WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation work experience

  1. Experience in the development and practical use of working control levels for radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epishin, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    The experience of development and practical use of working control levels (WCL) of radiation safety in the Gorky region, is discussed. WCL are introduced by ''Radiation Safety Guides'' (RSG-76) and have great practical importance. Regional control levels of radiation safety are determined for certain types of operations implying radioactive hazard and differentiated according to the types of sources applied and types of operation. Dose rates, radioactive contamination of operating surfaces, skin, air and waste water are subject to normalization. Limits of individual radiation doses specified according to operation categories are included. 10 tables of regional WCL indices are developed [ru

  2. Working with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This simple booklet is written primarily to supply information about radiation, its potential dangers and radiation protection, to those working for, or considering taking up employment with, British Nuclear Fuels plc. (U.K.)

  3. Operating experience and radiation protection problems in the working of the radio-metallurgy hot cell facilities at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Watamwar, S.B.; Mehta, S.K.; Pillai, P.M.B.; John, Jacob; Kutty, K.N.

    1977-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay has six hot cell facilities for radiometallurgical investigations of irradiated/failed fuel elements. The hot cell facilities have been provided with certain built-in safety features, a ventilation system, radiation monitoring instruments for various purposes, a centralised air monitoring system and a central panel for display of various alarms. Procedures adopted for radiation protection and contamination control include : (1) radiation leak test for cells and filter efficiency evaluation before cell activation, (2) practices to be followed by frog suit personnel while working in hot cell areas, (3) receipt and handling of irradiated fuel elements, (4) cell filter change operation, (5) checks on high level drains and (6) effluent discharge and waste shipments. Operating experience in the working of these facilities along with radiation accident incidents is described. Data regarding release of activity during normal cell operations, dose rates during various metallurgical operations and personnel exposures are presented. (M.G.B.)

  4. Working safely with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A small leaflet provides information on working safely with ionizing radiation. Topics covered include the types of radiation, radiological units, external radiation, contamination and internal radiation, methods of protection form radiation, radiation monitors, protective clothing for contamination, personal dosemeters, radiation dose limits for classified workers and finally the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. (UK)

  5. Radiation protection optimization and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    1994-09-01

    The influence quantification of bound factors to work management, and the obtained results when you apply the dosimetric economical evaluation model of the radiation protection experiments, prove that ALARA principle application musn't bound to actions on the radiation sources, but that you can find a wide act field in the irradiation work volume management topics. 53 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs., 4 appendixes

  6. Experiences in Radiation Litigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 20 years ago three events in the United States caused a significant increase in lawsuits filed by persons who claimed to have been injured from exposure to ionizing radiation. I have had some involvement in each of them. One event was the lawsuit filed by Karen Silkwood against Kerr McGee arising out of plutonium that had been found in her home. The Silkwood story became a popular movie and sensitized radiation workers to alleged injury from work related exposures. I participated in the United States Department of Justice amicus brief to the United States Supreme Court and attended that oral argument in the Supreme Court. The second event was a series of litigations filed against the United States by persons who had either been soldiers at the above ground testing of nuclear weapons (the so called a tomic soldiers ) or had been residents living downwind from the place where the bombs were exploded (the so called d ownwinders ) . I was responsible for defending many of these lawsuits as an attorney in the United States Department of Justice. The third event was the accident at Three Mile Island. Thousands of lawsuits were filed by nearby residents. After I entered private practice, I worked on those cases for some years. These three events served to stimulate an increase in cases filed because persons believe that their current illness was caused by some prior exposure to radiation. Most recently I have been defending lawsuits filed by persons who once worked at commercial nuclear power plants and now have some type of cancer. Over these 20 years I have won about 30 cases involving about 50 plaintiffs. In none of these cases was it likely that the person's cancer was caused by his radiation exposure. In fact, the plaintiff's dose was generally less than the average person's lifetime dose from diagnostic x-rays. There is a way in this mixed field of law and science to develop basic rules by which the legal system can quite easily distinguish between a

  7. Experience with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation sources is discussed, emphasizing characteristics important for x-ray microscopy. Bending magnets, wigglers and undulators are considered as sources of radiation. Operating experience at the national Synchrotron Light Source on the VUV and XRAY storage rings is reviewed, with particular consideration given to achieved current and lifetime, transverse bunch dimensions, and orbit stability. 6 refs., 3 figs

  8. Radiation sources working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  9. Virtual laboratory for radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiftikci, A.; Kocar, C.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation of alpha, beta and gamma radiation detection and measurement experiments which are part of real nuclear physics laboratory courses was realized with Monte Carlo method and JAVA Programming Language. As being known, establishing this type of laboratories are very expensive. At the same time, highly radioactive sources used in some experiments carries risk for students and also for experimentalists. By taking into consideration of those problems, the aim of this study is to setup a virtual radiation laboratory with minimum cost and to speed up the training of radiation physics for students with no radiation risk. Software coded possesses the nature of radiation and radiation transport with the help of Monte Carlo method. In this software, experimental parameters can be changed manually by the user and experimental results can be followed synchronous in an MCA (Multi Channel Analyzer) or an SCA (Single Channel Analyzer). Results obtained in experiments can be analyzed by these MCA or SCA panels. Virtual radiation laboratory which is developed in this study with reliable results and unlimited experimentation capability seems as an useful educational material. Moreover, new type of experiments can be integrated to this software easily and as a result, virtual laboratory can be extended.

  10. Conceptions and last works of Canberra-Packard firm in the field of radiation protection and environment and work's experience in the Chernobyl programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toritsin, O.S.; Kampagnuolo, B.

    1993-01-01

    The history of spectrometric system produced by firm is given. New generation of spectrometric equipment includes new multi-using program software on base 386-486 IBM and new generation of programming and control module. System for measuring of radioactivity level of radioactive wastes is based on the requirement of transmission ability and on levels of minimum detected activity. Firm proposes two main types of such system. Because of last time every where in the world are registered leaks of radioactive materials from its produced plants the firm generated two types systems for solving of this problem: both the stationary and the portable. There are arcs for control of personnel and transport based on registration gamma-radiation, and also system for defining neutron spontaneous fission. For solving problem on vast territories it is necessary conduct spectrometric and radiometric measuring with mobile laboratories. For this aims firm proposed number of conceptions, one of them includes sea container's complete equipment of apparatus

  11. Work, Experience and Adult Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt.......A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt....

  12. Radiation protection at urological fluoroscopy working stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, D.; Mohr, H.

    1979-01-01

    Two newly developed radiation protection devices for urological working stations are presented. The local dose to which doctor and assisting personnel are exposed during fluoroscopy and radiography was measured and the radiation burden with and without radiation protection determined. The studies show that without these devices organs such as the eyes are exposed, at a normal working distance from the table, to such an amount of scattered radiation as to reduce the permitted number of examinations per week. (Auth.)

  13. Design experience: CRBRP radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Chan, T.C.; Gallo, F.G.; Hedgecock, L.R.; McGinnis, C.A.; Wrights, G.N.

    1978-11-01

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is being designed as a fast breeder demonstration project in the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Radiation shielding design of the facility consists of a comprehensive design approach to assure compliance with design and government regulatory requirements. Studies conducted during the CRBRP design process involved the aspects of radiation shielding dealing with protection of components, systems, and personnel from radiation exposure. Achievement of feasible designs, while considering the mechanical, structural, nuclear, and thermal performance of the component or system, has required judicious trade-offs in radiation shielding performance. Specific design problems which have been addressed are in-vessel radial shielding to protect permanent core support structures, flux monitor system shielding to isolate flux monitoring systems for extraneous background sources, reactor vessel support shielding to allow personnel access to the closure head during full power operation, and primary heat transport system pipe chaseway shielding to limit intermediate heat transport system sodium system coolant activation. The shielding design solutions to these problems defined a need for prototypic or benchmark experiments to provide assurance of the predicted shielding performance of selected design solutions and the verification of design methodology. Design activities of CRBRP plant components an systems, which have the potential for radiation exposure of plant personnel during operation or maintenance, are controlled by a design review process related to radiation shielding. The program implements design objectives, design requirements, and cost/benefit guidelines to assure that radiation exposures will be ''as low as reasonably achievable''

  14. Units for radiation protection work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, L.

    1997-06-01

    ICRU has defined special measurable (operational) quantities for radiation protection. A consequence of using the operational quantities is that hand-held and personal dosemeters can give different measuring results in the same radiation situation. The differences vary and are caused by the geometry of the radiation field. The units have well documented relations to e.g. the ICRP effective dose and equivalent dose to an organ or tissue. Therefore, it is possible to estimate these doses from a measured value of e.g. the ambient dose equivalent. ICRU and ICRP have recently reviewed these relations in two important commonly issued reports (Report 57 and Publication 74). This report tries to show the value of understanding these units and their relations and is primarily meant to be used for educational purposes. 11 refs

  15. Experiences of a secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration from the radiation protection and hygiene center CPHR in its first year of work and the procedures for quality assessment used in the calibration and quality control service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J.A.; Campa, R.; Jova Sed, L.

    1996-01-01

    Experiences of a secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration from the Radiation Protection and Hygiene Center (CPHR) in first year of work and the procedures for quality assessment used in the calibration and quality control service of radiotherapeutic equipment. For the yield calibration of the calibrated sources an ionometric method was used using ionizing chambers coupled to electrometers. Those determination were based on dosimetric American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM)

  16. Working Group on Ionising Radiations. Report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The programme of work for 1987/88 by the Working Group on Ionising Radiation, Health and Safety Commision in February 1988, included the main topics of continuing interest and concern in relation to ionising radiations in general and the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR 85) (Ref 1) in particular. These were: emergency dose limitation, occupational dose limitation, practical experience of the principle of keeping doses as low as reasonably practicable, experience of the regulatory requirements in respect of internal dosimetry and the need for a standing advisory committee on ionising radiations. Calibration of radiotherapy equipment was also considered as a matter of principle following a specific incident involving cancer patients. This report of progress during the first year summarises the Group's opinions on each topic and gives recommendations. (author)

  17. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10 14 W cm −2 to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code

  18. Physiologie foundations of radiation hygiene of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, G.M.; Kopaev, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    The book deals with the physiological foundations of labour hygiene in handling sources of ionizing radiations. The main principles of radiation protection of personnel, questions of providing optimum hygienic working conditions, which ensure the maintenance of the working capacity of the personnel and their health are considered. Extensive factual material on estimation of the factors of professional effects on personnel is generalized. Particular attention is given to the functional reactions of the organism and extension of the physiological mechanisms of development of production fatigue in various forms of labour activity (when using sources of ionizing radiations in isotope laboratories and on nuclear reactors). A physiological substantiation of the hygienic requirements imposed on the equipment for handling radioactive materials is presented

  19. 20 CFR 627.245 - Work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Definition. Work experience means a short-term or part-time training assignment with a public or private... requirements. It is prohibited in the private for-profit sector. (b) Suitability. Work experience should be...

  20. Training of human resources on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Argentine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggio, Alfredo L.; Nasazzi, Nora B.; Arias, Cesar

    2004-01-01

    Argentina has a long experience in Radiation Protection training since 25 years ago. In the present work we analyse those variable and non variable training aspects according to scientific development, increasing radiation source diversity (including new concepts like orphan sources and security), mayor concern about patient in Radiation Protection, previous exposures, etc. We comment what we consider the main steps in the training of Radiation Protection specialists, like university degree, post graduate education distinguishing between formative and informative contents and on the job training. Moreover, we point out the trainees aptitudes and attitudes to be developed in order to work properly in this interdisciplinary field. (author)

  1. SORCE: Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Rottman, Gary; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Understanding the Sun's influence on the Earth; How the Sun affect Earth's climate; By how much does the Sun's radiation very; Understanding Solar irradiance; History of Solar irradiance observations; The SORCE mission; How do the SORCE instruments measure solar radiation; Total irradiance monitor (TIM); Spectral irradiance monitor (SIM); Solar stellar irradiance comparison experiment (SOLSTICE); XUV photometer system (XPS).

  2. Organizational citizenship behavior and work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegans, Loyd; McCamey, Randy B; Hammond, Honor

    2012-01-01

    The authors compared the relationship of elements of the Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) and years of work experience of registered nurses in the state of Texas. Work experience research has shown a relationship between OCB and work experience through mediating roles of various work related characteristics does exist. Work experience is described as the overall length of time in an occupation or workforce. Civic virtue was the only element of organizational citizenship behavior to have a statistically significant correlation with years of work experience in this study. Other elements were found to have no statistically significant correlation with years of work experience. Further research should be undertaken to determine if correlations between these two constructs holds up when the population under study is further refined by job classification, such as management and staff, or industry segment.

  3. Proceedings of the Fourth Working Meeting on Radiation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The meeting aimed at the exchange of information and experiences both in basic and applied research in radiation chemistry, radiation physics, and radiation biology including radiation processing, irradiation plants and techniques, methods and instrumentation as well as radiation dosimetry. Author and subject indexes are included

  4. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-21

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  5. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government's role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future

  6. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 52 papers are included in part 1

  7. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Brede, O.; Doellstaedt, R.; Mehnert, R.

    1984-12-01

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 55 papers are included in part 2

  8. Francois Garin: Pioneer work in catalysis through synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the late seventies, the progressively increased availability of beamlines dedicated to X-ray absorption spectroscopy allowed the execution of experiments in chemistry. In this manuscript, I describe the contribution of Francois Garin at the frontier of heterogeneous catalysis and synchrotron radiation. Working at LURE as a scientific in charge of a beamline dedicated to X-ray absorption spectroscopy during almost twenty years and thus, having the opportunity to discuss with research groups working in heterogeneous catalysis in Europe as well as in the United States, it was quite easy to show that his work is clearly at the origin of current research in heterogeneous catalysis, not only in France, but in different synchrotron radiation centres. (authors)

  9. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document

  10. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Michael V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  11. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. Social Work Experience and Development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibin, Wang

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experience and limitations of government-run social work and the nonprofessional nature of social work, and suggests that the rapid development of social work and its professionalization are the inevitable results of the reform in the system. The author maintains that under market socialism, social work requires the…

  13. INSAG's ongoing work on nuclear, radiation and waste safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) is an advisory group to the Director General of the IAEA. It identifies current nuclear safety issues, draws conclusions from its analyses and gives advice on those issues. INSAG is currently working on four documents: a complete revision of INSAG-3, the classical paper on safety principles for nuclear plants, published in 1988; 'Safety Management', the effective system for the management of operational strategy; 'Safe Management of the Life Cycle of Nuclear Power Plants'; and the fourth document in preparation entitled 'The Safe Management of Sources of Radiation: Principles and Strategies'. The fourth document is aimed primarily at political decision makers who have no knowledge of radiation safety or of nuclear matters generally but are called upon to make important decisions in this field. INSAG has attempted to present them with a 'unified doctrine' of the management of all radiation sources, even though, for historical reasons radiation protection and nuclear safety have evolved largely independently of each other. The major conclusion to be drawn from the paper is that a systematic application of protection and safety principles, and of appropriate strategies, goes a long way towards ensuring the safe management of technologies involving radiation. Furthermore, the management of sources of radiation could benefit from the experience accumulated in other industries facing comparable challenges

  14. Radiation protection training: twenty year experience in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, Sandor; Kanyar, Bela; Zagyvay, Peter; Solymosi, Jozsef; Bujtas, Tibor; Feher, Istvan; Giczi, Ferenc; Deme, Sandor; Uray, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    In Hungary, radiation protection training for radiation workers has been introduced in very early, just following the publication of the ICRP recommendation No. 26. Before that, in some of the institutions, radiation protection training was recommended for technicians and medical doctors working in nuclear medicine, X-ray diagnostic radiology and radiation therapy, as well as in some of industrial applications, but not on regular way. Since 1988, radiation protection training regulated by the Ministry of Health and required for all of the workers in radiation workplaces licensed by the authority the State Public Health and Medical Officers Service (SPHAMOS). Decree No. 16/2000. (VI. 8.) EuM of the Minister of Health on the enforcement of Clauses of the Nuclear Law 116/1996 regulates the radiation protection training of Radiation Workers (RW). Annex 4 of Decree sees radiation protection training and in-service training: Persons performing conducted work in the field of the use of the nuclear energy and any other work within legal relationship shall be educated in training and in-service training at an interval of 5 years. Three levels of the training introduced; basic, extended and comprehensive, based on radiation risk related to the given job. Several institutions are involved in performing radiation protection training, such universities, scientific institutions, Regional Radiological Health Centers (RRHC) of SPHAMOS, private enterprises etc. All training course material is subject to accreditation. Most of the faculties of the universities involved in training of natural sciences and engineering provide subjects on the fundamentals of dosimetry, radiobiology and radiation protection within the courses of physics, biophysics, chemistry, biology, ecology etc. These courses take 5-10 contact hours per week on average. The members of the Hungarian Committee of EUTERP Platform summarize their broad experience collected in the past 20 year. (author)

