientific literature containing expert-level knowledge, especially in the biomedical domain. This study aims to investigate whether a machine comprehension model can process biomedical articles as well as general texts. Since there is no dataset for the biomedical literature comprehension task, our work includes generating a large-scale question answering dataset using PubMed and manually evaluating the generated dataset. We present an attention-based deep neural model tailored to the biomedical domain. To further enhance the performance of our model, we used a pretrained word vector and biomedical entity type embedding. We also developed an ensemble method of combining the results of several independent models to reduce the variance of the answers from the models. The experimental results showed that our proposed deep neural network model outperformed the baseline model by more than 7% on the new dataset. We also evaluated human performance on the new dataset. The human evaluation result showed that our deep neural model outperformed humans in comprehension by 22% on average. In this work, we introduced a new task of machine comprehension in the biomedical domain using a deep neural model. Since there was no large-scale dataset for training deep neural models in the biomedical domain, we created the new cloze-style datasets Biomedical Knowledge Comprehension Title (BMKC_T) and Biomedical Knowledge Comprehension Last

  6. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1980-10-01

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  7. The transient radiation effects and hardness of programmed device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chuanhua; Xu Xianguo; Zhao Hailin

    2014-01-01

    A review and summary of research and development in the investigation of transient ionizing radiation effects in device and cirviut is presented. The transient ionizing radiation effects in two type of programmed device, that's 32 bit Microcontroller and antifuse FPGA, were studied. The expeiment test data indicate: The transient ionizing radiation effects of 32 bit Microcontroller manifested self-motion restart and Latchup, the Latchup threshold was 5 × 10"7 Gy (Si)/s. The transient ionizing radiation effects of FPGA was reset, no Latchup. The relationship of circuit effects to physical mechanisms was analized. A new method of hardness in circiut design was put forward. (authors)

  8. Gamma and electron radiation effects on straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.; Baer, M.; Huebner, G.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma and electron radiation effects on wheat straw, oat straw, barley straw and rye straw are reported. In vitro and in vivo studies show that the digestibility of these agricultural rough materials can be increased up to 80% and more at high doses. The increase of the digestibility is connected with a depolymerisation of cellulose and hemicellulose. (author)

  9. A Study of Hybrid Composite Hydroxyapatite (HA-Geopolymers as a Material for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to study the physical properties and microstructure characters of hybrid composites HA-geopolymers as a material for biomedical application. Hybrid composite HA–geopolymers were produced through alkaline activation method of metakaolin as a matrix and HA as the filler. HA was synthesized from eggshell particles by using a precipitation method. The addition of HA in metakaolin paste was varied from 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% relative the weight of metakaolin. FTIR was used to examine the absorption bands the composites. X-ray diffraction (XRD was used to study the crystal structure of the starting and the resulting materials. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS was used to investigate the surface morphology of the composites. The thermal properties of the samples was examined by means of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Capacitance measurement was conducted to investigate the bioactive properties of HA. The study results suggest that hybrid composite HA-geopolymers has a potential to be applied as a biomedical such as biosensor material.

  10. Galleria mellonella L. as model organism used in biomedical and other studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulak, Ewa; Gliniewicz, Aleksandra; Przygodzka, Marta; Solecka, Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    Comparative of studies of genomes of invertebrates and humans shows that in invertebrates including insects there are numerous homologues of human’s genes coding proteins involved in recognition pathogens or transduction of the expression signal. Thanks this features, insects such as Drosophila melanogaster M., Blattella germanica L., Culex quinquefasciatus S., Bombyx mori L. and Galleria mellonella L. are used in studies on virulence, host resistance or in assessing the in vivo efficacy of antibiotics, fungicides and other biologically active substances. G. mellonella (greater wax moth) are rapid growth, high fertility, size and short life cycle insects- these are features that should be met by good model organisms; therefore the number of researches with larvae of wax moth as the model organism for pathogens assays grows from year to year. This is showing by number of scientific publications about infection’s model of G. mellonella. An obstacle in the wide use of G. mellonella caterpillars as a model in biomedical research is the lack of standardized breeding of these insects, which would guarantee the reproducibility of the obtained results and lack of procedures and standards according to which biomedical research will be carried out. Despite this, the G. mellonella model can be used in the initial analysis before conventional in vivo tests and to reduce the number of tests performed on mammals.

  11. Study on the Nanomechanical and Nanotribological Behaviors of PEEK and CFRPEEK for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of polyether ether ketone (PEEK-based composites for biomedical applications and to gain a fundamental understanding of the effects of carbon fibers in carbon-fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFRPEEK on the mechanical properties and wear performance in a microscale. Nanoindentation tests with a Berkovich indenter and nanoscratch experiments with a diamond stylus were performed on PEEK and CFRPEEK samples. The nanowear features and mechanisms of the tested samples were analyzed using 3D white-light interfering profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The obtained results indicated that the reinforced carbon fibers increased the nanohardness and elastic modulus and decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate of PEEK. Different to many existing studies where a constant load was used in a nanoscratch test and the normal load was a key factor influencing the scratch performances of the tested specimens, stick–slip phenomena were observed on both PEEK and CFRPEEK in the nanoscratch tests with load increasing progressively. In constant load conditions, it was found that the major nanowear mechanisms of PEEK are adhesion, abrasion, and plastic deformation, while the nanowear mechanisms of CFRPEEK are dominated by severe adhesive wear, abrasive wear and mild fatigue. CFRPEEK has demonstrated superior nanomechanical and nanotribological performances, and hence can be considered a potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  12. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1982-February 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in studies investigating the chemical mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cellular damage is reported. Three organisms currently being tested are Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli, silver and mercury have been used as radiosensitizers, and their interaction with DNA studied

  13. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  14. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abler, Daniel; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN’s competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR an...

  15. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments. (author)

  16. DOE life-span radiation effects studies in experimental animals at University of Utah Division of Radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Stevens, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah compared the long-term biological effects of 226 Ra and 239 Pu in adult beagles. The program includes the investigation of other radionuclides. More recently, groups of juvenile and aged beagles were added to the study to investigate the influence of age at exposure. These studies involved single intravenous injection of radionuclides to small groups of beagles, in graded doses from levels at which no effects were expected up to levels where a 100% incidence of bone tumors was sometimes found. Some of the principal effects were bone tumors, fractures, and other skeletal alterations observed radiographically and histologically; emphasis was placed on the detection of precancerous changes, hematological changes, and changes related to aging. Emphasis was also placed on metabolic and autoradiographic studies necessary for good radiation dosimetry

  17. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Annual progress report, November 15, 1977--November 14, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1978-07-01

    Acquisition of information on molecular biology involves four stages: establishment of procedures for the separation, isolation, and characterization of radiation products of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides, etc.; development of methods for the synthesis of these products once they are identified so that a constant supply in milligram to gram quantities is available for the studies in stages 3 and 4; examination of the apparent biological effects of each product in vitro and in vivo; and study of the molecular mechanism related to an observed biological phenomenon. In view of the difficulties experienced in this area of research and this deliberate and careful investigative approach, it was generally believed that progress toward our final goal would be rather prolonged. Yet the elucidation of a molecular mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces mutation in vivo is very near at hand. Further progress has been made in the separation and isolation of three hydroperoxy derivatives of thymidine. One communication has appeared and another has been submitted for publication. The former reports the efficient stereospecific synthesis of cis-pyrimidine glycols and the latter describes the study of mutagenicity and toxicity of seven radiation products of thymine and thymidine using Ames Salmonella test. Also, a quantitative study of the reversion of cytosine N(3)-oxide, a hydroperoxidation product induced by 6-TOOH, to cytosine has been carried out

  18. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Annual progress report, August 15, 1974--August 14, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Interest is being centered on the chemical and physical nature of radiation-induced lesions to nucleic acids and their components. These investigations have revealed the enormous complexity of chemical events in these systems and the possible degradation of nucleic acids by strand breakage. Therefore, work in the ionizing radiation of DNA and its components has proceeded along a dual course. For chemical studies, our prime concern is the stepwise isolation and identification of the radiation products of derivatives of pyrimidines and the study of the actual mechanisms of their formation. For biological studies, H. influenzae cells, the Chinese hamster V79B-1 cell line, and the Dunn osteosarcoma lung colony system were used. During the last year, the method of synthesis of 5-hydroperoxymethyluracil (T/sub α/OOH) was greatly improved. Large-scale preparation of 5-hydroxy-6-hydroperoxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (T 6 OOH) were carried out in order to study the action of T 6 OOH on neighboring bases, glycosidic bond-breakage, cell mutagenesis, chromosomal aberrations, and possible synergistic effects on x radiation. These results allow one to relate radiobiological effects with radiation chemical changes in DNA

  19. Electron spin resonance studies of radiation effects. Final report, 1964-1979 (including annual progress reports for 1978 and 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.T.

    1979-07-01

    The discovery of new free radicals, largely in irradiated single crystals of nonmetallic solids, and the determination of the molecular and electronic structures of these paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, have been carried out using a wide variety of organic and inorganic materials. The mechanisms of production of radicals in solids, their motions, and their reactions have been investigated and some applicable general principles deduced. Emphasis has been on aliphatic free radicals from irradiated carboxylic acids and amides and their halogen-substituted derivatives, organometallic radicals and substituted cyclic hydrocarbon radicals; inorganic radicals studied include V centers, hypervalent radicals and electron adducts. Extensive investigations of paramagnetic transition metal complexes, particularly cyanides and fluorides, have been made. In all cases quantum mechanical calculations have been employed as far as possible in interpreting the data. An improved method for analyzing experimental ESR spectra of single crystals has been developed and a number of crystal structures have been determined to supplement the ESR studies. Applications of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy to the study of structure and bonding in inorganic solids have been made and a method for using nuclear magnetic relaxation data for estimating quadrupole coupling constants in liquids has been developed

  20. Life-span radiation effects studies in prenatally and postnatally exposed beagle dogs at Colorado State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Jaenke, R.S.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Brewster, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The lifetime hazards associated with exposure to ionizing radiation during development are studied in 1680 beagle dogs given whole-body exposures to 60 Co gamma radiation. Eight groups of 120 dogs each received 20-R or 100-R exposures at 8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or at 2 days postpartum (dpp). In addition, exposures of 100 R were given to 120 dogs at 70 dpp and to 240 dogs at 365 dpp. An additional 360 dogs were sham exposed. Smaller groups of dogs were used to identify organs and tissues of particular sensitivity to radiation injury during development and to evaluate mechanisms of radiation injury. The research is concerned primarily with evaluating the role of age at exposure as a factor influencing response to radiation injury. As of December 31, 1982, of the 1680 dogs, 1058 were dead. Survivors ranged from 9.9 to 15 years of age. Through 10 years of age, no differences in survival were evident in any exposure groups. A variety of clinical, pathophysiologic, and pathologic responses have been studied. Irradiation during development has been found to be associated with abnormalities of skeletal, dental, and central nervous system development. Irradiation during ocular development has induced dysplastic and atrophic retinal lesions. Perinatal irradiation of the kidney has resulted in dysplasia, and, in animals receiving higher doses, significant chronic renal disease. The thymus gland, particularly thymic epithelium, has been found to be highly radiosensitive during fetal development

  1. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Progress report, August 15, 1976--November 14, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1977-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on nucleic acids and components were studied in vitro. Our approach involves four levels of operation and progress is being made at each stage. First, procedures were established to separate and purify three reactive radiation products from thymidine. Second, improved methods of synthesizing trans-glycols of pyrimidines were developed, and a new method for the stereospecific synthesis of cis-glycol of pyrimidines was realized. Thirdly, the Ames Salmonella test was used to determine the mutagenicity of the radiation products and the reactive ones from thymine and thymidine were found to be highly mutagenic. Therefore, all radiation products should be considered potential human health hazards and should be screened when they can be purified and synthesized. In the fourth stage, the reaction of each nucleic-acid base with Cu ++ and cis-5,6-dihydro-6-hydroperoxy-5-hydroxythymine (6-TOOH) was studied in order to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of radiation mutagenesis. The presence of Cu ++ was shown to be necessary for the effective mutagenic activity of 6-TOOH in the H. influenzae transformation assay. These findings provide fundamental information about the possible health hazards of ionizing radiation and will be useful in designing methods to protect against and repair radiation damage, which may be mutagenic and carcinogenic

  2. Study of the gamma radiation effect on lincomycin by two techniques thermal analysis and fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zier, A.; Al-Kassiri, H.; Al Aji, Z.

    1999-02-01

    Sample of Lincomycin were irradiated by means of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) at dose rate ca. (408 kGy/h) in the range (3, 5, 15, 20)kGy in presence of air. Samples were investigated using two techniques: Thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TG)) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). DSC purity study, which depends on Vant Hof equation, showed that the purity of Lincomycin reduced by means of gamma radiation. The purity of theses samples decreased by increasing the dose, and the purity of lincomycin was still above (99%) at dose (10 kGy). To follow up this effects, (FTIR) spectrums of these sample were recorded before and after irradiation. The two peaks at (1500 - 1750 Cm -1 ) which belong to amide group, and the peak at (1050 - 1100 Cm -1 ) which belongs to the S-C groups have reduced. (author)

  3. Study of the gamma radiation effect on the lincomycin by two techniques thermal analysis and fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zier, A.; Al-Kassiri, H.

    1999-01-01

    Sample of Lincomycin were irradiated by means of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) at dose rate ca. (408 kGy/h) in the range (3, 5, 15, 20)kGy in presence of air. Samples were investigated using two techniques: Thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TG)) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). DSC purity study, which depends on Vant Hof equation, showed that the purity of Lincomycin reduced by means of gamma radiation. The purity of theses samples decreased by increasing the dose, and the purity of lincomycin was still above (99%) at dose (10 kGy). To follow up this effects, (FTIR) spectrums of these sample were recorded before and after irradiation. The two peaks at (1500 - 1750 Cm -1 ) which belong to amide group, and the peak at (1050 - 1100 Cm -1 ) which belongs to the S-C groups have reduced. (author)

  4. Study of 60 Co gamma radiation effects on the biochemical, biological and immunological properties of the Bothrops jararaca venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Gamma radiation, by including different modifications on the toxic, enzymatic and immunological activities of proteins, could be an useful implement for detoxification of snake venoms. The present work was done to study the mechanism of action and effects of gamma rays on the Bothrops jararaca venom, determining the radiation dose that attenuates the toxic and enzymatic activities maintaining the immunological properties of venom, and also the most important free radicals on this process. The results of immuno diffusion, immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunization of mice and rabbits, and neutralization tests, showed the maintenance of antigenic and immunogenic properties and decrease of neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced by 3,000 and 4,000 Gy irradiated venom. Since the immunological properties were the most radioresistant, it was possible to determine the dose of 2,000 Gy, as the ideal radiation dose in the treatment of venoms aiming the improvement of the immunization schedule to obtain bothropic antisera. (author). 164 refs, 19 tabs, 54 figs

  5. Radiation effects on testes. XI. Studies on glycogen and its metabolizing enzymes following radiation-induced atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.S.; Bawa, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Effect of radiation on enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism has been studied. It is observed that hexokinase of testis is highly sensitive to radiation damage. Reduced hexokinase activity seems to be related to those parts of the testis (spermatocytes and spermatids) which depend upon glucose for their functioning. Radiation-induced atrophic testis is rich in glycogen content. The observations on the inhibition of gluocose-6-phosphatase and phosphorylase may explain the higher levels of the polysaccharide although a possibility of enhanced glycogenesis due to the activation of glycogen synthetase has also been suggested. The presence of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and glycogen in atrophied testis in 11-month-treated rats indicate the higher glycolytic activity with hyperplastic testicular interstitium. The results suggest that the accumulated glycogen is acting as a reserve substrate in nongerminal cells

  6. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1984-February 14, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of Hg ++ were investigated in Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria having very different gc ratios in their DNA. A protective effect is seen in both with first order curves or at least in the k/sub L/ region of the breakpoints. However, it is curious that there is a distinct difference in the metal-free N 2 baseline of Staphylococcus aureus compared to its EtOH metal-free N 2 response while with Pseudomonas aeruginosa both the metal-free N 2 baseline and its EtOH metal-free results are similar. In related studies a new radioprotective substance was evaluated in bacterial systems. Results showed that, in the presence of Rh(NH 3 ) 3 C/ 3 , the anoxic cell shows greater sensitivity than the oxygenated cell. This compound has considerable therapeutic promise providing it acts the same on mammalian cells. 8 refs., 6 figs. (DT)

  7. Studies of thermal and radiation effects on water-rock systems related to envisaged isolation of high level radioactive wastes in crystalline formations of the Ukrainian shield (Ukraine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.; Kalinichenko, E.; Ivanitsky, V.; Bagmut, M.; Plastinina, M.; Zlobenko, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this work there are presented the general data on the study of thermal and radiation effects in minerals separated from rocks of the Ukrainian shield. These minerals (quartz, feldspar, amphiboles, apatite, biotite, kaolinite, etc.), exposed by doses 10 4 , 10 6 , 10 8 Gy by Co 60 source, were studied by a complex of physical methods. Special attention was given to the study of radiation defects formation (electron-hole paramagnetic centres, OH- groups destruction, changes in a charge state of ions) in a mineral structure. The mentioned radiation defects were used in the extrapolation method. The connection between structural peculiarities of minerals (containing uranium and thorium) and processes of their metamyctization are considered. It is demonstrated that the minerals, which have large channels or interlayer spaces in their structure, as a rule, are not metamyct. Using the spectroscopic methods of the extrapolation it is shown that the crystalline massifs, which do not have detectable amounts of hydroxyl containing minerals (biotite, amphibole, etc.) and ions Fe 2- , are perspective for long-lived radioactive wastes (RAW) dumping. As it follows from obtained results, the rocks, containing minerals with OH- groups and gas-liquid inclusions, should be considered as the 'mineral-water' system. (author)

  8. Radiation effects in the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A. Thermoluminescence electron spin resonance and charged particle track studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, E.A.

    1978-09-01

    A detailed investigation is presented of the thermoluminescence observable above room temperature from the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A after its exposure to different radiations. A correlation study is described by which features of the complex thermoluminescence glow curve from a commercial grade of the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A are related to the etchability of charged particle damage trails and the radiogenic ESR signal. A model is presented whereby the etchability of charged particle damage trails is associated with chain scission caused by the high local dose of radiation in the vicinity of the trajectories of charged particles. Methods by which activation constants controlling the thermoluminescence glow curve can be evaluated are discussed and results are presented. It is concluded that glow peaks associated with the ESR signal or enhanced etchability are related to small-scale motions in the molecular matrix of the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A. These motions are thermally activated in accord with the simple Boltzmann relation usually incorporated into theories of thermoluminescence. Another component glow peak of the thermoluminescence glow curve is shown to be associated with the glass-rubber transition in the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A. Different features of the thermoluminescence glow curve can be related to relaxations of the polymer matrix and decomposition of the matrix. It is confirmed that the dominant bulk effect of radiation in the polycarbonate of bisphenol-A exposed to large doses of radiation is chain scission. (author)

  9. Ionizing radiation effect study by electron beam on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene virgin and recycled industrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Salmo Cordeiro do

    2006-01-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is an engineering plastic which has several applications, chiefly, in specific areas of the industry and medicine. UHMWPE can be even for other applications such as: port fenders, current guide, bucket coating, silos and gutters, plugs, pulleys and surgical prosthesis. This range of applications is due to the excellent technical characteristics that this material owns, such as; high resistance to wear, high resistance to impact, anti-adherence, non toxic, excellent chemical resistance, low specific weight, easy mill processing, and high resistance to fatigue. The UHMWPE type used in this work were UTEC 3041 and UTEC 6541 of the Braskem. The recycling process of UHMWPE raised much interest, because the utilization of this raw material grew over 600% in the last decade, becoming one of the most used engineering plastics for attainment of mill processed parts after polyamide. As the utilization of this polymer in the manufacturing of parts for machinery has grown, its waste is very big, because the rest of this material is thrown out, usually not being reused. The goal of this work is to recycle the UHMWPE UTEC 3041 and study the properties of this recycled and virgin material and compare the results between both with these materials submitted to different radiation dose. (author)

  10. Advancing Solar Irradiance Measurement for Climate-Related Studies: Accurate Constraint on Direct Aerosol Radiative Effect (DARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Earth's climate is driven primarily by solar radiation. As summarized in various IPCC reports, the global average of radiative forcing for different agents and mechanisms, such as aerosols or CO2 doubling, is in the range of a few W/sq m. However, when solar irradiance is measured by broadband radiometers, such as the fleet of Eppley Precision Solar Pyranometers (PSP) and equivalent instrumentation employed worldwide, the measurement uncertainty is larger than 2% (e.g., WMO specification of pyranometer, 2008). Thus, out of the approx. 184 W/sq m (approx.263 W/sq m if cloud-free) surface solar insolation (Trenberth et al. 2009), the measurement uncertainty is greater than +/-3.6 W/sq m, overwhelming the climate change signals. To discern these signals, less than a 1 % measurement uncertainty is required and is currently achievable only by means of a newly developed methodology employing a modified PSP-like pyranometer and an updated calibration equation to account for its thermal effects (li and Tsay, 2010). In this talk, we will show that some auxiliary measurements, such as those from a collocated pyrgeometer or air temperature sensors, can help correct historical datasets. Additionally, we will also demonstrate that a pyrheliometer is not free of the thermal effect; therefore, comparing to a high cost yet still not thermal-effect-free "direct + diffuse" approach in measuring surface solar irradiance, our new method is more economical, and more likely to be suitable for correcting a wide variety of historical datasets. Modeling simulations will be presented that a corrected solar irradiance measurement has a significant impact on aerosol forcing, and thus plays an important role in climate studies.

  11. Studies on the health effects of a-bomb radiation exposure appeared in health examinations of adult survivors by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko

    2006-01-01

    The Research Foundation has conducted the health examinations in the title since 1958, based on which studies of a cohort type have been performed, and their results at present are summarized in this paper. Subjects have included a cohort of about 120000 cases in total. They have been those 4993 initial cases (the center group) exposed to estimated radiation doses of 4 -6 Gy within the distance of 2 km from the hypocenter and with acute exposure symptoms either in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, and 19961 cases (exposed ones within 2 km from the hypocenter but without the symptoms, exposed residents in the city 3 km far from the hypocenter, or ones absent in the city at explosion) matched to the above center group in the city, age and sex. Lower statures and weights are noted in some of the center group who were in growing ages at exposure. Increases of prevalence or incidence rate are suggested in malignant tumors, diseases of the thyroid and parathyroid, uterine myoma, chronic liver diseases, cataract, circulatory diseases, abnormal hemoglobin value, and psychological states. Relative risk at 1 Gy for incidence of non-cancer diseases is calculated and presented. Results are not always consistent with those of such population exposed to <6 Gy as that of Chernobyl Accident, of radiation technologist and of people accidentally exposed to environmental radiation. The Foundation is to continue the study and more profound results of radiation effects are expected to be obtainable. (T.I)

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Emad H., E-mail: efarag@uj.edu.sa [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Sayed, Hamed M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Taibah University, Yanbu (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer. - Highlights: • A comparative study for four nanoparticles with MHD and thermal radiation effects was studied. • The effective electrical conductivity is mandatory; otherwise a spurious physical sight will be gained. • The investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluids' flow. • The flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced by the slip model. • Lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  13. Radiation effects at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanger, P.A.; Danby, G.T.

    1975-01-01

    Shielding, radiation damage, and radiation heating at the planned ISABELLE storage rings were considered. Radiation shielding studies were reviewed and were found to be adequate for present day dosage limits. Radiation damage could be encountered in some extreme cases, but is not expected to limit the performance of the superconducting magnets. Experiments to study the effect of radiation heating on actual magnets are recommended

  14. Kinetic theory of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    To help achieve the quantitative and mechanistic understanding of these processes, the kinetic theory of radiation effects has been developed in the DOE basic energy sciences radiation effects and fusion reactor materials programs, as well as in corresponding efforts in other countries. This discipline grapples with a very wide range of phenomena and draws on numerous sub-fields of theory such as defect physics, diffusion, elasticity, chemical reaction rates, phase transformations and thermodynamics. The theory is cast in a mathematical framework of continuum dynamics. Issues particularly relevant to the present inquiry can be viewed from the standpoints of applications of the theory and areas requiring further progress

  15. Three-dimensional, two-species magnetohydrodynamic studies of the early time behaviors of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2 barium release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Lianghai; Li, Lei; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Yiteng

    2014-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional, two-species (Ba + and H + ) MHD model to study the early time behaviors of a barium release at about 1 R E like Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2, with emphasis placed on the three-dimensional evolution of the barium cloud and its effects on the ambient plasma environment. We find that the perturbations caused by the cloud are the combined results of the initial injection, the radial expansion, and the diamagnetic effect and propagate as fast MHD waves in the magnetosphere. In return, the transverse expansion and the cross-B motion of barium ions are constrained by the magnetic force, which lead to a field-aligned striation of ions and the decoupling of these ions from the neutrals. Our simulation shows the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity in the barium cloud. The estimated time scale for the cavity evolution might be much shorter if photoionization time scale and field aligned expansion of barium ions are considered. In addition, our two species MHD simulation also finds the snowplow effect resulting from the momentum coupling between barium ions and background H + , which creates density hole and bumps in the background H + when barium ions expanding along the magnetic field lines

  16. Studies on polyethylene glycol coating on NiFe2O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phadatare, M.R.; Khot, V.M.; Salunkhe, A.B.; Thorat, N.D.; Pawar, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    The NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by the combustion method and these nanoparticles were successfully coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the possible biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, tissue repair, magnetic fluid hyperthermia etc. The structural and magnetic characterizations of NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were carried out by x-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry techniques, respectively. The morphology of the uncoated and coated nanoparticles was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The existence of PEG layer on NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of nanocrystalline NiFe 2 O 4 by the combustion method. ► Magnetic properties of the NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles at room temperature. ► Coating of NiFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles by Polyethylene glycol (PEG).

  17. Comparative Study of the Electrochemical, Biomedical, and Thermal Properties of Natural and Synthetic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Kargarzadeh, Hanieh; Abdi, Mahnaz M.; Azli, Nur Farhana Waheeda Mohd; Abbasian, Maryam

    2018-04-01

    In this research, natural nanomaterials including cellulose nanocrystal (CNC), nanofiber cellulose (NFC), and synthetic nanoparticles such as carbon nanofiber (CNF) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with different structures, sizes, and surface areas were produced and analyzed. The most significant contribution of this study is to evaluate and compare these nanomaterials based on the effects of their structures and morphologies on their electrochemical, biomedical, and thermal properties. Based on the obtained results, the natural nanomaterials with low dimension and surface area have zero cytotoxicity effects on the living cells at 12.5 and 3.125 μg/ml concentrations of NFC and CNC, respectively. Meanwhile, synthetic nanomaterials with the high surface area around 15.3-21.1 m2/g and significant thermal stability (480 °C-600 °C) enhance the output of electrode by creating a higher surface area and decreasing the current flow resistance.

  18. Predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test: an evaluation and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Ferguson, Eamonn; Wakeford, Richard; Powis, David; James, David

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the use of pre-admission selection tests for medicine. Such tests need to show good psychometric properties. Here, we use a paper by Emery and Bell [2009. The predictive validity of the Biomedical Admissions Test for pre-clinical examination performance. Med Educ 43:557-564] as a case study to evaluate and comment on the reporting of psychometric data in the field of medical student selection (and the comments apply to many papers in the field). We highlight pitfalls when reliability data are not presented, how simple zero-order associations can lead to inaccurate conclusions about the predictive validity of a test, and how biases need to be explored and reported. We show with BMAT that it is the knowledge part of the test which does all the predictive work. We show that without evidence of incremental validity it is difficult to assess the value of any selection tests for medicine.

  19. Characterization of ionizing radiation effects in MOS structures by study of bipolar operation; Caracterisation des effets induits par irradiations ionisantes dans des structures MOS a partir de leur fonctionnement en regime bipolaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtiar, H. [Univ. Teknologi Malaysia, Dept. of Physics, Johor (Malaysia); Picard, C.; Brisset, C. [CEA Saclay, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bakhtiar, H.; Hoffmann, A.; Charles, J.P. [Metz Univ., LICM-CLOES-Supelec, 57 (France)

    1999-07-01

    This work presents an original method to characterize radiation effects of micronic transistors. The characterization includes a study of the transistor substrate-drain junction and current gain variation of the bipolar transistor (drain-substrate-source as emitter-base-collector) for different gate voltages. (author000.

  20. Motivational factors for participation in biomedical research: evidence from a qualitative study of biomedical research participation in Blantyre District, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph; Manda-Taylor, Lucinda; Masiye, Francis

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining effective informed consent from research participants is a prerequisite to the conduct of an ethically sound research. Yet it is believed that obtaining quality informed consent is generally difficult in settings with low socioeconomic status. This is so because of the alleged undue inducements and therapeutic misconception among participants. However, there is a dearth of data on factors that motivate research participants to take part in research. Hence, this study was aimed at filling this gap in the Malawian context. We conducted 18 focus group discussions with community members in urban and rural communities of Blantyre in Malawi. Most participants reported that they accepted the invitation to participate in research because of better quality treatment during study also known as ancillary care, monetary and material incentives given to participants, and thorough medical diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. A comparison study on algorithms of detecting long forms for short forms in biomedical text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Cathy H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation With more and more research dedicated to literature mining in the biomedical domain, more and more systems are available for people to choose from when building literature mining applications. In this study, we focus on one specific kind of literature mining task, i.e., detecting definitions of acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols in biomedical text. We denote acronyms, abbreviations, and symbols as short forms (SFs and their corresponding definitions as long forms (LFs. The study was designed to answer the following questions; i how well a system performs in detecting LFs from novel text, ii what the coverage is for various terminological knowledge bases in including SFs as synonyms of their LFs, and iii how to combine results from various SF knowledge bases. Method We evaluated the following three publicly available detection systems in detecting LFs for SFs: i a handcrafted pattern/rule based system by Ao and Takagi, ALICE, ii a machine learning system by Chang et al., and iii a simple alignment-based program by Schwartz and Hearst. In addition, we investigated the conceptual coverage of two terminological knowledge bases: i the UMLS (the Unified Medical Language System, and ii the BioThesaurus (a thesaurus of names for all UniProt protein records. We also implemented a web interface that provides a virtual integration of various SF knowledge bases. Results We found that detection systems agree with each other on most cases, and the existing terminological knowledge bases have a good coverage of synonymous relationship for frequently defined LFs. The web interface allows people to detect SF definitions from text and to search several SF knowledge bases. Availability The web site is http://gauss.dbb.georgetown.edu/liblab/SFThesaurus.

  2. Radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteurtre Jean.

    1978-01-01

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  3. Modification of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on the tissue distribution of 239 Pu and 241 Am in mice and beagle dogs and the effectiveness of various therapeutic treatments for decorporation. In dogs injected with monomeric Pu the value of a regimen of early and prolonged treatment with DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) for minimizing the Pu burden in the soft tissues and skeleton was demonstrated. These results have immediate implication for DTPA treatment in man. New studies in mice verified the action of pyran copolymer antiviral agents in enhancing the effectiveness of DTPA for removal of polymeric Pu from the liver. Recent application of autoradiographic procedures for quantitatively comparing short- and long-term localization of monomeric and polymeric 239 Pu in dog liver showed that there is no net translocation of monomeric Pu within the liver between 6 and 90 days following injection. One of the molecular studies presently underway aims at synthesis of a variety of DTPA esters. The diethyl ester has already been prepared and tested for toxicity in mice. These compounds are designed to bring DTPA into contact with plutonium deposits unavailable to the action of ionic DTPA. (U.S.)