  15. Atomic collision experiments using pulsed synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsutomu.

    1982-01-01

    High intensity and continuous nature of the synchrotron radiation are the properties that are fundamentally important for studies of some atomic collision experiments, and many processes have been investigated by using these characteristics. However, so far the property that the radiation is highly polarized and pulsed in time has not been exploited significantly in atomic physics. As an example of the atomic processes relevant to such polarized and pulsed features of the synchrotron radiation, collisions involving optically-allowed excited atoms and molecules will be presented. (author)

  16. BWR radiation exposure--experience and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, C.F.; Wilkinson, C.D.; Hollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR/6 Mark III radiation exposures are projected to be about half of those of current average operating experience of 725 man-rem. These projections are said to be realistic and based on current achievements and not on promises of future development. The several BWRs operating with low primary system radiation levels are positive evidence that radiation sources can be reduced. Improvements have been made in reducing the maintenance times for the BWR/6, and further improvements can be made by further attention to cost-effective plant arrangement and layout during detail design to improve accessibility and maintainability of each system and component

  17. Health surveillance of persons engaged in radiation work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the health surveillance of the workers engaged in radiation work prescribed in the section 33 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/91) are: (1) to ensure that the workers are suitable for the radiation work, (2) to monitor the health of the workers during the radiation work, and (3) to define the implications to the health if the radiation exposure exceeding the prescribed maximum value or other abnormal exposure is suspected or observed. The health requirements related to radiation work, aspects to be considered in the health surveillance, and procedures relating to observed or suspected overexposure are defined in this guide

  18. Work practices and occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin; Ha, Mina; Hwang, Seung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Jeong, Mee Seon

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists are one of the occupational groups exposed to the highest dose of radiation worldwide. In Korea, radiologic technologists occupy the largest group (about 33%) among medical radiation workers and they are exposed to the highest dose of occupational dose of radiation as well (1). Although work experience with diagnostic radiation procedure of U.S. radiologic technologists was reported roughly (2), few studies have been conducted for description of overall work practices and the change by calendar year and evaluation of related factors on occupational radiation dose. The aims of the study are to describe work practices and to assess risk factors for occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea. This study showed the work practices and occupational radiation dose among representative sample of radiologic technologists in Korea. The annual effective dose among radiologic technologists in Korea remains higher compared with those of worldwide average and varied according to demographic factors, year began working, and duration of working

  19. Medical management of radiation burns - some experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Localized exposure resulting in radiation burns are serious injuries, seen not only in this country but all over the world. All of these injuries have resulted from accidents in Industrial Radiography (non-destructive testing). In our country all these injuries have occurred in the private sectors who handle these radiography sources. These sources can be of Iridium-192 or Cobalt-60. Some of these accidents have occurred involving trained radiographers but sometimes casual workers have been exposed. Skin is highly vulnerable to the external radiation exposure. Damage of varying extent can be seen following radiotherapy and accidents involving X- and gamma-ray sources. The reaction is related to the absorbed dose, which in turn is dependent upon the energy of radiation and weather it is particulate or electromagnetic radiation. Beta particles give up their energy within a short range and hence are more hazardous. Radiation burns develop slowly and blister formation occurs usually after 4 weeks. After exposure the skin response occurs in the form of transient erythema, fixed erythema, transepidermal burns, full thickness radiation burns and epilation. In radiation accidents, particularly those involving X-ray machines, the patients may not be aware of the time of accident and the dose may not be known in those circumstances. The medical management and treatment of such patients, therefore, has its own challenges. This talk will share some experiences on treatment of radiation injuries. (author)

  20. Media Education in Kazakhstan: Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laila, Akhmetova

    2016-01-01

    In the Republic of Kazakhstan in 2012 started work on formation of literacy in the field of media education for journalists, educators, and youth. Studied publishing foreign scientists, work experience in different countries, manuals, seminars and workshops, publishes scientific works in the Kazakh and Russian languages, and considers issues of…

  1. Pneumatic radiator of transition radiation for large working area arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhlyarov, K.K.; Gavalyan, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    An unconventional approach to the constructions of large area regular radiator of X-rays transition radiation is proposed based on the use of a pack of hermetically sealed bags, in which elastic helium layers are formed. A prototype of such a radiator of about 1m 2 area was made for test of the proposed device. 9 refs

  2. Low skilled work, Work Life experiences and Learner identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    on an educational optimism not necessarily shared by the target groups . I therefore wanted to examine how an unskilled work life conditions the experience of a need for and possibility to participate in different kind of formal, informal and non-formal learning activities related to the job, and how...... this constitutes a certain learner identity. By conducting narrative interviews with 23 employees in 6 different small and medium sized private manufacturing companies in Denmark, I have focused on peoples work life stories, how they entered the labour marked, what kind of jobs and tasks they have undertaken, how...... their jobs have developed and how they have obtained the skills required in their jobs. I have thus examined the specific work life experiences of people working in unskilled jobs, most likely to be marginalised in a labour marked characterised by skill bias, and how these experiences constitutes a certain...

  3. Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of the NASA-sponsored Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite. The SORCE mission, launched aboard a Pegasus rocket January 25, 2003, will provide state of the art measurements of incoming x-ray, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and total solar radiation. Critical to studies of the Sun and its effect on our Earth system and mankind, SORCE will provide measurements that specifically address long-term climate change, natural variability and enhanced climate prediction, and atmospheric ozone and UV-B radiation. Orbiting around the Earth accumulating solar data, SORCE measures the Sun's output with the use of state-of-the-art radiometers, spectrometers, photodiodes, detectors, and bolo meters engineered into instruments mounted on a satellite observatory. SORCE is carrying 4 instruments: The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE); the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); and the XUV Photometer System (XPS).

  4. Low temperature experiments in radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moan, J.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for performing experiments in radiation biophysics at low temperatures, whereby electron spectra may be studied, are explained. The phenomenon of phosphorescence spectra observed in frozen aqueous solutions of tryptophan and adenosine is also described. Free radicals play an important part in biological radiation effects and may be studied by ESR spectroscopy. An ESR spectrum of T 1 bacteriophages irradiated dry at 130K is illustrated and discussed. Hydrogen atoms, which give lines on the spectrum, are believed to be those radiation products causing most biological damage in a dry system. Low temperature experiments are of great help in explaining the significance of direct and indirect effects. This is illustrated for the case of trypsin. (JIW)

  5. Research attitudes and experiences of radiation therapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutter, Sheila; Halkett, Georgia

    2003-01-01

    An important factor in professional status is the ongoing development of the area as a result of research findings. However, involvement by radiation therapists in research, publication and higher degree study is limited. The aim of the current study was to investigate the attitudes of radiation therapists towards research, and to investigate the major factors contributing to their limited participation in research. To achieve this, an anonymous questionnaire was developed and distributed to radiation therapists working at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH). The study found that radiation therapists at the RAH are interested in research but there are several factors that limit their involvement. These factors include limited knowledge about research processes, lack of support and lack of time to undertake research. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  6. Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Bloom; James Liang; John Roberts; Zhichun Jenny Ying

    2013-01-01

    A rising share of employees now regularly engage in working from home (WFH), but there are concerns this can lead to "shirking from home". We report the results of a WFH experiment at Ctrip, a 16,000-employee, NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency. Call center employees who volunteered to WFH were randomly assigned either to work from home or in the office for nine months. Home working led to a 13% performance increase, of which 9% was from working more minutes per shift (fewer breaks and sick ...

  7. Establishment of a national radiation protection infrastructure. The Philippine experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdezco, E.M. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Department of Science and Technology (Philippines)

    2000-05-01

    Radiation and radioactive materials have been used widely in the Philippines for the last four decades and have made substantial contributions to the improvement of the life and welfare of the Filipino people. In spite of the unsuccessful attempt to operate a nuclear power, plant, the country, through the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has consistently pursued an active small nuclear applications program to promote the peaceful applications of nuclear energy while also mandated to ensure radiation safety through nuclear regulations and radioactive materials licensing. Another government agency, the Radiation Health Services (RHS) of the Department of Health was created much later to address the growing concern on radiation hazards from electrically generated radiation devices and machines. The RHS has been strengthened later to include non-ionizing radiation health hazards and has expanded to include a biomedical engineering and non-radiation related medical equipment. The paper will describe the historical perspective highlighting the basis of the national regulatory framework to ensure that only qualified individuals are authorized to use radioactive materials and radiation emitting machines/devices. The development of national training programs in radiation protection and experiences in implementing these programs will be presented. National efforts to strengthen the radiation protection infrastructure through the establishment, improvement and upgrading of a number of facilities and capabilities in radiation protection related work activities will be discussed including participation in national, regional and international intercomparison programs to ensure accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and comparability of dose measurements. Lastly, data on the status of small nuclear applications and related activities in the country will be presented including a number of current issues related to the adoption of the new international basic safety standards

  8. Establishment of a national radiation protection infrastructure. The Philippine experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation and radioactive materials have been used widely in the Philippines for the last four decades and have made substantial contributions to the improvement of the life and welfare of the Filipino people. In spite of the unsuccessful attempt to operate a nuclear power, plant, the country, through the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute has consistently pursued an active small nuclear applications program to promote the peaceful applications of nuclear energy while also mandated to ensure radiation safety through nuclear regulations and radioactive materials licensing. Another government agency, the Radiation Health Services (RHS) of the Department of Health was created much later to address the growing concern on radiation hazards from electrically generated radiation devices and machines. The RHS has been strengthened later to include non-ionizing radiation health hazards and has expanded to include a biomedical engineering and non-radiation related medical equipment. The paper will describe the historical perspective highlighting the basis of the national regulatory framework to ensure that only qualified individuals are authorized to use radioactive materials and radiation emitting machines/devices. The development of national training programs in radiation protection and experiences in implementing these programs will be presented. National efforts to strengthen the radiation protection infrastructure through the establishment, improvement and upgrading of a number of facilities and capabilities in radiation protection related work activities will be discussed including participation in national, regional and international intercomparison programs to ensure accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and comparability of dose measurements. Lastly, data on the status of small nuclear applications and related activities in the country will be presented including a number of current issues related to the adoption of the new international basic safety standards

  9. Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kevin L [Washburn, IL; Elliott, Dwight E [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-09-02

    A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

  10. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

  11. Theory and Experiment on Radiative Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2005-07-01

    The current generation of high-energy-density research facilities has enabled the beginnings of experimental studies of radiation hydrodynamic systems, common in astrophysics but difficult to produce in the laboratory. Radiative shock experiments specifically have been a topic of increasing effort in recent years. Our group and collaborators [1] have emphasized the radiographic observation of structure in radiative shocks. These shocks have been produced on the Omega laser by driving a Be piston through Xenon at velocities above 100 km/s. The talk will summarize these experiments and their results. Interpreting these and other experiments is hampered by the limited range of assumptions used in published theories, and by the limitations in readily available simulation tools. This has motivated an examination of radiative shock theory [2]. The talk will summarize the key issues and present results for specific cases. [ 1 ] Gail Glendinning, Ted Perry, Bruce Remington, Jim Knauer, Tom Boehly, and other members of the NLUF Experimental Astrophysics Team. Publications: Reighard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. submitted; Leibrandt, et al., Ap J., in press, Reighard et al., IFSA 03 Proceedings, Amer. Nucl. Soc. (2004). [2] Useful discussions with Dmitri Ryutov and Serge Bouquet. Supported by the NNSA programs via DOE Grants DE-FG52-03NA00064 and DE FG53 2005 NA26014

  12. 20 CFR 638.507 - Work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... program activities or through arrangement with employers. Work experience shall be under actual working... other facilities, as well as clothing and living allowances) shall be no less than the federal minimum wage rate set forth in section (6)(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) for up to 25 hours a...

  13. Work on optimum medical radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2010-01-01

    Every day the medical world makes use of X-rays and radioisotopes. Radiology allows organs to be visualised, nuclear medicine diagnoses and treats cancer by injecting radioisotopes, and radiotherapy uses ionising radiation for cancer therapy. The medical world is increasingly mindful of the risks of ionising radiation that patients are exposed to during these examinations and treatments. In 2009 SCK-CEN completed two research projects that should help optimise the radiation doses of patients.

  14. Planning of optimal work path for minimizing exposure dose during radiation work in radwaste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Park, Won Man; Kim, Kyung Soo; Whang, Joo Ho

    2005-01-01

    Since the safety of nuclear power plant has been becoming a big social issue, the exposure dose of radiation for workers has been one of the important factors concerning the safety problem. The existing calculation methods of radiation dose used in the planning of radiation work assume that dose rate dose not depend on the location within a work space, thus the variation of exposure dose by different work path is not considered. In this study, a modified numerical method was presented to estimate the exposure dose during radiation work in radwaste storage considering the effects of the distance between a worker and sources. And a new numerical algorithm was suggested to search the optimal work path minimizing the exposure dose in pre-defined work space with given radiation sources. Finally, a virtual work simulation program was developed to visualize the exposure dose of radiation during radiation works in radwaste storage and provide the capability of simulation for work planning. As a numerical example, a test radiation work was simulated under given space and two radiation sources, and the suggested optimal work path was compared with three predefined work paths. The optimal work path obtained in the study could reduce the exposure dose for the given test work. Based on the results, the developed numerical method and simulation program could be useful tools in the planning of radiation work

  15. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ''false negative or false positive'' indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments

  16. Improving medical work experience for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Neil; Shah, Alexander; Bollina, Prasad; Bollina, Harsha

    2010-12-01

    This exploratory piece details the development of the programme Medic Insight, which was established in 2007 in Lothian. This is an aptly-named unique organisation that provides an insight into life as a doctor for school students. We believe that the provision of work experience needs to be improved for both students and doctors. Securing work experience in medicine has historically been biased: individuals that have family or friends who work as doctors are able to organise shadowing placements with greater ease. Shadowing experiences are of questionable value, and frequently offer exposure to only one field, and administrators struggle to match doctors' working schedules with those of students. Medic Insight has been developed to address these key problems. It provides a free, application-based shadowing experience for 15-16-year olds, in addition to interactive seminars for younger students. Over the course of the 5-day shadowing experience (Medic Insight Week), students rotate through a variety of specialties, meeting doctors of all grades. Doctors agree to act as mentors prior to the shadowing weeks and post their availability online. Data from our pilot in 2008 has been encouraging. All students who answered our questionnaire found the experience to be either useful or very useful, and ongoing data collection is proving this to be an enjoyable and effective programme. We are confident that Medic Insight will help all suitably enthusiastic and able school students make informed decisions to apply to study medicine. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  17. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Shinotsuka, Kazunori; Asakura, Yamato; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot had been carried out on March 1998. Since then plasma confinement experiments have been improved. This is the report of administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and related devices, and radiation monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation measurement and dose monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and access control system for the LHD controlled area. I hope that as like the published report of fiscal year 1999, the present report will be helpful for management of future radiation protection in the research institute. (author)

  18. A plan of radiation work market on the web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Haruo; Chino, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    In Japan there are many kinds of radiation facilities, and a great number of radiation employees are engaged in plant repairing. It is therefore, very important to strive for employee controls, radiation controls, health examinations and data control. Furthermore, it is necessary to establish a total data management system that processes numerous amounts of data concerning radiation employees. The present paper proposes the establishment of a radiation work market on the web using a total data management system. The system will include radiation employee control information service for members who are planning new employment contracts. (author)

  19. Women's postpartum maternity benefits and work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdingen, D K; McGovern, P M; Chaloner, K M; Street, H B

    1995-10-01

    This study was conducted to describe women's perceptions of their maternity leave policy and its implementation, maternity leave benefits, postpartum work experience, and factors that relate to returning to work. Surveys were mailed to 436 married, recently employed, first-time mothers at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months postpartum. Most respondents said they had written maternity leave policies they could understand, but they were not completely satisfied with their policies. The average 11.1-week maternity leave was considerably shorter than their 8-month ideal, and only 25.5% had the option of working part-time. A minority (35.8%) were allowed to use personal days to care for a sick infant. Most women were distressed about making child care arrangements. Compared with women who remained at home, those who returned to work complained of more respiratory, gynecologic, and breast symptoms. Relatively little is known about women's postpartum work experience. In this study, return to work after delivery was related to several demographic, occupational, and social factors and was associated with health problems and concerns about child care. With a majority of new mothers now returning to work, attention has recently been directed to factors that facilitate the merger of work and parenting roles. One such important factor is women's parental or maternity leave benefits, the focus of this study.

  20. Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Work-life Experience and Learner Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine how orientations toward learning activities are situated in and conditioned by specific work-life experiences it is crucial to develop a dialectic concept of learner identity. Based on a qualitative research-project (Kondrup 2012) this paper outlines how unskilled work forms...... a specific condition for engaging in lifelong learning. The aim of the study was to examine how an unskilled work-life presents certain conditions for the formation, maintenance and transformation of a learner identity, enabling workers to position themselves as educable subjects and engage in formal...

  2. Experiments planned to be made with the synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matz, W.

    1993-01-01

    For this working meeting, various research groups from the Land Sachsen and from the neighbouring countries Poland and the Czech Republic have been invited in order to present their materials research programmes or task-specific experiments intended to be carried out with the synchrotron radiation source to be installed in the near future. The proceedings volume in hand presents the discussion papers, which have been directly reproduced from the original foils. (orig.) [de

  3. Human radiation experiments: Looking beyond the headlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    There has been a great deal of publicity recently about experiments supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessors, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Energy Research and Development Administration, in which human subjects were exposed to radiation. Media stories give the impression that these experiments were done in secret, without informing the subjects, and that these subjects suffered horrible consequences. As a prelude to understanding the situation, it is useful to review the bases for judgement in deciding on this type of experiment. When it was first recognized that radiation can be harmful, national and international groups promulgated the concept of open-quotes maximum permissible doseclose quotes (MPD) on the basis that with a comfortable factor of safety (e.g., a factor of 10), there was no evidence of harm at that level. This had always been the principal method of providing safety, applied to everything from chemicals to bridges. In the 1940s, the MPD was 100 mrem per day, and it was assumed that there would be no harmful health impacts at that level. Current regulations require that experiments involving radiation exposure to human subjects be approved by a review board at the institution where they are carried out. National guidelines for these review boards require that whole-body doses to subjects be kept below 2 rem except in extraordinary circumstances. As an example of how these regulations are currently implemented, consider positron emission tomography (PET), a very active medical research topic for the past few years. In one major medical center, this involves exposing about 300 subjects per year, normally recruited through newspaper advertisements, with an average dose of about 400 mrem to each. There are about 50 comparable medical centers throughout the United States

  4. Coherent synchrotron radiation experiments for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Russell, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors describe a coherent synchrotron radiation experiment planned at Los Alamos to support the design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL. Preliminary simulations of the LCLS compressors show that a clever tuning strategy can be used to minimize the electron's beam emittance growth due to noninertial space-charge forces by employing a delicate cancellation of these forces. The purpose of the Los Alamos experiment, using a sub-picosecond chicane compressor, is to benchmark these simulations tools. In this paper, the authors present detailed numerical simulations of the experiment, and point out unique signatures of this effect that are measurable. As predicted previously, the largest emittance growths and induced energy spreads result from the nonradiative components of this space-charge force

  5. Work Experience, Age, and Gender Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, John; Wissmann, David A.

    1983-01-01

    Age is a determinant of the gap between U.S. men's and women's work wages; young men are paid more as they age because of age; young women are not. Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of the Labor Market Experience were analyzed for 5,225 men and 5,159 women. (KC)

  6. Variable Work Hours--The MONY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cynthia J.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment with variable work hours in one department of a large company was so successful that it has become standard procedure in various corporate areas, both staff and line. The result? Increased production, fewer errors, improved employee morale, and a significant reduction in lateness and absenteeism. (Author)

  7. The experience of returning to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Inger; Björklund, Anita

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore from an environmental perspective the experiences of returning to work of former unemployed sickness absentees. Five separate focus-group interviews were carried out with themes concerning different environmental areas. The findings showed that the participants in their process of being off work and then attempting returning to work experienced a personal transition manifesting itself as a negative self-image, change of life-rhythm and restrictions in their roles and activities. In their progression, the participants experienced a need for reorientation and expressed feelings of alienation, and for that reason felt need of support from a network, especially a professional one. Regarding attitudes in society, the participants reported experiences of social stigmatization, both in mass media and in their immediate social environment, and an increasing egocentricity among their fellow-workers. They perceived their progression back to work as a 'time quarantine' and as a long and destructive wait for support. The findings indicate that the phenomenon of 'returning to work' after unemployment and sick leave could not be reduced to a single issue. It should rather be seen as a dynamic problem with individual and structural, environmental aspects.

  8. Moments in Collaboration: Experiments in Concept Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsby, Trine Mygind; Stavrianakis, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    There is an increasing focus among anthropologists on the theme of collaboration with the people they work with and with other disciplines in the university space. Frequently justified in political terms of participation, there is often less attention paid to the conceptual work in and of collabo......There is an increasing focus among anthropologists on the theme of collaboration with the people they work with and with other disciplines in the university space. Frequently justified in political terms of participation, there is often less attention paid to the conceptual work...... in and of collaboration. In opposition to the attention given to the processes of exchange during fieldwork, there is rarely a description of the actual forms and practices created for such collective conceptual work and thinking-processes in extra-fieldwork situations. In this article, we report on an experiment...... in collaborative concept work at Berkeley known as ‘the Labinar'. We address a lacuna in the literature on collaboration by providing a description of how collective conceptual work can be given form and sustained with specific practices. We argue for understanding concepts as not only discursive but also as non...

  9. Los Alamos Science: Number 23, 1995. Radiation protection and the human radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the ionizing radiation that surrounds and penetrates us all. Dispel a few of these by taking a leisurely tour of radiation and its properties, of the natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation, and of the way doses are calculated. By damaging DNA and inducing genetic mutations, ionizing radiation can potentially initiate a cell on the road to cancer. The authors review what is currently known about regulation of cellular reproduction, DNA damage and repair, cellular defense mechanisms, and the specific cancer-causing genes that are susceptible to ionizing radiation. A rapid survey of the data on radiation effects in humans shows that high radiation doses increase the risk of cancer, whereas the effects of low doses are very difficult to detect. The hypothetical risks at low doses, which are estimated from the atomic-bomb survivors, are compared to the low-dose data so that the reader can assess the present level of uncertainty. As part of the openness initiative, ten individuals who have worked with plutonium during various periods in the Laboratory's history were asked to share their experiences including their accidental intakes. The history and prognosis of people who have had plutonium exposures is discussed by the Laboratory's leading epidemiologist

  10. Radiation survey and management on the reconstructed radioactive work-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Liang Shiqiang; Wang Youmei

    2004-12-01

    The experiences of radiation survey and administration in the prophase on reconstructed radioactive work-site are summarized. The advance works are to investigate the reconstructed work-site, settle working plans, devise inspecting flow charts, deal with something in time in the local and train the staffers. The works about prophasic decontaminating, removing and cleaning up the site have been finished, which have established the deep foundation to develop later task. (authors)

  11. Medical Managment of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: Recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waselenka, Jamie K; MacVittie, Thomas J; Blakely, William F; Pesik, Nicki; Wiley, Albert L; Dickerson, William E; Tsu, Horace; Confer, Dennis L; Coleman, Norman; Seed, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    .... This consensus document was developed by the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group to provide a framework for physicians in internal medicine and the medical subspecialties to evaluate...

  12. The concept of recommended working life applied to radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorch, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the background behind the Radiochemical Centre's decision to introduce values of recommended working life (RWL) of 5, 10 or 15 years for the majority of its radiation sources. Criteria used in assessing RWL included toxicity, half-life and total initial activity of the nuclide, source construction, typical application environments, experience of safety in use and test performance data. The introduction of the concept of RWL has meant that users are becoming aware of the need for regular inspection and assessment of sources, but it is emphasized that the RWL does not constitute a guarantee of performance. It represents an effort by the Radiochemical Centre to ensure the proper use of its products. (U.K.)

  13. Guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Danish National Institute of Radiation Protection (SIS) has published this, fourth edition of guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radiation sources. There are few changes compared to the previous edition, film doses are updated and preparation of the Danish legislation with respect to the 1991 ICRP recommendations (ICRP publication 60) is discussed. In this future recommendation the new dose limits will be proposed and new risk factors enlightened. (EG)

  14. Static speckle experiments using white synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant, Tushar; Panzner, Tobias; Pietsch, Ullrich [Solid State Physics Group, University of Siegen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Static speckle experiments were performed using coherent white X-ray radiation from a bending magnet at BESSYII. Semiconductor and polymer surfaces were investigated under incidence condition smaller than the critical angle of total external reflection. The scattering pattern of the sample results from the illumination function modified by the surface undulations. The periodic oscillations are caused by the illumination function whereas other irregular features are associated with sample surface. The speckle map of reflection from a laterally periodic structure like GaAs grating is studied. Under coherent illumination the grating peaks split into speckles because of fluctuations on the sample surface. It is important to understand which length scales on the sample surface are responsible for the oscillations in reflectivity map. To investigate this experiments are done with a triangular shaped sample. Different parts of the sample are illuminated with the footprint on the sample larger or smaller than the actual sample length. This gives prior information about total illuminated area on the sample. Using this additional information a detailed surface profile of the sample is reconstructed.

  15. Health physics measurements of laser radiation: Experience and competence wanted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the parameters required for an analysis of hazards involved is a complex task in terms of measuring techniques and calibration, and a costly procedure at that. Although part of the evaluation work can be done with the support of computers, evaluation and interpretation of measured information requires the experience and competence of the human expert. It is to be hoped that the computer industry will soon have developed turn-key solutions of universal applicability for analytical tasks of this kind, so that in the near future determination of the source terms, especially for LED or IRED radiation, will be an easy task. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research

  17. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

  18. Qualifications of persons working in radiation user's organization and radiation protection training required for competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    The Guide sets out the requirements governing the qualifications of persons working in userAes organizations and the radiation protection training required for such competence. It also sets out the requirements for training organizations arranging radiation safety officer training and exams. The Guide applies only to uses of radiation requiring a afety licence. The requirements for userAes organizations are set out in Guide ST 1.4

  19. Radiation Protection Officer certification scheme. Malaysian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pungut, Noraishah; Razali, Noraini; Mod Ali, Noriah

    2011-01-01

    In Malaysia, the need for maintaining competency in radiation protection is emerging, focusing on the qualification of Radiation Protection Officers (RPO). Regulation 23 of Malaysian Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standards) Regulations 1988, requires the applicant to employ an RPO, with the necessary knowledge, skill and training, enabling effective protection of individuals and minimizing danger to life, property and the environment for all activities sought to be licensed. An RPO must demonstrate the knowledge required, by attending RPO courses organised by an accredited agency and pass the RPO certification examination. Maintaining a high level of competency is crucial for future development of safe applications of ionising radiation. The major goal of training is to provide essential knowledge and skills and to foster correct attitudes on radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. Assessment of the competency is through theoretical and practical examination. A standard criterion on the performance of the individuals evaluated has been established and only those who meet this criterion can be accepted as certified RPO. The National Committee for the Certification of Radiation Protection Officer (NCCRPO), comprising experts in various fields, is responsible to review and update requirements on competency of a certified RPO. With increasing number of candidates (i.e. 701 in 2008) and the international requirement for radioactive source security, it is incumbent upon the NCCRPO to improve the syllabus of the certification scheme. The introduction of a Radiation Protection Advisor (RPA) to provide service and advice to the radiation industry in Malaysia is also seriously considered. (author)

  20. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2006 to March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio; Kaneko, Osamu; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2007-10-15

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with the research on magnetic confining nuclear fusion both experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment with deals with very hot plasma, X ray is generated. Therefore the experimental devices with their surroundings are administrated in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to keep workplace safety. The Radiation Control Safety Office of Safety Hygiene Protection Bureau carries out measuring the radiation dose level regularly, registering the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and training them. Non-regulated small sealed sources are used in some detectors. The treating of these sources is controlled by the Safety and Environmental Research Center. This report is on administrative works for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2006. It includes (1) report on the establishment of radiation safety management system, (2) report on the establishment of training and registration system for radiation workers, and (3) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE). The report has been published annually. We hope that these reports would be helpful for future safety management in NIFS. (author)

  1. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2006 to March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Kaneko, Osamu; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2007-10-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with the research on magnetic confining nuclear fusion both experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment with deals with very hot plasma, X ray is generated. Therefore the experimental devices with their surroundings are administrated in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to keep workplace safety. The Radiation Control Safety Office of Safety Hygiene Protection Bureau carries out measuring the radiation dose level regularly, registering the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and training them. Non-regulated small sealed sources are used in some detectors. The treating of these sources is controlled by the Safety and Environmental Research Center. This report is on administrative works for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2006. It includes (1) report on the establishment of radiation safety management system, (2) report on the establishment of training and registration system for radiation workers, and (3) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE). The report has been published annually. We hope that these reports would be helpful for future safety management in NIFS. (author)

  2. Experience of water chemistry and radiation levels in Swedish BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivars, R.; Elkert, J.

    1981-01-01

    From the BWR operational experience in Sweden it has been found that the occupational radiation exposures have been comparatively low in an international comparison. One main reason for the favourable conditions is the good water chemistry performance. This paper deals at first with the design considerations of water chemistry and materials selection. Next, the experience of water chemistry and radiation levels are provided. Finally, some methods to further reduce the radiation sources are discussed. (author)

  3. Radiation therapists' and radiation oncology medical physicists' perceptions of work and the working environment in Australia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, G K B; McKay, J; Hegney, D G; Breen, Lauren J; Berg, M; Ebert, M A; Davis, M; Kearvell, R

    2017-09-01

    Workforce recruitment and retention are issues in radiation oncology. The working environment is likely to have an impact on retention; however, there is a lack of research in this area. The objectives of this study were to: investigate radiation therapists' (RTs) and radiation oncology medical physicists' (ROMPs) perceptions of work and the working environment; and determine the factors that influence the ability of RTs and ROMPs to undertake their work and how these factors affect recruitment and retention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used. Twenty-eight RTs and 21 ROMPs participated. The overarching themes were delivering care, support in work, working conditions and lifestyle. The overarching themes were mostly consistent across both groups; however, the exemplars reflected the different roles and perspectives of RTs and ROMPs. Participants described the importance they placed on treating patients and improving their lives. Working conditions were sometimes difficult with participants reporting pressure at work, large workloads and longer hours and overtime. Insufficient staff numbers impacted on the effectiveness of staff, the working environment and intentions to stay. Staff satisfaction is likely to be improved if changes are made to the working environment. We make recommendations that may assist departments to support RTs and ROMPs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Measuring the Economic Value of Pre-MBA Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaple, Ronald N.; Johnston, Mark W.; Whittingham, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-MBA work experience is required for admission to many graduate schools of business. In the present study, MBA graduates with a wide range of pre-MBA work experience were surveyed to assess the economic value of such work experience. No evidence was found of a systematic financial advantage to students from working for several years before…

  5. Plasma radiation in tokamak disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Safronov, V.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Wuerz, H.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma impact results in sudden evaporation of divertor plate material and produces a plasma cloud which acts as a protective shield. The incoming energy flux is absorbed in the plasma shield and is converted mainly into radiation. Thus the radiative characteristics of the target plasma determine the dissipation of the incoming energy and the heat load at the target. Radiation of target plasma is studied at the two plasma gun facility 2MK-200 at Troitsk. Space- and time-resolved spectroscopy and time-integrated space-resolved calorimetry are employed as diagnostics. Graphite and tungsten samples are exposed to deuterium plasma streams. It is found that the radiative characteristics depend strongly on the target material. Tungsten plasma arises within 1 micros close to the surface and shows continuum radiation only. Expansion of tungsten plasma is restricted. For a graphite target the plasma shield is a mixture of carbon and deuterium. It expands along the magnetic field lines with a velocity of v = (3--4) 10 6 cm/s. The plasma shield is a two zone plasma with a hot low dense corona and a cold dense layer close to the target. The plasma corona emits intense soft x-ray (SXR) line radiation in the frequency range from 300--380 eV mainly from CV ions. It acts as effective dissipation system and converts volumetrically the incoming energy flux into SXR radiation

  6. Experience of the international network in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of exchanging information on various subjects about radiation protection and designing a site where the members can send and receive information on courses, scientific activities, articles, technical opinions, commentaries and everything that promotes the communication, collaboration and integration, the 15th March 2002 the networking: 'radioproteccion' is created with 11 persons from 11 countries. The number of members had been increased. By the first month it had 117 members and by the end of the year 2002 it had already 179 members, 315 messages were send by then. By December 2007, there were 726 members from 28 countries mainly from Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. There were also members from Austria, Canada, France, Israel, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States. There have been distributed 2049 messages about Congress, courses and activities on national and international radiation protection and related issues which initially were in Latin American and the Caribbean. This has allowed diverse specialists that work in different themes to interchange experiences and information about subjects of common interest. This objective is the continuation of the spreading of activities that since 1991 and for 10 consecutive years had been made through the Bulletin 'Proteccion Radiologica', from which 65000 samples were published and distributed to specialists from 40 countries thanks to the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO). This idea is complemented by the Web: www.radioproteccion.org. Interesting topics have been discussed in the network for example: Pregnancy and medical radiation, emergency response, occupational exposure, radiation protection responsibilities, lessons learned from accidental

  7. Occupational radiation exposure in work with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, G.V.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation exposure to personnel dealing with radioactive materials is studied on a national scale. The survey covers any type of radiation work except for mining and milling of radioactive ore, fuel production, and nuclear reactor operation. Assessments are based on a decade's collection of personnel monitoring data obtained by film dosimetry techniques, as well as on data from systematic operational site monitoring. Statistical analysis indicated exposures based on personal records to follow a normal distribution pattern and, hence, arithmetic averages to be representative. Airborne concontrations of radioactive materials and aerosols in working areas are shown to follow a logarithmic normal distribution pattern, so that geometric means are representative. Radiation exposures are generally found to be well below annual maximum permissible doses for radiation workers. However, their distribution among employee groups is nonuniform. Group A, comprising about 700 subjects, received mean annual gonad doses of more than 1000 mrem; group B, about 670 subjects, had doses ranging from 100 to 500 mrem per year; and group C, 1610 subjects, received less than 100 mrem per year. Most of the radiation dose is accounted for by external radiation, which contributed 0.327 mrem to the genetically significant population dose (0.227 from exposure to males, and 0.025 mrem from exposure to females). Analysis of accidental exposures occurring over the period 1963-1973 indicated that the contribution of this source is substantial as compared to routine work (1.0:0.3). Based on the results obtained, a number of preventive measures are developed and introduced into practice to improve radiological safety in work with radioactive materials. (A.B.)