  4. Radiation effects on biodegradable polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Mitomo; Darmawan Darwis; Fumio Yoshii; Keizo Makuuchi

    1999-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and its copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] are microbial biodegradable polyesters produced by many types of bacteria. Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(E-caprolactone) (PCL) are also biodegradable synthetic polyesters which have been commercialized. These thermoplastics are expected for wide usage in environmental protection and blocompatible applications. Radiation grafting of hydrophilic monomers onto many polymers, e.g., polyethylene and polypropylene has been studied mainly for biomedical applications. In the present study, radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinyl monomers onto PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) was carried out and improvement of their properties was studied. Changes in the properties and biodegradability were compared with the degree of grafting. Radiation-induced crosslinking of PBS and PCL which relatively show thermal and irradiation stability was also carried out to improve their thermal stability or processability. Irradiation to PBS and PCL mainly resulted in crosslinking and characterization of these crosslinked polyesters was investigated

  5. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1984-04-01

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  6. [Disclosure of sources of funding in biomedical journals. Descriptive study of four Spanish publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, F; Borrego, A

    2015-01-01

    The source of research funding can result in bias, and its disclosure is essential in the publication of results. The aim of the study is to identify the frequency and type of sources of funding in the articles published by four Spanish biomedical journals published in Spanish. The frequency and type of financial disclosures in the articles published during 2012 in the ordinary numbers of Atención Primaria, Medicina Clínica, Revista Clínica Española and Revista Española de Cardiología were analyzed. Articles described as "Editorial", "Original article", "Consensus Document", "Review" and "Special Article" were considered. It was decided in each case whether or not the article included any funding disclosure and the type of the declared funding (public or private). Four hundred and twelve publications were analyzed. In 32.5% there was disclosure of funding: 38% in Atención Primaria, 27% in Medicina Clínica, 15% in Revista Clínica Española and 45% in Revista Española de Cardiología. By type of articles, 47% of original articles, 44% of consensus documents, 21% of reviews, 14% of special articles and 8% of editorials had a funding source. In 51.5% of the cases, funding was exclusively public, in 36.5% exclusively private and in 10% mixed. There is considerable variability in the disclosure of funding sources in articles appearing in these four Spanish biomedical journals. It would be necessary to improve the disclosure requirements of sources of funding, making them uniform, clear and transparent.

  7. Research on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Researches on radiation effect and radiation protection at JAEA have been carried out in different sections. In recent years, the organizations were rearranged to attain better research circumstances, and new research programs started. At present, radiation effect studies focus on radiation effect mechanisms at atomic, molecular and cellular levels including simulation studies, and protection studies focus on dosimetry for conditions difficult to cover with currently used methods and data as well as the related basic studies. The outlines of the whole studies and also some descriptions on selected subjects will be given in this paper. (author)

  8. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, R.K., E-mail: dr_rajendra_purohit@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, Bikaner (India); Bugalia, Saroj [Department of Zoology, S.K. Kalyan College, Sikar (India); Dakshene, Monika [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College, Kota (India)

    2012-07-01

    -protective compounds are highly toxic at their effective dose levels except MPG and hence attempts were made to find out a non-toxic agent which can minimize the harmful effects of radiations. Secondly, the uses of radio-protectors so far studied have been restricted by their availability and cost. Therefore, there is a need for compounds which are very effective in radio-protection and at the same time non-toxic, inexpensive and easily available. Various indigenous drugs of plant origin are being used in the Indian system of medicine for the treatment of ailments. The Aloe vera, Embijea officinalis, Ocimum snctum and Liv.52 etc. have been used effectively against radiation induced effects in the mammalian body. (author)

  9. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Bugalia, Saroj; Dakshene, Monika

    2012-01-01

    -protective compounds are highly toxic at their effective dose levels except MPG and hence attempts were made to find out a non-toxic agent which can minimize the harmful effects of radiations. Secondly, the uses of radio-protectors so far studied have been restricted by their availability and cost. Therefore, there is a need for compounds which are very effective in radio-protection and at the same time non-toxic, inexpensive and easily available. Various indigenous drugs of plant origin are being used in the Indian system of medicine for the treatment of ailments. The Aloe vera, Embijea officinalis, Ocimum snctum and Liv.52 etc. have been used effectively against radiation induced effects in the mammalian body. (author)

  10. Study design and rationale for biomedical shirt-based electrocardiography monitoring in relevant clinical situations: ECG-shirt study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Paweł; Lodziński, Piotr; Tymińska, Agata; Ozierański, Krzysztof; Januszkiewicz, Łukasz; Główczyńska, Renata; Wesołowska, Katarzyna; Peller, Michał; Pietrzak, Radosław; Książczyk, Tomasz; Borodzicz, Sonia; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Borkowski, Mariusz; Werner, Bożena; Opolski, Grzegorz; Grabowski, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    Today, the main challenge for researchers is to develop new technologies which may help to improve the diagnoses of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving the quality of life for patients. This study aims to show the utility of biomedical shirt-based electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring of patients with CVD in different clinical situations using the Nuubo® ECG (nECG) system. An investigator-initiated, multicenter, prospective observational study was carried out in a cardiology (adult and pediatric) and cardiac rehabilitation wards. ECG monitoring was used with the biomedical shirt in the following four independent groups of patients: 1) 30 patients after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), 2) 30 cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) recipients, 3) 120 patients during cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction, and 4) 40 pediatric patients with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) before electrophysiology study. Approval for all study groups was obtained from the institutional review board. The biomedical shirt captures the electrocardiographic signal via textile electrodes integrated into a garment. The software allows the visualization and analysis of data such as ECG, heart rate, arrhythmia detecting algorithm and relative position of the body is captured by an electronic device. The major advantages of the nECG system are continuous ECG monitoring during daily activities, high quality of ECG recordings, as well as assurance of a proper adherence due to adequate comfort while wearing the shirt. There are only a few studies that have examined wearable systems, especially in pediatric populations. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov: Identifier NCT03068169. (Cardiol J 2018; 25, 1: 52-59).

  11. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  12. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  13. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  14. Student engagement in biomedical courses : studies in technology-enhanced seminar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, RAM

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical and biomedical curricula are designed to educate future academics contributing to new developments in science, clinical practice and society. During undergraduate programs student training is typically focused on acquisition of knowledge and understanding of these interdisciplinary

  15. A study to assess the knowledge and practice on bio-medical waste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Practice, Bharathi College of Pharmacy, Mandya 571401, India. 5Department of ... revealed the lack of knowledge and awareness of bio-medical waste .... Female. 43. 77. 36. 64. Qualification. MPBHW/ ANM. DMLTC. D.Pharm. 101. 10. 09. 85.

  16. Overview of radiation effects research in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert C.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Taylor, Edward W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1995-05-01

    A brief overview of ongoing radiation effects research in photonics is presented focusing on integrated optic and acousto-optic components. A short summary of radiation-induced effects in electro-optic modulators, detector arrays, and other photonic technologies is presented along with extensive references. The coordinated radiation effects studies among researchers within the Tri-Service Organizations and international experimental teams are beginning to demonstrate consistent measurements of radiation-induced effects in photonic components and confirming earlier reported data. This paper will present an overview of these coordinated investigations and focus on key research being conducted with the AFMC Phillips Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Defence Nuclear Agency, NATO Nuclear Effects Task Group, and the Tri-Service Photonics Coordinating Committee.

  17. Ionizing radiation effect on human reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirous, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the existing knowledge on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation on human reproduction. Some interesting findings have been obtained by interapolating the results of studies in mouse embryos to humans, important knowledge has been obtained in studies involving the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The review summarizes the knowledge in the following conclusions: (1) prior to the blastocyst stage, the mammalian embryo is insensitive to teratogenic and growth retarding radiation effects but is highly sensitive to the lethal radiation effect; (2) in the early organogenesis, the embryo is very sensitive to growth retarding, teratogenic and lethal radiation effects. It can, however, partly offset growth retardation in the post-natal period; (3) in the early fetal development stage, the fetus shows reduced sensitivity to teratogenic damage of many organs; sensitivity of the central nervous system and growth retardation remain which can only be compensated post-natally with difficulties; (4) in the late stage of pregnancy the fetus is not significantly deformed as a result of irradiation but permanent cellular depletion can result in various organs and tissues post-natally if radiation doses are high. (L.O.). 22 refs

  18. Comparatively Studied Color Correction Methods for Color Calibration of Automated Microscopy Complex of Biomedical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kravtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a task of generating the requirements and creating a calibration target for automated microscopy systems (AMS of biomedical specimens to provide the invariance of algorithms and software to the hardware configuration. The required number of color fields of the calibration target and their color coordinates are mostly determined by the color correction method, for which coefficients of the equations are estimated during the calibration process. The paper analyses existing color calibration techniques for digital imaging systems using an optical microscope and shows that there is a lack of published results of comparative studies to demonstrate a particular useful color correction method for microscopic images. A comparative study of ten image color correction methods in RGB space using polynomials and combinations of color coordinate of different orders was carried out. The method of conditioned least squares to estimate the coefficients in the color correction equations using captured images of 217 color fields of the calibration target Kodak Q60-E3 was applied. The regularization parameter in this method was chosen experimentally. It was demonstrated that the best color correction quality characteristics are provided by the method that uses a combination of color coordinates of the 3rd order. The study of the influence of the number and the set of color fields included in calibration target on color correction quality for microscopic images was performed. Six train sets containing 30, 35, 40, 50, 60 and 80 color fields, and test set of 47 color fields not included in any of the train sets were formed. It was found out that the train set of 60 color fields minimizes the color correction error values for both operating modes of digital camera: using "default" color settings and with automatic white balance. At the same time it was established that the use of color fields from the widely used now Kodak Q60-E3 target does not

  19. Biomedical nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the roles of nanomaterials in biomedical applications, focusing on those highlighted in this volume. A brief history of nanoscience and technology and a general introduction to the field are presented. Then, the chemical and physical properties of nanostructures that make them ideal for use in biomedical applications are highlighted. Examples of common applications, including sensing, imaging, and therapeutics, are given. Finally, the challenges associated with translating this field from the research laboratory to the clinic setting, in terms of the larger societal implications, are discussed.

  20. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengfelder, E.; Forst, D.; Feist, H.; Pratzel, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix [de

  1. Setup of a Biomedical Facility to Study Physiologically Relevant Flow-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The design and implementation of a closed loop biomedical facility to study arterial flows is presented. The facility has a test section of 25 inches, and is capable of generating both steady and pulsatile flows via a centrifugal and a dual piston pump respectively. The Reynolds and Womersley numbers occurring in major blood vessels can be matched. The working fluid is a solution of NaI that allows refractive index matching with both rigid glass and compliant polymer models to facilitate tomographic PIV and holographic PIV. The combination of these two techniques allows us to study both large scale flow features as well as flows very close to the wall. The polymer models can be made with different modulus of elasticity and can be pre-stressed using a 5-axis stage. Radially asymmetric patches can also be pre-fabricated and incorporated in the tube during the manufacturing process to simulate plaque formation in arteries. These tubes are doped with tracer particles allowing for the measurement of wall deformation. Preliminary flow data over rigid and compliant walls is presented. One of the aims of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy of blood vessels change due to age or disease, and explore the fluid interactions with an evolving surface boundary.

  2. Study of Organosilicon Plasma Polymer Used in Composite Layers with Biomedical Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeva, E.; Pramatarova, L.; Pecheva, E.; Hikov, T.; Fingarova, D.; Iacob, E.; Vanzetti, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Krasteva, N.; Spassov, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the ability of plasma polymer (PP) films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) on silica glass (SG) to induce hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composite layers from a mixture of simulated body fluid (SBF) and clear solution of detonation nanodiamond (DND) by a biomimetic process. The grown composites (PPHMDS/HADND) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. FTIR spectra of the PPHMDS indicated diminishing of the polymer characteristic bands when the polymer is immersed in DND clear solution. Furthermore, after sample immersion in the SBF-DND mixture, the FTIR spectra showed the presence of carbonate-containing HA through the characteristic vibration modes of P-O in the phosphate group and C-O in the carbonate group. The formation of HA layers, rich in silica and/or carbon was confirmed by RBS and SEM. The cell viability measured after 7 days on the polymer surface is more then 95% for all samples. The results show that the PPHMDS is promising as a substrate for growing HA/DND layers and that the materials obtained are biocompatible. The variations of plasma polymerization conditions and modification of the composite layers will aid in using such materials for biomedical applications.

  3. Integrating biomedical and herbal medicine in Ghana - experiences from the Kumasi South Hospital: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Millicent Addai; Danso-Appiah, Anthony; Turkson, Bernard Kofi; Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowski

    2016-07-07

    Over the past decade there has been growing interest in the use of herbal medicine both in developed and developing countries. Given the high proportion of patients using herbal medicine in Ghana, some health facilities have initiated implementation of herbal medicine as a component of their healthcare delivery. However, the extent to which herbal medicine has been integrated in Ghanaian health facilities, how integration is implemented and perceived by different stakeholders has not been documented. The study sought to explore these critical issues at the Kumasi South Hospital (KSH) and outline the challenges and motivations of the integration process. Qualitative phenomenological exploratory study design involving fieldwork observations, focus group discussion, in-depth interviews and key informants' interviews was employed to collect data. Policies and protocols outlining the definition, process and goals of integration were lacking, with respondents sharing different views about the purpose and value of integration of herbal medicine within public health facilities. Key informants were supportive of the initiative. Whilst biomedical health workers perceived the system to be parallel than integrated, health personnel providing herbal medicine perceived the system as integrated. Most patients were not aware of the herbal clinic in the hospital but those who had utilized services of the herbal clinic viewed the clinic as part of the hospital. The lack of a regulatory policy and protocol for the integration seemed to have led to the different perception of the integration. Policy and protocol to guide the integration are key recommendations.

  4. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  5. Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Sang C; Tanik, Murat M

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering: Health Care Systems, Technology and Techniques is an edited volume with contributions from world experts. It provides readers with unique contributions related to current research and future healthcare systems. Practitioners and researchers focused on computer science, bioinformatics, engineering and medicine will find this book a valuable reference.

  6. Scientific Reproducibility in Biomedical Research: Provenance Metadata Ontology for Semantic Annotation of Study Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Valdez, Joshua; Rueschman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reproducibility is key to scientific progress as it allows the research community to build on validated results, protect patients from potentially harmful trial drugs derived from incorrect results, and reduce wastage of valuable resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a systematic guideline titled "Rigor and Reproducibility " for supporting reproducible research studies, which has also been accepted by several scientific journals. These journals will require published articles to conform to these new guidelines. Provenance metadata describes the history or origin of data and it has been long used in computer science to capture metadata information for ensuring data quality and supporting scientific reproducibility. In this paper, we describe the development of Provenance for Clinical and healthcare Research (ProvCaRe) framework together with a provenance ontology to support scientific reproducibility by formally modeling a core set of data elements representing details of research study. We extend the PROV Ontology (PROV-O), which has been recommended as the provenance representation model by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), to represent both: (a) data provenance, and (b) process provenance. We use 124 study variables from 6 clinical research studies from the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) to evaluate the coverage of the provenance ontology. NSRR is the largest repository of NIH-funded sleep datasets with 50,000 studies from 36,000 participants. The provenance ontology reuses ontology concepts from existing biomedical ontologies, for example the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), to model the provenance information of research studies. The ProvCaRe framework is being developed as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) data provenance project.

  7. Simulation study of a high power density rectenna array for biomedical implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John; Yoon, Hargsoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    2016-04-01

    The integration of wireless power transmission devices using microwaves into the biomedical field is close to a practical reality. Implanted biomedical devices need a long lasting power source or continuous power supply. Recent development of high efficiency rectenna technology enables continuous power supply to these implanted devices. Due to the size limit of most of medical devices, it is imperative to minimize the rectenna as well. The research reported in this paper reviews the effects of close packing the rectenna elements which show the potential of directly empowering the implanted devices, especially within a confined area. The rectenna array is tested in the X band frequency range.

  8. Awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the US presidential apology and their influence on minority participation in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ralph V; Kegeles, S Stephen; Kressin, Nancy R; Green, B Lee; James, Sherman A; Wang, Min Qi; Russell, Stefanie L; Claudio, Cristina

    2008-06-01

    We compared the influence of awareness of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and the presidential apology for that study on the willingness of Blacks, non-Hispanic Whites, and Hispanics to participate in biomedical research. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered to 1133 adults in 4 US cities. This 60-item questionnaire addressed issues related to the recruitment of minorities into biomedical studies. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed that, compared with Whites, Blacks were nearly 4 times as likely to have heard of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, more than twice as likely to have correctly named Clinton as the president who made the apology, and 2 to 3 times more likely to have been willing to participate in biomedical studies despite having heard about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (odds ratio [OR]=2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.4, 6.2) or the presidential apology (OR=2.3; 95% CI=1.4, 3.9). These marked differences likely reflect the cultural reality in the Black community, which has been accustomed to increased risks in many activities. For Whites, this type of information may have been more shocking and at odds with their expectations and, thus, led to a stronger negative impact.

  9. Financial Relationships between Organizations That Produce Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Biomedical Industry: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campsall, Paul; Colizza, Kate; Straus, Sharon; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-05-01

    ): guidelines produced by organizations reporting more comprehensive conflict of interest policies (per additional procedure, range 5-17) included fewer positive (rate ratio [RR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.86-0.95) and more negative (RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.60) recommendations regarding patented biomedical products. The clinical practice guidelines produced by organizations reporting more comprehensive conflict of interest policies were also more likely to include disclosure statements for direct funding sources (odds ratio [OR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.56) and financial relationships of guideline committee members (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.09-1.79), but not financial relationships of the organizations (0 disclosures). Limitations of the study include the use of the National Guideline Clearinghouse as the single source of clinical practice guidelines and the self-report of survey responses and organizations' website postings. Financial relationships between organizations that produce clinical practice guidelines and biomedical companies are common and infrequently disclosed in guidelines. Our study highlights the need for an effective policy to manage organizational conflicts of interest and disclosure of financial relationships.

  10. Contribution for labelling study of cellular and molecular structures of biomedical interest with technetium 99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebello, L.H.; Piotkwosky, M.C.; Pereira, J.A.A.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Silva, J.R.M.; Reis, R.J.N.; Pires, E.T.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1992-01-01

    The methodologies for labelling bacteria, planaria and cercaria from schistosomiasis evolution cycle and in oxamniquine with technetium 99 m, developed in the Biomedical Center of Rio de Janeiro University and in the Research Center of National Institute of Cancer are shown. (C.G.C.)

  11. Role of institutional climate in fostering diversity in biomedical research workforce: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Gary C; Hurd, Yasmin; Palermo, Ann-Gel S; Delbrune, Denise; Saran, Suman; Zony, Chati; Krulwich, Terry A

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the barriers to diversity in biomedical research and describes the evolution of efforts to address climate issues to enhance the ability to attract, retain, and develop underrepresented minorities, whose underrepresentation is found both in science and medicine, in the graduate-school biomedical research doctoral programs (PhD and MD/PhD) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. We also describe the potential beneficial impact of having a climate that supports diversity and inclusion in the biomedical research workforce. The Mount Sinai School of Medicine diversity-climate efforts are discussed as part of a comprehensive plan to increase diversity in all institutional programs: PhD, MD/PhD, and MD, and at the residency, postdoctoral fellow, and faculty levels. Lessons learned from 4 decades of targeted programs and activities at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine may be of value to other institutions interested in improving diversity in the biomedical science and academic medicine workforce. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  12. Feasibility study of the production of biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2015-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are characterized by an exceptional combination of properties like high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility which makes them suitable materials for biomedical prosthesis and devices. The wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy is generally favored in comparison to other metallic biomaterials due to its relatively low elastic modulus and it has been long used to obtain products for biomedical applications. In this work an alternative route to fabricate biomedical implants made out of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. Specifically, the feasibility of the conventional powder metallurgy route of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering is addressed by considering two types of powders (i.e. blended elemental and prealloyed). The characterization of physical properties, chemical analysis, mechanical behavior and microstructural analysis is carried out in-depth and the properties are correlated among them. On the base of the results found, the produced alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications as well as cheaper surgical devices and tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de; Falchete do Prado, Renata; Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto; Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys

  14. Titanium–35niobium alloy as a potential material for biomedical implants: In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Andrade, Dennia; Marotta Reis de Vasconcellos, Luana; Chaves Silva Carvalho, Isabel; Ferraz de Brito Penna Forte, Lilibeth; Souza Santos, Evelyn Luzia de [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Falchete do Prado, Renata, E-mail: renatafalchete@hotmail.com [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dalcy Roberto dos; Alves Cairo, Carlos Alberto [Division of Materials, Air and Space Institute, CTA, Praça Mal. do Ar Eduardo Gomes, 14, São José dos Campos 12904-000, SP (Brazil); Rodarte Carvalho, Yasmin [Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, UNESP — Univ Estadual Paulista, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Av. Engenheiro Francisco José Longo, 777, São José dos Campos 12245-000, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    Research on new titanium alloys and different surface topographies aims to improve osseointegration. The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of osteogenic cells cultivated on porous and dense samples of titanium–niobium alloys, and to compare them with the behavior of such type of cells on commercial pure titanium. Samples prepared using powder metallurgy were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and metallographic and profilometer analyses. Osteogenic cells from newborn rat calvaria were plated over different groups: dense or porous samples composed of Ti or Ti–35niobium (Nb). Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, MTT assay, cell morphology, protein total content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization nodules were assessed. Results from XRD and EDS analysis confirmed the presence of Ti and Nb in the test alloy. Metallographic analysis revealed interconnected pores, with pore size ranging from 138 to 150 μm. The profilometer analysis detected the greatest rugosity within the dense alloy samples. In vitro tests revealed similar biocompatibility between Ti–35Nb and Ti; furthermore, it was possible to verify that the association of porous surface topography and the Ti–35Nb alloy positively influenced mineralized matrix formation. We propose that the Ti–35Nb alloy with porous topography constitutes a biocompatible material with great potential for use in biomedical implants. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy is effective in producing porous biomaterials. • Ti–35Nb alloy improved mineralized matrix formation. • Porous surface favored a multidirectional pattern of cell spreading. • Porous surface Ti–35Nb alloy appears to be more favorable to bone formation than existing alloys.

  15. Using typed dependencies to study and recognise conceptualisation zones in biomedical literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Groza

    Full Text Available In the biomedical domain, authors publish their experiments and findings using a quasi-standard coarse-grained discourse structure, which starts with an introduction that sets up the motivation, continues with a description of the materials and methods, and concludes with results and discussions. Over the course of the years, there has been a fair amount of research done in the area of scientific discourse analysis, with a focus on performing automatic recognition of scientific artefacts/conceptualisation zones from the raw content of scientific publications. Most of the existing approaches use Machine Learning techniques to perform classification based on features that rely on the shallow structure of the sentence tokens, or sentences as a whole, in addition to corpus-driven statistics. In this article, we investigate the role carried by the deep (dependency structure of the sentences in describing their rhetorical nature. Using association rule mining techniques, we study the presence of dependency structure patterns in the context of a given rhetorical type, the use of these patterns in exploring differences in structure between the rhetorical types, and their ability to discriminate between the different rhetorical types. Our final goal is to provide a series of insights that can be used to complement existing classification approaches. Experimental results show that, in particular in the context of a fine-grained multi-class classification context, the association rules emerged from the dependency structure are not able to produce uniform classification results. However, they can be used to derive discriminative pair-wise classification mechanisms, in particular for some of the most ambiguous types.

  16. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D; Channon, Keith M; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-08-14

    Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country's international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) apply the evidence base on how best to support the various partnerships in this large, multi-stakeholder research system and (2) research how these partnerships play out in a new, ambitious programme of translational research. Organisational case study, informed by the principles of action research. A cross-cutting theme, 'Partnerships for Health, Wealth and Innovation' has been established with multiple sub-themes (drug development, device development, business support and commercialisation, research methodology and statistics, health economics, bioethics, patient and public involvement and engagement, knowledge translation, and education and training) to support individual BRC research themes and generate cross-theme learning. The 'Partnerships' theme will support the BRC's goals by facilitating six types of partnership (with patients and citizens, clinical services, industry, across the NIHR infrastructure, across academic disciplines, and with policymakers and payers) through a range of engagement platforms and activities. We will develop a longitudinal progress narrative centred around exemplar case studies, and apply theoretical models from innovation studies (Triple Helix), sociology of science (Mode 2 knowledge production) and business studies (Value Co-creation). Data sources will be the empirical research studies within individual BRC research themes (who will apply separately for NHS ethics approval), plus documentary analysis and interviews and ethnography with research

  17. Epidemiology and Reporting Characteristics of Systematic Reviews of Biomedical Research: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Page

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews (SRs can help decision makers interpret the deluge of published biomedical literature. However, a SR may be of limited use if the methods used to conduct the SR are flawed, and reporting of the SR is incomplete. To our knowledge, since 2004 there has been no cross-sectional study of the prevalence, focus, and completeness of reporting of SRs across different specialties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a more recent cross-section of SRs.We searched MEDLINE to identify potentially eligible SRs indexed during the month of February 2014. Citations were screened using prespecified eligibility criteria. Epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a random sample of 300 SRs were extracted by one reviewer, with a 10% sample extracted in duplicate. We compared characteristics of Cochrane versus non-Cochrane reviews, and the 2014 sample of SRs versus a 2004 sample of SRs. We identified 682 SRs, suggesting that more than 8,000 SRs are being indexed in MEDLINE annually, corresponding to a 3-fold increase over the last decade. The majority of SRs addressed a therapeutic question and were conducted by authors based in China, the UK, or the US; they included a median of 15 studies involving 2,072 participants. Meta-analysis was performed in 63% of SRs, mostly using standard pairwise methods. Study risk of bias/quality assessment was performed in 70% of SRs but was rarely incorporated into the analysis (16%. Few SRs (7% searched sources of unpublished data, and the risk of publication bias was considered in less than half of SRs. Reporting quality was highly variable; at least a third of SRs did not report use of a SR protocol, eligibility criteria relating to publication status, years of coverage of the search, a full Boolean search logic for at least one database, methods for data extraction, methods for study risk of bias assessment, a primary outcome, an

  18. Radiation Effects in Paediatric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutwasi, O.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging has evolved from single technique to a field which we have a choice from many modalities. Some without radiation. Radiation producing modalities include plain films (low dose), Fluoroscopy (mid range dose), Computed tomography (high dose). Radiography dose can significantly be influenced in plain radiography by varying speed of screens, cassette construction and type of radiography. E.g. digital or computed. In computed or digital radiography we are no longer able to tell h igh dose b y the quality of images. The final image is by great extend a product of post processing algorithms. It's for this reasons that the basic understanding of the sensitivity and specifying of various types of examinations and of specifically radiation effects is mandatory for a paediatric imager

  19. How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijdink, J K; Schipper, K; Bouter, L M; Maclaine Pont, P; de Jonge, J; Smulders, Y M

    2016-02-17

    To investigate the biomedical scientist's perception of the prevailing publication culture. Qualitative focus group interview study. Four university medical centres in the Netherlands. Three randomly selected groups of biomedical scientists (PhD, postdoctoral staff members and full professors). Main themes for discussion were selected by participants. Frequently perceived detrimental effects of contemporary publication culture were the strong focus on citation measures (like the Journal Impact Factor and the H-index), gift and ghost authorships and the order of authors, the peer review process, competition, the funding system and publication bias. These themes were generally associated with detrimental and undesirable effects on publication practices and on the validity of reported results. Furthermore, senior scientists tended to display a more cynical perception of the publication culture than their junior colleagues. However, even among the PhD students and the postdoctoral fellows, the sentiment was quite negative. Positive perceptions of specific features of contemporary scientific and publication culture were rare. Our findings suggest that the current publication culture leads to negative sentiments, counterproductive stress levels and, most importantly, to questionable research practices among junior and senior biomedical scientists. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V.; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D.; Channon, Keith M.; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country’s international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) a...

  1. Knowledge, attitude, and practices about biomedical waste management among healthcare personnel: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Vanesh Mathur; S Dwivedi; M A Hassan; R P Misra

    2011-01-01

    Background: The waste produced in the course of healthcare activities carries a higher potential for infection and injury than any other type of waste. Inadequate and inappropriate knowledge of handling of healthcare waste may have serious health consequences and a significant impact on the environment as well. Objective: The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practices of doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians, and sanitary staff regarding biomedical waste management. Material...

  2. Study of the radiation effect of "9"9Mo/"9"9"mTc generator on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Endo, Erica M.M.; Felgueiras, Carlos F.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N.; Osso Junior, João A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, molybdenum-99 loaded columns were challenged with Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells and Bacillus pumilus spores inside and outside the alumina column, and microbial recovery and radiation effect were assessed. Alumina was a barrier for the passage of microorganisms regardless the species, whilst spores were more retained than vegetative cells with a lower microbial recovery, without significant differences between 9.25 and 74 GBq generators. Bacillus pumilus biological indicator showed lower recoveries, suggesting a radiation inactivating effect on microorganisms. - Highlights: • Microorganisms in radionuclide generator may impair the quality of the product. • Killing of Bacillus pumilus was not complete even after 20 days of exposition. • Alumina column was a physical barrier for the microbial recovery. • An alternative biological indicator based on B. pumilus spores is proposed.

  3. Radiation effects in charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.; Nelson, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCD s) exhibit a number of advantages (low cost, low power, high bit density) in their several applications (serial memories, imagers, digital filters); however, fairly elementary theoretical considerations indicate that they will be very vulnerable to permanent radiation damage, by both neutrons and ionizing radiation, and to transient upset by pulsed ionizing radiation. Although studies of permanent ionizing-radiation damage in CCD's have been reported, little information has been published concerning their overall nuclear radiation vulnerability. This paper presents a fairly comprehensive experimental study of radiation effects in a 256-cell surface-channel, CCD shift-register. A limited amount of similar work is also presented for a 128-cell surface-channel device and a 130 cell peristaltic CCD shift register. The radiation effects phenomena discussed herein, include transient-ionizing-radiation responses, permanent ionizing- radiation damage to transfer efficiency, charge-carrying capacity and input transfer gate bias, and neutron damage to storage time--determined from dark current and charge-up time measurements

  4. Using Animal Instincts to Design Efficient Biomedical Studies via Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiaheng; Chen, Ray-Bing; Wang, Weichung; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-10-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is an increasingly popular metaheuristic algorithm for solving complex optimization problems. Its popularity is due to its repeated successes in finding an optimum or a near optimal solution for problems in many applied disciplines. The algorithm makes no assumption of the function to be optimized and for biomedical experiments like those presented here, PSO typically finds the optimal solutions in a few seconds of CPU time on a garden-variety laptop. We apply PSO to find various types of optimal designs for several problems in the biological sciences and compare PSO performance relative to the differential evolution algorithm, another popular metaheuristic algorithm in the engineering literature.

  5. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H{sup -}, H{sup o}, and H{sup +} beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 {mu}s to 500 {mu}s length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 {sigma}) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  6. The Brookhaven Radiation Effects Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Snead, C.L.; Ward, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Radiation Effects Facility (REF), funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) through the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) and the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), has been constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Operation started in October 1986. The facility is capable of delivering pulsed H - , H/sup o/, and H + beams of 100 to 200 MeV energy up to 30 mA peak current. Pulses can be adjusted from 5 μs to 500 μs length at a repetition rate of 5 pps. The beam spot on target is adjustable from 3 to 100 cm diameter (2 σ) resulting in a maximum dose of about 10 MRads (Si) per pulse (small beam spot). Experimental use of the REF is being primarily supported by the SDI lethality (LTH-4) program. The program has addressed ionization effects in electronics, both dose rate and total dose dependence, radiation-sensitive components, and dE/dx effects in energetic materials including propellants and high explosives (HE). This paper describes the facility, its capabilities and potential, and the experiments that have been carried out to date or are being planned. 2 refs., 10 figs

  7. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  8. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  9. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  10. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application – the frutalin case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eOliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly-glycosylated alpha-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that batch-to-batch variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine.

  11. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application – the frutalin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A.; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that “batch-to-batch” variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine. PMID:25152749

  12. Study designs for identifying risk compensation behavior among users of biomedical HIV prevention technologies: balancing methodological rigor and research ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Kristen

    2013-10-01

    The growing evidence base for biomedical HIV prevention interventions - such as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, microbicides, male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and eventually prevention vaccines - has given rise to concerns about the ways in which users of these biomedical products may adjust their HIV risk behaviors based on the perception that they are prevented from infection. Known as risk compensation, this behavioral adjustment draws on the theory of "risk homeostasis," which has previously been applied to phenomena as diverse as Lyme disease vaccination, insurance mandates, and automobile safety. Little rigorous evidence exists to answer risk compensation concerns in the biomedical HIV prevention literature, in part because the field has not systematically evaluated the study designs available for testing these behaviors. The goals of this Commentary are to explain the origins of risk compensation behavior in risk homeostasis theory, to reframe risk compensation as a testable response to the perception of reduced risk, and to assess the methodological rigor and ethical justification of study designs aiming to isolate risk compensation responses. Although the most rigorous methodological designs for assessing risk compensation behavior may be unavailable due to ethical flaws, several strategies can help investigators identify potential risk compensation behavior during Phase II, Phase III, and Phase IV testing of new technologies. Where concerns arise regarding risk compensation behavior, empirical evidence about the incidence, types, and extent of these behavioral changes can illuminate opportunities to better support the users of new HIV prevention strategies. This Commentary concludes by suggesting a new way to conceptualize risk compensation behavior in the HIV prevention context. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discussing study limitations in reports of biomedical studies-the need for more transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puhan, Milo A.; Akl, Elie A.; Bryant, Dianne; Xie, Feng; Apolone, Giovanni; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    Unbiased and frank discussion of study limitations by authors represents a crucial part of the scientific discourse and progress. In today's culture of publishing many authors or scientific teams probably balance 'utter honesty' when discussing limitations of their research with the risk of being

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. The Vulnerability of Study Participants in the Context of Transnational Biomedical Research: From Conceptual Considerations to Practical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Helen Grete; Schicktanz, Silke

    2017-08-01

    Outsourcing clinical trials sponsored by pharmaceutical companies from industrialized countries to low- (middle)-income countries - summarized as transnational biomedical research (TBR) - has lead to many concerns about ethical standards. Whether study participants are particularly vulnerable is one of those concerns. However, the concept of vulnerability is still vague and varies in its definition. Despite the fact that important international ethical guidelines such as the Declaration of Helsinki by the World Medical Association or the Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects by the Council of International Organizations of Medical Sciences refer to vulnerability as ethical principle, each of their approaches are different. To overcome these shortcomings, we analyze and unite different approaches of vulnerability and develop practical criteria in order to operationalize the concept especially for the context of TBR. These criteria refer to the context of a study as well as the characteristics and the current living situation of study participants. Based on a case study of an HIV-vaccine-trial conducted in India we demonstrate how those criteria can be applied in a retrospective way to identify potential ethical conflicts. The criteria can also indicate a prospective function for ethical pre-assessment. For this, we provide an outlook for three major topics: 1. Vulnerability as a normative concept: Different ways of protection; 2. The relevance of transparency and 3. Vulnerability as an instrument to increase decision participation of human subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Summer Biomedical Engineering Institute 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloatch, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The five problems studied for biomedical applications of NASA technology are reported. The studies reported are: design modification of electrophoretic equipment, operating room environment control, hematological viscometry, handling system for iridium, and indirect blood pressure measuring device.

  17. The radiation effects on lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Matsuura, Tomio; Narita, Noboru; Ozawa, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation effects on lipid bilayers are studied by the electron spin resonance. Egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes are labeled with spin probes (5 SAL, 12 SAL). Effects of membrane fluidity by X-Ray (or ultraviolet) irradiation are measured by change of the order parameter S. The results obtained are as follows: 1) A similar tendency is observed on the order parameter S between X-Ray irradiated egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes. 2) The rapid changes of the membrane fluidity are observed below 1 krad. The fluctuation of membrane fluidity decreases above 1 krad, consequently the membrane has a tendency changing to a rigid state at low dose area. 3) It is suggested that the more effective radicals are hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals. 4) The effects of ultraviolet irradiation with hydrogen peroxide show that hydroxyl radicals lead to changes of membrane fluidity. (author)

  18. Design Study of a Mini Cyclotron for the Application of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Yun, Chong-Chul; Youn, Min-Yong; Wang, Sonjong

    2009-01-01

    A small cyclotron has been considered for the use of biomedical accelerator mass spectrometer (BAMS). Over a decade ago a few cyclotrons had been constructed and tested for AMS, but technical problems of instability and poor transmission efficiency caused to discontinue further developments. The major reason of the demise of cyclotron AMS was the dominance of commercial Tandem-based AMS facilities. Now BAMS may ask for more compact system, and perhaps using positive ions to accelerate isotope tracers is a favorable feature. The design of a cyclotron to meet the requirements of BAMS has been performed by adopting a compact magnet with high stability and a flat-topping rf system to increase transmission efficiency.

  19. Studies on novel radiopaque methyl methacrylate: glycidyl methacrylate based polymer for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawlee, S; Jayakrishnan, A; Jayabalan, M

    2009-12-01

    A new class of radiopaque copolymer using methyl methacrylate (MMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers was synthesized and characterized. The copolymer was made radiopaque by the epoxide ring opening of GMA using the catalyst o-phenylenediamine and the subsequent covalent attachment of elemental iodine. The copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, energy dispersive X-ray analysis using environmental scanning electron microscope (EDAX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray visibility of the copolymer was checked by X-radiography. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity of the newly synthesized copolymer were also evaluated. The iodinated copolymer was thermally stable, blood compatible, non-cytotoxic, and highly radiopaque. The presence of bulky iodine group created a new copolymer with modified properties for potential use in biomedical applications.

  20. RADIATION EFFECTS IN NUCLEAR WASTE MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop fundamental understanding and predictive models of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels, as well as an understanding of the effects of these radiation-induced solid-state changes on dissolution kinetics (i.e., radionuclide release). The research performed during the duration of this project has addressed many of the scientific issues identified in the reports of two DOE panels [1,2], particularly those related to radiation effects on the structure of glasses and ceramics. The research approach taken by this project integrated experimental studies and computer simulations to develop comprehensive fundamental understanding and capabilities for predictive modeling of radiation effects and dissolution kinetics in both glasses and ceramics designed for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste (HLW), plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, other actinides, and other highly radioactive waste streams. Such fundamental understanding is necessary in the development of predictive models because all experimental irradiation studies on nuclear waste materials are ''accelerated tests'' that add a great deal of uncertainty to predicted behavior because the damage rates are orders of magnitude higher than the actual damage rates expected in nuclear waste materials. Degradation and dissolution processes will change with damage rate and temperature. Only a fundamental understanding of the kinetics of all the physical and chemical processes induced or affected by radiation will lead to truly predictive models of long-term behavior and performance for nuclear waste materials. Predictive models of performance of nuclear waste materials must be scientifically based and address both radiation effects on structure (i.e., solid-state effects) and the effects of these solid-state structural changes on dissolution kinetics. The ultimate goal of this

  1. Testing an integrated behavioural and biomedical model of disability in N-of-1 studies with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Francis; Johnston, Marie; Johnston, Derek W

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has supported an integrated biomedical and behavioural model explaining activity limitations. However, further tests of this model are required at the within-person level, because while it proposes that the constructs are related within individuals, it has primarily been tested between individuals in large group studies. We aimed to test the integrated model at the within-person level. Six correlational N-of-1 studies in participants with arthritis, chronic pain and walking limitations were carried out. Daily measures of theoretical constructs were collected using a hand-held computer (PDA), the activity was assessed by self-report and accelerometer and the data were analysed using time-series analysis. The biomedical model was not supported as pain impairment did not predict activity, so the integrated model was supported partially. Impairment predicted intention to move around, while perceived behavioural control (PBC) and intention predicted activity. PBC did not predict activity limitation in the expected direction. The integrated model of disability was partially supported within individuals, especially the behavioural elements. However, results suggest that different elements of the model may drive activity (limitations) for different individuals. The integrated model provides a useful framework for understanding disability and suggests interventions, and the utility of N-of-1 methodology for testing theory is illustrated.

  2. Notes on radiation effects on materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of radiation from nuclear reactions on various classes of materials are examined in an introductory textbook for students of nuclear engineering. Topics discussed include the units and general scale of radiation damage, fundamental interactions of neutrons and gamma rays with materials, transient radiation effects on electrical components, radiation effects on organic materials and on steels, nuclear fission effects, surface effects of nuclear radiations, radiation effects on biological material, and neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry. Graphs, diagrams, tables of numerical data, and problems for each chapter are provided. 122 references

  3. Biomedical engineering and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.H.; Khyalappa, R.J.; Yakhmi, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    This book is predominantly a compilation of papers presented in the conference which is focused on the development in biomedical materials, biomedical devises and instrumentation, biomedical effects of electromagnetic radiation, electrotherapy, radiotherapy, biosensors, biotechnology, bioengineering, tissue engineering, clinical engineering and surgical planning, medical imaging, hospital system management, biomedical education, biomedical industry and society, bioinformatics, structured nanomaterial for biomedical application, nano-composites, nano-medicine, synthesis of nanomaterial, nano science and technology development. The papers presented herein contain the scientific substance to suffice the academic directivity of the researchers from the field of biomedicine, biomedical engineering, material science and nanotechnology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  4. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The present study  is a Cross sectional Study carried out to assess the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Paramedical staff posted at District Hospital, Etawah. The change in knowledge was assessed using pre- test and post- test questionnaire.Result: A total of 72 paramedical staff participated in the study. Majority of the participants were unaware about the hazards associated with the improper handing f Biomedical wastes. The knowledge about the different color codes used for the segregation of biomedical waste was also very low. Similarly, the awareness about the vehicle used for the transportation of biomedical waste was also poor.Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is an urgent need for regular training for paramedical staff posted at District Hospital and other government hospital located in small District & town as awareness about the Biomedical waste among them is very low.

  5. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The present study  is a Cross sectional Study carried out to assess the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Paramedical staff posted at District Hospital, Etawah. The change in knowledge was assessed using pre- test and post- test questionnaire.Result: A total of 72 paramedical staff participated in the study. Majority of the participants were unaware about the hazards associated with the improper handing f Biomedical wastes. The knowledge about the different color codes used for the segregation of biomedical waste was also very low. Similarly, the awareness about the vehicle used for the transportation of biomedical waste was also poor.Conclusion: The present study concludes that there is an urgent need for regular training for paramedical staff posted at District Hospital and other government hospital located in small District & town as awareness about the Biomedical waste among them is very low.

  6. Internal friction, microstructure, and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Sommer, W.F.; Davidson, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is given of internal friction relaxation peaks and background internal friction. The microstructural origin of the internal friction is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on radiation effects

  7. Sterilizing radiation effects on selected polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiens, W.E.

    1979-03-01

    The mechanism of radiation effects and their industrial applications are discussed for the following classes of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, films and fibers, and adhesives/coatings/potting compounds. 35 references, 3 tables

  8. Heavy accelerated nuclei in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Accelerated atomic nuclei in physics accelerators have been used in basic biological research and in applied medical diagnostic and therapeutic studies for the past 50 years. The passage of single heavy particles through the cell nucleus is capable of producing multiple DNA double-strand scission and chromatin breaks. According to the Repair-Misrepair model, the high biological effectiveness of high-LET particles is due to misrepair and misrejoining of the breaks. The Bragg depth ionization effect allows heavy particles to deposit considerably more energy deep in tissue than at the surface, and this property has been used for great improvements in the radiation therapy of localized tumors. Recent advances in producing radioactive beams will allow verification of therapeutic administration of such beams. The radioactive beams also open a new field of Nuclear Medicine. There is increasing interest in building special biomedical light and heavy-ion accelerators. These will be used not only for therapy but also for diagnosis, for the study of radiation hazards in space flight, and for basic molecular and cellular understanding of the mechanisms of radiation effect

  9. Radiation Effects in M and NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    electrical basis of operation of M&NEM structures? In particular, cumulative damage by non - ionizing energy loss can, in principle, alter the... Radiation Effects in M&NEMS Michael Alles, Kirill Bolotin, Alex Zettl, Brian Homeijer, Jim Davidson, Ronald Schrimpf, Robert Reed, Dan Fleetwood...understanding radiation effects on the relevant properties of the constituent materials and structures, particularly advanced 2D materials, and the

  10. Radiation effects on microelectronics in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srour, J.R.; McGarrity, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of space radiation effects on microelectronics are reviewed in this paper. Topics discussed include the effects of displacement damage and ionizing radiation on devices and circuits, single event phenomena, dose enhancement, radiation effects on optoelectronic devices and passive components, hardening approaches, and simulation of the space radiation environment. A summary is presented of damage mechanisms that can cause temporary or permanent failure of devices and circuits operating in space

  11. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-01-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam

  12. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  13. What Google Maps can do for biomedical data dissemination: examples and a design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianu, Radu; Laidlaw, David H

    2013-05-04

    Biologists often need to assess whether unfamiliar datasets warrant the time investment required for more detailed exploration. Basing such assessments on brief descriptions provided by data publishers is unwieldy for large datasets that contain insights dependent on specific scientific questions. Alternatively, using complex software systems for a preliminary analysis may be deemed as too time consuming in itself, especially for unfamiliar data types and formats. This may lead to wasted analysis time and discarding of potentially useful data. We present an exploration of design opportunities that the Google Maps interface offers to biomedical data visualization. In particular, we focus on synergies between visualization techniques and Google Maps that facilitate the development of biological visualizations which have both low-overhead and sufficient expressivity to support the exploration of data at multiple scales. The methods we explore rely on displaying pre-rendered visualizations of biological data in browsers, with sparse yet powerful interactions, by using the Google Maps API. We structure our discussion around five visualizations: a gene co-regulation visualization, a heatmap viewer, a genome browser, a protein interaction network, and a planar visualization of white matter in the brain. Feedback from collaborative work with domain experts suggests that our Google Maps visualizations offer multiple, scale-dependent perspectives and can be particularly helpful for unfamiliar datasets due to their accessibility. We also find that users, particularly those less experienced with computer use, are attracted by the familiarity of the Google Maps API. Our five implementations introduce design elements that can benefit visualization developers. We describe a low-overhead approach that lets biologists access readily analyzed views of unfamiliar scientific datasets. We rely on pre-computed visualizations prepared by data experts, accompanied by sparse and intuitive

  14. Dependence of radiation effects in the progeny of the fist and second generation on stages of the development of germ cell of both parents at the time of irradiation: Experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefyodov, I.; Nefyodova, I.; Palyga, G.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of 35199 offspring of Wistar rats showed that after irradiation of both parents (P) with doses of 0.25-4 Gy the manifestation of radiation effects in the descendants of the first (F1) and second (F2) generations in ontogenesis depended upon radiation dose and the stage of development of P germ cells at the moment of radiation exposure. After irradiation of the matured oocytes, spermatidis and spermatozoids the consequences for FI are mainly determined by a female or their aggravation takes place. After irradiation of the maturing oocytes, spermatocytes and spermatogonia the effects for F1 are mainly determined by the male. The death of F1 occurs chiefly in embryogenesis and F2 in early postnatal ontogenesis. It is more marked by the father's line (the descendants of F1 males and intact females) than by mother's line (the descendants of F1 females and intact males). (author)

  15. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liming, E-mail: wangliming@ihep.ac.cn; Chen, Chunying, E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs.

  17. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs

  18. Radiation effects in bulk and nanostructured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrom, E.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding radiation effects in silicon (Si) is of great technological importance. The material, being the basis of modern semiconductor electronics and photonics, is subjected to radiation already at the processing stage, and in many applications throughout the lifetime of the manufactured component. Despite decades of research, many fundamental questions on the subject are still not satisfactorily answered, and new ones arise constantly as device fabrication shifts towards the nanoscale. In this study, methods of computational physics are harnessed to tackle basic questions on the radiation response of bulk and nanostructured Si systems, as well as to explain atomic-scale phenomena underlying existing experimental results. Empirical potentials and quantum mechanical models are coupled with molecular dynamics simulations to model the response of Si to irradiation and to characterize the created crystal damage. The threshold displacement energy, i.e., the smallest recoil energy required to create a lattice defect, is determined in Si bulk and nanowires, in the latter system also as a function of mechanical strain. It is found that commonly used values for this quantity are drastically underestimated. Strain on the nanowire causes the threshold energy to drop, with an effect on defect production that is significantly higher than in an another nanostructure with similar dimensions, the carbon nanotube. Simulating ion irradiation of Si nanowires reveals that the large surface area to volume ratio of the nanostructure causes up to a three-fold enhancement in defect production as compared to bulk Si. Amorphous defect clusters created by energetic neutron bombardment are predicted, on the basis of their electronic structure and abundance, to cause a deleterious phenomenon called type inversion in Si strip detectors in high-energy physics experiments. The thinning of Si lamellae using a focused ion beam is studied in conjunction with experiment to unravel the cause for

  19. A Study of the Information Literacy of Biomedical Graduate Students: Based on the Thesis Topic Discovery Process in Molecular Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhao-Yen Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The biomedical information environment is in a state of constant and rapid change due to the increase in research data and rapid technological advances. In Taiwan, few research has investigated the information literacy of biomedical graduate students. This exploratory study examined the information literacy abilities and training of biomedical graduate students in Taiwan. Semi-structured interviews based on the Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology were conducted with 20 molecular biological graduate students. The interview inquired about their information-seeking channels and information literacy education. The findings show that the biomedical graduate students developed a workable thesis topic with their advisors. Through various information-seeking channels and retrieval strategies, they obtained and critically evaluated information to address different information needs for their thesis research. Through seminars, annual conferences and papers, the interviewees were informed of current developments in their field. Subsequently, through written or oral communications, they were able to integrate and exchange the information. Most interviewees cared about the social, economic, legal, and ethical issues surrounding the use of information. College courses and labs were the main information literacy education environment for them to learn about research skills and knowledge. The study concludes four areas to address for the information literacy of biomedical graduate students, i.e., using professional information, using the current information, efficiency in assessing the domain information, and utilization of diverse information channels. Currently, the interviewees showed rather low usage of library resources, which is a concern for biomedical educators and libraries. [Article content in Chinese

  20. Biomedical engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Engineering Fundamentals, the first volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in physiological systems, biomechanics, biomaterials, bioelectric phenomena, and neuroengineering. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including cardia

  1. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  2. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovsky, K.N.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  3. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyagu, A I; Loganovsky, K N [Department of Neurology, Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Scientific Centre for Radiation Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of {delta}- and {beta}- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both {theta}- and {alpha}-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author). 25 refs.

  4. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  5. SU-E-T-13: A Feasibility Study of the Use of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Improved Historical Dose Reconstruction in the Study of Late Radiation Effects for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H; O' Reilly, S; Bolch, W [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, N; Li, Z; Slopsema, R [Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cancer effects are well-documented following radiotherapy. Further investigation is needed to more accurately determine a dose-response relationship for late radiation effects. Recent dosimetry studies tend to use representative patients (Taylor 2009) or anthropomorphic phantoms (Wirth 2008) for estimating organ mean doses. In this study, we compare hybrid computational phantoms to patient-specific voxel phantoms to test the accuracy of University of Florida Hybrid Phantom Library (UFHP Library) for historical dose reconstructions. Methods: A cohort of 10 patients with CT images was used to reproduce the data that was collected historically for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (i.e. caliper measurements and photographs). Four types of phantoms were generated to show a range of refinement from reference hybrid-computational phantom to patient-specific phantoms. Each patient is matched to a reference phantom from the UFHP Library based on height and weight. The reference phantom is refined in the anterior/posterior direction to create a ‘caliper-scaled phantom’. A photograph is simulated using a surface rendering from segmented CT images. Further refinement in the lateral direction is performed using ratios from a simulated-photograph to create a ‘photograph and caliper-scaled phantom’; breast size and position is visually adjusted. Patient-specific hybrid phantoms, with matched organ volumes, are generated and show the capabilities of the UF Hybrid Phantom Library. Reference, caliper-scaled, photograph and caliper-scaled, and patient-specific hybrid phantoms are compared with patient-specific voxel phantoms to determine the accuracy of the study. Results: Progression from reference phantom to patient specific hybrid shows good agreement with the patient specific voxel phantoms. Each stage of refinement shows an overall trend of improvement in dose accuracy within the study, which suggests that computational phantoms can show

  6. Introduction to biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Enderle, John D; Blanchard, Susan M

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of John Enderle, Susan Blanchard and Joe Bronzino, leaders in the field have contributed chapters on the most relevant subjects for biomedical engineering students. These chapters coincide with courses offered in all biomedical engineering programs so that it can be used at different levels for a variety of courses of this evolving field. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, Second Edition provides a historical perspective of the major developments in the biomedical field. Also contained within are the fundamental principles underlying biomedical engineering design, analysis, and modeling procedures. The numerous examples, drill problems and exercises are used to reinforce concepts and develop problem-solving skills making this book an invaluable tool for all biomedical students and engineers. New to this edition: Computational Biology, Medical Imaging, Genomics and Bioinformatics. * 60% update from first edition to reflect the developing field of biomedical engineering * New chapters o...

  7. Late radiation effects: status and needs of epidemiologic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of late radiation effects in man are reviewed, based on exposure to the atomic bomb, radiotherapy, diagnostic radiations, and occupational or accidental exposures. Areas studied include: genetic effects, fertility, immunology, cancer, congenital malformations, growth and development, aging, cataracts, psychiatric effects, interactions with drugs or viruses, host susceptibility, and radiation factors. Cancer areas discussed include leukemia; thyroid, lung, breast, bone, and liver cancers; lymphoma; salivary gland tumors; brain tumors; nonleukemia cancers; intrauterine exposures; and preconception irradiation and childhood cancers. (U.S.)

  8. Biomedical applications of batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Roger [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Linford, Roger [The Research Office, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Schlindwein, Walkiria [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-31

    An overview is presented of the many ways in which batteries and battery materials are used in medicine and in biomedical studies. These include the use of batteries as power sources for motorised wheelchairs, surgical tools, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, dynamic prostheses, sensors and monitors for physiological parameters, neurostimulators, devices for pain relief, and iontophoretic, electroporative and related devices for drug administration. The various types of battery and fuel cell used for this wide range of applications will be considered, together with the potential harmful side effects, including accidental ingestion of batteries and the explosive nature of some of the early cardiac pacemaker battery systems.

  9. Radiation effects in C cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz Banos, M.; Garcia Ayala, A.; Meseguer Penalver, J.; Genoves Garcia, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The para follicular cell (C cell) ultrastructure of euthyroid, propyl thiouracil-treated (PTU) and protyrreline-treated (TRH) irradiated rabbit thyroid gland was studied. The ultrastructural features of C cells in the non-irradiated thyroid glands were similar to those described in other mammals. We have not observed the disappearance of the C cells in irradiated thyroid glands. Clusters of C cells were occasionally observed in the irradiated glands. The irradiated C cells showed intranuclear, filamentous bundles and a dense body together with a well-developed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous secretory vesicles. C cells follicles could be observed in irradiated and TRH-treated animals. (Author)

  10. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The recent developments in the field of membrane biology of eukaryotic cells result in revival of relevant radiobiological studies. The spatial relations and chemical nature of membrane components provide rather sensitive targets. Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of X-irradiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus - of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the multifold roles of radiationinduced membrane phenomena on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries. (orig.)

  11. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-11-01

    The recent developments in the field of membrane biology of eukaryotic cells result in revival of relevant radiobiological studies. The spatial relations and chemical nature of membrane components provide rather sensitive targets. Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of X-irradiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus - of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the multifold roles of radiationinduced membrane phenomena on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries.

  12. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  13. Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch syntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, M.; Matsuda, K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been examined using high dose rate electron beams and Fe-Cu-diatomaceous earth catalyst. Yields of saturated hydrocarbons were found to increase by irradiation, but the yields of these compounds were decreased by raising reaction temperature without irradiation, suggesting the presence of radiation chemical process in catalytic reactions. (author)

  14. Study of radiative effects in 1.8 GeV/n 40Ar incident on Pb (Bevalac Experiment E486H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, T.; McIntyre, E.; Madansky, L.; Carroll, J.; Mulera, T.; Sagle, A.; Koontz, R.; Roche, G.; Schroeder, L.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental setup, instrumentation, and results of Experiment 486H at Bevalac to test the feasibility of studying two photon inclusive and inclusive lepton pair production in the presence of a high multiplicity of background secondaries are described. Some preliminary observations are discussed

  15. Morpho-functional study of ionizing radiation effects on the rabbits` femoral vein; Avaliacao morfofuncional do efeito da radiacao ionizante sobre a veia femoral. Estudo experimental em coelhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Mauro Yoshimitsu

    1996-12-31

    In this study we evaluate the effects of the ionizing radiation on the rabbits femoral vein. The samples of femoral vein were obtained from 56 New Zealand rabbits, male with ageing from 90 to 120 days, that were divided into 4 groups of 14 animals: one control group non-irradiated and three animal groups sacrificed 2 days, 14 days and 90 days after irradiation. In the three irradiated rabbits groups, each animal received the total dose 4000 cGy (rads) divided in 10 sessions of 400 cGy, a dose equivalent that utilized on clinical therapeutic. A morpho functional study of vein samples was carried out with: light microscopy: stained by hematoxin - eosin, Masson`s tricromic, and Verhoeff. Immunohistochemical: reactions of immunoperoxidase with monoclonal mouse anti-human endothelial cell factor CD-31 and anti-human Von Willebrand factor (factor VIII), to study the vein endothelium. Histomorphometry of elastic fiber system stained by Weigert`s resorcin-fuchsin with and without prior oxidation with oxone; for the study of mature, elaunin or pre-mature and oxytalan or young elastic fibers. Electronic microscopy: transmission and scanning. With the methodology utilized we observe changes in the femoral vein of the animals submitted to irradiation in relation to the control group, thus described: there is formation of vacuoles between the endothelium and the basal membrane, called sub endothelial vacuoles, in focal areas. The factor VIII and CD-31 endothelial antigens are preserved with no changes in their functions. Focal alterations are present in the endothelial surface with disorder in the setting and orientation of the endothelial cells. there is degeneration of the elastic fibers with significant decrease in their quantity in the stage, 2 days and 14 days after irradiation. There is increase in the quantity of elastic fibers in the late stage, 90 days after irradiation, tending to normality. In this present study, the changes described are not accompanied by venous

  16. Morpho-functional study of ionizing radiation effects on the rabbits` femoral vein; Avaliacao morfofuncional do efeito da radiacao ionizante sobre a veia femoral. Estudo experimental em coelhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Mauro Yoshimitsu

    1995-12-31

    In this study we evaluate the effects of the ionizing radiation on the rabbits femoral vein. The samples of femoral vein were obtained from 56 New Zealand rabbits, male with ageing from 90 to 120 days, that were divided into 4 groups of 14 animals: one control group non-irradiated and three animal groups sacrificed 2 days, 14 days and 90 days after irradiation. In the three irradiated rabbits groups, each animal received the total dose 4000 cGy (rads) divided in 10 sessions of 400 cGy, a dose equivalent that utilized on clinical therapeutic. A morpho functional study of vein samples was carried out with: light microscopy: stained by hematoxin - eosin, Masson`s tricromic, and Verhoeff. Immunohistochemical: reactions of immunoperoxidase with monoclonal mouse anti-human endothelial cell factor CD-31 and anti-human Von Willebrand factor (factor VIII), to study the vein endothelium. Histomorphometry of elastic fiber system stained by Weigert`s resorcin-fuchsin with and without prior oxidation with oxone; for the study of mature, elaunin or pre-mature and oxytalan or young elastic fibers. Electronic microscopy: transmission and scanning. With the methodology utilized we observe changes in the femoral vein of the animals submitted to irradiation in relation to the control group, thus described: there is formation of vacuoles between the endothelium and the basal membrane, called sub endothelial vacuoles, in focal areas. The factor VIII and CD-31 endothelial antigens are preserved with no changes in their functions. Focal alterations are present in the endothelial surface with disorder in the setting and orientation of the endothelial cells. there is degeneration of the elastic fibers with significant decrease in their quantity in the stage, 2 days and 14 days after irradiation. There is increase in the quantity of elastic fibers in the late stage, 90 days after irradiation, tending to normality. In this present study, the changes described are not accompanied by venous

  17. Radiation effects at the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchriese, M.G.D. [ed.] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1988-06-01

    This report contains a preliminary study of the effects of the radiation levels expected at the SSC on potential detector components and a subset of materials to be used in the SSC accelerators. The report does not contain a discussion of radiation damage to electronics components that may be used at the SSC. We have investigated many of the effects of radiation on silicon detectors, on wire chambers, on scintillating materials and the associated readout, on optical fibers for data transmission and on structural or other materials to be used in detector or accelerator components. In the SSC accelerator complex, in particular the storage rings, radiation damage will not present significant problems different than those now faced by existing high energy accelerators. We find that the effects of radiation damage on SSC detector components will be significant at the design luminosity of the ssc and will limit, or determine, many of the options for different detector components. In this regard the reader should keep in mind that, in the absence of a specific detector design, it is not possible to form definitive conclusions regarding the viability of the detector components. Since the radiation levels in experiments at the SSC will depend on the geometry and composition of the apparatus, simple yes /no generalizations about the feasibility of a detector component are not possible.

  18. Fundamental radiation effects in αAg-Zn alloys: Zener relaxation, study of the mobility of point defects and the evolution of their populations in a particle flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwachs, Michel.