  8. THE WORK PROCESS IN RADIOLOGICAL NURSING: INVISIBILITY OFIONIZING RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Melo,Juliana Almeida Coelho de; Gelbcke,Francine Lima; Huhn,Andrea; Vargas,Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, performed with 20 nursing professionals working in a general radiology unit and surgery center with the "C-arm" equipment, and the hemodynamics unit of a southern Brazilian teaching hospital. Aim was to analyze the dimensions of the work process for radiological technology nurse professionals. This paper made clear that radiological technologies are outside nursing, which leads to the invisibility of ionizing radiation, leading to ina...

  9. The role of a Works Council in implementing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigenwillig, G.G.; Zinke, E.

    2005-01-01

    In Germany, a works council has the right of co-determination concerning the concrete forms of occupational health and safety in the company according to the Labour-Management Relations Act. In practice coordination is needed between radiation protection and occupational health and safety. This makes a qualified cooperation between workers council, employer and other parties in the company necessary. (orig.)

  10. 1D radiation analysis for the fusion ignition experiment ZEPHYR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, H.; Ohlig, U.; Krause, H.

    1979-11-01

    For the proposed tokamak ignition experiment ZEPHYR a nuclear radiation analysis is performed for both the prompt radiation during a discharge and the delayed radiation after discharges. This analysis is restricted to a one-dimensional geometrical approximation of the apparatus. Nuclear heating data are derived for the prompt radiation and the shielding concept is investigated. Results for the delayed radiation are given for three activation scenarios, that are anticipated for machine operation. The cooling phase after one of these scenarios is investigated in some detail in order to trace the dominant contributions to biological dose rates back to machine components and to specific activation reactions. (orig.)

  11. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2003-03-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot had been carried out on March 1998. In the experiments high plasma temperature and improved plasma confinement have been achieved. This is the report of administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and related devices, and radiation monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation measurement and dose monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and access control system for the LHD controlled area. I hope that as like the published reports of fiscal year 1999 and 2000, the present report will be helpful for management of future radiation protection in the research institute. (author)

  12. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils system. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot was carried out on March 1998. Since then high temperature plasma and improved plasma confinement experiments have been achieved. This is the report on administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and the Compact Helical Device (CHS), and radiation measurement and monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation (X ray) dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and accessing control system for the LHD controlled area. As same as the published annual reports from fiscal year 1999 to 2002, this report will be helpful for the future radiation safety management in the research institute. (author)

  13. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2004 to March 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2006-11-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) constructed the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using a super conducting magnet coils system. The first plasma shot was carried out in March 1998 after eight years of construction. Since then high temperature plasmas and improved plasma confinement experiments have been achieved. On 1st April 2004, NIFS became one of the research institutes which constitute National Institute of Natural Sciences. Since then the regulation system of safety, health and environmental management has been minorly changed. This is a report on administrative work for radiation safety at the LHD and the Compact Helical System (CHS), and radiation measurement and monitoring on the site from 1st April 2004 to 31st March 2006. Major topics are as follows. (1) Establishment of a radiation safety management system based on the law of occupational safety, health and environment. (2) Radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site using a particularly developed monitoring system named Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (3) Establishment of an education and registration system for radiation workers, and accessing control system for the LHD controlled area. This report has been annually published from fiscal year 1999. We expect that these reports could be helpful for future radiation safety management in NIFS. (author)

  14. Applications of radiation processing: SRI experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Shriram Applied Radiation Centre (SARC) is a part of Shriram Institute for Industrial Research (SRI), and was established in 1986, in collaboration with Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). SARC was established with a objective to popularize the radiation processing technology for various applications. SARC is a fully automatic, computerized plant setup as per the design and norms of BRIT/AERB for round the clock fail safe operations. The capacity of SARC Irradiator is 800 kCi of Cobalt -60 source which can process up to 10,000 cubic meters of material (0.1g/cc) at 25 kGy level

  15. Work Placement in UK Undergraduate Programmes. Student Expectations and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David; Richardson, Anne

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 189 pre- and 106 post-sandwich work-experience students in tourism suggested that potential benefits were not being maximized. Students needed better preparation for the work experience, especially in terms of their expectations. The work experience needed better design, and the role of industry tutors needed clarification. (SK)

  16. Counterpropagating Radiative Shock Experiments on the Orion Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F; Clayson, T; Stehlé, C; Swadling, G F; Foster, J M; Skidmore, J; Graham, P; Burdiak, G C; Lebedev, S V; Chaulagain, U; Singh, R L; Gumbrell, E T; Patankar, S; Spindloe, C; Larour, J; Kozlova, M; Rodriguez, R; Gil, J M; Espinosa, G; Velarde, P; Danson, C

    2017-08-04

    We present new experiments to study the formation of radiative shocks and the interaction between two counterpropagating radiative shocks. The experiments are performed at the Orion laser facility, which is used to drive shocks in xenon inside large aspect ratio gas cells. The collision between the two shocks and their respective radiative precursors, combined with the formation of inherently three-dimensional shocks, provides a novel platform particularly suited for the benchmarking of numerical codes. The dynamics of the shocks before and after the collision are investigated using point-projection x-ray backlighting while, simultaneously, the electron density in the radiative precursor was measured via optical laser interferometry. Modeling of the experiments using the 2D radiation hydrodynamic codes nym and petra shows very good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

  18. Experience With Flexible Hours of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Jo

    1976-01-01

    A summary of an 80-page booklet called Hours of Work When Workers Can Choose is presented. The booklet reports a survey and focuses on the benefits of flexible hours of work. It was published by the Business and Professional Women's Foundation and is available from that organization. (EC)

  19. VIII. Safety and method of work in ionizing radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Ionizing radiation may damage the organism in two ways: the damage may be chronic or acute. The characteristics of the two types of damage are described. The Czechoslovak State Standard allows the level of 50 mSv as the maximum permissible dose for whole-body exposure for personnel working with radiation. In case of sources incorporated in the body of the workers the maximum permissible dose should not exceed the value of 2.8 μSv/h during decay. Precautions are given for operation with X-ray instruments. In the X-ray room good ventilation must be provided in view of the presence of ozone and oxides. Diagnostic and therapeutical instruments are placed in a separate room from control instruments. The walls are reinforced with barite concrete. Tables are given showing excitation voltage in kV of primary radiation at which the shortest wavelengths and corresponding voltage would be o.enerated scattered at different angles and with minimum wavelength. Also given are thicknesses of the lead layer in mm for different distances from the source and for different voltages in kV at 10 mA. Corrections are given for other current intensities. Radiation protection of personnel working with sealed sources may be achieved by shielding, shortening the time required for handling and the distance at which the source is operated. For operating unsealed radioactive sources various types of shieldings are used depending on the type of radiation. Workplaces are classified into three categories and hygiene regulations are summed up for work with unsealed sources. (E.S.)

  20. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2010 to March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with basic research on magnetic nuclear fusion which is expected to be a perpetual energy source for the future. Because the object of research is a hot plasma, high energy particles which are elements of the plasma generate X-rays. Therefore we administrate the devices and their surroundings in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to maintain workplace safety. We measure the radiation dose levels regularly, register the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and educate them. We also control the handling of non-regulated small sealed sources that are used in the detectors in some cases. This report is on administrative work for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2010. It includes (1) a report on the establishment of a radiation safety management system, (2) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE), (3) a report on the establishment of an education and registration system for radiation workers. (author)

  1. Risk perception in the process of working with radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, J.C.G.; Levy, D.; Sanches, M.P.; Rodrigues, D.L.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    This study discusses occupational risk under three distinct aspects, which are often interconnected or interdependent in the work environment. These are: environmental risks, human failures and equipment failures. The article addresses the potential exposure in the workplace, caused by the agent's physical radiation risk, resulting from handling with sources of ionizing radiation. Based on the history of accidents occurring in normal operations, the study summarizes the main accidents in various facilities and possible causes involving the three aspects of risk. In its final considerations, it presents the lessons learned and the measures to be taken with the intention of contributing to the prevention and mitigation of risks in the work environment. The analysis of accident cases and their causes provide valuable information to prevent the risk of similar accidents and contribute to the improvement of operational projects and procedures

  2. Summary -- Experiments with Radioactive Beams Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wiescher, M. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    During the course of the workshop, a wide range of futuristic radioactive-beam experiments were discussed. These extended from the study of electroweak interactions in nuclei to materials science, nuclear astrophysics, and a host of nuclear physics investigations. Emphasis was placed on illustrating how these prototypical experiments could be done, discussing what types of detection systems would be needed, exploring the new problems which would be confronting the radioactive beam experimenter, and better defining the beam requirements. Contained herein is a summary of these discussions.

  3. Chronic radiation enteritis: A community hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, M.N.; Sheehan, P.; Nanavati, P.J.; Ross, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the operative management of patients with chronic radiation enteropathy. Thirty-eight affected patients from 1974 to 1986 were reviewed. Patients with recurrent cancer responsible for symptoms were excluded. Seventy-one percent of patients presented with bowel obstruction. Twenty-one patients were treated with bowel resection, while 17 were treated with a bypass procedure or diverting ostomy alone. Overall morbidity was 45%, and postoperative mortality was 16%. Patients in the bypass group were significantly older than those in the resection group (70.3 vs. 55.5 years, P = .024), suggesting that age may have been a determinant of the procedure performed. In our study there was no difference in outcome based on preexisting vascular disease, tumor site, type of procedure performed, or radiation dose. We conclude that resection is the procedure of choice in cases of chronic radiation enteritis requiring surgery except in cases with dense adhesions when enteroenterostomal bypass is a viable alternative

  4. Working across difference : theory, practice and experience

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    Back in October 2015 I had the opportunity to chair the book launch for all three works discussed in this review essay. At the event, Shirley Anne Tate said, “Black feminist theory is the theory”. The comment referred to how it is not ‘just’ that Black feminist theory is typically marginalised within institutional contexts and academic scholarship, ‘even’ within critical, feminist and poststructural work, but also to highlight the capacity of Black feminist scholarship to unpick and destabili...

  5. Capacity for work researching method in animal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pul'nov, V.N.; Mashneva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The existing methods of examining the work capacity of animals are discussed with reference to extrapolation of animal data to man. A modified procedure for measuring maximal physical strength is proposed, whereby static endurance of animals at a given exercise rate can be measured. For an integrated evaluation of work capacity, a formula of absolute work capacity is suggested. The proposed procedure may be used to study the working capacity of animals exposed to unfavorable factors of radiation or nonradiation nature

  6. Participation in Students' Industrial Work Experience Scheme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIWES has been part of the training requirement of Pharmacy students at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, for a long time now. At inception, it was done during vacations until about ten years ago when it was incorporated into the semester period. This work was done to find out the feelings and ...

  7. Risk assessment of chronic stress at work place and work environment of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovic, S.; Ilic, Z.; Spasojevic-Tisma, V.; Milanovic, S.)

    2007-01-01

    Interactions of factors at work and worker's health have been analyzed through indicators of chronic professional stress. The examinees have been persons working with sealed sources of radiation with various professional risks among which we have stressed exposure to different radiation doses. Health professionals (medical doctors, radiologist, technicians) working in radio diagnostic and radiotherapy of oncology deceases have been examined. It was concluded that examinees among the subgroup 'therapy' has higher values of stress indicators expressed through all examined indicators: work motivation, personal opinion of work load, behavioral dysfunctions (smoking, alcoholism, drug abuse), increase incidence of health dysfunctions and general neuroticism of examinees. Obtained results are values for which statistical significant have not been established, so they have certain theoretical and practical importance in the frame research with descriptive nature [sr

  8. WORKING WITH THE POPULATION: a teaching experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Moresco Mezzomo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of didactic experience developed in the discipline of Geography, taught for two classes of 3rd year of Integrated on Informatic Technical course of the Technological Federal University of Paraná, Campo Mourão-PR. The experiment regarding the application of an activity, which aimed to bring the theme 'Brazilian Population' to the reality of the students through the study of population data from the middle region in which they reside. The results demonstrate that application of activity after contact with quantitative and qualitative analyzes, the students developed new insights into the subject population and the reality lived with transformation of critical and constructive position of geographical knowledge. RESUMO: O artigo apresenta uma análise sobre uma experiência didática desenvolvida na disciplina de Geografia, ministrada para duas turmas de 3° anos do curso Técnico Integrado em Informática da Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Campo Mourão-PR. A experiência diz respeito à aplicação de uma atividade, que teve como objetivo aproximar o tema ‘População brasileira’ à realidade dos alunos, por meio do estudo de dados populacionais da mesorregião em que residem. Os resultados da aplicação da atividade demonstram que após o contato com dados quantitativos e análises qualitativas, os alunos desenvolveram novas percepções sobre o tema população e sobre a realidade vivida, com transformação do posicionamento crítico e construtivo do conhecimento geográfico.

  9. Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341385; Corti, Gloria

    The unprecedented radiation levels of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during high-energy proton-proton collisions will have an impact on the operation of its experiments’ detectors and electronics. LHCb, one of the 4 major LHC experiments, has started operation in 2009 and from 2011 onward it has been collecting data at and above its design luminosity. Detectors and associated detector electronics are prone to damage if the radiation levels exceed the expected values. It is essential to monitor the radiation environment of the experimental area and compare it with predictions obtained from simulation studies in order to assess the situation and take corrective action in case of need. Understanding the existing radiation environment will also provide important input to the planning of maintenance and for operation at upgrade luminosity. A set of radiation detectors has been installed in the LHCb experimental area to measure different aspects of its radiation environment. Passive dosimeters including Thermo-L...

  10. Radiation therapists' perceptions of the minimum level of experience required to perform portal image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybovic, Michala; Halkett, Georgia K.; Banati, Richard B.; Cox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Our aim was to explore radiation therapists' views on the level of experience necessary to undertake portal image analysis and clinical decision making. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed to determine the availability of portal imaging equipment in Australia and New Zealand. We analysed radiation therapists' responses to a specific question regarding their opinion on the minimum level of experience required for health professionals to analyse portal images. We used grounded theory and a constant comparative method of data analysis to derive the main themes. Results: Forty-six radiation oncology facilities were represented in our survey, with 40 questionnaires being returned (87%). Thirty-seven radiation therapists answered our free-text question. Radiation therapists indicated three main themes which they felt were important in determining the minimum level of experience: 'gaining on-the-job experience', 'receiving training' and 'working as a team'. Conclusions: Radiation therapists indicated that competence in portal image review occurs via various learning mechanisms. Further research is warranted to determine perspectives of other health professionals, such as radiation oncologists, on portal image review becoming part of radiation therapists' extended role. Suitable training programs and steps for implementation should be developed to facilitate this endeavour

  11. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Artan Çela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. I...

  12. Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-07-01

    This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

  13. Investigation of status of safety management in radiation handle works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amauchi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Kenji; Izumi, Kokichi

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the investigation in the title concerning the system for safety management and for accident prevention, which was done by a questionnaire in a period of 1.5 months in 2005. The questionnaire including 55 questions for safety management system, 33 for instruments and safety utilization of radiation and 57 for present status of safety management in high-risk radiation works, was performed in 780 hospitals, of which 313 answered. The first 55 questions concerned with the facility, patient identification, information exchange, management of private information, safety management activities, measures to prevent accident, manual preparation, personnel education and safety awareness; the second, with management of instruments, package insert, system for reporting the safety information, management of implants, re-imaging and radiation protection; and the third, with the systems for patients' emergency, in departments of CT/MR, of IVR, of nuclear diagnosis and of radiation therapy. Based on the results obtained, many problems, tasks and advices are presented to various items and further continuation of efforts to improve the present status is mentioned to be necessary. Details are given in the homepage of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology. (T.I.)

  14. Optimal experience among teachers: new insights into the work paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Marta; Delle Fave, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    Several studies highlighted that individuals perceive work as an opportunity for flow or optimal experience, but not as desirable and pleasant. This finding was defined as the work paradox. The present study addressed this issue among teachers from the perspective of self-determination theory, investigating work-related intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, as well as autonomous and controlled behavior regulation. In Study 1, 14 teachers were longitudinally monitored with Experience Sampling Method for one work week. In Study 2, 184 teachers were administered Flow Questionnaire and Work Preference Inventory, respectively investigating opportunities for optimal experience, and motivational orientations at work. Results showed that work-related optimal experiences were associated with both autonomous regulation and with controlled regulation. Moreover, teachers reported both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation at work, with a prevailing intrinsic orientation. Findings provide novel insights on the work paradox, and suggestions for teachers' well-being promotion.

  15. Working capacity in the experiment with animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pul'kov, V.N.; Mashneva, N.I.; Rodionova, L.F.

    1984-01-01

    Influence of different harmful factors such as 90 Sr, 210 Po, mercury, lead on working capacity is studied; special attention is paid to study of behaviour. Low-motivated reactions (spontaneous motor activity, some parameters of orientation-research behaviour) are shown to be most sensitive. The reaction of active avoiding electroskin stimulation or defense conditioned reflexes are more stable to the effect of harmful factors. Dependence of the effect of radioactive and chemical substances at intake with drinking water from different safety standard levels on behaviour reactions is presented

  16. Operational experience of gamma radiation processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    Universal lSO-MED is now proud to announce an extension of its irradiation service for low-dose applications specifically in agriculture commodities, food and healthcare applications with the start of Gujarat Agro Radiation Processing Facility at Village: Bavla, Ahmedabad (A Government Enterprise) Operated, Maintained and Managed by Universal Medicap Ltd. Availability of hygienic, safe and nutritious food commodities is essential for any sustainable human development. Food stability is an important element of economic stability and self-reliance of a nation. Though the need to preserve food has been felt by the mankind since the time immemorial, it is even stronger in today's context. The rising population and increasing gap between demand and supply, agro-climatic conditions, in adequate post-harvest practices, seasonal nature of produce and long distances between production and consumption centers underscore the need to device improved conservation and preservation strategies

  17. Effects of atomic radiation. Work of the UN Scientific Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleyard, R.K.

    1959-01-01

    In December 19555, the First Committee of the Assembly, at the initiative of India and the United States, discussed the biological effects of ionizing radiation. Out of this discussion came a unanimous resolution establishing the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation- a committee of the General Assembly consisting of fifteen Member States, including the principal nuclear powers. Although the members were thus political entities, each was represented by a distinguished scientist and by this device the Committee was enabled to function as an active scientific body. The permanent United Nations missions were always available to advise the scientists on how to keep the discussions on a scientific as distinct from a political level. The principal task of the Radiation Committee, as it soon came to be called at United Nations Headquarters, was to collect information, study and analyze it, make certain evaluations, indicate research projects of interest in its field, report progress annually to the General Assembly and submit a comprehensive report within two and a half years. The Committee received over 200 special reports from governments in the two years during which it was actively preparing its comprehensive report, all of which had to be studied and related to the prodigious normal output of scientific literature in its field. Method and organization of work, nature of investigations as well as its role within the UN family are discussed. Throughout its activities, the Radiation Committee and its scientific staff have worked very closely with the various specialized agencies of the United Nations, several of which have important interests in the field, and particularly with the FAO, UNESCO, WMO and WHO, all of which contributed reports and a wealth of expert knowledge to the discussion. It expects in the future to work just as closely with the new IAEA, with which it has a number of interests in common. The SCEAR has established

  18. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  19. Experiences of work among people with disabilities who are HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiences of work among people with disabilities who are HIV-positive in Zambia. ... HIV in Lusaka, not only secondary to the effects of HIV influencing their physical capacity to work ... Keywords: qualitative, disability, stigma, Southern Africa ...

  20. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artan Çela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. It is an unjustified interference of integrity, dignity and well-being of workers, causing problems from headaches to depression, loss of confidence, panic attacks and perhaps suicide as the only way appearing to be the sole possible relief from the unremitting and frightening behavior. This article presents information concerning the sexual harassment at workplace, covering topics such as, the definitions for sexual harassment in both international and national context, a short history of sexual harassment, types of sexual harassment, effect of sexual harassment, measure to combat and prevent sexual harassment. It offers a short overview in sexual harassment legislation of some industrialized EU Member States and the legal remedies available against sexual harassment. The main purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding and prevention concerning the issue of sexual harassment in workplace.

  1. An investigation into the experiences of managers who work flexibly

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the experiences of managers who work flexibly. Flexible working policies are prevalent in all organizations in the UK because of the legislation giving specific groups of parents and carers the right to request flexible working. Many organizations extend the policies to all employees, yet the take-up is not as high as expected, particularly among staff at managerial levels. This thesis explores how managers construe and experience flexible working arrangeme...

  2. Modeling and design of radiative hydrodynamic experiments with X-ray Thomson Scattering measurements on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K. H.; Lefevre, H. J.; Belancourt, P. X.; MacDonald, M. J.; Doeppner, T.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility studied the effect of radiation on shock-driven hydrodynamic instability growth. X-ray radiography images from these experiments indicate that perturbation growth is lower in highly radiative shocks compared to shocks with negligible radiation flux. The reduction in instability growth is attributed to ablation from higher temperatures in the foam for highly radiative shocks. The proposed design implements the X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) technique in the radiative shock tube platform to measure electron temperatures and densities in the shocked foam. We model these experiments with CRASH, an Eulerian radiation hydrodynamics code with block-adaptive mesh refinement, multi-group radiation transport and electron heat conduction. Simulations are presented with SiO2 and carbon foams for both the high temperature, radiative shock and the low-temperature, hydrodynamic shock cases. Calculations from CRASH give estimations for shock speed, electron temperature, effective ionization, and other quantities necessary for designing the XRTS diagnostic measurement. This work is funded by the LLNL under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Fusion-relevant basic radiation effects: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Coghlan, W.A.; Farrell, K.; Horton, L.L.; Lee, E.H.; Lewis, M.B.; Packan, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of results of the basic radiation effects program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which are relevant to fusion reactor materials applications. The basic radiation effects program at ORNL is a large effort with the dual objectives of understanding the atomic and microstructural defect mechanisms underlying radiation effects and of determining principles for the design of radiation resistant materials. A strength of this effort is the parallel and integrated experimental and theoretical approaches in each major research area. The experimental effort is active in electron microscopy, ion irradiations and ion-beam techniques, neutron irradiations, surface analysis and in other areas. The theoretical effort is active in developing the theory of radiation effects for a broad range of phenomena and in applying it to the design and interpretation of experiments and to alloy design

  4. Experience in Strengthening Cooperation Between Radiation Safety Regulators in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, S.

    2016-01-01

    HERCA is a voluntary association in which the Heads of Radiation Protection Authorities in Europe work together in order to develop common regulatory approaches in terms of practical implementation. HERCA addresses topics generally covered by provisions of the EURATOM Treaty and its work program is based on significant regulatory issues of common interest. HERCA was established in 2007 and brings together 51 radiation protection Authorities from 31 European countries. The current HERCA work program focuses on Medical and Veterinary Applications, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Non-Medical Sources and Practices, Radon and Euratom BSS Transposition as well as Education and Training.

  5. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassompierre, G.; Bermond, M.; Berthet, M.; Bertozzi, T.; Détraz, C.; Dubois, J.-M.; Dumps, L.; Engster, C.; Fazio, T.; Gaillard, G.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gouanère, M.; Manola-Poggioli, E.; Mossuz, L.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Nédélec, P.; Palazzini, E.; Pessard, H.; Petit, P.; Petitpas, P.; Placci, A.; Sillou, D.; Sottile, R.; Valuev, V.; Verkindt, D.; Vey, H.; Wachnik, M.

    1998-02-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  6. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, Gabriel; Berthet, M; Bertozzi, T; Détraz, C; Dubois, J M; Dumps, Ludwig; Engster, Claude; Fazio, T; Gaillard, G; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gouanère, M; Manola-Poggioli, E; Mossuz, L; Mendiburu, J P; Nédélec, P; Palazzini, E; Pessard, H; Petit, P; Petitpas, P; Placci, Alfredo; Sillou, D; Sottile, R; Valuev, V Yu; Verkindt, D; Vey, H; Wachnik, M

    1997-01-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  7. A unique experiment. Measurement of radiation doses at Vinca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-15

    For the first time in the history of the peaceful applications of atomic energy, an experiment was conducted to determine the exact levels of radiation exposure resulting from a reactor incident. The experiment was made at Vinca, Yugoslavia, wherein October 1958 six persons had been subjected to high doses of neutron and gamma radiation during a brief uncontrolled run of a zero-power reactor. One of them died but the other five were successfully treated at the Curie Hospital in Paris. In the case of four of them, the treatment involved the grafting of healthy bone marrow to counteract the effects of radiation on blood-forming tissues. It was recognized that if the effects produced on the irradiated persons could be related to the exact doses of radiation they had received, it would be possible to gain immensely valuable knowledge about the biological consequences of acute and high level radiation exposure on a quantitative basis. It was suggested to the Yugoslav authorities that a dosimetry experiment be conducted at Vinca. The most accurate modern techniques of dosimetry developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were employed during the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the neutron and gamma doses were made at points where the people had been located. At these points the effects of the radiation on the salt solution in the phantoms were studied. In particular, the energy distribution of the radiation was investigated.It was the ratio between the various components of the radiation that was of special interest in these measurements because this ratio itself would help in determining the exact doses. The dose of one of the components, viz. slow neutrons, had already been determined during the treatment of the patients. If the ratio of the components could be ascertained, the doses of the fast neutrons and gamma rays could also be established because the ratio would not be affected by the power level at which the reactor was operated

  8. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bronner, J.; Hartet, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, Freiburg (Germany); Franz, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO{sub 2} will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  9. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuz, M.; Bronner, J.; Hartet, J.; Franz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO 2 will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10 9 n/cm 2 for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10 12 n/cm 2 for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  10. Belgian experience with radiation technologies for sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet, H.; Dardenne, P.; Herier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Belgium pioneered in non energetic applications of nuclear science. In 1970, the National Institute for Radioisotopes (IRE) was founded on the ground of the experience acquired at the CEN/SCK, for developing nuclear techniques oriented to the well-being of population. In 1978 IRE started operation of 2 γ-irradiation units with a 2.25 million Ci Co 60 , source having a capacity for sterilization of more than 100 m 3 of product per day. this installation is currently operated by Griffith-Mediris (Group Griffith Micro Science) and has accumulated 20 years of experience for irradiation of foodstuffs, medical appliances and pharmaceuticals. In 1986, IRE was producing radioisotopes from accelerators and joined UCL for founding Ion Beam Applications (IBA) company which shortly became the world leader for design and delivery of cyclotrons. More recently, on the basis of French CEA patent, IBA developed the Rhodotron, an e-beam accelerator, with an X-ray option, which is now facing commercial success i area of ionization of food and medical appliances. IRE developed also expertise for the back-end of these activities i.e. final disposal of radioactive sealed source and dismantling of the installations. (author)

  11. Work for radiation shielding concrete in large-scaled radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, Shinzo; Sato, Shoni; Otake, Takao.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports the radiation shielding concrete work in the construction of radiation laboratory facilities of Electrotechnical Laboratory, a Japanese Government agency for the research and development of electronic technology. The radiation shielding walls of the facilities are made of ordinary concrete, heavy weight concrete and raw iron ore. This paper particularly relates the use of ordinary concrete which constitutes the majority of such concretes. The concrete mix was determined so as to increase its specific gravity for better shielding effect, to improve mass concrete effect and to advance good workability. The tendency of the concrete to decrease its specific gravity and the temperature variations were also made on how to place concrete to secure good shielding effect and uniform quality. (author)

  12. EV M-experiment in radiation material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, G.Z.; Kislitsin, S.B.; Pyatiletov, Yu.S.; Turkebaev, T.Eh.; Tyupkina, O.G.

    1999-01-01

    To simulate rapid processes in materials, rearrangement at the atomic level, or processes in which the access to the materials is limited or considered to be hazardous, the EV M-experiment is going to be applied more often in the atomic material science (calculating experiment, computer-aided simulation). This paper presents the most important outcomes obtained from the calculating experiment carried out by scientists of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of NNC RK, who are considered to be followers of the scientific school named after Kirsanov V.V. The review consists of the following sections: 1. Simulation of dynamic processes of radiation damage of materials. 2. Simulation of radiation defects in materials. 3. Simulation of radiation defects migration processes in crystals. 4. Simulation of irradiated materials failure and deformation processes

  13. Remote participation at JET Task Force work: users' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttrop, W.; Kinna, D.; Farthing, J.; Hemming, O.; How, J.; Schmidt, V.

    2002-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) fusion experiment is now operated with strong involvement of physicists from outside research laboratories, which often requires remote participation in JET physics experiments. Users' experience with tools for remote collaborative work is reported, including remote computer and data access, remote meetings, shared documentation and various other communication channels

  14. Working memory for braille is shaped by experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Henri; Scherzer, Peter; Viau, Robert; Voss, Patrice; Lepore, Franco

    2011-03-01

    Tactile working memory was found to be more developed in completely blind (congenital and acquired) than in semi-sighted subjects, indicating that experience plays a crucial role in shaping working memory. A model of working memory, adapted from the classical model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch1 and Baddeley2 is presented where the connection strengths of a highly cross-modal network are altered through experience.

  15. Working memory for braille is shaped by experience

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Henri; Scherzer, Peter; Viau, Robert; Voss, Patrice; Lepore, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Tactile working memory was found to be more developed in completely blind (congenital and acquired) than in semi-sighted subjects, indicating that experience plays a crucial role in shaping working memory. A model of working memory, adapted from the classical model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch1 and Baddeley2 is presented where the connection strengths of a highly cross-modal network are altered through experience.

  16. Experiences of occupational therapists returning to work after maternity leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcsi, Lisa; Curtin, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Returning to work after maternity leave can be a challenging, anxious and fraught experience for women, and has been portrayed in the literature as a generally negative experience. Interestingly, although occupational therapists were predominantly women, no research was found focussing on their experiences of returning to work after maternity leave. The aim of this research was to gain an insight into occupational therapists' experiences of returning to work following maternity leave. Principles of interpretive phenomenological analysis were used to explore the individual experiences of six Australian occupational therapists returning to work after a period of maternity leave. Individual semi-structured interviews lasting up to 90 minutes were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and then analysed. Two major themes emerged from the analysis of interviews: compromise and feeling valued. The experience of returning to work was a process of compromise in which women found strategies to cope with their changing roles and demands, to find a balance between home and work life. The women wanted to feel valued by their managers and co-workers, as this enabled them to feel comfortable and confident with some of the compromises they made. Occupational therapists returning to work after maternity leave will make compromises so that they can balance their home and work life. Occupational therapists value managers and co-workers who understand the compromises women make when returning to work following maternity leave and who create a supportive workplace that acknowledges and values their contribution. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten

  18. Child Care Teaching as Women's Work: Reflections on Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miai; Reifel, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Child care teachers' experiences and their gendered understandings of their work were explored in this study. Two female child care teachers were interviewed individually and asked to describe their work as women's work. Analysis showed that teachers essentialized child care teaching, recognized the paradoxes of being a child care teacher,…

  19. Astronaut exposure to space radiation - Space Shuttle experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwell, W.