    1977-01-01

    After a recall on the physical effects of radiations, a model used to describe the defect populations produced in a fast particle flux is presented. The experimental devices used and the measurements carried out on a solid solution of αAg-Zn are described. The results obtained in an electron flux are compared with the forecastings of the theoretical models. The mobility and the apparent recombination radius of vacancies and autointerstitials, the absorption efficiency of dislocations in regard to point defects and the participation of autointerstitials to short-range order are studied. A similar study carried out under neutron irradiation is reported. The influence of neutron doses and temperature on atomic mobility is investigated. An experiment carried out under gamma photon irradiation enables a comparison to be made between the creation of defects by gamma photons and electrons [fr

  19. Radiation effect of radioiodide therapy on the hypophyseal and hypothalamic feedback control centers for thyroid function studied by dry-mount autoradiography. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.E.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported from studies in rats on the effects of β radiation from therapeutic doses of 131 I on the physiology of the pituitary gland and on brain structures considered thyroid hormone control areas. Iodine-125-labeled triiodothyronine and thyroxine and autoradiographic techniques were used to determine the cellular and subcellular localization of thyroid hormones in the brain tissues of untreated and thyroidectomized animals. The results suggest that thyroid hormones act on all neurons throughout the mature brain. (U.S.)

  20. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Three year progress report, 15 August 1972--14 August 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Research in this project has proceeded with the chemical objective of isolating and characterizing radiation products and with the biological objective of determining the action of reactive radiation products on and in biological systems. Study has also been made on the simulation of γ radiation by various photochemical reaction conditions. Progress is reported in the chemical studies on the isolation and characterization of thymine glycols, isolation and characterization of glycols of 1-carbamylimidazolidone as products of cytosine, identification of the major hydroperoxy thymine (T 6 OOH), attempted synthesis of the nucleoside and nucleotide of T 6 OOH, and synthesis and characterization of 5-hydroperoxy-methyluracil. Progress is reported in the biological studies on the effects of T 6 OOH on nucleic acid components, on C--N glycosidic bonds, as a chemical mutagen, on the chromosomes of cells, and as a potential synergist of ionizing radiation. The photoproducts of uracil, cytosine, thymine, and thymidine that have been isolated and characterized are tabulated. (U.S.)

  1. Radiation effects on biochemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, G.M.

    2000-04-01

    Xanthine oxidase catalyses the oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine, xanthine and a wide range of carbonyl compounds. The enzyme exists as an oxidase and a dehydrogenase; both catalyze the oxidation of the same substrates. Steady state radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate oxidative and reductive free radicals. Their effects on the enzymatic activity of xanthine oxidase were determined. Initially inactivation studies were carried out to evaluate the extent to which radiolysis in aqueous solution affects the enzyme activity. Values of D 37 and G inactivation were calculated following irradiation in the presence of free radical scavengers and in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase. The kinetic constants Vmax and Km were also determined following radiolysis. The effect of ionising radiation on the iron content of xanthine oxidase was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Native gel electrophoresis and iso-electric focussing were performed in an attempt to demonstrate changes in the overall structure of the enzyme. The binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin was carried out by measuring, (1) the displacement of methylene blue (MB + ) from a heparin-MB + complex, (2) affinity chromatography and, (3) pulse radiolysis. The effect of irradiation on the binding process was investigated using techniques (1) and (2). Finally the radiation-induced conversion of xanthine oxidase to dehydrogenase was established. The results indicate that xanthine oxidase is inactivated greatest in the presence of air and irradiation causes Vmax to he reduced and Km to increase. The iron content of irradiated xanthine oxidase is unaffected. Electrophoresis shows the enzyme becomes fragmented and the isoelectric points of the fragments vary over a wide range of pH. Binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin as measured by displacement of MB + from a heparin-MB + complex suggests that irradiation increases the affinity of the enzyme for the polyanion, whereas

  2. Errors, uncertainties and other problems associated with the interpretation of transgenerational epidemiological studies with special reference to postulated ionising radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovak, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The transgenerational effects debate of recent years can, in the light of current knowledge, be seen as a working example of the operation of a powerful range of errors, biases and confounders. These have often helped to obfuscate the issues addressed to the disbenefit of interested parties such as vicinity populations and workforces. The possibility of transgenerational effects has been entertained as a theoretical constant throughout the history of radiation science being given particular direction and focus by the work of Mueller in the 1920's. The absence of such effect in bomb survivors was therefore somewhat surprising to researchers even though this relative radio resistance was confirmed by later animal studies, such as by Russell and Selby. For emotive and situational reasons the renewed transgenerational debate of the last couple of decades has focused largely on childhood leukaemia, a very late, even remote-manifesting putative, transgenerational effect. This effect has now been demonstrated to be mainly due to confounding, most likely by population mixing, even in the sentinel study population of Seascale, near Sellafield. Little attention had been paid to the nature of the biological plausibility of putative transgenerational effects of ionizing radiation in terms of likelihood and closeness of fit. Thus there is a likelihood gradient of expected magnitude of effect which may be predicted to run from early to late manifesting defects. This would be expected to be high for pre-implantation loss and low for stillbirths or childhood cancer. Cited biological concordance also seldom takes regard of dose and dose rate. This is a particular problem because many epidemiological studies use more or less crude surrogate of dose such as monitored/never monitored or mechanical proportionalisation of annual dose summaries to shorter critical periods (such as spermatogenesis). In questionnaire studies, which are often regarded as inescapable in reproductive

  3. Ionising radiation effects on food packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragni, P.; Segre, A. L.; Capitani, D.; Danesi, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of any food irradiation treatment is to guarantee the best safe quality of the products, reducing the spreading risk ( c ross-contamination ) for several food-associated diseases. Actually, over 40 countries provide clearances for the treatment of about 45 different types of foodstuffs. EU has to homogenise the situation within the associated States. With the European directive 1999/2/EC Italy, as other EU countries, already has brought into force their regulations to comply. The current Italian regulation on irradiation treatment of foodstuffs is referred since 1996 as follows: a) potatoes, onions and garlic; b) spices, herbs and condiments microbial. The new (April 2001) Italian law allows the possibility to ask for special permission of treatment for other foodstuff which is possible to treat in other E.U. countries. Large majority of foods are submitted to irradiation treatment after they have been packaged. In Dutch cases the study of radiation effects on the package becomes crucial, also because polymeric materials may be affected by ionizing radiation. We performed our studies on several materials employed in food packaging, with a particular care to the role of anti-oxidant additives present in food packaging materials. The attention is pointed on the possible chemical-physical effects induced by radiation on foodstuff packaging. After irradiation in plastic materials two main effects may occur: degradation and cross-linking. The result depending on the comparative rates of the two actions. This kind of information was successfully obtained using NMR methods on a large number of polymers effectively used for the food packaging procedures

  4. Genomic instability and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian Streffer

    2007-01-01

    malformations) develop by going through several mutation steps, an increase of genomic instability can have the consequence that the probability for the necessary mutation steps after the initiation processes will be enhanced and facilitated. In this connection it is of high interest that genomic instability is increased in several human populations who have developed or will develop a cancer with/or without radiation. The genomic instability was studied in peripheral lymphocytes of these patients. Such an effect has been found in patients with head and neck cancers before treatment. It has been observed in uranium miners and patients with Morbus Hodgkin who developed secondary cancers after exposures. The implications of these phenomena for low dose radiation seem to be important.

  5. [Master course in biomedical engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbágy, Akos; Benyó, Zoltán; Monos, Emil

    2009-11-22

    The Bologna Declaration aims at harmonizing the European higher education structure. In accordance with the Declaration, biomedical engineering will be offered as a master (MSc) course also in Hungary, from year 2009. Since 1995 biomedical engineering course has been held in cooperation of three universities: Semmelweis University, Budapest Veterinary University, and Budapest University of Technology and Economics. One of the latter's faculties, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, has been responsible for the course. Students could start their biomedical engineering studies - usually in parallel with their first degree course - after they collected at least 180 ECTS credits. Consequently, the biomedical engineering course could have been considered as a master course even before the Bologna Declaration. Students had to collect 130 ECTS credits during the six-semester course. This is equivalent to four-semester full-time studies, because during the first three semesters the curriculum required to gain only one third of the usual ECTS credits. The paper gives a survey on the new biomedical engineering master course, briefly summing up also the subjects in the curriculum.

  6. The art and science of selecting graduate students in the biomedical sciences: Performance in doctoral study of the foundational sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Young; Berkowitz, Oren; Symes, Karen; Dasgupta, Shoumita

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate associations between admissions criteria and performance in Ph.D. programs at Boston University School of Medicine. The initial phase of this project examined student performance in the classroom component of a newly established curriculum named "Foundations in Biomedical Sciences (FiBS)". Quantitative measures including undergraduate grade point average (GPA), graduate record examination (GRE; a standardized, computer-based test) scores for the verbal (assessment of test takers' ability to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information and concepts provided in writing) and quantitative (assessment of test takers' problem-solving ability) components of the examination, previous research experience, and competitiveness of previous research institution were used in the study. These criteria were compared with competencies in the program defined as students who pass the curriculum as well as students categorized as High Performers. These data indicated that there is a significant positive correlation between FiBS performance and undergraduate GPA, GRE scores, and competitiveness of undergraduate institution. No significant correlations were found between FiBS performance and research background. By taking a data-driven approach to examine admissions and performance, we hope to refine our admissions criteria to facilitate an unbiased approach to recruitment of students in the life sciences and to share our strategy to support similar goals at other institutions.

  7. Density functional theory (DFT) study on the hydrolysis behavior of degradable Mg/Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafati, Marjan

    Magnesium-based (Mg and/or Mg alloys) materials possess many advantageous physicochemical/biological characteristics such as good biocompatibility and similarity of the mechanical properties to the human bone tissue, which renders this material a promising candidate for the biomedical and implant applications. One of the most attractive features of Mg-based materials is the degradability in the physiological environment. With the burst of research on the biodegradable materials for the healthcare device applications, Mg and its alloys attracted a strong attention in the bioengineering field in recent years. However, the major limitation of applying Mg-based materials to biomedical applications is the fast degradation/corrosion rate with regards to the healing process time-span. In the present thesis, an atomistic model employing the density-functional theory (DFT) has been developed to study the hydrolysis process by understanding the influences of commonly used alloying elements (zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), aluminum (Al), and yttrium (Y)) and the crystallographic orientation of the dissolution surfaces (basal (0001), prism (1010), and pyramidal (1011) planes) on the corrosion behavior. These parameters are known to strongly impact the initial hydrolysis phenomena of Mg-based materials. To develop the atomistic computational model, we have implemented the Dmol3 software package in conjunction with PBE (Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof) correlation energy functional in the GGA (generalized gradient approximation) scheme. Throughout the thesis, we performed three sets of calculations, i) surface energy, ii) dissolution potential, and iii) water adsorption computations, to examine the hydrolysis mechanism and the subsequent corrosion/degradation of Mg/Mg alloys. The total energy changes of various Mg-based systems in different conditions for these surface energies, dissolution behavior, and tendency of the system for adsorbing the water molecule were quantified. The results

  8. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  9. Ab initio study of radiation effects on the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} electrode used in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib, E-mail: Samin.2@osu.edu, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu; Kurth, Michael; Cao, Lei, E-mail: Samin.2@osu.edu, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W 19" t" h Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently in wide use owing to their high energy density and enhanced capabilities. Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries because of its advantageous properties. Lithium-ion batteries could be exposed to radiation occurring in various conditions such as during outer space exploration and nuclear accidents. In this study, we apply density functional theory to explore the effect of radiation damage on this electrode and, ultimately, on the performance of the battery. It was found that radiation could affect the structural stability of the material. Furthermore, the electrode was shown to undergo a transition from insulator to metal, following the defects due to radiation. In addition, the effect of radiation on the intercalation potential was found to be highly dependent on the nature of the defect induced.

  10. Ab initio study of radiation effects on the Li4Ti5O12 electrode used in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Adib; Kurth, Michael; Cao, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently in wide use owing to their high energy density and enhanced capabilities. Li4Ti5O12 is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries because of its advantageous properties. Lithium-ion batteries could be exposed to radiation occurring in various conditions such as during outer space exploration and nuclear accidents. In this study, we apply density functional theory to explore the effect of radiation damage on this electrode and, ultimately, on the performance of the battery. It was found that radiation could affect the structural stability of the material. Furthermore, the electrode was shown to undergo a transition from insulator to metal, following the defects due to radiation. In addition, the effect of radiation on the intercalation potential was found to be highly dependent on the nature of the defect induced.

  11. Ab initio study of radiation effects on the Li4Ti5O12 electrode used in lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" >Samin, Adib; th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" >Kurth, Michael; th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" data-affiliation=" (Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))" >Cao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently in wide use owing to their high energy density and enhanced capabilities. Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries because of its advantageous properties. Lithium-ion batteries could be exposed to radiation occurring in various conditions such as during outer space exploration and nuclear accidents. In this study, we apply density functional theory to explore the effect of radiation damage on this electrode and, ultimately, on the performance of the battery. It was found that radiation could affect the structural stability of the material. Furthermore, the electrode was shown to undergo a transition from insulator to metal, following the defects due to radiation. In addition, the effect of radiation on the intercalation potential was found to be highly dependent on the nature of the defect induced

  12. Biomedical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the last years computational methods lead to new approaches that can be applied within medical practice. Based on the tremendous advances in medical imaging and high-performance computing, virtual testing is able to help in medical decision processes or implant designs. Current challenges in medicine and engineering are related to the application of computational methods to clinical medicine and the study of biological systems at different scales. Additionally manufacturers will be able to use computational tools and methods to predict the performance of their medical devices in virtual patients. The physical and animal testing procedures could be reduced by virtual prototyping of medical devices. Here simulations can enhance the performance of alternate device designs for a range of virtual patients. This will lead to a refinement of designs and to safer products. This book summarizes different aspects of approaches to enhance function, production, initialization and complications of different types o...

  13. Utilization of rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite;Utilizacao da cinza da casca de arroz como carga em matriz de poliamida 6 submetida a radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Waldir Pedro

    2009-07-01

    In order to improve the dimensional stability, as well as, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of polymers, new filler to this purpose has been developed. The mos applied filler to propitiate the features previously mentioned are the glass and carbon fibers, the mineral filler as the calcium carbonate, the talc and the micro glass sphere. The main aim of this work was to study the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite, irradiated by electron beam at different doses, since it is constituted of at least 90% of silicon dioxide, and compared with the talc which is the most applied mineral filler. This comparison was made from a compound made through the refined rice husk ash and the polyamide 6 (PA 6), which is one of the main engineering plastic with applications in several productive areas. The samples were injected and irradiated in a electron accelerator. Afterwards, their mechanical and thermal properties were measured. It was also inject automotive parts to verify the processing of the PA 6 with CCA. The results showed that the use of the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 composite is technically and economically viable. The irradiation of the studied composite (PA 6 with 30% of rice husk ash) did not provide any improvement for the mechanical and thermal properties previously appraised. (author)

  14. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gamma radiation effects in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lubkowski, Grzegorz; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Suhrke, Michael; Weinand, Udo; Endler, Ingolf; Meißner, Frank; Richter, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of gamma radiation effects in low-density arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. These arrays are characterized by excellent anti-reflective and absorbing properties for wavelengths from UV to IR, which makes them an interesting option for stray light control in optical space applications. Gamma irradiation equivalent to an estimated surface lifetime exposition in geostationary orbit does not affect the reflectivity of the structures. First h...

  16. Gamma radiation effects on different sorts of onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma radiation effects on different sorts of onions were studied to improve ways of obtaining agricultural vegetation mutations and to find out the genotype role in induced mutagenesis. It is established that rhizome onion seeds are more radiosensitive than bulbous ones, ephemeroide form seeds are most stable among bulbous plants. Table data on dependence of seed germination and plant survival on radiation dose are presented

  17. Lifetime radiation effects research in animals: An overview of the status and philosophy of studies at University of California-Davis Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Book, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the life-shortening and carcinogenic effects of internal emitters and external irradiation have been conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research for over three decades. Our principal animal model has been the beagle dog. The beagle's tissue sensitivity, metabolic and dosimetric characteristics, pathologic responses, and aging changes give it relevance for the assessment of radiation risks in humans. Although our results confirm the existence of an amelioration of effects at low doses and low dose rates (the dose-rate effectiveness factor), the manifestation of the amelioration may vary. For example, with x-irradiation higher exposures appeared to decrease latency but did not alter the incidence of mammary cancer, whereas with the bone-seeking radionuclides, 90 Sr and 226 Ra, higher doses decreased the latency and increased the incidence of osteosarcomas. Radiation-induced leukemias were seen only with high doses at high dose rates but only from 90 Sr and from chronic exposures to 60 Co, mainly in dogs exposed beginning in utero. Most of the radiation-induced life shortening in dogs exposed to internal emitters appears attributable to an increased cancer risk, but this is not necessarily the case for x-irradiated dogs

  18. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  19. Statistics in biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Manteiga, Wenceslao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of biostatistics is nowadays a fundamental scientific component of biomedical, public health and health services research. Traditional and emerging areas of application include clinical trials research, observational studies, physiology, imaging, and genomics. The present article reviews the current situation of biostatistics, considering the statistical methods traditionally used in biomedical research, as well as the ongoing development of new methods in response to the new problems arising in medicine. Clearly, the successful application of statistics in biomedical research requires appropriate training of biostatisticians. This training should aim to give due consideration to emerging new areas of statistics, while at the same time retaining full coverage of the fundamentals of statistical theory and methodology. In addition, it is important that students of biostatistics receive formal training in relevant biomedical disciplines, such as epidemiology, clinical trials, molecular biology, genetics, and neuroscience.La Bioestadística es hoy en día una componente científica fundamental de la investigación en Biomedicina, salud pública y servicios de salud. Las áreas tradicionales y emergentes de aplicación incluyen ensayos clínicos, estudios observacionales, fisología, imágenes, y genómica. Este artículo repasa la situación actual de la Bioestadística, considerando los métodos estadísticos usados tradicionalmente en investigación biomédica, así como los recientes desarrollos de nuevos métodos, para dar respuesta a los nuevos problemas que surgen en Medicina. Obviamente, la aplicación fructífera de la estadística en investigación biomédica exige una formación adecuada de los bioestadísticos, formación que debería tener en cuenta las áreas emergentes en estadística, cubriendo al mismo tiempo los fundamentos de la teoría estadística y su metodología. Es importante, además, que los estudiantes de

  20. In silico assessment of biomedical products: The conundrum of rare but not so rare events in two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Cobelli, Claudio; Haddad, Tarek; Himes, Adam; Kovatchev, Boris; Palmer, Mark

    2017-05-01

    In silico clinical trials, defined as "The use of individualized computer simulation in the development or regulatory evaluation of a medicinal product, medical device, or medical intervention," have been proposed as a possible strategy to reduce the regulatory costs of innovation and the time to market for biomedical products. We review some of the the literature on this topic, focusing in particular on those applications where the current practice is recognized as inadequate, as for example, the detection of unexpected severe adverse events too rare to be detected in a clinical trial, but still likely enough to be of concern. We then describe with more details two case studies, two successful applications of in silico clinical trial approaches, one relative to the University of Virginia/Padova simulator that the Food and Drug Administration has accepted as possible replacement for animal testing in the preclinical assessment of artificial pancreas technologies, and the second, an investigation of the probability of cardiac lead fracture, where a Bayesian network was used to combine in vivo and in silico observations, suggesting a whole new strategy of in silico-augmented clinical trials, to be used to increase the numerosity where recruitment is impossible, or to explore patients' phenotypes that are unlikely to appear in the trial cohort, but are still frequent enough to be of concern.

  1. Radiation-induced polymerization and radiation effect on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao

    1977-12-01

    The processes of radiation-induced polymerization of monomers and also radiation effects on polymers have been studied by instrumental analyses of electron spin resonance (ESR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron microscopy. In radiation-induced polymerization, graft-copolymerization and absorbed state polymerization were taken up. For graft-copolymerization, monomers such as methylmethacrylate and butadiene were made to react with irradiated polyethylene, and behaviors of the initiating radicals and propagating radicals were followed under the reaction by ESR. For absorbed state polymerization, acrylonitrile/zeolite and methylmethacrylate/zeolite were chosen. Absorbed monomers were irradiated at 77 0 K and polymerized at room temperature. Active species and the concentrations were measured by ESR and the yields of polymer were observed by NMR. In radiation effect on polymers, polyvinylfluoride, polyvinylidenfluoride and polytetrafluoroethylene were taken up. Active species trapped in the polymer matrixes were identified and decay and reactivity of the species were also studied. On the basis of information from the electron microscopy and x-ray analysis, radiation effects on these polymers are described. In polytetrafluoroethylene produced by radiation polymerization, the relation between morphology and polymerization conditions and also the process of crystallization during polymerization were studied. (auth.)

  2. Anti-radiation effect of hericium erinaceus polysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchen; Zhang Huijuan; Luo Chuanhuan; Wang Bingji

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-radiation effect of hericium erinaceus polysaccharide on irradiated mice. Methods: 520 female mice were randomized to several groups and exposed to 6.25-8.5 Gy whole-body γ-rays. The hericium erinaceus polysaccharide was injected i.p before or after irradiation. The 30-day survival rate of mice was determined, and DNA content of bone marrow was observed as well at seventh day after irradiation. Results: It was showed that the 30-day survival rate and DNA content of bone marrow were all significantly higher in 30 mg or 15 mg hericium erinaceus polysaccharide-treated groups than those in the corresponding irradiated controls (P < 0.01). The 30-day survival rate increased from 35% to 97.5%. Conclusion: The hericium erinaceus polysaccharide has marked anti-radiation effect. Further investigation is worthwhile

  3. Study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuboyama, Satoshi; Shindou, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Fine structure of the recent semiconductor devices has made them more sensitive to the space radiation environment with trapped high-energy protons and heavy ions. A new failure mode caused by bulk damage had been reported on such devices with small structure, and its effect on commercial synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAMs) was analyzed from the irradiation test results performed at Heavy ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Single event upset (SEU) data of static random access memory (SRAMs) were also collected to establish the method of estimating the proton-induced SEU rate from the results of heavy ion irradiation tests. (authors)

  4. A randomized study of a method for optimizing adolescent assent to biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Robert D; Brody, Janet L; Scherer, David G; Turner, Charles W; Dalen, Jeanne; Raissy, Hengameh

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary consent/assent with adolescents invited to participate in research raises challenging problems. No studies to date have attempted to manipulate autonomy in relation to assent/consent processes. This study evaluated the effects of an autonomy-enhanced individualized assent/consent procedure embedded within a randomized pediatric asthma clinical trial. Families were randomly assigned to remain together or separated during a consent/assent process; the latter we characterize as an autonomy-enhanced assent/consent procedure. We hypothesized that separating adolescents from their parents would improve adolescent assent by increasing knowledge and appreciation of the clinical trial and willingness to participate. Sixty-four adolescent-parent dyads completed procedures. The together versus separate randomization made no difference in adolescent or parent willingness to participate. However, significant differences were found in both parent and adolescent knowledge of the asthma clinical trial based on the assent/consent procedure and adolescent age. The separate assent/consent procedure improved knowledge of study risks and benefits for older adolescents and their parents but not for the younger youth or their parents. Regardless of the assent/consent process, younger adolescents had lower comprehension of information associated with the study medication and research risks and benefits, but not study procedures or their research rights and privileges. The use of an autonomy-enhanced assent/consent procedure for adolescents may improve their and their parent's informed assent/consent without impacting research participation decisions. Traditional assent/consent procedures may result in a "diffusion of responsibility" effect between parents and older adolescents, specifically in attending to key information associated with study risks and benefits.

  5. Pitting corrosion studies on nitrogen implanted 316L SS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaiyan, M.; Veerabadran, K.M.; Thampi, N.S.; Kanwar Krishnan; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, human bone fracture and defects have been corrected using metal and alloy fixing devices. Austenitic stainless steels (such as 316L alloy studied here) are favoured because of low cost, compared to titanium alloys, ease of fabrication and fair corrosion resistance. Localized attack on 316l stainless steel, however, results in iron, chromium and nickel ions leaching into surrounding body fluids. This study reports on the successful use of nitrogen ion implantation into 316lSS to evaluate the optimum dose needed to minimise this localised attack, in a physiological saline solution. (UK)

  6. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain); Mariani, Valentina [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Cohen, Dror [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Madi, Lea [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Garanger, Elisabeth [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Rossi, François [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Korenstein, Rafi [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Lecommandoux, Sébastien [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Ponti, Jessica [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro, E-mail: heredia@gaiker.es [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)-block–poly(l-glutamic acid) (PTMC-b–PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-block–poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PEG-b–PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood–serum–protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC-b–PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG-b–PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  7. Culture & differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into osteoblast on degradable biomedical composite scaffold: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan G Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a significant bone tissue loss in patients from diseases and traumatic injury. The current autograft transplantation gold standard treatment has drawbacks, namely donor site morbidity and limited supply. The field of tissue engineering has emerged with a goal to provide alternative sources for transplantations to bridge this gap between the need and lack of bone graft. The aim of this study was to prepare biocomposite scaffolds based on chitosan (CHT, polycaprolactone (PCL and hydroxyapatite (HAP by freeze drying method and to assess the role of scaffolds in spatial organization, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs in vitro, in order to achieve bone graft substitutes with improved physical-chemical and biological properties. Methods: Pure chitosan (100CHT and composites (40CHT/HAP, 30CHT/HAP/PCL and 25CHT/HAP/PCL scaffolds containing 40, 30, 25 parts per hundred resin (phr filler, respectively in acetic acid were freeze dried and the porous foams were studied for physicochemical and in vitro biological properties. Results: Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the scaffolds showed porous microstructure (20-300 μm with uniform pore distribution in all compositions. Materials were tested under compressive load in wet condition (using phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4. The in vitro studies showed that all the scaffold compositions supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation as visible from SEM images, [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP assay and quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR. Interpretation & conclusions: Scaffold composition 25CHT/HAP/PCL showed better biomechanical and osteoinductive properties as evident by mechanical test and alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast specific gene expression studies. This study suggests that this novel

  8. Biomedical Imaging Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salzer, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    This book presents and describes imaging technologies that can be used to study chemical processes and structural interactions in dynamic systems, principally in biomedical systems. The imaging technologies, largely biomedical imaging technologies such as MRT, Fluorescence mapping, raman mapping, nanoESCA, and CARS microscopy, have been selected according to their application range and to the chemical information content of their data. These technologies allow for the analysis and evaluation of delicate biological samples, which must not be disturbed during the profess. Ultimately, this may me

  9. Biomedical engineering principles

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Arthur B; Valdevit, Antonio; Ascione, Alfred N

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Modeling of Physiological ProcessesCell Physiology and TransportPrinciples and Biomedical Applications of HemodynamicsA Systems Approach to PhysiologyThe Cardiovascular SystemBiomedical Signal ProcessingSignal Acquisition and ProcessingTechniques for Physiological Signal ProcessingExamples of Physiological Signal ProcessingPrinciples of BiomechanicsPractical Applications of BiomechanicsBiomaterialsPrinciples of Biomedical Capstone DesignUnmet Clinical NeedsEntrepreneurship: Reasons why Most Good Designs Never Get to MarketAn Engineering Solution in Search of a Biomedical Problem

  10. Fundamental of biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sawhney, GS

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: A well set out textbook explains the fundamentals of biomedical engineering in the areas of biomechanics, biofluid flow, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation and use of computing in biomedical engineering. All these subjects form a basic part of an engineer''s education. The text is admirably suited to meet the needs of the students of mechanical engineering, opting for the elective of Biomedical Engineering. Coverage of bioinstrumentation, biomaterials and computing for biomedical engineers can meet the needs of the students of Electronic & Communication, Electronic & Instrumenta

  11. Improving completion rates of students in biomedical PhD programs: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viđak, Marin; Tokalić, Ružica; Marušić, Matko; Puljak, Livia; Sapunar, Damir

    2017-08-25

    Analysis of graduation success at the University of Split School of Medicine PhD programs conducted in 2011 revealed that only 11% of students who enrolled and completed their graduate coursework between 1999 and 2011 earned a doctoral degree. In this prospective cohort study we evaluated and compared three PhD programs within the same medical school, where the newest program, called Translational Research in Biomedicine (TRIBE), established in the academic year 2010/11, aimed to increase the graduation rate through an innovative approach. The intervention in the new program was related to three domains: redefined recruitment strategy, strict study regulations, and changes to the curriculum. We compared performance of PhD students between the new and existing programs and analyzed their current status, time to obtain a degree (from enrolment to doctorate), age at doctorate, number of publications on which the thesis was based and the impact factor of journals in which these were published. These improvement strategies were associated with higher thesis completion rate and reduced time to degree for students enrolled in the TRIBE program. There was no change in the impact factor or number of publications that were the basis for the doctoral theses. Our study describes good practices which proved useful in the design or reform of the PhD training program.

  12. The radiation effects on the living cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, E.; Dutrillaux, B.; Soussi, Th.; Boiteux, S.; Lopez, B.; Feunteun, J.

    1999-06-01

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  13. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  14. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  15. Radiation effects on light sources and detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of optoelectronics includes a wide variety of both military and non-military applications in which the systems must meet radiation exposure requirements. Herein, we review the work on radiation effects on sources and detectors for such optoelectronic systems. For sources the principal problem is permanent damage-induced light output degradation, while for detectors it is ionizing radiation-induced photocurrents

  16. Studying the influence of nanodiamonds over the elasticity of polymer/nanodiamond composites for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, T.; Mitev, D.; Radeva, E.; Iglic, A.; Presker, R.; Daniel, M.; Sepitka, J.; Krasteva, N.; Keremidarska, M.; Cvetanov, I.; Pramatarova, L.