    1990-01-01

    Space Shuttle astronauts are exposed to both the trapped radiation and the galactic cosmic radiation environments. In addition, the sun periodically emits high-energy particles which could pose a serious threat to flight crews. NASA adheres to federal regulations and recommended exposure limits for radiation protection and has established a radiological health and risk assessment program. Using models of the space radiation environment, a Shuttle shielding model, and an anatomical human model, crew exposure estimates are made for each Shuttle flight. The various models are reviewed. Dosimeters are worn by each astronaut and are flown at several fixed locations to obtain inflight measurements. The dosimetry complement is discussed in detail. A comparison between the premission calculations and measurements is presented. Extrapolation of Shuttle experience to long-duration exposure is explored. 14 refs

  20. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  1. Sample Environment in Experiments using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B

    1984-01-01

    beam experiments with wavelength chosen at will from the continuous spectrum. Another type of insertion device, called undulator produces quasi-monochromatic radiation. The insertion devices enable the tailoring of the emitted S.R. to the requirements of the users and can be treated as the first......Modern electron (positron) storage rings are able to emit very intense X-ray radiation with a continuous spectrum extending to 0.1 A, from bending magnets and insertion devices (wavelength shifters and multipole wigglers). It can be used directly for white beam experiments and/or for monochromatic...... optical element of the beam line. This feature is especially important for experiments with samples in special environment because the latter imposes limitations both on scattering and absorption experiments. However, these limitations can be minimized in each case by finding the best match between...

  2. Computer system of radiation control at PNC Tokai Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Ebana, Minoru; Seki, Akio

    1984-01-01

    In the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), the operation of the fuel reprocessing plant started in January, 1981, the high level radioactive substance research facility (CPF) was completed in 1982, and the plutonium conversion technique development facility started the actual operation in September, 1983. In this situation, PNC introduced computer systems for radiation control to increase efficiency and to save labor: concretely computer systems were introduced for the continuous monitoring system in CPF in September, 1982, and for the plutonium conversion technique development facility in April, 1983. In this review, radiation control items in CPF are shown. The stationary monitors for continuous monitoring are employed for area monitors and exhaust monitors, while off-line input processing is adopted for batch measurement every week, such as iodine with an off-gas monitor. Batch data processing includes routine smear survey for working environment and shield wall survey. Other area monitors are criticality alarm systems which are designed with 2 out of 3 redundancy. In the second half of the review, the data processing system is described on each item of hardware and software, system configuration, data acquisition and demand input, processing, alarm functions, data recording and CRT display. In the review, also the system evaluation and future problems are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Evaluation of radiation risk and work practices during cerebral interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Raghuram, L; Korah, Ipeson P; Raj, D Victor [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632004 (India)

    2003-09-01

    This study was intended to evaluate radiation risk to patients during cerebral interventions and the contribution to this risk from work practices. Thirty nine patients undergoing cerebral interventions in a digital subtraction angiography suite were included in this study. Patients who underwent cerebral interventions were categorised into two groups according to the number of cerebral interventions performed on them, and their effective doses were calculated. The effective dose for patients undergoing a single cerebral intervention (group A) varied from 1.55 to 15.9 mSv and for multiple cerebral interventions (group B) varied from 16.52 to 43.52 mSv. Two patients who underwent multiple cerebral interventions (group B) had alopecia of the irradiated scalp.

  4. Benchmark experiment to verify radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy; Benchmark-Experiment zur Verifikation von Strahlungstransportrechnungen fuer die Dosimetrie in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Franziska [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method of solving complex problems in the field of dosimetry and radiation transport. In (external) radiation therapy they are increasingly used for the calculation of dose distributions during treatment planning. In comparison to other algorithms for the calculation of dose distributions, Monte Carlo methods have the capability of improving the accuracy of dose calculations - especially under complex circumstances (e.g. consideration of inhomogeneities). However, there is a lack of knowledge of how accurate the results of Monte Carlo calculations are on an absolute basis. A practical verification of the calculations can be performed by direct comparison with the results of a benchmark experiment. This work presents such a benchmark experiment and compares its results (with detailed consideration of measurement uncertainty) with the results of Monte Carlo calculations using the well-established Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The experiment was designed to have parallels to external beam radiation therapy with respect to the type and energy of the radiation, the materials used and the kind of dose measurement. Because the properties of the beam have to be well known in order to compare the results of the experiment and the simulation on an absolute basis, the benchmark experiment was performed using the research electron accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), whose beam was accurately characterized in advance. The benchmark experiment and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for two different types of ionization chambers and the results were compared. Considering the uncertainty, which is about 0.7 % for the experimental values and about 1.0 % for the Monte Carlo simulation, the results of the simulation and the experiment coincide.

  5. Undergraduate experiments using the neutron radiation from californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossel, J.; Golecki, I.

    1976-01-01

    Three experiments designed to demonstrate and measure several properties of the neutron radiation emitted by a 3μg 252 Cf source are described. The experiments constitute a special project carried out by a third-year undergraduate student at the Institute of Physics of the University of Neuchatel. The 252 Cf source is enclosed in a shield which allows a pencil of fast neutrons to pass through a central tube, while reducing the ambient radiation below the tolerance level. The shield consists of layers of borated paraffin wax, iron and cadmium. The first experiment uses an air-alcohol diffusion cloud chamber for the demonstration of tracks of recoil protons produced by the neutrons. Semi-quantitative measurements of track lengths give the correct order of magnitude of the proton energies. In the second experiment a liquid scintillator detector is used to scan the beam profile across the radiation shield enclosing the source. A pulse-shape-discrimination system discriminates between neutrons and gamma photons. The third experiment makes use of the nuclear emulsion technique to study the neutron energy distribution of 252 Cf. Preliminary results are compared with published values. (author)

  6. Radiation health effects. Experience from Chernobyl to Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekitani, Yui; Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986 led to a high level of radioactive contamination over wide area in Europe. High radiation-dose exposure to 134 power plant staff and emergency personnel resulted in acute radiation syndrome. The internal radiation exposure by radioactive iodine-131 caused operated thyroid cancer among more than 6000 children at the time of the accident until 2010. The low dose irradiation by radioactive cesium-137 continues even today, and evacuation and relocation proved a deeply traumatic experience to many people. Since the Chernobyl accident, WHO and IAEA have established a global assistance system to strengthen the activities related to radiation emergency medical preparedness and response network. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 has also caused many people to evacuate, and great suffering, hardship, and anxiety to the residents of Fukushima Prefecture. Therefore the Fukushima Prefectural Government is now conducting the 'The Fukushima Health Management Survey' to alleviate residents' concerns about radiation and to facilitate suitable healthcare in the future. It is necessary to continue scientific research around Chernobyl and provide accurate information on radiation health effects not only to the Fukushima residents but also toward all over the world. (author)

  7. Flexible working and work-life balance: Midwives’ experiences and views

    OpenAIRE

    Prowse, Julie; Prowse, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article presents midwives’ views and experiences of flexible working and work–life balance. Both flexible working and work–life balance are important contemporary agendas within midwifery and can have both positive and negative consequences for midwives. Full-time midwives and those without caring commitments feel disadvantaged by flexible working and work–life balance policies as they have to fit when they work around part-time midwives and are increasingly expected to cover extra work....

  8. Investigating work-related neoplasia associated with solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Forman, S D; McNamee, R; Wilkinson, S M; Agius, R

    2015-01-01

    Both solar and non-solar exposures associated with occupation and work tasks have been reported as skin carcinogens. In the UK, there are well-established surveillance schemes providing relevant information, including when exposures took place, occupation, location of work and dates of symptom onset and diagnosis. To add to the evidence on work-related skin neoplasia, including causal agents, geographical exposure and time lag between exposure and diagnosis. This study investigated incident case reports of occupational skin disease originating from clinical specialists in dermatology reporting to a UK-wide surveillance scheme (EPIDERM) by analysing case reports of skin neoplasia from 1996 to 2012 in terms of diagnosis, employment, suspected causal agent and symptom onset. The suspected causal agent was 'sun/sunlight/ultraviolet light' in 99% of the reported work-related skin neoplasia cases. Most cases reported (91%) were in males, and the majority (62%) were aged over 65 at the time of reporting. More detailed information on exposure was available for 42% of the cases, with the median time from exposure to symptom onset ranging from 44 (melanoma) to 57 (squamous cell carcinoma) years. Irrespective of diagnostic category, the median duration of exposure to 'sun/sunlight/ultraviolet light' appeared longer where exposures occurred in the UK (range 39-51 years) rather than outside the UK (range 2.5-6.5 years). It is important to provide effective information about skin protection to workers exposed to solar radiation, especially to outdoor workers based outside the UK. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Operating experience on radiation reduction in the latest BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, K.; Uchida, S.; Aizawa, M.; Takagi, K.; Amano, O.; Yamashita, K.

    1988-01-01

    In Japan, BWR plants have been operated commercially since 1970, and the reduction of radiation exposure has been an important concern. The application of the procedure for reducing occupational exposure is incorporated in Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program for LWRs. No.2 and No.4 plants in Fukushima No.2 Nuclear Power Station were designed and constructed as the latest 1,100 MWe BWRs in conformity with the Improvement and Standardization Program. No.2 plant began the commercial operation in February, 1984, and experienced three times of the scheduled annual maintenance outage. No.4 plant began the commercial operation in September, 1987, and the first annual maintenance is scheduled from September, 1988. In this paper, discussion is focused on recent radiation reduction measures, that is the control of iron and nickel in primary coolant for reducing the radiation dose rate in primary systems, based on the experience with No.2 and No.4 plants. The design concept of a low radiation dose rate nuclear power plant, the experience on water chemistry in No.2 plant, the control of iron and nickel in No.4 plant operation and so on are reported. It is believed that these operation experiences contribute to the reduction of occupational exposure in BWR plants currently in operation and in future. (Kako, I.)

  10. LHCb: Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Karacson, M

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of all aspects of the radiation field of the LHCb experiment is needed to understand the impact of the unprecedented radiation levels to which its detector and electronics are exposed to. The methodology on how this is done is described. Analysis of the measurements of active and passive sensors of various types which are distributed in and around the detector will be carried out. Appropriate cross calibrations will be applied and comparisons between them will be performed. Critical comparisons with simulation results obtained with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are also an essential element of the study.

  11. Radiation dose assessment in space missions. The MATROSHKA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The exact determination of radiation dose in space is a demanding and challenging task. Since January 2004, the International Space Station is equipped with a human phantom which is a key part of the MATROSHKA Experiment. The phantom is furnished with thousands of radiation sensors for the measurement of depth dose distribution, which has enabled the organ dose calculation and has demonstrated that personal dosemeter at the body surface overestimates the effective dose during extra-vehicular activity by more than a factor two. The MATROSHKA results serve to benchmark models and have therefore a large impact on the extrapolation of models to outer space. (author)

  12. Experiences Gained from Radiation Protection Activities in Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    My official duties and responsibilities in Egypt and Saudi Arabia as radiation safety officer, qualified expert and head of dosimetry section covered the specified branch of radiation protection. This branch may be called Applied Radiation Protection. This branch covers all aspects of personal and environmental dosimetry and monitoring, as well as, radiation measurements and shielding. This branch has been implemented at many universities, medical centers and nuclear organizations in both Egypt and Saudi Arabia. As a result, three subjects have been highlighted 1] Radiation Protection of workers, public and environment, 2) Safety of radioactive materials to ensure its control and 3) Security from unauthorized removal. A program has been proposed as (RPSS program). In this program, radiation workers are responsible for the security of all radioactive materials in their possession including radioactive waste in storage cabinets and sources left unattended on laboratory benches. Occupational radiation exposures have been kept below dose limits at all radiation areas by training increased experience and ability of radiation workers. All radioactive materials that are not in locked storage are under constant surveillance and immediate control at all times by Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) or medical physicist departments. Precautionary measures serve as a guide to safe operations in handling radioactive materials and radiation sources. Certain restricted areas, which contain large quantities of radioactive materials, required additional security measures. Implementation of this program led to secure of radioactive materials from unauthorized removal or access, public health, maintaining exposures as low as reasonably achievable and promoting a protective safe working environment with no contamination. It is recommended to include this program in Radiation Protection Manual and Emergency preparedness procedures at academic institutions, nuclear research facilities and

  13. Chinese experience on medical response to radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Qin, Bin; Lei, Cuiping; Chen, Huifang; Han, Yuhong

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Chinese Center for Medical Response to Radiation Emergency (CCMRRE) was established in 1992, based on the National Institute for Radiological Protection, China CDC (NIRP, China CDC). CCMRRE is a liaison of WHO/REMPAN and functions as a national and professional institute for medical preparedness and response to emergencies involving radioactive material. CCMRRE participates in drafting National Medical Assistant Program for Radiation Emergency and relevant technical documents, develops preventive measures and technique means of medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE is responsible for medical response to radiological or nuclear accident on national level. CCMRRE holds training courses, organizes drills and provides technical support to local medical organizations in practicing medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE collects, analyzes and exchanges information on medical response to radiological and nuclear emergency and establishes relevant database. CCMRRE also guides and participates in radiation pollution monitoring on accident sites. In the past ten years, we accumulate much knowledge and experience on medical response to radiation emergencies. In this context, we will discuss Xinzhou Accident, which took place in 1992 and involved in three deaths, and Ha'erbin Accident that took place in 2005 and involved one death. A father and two brothers in Xinzhou Accident died of over-exposed to 60 Co source and misdiagnosis and improper treatment, which indicates that most general practitioners are uncertain about the health consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and the medical management of exposed patients. When Ha'erbin Accident happened in 2005, the local hospital gave the right diagnosis and treatment based on the clinic symptoms and signs, which prevent more people suffering from over-expose to 192 Ir source. The distinct changes comes from the education and training to primary doctors related

  14. Impact of Work Experiences on Attitudes toward Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Alison M.; Gutek, Barbara A.

    1986-01-01

    Three theories account for individuals' perceptions of sexual harassment: (1) men and women view and define sexual harassment differently; (2) differential sexual experiences at work account for different perceptions; and (3) gender role "spillover" accounts for perceptual differences. A sample of 1,232 working men and women supports these…

  15. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation’s lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers. IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. (paper)

  16. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  17. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  18. Experience with first aid in radiation sources accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    1979-01-01

    More than 20 years of experience at the Radiation Hygiene Centre of the Prague Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology with prevention of accidents involving sources of radiation and the Centre's participation in providing medical aid in such accidents are described. A list is given of major types of accidents over the past decade. Prevalent were accidents involving sealed gamma sources, resulting in excessive local irradiation with serious skin damage or injury to some of the deeper structures of the hands, requiring plastic operation. Chromosomal picture investigation allows the estimation of the equivalent body dose which only reached higher values in a single case recorded (1.5 Gy = 150 rad). Organisational measures are described for emergencies and the task is shown by radiation hygiene departments attached to regional hygiene stations. The present system is capable of providing adequate, prompt and effective assistance. (author)

  19. How Nurses Experience Their Work as a Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Skår, Randi

    2010-01-01

    This article explores and illuminates the meaning of nurses’ experiences with their work as a learning environment. A qualitative hermeneutic approach guided the research process and the analysis and interpretation of the transcribed interview-texts of eleven graduate nurses. Three core themes emerged from these informants’ descriptions of their work as a learning environment: ‘participation in the work community’, ‘to engage in interpersonal relations’ and ‘accessing important...

  20. Working in dissonance: experiences of work instability in workers with common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Louise; Bertilsson, Monica; Holmgren, Kristina; Hensing, Gunnel

    2017-05-18

    Common mental disorders have a negative impact on work functioning, but less is known about the process when the functioning starts to destabilize. This study explores experiences of work instability in workers with common mental disorders. A grounded theory study using a theoretical sampling frame, individual in-depth interviews and a constant comparative analysis conducted by a multidisciplinary research team. The sample involved 27 workers with common mental disorders, currently working full or part time, or being on sick leave not more than 6 months. They were women and men of different ages, representing different occupations and illness severity. A general process of work instability was conceptualized by the core category Working in dissonance: captured in a bubble inside the work stream. The workers described that their ordinary fluency at work was disturbed. They distanced themselves from other people at and outside work, which helped them to regain their flow but simultaneously made them feel isolated. Four categories described sub-processes of the dissonance: Working out of rhythm, Working in discomfort, Working disconnected and Working in a no man's land. The experience of work instability in CMDs was conceptualized as "working in dissonance", suggesting a multifaceted dissonance at work, characterized by a sense of being caught up, as if in a bubble. Focusing on how the worker can re-enter their flow at work when experiencing dissonance is a new approach to explore in occupational and clinical settings.

  1. Needs For Education And Training In Radiation Protection: Kenya Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, A.O.; Kalambuka, H.A.; Maina, D.M.; Onyatta, J.; Kioko, J.; Masinza, S.; Kamande, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many nations, Kenya inclusive, have insufficient number of trained personnel to deal with regulatory and technical radiation safety issues. The IAEA Basic safety standards and the 96/29 EURATOM Directive put emphasis on education and training. Both organizations as well as IRPA have been proactive on training and educational issues. The Eastern Africa Association for Radiation Protection (EAARP) in collaboration with some national institutions has also been involved in awareness creation and provision of training and education opportunities for users of radioactive sources as well as the general public on issues related to radiation protection. Experience so far indicates that public demand is high for information and education in this area. In this paper we have identified the educational needs in radiation protection in the region using the Kenyan experience. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructures, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders and their roles if a sustainable education and training program were to be developed in the region

  2. Preservice teachers’ objectives and their experience of practical work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Nivalainen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores third-year preservice physics teachers’ (n=32 views concerning the objectives of practical work at school and university. Content analysis of their essays about practical work revealed not only the objectives of the practical work undertaken but also how they had experienced teaching as school and university students. The objectives most commonly referred to were related to the connections between theory and practice, motivation, understanding phenomena, learning how to observe, and learning how to report. In contrast, some objectives were recognized only rarely, which is an important issue for discussion as a future challenge. Preservice teachers’ positive experiences of practical work resulted from the successful implementation of practical work. According to our findings, practical work can in many cases be regarded as successful, especially when the participants understand the objectives of the teaching. In contrast, negative experiences reflected failures or difficulties in implementation. We conclude by suggesting that preservice teachers should be offered opportunities to reflect on their previous experiences and to see and experience in practice the advantages of practical work.

  3. Radiation protection officers in customs : an experience in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscar Bordon

    2008-01-01

    The September 11, 2001 events unleashed an offensive of the United States government to detect devices that could suppose a terrorist threat. One U.S. program entitled the Container Security Initiative affected all the customs in the world. All the countries desiring commerce with the USA must be signatory to the program; otherwise its products will not arrive to the U.S. ports. With that imposition Customs began to invest more in non-intrusive means of detection. The introduction of new equipment into the Customs environment forced the institution to enter a new area called radiation protection. The beginning was difficult due to the lack of knowledge concerning procedures in the ionizing radiation field. Not one legal regulation was known. Fortunately, the regulatory authority followed the purchase of the scanner and communicated the necessity of a license to operate and demanded that a qualified person in the radiation protection area be hired. Initially the main goal required the officer to obtain the license; however, this took some time because neither national nor international norms for scanners in Customs existed. At that time the recommendations of the regulatory authority were essential. Therefore, several procedures were adapted, thus reinforcing the necessity of specific rules for scanners in Customs. The support of the Customs director was essential. A department of radiation protection was created. Immediately a series of informative classes about radiation protection was administered producing changes in the minds of the employees, especially concerning the safety of working with ionizing radiation. This paper discusses the role of the radiation protection officer within Customs, the difficulties of this position, and the benefits that the collaboration of the officer can bring towards the construction of a safety culture in this institution. (author)

  4. The research of nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqiong; Wang Pan; Fang Fang

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces based on monolithic integrated circuit's nuclear experiment radiation environment wireless alarm device's software and hardware design. The system by G-M tube, high-pressured module, signal conditioning circuit, power source module, monolithic integrated circuit and wireless transmission module is composed. The device has low power consumption, high performance, high accuracy detection, easy maintenance, small size, simple operation, and other features, and has a broad application prospects. (authors)

  5. Planar radiative shock experiments and their comparison to simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reighard, A. B.; Drake, R. P.; Mucino, J. E.; Knauer, J. P.; Busquet, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments have obtained radiographic data from shock waves driven at >100 km/s in xenon gas, and Thomson scattering data from similar experiments using argon gas. Presented here is a review of these experiments, followed by an outline of the discrepancies between the data and the results of one-dimensional simulations. Simulations using procedures that work well for similar but nonradiative experiments show inconsistencies between the measured position of the interface of the beryllium and xenon and the calculated position for these experiments. Sources of the discrepancy are explored

  6. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  7. Free electron laser and coherent radiation. Working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Csonka, P.; Deacon, D.

    1984-01-01

    The planned development of a new storage ring at SSRL gives hope for the exciting possibility that an x-ray laser may become available in a users facility. Such a device would certainly be a unique and revolutionary tool for scientific research and industrial applications, which may take advantage of the spatial and temporal coherence, high power and high brightness of this device in a wavelength regime where no alternative coherent radiation sources exist. The feasibility of implementing such a device in the new ring should be examined carefully by the ring designers. If conclusions are positive, the ring design should take into account the special requirements which are set by the x-ray laser design parameters. Our working group made the first step in this examination process. Most of the emphasis was put on the consideration of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XR FEL). FEL technology has developed in the last few years and was recently demonstrated to operate successfully in the visible wavelength regime in the ACO storage ring in Orsay

  8. Collaboration for cooperative work experience programs in biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating cooperative education modules as a segment of the undergraduate educational program is aimed to assist students in gaining real-life experience in the field of their choice. The cooperative work modules facilitate the students in exploring different realistic aspects of work processes in the field. The track records for cooperative learning modules are very positive. However, it is indeed a challenge for the faculty developing Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum to include cooperative work experience or internship requirements coupled with a heavy course load through the entire program. The objective of the present work is to develop a scheme for collaborative co-op work experience for the undergraduate training in the fast-growing BME programs. A few co-op/internship models are developed for the students pursuing undergraduate BME degree. The salient features of one co-op model are described. The results obtained support the proposed scheme. In conclusion, the cooperative work experience will be an invaluable segment in biomedical engineering education and an appropriate model has to be selected to blend with the overall training program.

  9. The influence of career orientations on subjective work experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2010-11-01

    Research purpose: The study empirically assessed the causal influence of individuals’ career orientations on their perceived life satisfaction, job or career satisfaction, sense of happiness and their perceptions of work as a valuable activity as aspects of their subjective work experiences. Motivation for study: From an organisational perspective, research on individuals’ inner definitions of career success and satisfaction is needed to guide current selection, placement, development, reward and retention practices. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted on a random sample of 2997 participants at predominantly managerial and supervisory level in the service industry. The measuring instruments consisted of an adapted five-factor career orientations model of the Career Orientations Inventory and a 4-item global subjective work experiences scale. Structural equation modelling (SEM was conducted to achieve the aim of the study. Main findings/results: Statistically significant causal relationships were observed between the career orientations and subjective work experiences variables. Practical implications: Individuals’ career orientations influence their general sense of life and job or career satisfaction, happiness and perceptions of work as a valuable activity. Organisations concerned with the retention of staff need to find a way of aligning individuals’ career needs and motives with the goals and aspirations of the organisation. Contribution/value-add: The research confirms the need for assessing the inner career orientations of employees as these provide valuable information regarding the motives and values driving individuals’ career decision making and subjective experiences of their working lives.

  10. Evaluation of awareness on radiation protection and knowledge about radiological examinations in healthcare professionals who use ionized radiation at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurt, Ayşegül; Cavuşoğlu, Berrin; Günay, Türkan

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the knowledge and perception and mitigation of hazards involved in radiological examinations, focusing on healthcare personnel who are not in radiation-related occupations, but who use ionising radiation as a part of their work. A questionnaire was applied to physicians, nurses, technicians and other staff working in different clinics that use radiation in their work, in order to evaluate their knowledge levels about ionizing radiation and their awareness about radiation doses resulting from radiological examinations. The statistical comparisons between the groups were analyzed with the Kruskal Wallis test using the SPSS program. Ninety two participants took part in the study. Their level of knowledge about ionizing radiation and doses in radiological examinations were found to be very weak. The number of correct answers of physicians, nurses, medical technicians and other personnel groups were 15.7±3.7, 13.0±4.0, 10.1±2.9 and 11.8±4.0, respectively. In the statistical comparison between the groups, the level of knowledge of physicians was found to be significantly higher than the level of the other groups (p=0.005). The present study demonstrated that general knowledge in relation to radiation, radiation protection, health risks and doses used for radiological applications are insufficient among health professions using with ionizing radiation in their work.

  11. Design of two digital radiation tolerant integrated circuits for high energy physics experiments data readout

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacini, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    High Energy Physics research (HEP) involves the design of readout electron- ics for its experiments, which generate a high radiation ¯eld in the detectors. The several integrated circuits placed in the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments' environment have to resist the radiation and carry out their normal operation. In this thesis I will describe in detail what, during my 10-months partic- ipation in the digital section of the Microelectronics group at CERN, I had the possibility to work on: - The design of a radiation-tolerant data readout digital integrated cir- cuit in a 0.25 ¹m CMOS technology, called \\the Kchip", for the CMS preshower front-end system. This will be described in Chapter 3. - The design of a radiation-tolerant SRAM integrated circuit in a 0.13 ¹m CMOS technology, for technology radiation testing purposes and fu- ture applications in the HEP ¯eld. The SRAM will be described in Chapter 4. All the work has carried out under the supervision and with the help of Dr. Kostas Klouki...

  12. Bringing work home: the emotional experiences of mothers and fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjasko, Jennifer L; Feldman, Amy F

    2006-03-01

    Given the salience of work in our society, this study investigated how intrinsic work motivation, work hours, and taking time for self influenced the interplay between the emotional climates of work and home. The authors examined day-to-day emotional transmission between work and home (spillover) for 143 families using the experience sampling method and interview data from the Sloan Center's 500 Family Study (L. J. Waite & B. Schneider, 1997). Intrinsic work motivation, work hours, and taking time for self were used as predictors of spillover. There was evidence of emotional transmission from work to home for mothers' happiness, anger, and anxiety as well as for father's anxiety. Also, fathers scoring higher on intrinsic work motivation tended to report greater overall anxiety at home after the workday. Anxiety from work was less likely to spill over to the home when fathers reported working longer hours. These findings have practice implications for improving worker productivity and the well-being of two-working-parent families. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Group work as an incentive for learning – students’ experiences of group work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students’ ability to learn is still lacking. Similarly, the question of why some group work is successful and other group work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students’ experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students’ positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students’ explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students’ experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function, and organization) for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students’ learning, as well as impact their experiences with

  14. Group work as an incentive for learning – students’ experiences of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eHammar Chiriac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students’ ability to learn is still lacking. Likewise, the question of why some group work is successful and other work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students’ experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students’ positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students’ explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students’ experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function and organization for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students’ learning, as well as impact their

  15. Construction experiences from underground works at Forsmark. Compilation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Anders [Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    The main objective with this report, the Construction Experience Compilation Report (CECR), is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Forsmark, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the two cooling water tunnels of the Forsmark nuclear power units 1, 2 and 3, and from the underground excavations of the undersea repository for low and intermediate reactor waste, SFR. In addition, a brief account is given of the operational experience of the SFR on primarily rock support solutions. The authors of this report have separately participated throughout the entire construction periods of the Forsmark units and the SFR in the capacity of engineering geologists performing geotechnical mapping of the underground excavations and acted as advisors on tunnel support; Anders Carlsson participated in the construction works of the cooling water tunnels and the open cut excavations for Forsmark 1, 2 and 3 (geotechnical mapping) and the Forsmark 3 tunnel (advise on tunnel support). Rolf Christiansson participated in the underground works for the SFR (geotechnical mapping, principal investigator for various measurements and advise on tunnel support and grouting). The report is to a great extent based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. But it stands to reason that, during the course of the work with this report, unpublished notes, diaries, drawings, photos and personal recollections of the two authors have been utilised in order to obtain such a complete compilation of the construction experiences as possible.

  16. Construction experiences from underground works at Forsmark. Compilation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Christiansson, Rolf

    2007-02-01

    The main objective with this report, the Construction Experience Compilation Report (CECR), is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Forsmark, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the two cooling water tunnels of the Forsmark nuclear power units 1, 2 and 3, and from the underground excavations of the undersea repository for low and intermediate reactor waste, SFR. In addition, a brief account is given of the operational experience of the SFR on primarily rock support solutions. The authors of this report have separately participated throughout the entire construction periods of the Forsmark units and the SFR in the capacity of engineering geologists performing geotechnical mapping of the underground excavations and acted as advisors on tunnel support; Anders Carlsson participated in the construction works of the cooling water tunnels and the open cut excavations for Forsmark 1, 2 and 3 (geotechnical mapping) and the Forsmark 3 tunnel (advise on tunnel support). Rolf Christiansson participated in the underground works for the SFR (geotechnical mapping, principal investigator for various measurements and advise on tunnel support and grouting). The report is to a great extent based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. But it stands to reason that, during the course of the work with this report, unpublished notes, diaries, drawings, photos and personal recollections of the two authors have been utilised in order to obtain such a complete compilation of the construction experiences as possible

  17. Learning from experience in the context of work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte

    experience in the context of work. The educational design is called Proactive Review (PR) and includes two opposite directions simultaneously, proactive, which entails looking ahead and review, which entails reflecting on the past. The subjects for learning in a PR may be any group of employees that have...... in the field, more specifically an educational design of seven questions called PR, four roles involved in PR and suggestions for organizational requirements and codes of conduct that support learning from experience in the context of work...

  18. Conflict management style, supportive work environments and the experience of work stress in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mary L; Cadmus, Edna

    2016-03-01

    To examine the conflict management style that emergency department (ED) nurses use to resolve conflict and to determine whether their style of managing conflict and a supportive work environment affects their experience of work stress. Conflict is a common stressor that is encountered as nurses strive to achieve patient satisfaction goals while delivering quality care. How a nurse perceives support may impact work stress levels and how they deal with conflict. A correlational design examined the relationship between supportive work environment, and conflict management style and work stress in a sample of 222 ED nurses using the expanded nurse work stress scale; the survey of perceived organisational support; and the Rahim organisational conflict inventory-II. Twenty seven percent of nurses reported elevated levels of work stress. A supportive work environment and avoidant conflict management style were significant predictors of work stress. Findings suggest that ED nurses' perception of a supportive work environment and their approach to resolving conflict may be related to their experience of work stress. Providing opportunities for ED nurses in skills training in constructive conflict resolution may help to reduce work stress and to improve the quality of patient care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Latina/o Food Industry Employees' Work Experiences: Work Barriers, Facilitators, Motivators, Training Preferences, and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Garriott, Patton O.; Flores, Lisa Y.; Cho, Seonghee; Groves, James

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the work experiences, job satisfaction, and work behaviors of Latina/o restaurant workers. A total of 10 semistructured focus group (N = 75) interviews were conducted in the Midwest and Southwest. Data were analyzed using a combination of Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR; Hill et al., 2005; Hill, Thompson, &…

  20. The Dynamic between Work Values and Part-Time Work Experiences across the High School Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfeli, Erik J.