    2014-12-01

    The combined unique properties offered by organic and inorganic constituents within a single material on a nanoscale level make nanocomposites attractive for the next generation of biocompatible materials. The composite materials of the detonation nanodiamond/polymer type possess spatial organization of components with new structural features and physical properties, as well as complex functions due to the strong synergistic effects between the nanoparticles and the polymer [1]. The plasma polymerization (PP) method was chosen to obtain composites of silicon-based polymers, in which detonation generated nanodiamond (DND) particles were incorporated. The composite layers are homogeneous, chemically resistant, thermally and mechanically stable, thus allowing a large amount of biological components to be loaded onto their surface and to be used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, implants, stents, biosensors and other medical and biological devices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main focus of research in regenerative medicine due to their extraordinary potential to differentiate into different kinds of cells including osteoblasts, which are needed for various bone disease treatments. However, for optimal usage of MSCs knowledge about the factors that influence their initial distribution in the human system, tissue-specific activation and afterwards differentiation into osteoblasts is required. In recent studies it was found that one of these factors is the elasticity of the substrates [2]. The choice of the proper material which specifically guides the differentiation of stem cells even in the absence of growth factors is very important when building modern strategy for bone regeneration. One of the reasons for there not being many studies in this area worldwide is the lack of suitable biomaterials which support these kinds of experiments. The goal of this study is to create substrates suitable for cell culture with a range of mechanical properties

  17. Studying the influence of nanodiamonds over the elasticity of polymer/nanodiamond composites for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, T; Iglic, A; Presker, R; Daniel, M; Sepitka, J; Krasteva, N; Keremidarska, M; Mitev, D; Radeva, E; Cvetanov, I; Pramatarova, L

    2014-01-01

    The combined unique properties offered by organic and inorganic constituents within a single material on a nanoscale level make nanocomposites attractive for the next generation of biocompatible materials. The composite materials of the detonation nanodiamond/polymer type possess spatial organization of components with new structural features and physical properties, as well as complex functions due to the strong synergistic effects between the nanoparticles and the polymer [1]. The plasma polymerization (PP) method was chosen to obtain composites of silicon-based polymers, in which detonation generated nanodiamond (DND) particles were incorporated. The composite layers are homogeneous, chemically resistant, thermally and mechanically stable, thus allowing a large amount of biological components to be loaded onto their surface and to be used in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, implants, stents, biosensors and other medical and biological devices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main focus of research in regenerative medicine due to their extraordinary potential to differentiate into different kinds of cells including osteoblasts, which are needed for various bone disease treatments. However, for optimal usage of MSCs knowledge about the factors that influence their initial distribution in the human system, tissue-specific activation and afterwards differentiation into osteoblasts is required. In recent studies it was found that one of these factors is the elasticity of the substrates [2]. The choice of the proper material which specifically guides the differentiation of stem cells even in the absence of growth factors is very important when building modern strategy for bone regeneration. One of the reasons for there not being many studies in this area worldwide is the lack of suitable biomaterials which support these kinds of experiments. The goal of this study is to create substrates suitable for cell culture with a range of mechanical properties

  18. Magnetic properties study of iron-oxide nanoparticles/PVA ferrogels with potential biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Zélis, P.; Muraca, D.; Gonzalez, J. S.; Pasquevich, G. A.; Alvarez, V. A.; Pirota, K. R.; Sánchez, F. H.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the magnetic behavior of maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer matrices prepared by physical cross-linking is reported. The magnetic nanocomposites (ferrogels) were obtained by the in situ co-precipitation of iron salts in the presence of PVA polymer, and subsequently subjected to freezing–thawing cycles. The magnetic behavior of these ferrogels was compared with that of similar systems synthesized using the glutaraldehyde. This type of chemical cross-linking agents presents several disadvantages due to the presence of residual toxic molecules in the gel, which are undesirable for biological applications. Characteristic particle size determined by several techniques are in the range 7.9–9.3 nm. The iron oxidation state in the NPs was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mössbauer measurements showed that the NP magnetic moments present collective magnetic excitations and superparamagnetic relaxations. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures of the NPs in the ferrogels, and the magnetic anisotropy constant, were obtained from magnetic measurements. An empirical model including two magnetic contributions (large NPs slightly departed from thermodynamic equilibrium below 200 K, and small NPs at thermodynamic equilibrium) was used to fit the experimental magnetization curves. A deviation from the superparamagnetic regime was observed. This deviation was explained on the basis of an interacting superparamagnetic model. From this model, relevant magnetic and structural properties were obtained, such as the magnitude order of the dipolar interaction energy, the NPs magnetic moment, and the number of NPs per ferrogel mass unit. This study contributes to the understanding of the basic physics of a new class of materials that could emerge from the PVA-based magnetic ferrogels.

  19. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data.

  20. Radiation effects concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials used at spallation neutron sources are exposed to energetic particle and photon radiation. Mechanical and physical properties of these materials are altered; radiation damage on the atomic scale leads to radiation effects on the macroscopic scale. Most notable among mechanical-property radiation effects in metals and metal alloys are changes in tensile strength and ductility, changes in rupture strength, dimensional stability and volumetric swelling, and dimensional changes due to stress-induced creep. Physical properties such as electrical resistivity also are altered. The fission-reactor community has accumulated a good deal of data on material radiation effects. However, when the incident particle energy exceeds 50 MeV or so, a new form of radiation damage ensues; spallation reactions lead to more energetic atom recoils and the subsequent temporal and spatial distribution of point defects is much different from that due to a fission-reactor environment. In addition, spallation reactions cause atomic transmutations with these new atoms representing an impurity in the metal. The higher-energy case is of interest at spallation sources; limited detailed data exist for material performance in this environment. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  1. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR. - Highlights: • On increasing e-beam dose from 5 kGy to 60 kGy the MVTR decreased continuously. • Increasing crosslinker concentration from 2% to10% resulted in decrease of MVTR. • IPDI has the highest and TAC has the least MVTR in PU-PSA system among the crosslinkers. • MVTR/peel adhesion/shear adhesion/initial tack: IPDI>MDI>CMDI>PMDI>TAIC>TAC. • Gel content/T g /crystallinity: TAC>TAIC>PMDI>CMDI>MDI>IPDI

  2. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    damage. We compared curvature in untreated with irradiated roots and measured the inhibition of curvature at 2×1013 - 8×1013 ions/cm2. Despite greater mass of imbibed seeds, the dose-response curve showed greater sensitivity of imbibed than for dry seeds. In addition, germination rate was found to be strongly dependent on ion beam current, at least for 3 MeV protons. Our data show that weak ionizing particles (low MeV protons) are suitable to study radiation effects and seedlings are a useful biological systems to study space radiation. Supported by NASA grant NNX13AN05A.

  3. Staff perception on biomedical or health care waste management: a qualitative study in a rural tertiary care hospital in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Chandra Joshi

    Full Text Available Health care or biomedical waste, if not managed properly, can be of high risk to the hospital staff, the patients, the community, public health and the environment, especially in low and middle income settings where proper disposal norms are often not followed. Our aim was to explore perceptions of staff of an Indian rural tertiary care teaching hospital on hospital waste management.A qualitative study was conducted using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs, with different professional groups, cleaning staff, nurses, medical students, doctors and administrators. The FGD guide included the following topics: (i role of Health Care Waste Management (HCWM in prevention of health care associated infections, (ii awareness of and views about HCWM-related guidelines/legislation, (iii current HCWM practices, (iv perception and preparedness related to improvements of the current practices, and (v proper implementation of the available guidelines/legislation. The FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated to English (when conducted in Hindi and analysed using content analysis.Two themes were identified: Theme (A, 'Challenges in integration of HCWM in organizational practice,' with the categories (I Awareness and views about HCWM, (II Organizational practices regarding HCWM, and (III Challenges in Implementation of HCWM; and Theme (B, 'Interventions to improve HCWM,' with three categories, (I Educational and motivational interventions, (II Organizational culture change, and (III Policy-related interventions.A gap between knowledge and actual practice regarding HCWM was highlighted in the perception of the hospital staff. The participants suggested organizational changes, training and monitoring to address this. The information generated is relevant not merely to the microsystem studied but to other institutions in similar settings.

  4. A cytotoxicity study of silicon oxycarbide nanowires as cell scaffold for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagonegro, P.; Rossi, F. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Galli, C., E-mail: carlo.galli@unipr.it [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Smerieri, A. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Alinovi, R.; Pinelli, S. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Rimoldi, T. [Physics and Earth Science Department, Parma University, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Attolini, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Macaluso, G.; Macaluso, C. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Saddow, S.E. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, ENB118 Tampa, Florida (United States); Salviati, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2017-04-01

    Goal: Nanowires are promising biomaterials in multiple clinical applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of carbon-doped silica nanowires (SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs) on a fibroblastic cell line in vitro. Materials and methods: SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs were grown on Si substrates by CVD process. Murine L929 fibroblasts were cultured in complete DMEM and indirect and direct cytotoxicity tests were performed in agreement with ISO 19003-5, by quantitating cell viability at MTT and chemiluminescent assay. Cell cultures were investigated at Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and immunocytochemistry to observe their morphology and investigate cell-NWs interactions. Furthermore, hemocompatibility with Platelet-rich Plasma was assayed at SEM and by ELISA assay. Results: SiOxCy NWs proved biocompatible and did not impair cell proliferation at contact assays. L929 were able to attach on NWs and proliferate. Most interestingly, L929 reorganised the NW scaffold by displacing the nanostructure and creating tunnels within the NW network. NWs moreover did not impair platelet activation and behaved similarly to flat SiO{sub 2}. Conclusions: Our data show that SiOxCy NWs did not release cytotoxic species and acted as a viable and adaptable scaffold for fibroblastic cells, thus representing a promising platform for implantable devices. - Highlights: • NWs did not release cytotoxic species. • Fibroblasts reorganised the NWs network, adapting it to their needs. • Blood tests with platelet-rich plasma and dynamic blood coagulation tests showed oxycarbide NWs induced platelet activation. • Carbon-doped SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs network are a promising biomaterial for implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  5. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  6. The manufacture of system for testing static random access memory radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation effects will lead to single event upset, event latch up and other phenomena in SRAM devices. This paper introduces the hardware, software composition and related testing technology of SRAM radiation effect testing device. Through to the SRAM chip current detection and power protection, it has solved the SRAM chip damage question in the SRAM experiment. It has accessed to the expected experimental data by using the device in different source of radiation conducted on SRAM Experimental study of radiation effects. It provides important references in the assessment of operational life and reinforcement of the memory carried in the satellites. (authors)

  7. Data-Driven Approaches for Computation in Intelligent Biomedical Devices: A Case Study of EEG Monitoring for Chronic Seizure Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Verma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent biomedical devices implies systems that are able to detect specific physiological processes in patients so that particular responses can be generated. This closed-loop capability can have enormous clinical value when we consider the unprecedented modalities that are beginning to emerge for sensing and stimulating patient physiology. Both delivering therapy (e.g., deep-brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, etc. and treating impairments (e.g., neural prosthesis requires computational devices that can make clinically relevant inferences, especially using minimally-intrusive patient signals. The key to such devices is algorithms that are based on data-driven signal modeling as well as hardware structures that are specialized to these. This paper discusses the primary application-domain challenges that must be overcome and analyzes the most promising methods for this that are emerging. We then look at how these methods are being incorporated in ultra-low-energy computational platforms and systems. The case study for this is a seizure-detection SoC that includes instrumentation and computation blocks in support of a system that exploits patient-specific modeling to achieve accurate performance for chronic detection. The SoC samples each EEG channel at a rate of 600 Hz and performs processing to derive signal features on every two second epoch, consuming 9 μJ/epoch/channel. Signal feature extraction reduces the data rate by a factor of over 40×, permitting wireless communication from the patient’s head while reducing the total power on the head by 14×.

  8. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante em compostos organicos do diesel e do petroleo: hidrocarbonetos, sulfurados e nitrogenados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  9. Biomedical applications engineering tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenger, C. J., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The engineering tasks performed in response to needs articulated by clinicians are described. Initial contacts were made with these clinician-technology requestors by the Southwest Research Institute NASA Biomedical Applications Team. The basic purpose of the program was to effectively transfer aerospace technology into functional hardware to solve real biomedical problems.

  10. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergence of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine desintegrations which lead to a disturbed supply of the vessels and afterwards to their sclerosis. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as festures of ageing while in irradiated animals they were manifested in an earlier period. After application of optimal amounts radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival

  11. Career Coaches as a Source of Vicarious Learning for Racial and Ethnic Minority PhD Students in the Biomedical Sciences: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Simon N; Thakore, Bhoomi K; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many recent mentoring initiatives have sought to help improve the proportion of underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities (URMs) in academic positions across the biomedical sciences. However, the intractable nature of the problem of underrepresentation suggests that many young scientists may require supplemental career development beyond what many mentors are able to offer. As an adjunct to traditional scientific mentoring, we created a novel academic career "coaching" intervention for PhD students in the biomedical sciences. To determine whether and how academic career coaches can provide effective career-development-related learning experiences for URM PhD students in the biomedical sciences. We focus specifically on vicarious learning experiences, where individuals learn indirectly through the experiences of others. The intervention is being tested as part of a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT). Here, we describe a nested qualitative study, using a framework approach to analyze data from a total of 48 semi-structured interviews from 24 URM PhD students (2 interviews per participant, 1 at baseline, 1 at 12-month follow-up) (16 female, 8 male; 11 Black, 12 Hispanic, 1 Native-American). We explored the role of the coach as a source of vicarious learning, in relation to the students' goal of being future biomedical science faculty. Coaches were resources through which most students in the study were able to learn vicariously about how to pursue, and succeed within, an academic career. Coaches were particularly useful in instances where students' research mentors are unable to provide such vicarious learning opportunities, for example because the mentor is too busy to have career-related discussions with a student, or because they have, or value, a different type of academic career to the type the student hopes to achieve. Coaching can be an important way to address the lack of structured career development that students receive in their home training

  12. Biomedical applications of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ana P; Cruz, Marcos A E; Tovani, Camila B; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    The ability to investigate substances at the molecular level has boosted the search for materials with outstanding properties for use in medicine. The application of these novel materials has generated the new research field of nanobiotechnology, which plays a central role in disease diagnosis, drug design and delivery, and implants. In this review, we provide an overview of the use of metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-nanotubes, liposomes, and nanopatterned flat surfaces for specific biomedical applications. The chemical and physical properties of the surface of these materials allow their use in diagnosis, biosensing and bioimaging devices, drug delivery systems, and bone substitute implants. The toxicology of these particles is also discussed in the light of a new field referred to as nanotoxicology that studies the surface effects emerging from nanostructured materials.

  13. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  14. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A.; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. Methods From 2008–2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Results Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of “community”; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. Conclusions This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the

  15. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Newman

    Full Text Available Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations.From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement.Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted.This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as

  16. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  17. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin; Hess, Nancy J.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials

  18. Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    induction linear accelerator that has been developed to deliver intense, up to 50 nC/pulse/mm2, sub-ns pulses of light ions with kinetic energy up to 1.2...II induction linear accelerator for intense ion beam pulses at Berkeley Lab. Figure 3. Helium current and integrated charge versus time at the...under contracts DE-AC02-205CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. JOURNAL OF RADIATION EFFECTS, Research and Engineering Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2017 158 INTENSE

  19. Biomedical applications of polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gebelein, C G

    1991-01-01

    The biomedical applications of polymers span an extremely wide spectrum of uses, including artificial organs, skin and soft tissue replacements, orthopaedic applications, dental applications, and controlled release of medications. No single, short review can possibly cover all these items in detail, and dozens of books andhundreds of reviews exist on biomedical polymers. Only a few relatively recent examples will be cited here;additional reviews are listed under most of the major topics in this book. We will consider each of the majorclassifications of biomedical polymers to some extent, inclu

  20. Handbook of biomedical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics holds tremendous promise to deliver effective, safe, non- or minimally invasive diagnostics and targeted, customizable therapeutics. Handbook of Biomedical Optics provides an in-depth treatment of the field, including coverage of applications for biomedical research, diagnosis, and therapy. It introduces the theory and fundamentals of each subject, ensuring accessibility to a wide multidisciplinary readership. It also offers a view of the state of the art and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.Organized into six sections, this handbook: Contains intr

  1. Biomedical Engineering Desk Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Ratner, Buddy D; Schoen, Frederick J; Lemons, Jack E; Dyro, Joseph; Martinsen, Orjan G; Kyle, Richard; Preim, Bernhard; Bartz, Dirk; Grimnes, Sverre; Vallero, Daniel; Semmlow, John; Murray, W Bosseau; Perez, Reinaldo; Bankman, Isaac; Dunn, Stanley; Ikada, Yoshito; Moghe, Prabhas V; Constantinides, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop Desk Reference, for Biomedical Engineers involved in the ever expanding and very fast moving area; this is a book that will not gather dust on the shelf. It brings together the essential professional reference content from leading international contributors in the biomedical engineering field. Material covers a broad range of topics including: Biomechanics and Biomaterials; Tissue Engineering; and Biosignal Processing* A hard-working desk reference providing all the essential material needed by biomedical and clinical engineers on a day-to-day basis * Fundamentals, key techniques,

  2. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  3. A critical review of radiation effects on borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Manara, A.; Rutten, F. van

    1981-01-01

    Most of the experimental values have been obtained by loading the glass with alpha emitters like Cm 244 and Pu 238. The data existing in literature on stored energy, and density variation are presented and discussed. Attention is given to the variation of the leaching rate due to the radiation effect. Samples loaded with alpha emitters have given data up to 0.17 dpa and such bombarded with heavy ions show large effects due to dose rate effects. A study on defect formation has shown that under electrons irradiation, formation of bubbles is possible. (DG)

  4. NDE in biomedical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, Aditya; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical Engineering (BME) is an interdisciplinary field, marking the conjunction of Medical and Engineering disciplines. It combines the design and problem solving skills of engineering with medical and biological sciences to advance health care treatment, including diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy

  5. Biomedical signal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M

    2015-01-01

    The book will help assist a reader in the development of techniques for analysis of biomedical signals and computer aided diagnoses with a pedagogical examination of basic and advanced topics accompanied by over 350 figures and illustrations. Wide range of filtering techniques presented to address various applications. 800 mathematical expressions and equations. Practical questions, problems and laboratory exercises. Includes fractals and chaos theory with biomedical applications.

  6. Barriers to publishing in biomedical journals perceived by a sample of French researchers: results of the DIAzePAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duracinsky, Martin; Lalanne, Christophe; Rous, Laurence; Dara, Aichata Fofana; Baudoin, Lesya; Pellet, Claire; Descamps, Alexandre; Péretz, Fabienne; Chassany, Olivier

    2017-07-10

    As publishing is essential but competitive for researchers, difficulties in writing and submitting medical articles to biomedical journals are disabling. The DIAzePAM (Difficultés des Auteurs à la Publication d'Articles Médicaux) survey aimed to assess the difficulties experienced by researchers in the AP-HP (Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, i.e., Paris Hospitals Board, France), the largest public health institution in Europe, when preparing articles for biomedical journals. The survey also aimed to assess researchers' satisfaction and perceived needs. A 39-item electronic questionnaire based on qualitative interviews was addressed by e-mail to all researchers registered in the AP-HP SIGAPS (Système d'Interrogation, de Gestion et d'Analyse des Publications Scientifiques) bibliometric database. Between 28 May and 15 June 2015, 7766 researchers should have received and read the e-mail, and 1191 anonymously completed the questionnaire (write (79%) or submit (27%), limited skills in English (40%) or in writing (32%), and difficulty in starting writing (35%). 87% of respondents would accept technical support, especially in English reediting (79%), critical reediting (63%), formatting (52%), and/or writing (41%), to save time (92%) and increase high-impact-factor journal submission and acceptance (75%). 79% of respondents would appreciate funding support for their future publications, for English reediting (56%), medical writing (21%), or publication (38%) fees. They considered that this funding support could be covered by AP-HP (73%) and/or by the added financial value obtained by their department from previous publications (56%). The DIAzePAM survey highlights difficulties experienced by researchers preparing articles for biomedical journals, and details room for improvement.

  7. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, L A

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergency of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine disintegrations. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as features of ageing. After application of radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival till 30th day, DNA and protein metabolism, immune reactions) of the lethally irradiated animals.

  8. Simulation of first-wall radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, C.M.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.F.

    1975-01-01

    Many of the effects induced in metals as a result of exposure to a radiation environment are intimately associated with the energy of primary recoil atoms (PKAs). Protons with an energy of 16 MeV closely reproduce the PKA energy spectrum which will be present at the first wall in a D--T fusion reactor and should therefore closely reproduce the radiation effects induced by PKAs in the first wall. A preliminary experiment with protons was conducted to measure the sputtering rate and to look for the phenomenon of chunk emission recently observed by Kaminsky and co-workers in samples exposed to 14-MeV neutrons. We are also able to observe the average projected transport range of activated PKAs. (U.S.)

  9. Radiation effects on cultured human lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.; Nilsson, K.; Carlsson, J.; Larsson, B.; Jakobsson, P.

    1981-01-01

    The cloning efficiency of human normal and malignant lymphoid cells is usually low. Radiation effects in vitro on such cells can therefore not be analysed with conventional cloning. However, this problem can be circumscribed by using the growth extrapolation method. A panel of human leukemia-lymphoma cell-lines representing Epstein-Barr virus carrying lymphoblastoid cells of presumed non-neoplastic derivation and neoplastic T- and B-lymphocytes was used to test the efficiency of this method. The sensitivity to radiation could be determined for all these cell types. The growth extrapolation method gave generally the same result as conventional cloning demonstrated by comparison with one exceptional cell-line with capacity for cloning in agar. The sensitivity varied largely between the different cell types. A common feature was that none of the cell lines had a good capacity to accumulate sublethal radiation injury. (Auth.)

  10. Ceramics radiation effects issues for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    The key radiation effects issues associated with the successful operation of ceramic materials in components of the planned International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are discussed. Radiation-induced volume changes and degradation of the mechanical properties should not be a serious issue for the fluences planned for ITER. On the other hand, radiation-induced electrical degradation effects may severely limit the allowable exposure of ceramic insulators. Degradation of the loss tangent and thermal conductivity may also restrict the location of some components such as ICRH feedthrough insulators to positions far away from the first wall. In-situ measurements suggest that the degradation of physical properties in ceramics during irradiation is greater than that measured in postirradiation tests. Additional in-situ data during neutron irradiation are needed before engineering designs for ITER can be finalized

  11. Radiation effects on structural ceramics in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.R.; Price, R.J.; Trester, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required to serve in a conventional role as electrical and thermal insulators and dielectrics in fusion power reactors. In addition, certain ceramic materials can play a unique structural role in fusion power reactors by virtue of their very low induced radioactivity from fusion neutron capture. The aspects of safety, long-term radioactive waste management, and personnel access for maintenance and repair can all be significantly improved by applying the low-activation ceramics to the structural materials of the first-wall and blanket regions of a fusion reactor. Achievement of long service life at high structural loads and thermal stresses on the materials exposed to high-radiation doses presents a critical challenge for fusion. In this paper, we discuss radiation effects on structural ceramics for fusion application

  12. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; David, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60 Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  13. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  14. History of the biomedical studies PhD program: a joint graduate program of the Baylor Health Care system and Baylor University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Christine R; Horton, Joshua M; Peng, Han; Xu, Kangling; Batra, Sushil K; Miles, Jonathan P; Kane, Robert R

    2008-10-01

    On a sweltering summer morning, throngs of people filed into Jones Theatre at Baylor University in Waco for the graduate student orientation. One could look around and notice the diversity of not only the student population, but also the disciplines being represented. Many students had stepped off planes only hours prior, but even those who had been traveling for days could not contain their excitement. As for me, I was nowhere near any of this. I was still 40 miles north of Waco in Waxahachie, having been pulled over for speeding. After 4 days of traveling with my life in my Volkswagon Jetta, all the way from San Francisco, on one of the most important days of my life, I was late. When I finally arrived at the Hooper Schafer Fine Arts Auditorium, out of breath from running all the way from the parking structure, all of the graduate students were quietly listening to the first introductory speech. I snuck into the back and sat down. My mind was racing, as I knew very little about Waco and Baylor University except for the growing accomplishments of the biomedical studies program. What little I did know about Baylor seemed so different from my very liberal upbringing in California. What would this experience be like for me? But, as I listened to the talks, met with other students, and finally met the entire biomedical studies entering class of 2007, I knew that I had made the right decision in coming to Baylor. This would be an experience unlike any other, and I was wholeheartedly open to embracing it. -Christine Morel, PhD candidate, Institute of Biomedical Studies.

  15. Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar citation rates: a case study of medical physics and biomedical engineering: what gets cited and what doesn't?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    There are often differences in a publication's citation count, depending on the database accessed. Here, aspects of citation counts for medical physics and biomedical engineering papers are studied using papers published in the journal Australasian physical and engineering sciences in medicine. Comparison is made between the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Papers are categorised into subject matter, and citation trends are examined. It is shown that review papers as a group tend to receive more citations on average; however the highest cited individual papers are more likely to be research papers.

  16. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava; Manoj ansal; Neeraj Gour; Pooja Chaduary; Pankaj Kumar Jain; Mahendra Chouksey; Pawan pathak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: The pr...

  17. A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THREE DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE REGARDING BIOMEDICAL WASTE AMONG PARAMEDICAL STAFF OF DISTRICT HOSPITAL ETAWAH (UP)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava; Manoj ansal; Neeraj Gour; Pooja Chaduary; Pankaj Kumar Jain; Mahendra Chouksey; Pawan pathak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Biomedical waste by definition means “Any waste which is generated during the process of diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human or animal or in research activities pertaining there to in the production or testing of biological”Objectives:•    The level of awareness about various aspect of Bio Medical Waste management among the paramedical staff.•    To study the impact of three day training programme on knowledge of Bio Medical Waste management. Material & Methods: Th...

  18. Figure mining for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Iossifov, Ivan

    2009-08-15

    Figures from biomedical articles contain valuable information difficult to reach without specialized tools. Currently, there is no search engine that can retrieve specific figure types. This study describes a retrieval method that takes advantage of principles in image understanding, text mining and optical character recognition (OCR) to retrieve figure types defined conceptually. A search engine was developed to retrieve tables and figure types to aid computational and experimental research. http://iossifovlab.cshl.edu/figurome/.

  19. Barriers to publishing in biomedical journals perceived by a sample of French researchers: results of the DIAzePAM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Duracinsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As publishing is essential but competitive for researchers, difficulties in writing and submitting medical articles to biomedical journals are disabling. The DIAzePAM (Difficultés des Auteurs à la Publication d’Articles Médicaux survey aimed to assess the difficulties experienced by researchers in the AP-HP (Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, i.e., Paris Hospitals Board, France, the largest public health institution in Europe, when preparing articles for biomedical journals. The survey also aimed to assess researchers’ satisfaction and perceived needs. Methods A 39-item electronic questionnaire based on qualitative interviews was addressed by e-mail to all researchers registered in the AP-HP SIGAPS (Système d’Interrogation, de Gestion et d’Analyse des Publications Scientifiques bibliometric database. Results Between 28 May and 15 June 2015, 7766 researchers should have received and read the e-mail, and 1191 anonymously completed the questionnaire (<45 years of age: 63%; women: 55%; physician: 81%; with PhD or Habilitation à Diriger des recherches––accreditation to direct research––: 45%. 94% of respondents had published at least one article in the previous 2 years. 76% of respondents felt they were not publishing enough, mainly because of lack of time to write (79% or submit (27%, limited skills in English (40% or in writing (32%, and difficulty in starting writing (35%. 87% of respondents would accept technical support, especially in English reediting (79%, critical reediting (63%, formatting (52%, and/or writing (41%, to save time (92% and increase high-impact-factor journal submission and acceptance (75%. 79% of respondents would appreciate funding support for their future publications, for English reediting (56%, medical writing (21%, or publication (38% fees. They considered that this funding support could be covered by AP-HP (73% and/or by the added financial value obtained by their

  20. Study on pivot-point vibration of molecular bond-rupture events by quartz crystal microbalance for biomedical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong J; Jia, Renjie

    2012-01-01

    Bond-rupture scanning for biomedical diagnostics is examined using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) experiments and microparticle mechanics modeling calculations. Specific and nonspecific interactions between a microparticle and its binding QCM surface can be distinguished by gradually increasing the amplitude of driving voltage applied to QCM and monitoring its frequency changes. This research proposes a mechanical model of interactions between biological molecules and a QCM substrate surface. The mechanical force required to break a biotin-streptavidin bond was calculated through a one-pivot-point bottom-up vibration model. The bond-rupture force increases with an increase of the microparticle radius, the QCM resonant frequency, and the amplitude of driving voltage applied to the QCM. The significance of the research on biological molecular bond rupture is extremely important in characterizing microbial (such as cells and virus) specificity, due to the force magnitude needed to break bonds using a transducer.

  1. Applications of isotopes. [Need and cost of stable iotopes for use as tracers in biomedical and environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of /sup 12/C, /sup 13/C, /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 16/O, /sup 17/O, and /sup 18/O are discussed.

  2. Handbook of photonics for biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Donghyun; Somekh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged rapidly into technological mainstream with the advent and maturity of nanotechnology available in photonics and enabled many new exciting applications in the area of biomedical science and engineering that were unimagined even a few years ago with conventional photonic engineering techniques. Handbook of Nanophotonics in Biomedical Engineering is intended to be a reliable resource to a wealth of information on nanophotonics that can inspire readers by detailing emerging and established possibilities of nanophotonics in biomedical science and engineering applications. This comprehensive reference presents not only the basics of nanophotonics but also explores recent experimental and clinical methods used in biomedical and bioengineering research. Each peer-reviewed chapter of this book discusses fundamental aspects and materials/fabrication issues of nanophotonics, as well as applications in interfaces, cell, tissue, animal studies, and clinical engineering. The organization provides ...

  3. Biomedical signal and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Sergio; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Anna; Caiani, Enrico; Contini, Davide; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Dercole, Fabio; Rienzo, Luca; Liberati, Diego; Mainardi, Luca; Ravazzani, Paolo; Rinaldi, Sergio; Signorini, Maria; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Generally, physiological modeling and biomedical signal processing constitute two important paradigms of biomedical engineering (BME): their fundamental concepts are taught starting from undergraduate studies and are more completely dealt with in the last years of graduate curricula, as well as in Ph.D. courses. Traditionally, these two cultural aspects were separated, with the first one more oriented to physiological issues and how to model them and the second one more dedicated to the development of processing tools or algorithms to enhance useful information from clinical data. A practical consequence was that those who did models did not do signal processing and vice versa. However, in recent years,the need for closer integration between signal processing and modeling of the relevant biological systems emerged very clearly [1], [2]. This is not only true for training purposes(i.e., to properly prepare the new professional members of BME) but also for the development of newly conceived research projects in which the integration between biomedical signal and image processing (BSIP) and modeling plays a crucial role. Just to give simple examples, topics such as brain–computer machine or interfaces,neuroengineering, nonlinear dynamical analysis of the cardiovascular (CV) system,integration of sensory-motor characteristics aimed at the building of advanced prostheses and rehabilitation tools, and wearable devices for vital sign monitoring and others do require an intelligent fusion of modeling and signal processing competences that are certainly peculiar of our discipline of BME.

  4. Superhydrophobic Materials for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are actively studied across a wide range of applications and industries, and are now finding increased use in the biomedical arena as substrates to control protein adsorption, cellular interaction, and bacterial growth, as well as platforms for drug delivery devices and for diagnostic tools. The commonality in the design of these materials is to create a stable or metastable air state at the material surface, which lends itself to a number of unique properties. These activities are catalyzing the development of new materials, applications, and fabrication techniques, as well as collaborations across material science, chemistry, engineering, and medicine given the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The review begins with a discussion of superhydrophobicity, and then explores biomedical applications that are utilizing superhydrophobicity in depth including material selection characteristics, in vitro performance, and in vivo performance. General trends are offered for each application in addition to discussion of conflicting data in the literature, and the review concludes with the authors’ future perspectives on the utility of superhydrophobic surfaces for biomedical applications. PMID:27449946

  5. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 6, is a collection of papers that discusses the role of integrated electronics in medical systems and the usage of biological mathematical models in biological systems. Other papers deal with the health care systems, the problems and methods of approach toward rehabilitation, as well as the future of biomedical engineering. One paper discusses the use of system identification as it applies to biological systems to estimate the values of a number of parameters (for example, resistance, diffusion coefficients) by indirect means. More particularly, the i

  6. Biomedical enhancements as justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeesoo

    2015-02-01

    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical advance in how we compensate the most disadvantaged members of society. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 5, is a collection of papers that deals with application of the principles and practices of engineering to basic and applied biomedical research, development, and the delivery of health care. The papers also describe breakthroughs in health improvements, as well as basic research that have been accomplished through clinical applications. One paper examines engineering principles and practices that can be applied in developing therapeutic systems by a controlled delivery system in drug dosage. Another paper examines the physiological and materials vari

  8. Radiation effects on superconducting fusion magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO. (author)

  9. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations. PMID:29619289

  10. The Radiation Effect on Peripheral Blood Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae June; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Im, Sun Kyun; Choi, Ki Chul

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate radiation effect on the hematopoietic system, we analyzed 44 patients who were treated with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) at Chonbuk National University Hospital. According to the treatment sites, we classified them into three groups: group I as head and neck, group II as thorax, and group III as pelvis. White blood cell, lymphocyte, platelet and hemoglobin were checked before and during RT The results were as follow; 1. White blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte count were declined from the first week of RT to the third week, and then slightly recovered after the third or fourth week. There was prominent decrease in lymphocyte counts than WBC. 2. Platelet counts were declined until the second week of the RT, showed slight recovery at fourth week in all groups. Hemoglobin values were slightly decreased in the first week and then recovered the level of pretreatment value, gradually. 3. Lymphocyte count were declined significantly on group III(p<0.01), WBC and platelet counts were decreased on group II but statistically not significant

  11. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  12. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  13. Radiation effects in uranium-niobium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Wang, S.X.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochlore is an important actinide host phase proposed for the immobilization of high level nuclear wastes and excess weapon plutonium.[1] Synthetic pyrochlore has a great variety of chemical compositions due to the possibility of extensive substitutions in the pyrochlore structure.[2] During the synthesis of pyrochlore, additional complex titanate phases may form in small quantities. The response of these phases to radiation damage must be evaluated because volume expansion of minor phases may cause micro-fracturing. In this work, two complex uranium-niobium titanates, U 3 NbO 9.8 (U-rich titanate) and Nb 3 UO 10 (Nb-rich titanate) were synthesized by the alkoxide/nitrate route at 1300 deg. C under an argon atmosphere. The phase composition and structure were analyzed by EDS, BSE, XRD, EMPA and TEM techniques. An 800 KeVKr 2+ irradiation was performed using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory in a temperature range from 30 K to 973 K. The radiation effects were observed by in situ TEM

  14. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathod, T.D.; Sahu, S.K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g"−"1 and 17.84±6.45 W g"−"1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67–90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV–visible spectrum. - Highlights: • Biomass fuels (wood and dung cake) were studied for brown carbon direct radiative effects. • Model calculations predicted positive contribution of Brown carbon aerosols to organic carbon direct radiative effect. • Average direct radiative values for brown carbon from dung cake were higher compare to wood. • The visible light absorption played major role in brown carbon contribution (67–90 %) to total direct radiative effect.

  15. Honey/PVA hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structural, physico-mechanical and in-vitro biomedical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Javad; Tang, Youhong

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogel/honey hybrids manifest an attractive design with an exclusive therapeutic property that promotes wound healing process. The greater the concentration of honey within the formulation, the better the biomedical properties that will be achieved. However, an increase in the percentage of honey can negatively affect the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels. The need exists, therefore, to prepare wound dressings that contain high honey density with optimal biomedical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. In this study, a simple method for the preparation of a highly concentrated honey/PVA hybrid hydrogel with borax as the crosslinking agent is reported. Comprehensive evaluations of the morphology, swelling kinetics, permeability, bio-adhesion, mechanical characteristics, cytotoxicity, antibacterial property, cell proliferation ability and their controlling release properties were conducted as a function of crosslinking density. All the borax-induced hydrogels showed acceptable biocompatibility, and the incorporation of 1% borax in the hydrogel formulation produced optimal behaviours for wound addressing applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Initial processes of radiation effects on genomic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve du Penhoat, Marie-Anne; Touati, Alain; Sage, Evelyne; Houee-Levin, Chantal; Lacombe, Sandrine; Politis, Marie-Françoise; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Wien, Frank; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Shikazono, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    We describe the progresses and current status of the REIMEI study on 'Initial processes of radiation effects on genomic stability', which is a new collaborative project between France and Japan. The theoretical study on the fragmentation pattern of doubly ionized deoxyribose has reached a new stage focusing on the effect of water molecules surrounding the deoxyribose molecule. In order to substantiate the theoretical predictions, new devices have been installed in a SPring-8 beamline. To explore the origin of signal transduction of DNA repair processes, a preliminary CD measurement in the far UV region was performed to study histone conformation changes. Based on these results, we will propose a new experimental subject in SOLEIL synchrotron to investigate the conformational changes of phosphorylated histone. Preliminary experiments using mammalian cell free extract have also been performed focusing on the role of DNA polymerases on the mutagenic potential of clustered DNA lesions. (author)

  17. RPCs in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, G.; De Vecchi, C.; Giroletti, E.; Guida, R.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Sani, G.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    2006-08-01

    We are studying possible applications of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the biomedical domain such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The use of RPCs in PET can provide several improvements on the usual scintillation-based detectors. The most striking features are the extremely good spatial and time resolutions. They can be as low as 50 μm and 25 ps respectively, to be compared to the much higher intrinsic limits in bulk detectors. Much efforts have been made to investigate suitable materials to make RPCs sensitive to 511 keV photons. For this reason, we are studying different types of coating employing high Z materials with proper electrical resistivity. Later investigations explored the possibility of coating glass electrodes by mean of serigraphy techniques, employing oxide based mixtures with a high density of high Z materials; the efficiency is strongly dependent on its thickness and it reaches a maximum for a characteristic value that is a function of the compound (usually a few hundred microns). The most promising mixtures seem to be PbO, Bi 2O 3 and Tl 2O. Preliminary gamma efficiency measurements for a Multigap RPC prototype (MRPC) are presented as well as simulations using GEANT4-based framework. The MRPC has 5 gas gaps; their spacings are kept by 0.3 mm diameter nylon fishing line, electrodes are made of thin glasses (1 mm for the outer electrodes, 0.15-0.4 mm for the inner ones). The detector is enclosed in a metallic gas-tight box, filled with a C 2H 2F 4 92.5%, SF 6 2.5%, C 4H 10 5% mixture. Different gas mixtures are being studied increasing the SF6 percentage and results of efficiency as a function of the new mixtures will be presented.

  18. Radiation-effects state of the art 1965-1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamman, D.J.; Drennan, J.E.; Veazie, W.H.; Shober, F.R.; Leach, E.R.

    1966-06-30

    Developments in the field of radiation effects on electronic components including semiconductors, polymetric materials, lubricants, flotation fluids, hydraulic fluids, structural metals and alloys, ceramics, space radiation environment, dosimetry, and ceramic and metallic fuel materials are reviewed. Programs currently being conducted in radiation effects are briefly given for each section of the report.

  19. Exploring subdomain variation in biomedical language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séaghdha Diarmuid Ó

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applications of Natural Language Processing (NLP technology to biomedical texts have generated significant interest in recent years. In this paper we identify and investigate the phenomenon of linguistic subdomain variation within the biomedical domain, i.e., the extent to which different subject areas of biomedicine are characterised by different linguistic behaviour. While variation at a coarser domain level such as between newswire and biomedical text is well-studied and known to affect the portability of NLP systems, we are the first to conduct an extensive investigation into more fine-grained levels of variation. Results Using the large OpenPMC text corpus, which spans the many subdomains of biomedicine, we investigate variation across a number of lexical, syntactic, semantic and discourse-related dimensions. These dimensions are chosen for their relevance to the performance of NLP systems. We use clustering techniques to analyse commonalities and distinctions among the subdomains. Conclusions We find that while patterns of inter-subdomain variation differ somewhat from one feature set to another, robust clusters can be identified that correspond to intuitive distinctions such as that between clinical and laboratory subjects. In particular, subdomains relating to genetics and molecular biology, which are the most common sources of material for training and evaluating biomedical NLP tools, are not representative of all biomedical subdomains. We conclude that an awareness of subdomain variation is important when considering the practical use of language processing applications by biomedical researchers.

  20. Biomedical Engineering in Modern Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attinger, E. O.

    1971-01-01

    Considers definition of biomedical engineering (BME) and how biomedical engineers should be trained. State of the art descriptions of BME and BME education are followed by a brief look at the future of BME. (TS)

  1. Radiation effects in wild terrestrial vertebrates - the EPIC collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykina, Tatiana; Kryshev, Ivan I

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents data on radiation effects in populations of wild vertebrate animals inhabiting contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. The data were extracted from the database "Radiation effects on biota", compiled within the framework of the EC Project EPIC (2000-2003). The data collection, based on publications in Russian, demonstrates radiation effects in the areas characterized with high levels of radionuclides (Kyshtym radioactive trace; "spots" of enhanced natural radioactivity in the Komi region of Russia; territories contaminated from the Chernobyl fallout). The data covers a wide range of exposures from acute accidental irradiation to lifetime exposures at relatively low dose rates. Radiation effects include mortality, changes in reproduction, decrease of health, ecological effects, cytogenetic effects, adaptation to radiation, and others. Peculiarities of radiation effects caused by different radionuclides are described, also the severity of effects as they appear in different organisms (e.g. mice, frogs, birds, etc.).

  2. Radiation effects in wild terrestrial vertebrates - the EPIC collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazykina, Tatiana; Kryshev, Ivan I.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents data on radiation effects in populations of wild vertebrate animals inhabiting contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. The data were extracted from the database 'Radiation effects on biota', compiled within the framework of the EC Project EPIC (2000-2003). The data collection, based on publications in Russian, demonstrates radiation effects in the areas characterized with high levels of radionuclides (Kyshtym radioactive trace; 'spots' of enhanced natural radioactivity in the Komi region of Russia; territories contaminated from the Chernobyl fallout). The data covers a wide range of exposures from acute accidental irradiation to lifetime exposures at relatively low dose rates. Radiation effects include mortality, changes in reproduction, decrease of health, ecological effects, cytogenetic effects, adaptation to radiation, and others. Peculiarities of radiation effects caused by different radionuclides are described, also the severity of effects as they appear in different organisms (e.g. mice, frogs, birds, etc.)

  3. Biomedical Image Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Biomedical Image Registration, WBIR 2018, held in Leiden, The Netherlands, in June 2018. The 11 full and poster papers included in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 17 submitted papers. The pap...

  4. Biomedical Data Mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, N.; Combi, C.; Tucker, A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the special topic of Methods of Information in Medicine on data mining in biomedicine, with selected papers from two workshops on Intelligent Data Analysis in bioMedicine (IDAMAP) held in Verona (2006) and Amsterdam (2007). Methods: Defining the field of biomedical data

  5. Careers in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, R E; Rotger, V I; Herrera, M C

    2010-01-01

    Although biomedical engineering was started in Argentina about 35 years ago, it has had a sustained growth for the last 25 years in human resources, with the emergence of new undergraduate and postgraduate careers, as well as in research, knowledge, technological development, and health care.

  6. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  7. Biomedical research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The biomedical research Panel believes that the Calutron facility at Oak Ridge is a national and international resource of immense scientific value and of fundamental importance to continued biomedical research. This resource is essential to the development of new isotope uses in biology and medicine. It should therefore be nurtured by adequate support and operated in a way that optimizes its services to the scientific and technological community. The Panel sees a continuing need for a reliable supply of a wide variety of enriched stable isotopes. The past and present utilization of stable isotopes in biomedical research is documented in Appendix 7. Future requirements for stable isotopes are impossible to document, however, because of the unpredictability of research itself. Nonetheless we expect the demand for isotopes to increase in parallel with the continuing expansion of biomedical research as a whole. There are a number of promising research projects at the present time, and these are expected to lead to an increase in production requirements. The Panel also believes that a high degree of priority should be given to replacing the supplies of the 65 isotopes (out of the 224 previously available enriched isotopes) no longer available from ORNL

  8. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  9. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-01-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  10. Between biomedical and psychological experiments: The unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institutes and the study of animal mind in the second quarter of twentieth-century France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marion

    2016-02-01

    This article explores the unexpected connections between the Pasteur Institute in French Guinea and the study of animal mind in early twentieth century France. At a time when the study of animal intelligence was thriving in France and elsewhere, apes were appealing research subjects both in psychological and biomedical studies. Drawing on two case studies (Guillaume/Meyerson and Urbain), and then, on someone responding negatively to those connections, Thétard, this article shows how the long reach of biomedicine (linked to the prestige of Bernard and Pasteur) impinged on French biology and played a role in the tortuous, if not unsuccessful fate of animal psychology in France in the second quarter of the twentieth century. It shows how attempts to use apes (and other zoo animals) to yield new insights on animal psychology faced heavy restrictions or experienced false starts, and examines the reasons why animal psychology could not properly thrive at that time in France. Beyond the supremacy of biomedical interests over psychological ones, this article additionally explains that some individuals used animal behaviour studies as steppingstones in careers in which they proceeded on to other topics. Finally, it illustrates the tension between non-academic and academic people at a time when animal psychology was trying to acquire scientific legitimacy, and also highlights the difficulties attached to the scientific study of animals in a multipurpose and hybrid environment such as the early twentieth century Parisian zoo and also the Pasteur Institute of French Guinea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on pivot-point vibration of molecular bond-rupture events by quartz crystal microbalance for biomedical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan YJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yong J Yuan, Renjie JiaLaboratory of Biosensing and MicroMechatronics, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Bond-rupture scanning for biomedical diagnostics is examined using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM experiments and microparticle mechanics modeling calculations. Specific and nonspecific interactions between a microparticle and its binding QCM surface can be distinguished by gradually increasing the amplitude of driving voltage applied to QCM and monitoring its frequency changes. This research proposes a mechanical model of interactions between biological molecules and a QCM substrate surface. The mechanical force required to break a biotin–streptavidin bond was calculated through a one-pivot-point bottom-up vibration model. The bond-rupture force increases with an increase of the microparticle radius, the QCM resonant frequency, and the amplitude of driving voltage applied to the QCM. The significance of the research on biological molecular bond rupture is extremely important in characterizing microbial (such as cells and virus specificity, due to the force magnitude needed to break bonds using a transducer.Keywords: bond rupture, mechanical force, biomolecular binding energy spectra, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM

  12. Novel magnetic multicore nanoparticles designed for MPI and other biomedical applications: From synthesis to first in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Kratz

    Full Text Available Synthesis of novel magnetic multicore particles (MCP in the nano range, involves alkaline precipitation of iron(II chloride in the presence of atmospheric oxygen. This step yields green rust, which is oxidized to obtain magnetic nanoparticles, which probably consist of a magnetite/maghemite mixed-phase. Final growth and annealing at 90°C in the presence of a large excess of carboxymethyl dextran gives MCP very promising magnetic properties for magnetic particle imaging (MPI, an emerging medical imaging modality, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and thus potential candidates for future biomedical applications such as cardiovascular imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping in cancer patients, and stem cell tracking. The new MCP that we introduce here have three times higher magnetic particle spectroscopy performance at lower and middle harmonics and five times higher MPS signal strength at higher harmonics compared with Resovist®. In addition, the new MCP have also an improved in vivo MPI performance compared to Resovist®, and we here report the first in vivo MPI investigation of this new generation of magnetic nanoparticles.

  13. Using ISCCP Weather States to Decompose Cloud Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Rossow, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will examine the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect CRE (aka "cloud radiative forcing") at the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface of ISCCP weather states (aka "cloud regimes") in three distinct geographical zones, one tropical and two mid-latitude. Our goal is to understand and quantify the contribution of the different cloud regimes to the planetary radiation budget. In the tropics we find that the three most convectively active states are the ones with largest SW, LW and net TOA CRE contributions to the overall daytime tropical CRE budget. They account for 59%, 71% and 55% of the total CRE, respectively. The boundary layer-dominated weather states account for only 34% of the total SW CRE and 41% of the total net CRE, so to focus only on them in cloud feedback studies may be imprudent. We also find that in both the northern and southern midlatitude zones only two weather states, the first and third most convectively active with large amounts of nimbostratus-type clouds, contribute ",40% to both the SW and net TOA CRE budgets, highlighting the fact that cloud regimes associated with frontal systems are not only important for weather (precipitation) but also for climate (radiation budget). While all cloud regimes in all geographical zones have a slightly larger SFC than TOA SW CRE, implying cooling of the surface and slight warming of the atmosphere, their LW radiative effects are more subtle: in the tropics the weather states with plentiful high clouds warm the atmosphere while those with copious amounts of low clouds cool the atmosphere. In both midlatitude zones only the weather states with peak cloud fractions at levels above 440 mbar warm the atmosphere while all the rest cool it. These results make the connection of the contrasting CRE effects to the atmospheric dynamics more explicit - "storms" tend to warm the atmosphere whereas fair weather clouds cool it, suggesting a positive feedback of clouds on weather systems. The

  14. Radiation effect of gate controlled lateral PNP BJTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Shanbin; Zhou Dong; Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Wen Lin; Sun Jing; Wang Zhikuan

    2012-01-01

    Design and fabricate a new test structure of bipolar device: the gate controlled later PNP bipolar transistor (GCLPNP BJT), then sealed it together with the normal lateral PNP bipolar transistor which is made under the same manufacture process. Then 60 Co-γ radiation effects and annealing behaviors of these two structures are investigated. The results show that the response about base current, collector current, access base current and normalized current gain of GCLPNP bipolar transistor are almost identical to the normal one. Radiation induced defects in the GCLPNP bipolar transistor is separated quantitatively. Studying on the quantitative change of radiation induced defects in the domestic gate controlled bipolar transistor should be a useful way to research the change of radiation induced charges of normal PNP bipolar transistor. (authors)

  15. Oxidation-reduction enzymes of myocardium under ionizing radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteshev, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue respiration proceses under radiation effect were investigated which allowed one to reveal slight biochemical disturbances in a cell which make up the base of functional changes of different organs and tissues and to get to know the essence of tissue respiration processes. An attempt to explain significant value of oxidation enzyme system radiosensitivity in the course of cell respiration process altogether is made when studying the state of separate links of oxidation-reduction chain. It is shown that at early periods of radiation injury activity of catalase, dehydrogenases (isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, malic, succinic acids) is suppressed, concentration of a number of cytochromes is reduced and general ferrum content is increased which is connected with conformation changes of ultrastructure of mitochondrial membranes

  16. Microstructural characterization of radiation effects in nuclear materials

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural Characterization of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Materials provides an overview into experimental techniques that can be used to examine those effects (both neutron and charged particle) and can be used by researchers, technicians or students as a tool to introduce them to the various techniques. The need to examine the effect of radiation on materials is becoming increasingly important as nuclear energy is emerging as a growing source of renewable energy. The book opens with a discussion of why it is important to study the effects of radiation on materials and looks at current and future reactor designs and the various constraints faced by materials as a result of those designs. The book also includes an overview of the radiation damage mechanisms. The next section explores the various methods for characterizing damage including transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, atom probe tomography,...

  17. Experimental research on transient ionizing radiation effects of CMOS microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xiaoming; Fan Ruyu; Chen Wei; Wang Guizhen; Lin Dongsheng; Yang Shanchao; Bai Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental test system of CMOS microcontroller EE80C196KC20. Based on this system, the transient ionizing radiation effects on microcontroller were investigated using 'Qiangguang-I' accelerator. The gamma pulse width was 20 ns and the dose rate (for the Si atom) was in the range of 6.7 x 10 6 to 2.0 x 10 8 Gy/s in the experimental study. The disturbance and latchup effects were observed at different dose rate levels. Latchup threshold of the microcontroller was obtained. Disturbance interval and the system power supply current have a relationship with the dose rate level. The transient ionizing radiation induces photocurrent in the PN junctions that are inherent in CMOS circuits. The photocurrent is responsible for the electrical and functional degradation. (authors)

  18. Shortwave radiative effects of unactivated aerosol particles in clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, T.; Baker, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    Clouds in some polluted areas may contain high concentrations of anthropogenic aerosol particles. The possible role of these particles in perturbing the optical and dynamical properties of the clouds is an important question for climate studies. The direct radiative effects of unactivated aerosol particles in stable stratus clouds have been calculated at lambda=0.5μm. Several simplifying asumptions have been made relating the behavior of such particles in the high humidity enviornment within the cloud to their physicochemical make-up. It is shown that the energy absorbed by particles within the clouds may be, for realistic concentrations, comparable to the latent heat released and thus may play a significant role in cloud dynamics in some areas. These results are shown to be relatively insensitive to the assumptions about the particle properties within the cloud

  19. Radiation effects on epoxy composites at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Miyata, K.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation effects on glass-fiber reinforced epoxy composites at cryogenic temperatures has been studied by measuring the changes in interlaminar shear strength of the specimens. The scanning electron microscope observation has also been performed on fracture surface of the specimens. At 8.5 MGy of absorbed dose, only 10 % decrease of the strength was observed in the case of gamma irradiation, whereas over 80 % decrease of the strength was found on the reactor irradiated specimen. The difference of degradation behavior between gamma and reactor irradiations is attributed to the additional absorbed dose in the latter from the nuclear reaction due to boron-10 contained in the glass fibers by capture of thermal neutrons. (author)

  20. Thermoresponsive Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoni K. Georgiou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymers are a class of “smart” materials that have the ability to respond to a change in temperature; a property that makes them useful materials in a wide range of applications and consequently attracts much scientific interest. This review focuses mainly on the studies published over the last 10 years on the synthesis and use of thermoresponsive polymers for biomedical applications including drug delivery, tissue engineering and gene delivery. A summary of the main applications is given following the different studies on thermoresponsive polymers which are categorized based on their 3-dimensional structure; hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, micelles, crosslinked micelles, polymersomes, films and particles.

  1. A study on knowledge and practice regarding biomedical waste management among staff nurses and nursing students of Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Haider

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals are the centre of cure and also the important centres of infectious waste generation. Effective management of Biomedical Waste (BMW is not only a legal necessity but also a social responsibility. Aims and Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practice in managing the biomedical wastes among nursing staff and student nurses in RIMS, Ranchi. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at RIMS, Ranchi from Oct 2013 to March 2014 (6 months. It was a descriptive, hospital based, cross-sectional study. A total of 240 nurses participated in the present study, randomly chosen from various departments A pre-designed, pre-tested, structured proforma was used for data collection after getting their informed consent. Self-made scoring system was used to categorize the participants as having good, average and poor scores. Data was tabulated and analyzed using percentages and chi-square test. Results: The knowledge regarding general information about BMW management was assessed(with scores 0-8,it was found  that level of knowledge was better in student nurses than staff nurses as student nurses scored good(6-8correct answers in more than half of the questions (65%.Whereas staff nurses scored good in only 33.33% questions. When the practical information regarding the BMW management is assessed (with scores 0-8, it was found that staff nurses had relatively better practice regarding BMW management than students as they scored good(6-8correct answers in 40% and 30% respectively. Conclusion: Though overall knowledge of study participants was good but still they need good quality training to improve their current knowledge about BMW. 

  2. Perspectives and opportunities for research in radiation effects on materials in the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1992-01-01

    Needs for research in radiation effects on materials span a broad range, from investigations of fundamental mechanisms to requirements on irradiation parameters suitable for technological studies in no less than a dozen reactor systems and subsystems. In the 1970's, 1980's and again in 1990, workshops were convened to refocus attention on progress and needs in these areas. Critical review papers and smaller meetings have also considered more specialized questions and identified important needs. In the present report, one author's view of current status and desirable avenues for radiation effects research are presented. Issues are discussed covering point defect production and availability, considerations peculiar to widely different classes of materials and radiation effects phenomena, and irradiation conditions needed for current and planned reactor systems. Research recommendations cannot be made independently of the availability of experimental facilities. Needs in the latter area are reflected in the paper

  3. Biomedical signals, imaging, and informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering.Biomedical Signals, Imaging, and Informatics, the third volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in biosignal processing, medical imaging, infrared imaging, and medical informatics.More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including biomedical s

  4. A Student Team in a University of Michigan Biomedical Engineering Design Course Constructs a Microfluidic Bioreactor for Studies of Zebrafish Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-chi; Li, David; Al-Shoaibi, Ali; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahid; Flak, Betsy; Perrin, Catherine; Winslow, Max; Shah, Harsh; Ramamurthy, Poornapriya; Schmedlen, Rachael H.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish is a valuable model for teaching developmental, molecular, and cell biology; aquatic sciences; comparative anatomy; physiology; and genetics. Here we demonstrate that zebrafish provide an excellent model system to teach engineering principles. A seven-member undergraduate team in a biomedical engineering class designed, built, and tested a zebrafish microfluidic bioreactor applying microfluidics, an emerging engineering technology, to study zebrafish development. During the semester, students learned engineering and biology experimental design, chip microfabrication, mathematical modeling, zebrafish husbandry, principles of developmental biology, fluid dynamics, microscopy, and basic molecular biology theory and techniques. The team worked to maximize each person's contribution and presented weekly written and oral reports. Two postdoctoral fellows, a graduate student, and three faculty instructors coordinated and directed the team in an optimal blending of engineering, molecular, and developmental biology skill sets. The students presented two posters, including one at the Zebrafish meetings in Madison, Wisconsin (June 2008). PMID:19292670

  5. Aerosol microphysical and radiative effects on continental cloud ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Vogel, Jonathan M.; Lin, Yun; Pan, Bowen; Hu, Jiaxi; Liu, Yangang; Dong, Xiquan; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhang, Renyi

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions represent one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate assessment. Much of the complexity arises from the non-monotonic responses of clouds, precipitation and radiative fluxes to aerosol perturbations under various meteorological conditions. In this study, an aerosol-aware WRF model is used to investigate the microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols in three weather systems during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period campaign at the US Southern Great Plains. Three simulated cloud ensembles include a low-pressure deep convective cloud system, a collection of less-precipitating stratus and shallow cumulus, and a cold frontal passage. The WRF simulations are evaluated by several ground-based measurements. The microphysical properties of cloud hydrometeors, such as their mass and number concentrations, generally show monotonic trends as a function of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol radiative effects do not influence the trends of cloud microphysics, except for the stratus and shallow cumulus cases where aerosol semi-direct effects are identified. The precipitation changes by aerosols vary with the cloud types and their evolving stages, with a prominent aerosol invigoration effect and associated enhanced precipitation from the convective sources. The simulated aerosol direct effect suppresses precipitation in all three cases but does not overturn the aerosol indirect effect. Cloud fraction exhibits much smaller sensitivity (typically less than 2%) to aerosol perturbations, and the responses vary with aerosol concentrations and cloud regimes. The surface shortwave radiation shows a monotonic decrease by increasing aerosols, while the magnitude of the decrease depends on the cloud type.

  6. Radiative effects of interannually varying vs. interannually invariant aerosol emissions from fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Grandey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Open-burning fires play an important role in the earth's climate system. In addition to contributing a substantial fraction of global emissions of carbon dioxide, they are a major source of atmospheric aerosols containing organic carbon, black carbon, and sulfate. These “fire aerosols” can influence the climate via direct and indirect radiative effects. In this study, we investigate these radiative effects and the hydrological fast response using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5. Emissions of fire aerosols exert a global mean net radiative effect of −1.0 W m−2, dominated by the cloud shortwave response to organic carbon aerosol. The net radiative effect is particularly strong over boreal regions. Conventionally, many climate modelling studies have used an interannually invariant monthly climatology of emissions of fire aerosols. However, by comparing simulations using interannually varying emissions vs. interannually invariant emissions, we find that ignoring the interannual variability of the emissions can lead to systematic overestimation of the strength of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols. Globally, the overestimation is +23 % (−0.2 W m−2. Regionally, the overestimation can be substantially larger. For example, over Australia and New Zealand the overestimation is +58 % (−1.2 W m−2, while over Boreal Asia the overestimation is +43 % (−1.9 W m−2. The systematic overestimation of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols is likely due to the non-linear influence of aerosols on clouds. However, ignoring interannual variability in the emissions does not appear to significantly impact the hydrological fast response. In order to improve understanding of the climate system, we need to take into account the interannual variability of aerosol emissions.

  7. Investigation of the factors disguising radiation effects on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzeneva, I.B.; Styazhkina, T.V.; Dubrova, Y.E.; Malinina, T.V.; Prokhorovskaya, V.D.; Kholod, O.N.

    1998-01-01

    Herein we have studied the effects of some hereditary and environmental factors on children's states of health. The factors under investigation, along with radiation, also impact the immunological status and human adaptivity, thus disguising hazardous radiation effects. The state-of-health criterion we have chosen are children's liability to a wide range of intrinsic diseases through the first three years of life. The analysis involved 626 children (326 male and 300 female) who's parents and grandparents lived in the vicinity of the Russian Federal Nuclear Centre (RFNC), a large-scale nuclear facility. Our results should preferably be taken into consideration when projecting radiation effects on the human body. (author)

  8. Radiation effects of energetic thorium ions in monocrystalline Mg O and Si O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuassy, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation effects of energetic thorium ions in the energy range ∼ (100-1200) eV in both Mg O and Si O 2 single crystal have been investigated with program MARLOWE which simulate the collision cascades using the binary collision approximation. The effect of binding parameters on the radiation effects have been studied. The calculations covered the range, energy loss and Frenkel pair production. The results of MARLOWE have been compared with results of program TRIM and with the energy-partition theory of lindhard

  9. Tritium AMS for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Velsko, C.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-08-01

    We are developing 3 H-AMS to measure 3 H activity of mg-sized biological samples. LLNL has already successfully applied 14 C AMS to a variety of problems in the area of biomedical research. Development of 3 H AMS would greatly complement these studies. The ability to perform 3 H AMS measurements at sensitivities equivalent to those obtained for 14 C will allow us to perform experiments using compounds that are not readily available in 14 C-tagged form. A 3 H capability would also allow us to perform unique double-labeling experiments in which we learn the fate, distribution, and metabolism of separate fractions of biological compounds

  10. An introduction to biomedical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhurst, D J

    1976-01-01

    An Introduction to Biomedical Instrumentation presents a course of study and applications covering the basic principles of medical and biological instrumentation, as well as the typical features of its design and construction. The book aims to aid not only the cognitive domain of the readers, but also their psychomotor domain as well. Aside from the seminar topics provided, which are divided into 27 chapters, the book complements these topics with practical applications of the discussions. Figures and mathematical formulas are also given. Major topics discussed include the construction, handli

  11. Engineering β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiling; Liu, Menghua; Ye, Ling; Ren, Jiaoyan; Liao, Wenzhen; Liu, Shuwen

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels have been widely studied in various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, cell culture, immunotherapy and vaccines, and drug delivery. Peptide-based nanofibers represent a promising new strategy for current drug delivery approaches and cell carriers for tissue engineering. This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of self-assembling engineered β-sheet peptide assemblies for biomedical applications. The applications of peptide nanofibers in biomedical fields, such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunotherapy, and vaccines, are highlighted. The current challenges and future perspectives for self-assembling peptide nanofibers in biomedical applications are discussed.

  12. The importance of Zebrafish in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Bárbara; Santos Lopes, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal model organism for the study of vertebrate development. This is due to the large clutches that each couple produces, with up to 200 embryos every 7 days, and to the fact that the embryos and larvae are small, transparent and undergo rapid external development. Using scientific literature research tools available online and the keywords Zebrafish, biomedical research, human disease, and drug screening, we reviewed original studies and reviews indexed in PubMed. In this review we summarized work conducted with this model for the advancement of our knowledge related to several human diseases. We also focused on the biomedical research being performed in Portugal with the zebrafish model. Powerful live imaging and genetic tools are currently available for zebrafish making it a valuable model in biomedical research. The combination of these properties with the optimization of automated systems for drug screening has transformed the zebrafish into "a top model" in biomedical research, drug discovery and toxicity testing. Furthermore, with the optimization of xenografts technology it will be possible to use zebrafish to aide in the choice of the best therapy for each patient. Zebrafish is an excellent model organism in biomedical research, drug development and in clinical therapy.

  13. Fusion-relevant basic radiation effects: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Coghlan, W.A.; Farrell, K.; Horton, L.L.; Lee, E.H.; Lewis, M.B.; Packan, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of results of the basic radiation effects program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which are relevant to fusion reactor materials applications. The basic radiation effects program at ORNL is a large effort with the dual objectives of understanding the atomic and microstructural defect mechanisms underlying radiation effects and of determining principles for the design of radiation resistant materials. A strength of this effort is the parallel and integrated experimental and theoretical approaches in each major research area. The experimental effort is active in electron microscopy, ion irradiations and ion-beam techniques, neutron irradiations, surface analysis and in other areas. The theoretical effort is active in developing the theory of radiation effects for a broad range of phenomena and in applying it to the design and interpretation of experiments and to alloy design

  14. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  15. Industry careers for the biomedical engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzner, Robert F

    2004-01-01

    This year's conference theme is "linkages for innovation in biomedicine." Biomedical engineers, especially those transitioning their career from academic study into medical device industry, will play a critical role in converting the fruits of scientific research into the reality of modern medical devices. This special session is organized to help biomedical engineers to achieve their career goals more effectively. Participants will have opportunities to hear from and interact with leading industrial experts on many issues. These may include but not limited to 1) career paths for biomedical engineers (industrial, academic, or federal; technical vs. managerial track; small start-up or large established companies); 2) unique design challenges and regulatory requirements in medical device development; 3) aspects of a successful biomedical engineering job candidate (such as resume, interview, follow-up). Suggestions for other topics are welcome and should be directed to xkong@ieee.org The distinguished panelists include: Xuan Kong, Ph.D., VP of Research, NEUROMetrix Inc, Waltham, MA Robert F. Munzner, Ph.D., Medical Device Consultant, Doctor Device, Herndon, VA Glen McLaughlin, Ph.D., VP of Engineering and CTO, Zonare Medical System Inc., Mountain View, CA Grace Bartoo, Ph.D., RAC, General Manager, Decus Biomedical LLC San Carlos, CA.

  16. Gamma-radiation effect on diamond and steel during their irradiation in WWER type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Karpukhin, V.I.; Amaev, A.D.; Vikhrov, V.I.; Korolev, Yu.N.; Krasikov, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    A study is made into the influence of reactor gamma radiation on expansion of crystal lattice in diamond. The data obtained are compared to those on radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. The necessity of taking into consideration gamma radiation effects on WWER reactor vessel radiation resistance during long-term operation is shown [ru

  17. Radiation effects and hardness of semiconductor electronic devices for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payat, R.; Friant, A.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief review of industrial and nuclear specificity and radiation effects in electronics components (semiconductors) the need for a specific test methodology of semiconductor devices is emphasized. Some studies appropriate for nuclear industry at D. LETI/DEIN/CEN-SACLAY are related [fr

  18. Gamma radiation effect on the anatomical structure of soybean (Glycine max. Merr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhikuningputra, W.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma radiation effects on soybean plant (Glycine max. Merr) have been studied by using radiation doses of 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 Krad. Investigation is carried out after each treatment. It proves that each treatment causes different morphological changes on leaves, stems, roots, and fibres of the treated plants. (SMN)

  19. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Middle East and North Africa Climate

    KAUST Repository

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu

    2016-01-01

    Dust-climate interaction over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has long been studied, as it is the "dustiest" region on earth. However, the quantitative and qualitative understanding of the role of dust direct radiative effect on MENA climate

  20. Gamma radiation effects on rice, substrate for Sitophilus oryzae (L.) rearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, F.M.; Arthur, V.; Walder, J.M.M.; Domarco, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gamma radiation effects (800 Krad, 60 Co) on rice are studied. Degraded substances by the radiation and how this degradation affects the biology of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) are searched. The vitamins, proteins and stard of the rice are affected by the radiation. (M.A.C.) [pt

  1. Three-dimensional biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Scientists in biomedical imaging provide researchers, physicians, and academicians with an understanding of the fundamental theories and practical applications of three-dimensional biomedical imaging methodologies. Succinct descriptions of each imaging modality are supported by numerous diagrams and illustrations which clarify important concepts and demonstrate system performance in a variety of applications. Comparison of the different functional attributes, relative advantages and limitations, complementary capabilities, and future directions of three-dimensional biomedical imaging modalities are given. Volume 1: Introductions to Three-Dimensional Biomedical Imaging Photoelectronic-Digital Imaging for Diagnostic Radiology. X-Ray Computed Tomography - Basic Principles. X-Ray Computed Tomography - Implementation and Applications. X-Ray Computed Tomography: Advanced Systems and Applications in Biomedical Research and Diagnosis. Volume II: Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography. Position Emission Tomography (PET). Computerized Ultrasound Tomography. Fundamentals of NMR Imaging. Display of Multi-Dimensional Biomedical Image Information. Summary and Prognostications

  2. An exploration of the biomedical optics course construction of undergraduate biomedical engineering program in medical colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shijun; Lyu, Jie; Zhang, Peiming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the teaching goals, teaching contents and teaching methods in biomedical optics course construction are discussed. From the dimension of teaching goals, students should master the principle of optical inspection on the human body, diagnosis and treatment of methodology and instruments, through the study of the theory and practice of this course, and can utilize biomedical optics methods to solve practical problems in the clinical medical engineering practice. From the dimension of teaching contents, based on the characteristics of biomedical engineering in medical colleges, the organic integration of engineering aspects, medical optical instruments, and biomedical aspects dispersed in human anatomy, human physiology, clinical medicine fundamental related to the biomedical optics is build. Noninvasive measurement of the human body composition and noninvasive optical imaging of the human body were taken as actual problems in biomedical optics fields. Typical medical applications such as eye optics and laser medicine were also integrated into the theory and practice teaching. From the dimension of teaching methods, referencing to organ-system based medical teaching mode, optical principle and instrument principle were taught by teachers from school of medical instruments, and the histological characteristics and clinical actual need in areas such as digestive diseases and urinary surgery were taught by teachers from school of basic medicine or clinical medicine of medical colleges. Furthermore, clinical application guidance would be provided by physician and surgeons in hospitals.

  3. Advances in biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, J H U

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Biomedical Engineering, Volume 2, is a collection of papers that discusses the basic sciences, the applied sciences of engineering, the medical sciences, and the delivery of health services. One paper discusses the models of adrenal cortical control, including the secretion and metabolism of cortisol (the controlled process), as well as the initiation and modulation of secretion of ACTH (the controller). Another paper discusses hospital computer systems-application problems, objective evaluation of technology, and multiple pathways for future hospital computer applications. The pos

  4. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  5. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  6. Radiochemicals in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Oldham, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    This volume describes the role of radiochemicals in biomedical research, as tracers in the development of new drugs, their interaction and function with receptor proteins, with the kinetics of binding of hormone - receptor interactions, and their use in cancer research and clinical oncology. The book also aims to identify future trends in this research, the main objective of which is to provide information leading to improvements in the quality of life, and to give readers a basic understanding of the development of new drugs, how they function in relation to receptor proteins and lead to a better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. (author)

  7. Reviewing Manuscripts for Biomedical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmel, Gus M

    2010-01-01

    Writing for publication is a complex task. For many professionals, producing a well-executed manuscript conveying one's research, ideas, or educational wisdom is challenging. Authors have varying emotions related to the process of writing for scientific publication. Although not studied, a relationship between an author's enjoyment of the writing process and the product's outcome is highly likely. As with any skill, practice generally results in improvements. Literature focused on preparing manuscripts for publication and the art of reviewing submissions exists. Most journals guard their reviewers' anonymity with respect to the manuscript review process. This is meant to protect them from direct or indirect author demands, which may occur during the review process or in the future. It is generally accepted that author identities are masked in the peer-review process. However, the concept of anonymity for reviewers has been debated recently; many editors consider it problematic that reviewers are not held accountable to the public for their decisions. The review process is often arduous and underappreciated, one reason why biomedical journals acknowledge editors and frequently recognize reviewers who donate their time and expertise in the name of science. This article describes essential elements of a submitted manuscript, with the hopes of improving scientific writing. It also discusses the review process within the biomedical literature, the importance of reviewers to the scientific process, responsibilities of reviewers, and qualities of a good review and reviewer. In addition, it includes useful insights to individuals who read and interpret the medical literature. PMID:20740129

  8. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  9. Polymer/metal nanocomposites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Yasser; Shabani, Iman

    2016-03-01

    Polymer/metal nanocomposites consisting of polymer as matrix and metal nanoparticles as nanofiller commonly show several attractive advantages such as electrical, mechanical and optical characteristics. Accordingly, many scientific and industrial communities have focused on polymer/metal nanocomposites in order to develop some new products or substitute the available materials. In the current paper, characteristics and applications of polymer/metal nanocomposites for biomedical applications are extensively explained in several categories including strong and stable materials, conductive devices, sensors and biomedical products. Moreover, some perspective utilizations are suggested for future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  11. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The report lists the titles and authors of the reports of studies made under the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The list include 87 studies, which cover 'immunological diagnosis of lung cancer', 'electrophoretic variants of haptoglobin found in the children of atomic bomb survivors', 'rogue cells in the general human population', 'host variation of X-ray sensitivity among atomic bomb survivors with or without breast cancer', 'disorders in the endocrine gland and gonad of A-bomb survivors', 'incidence of vertebral compression fractures among atomic bomb survivors', 'measurement of the frequency of in vivo somatic mutation in atomic bomb survivors by T-cell cloning', 'mechanism of carcinogenesis in A-bomb survivors', 'effects of aging on blood pressure', 'expediting factors of blood sedimentation of heavily exposed survivors', 'record linkage between local cancer registry and tumor and tissue registries', 'reclassification of diagnosis and types of leukemia in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima', 'cytogenetic study in utero exposed individuals', 'estimation of indoor and outdoor A-bomb gamma-ray doses by thermoluminescence measurement', and many other studies. (N.K.) 87 refs

  12. A Novel Approach to Physiology Education for Biomedical Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCecco, J.; Wu, J.; Kuwasawa, K.; Sun, Y.

    2007-01-01

    It is challenging for biomedical engineering programs to incorporate an indepth study of the systemic interdependence of cells, tissues, and organs into the rigorous mathematical curriculum that is the cornerstone of engineering education. To be sure, many biomedical engineering programs require their students to enroll in anatomy and physiology…

  13. Advances in biomedical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry, the accurate determination of the absorbed dose within an irradiated body or a piece of material, is a prerequisite for all applications of ionizing radiation. This has been known since the very first radiation applications in medicine and biology, and increasing efforts are being made by radiation researchers to develop more reliable, effective and safe instruments, and to further improve dosimetric accuracy for all types of radiation used. Development of new techniques and instrumentation was particularly fast in the field of both medical diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. Thus, in Paris in October the IAEA held the latest symposium in its continuing series on dosimetry in medicine and biology. The last one was held in Vienna in 1975. High-quality dosimetry is obviously of great importance for human health, whether the objectives lie in the prevention and control of risks associated with the nuclear industry, in medical uses of radioactive substances or X-ray beams for diagnostic purposes, or in the application of photon, electron or neutron beams in radiotherapy. The symposium dealt with the following subjects: General aspects of dosimetry; Special physical and biomedical aspects; Determination of absorbed dose; Standardization and calibration of dosimetric systems; and Development of dosimetric systems. The forty or so papers presented and the discussions that followed them brought out a certain number of dominant themes, among which three deserve particular mention. - The recent generalization of the International System of Units having prompted a fundamental reassessment of the dosimetric quantities to be considered in calibrating measuring instruments, various proposals were advanced by the representatives of national metrology laboratories to replace the quantity 'exposure' (SI unit = coulomb/kg) by 'Kerma' or 'absorbed dose' (unit joule/kg, the special name of which is 'gray'), this latter being closer to the practical

  14. Usage of cell nomenclature in biomedical literature

    KAUST Repository

    Kafkas, Senay; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2017-01-01

    large scale for understanding the level of uptake of cell nomenclature in literature by scientists. In this study, we analyse the usage of cell nomenclature, both in Vivo, and in Vitro in biomedical literature by using text mining methods and present our

  15. Electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical purposes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the suitability of the Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD) technique was studied for biomedical purposes, i.e., deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates. Using ESD, which is a simple and cheap deposition method for inorganic and organic coatings, it

  16. BIOMedical Search Engine Framework: Lightweight and customized implementation of domain-specific biomedical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alberto G; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-07-01

    meaningful to that particular scope of research. Conversely, indirect concept associations, i.e. concepts related by other intermediary concepts, can be useful to integrate information from different studies and look into non-trivial relations. The BIOMedical Search Engine Framework supports the development of domain-specific search engines. The key strengths of the framework are modularity and extensibilityin terms of software design, the use of open-source consolidated Web technologies, and the ability to integrate any number of biomedical text mining tools and information resources. Currently, the Smart Drug Search keeps over 1,186,000 documents, containing more than 11,854,000 annotations for 77,200 different concepts. The Smart Drug Search is publicly accessible at http://sing.ei.uvigo.es/sds/. The BIOMedical Search Engine Framework is freely available for non-commercial use at https://github.com/agjacome/biomsef. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomedical ontologies: toward scientific debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojo, V; Crespo, J; García-Remesal, M; de la Iglesia, D; Perez-Rey, D; Kulikowski, C

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical ontologies have been very successful in structuring knowledge for many different applications, receiving widespread praise for their utility and potential. Yet, the role of computational ontologies in scientific research, as opposed to knowledge management applications, has not been extensively discussed. We aim to stimulate further discussion on the advantages and challenges presented by biomedical ontologies from a scientific perspective. We review various aspects of biomedical ontologies going beyond their practical successes, and focus on some key scientific questions in two ways. First, we analyze and discuss current approaches to improve biomedical ontologies that are based largely on classical, Aristotelian ontological models of reality. Second, we raise various open questions about biomedical ontologies that require further research, analyzing in more detail those related to visual reasoning and spatial ontologies. We outline significant scientific issues that biomedical ontologies should consider, beyond current efforts of building practical consensus between them. For spatial ontologies, we suggest an approach for building "morphospatial" taxonomies, as an example that could stimulate research on fundamental open issues for biomedical ontologies. Analysis of a large number of problems with biomedical ontologies suggests that the field is very much open to alternative interpretations of current work, and in need of scientific debate and discussion that can lead to new ideas and research directions.

  18. Professional Identification for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Francis M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses four methods of professional identification in biomedical engineering including registration, certification, accreditation, and possible membership qualification of the societies. Indicates that the destiny of the biomedical engineer may be under the control of a new profession, neither the medical nor the engineering. (CC)

  19. Egyptian Journal of Biomedical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Egyptian Journal of Biomedical Sciences publishes in all aspects of biomedical research sciences. Both basic and clinical research papers are welcomed. Vol 23 (2007). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Phytochemical And ...

  20. African Journal of Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of biomedical Research was founded in 1998 as a joint project ... of the journal led to the formation of a group (Biomedical Communications Group, ... analysis of multidrug resistant aerobic gram-negative clinical isolates from a ... Dental formula and dental abnormalities observed in the Eidolon helvum ...

  1. Pretreatment Predictors of Adverse Radiation Effects After Radiosurgery for Arteriovenous Malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Prooijen, Monique van; Cusimano, Michael; Tsao, May; Menard, Cynthia; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Schwartz, Michael; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify vascular and dosimetric predictors of symptomatic T2 signal change and adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation, in order to define and validate preexisting risk models. Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVM) were treated at our institution between 2005 and 2009. Eighty-five patients have at least 12 months of clinical and radiological follow-up. Any new-onset headaches, new or worsening seizures, or neurological deficit were considered adverse events. Follow-up magnetic resonance images were assessed for new onset T2 signal change and the volume calculated. Pretreatment characteristics and dosimetric variables were analyzed to identify predictors of adverse radiation effects. Results: There were 19 children and 66 adults in the study cohort, with a mean age of 34 (range 6–74). Twenty-three (27%) patients suffered adverse radiation effects (ARE), 9 patients with permanent neurological deficit (10.6%). Of these, 5 developed fixed visual field deficits. Target volume and 12 Gy volume were the most significant predictors of adverse radiation effects on univariate analysis (p 3 , above which the rate of ARE increased dramatically. Multivariate analysis target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage are the only significant predictors of ARE. The volume of T2 signal change correlates to ARE, but only target volume is predictive of a higher volume of T2 signal change. Conclusions: Target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage is the most accurate predictor of adverse radiation effects and complications after radiosurgery for AVMs. A high percentage of permanent visual field defects in this series suggest the optic radiation is a critical radiosensitive structure.

  2. Radiation effect of ethylene/vinyl alcohol copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Meihua; Jilin Univ., Changchun; Deng Pengyang; Sun Jiazhen; Dong Lisong; Sun Guoen; Zhang Wanxi

    2006-01-01

    The radiation effect of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH), EVOH/glycerin blend was studied by solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR) methods. Samples were irradiated up to 1800 kGy at room temperature under N 2 . The results show that degradation is the main reaction in pure EVOH. Trace gel content could be found in E151 irradiated to at least 800 kGy, and only 5.9% gel content was found in the sample irradiated to 1200 kGy. While trace gel content could be found in F101 irradiated to at least 1800 kGy, the different gelation doses of E151 and F101 are due to different contents of vinyl alcohol units. Unsaturation structure can be found in the irradiated EVOH. The content increased at first, and then decreased, with the dose. The existence of double bond enhances the radiation efficiency of EVOH. For EVOH/glycerin blend, the gel content was higher than that of pure EVOH when the absorbed dose exceeds 800 kGy, and the gel content increased with the absorbed dose. But it cannot enhance radiation efficiency of EVOH as water. (authors)

  3. The treatment of late radiation effects with hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plafki, C.; Carl, U.M.; Glag, M.; Hartmann, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Late radiation injuries may impose a negative influence on the quality of life in the affected patients. In several entities, standardized treatment protocols are lacking. Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) has been shown to have beneficial effects in the treatment of late radiation sequelae. Material and methods: The basic principles of HBO are reviewed as well as clinical issues. Current study protocols are presented. Results: During HBO-therapy the patient breathes pure oxygen at pressures above 100 kPa. The oxygen solubility within the fluid phase of the blood is largely increased. Biological effects include an increased oxygen diffusibility, improved collagen synthesis and neoangiogenesis as well as an enhancement of antimicrobial defenses. By decreasing the capillary filtration pressure a reduction of edema becomes possible. HBO has been shown to prevent complications following surgery in irradiated tissues. Its efficacy as an adjunct in the treatment of osteonecroses in radiation patients could be demonstrated. In addition, the loss of osseointegrated implants in the maxillofacial bones of these patients could be significantly reduced. Further indications include soft tissue necroses, hemorrhagic cystitis and proctitis in tumor patients that have been treated by radiotherapy as part of a multimodality approach. Conclusions: HBO in the treatment of late radiation effects is still subject of investigation, but remarkable results have been reported. Optimized treatment protocols need to be determined in various entities. The rate of side effects is acceptable low. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation damage to process materials used in radioactive waste management has been a topic of little interest in the past. In recent years, as a result of the increasing number of accidents reported in the open literature, there has been some desire to examine the radiation decomposition of ion exchange materials and its consequences to the interim and long-term management of radioactive wastes. Extensive literature surveys and some confirmatory laboratory investigations conducted conclusively demonstrate that radiation damage to ion exchangers has the potential to cause problems of corrosion, elution of adsorbed ionic species, generation of flammable and explosive gaseous products and agglomeration of particulates to form rigid monoliths. This paper is an overview of present knowledge and a presentation of the results of our investigations of this phenomenon. The distinct lack of systematic studies to evaluate the problems of radiation damage to process materials used in the consolidation and isolation of high specific activity radionuclides still leaves considerable gaps in our knowledge of the processes and consequences of radiation effects on ion exchangers used in radioactive waste management

  5. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The bibliography lists the titles of a total of 75 papers published by members of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in 1986 (three of them published in 1985). The papers cover; 'The central nervous system and in utero exposure to ionizing radiation', 'Future directions for biostatistics and cancer epidemiology in Japan', 'Passive smoking and lung cancer among Japanese women', 'Late effects of atomic bomb radiation on human immune response', 'Delayed effects of atomic bomb radiation to human cellular immune competence', 'Characterization of three electrophoretic variants of human erythrocyte triosephosphate isomerase found in Japanese', 'A follow-up study of clonal T-lymphocytes with chromosome aberrations in Hiroshima A-bomb survivors', 'Comments on recent cytogenetic findings at RERF', 'Cytogenetic 'rogue' cells; What is their frequency, origin, and evolutionary sinificance?', 'A parallel analysis of cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors and patients with ankylosing spondylitis given X-ray therapy', 'Cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands', 'Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of atomic bomb survivors using monoclonal antibodies', 'Celluar immune competence of patients with lung cancer and other lung diseases. I. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets using monoclonal antibodies', etc. (N.K.) 75 refs

  6. Biomedical Science Technologists in Lagos Universities: Meeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomedical Science Technologists in Lagos Universities: Meeting Modern Standards ... like to see in biomedical science in Nigeria; 5) their knowledge of ten state-of-the-arts ... KEY WORDS: biomedical science, state-of-the-arts, technical staff ...

  7. Journal of Biomedical Investigation: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Biomedical Investigation: Editorial Policies. Journal Home ... The focus of the Journal of Biomedical Research is to promote interdisciplinary research across all Biomedical Sciences. It publishes ... Business editor – Sam Meludu.

  8. The development and purpose of the FREDERICA radiation effects database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Hingston, J.; Real, A.

    2008-01-01

    Any system for assessing the impact of a contaminant on the environment requires an analysis of the possible effects on the organisms and ecosystems concerned. To facilitate this, the FREDERICA radiation effects database has been developed to provide an online search of the known effects of ionising radiation on non-human species, taken from papers in the scientific peer reviewed literature. The FREDERICA radiation effects database has been produced by merging the work done on radiation effects under two European funded projects (FASSET and EPIC) and making the database available online. This paper highlights applications for the database, gaps in the available data and explains the use of quality scores to help users of the database determine which papers may benefit their research in terms of techniques and reproducibility

  9. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  10. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Indra

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians" can be essential members of translational medicine teams.

  11. Customization of biomedical terminologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homo, Julien; Dupuch, Laëtitia; Benbrahim, Allel; Grabar, Natalia; Dupuch, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Within the biomedical area over one hundred terminologies exist and are merged in the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus, which gives over 1 million concepts. When such huge terminological resources are available, the users must deal with them and specifically they must deal with irrelevant parts of these terminologies. We propose to exploit seed terms and semantic distance algorithms in order to customize the terminologies and to limit within them a semantically homogeneous space. An evaluation performed by a medical expert indicates that the proposed approach is relevant for the customization of terminologies and that the extracted terms are mostly relevant to the seeds. It also indicates that different algorithms provide with similar or identical results within a given terminology. The difference is due to the terminologies exploited. A special attention must be paid to the definition of optimal association between the semantic similarity algorithms and the thresholds specific to a given terminology.

  12. Dosimetric and biomedical studies conducted in Cuba of children from areas of the former USSR affected by the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    Children from ares affected by the Chernobyl accident have been receiving medical care in Cuba since 1990. The dosimetric and biomedical studies made include: measurement of 137 Cs body content; internal, external, thyroid and total dose estimation; evaluation of the overall health condition and behaviour of hameatological, endocrinological, biochemical and cytogenetic indicators. Measurements of body activity and dose estimation have been performed on altogether 4506 children. Of this total, 69.3% of the children were from the Ukraine, 22.5% from Russia and 8.1% from Belarus. Assessments of overall health conditions, haematological and thyroid indicators have been made covering 3016 children from 421 Ukrainian townships, taking into account the body measurements of 137 Cs and the surface contamination of the locations where the children come from. The biochemical indicator used (nucleic acid concentration in leucocytes) was assessed in five groups comprising some 445 children from areas where the level of surface contamination varied. Chromosome and micronuclei aberration rates were established in 28 children from Pripyat, 21 living in Kiev and 20 in Ovruch

  13. Dosimetric and biomedical studies conducted in Cuba of children from areas of the former USSR affected by the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    Children from ares affected by the Chernobyl accident have been receiving medical care in Cuba since 1990. The dosimetric and biomedical studies made include: measurement of {sup 137}Cs body content; internal, external, thyroid and total dose estimation; evaluation of the overall health condition and behaviour of hameatological, endocrinological, biochemical and cytogenetic indicators. Measurements of body activity and dose estimation have been performed on altogether 4506 children. Of this total, 69.3% of the children were from the Ukraine, 22.5% from Russia and 8.1% from Belarus. Assessments of overall health conditions, haematological and thyroid indicators have been made covering 3016 children from 421 Ukrainian townships, taking into account the body measurements of {sup 137}Cs and the surface contamination of the locations where the children come from. The biochemical indicator used (nucleic acid concentration in leucocytes) was assessed in five groups comprising some 445 children from areas where the level of surface contamination varied. Chromosome and micronuclei aberration rates were established in 28 children from Pripyat, 21 living in Kiev and 20 in Ovruch.

  14. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  15. FULERENIC MATERIALS WITH BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Claudiu FIERASCU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Soluble fullerenic derivates are essential for numerous biomedical techniques that exploit the unique structural chemical and physical properties of carbon nanospheres. Their toxicity, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo is important for the characterization and limitation of those applications. The phototoxicity of some fullerene molecules was identified as a future therapeutical instrument. Other studies focused on the decrease of the phototoxicity of hydrosoluble fullerenes follow the use of those compounds as drug delivery systems or their use in environment protection. Starting from the characteristics of those compounds, which can be by themeselves cytotoxic, or could become during irradiation (photosensitizers we have tried to obtain new materials based on fullerenes and diads/triads fullerene/porphyrines or fullerenes/calixarenes.The obtained complexes were characterized by UV Vis and IR spectroscopy.

  16. Radiation effects on the developing human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The developing human brain has been shown to be especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. Mental retardation has been observed in the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan exposed in utero during sensitive periods, and clinical studies of pelvically irradiated pregnant women have demonstrated damaging effects on the fetus. In this annex the emphasis is on reviewing the results of the study of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan, although the results of other human epidemiological investigations and of pertinent experimental studies are also considered. Refs, 3 figs, 10 tabs

  17. Decomposition of radiational effects of model feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.; MacCracken, M.C.; Potter, G.L.; Mitchell, C.S.

    1981-08-01

    Three separate doubled CO 2 experiments with the statistical dynamic model are used to illustrate efforts to study the climate dynamics, feedbacks, and interrelationships of meteorological parameters by decomposing and isolating their individual effects on radiation transport

  18. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation effect in damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T

    2004-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) can play an important role by not only increasing the energy spread and emittance of a beam, but also leading to a potential instability. Previous studies of the CSR induced longitudinal instability were carried out for the CSR impedance due to dipole magnets. In this paper, the instability due to the CSR impedance from a wiggler is studied assuming a large wiggler parameter K. The primary consideration is a low frequency microwave-like instability in the damping rings of several linear collider projects. The threshold is determined by the instability with the longest possible wavelength

  19. Photonuclear and Radiation Effects Testing with a Refurbished 20 MeV Medical Electron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Timothy; Beezhold, Wendland; De Veaux, Linda C; Harmon, Frank; Petrisko, Jill E; Spaulding, Randy

    2005-01-01

    An S-band 20 MeV electron linear accelerator formerly used for medical applications has been recommissioned to provide a wide range of photonuclear activation studies as well as various radiation effects on biological and microelectronic systems. Four radiation effect applications involving the electron/photon beams are described. Photonuclear activation of a stable isotope of oxygen provides an active means of characterizing polymer degradation. Biological irradiations of microorganisms including bacteria were used to study total dose and dose rate effects on survivability and the adaptation of these organisms to repeated exposures. Microelectronic devices including bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and diodes were irradiated to study photocurrent from these devices as a function of peak dose rate with comparisons to computer modeling results. In addition, the 20 MeV linac may easily be converted to a medium energy neutron source which has been used to study neutron damage effects on transistors.

  20. Activities and future plans of the radiation effects research foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagataki, Shigenobu

    2000-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) was established in 1975 as a binational research foundation supported by Japan and the United States. It continues the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) which was established in 1974. ABCC-RERF studies focus on several fixed cohorts of survivors and their children: the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort (120,000 survivors); the In-Utero cohort (3,300 people born within 9 months of the bombings); the F 1 cohort (88,000 people born between mid-1946 and 1984), and the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort (an ongoing clinical study of 17,000 LSS survivors and 1,100 people exposed in-utero). Epidemiological data have shown increased risks of leukemia and solid cancers by radiation exposure among the survivors. Excess leukemia risks, especially for children, were markedly elevated 5 to 10 years after exposure and have continued at reduced levels. Excess solid cancer rates became apparent within 10 years after exposure, increasing throughout life in rough proportion to background rates. For doses of interest in radiation protection excess leukemia risks exhibit an upward curving dose response pattern while the solid cancer excess appears to be linear by dose with no apparent threshold. In addition to malignancy, AHS data has shown dose-related increased risk for various non-malignant diseases; radiation cataracts, benign tumors of uterus, thyroid and parathyroid (hyperparathyroidism), and autoimmune thyroid diseases. Persons exposed in-utero exhibit a broad range of dose-related effects including delayed growth and development and higher rates of microcephaly. Studies of birth defects, chromosome aberrations, childhood mortality, and genetic variants of serum or erythrocyte proteins have provided no indication of heritable mutations in the F 1 cohort. Continued follow-up of survivors exposed as children (90% are still alive) is essential to understanding the temporal pattern of excess risks and lifetime risks, and may

  1. Radiation effect on PVC/ENR blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantara Thevy Ratnam; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    1997-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the physical properties of Polyvinyl Chloride / Epoxidised Natural Rubber Blends (PVC/ENR blends) were investigated. The enhancement in tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness and aging properties of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of irradiation on the blends. It is evident from gel fraction and infra red spectroscopic studies that the blends of PVC and ENR cross-linked upon irradiation. The results also revealed that at any blend composition, the enhancement in properties depend on irradiation dose which controls the degree of radiation induced cross-linking. In an attempt to maximize the constructive effect of irradiation, the influence of various additives such as stabilizers, radiation sensitizers, fillers and processing aids on the blend properties were studied. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the presents of above additives were also presented in this paper

  2. Radiation effects on the integrity of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero D'Almeida, Maria Luiza; Medeiros Barbosa, Patricia de Souza; Boaratti, Marcelo Fernando Guerra; Borrely, Sueli Ivone

    2009-01-01

    Books and documents attacked by fungi and insects have already been treated by radiation for disinfestations purposes. However, there is still need to investigate the influence of radiation on the cellulose paper structure. The aim of this research was to study the effects of radiation on paper properties, especially those related to strength and appearance. Paper sheets for this study were prepared in the laboratory, using bleached eucalyptus pulp as raw material. No additives were used to concentrate the attention only on the effects of irradiation on the pure cellulose matrix. The samples were irradiated at IPEN's 60 Co Gammacell irradiator with six radiation doses, from 3 to 15 kGy at the dose rate 0.817 Gy/s. The properties of paper sheets were tested after irradiation and compared with unirradiated samples according to ISO methods. No significant changes were detected in paper samples irradiated up to 15 kGy.

  3. Toward High-Performance Coatings for Biomedical Devices: Study on Plasma-Deposited Fluorocarbon Films and Ageing in PBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Mantovani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available High performance coatings tailored to medical devices represent a recognised approach to modulate surface properties. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films have been proposed as a potential stent coating. Previous studies have shown promising adhesion properties: the 35 nm-thick film sustained plastic deformation up to 25% such as induced during the clinical implantation. In this study, the compositional and morphological changes of plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films were examined during ageing in a pseudo-physiological medium, a phosphate buffer solution (PBS, by angle-resolved XPS, FT-IR data and AFM images. The evolution of the ageing process is discussed: defluorination and crosslinking yielded an oxidized protective top layer onto the films, which showed further degradation.

  4. Tailoring consent to context: designing an appropriate consent process for a biomedical study in a low income setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Tekola

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is increasing recognition of the need for research in developing countries where disease burden is high. Understanding the role of local factors is important for undertaking ethical research in developing countries. We explored factors relating to information and communication during the process of informed consent, and the approach that should be followed for gaining consent. The study was conducted prior to a family-based genetic study among people with podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis in southern Ethiopia.We adapted a method of rapid assessment validated in The Gambia. The methodology was entirely qualitative, involving focus-group discussions and in-depth interviews. Discussions were conducted with podoconiosis patients and non-patients in the community, fieldworkers, researchers, staff of the local non-governmental organisation (NGO working on prevention and treatment of podoconiosis, and community leaders. We found that the extent of use of everyday language, the degree to which expectations of potential participants were addressed, and the techniques of presentation of information had considerable impact on comprehension of information provided about research. Approaching podoconiosis patients via locally trusted individuals and preceding individual consent with community sensitization were considered the optimal means of communication. Prevailing poverty among podoconiosis patients, the absence of alternative treatment facilities, and participants' trust in the local NGO were identified as potential barriers for obtaining genuine informed consent.Researchers should evaluate the effectiveness of consent processes in providing appropriate information in a comprehensible manner and in supporting voluntary decision-making on a study-by-study basis.

  5. The feasibility study on 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using the pinhole effect for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (CT) pinhole collimator, aimed at providing molecular imaging with quantifiable measures and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept and investigate imaging properties such as spatial resolution, contrast resolution and quantifiable measures, by imaging physical phantoms using a preliminary imaging system developed with monochromatic synchrotron x rays constructed at the BLNE-7A experimental line at KEK, Japan.

  6. X-radiation effect on water transport in ascite cells of Ehrlich carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnov, V.A.; Ajvazishvili, M.A.; Kartvelishvili, I.I.; Tushishvili, D.I.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of local X radiation with doses 0.05 and 0.15 C/kg on water transport in ascitic cells of Erlich carcinoma is studied in rats. To study water transport through cell membranes, tritium mark was used. It is concluded that radiation effect on water transport in cells of Erlich carcinoma may be related to change in ionic permittivity of the membrane, because small changes in transmembrane ion transport affect immediately the osmotic motion of water. 5 refs

  7. Knowledge, Attitude And Practices of Healthcare Workers (HCWs Regarding Biomedical Waste (BMW Management: A Multispeciality Hospital Based CrossSectional Study In Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravishekar N. Hiremath

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evolving health care system of India, in its goal of solving health issues and minimizing possible health risks, has unavoidably created waste, which itself may be harmful for health. Inefficient and inadequate knowledge of managing health care waste may have detrimental effects on health and environment. Aim and Objectives: To asses level of Knowledge, Attitude, Practices (KAP about Biomedical Waste (BMW management among Health Care Workers (HCWs with an endeavor to improve the standards and protect the health of HCWs and the environment. Methodology: A Hospital- based cross sectional descriptive study was carried out at one of the Multispecialty Hospital in Eastern India. A total of 80 HCWs who were available at the time of study were included and the data were collected by means of 'personal interview technique' by using a pre-designed semi-structured questionnaire in Hindi (local language. The relevant data was collected, compiled and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 version. Results: Assessment of KAP with pre-decided scoring system showed, 17.5 % had excellent knowledge, 70% with good to average and 12.5% had poor knowledge with respect to BMW management. Knowledge status was not significantly associated with any of the sociodemographic characteristics. When asked about needle stick injuries, 88% felt that needle stick injury was a concern to them and 86% of them were well aware about the consequences of needle-stick injuries. Conclusion: Although the awareness level was high with various aspects of BMW management among HCWs compared to other studies, but still there exists scope for more improvement. Regular awareness capsule with proper BMW committee monitoring is the need of the hour. All measures to sensitize the HCWs against needle stick injuries including both pre and post incident measures need to be taken.

  8. Ionizing Radiation Effects in Ni Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D.; Kozlovsky, A.; Shumskaya, A.; Kaniukov, E.; Ibragimova, M.; Zdorovets, M.; Kadyrzhanov, K.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline nickel nanotubes with diameter of 380 nm and wall thickness 95 nm were synthesized by electrochemical method using PET track-etched membranes with thickness of 12 μm. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of Ni nanotubes irradiated with C+13 ions with energy 1.75 MeV/nucleon and fluence ranging from 109 to 5 × 1011 cm-2 was carried out. The ability of modification of structural parameters such as lattice parameter and the average size of crystallites and conductivity of Ni nanotubes by irradiation was shown.

  9. Gamma Radiation Effect on Titan Yellow Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Banna, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the radiation induced color bleaching of Titan yellow dye (TY) in different solvents has been studied. The color bleaching of the dye solutions upon irradiation was followed spectrophotometrically. The % color bleaching of the dyes in different solvent systems was plotted against different gamma irradiation doses used and was determined and the obtained relationships were found to be linear in most cases. These relationships were used as calibration curves to determine the unknown irradiation dose. The results obtained were reproducible and showed differences from calculated values ranging from 10 % to 15 %

  10. Temperature dependence of radiation effects in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G; Katsumura, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Morita, Y.; Seguchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Temperature dependence of crosslinking and gas evolution under γ-irradiation was studied for high-density and low-density polyethylene samples in the 30-360degC range. It was found that crosslinking was the predominant process up to 300degC and the gel point decreased with increasing temperature. At above 300degC, however, the gel fraction at a given dose decreased rapidly with temperature and the action of radiation turned to enhance polyethylene degradation. Yields of H 2 and hydrocarbon gases increased with temperature and the compositions of hydrocarbons were dose dependent. (author)

  11. Ionizing radiation effects on silicon test structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Chen, W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Dou, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of 60 Co gamma irradiation on MOSCAPS and special junction diode detectors have been studied. The capacitors were used to ellicit the charge accumulation and anneal in two types of thermally grown oxides representative of those used in routine detector processing. Ion implanted, oxide passivated junction detectors having 0.25 and 1 cm 2 areas and perimeter to area ratios of 1 (a square), 2 and 5 were designed and constructed to amplify the ionizing effects expected to largely affect junction edges through changes in fixed oxide charges. Detectors were exposed to over 4 Mrad and showed clear increases in leakage current in proportion to the junction edge length. Annealing schedules were determined to provide a continuous response to incremental irradiations and subsequent room temperature anneals of leakage current. Besides an increase in gate threshold, little effect on the C(V) response was found. PISCES simulation of the edge fields using different fixed oxide charge revealed regions of very high lateral fields near the junction edges for fixed charges in the 2 x 10 12 /cm 2 range expected from the capacitor studies which could be responsible for the observed leakage currents

  12. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Middle East and North Africa Climate

    KAUST Repository

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu

    2016-11-01

    Dust-climate interaction over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has long been studied, as it is the "dustiest" region on earth. However, the quantitative and qualitative understanding of the role of dust direct radiative effect on MENA climate is still rudimentary. The present dissertation investigates dust direct radiative effect on MENA climate during summer with a special emphasis on the sensitivity of climate response to dust shortwave absorption, which is one of the most uncertain components of dust direct radiative effect. Simulations are conducted with and without dust radiative effect, to differentiate the effect of dust on climate. To elucidate the sensitivity of climate response to dust shortwave absorption, simulations with dust assume three different cases of dust shortwave absorption, representing dust as a very efficient, standard and inefficient shortwave absorber. The non-uniformly distributed dust perturb circulations at various scales. Therefore, the present study takes advantage of the high spatial resolution capabilities of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM), High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM), which incorporates global and regional circulations. AMIP-style global high-resolution simulations are conducted at a spatial resolution of 25 km. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet and West African Monsoon circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rainbelt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Similarly, the temperature under rainbelt cools and that over subtropical deserts warms. Inter-comparison of various dust shortwave absorption cases shows that the response of the MENA tropical rainbelt is extremely sensitive to the

  13. The study of Parkinson's disease with biomedical instrumentation: a project for the classroom of Technology in secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Encarnación Micó-Amigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This project aims to engage young students of educación secundaria obligatoria (ESO and bachillerato (last levels of the compulsory high school education system in an experimental project based on the application of medical technology for the study of Parkinson’s disease (PD. The project consists of an informative session and two practical sessions, all to be carried on the classroom-workshop of the Technology course. At the initial and informative session, it is proposed to expose the context, challenges and current technical constraints in the field of neurology for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, with special focus on PD. The first practical session presents an interactive activity that includes the study, design, assembly and calibration of an inertial sensor (accelerometer or gyroscope. The second practical session requests the students to perform a measurement protocol with a commercial device of clinical use on all the students and involved teachers. The analysis of the obtained measures and the comparison of these with data corresponding to a cohort of patients with PD (provided by the teachers will lead to the proposal of ideas for the development of a diagnostic method for PD. With an experimental, innovative and pragmatic methodology, this projects aims to foster a constructivist learning, to boost a rational thinking, to stimulate the imagination and wit, to expand multidisciplinary knowledge, to raise awareness about a socially relevant reality, to develop social skills though a team work approach and to motivate and inspire the students.

  14. Native American gene continuity to the modern admixed population from the Colombian Andes: Implication for biomedical, population and forensic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo-Rayo, Angel A; Bohórquez, Mabel; Prieto, Rodrigo; Howarth, Kimberley; Culma, Cesar; Carracedo, Angel; Tomlinson, Ian; Echeverry de Polnaco, Maria M; Carvajal Carmona, Luis G

    2018-06-07

    Andean populations have variable degrees of Native American and European ancestry, representing an opportunity to study admixture dynamics in the populations from Latin America (also known as Hispanics). We characterized the genetic structure of two indigenous (Nasa and Pijao) and three admixed (Ibagué, Ortega and Planadas) groups from Tolima, in the Colombian Andes. DNA samples from 348 individuals were genotyped for six mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), seven non-recombining Y-chromosome (NRY) region and 100 autosomal ancestry informative markers. Nasa and Pijao had a predominant Native American ancestry at the autosomal (92%), maternal (97%) and paternal (70%) level. The admixed groups had a predominant Native American mtDNA ancestry (90%), a substantial frequency of European NRY haplotypes (72%) and similar autosomal contributions from Europeans (51%) and Amerindians (45%). Pijao and nearby Ortega were indistinguishable at the mtDNA and autosomal level, suggesting a genetic continuity between them. Comparisons with multiple Native American populations throughout the Americas revealed that Pijao, had close similarities with Carib-speakers from distant parts of the continent, suggesting an ancient correlation between language and genes. In summary, our study aimed to understand Hispanic patterns of migration, settlement and admixture, supporting an extensive contribution of local Amerindian women to the gene pool of admixed groups and consistent with previous reports of European-male driven admixture in Colombia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The upper reference limit for thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies is method-dependent: A collaborative study with biomedical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Ferrari, Anna; Castello, Roberto; Metus, Paolo; Caruso, Beatrice; Perosa, Anna Rosa; Sirianni, Francesca; Stenner, Elisabetta; Steffan, Agostino; Villalta, Danilo

    2016-01-15

    The determination of the upper reference limit (URL) for thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (TPOAbs) is a contentious issue, because of the difficulty in defining the reference population. The aim of this study was to establish the URL (eURL) for TPOAbs, according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to compare them with those obtained in a female counterpart, by the use of six commercial automated platforms. 120 healthy males and 120 healthy females with NACB-required characteristics (Lumipulse G1200, Fujirebio. Within each method, TPOAbs values had a high degree of dispersion and the eURLs were lower than those stated by the manufacturer. A statistically significant difference (p0.05). Despite the analytical harmonization, the wide dispersion of the results and the differences of the eURLs between methods suggest the need of further studies focusing on TPO antigen preparations as the possible source of variability between different assays. In addition, the lack of clinical significant difference between males and females, in terms of TPOAb eURLs, confirms the suitability of the NACB recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and electrochemical study of a hybrid structure based on PDMS-TEOS and titania nanotubes for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, António G B; Bastos, Alexandre C; Miranda Salvado, Isabel M; Galstyan, Vardan; Faglia, Guido; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Metallic implants and devices are widely used in the orthopedic and orthodontic clinical areas. However, several problems regarding their adhesion with the living tissues and inflammatory responses due to the release of metallic ions to the medium have been reported. The modification of the metallic surfaces and the use of biocompatible protective coatings are two approaches to solve such issues. In this study, in order to improve the adhesion properties and to increase the corrosion resistance of metallic Ti substrates we have obtained a hybrid structure based on TiO 2 nanotubular arrays and PDMS-TEOS films. TiO 2 nanotubes have been prepared with two different diameters by means of electrochemical anodization. PDMS-TEOS films have been prepared by the sol–gel method. The morphological and the elemental analysis of the structures have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves have been performed during immersion of the samples in Kokubo’s simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C to study the effect of structure layers and tube diameter on the protective properties. The obtained results show that the modification of the surface structure of TiO 2 and the application of PDMS-TEOS film is a promising strategy for the development of implant materials. (paper)

  17. Indirect radiation effects related to the environmental structure of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.

    1976-01-01

    It is supposed, that in biological systems there are direct as well as indirect radiation effects. Their contributions to lethal effects depend mainly on two different kinds of structures within irradiated systems: the microscopic energy deposition patterns of radiation and the environmental structures of targets. The approach to determine these contributions of the lethal action of ionizing radiation in yeast cells was, to use chemical compounds, which specifically change the radical spectrum of water radiolysis. The efficiency of such chemical compounds in scavenging specifically water radicals was tested in aqueous solutions of thymine molecules, in which indirect radiation effects occur exclusively. The main result is, that the OH'-radical is by far the most effective radical to destroy thymine molecules. The relative contributions of direct and indirect radiation effects to lethal actions of ionizing radiation was investigated in yeast cells. The radical spectrum of water radiolysis was changed by bubbling the cell suspensions with different gases. The main result is, that there are no lethal radiation effects du to the action of water radicals

  18. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This issue is the bibliography of the publication by the staffs of the Radiation Effects Research Institute (RERF) in 1989. Titles in original and English language with author names are enumerated. Indexes by research areas and by author name are also attached. (J.P.N.) 62 refs

  19. Radiation effects on and dose enhancement of electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srour, J.R.; Long, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes radiation effects on and dose enhancement factors for electronic materials. Alteration of the electrical properties of solid-state devices and integrated circuits by impinging radiation is well-known. Such changes may cause an electronic subsystem to fail, thus there is currently great interest in devising methods for avoiding radiation-induced degradation. The development of radiation-hardened devices and circuits is an exciting approach to solving this problem for many applications, since it could minimize the need for shielding or other system hardening techniques. Part 1 describes the basic mechanisms of radiation effects on electronic materials, devices, and integrated circuits. Radiation effects in bulk silicon and in silicon devices are treated. Ionizing radiation effects in silicon dioxide films and silicon MOS devices are discussed. Single event phenomena are considered. Key literature references and a bibliography are provided. Part II provides tabulations of dose enhancement factors for electronic devices in x-ray and gamma-ray environments. The data are applicable to a wide range of semiconductor devices and selected types of capacitors. Radiation environments discussed find application in system design and in radiation test facilities

  20. Radiation effects on integrated circuits used in high energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanofsky, A.S.; Yost, B.; Farr, W.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report here on radiation effects on two amplifiers used in high energy experiments. These are standard devices that are produced by LeCroy. They describe each of the devices and the experimental techniques. Finally, they present and discuss the results of the measurements. 5 figs

  1. Radiation Effects Research Foundation bibliography of published papers, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue is the bibliography of the publication by the staffs of the Radiation Effects Research Institute (RERF) in 1988. Titles in original and English language with author names are enumerated. Indeces by research areas and by author name are also attached. (J.P.N.) 99 refs

  2. Radiation effects on polyacetylenes having substituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashimura, Toshinobu; Tang, Ben-Zhong; Masuda, Toshio; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Matsuyama, Tomochika.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of γ-ray irradiation on high molecular weight polyacetylenes with various substituents were studied in air and in vacuum. The molecular weights of polymers from aliphatic disubstituted acetylenes (2-octyne and 2-decyne) remarkably reduced with irradiation in air. Their G values for chain scission in air were as high as 3 - 12, whereas no degradation occurred in vacuum. The degraded polymers contain carbonyl and hydroxyl groups, and are soluble in polar solvents such as methyl ethyl ketone and acetone. In contrast, polymers of aromatic disubstituted acetylenes (1-phenyl-1-propyne and 1-chloro-2-phenylacetylene) hardly degraded in air even with irradiation up to 40 Mrad. The degradation behavior of poly(t-butylacetylene) was intermediate between those of the above aliphatic and aromatic polymers. Thus the radiolysis of polyacetylenes was found to be greatly dependent on the kind of substituents. (author)

  3. Thermal radiation effects on hydromagnetic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelkhalek, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for the effects of thermal radiation, buoyancy and heat generation or absorption on hydromagnetic flow over an accelerating permeable surface. These results are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy by a perturbation technique. This qualitatively agrees with the expectations, since the magnetic field exerts a retarding force on the free convection flow. A parametric study is performed to illustrate the influence of the radiation parameter, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, Grashof number and Schmidt number on the profiles of the velocity components and temperature. The effects of the different parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction and wall heat transfer are presented graphically. Favorable comparisons with previously published work confirm the correctness of numerical results

  4. Radiation effect on polystyrene-divinylbenze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie

    2008-06-01

    The SDB polymer had better irradiation resistance. The property of SDB was studied by the methods of FT-IR, SEM and GC/MS. With the increasing absorbed dose, the color of SDB turned yellow slowly and the increase of weight was also found to turn to be higher. The oxidation reaction was confirmed by the appearance of C=O and C--O. The SEM images of SDB had unobvious change. From the results of the quantity of the irradiated gas in air, it was found that the CO 2 had the highest content, the H 2 , CO, CH 4 and C 2 H 6 took turns. The phenomenon was explained clearly and the peroxides structures were also confirmed. (authors)

  5. Radiation effect on rocket engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang; Kross, K. W.; Krebsbach, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    Critical problem areas involving the effect of radiation on the combustion of bipropellants are addressed by formulating a universal scaling law in combination with a radiation-enhanced vaporization combustion model. Numerical algorithms are developed and data pertaining to the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) and the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are used to conduct parametric sensitivity studies to predict the principal intercoupling effects of radiation. The analysis reveals that low-enthalpy engines, such as the VTE, are vulnerable to a substantial performance setback due to radiative loss, whereas the performance of high-enthalpy engines such as the SSME are hardly affected over a broad range of engine operation. Combustion enhancement by radiative heating of the propellant has a significant impact on propellants with high absorptivity.

  6. Ionizing radiation effects on floating gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Floating gate (FG) memories, and in particular Flash, are the dominant among modern nonvolatile memory technologies. Their performance under ionizing radiation was traditionally studied for the use in space, but has become of general interest in recent years. We are showing results on the charge loss from programmed FG arrays after 10 keV x-rays exposure. Exposure to ionizing radiation results in progressive discharge of the FG. More advanced devices, featuring smaller FG, are less sensitive to ionizing radiation that older ones. The reason is identified in the photoemission of electrons from FG, since at high doses it dominates over charge loss deriving from electron/hole pairs generation in the oxides

  7. Gamma radiation effects on liofilized human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padron Soler, E.; Romay Penabad, Z.; Chavez Ardanza, A.; Hernandez Gonzalez, C.; Martin Gonzalez, O.; Garcia Gonzalez, I.; Prieto Miranda, E.

    1995-01-01

    Human freeze dried serum was artificially contaminated with Flavobacterium sp. for studying the effects of gamma radiation of it. The radiobiological parameters of the contaminator were determined and the sterilization dose was set. The quality of the product irradiated at both, calculated sterilization dose (8.5 kGy) an another one about 25 kGy was determined. It was made according to: sterility testing, total proteins, pH enzymes (alanina-aminotransferase, aspartato-aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase), protein electrophoresis, fast performance liquid chromatographic and effect on the cellular growth. From the latter was concluded that the calculated sterilization dose was adequate form keeping the biological properties and viability of the irradiated serum. Nevertheless, the dose of 25 k Gy was not adequate because of its dangerous effects on the cell culture

  8. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.W.; Zhang, L.P.; Borgen, N.; Pannell, K.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg K α irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  9. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  10. Radiation effect onto biodiversity of spiders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabova, M.A.; Naghiyev, J.A; Huseynov, N.I; Topchiyeva, Sh.A.; Hasanov, N.H.

    2010-01-01

    At present time spiders are one of the considerably diverse groups of living organisms in fauna of Azerbayjan Republic. They play an important in environmental chain, being the main group of wild arthropodas in most biocoenoses. Therefore, it's not surprised that recently an increased interest has being observed to the study of spiders as indicators of environmental conditions. Spiders have been collected in polluted areas, their identification and sampling of soil, water and plants has been conducted. The degree of radionuclides' impact on the number and distribution of spiders and their venom in the observed zones of Azerbaijan has been revealed and preliminarily predicted. The number of the collected spiders equals to 292 which has been determined later at an electronic identifier Spinnen Mitteleuropas. The radionuclides in spiders have been determined at Canberra facility. Different natural radioactive elements were revealed in the investigated samples.

  11. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  12. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia

    2011-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a 60 Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  13. Solar Radiation effect on the bituminous binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadeo Rico, A.; Torres Perez, A.

    2010-01-01

    Asphalt, used as binder in road construction, becomes more brittle and harder during working life on the surface of the road pavement, conducting toward their deterioration. This is caused by the oxidation of the molecular functional groups of the asphalt molecular structure. Moreover, it is observed that ultraviolet radiation increases the oxidation process. However, the effect of solar light on the asphalt degradation has been poorly researched. The aim of this work is to study asphalt ageing caused by effect of solar radiation, by using standard test. Four commercial asphalts from different companies were selected: two with penetration number 50/70, and the other two polymer modified asphalts. From each of the asphalts forty samples were taken off and placed in four different aging conditions of temperature and radiation for a period ranging from 40 to 500 days. Ring and Ball test, and Fraass breaking Point test, were used to analyse the changes of asphalt properties after exposition to solar radiation. The results of the four analyzed asphalts showed a distinct behaviour; not only in the test temperature increase but also in the rate. Another experiment was carried out. Samples from a hot mix asphalt batch were placed under solar radiation, and were compacted by the Marshall procedure after increasing periods of time. Density and resistance to plastic flow using Marshall Apparatus were measured. Results showed an increase in the stability of samples under radiation. Both experiments show that the solar radiation is enough to cause changes in the asphalt molecular structure due to oxidation. So that, the study of the effect of the solar radiation on the asphalt properties could be a good tool to asses the performances of asphalt pavement. (Author) 26 refs.

  14. Barriers to biomedical care and use of traditional medicines for treatment of cervical cancer: an exploratory qualitative study in northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaka, A D; Okello, E S; Orach, C G

    2015-07-01

    Use of traditional medicines for treatment of cancers has increased worldwide. We used a qualitative approach to explore barriers to biomedical care and reasons for use of traditional medicines for the treatment of cervical cancer in Gulu, northern Uganda. We carried out 24 focus group discussions involving men and women aged 18-59 years. We employed content analyses technique in data analysis. Traditional medicines were used mainly due to barriers to biomedical care for cervical cancer. The barriers included health system factors, for example long distances to health facilities and unavailability of medicines; health workers' factors, for example negative attitudes towards patients and demands for bribes; individual patient's factors, for example inability to pay for medical care; and socio-cultural beliefs about superiority of traditional medicines and perceived greater privacy in accessing traditional healers. Barriers to biomedical care and community beliefs in the effectiveness of traditional medicines encourage use of traditional medicines for treatment of cervical cancer but might hinder help-seeking at biomedical facilities. There is need for targeted culturally sensitive awareness campaign to promote effectiveness of modern medicine and to encourage cautious use of traditional medicines in the treatment of cervical cancer. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biological radiation effects of Radon in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel P, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    In order to contribute to the knowledge on the effects of radon and its decay products, the aim of this investigation is to study the biological effects of radon using Drosophila melanogaster throught the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) and the analysis of some adaptative factors exposing larvaes to controlled radon atmosphers, considering that this insect could be used as biological monitor. Using the somatic mutation test a mutagenic effect was observed proportional to radon concentration, into an interval of 1 ± 0.3 to 111 ± 7.4 KBq/m 3 equivalent to doses under 0.0106 Gy. The correlation analysis gives a linear (r=0.80) relationship with a positive slope of 0.2217. The same happens when gamma rays are used in the interval of 1 to 20 Gy, given a linear dose-dependent effect (r=0.878) is obtained; nevetheless the slop is smaller (m=0.003) than for radon. Analysing the results of adaptative factors of the nine exposed generations, it was found that probably radon exposition induced dominant lethals during gametogenesis or/and a selection of the more component gamets of the treated individuals in larval state. It was reflected in the significant decrease on fecundity of the generation exposed. Nevertheless the laying eggs had an increase in egg-to-adult viability and the develop velocity was higher than in control for 3 KBq/m 3 , this suggest that radon concentrations used were able to induce repair mechanisms. These data agree with the Hormesis hypothesis that says: low doses have positive effects on health. It was not possible to obtain a dose-effect relationship except with the develop velocity where it was found a dose-effect inverse proportion. In conclusion, Drosophila melanogaster could be a good system to obtain in vivo damaged induction concentration dependent of radon and its decay products, as well as to study the effects in an exposed population by the analysis of adaptative factors. (Author)

  16. Radiation effects on custom MOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Thesis consists of four chapters: The first is primarily for background information on the effects of radiation on MOS devices and the theory of wafer bonding; the second gives a full discussion of all practical work carried out for manufacture of Field Effect test Capacitors, the third discusses manufacture of vacuum insulator Field Effect Transistors (FET's) and the fourth discusses the testing of these devices. Using a thermally bonded field effect capacitor structure, a vacuum dielectric was studied for use in high radiation environments with a view to manufacturing a CMOS compatible, micro machined transistor. Results are given in the form of high frequency C-V curves before and after a 120 kGy(Si), 12 MRad(Si), dose from a Co 60 source showing a 1 Volt shift. The work is then extended to the design and manufacture of a micro machined, under-etch technique, Field Effect Transistor for use in high radiation areas. Results are shown for Threshold, Subthreshold and Transfer characteristics before and after irradiation up to a total dose of 100kGy or 10MRad. The conclusion from this work is that it should be possible to commercially manufacture practical vacuum dielectric field effect transistors which are radiation hard to at least 120 kGy(Si). (author)

  17. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Chottova, O.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect was studied of gamma radiation on the proteolytic activity of pancreatin prepared either by separating enzymes from an activated extract of the pancreas, containing 2.15% of lipids, or by drying the not completely activated ground pancreas, containing 6.14% of lipids. A part of the first sample in which the proportion of lipids was additionally increased to 16.55% was also irradiated. The moisture content was practically the same in all three samples. The source of radiation was 60 Co, the dose rate 1.27 kGy/h. The samples of pancreatin in test-tubes were irradiated at 25 degC, doses ranging from 1x10 4 to 12x10 4 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and are given in tables, and converted to the dried lipid-free substance they are expressed in graphs. The technological procedure of pancreatin preparation and the content of lipids do not influence the decrease in proteolytic activity (Graph 3). (author)

  18. Radiation effects on two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.C. II; Robinson, J.A. [Department of Materials Science, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Center for Two-Dimensional Layered Materials, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Shi, T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Silva, E.C. [GlobalFoundries, Malta, NY (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The effects of electromagnetic and particle irradiation on two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are discussed in this review. Radiation creates defects that impact the structure and electronic performance of materials. Determining the impact of these defects is important for developing 2DM-based devices for use in high-radiation environments, such as space or nuclear reactors. As such, most experimental studies have been focused on determining total ionizing dose damage to 2DMs and devices. Total dose experiments using X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and heavy ions are summarized in this review. We briefly discuss the possibility of investigating single event effects in 2DMs based on initial ion beam irradiation experiments and the development of 2DM-based integrated circuits. Additionally, beneficial uses of irradiation such as ion implantation to dope materials or electron-beam and helium-beam etching to shape materials have begun to be used on 2DMs and are reviewed as well. For non-ionizing radiation, such as low-energy photons, we review the literature on 2DM-based photo-detection from terahertz to UV. The majority of photo-detecting devices operate in the visible and UV range, and for this reason they are the focus of this review. However, we review the progress in developing 2DMs for detecting infrared and terahertz radiation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Husakova, A.; Urban, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect was studied of 60 Co gamma radiation on the total proteolytic efficacy of pancreatin with gradually differentiated humidity, both in a preparation obtained by separating the active ingredients from an extract from the pancreas destroyed by autolysis, and in a preparation containing the remains of the pancreatic tissue, where the basic operation of manufacture was drying of the ground pancreas. The samples were irradiated with doses of 2.5x10 4 and 12x10 4 , or 14.2x10 4 Gy. The mean values found of the residual proteolytic efficacy expressed in the units of PhBs 3, calculated to the dried substance, are tabulated. At the same time the efficacy of samples before irradiation was tested. The evaluation of results included in the individual tables by variance analysis and Lord's u-test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the mean values of the efficacy of samples with the initial humidity and the samples with increased humidity (maximally 16.20%). (author)

  20. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Chottova, O.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.; Kubankova, V.

    1980-01-01

    A decrease in the efficacy of trypsin (determination according to PhBs 3 with the use of L-lysine ethyl ester chloride) was investigated in pancreatin obtained by enzyme precipitation from a pancreas extraction after autolysis, in the identical sample with an additionally increased content of lipids, in pancreatin containing parts of the pancreatic tissue, in crystalline trypsin, and in crystalline salt-free and lyophilized trypsine after irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co, doses ranging from 1x10 4 Gy to 12x10 4 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and after the conversion to dried or lipid-free substance expressed in graphs. The dependence of the efficacy on the radiation dose has a linear course in semi-logarithmic arrangement, similarly as it occurred in chymotrypsin and in the total proteolytic efficacy. The decrease in the efficacy of trypsin in the samples of pancreatin in percentage maintains the same sequence in the samples under study as it was in the decrease in the efficacy of chymotrypsin and the total proteolytic efficacy, but it is smaller. The decrease in the efficacy of pure enzyme is, similarly to chymotrypsin, greater than the decrease in the efficacy of the enzyme in pancreatin. The present ballast substances thus significantly influence stability. (author)