    2008-01-01

    The work value system, its development, and its relationship with work experiences can be modeled as an adaptive control system [Ford, D. H., & Lerner, R. M. (1992). "Developmental systems theory: An integrative approach". Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications]. This study employed longitudinal data from 1000 participants (Youth Development Study;…

  1. Work report 1999 of the Safety and Radiation Protection Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    2000-05-01

    Research Centre Juelich is a member of the Hermann von Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres (HGF) in which Germany's 16 research institutions are joined together. The Centre's mission is future-oriented basic research and application-oriented research and development. The Centre's research and development activities are subsumed under the following five research priorities: - structure of matter and materials research, - energy technology, - information technology, - environmental precaution research, - life sciences. In order to perform its research tasks, the Research Centre also operates facilities in which radioactive substances are handled or ionizing radiation generated. The following facilities currently in operation are of particular significance in this respect due to their activity inventory or accelerator power: - DIDO research reactor (FRJ-2), - Large Hot Cells, chemistry cells, - interim store for spent AVR fuel elements, - decontamination operations with waste store and waste cells, - TEXTOR fusion experiment, - accelerator facilities such as COSY, JULIC, Compact and BABY cyclotron, - radionuclide laboratories in the fields of chemistry and medicine. The MERLIN research reactor (FRJ-1) has been shut down since 1985 and the fuel discharged, the decommissioning licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act is about to be completed. The high-temperature experimental reactor, AVR, has been shut down since the end of 1988 and received a decommissioning licence in 1994. Although it is not part of the Research Centre according to company law, it is supervised by the Research Centre with respect, amongst other aspects, to waste management and fuel element disposal. Core discharge was completed in 1997. Various nuclear facilities licensed pursuant to paragraph 9 of the Atomic Energy Act are being dismantled. This includes the fuel cells and several laboratories at the IFF and IWV-2 institutes. (orig.) [de

  2. Fluid Line Evacuation and Freezing Experiments for Digital Radiator Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Miller, Jennifer R.; Sunada, Eric T.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Stephan, Ryan; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The digital radiator technology is one of three variable heat rejection technologies being investigated for future human-rated NASA missions. The digital radiator concept is based on a mechanically pumped fluid loop with parallel tubes carrying coolant to reject heat from the radiator surface. A series of valves actuate to start and stop fluid flow to di erent combinations of tubes, in order to vary the heat rejection capability of the radiator by a factor of 10 or more. When the flow in a particular leg is stopped, the fluid temperature drops and the fluid can freeze, causing damage or preventing flow from restarting. For this reason, the liquid in a stopped leg must be partially or fully evacuated upon shutdown. One of the challenges facing fluid evacuation from closed tubes arises from the vapor generated during pumping to low pressure, which can cause pump cavitation and incomplete evacuation. Here we present a series of laboratory experiments demonstrating fluid evacuation techniques to overcome these challenges by applying heat and pumping to partial vacuum. Also presented are results from qualitative testing of the freezing characteristics of several different candidate fluids, which demonstrate significant di erences in freezing properties, and give insight to the evacuation process.

  3. Integration of social aspects in radiation protection. The AIRP Work group on communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantone, Marie C.; Magnoni, Mauro; Sturloni, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Radiation protection has never been confined just to its scientific and quantitative aspects as it also incorporates a real and proper social factor. In most developed countries, considerations on the social and ethical issues of radiation protection and discussions on the approaches to stakeholder involvement are in a state of positive turmoil. Scientific and practical experts are identifying and promoting dialogue procedures, embracing ethical and social aspects, and are moving together to add to their experience in new and improved practices for the decision-making process. In early 2006, the Italian Radiation Protection Association (AIRP) set up a workgroup for the purpose of: 1-) Promoting dialogue among RP experts, experts in other disciplines, national and local authorities and the public, in relation to social awareness issues in the fields of ionising and non-ionising radiation protection; 2-) Promoting reflection on the mutual interactions between radiation protection and society; 3-) Contributing to the development and diffusion in the RP community of the culture of stakeholder engagement in the decision-making process. Aiming at promoting continual dialogue between the radiation protection community and society, an initial meeting was held in June 2006 on the fundamentals and objectives of RP communication, by focusing on issues such as: the credibility of information sources, the role of the mass media and institutions in risk communication. A workshop was held in November 2006 on the social aspects of radiation protection: experts in scientific journalism, sociology and medical physics, representatives of consumer associations, participants in a Government task commission, local authorities and representatives of the leading local and national institutions involved in RP, were given the opportunity of communicating and discussing the main socially-sensitive aspects of RP. The work of the AIRP group continued in 2007 with two events related on the

  4. The transition radiation detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility. The CBM Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is one of the key detectors to provide electron identification above momenta of 1 GeV/c and charged particle tracking. Due its capability to identify charged particles via their specific energy loss, the TRD in addition will provide valuable information for the measurement of fragments. These requirements can be fulfilled with a XeCO{sub 2} based Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) detector in combination with an adequate radiator. The default MWPC is composed of a symmetric amplification area of 7 mm thickness, followed by a 5 mm drift region to enhance the TR-photon absorption probability in the active gas volume. This geometry provides also efficient and fast signal creation, as well as read-out, of the order of 200 μs per charged particle track. The performance of this detector is maximized by reducing the material budget between the radiator and gas volume to a minimum. The full detector at SIS100 will be composed of 200 modules in 2 sizes. To limit cost and production time the number of various module types is limited to 6 types and 4 types of Front End Board (FEB) flavors are required. An overview of the design and performance of the TRD detector is given.

  5. A transition radiation tracker (TRT) for the Atlas experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, W.

    1995-05-01

    The LHC (Large Hadron Collider) foresees two general purpose detectors, CMS and ATLAS. The inner ATLAS detector will make use of a Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT), which consists of a barrel TRT and a forward TRT. The TRT will provide additional rejection power in order to reduce the jet background to less than 10 % of the inclusive isolated electron signal. Transition Radiation (TR) is generated by charged particles when they cross an interface of changing dielectric behaviour (radiator). The intensity of TR produced is proportional to the γ-factor (γ=E/mc 2 ). A short introduction of TR theory is followed by optimization studies of the radiator and the working gas mixture. TR is detected by gas proportional counters (straws). The electrical and mechanical characteristics of the straws were studied. Furthermore, the straw's operation at the presence of the 2 T magnetic field was investigated. Any signal corresponds to a heat load which has to be cooled in order to provide stable conditions. A cooling system is presented. The induced signal exhibits a long lasting component (ion tail). This ion tail tends to influence signals which are closely spaced in time. A filter was designed which suppresses the ion tail (pole/zero network). The physics performance of some prototypes was studied, in particular the hadron rejection and the tracking capability. A full-scale prototype (9600 channels) was designed and manufactured. A summary of the machinery and tooling involved is presented. (author)

  6. Conceptual design of a Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) shuttle-attached experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual design of a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment is presented. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt is used to radiate thermal energy to space. The experiment is developed with the primary focus being the verification of the dynamic characteristics of a rotating belt with a secondary objective of proving the thermal and sealing aspects in a reduced gravity, vacuum environment. The mechanical design, selection of the belt material and working fluid, a preliminary test plan, and program plan are presented. The strategy used for selecting the basic sizes and materials of the components are discussed. Shuttle and crew member requirements are presented with some options for increasing or decreasing the demands on the STS. An STS carrier and the criteria used in the selection process are presented. The proposed carrier for the Moving Belt Radiator experiment is the Hitchhiker-M. Safety issues are also listed with possible results. This experiment is designed so that a belt can be deployed, run at steady state conditions, run with dynamic perturbations imposed, verify the operation of the interface heat exchanger and seals, and finally be retracted into a stowed position for transport back to earth.

  7. The radiation protection experience in KSNP of Taiwan during the past decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the radiation protection program in Kuosheng of Taiwan. Most doses are due to maintenance operations. The day-to-day efforts of the radiation protectors are to reduce occupational exposures for both external radiation exposure and internal contamination. Some salient works performed during the past decade by the radiation protectors are also addressed as feedback of radiation protection

  8. NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner offsets determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Lee M.; Paden, Jack; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert S.; Tolson, Carol J.; Bolden, William C.

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments are designed to measure the components of the radiative exchange between the Sun, Earth and space. ERBE is comprised of three spacecraft, each carrying a nearly identical set of radiometers: a three-channel narrow-field-of-view scanner, a two-channel wide-field-of-view (limb-to-limb) non-scanning radiometer, a two-channel medium field-of view (1000 km) non-scanning radiometer, and a solar monitor. Ground testing showed the scanners to be susceptible to self-generated and externally generated electromagnetic noise. This paper describes the pre-launch corrective measures taken and the post-launch corrections to the NOAA-9 scanner data. The NOAA-9 scanner has met the mission objectives in accuracy and precision, in part because of the pre-launch reductions of and post-launch data corrections for the electromagnetic noise.

  9. Radiation load experiments with electronic components of the SYMPHONIE satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencker, A.; Wagemann, H.G.; Braeunig, D.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys fundamentals, realization and results of irradiation experiments which applied to 36 different electronic components of the Symphonie satellite and which were completed at the HMI Berlin and the C.N.E.T. Lannion in the years 1972/73. In a general section the evaluation of equivalent fluencies concerning 1 MeV electrons as radiation simulating the extraterrestric particle spectra with regard to the well-known semiconductor damage mechanisms is discussed. Then the realization of irradiation testing for the Symphonie satellite is described. Three selected examples demonstrate typical failure modes of semiconductor devices under radiation stress: Finally the main experimental results are shown in a standardized manner; a survey in English is given on p. 44. (orig.) [de

  10. Management of Spent and Disused Radiation Sources - The Zambian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabala, F.

    2002-01-01

    Zambia like all other countries in the world is faced with environmental problems brought about by a variety of human activities. In Zambia the major environmental issues as identified by Nation Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) of 1994 are water pollution, poor sanitation, land degradation, air pollution, poor waste management, misuse of chemicals, wildlife depletion and deforestation. Zambian has been using a lot of radioactive materials in its various industries. The country has taken several projects with help of external partners. These partners however left these projects in the hands of the Zambians without developing their capacities to manage these radioactive sources. The Government recognized the need to manage these sources and passed legislation governing the management of radioactive materials. The first act of Parliament on Radiation Protection work was passed in 1975 to legislate the use of ionizing radiation. However, because of financial constraints the Country is facing, these regulations have remained unimplemented. Fortunately the international Community has been working in partnership with the Zambian Government in the Management of Radioactive Material. Therefore this paper will present the following aspects of radioactive waste management in Zambia: review Existing Legislation in Zambia regarding management of spent/radioactive sources; capacity building in the field of management of radioactive waste; management of spent and disused radiation sources; existing disposal systems in Zambia regarding spent/orphaned sources; existing stocks of radioactive sources in the Zambian industries

  11. Radiation processing for cultural heritage preservation – Romanian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moise Ioan Valentin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation sterilization has been considered a mass decontamination technique for biodegradable cultural heritage (CH since its widespread application in the medical field. Initial experiments have revealed advantages, for example, efficiency and effectiveness, but also disadvantages, namely “side effects” concerning CH materials. More than 50 years later, the adequacy of ionizing radiation for some CH artefacts is still the subject of discussion. The main reason why is that science and industry are not yet able to provide a more efficient technique for treating mass decontamination. For wooden items, there is general agreement that the irradiation dose required for insect eradication is not damaging, even in the case of polychromed wood. For cellulose pulp (paper, there is a reduction in polymerization degree (DP at the high doses necessary to stop the attack of fungi, but this should be considered taking into account the purpose of the treatment. Emergency or rescue treatments are necessary to mitigate the consequences of accidents or improper storage conditions. In some cases (archives, the value of written information is greater than the historical value of the paper support. For other materials, namely textiles, leather and parchment, less research has been published on the effect of ionizing radiation treatment. As a general rule, irradiation is not necessary when only a few CH elements are present that are affected by biological contamination since restorers can solve the problem by classical means. The need for radiation treatment arises when large collections (hundreds, thousands or even more elements are heavily affected by the biological attack. In Romania, the IRASM gamma irradiator of IFIN-HH is receiving an increasing number of requests for CH treatment, mainly due to an intensive research programme concerning this topic and close liaison with CH owners or administrators. Besides reviewing the scientific results obtained in

  12. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacca Univ., Bangladesh. Inst. of Education and Research.

    Bangladesh stresses the importance of education responsive to the country's development needs and capable of producing, through formal or non-formal methods, skilled, employable manpower. Although no pre-vocational training exists, new curricula have introduced practical work experience in the primary schools and have integrated agriculture,…

  13. Analysis of Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined Student's Industrial Work Experience Scheme carried out in NIFFR visa-a-vise the challenge of skilled manpower development for fishery extension. Secondary data collected from NIFFR library and report of 2007 SIWES period was analysed descriptively. Out of 617 students from 36 schools that visited ...

  14. The Migrant Experience in the Works of Mexican American Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 40 titles that provide an authentic look into the migrant experience, a segment of society that still exists in the United States today. Notes that these works of literature contain recurring themes regarding education, family, poverty, labor, immigration, and citizenship--all topics that are especially relevant in post-September 11…

  15. High-dependency care: experiences of the psychosocial work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hanif Abdul; Naing, Lin; Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah

    2017-11-23

    to explore high-dependency care nurses' experiences of their psychosocial work environment. four focus groups were conducted with 23 emergency and critical care hospital nurses in Brunei. All sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using inductive-approach thematic analysis. three major themes were identified. 'Specialisation/specific skills' explained a fundamental requirement for the high-dependency care nurses to work effectively and efficiently in their workplace. 'Task completion' narrated the pressure they experienced to complete their tasks within time constraints exacerbated by a reduced number of staff. 'Acknowledgement' signified their need for fair and adequate reward for their hard work through career progression and promotion. this study facilitates the design of future interventions and policies that promote a healthy psychosocial work environment by ensuring nurses working in these areas have the required specialisation skills, there is a balance of workload and nurse-to-patient ratios, and they are offered fairness and equity in career progression and promotion.

  16. Work experiences of internationally trained pharmacists in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Zainab; Hassell, Karen; Schafheutle, Ellen I

    2015-04-01

    Internationally trained health professionals are an important part of the domestic workforce, but little is known about the working experiences of internationally trained pharmacists (ITPs) in Great Britain (GB). The purpose of this study is to explore the work experiences of ITPs practising in the community or hospital sector in GB. Twenty-five semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with a sample of European Economic Area (EEA) and non-EEA pharmacists who, at the time of the study, practised in the community (n = 20) or hospital sector (n = 5) in the North West England from March to May 2009. In general, ITPs complained about their heavy workload, long working hours and lack of support from their employers. Specifically, EEA pharmacists in most cases felt excluded from the professional network and sensed colleagues saw them as 'foreigners' while some non-EEA pharmacists had to deal with a level of hostility from patients. This novel research provides a foundation for future work on ITPs in GB and could assist employers to better target their efforts in development of standards to support the working experiences of ITPs in GB. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E

    2010-06-01

    PURPOSE: This article considers some important questions faced by youth as they enter and adapt to paid work. We focus on two key questions: (1) how many hours should teenagers work during the school year and (2) what available jobs are desirable? DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: To help answer these questions, we review studies that have examined the effects of early work experiences on academic achievement, positive youth development, and health-risk behaviors. We also draw upon nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study to illustrate some new findings on youth employment. FINDINGS: Moderate work hours, especially in jobs of higher-quality, are associated with a broad range of positive developmental outcomes. IMPLICATIONS: These questions are not only important to teenagers and their parents, they also reflect key debates among scholars in sociology, developmental psychology, and economics regarding the potential short- and long-term consequences of early work experiences for social development and socioeconomic achievement. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Although work intensity is an important dimension of adolescent work experience, it is clearly not the only one and we argue that it may not even be the most important one. By focusing on types and qualities of jobs, more can be gained in terms of understanding for whom and under what conditions teenage work does provide benefits for and detriments to youth development.

  18. Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This article considers some important questions faced by youth as they enter and adapt to paid work. We focus on two key questions: (1) how many hours should teenagers work during the school year and (2) what available jobs are desirable? Design/Methodology/Approach To help answer these questions, we review studies that have examined the effects of early work experiences on academic achievement, positive youth development, and health-risk behaviors. We also draw upon nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study to illustrate some new findings on youth employment. Findings Moderate work hours, especially in jobs of higher-quality, are associated with a broad range of positive developmental outcomes. Implications These questions are not only important to teenagers and their parents, they also reflect key debates among scholars in sociology, developmental psychology, and economics regarding the potential short- and long-term consequences of early work experiences for social development and socioeconomic achievement. Originality/Value Although work intensity is an important dimension of adolescent work experience, it is clearly not the only one and we argue that it may not even be the most important one. By focusing on types and qualities of jobs, more can be gained in terms of understanding for whom and under what conditions teenage work does provide benefits for and detriments to youth development. PMID:20495611

  19. Quality of work life: experiences of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl; Vanaki, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of Iranian nurses concerning their quality of work life. A purposive sample of nurses (n = 14) was recruited from two university hospitals. The data were collected through unstructured interviews and were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that the participants discerned their quality of work life by assessing how favorable were their working conditions, the level of fulfilment of their personal needs, and the impact of their working conditions on their private life and their social life. Three main themes were identified: quality of work life, as experienced from a personal perspective; quality of work life, as experienced from a sociocultural perspective; and quality of work life, as experienced from an organizational-professional perspective. The results of the present study will help Iranian nurse administrators to adopt effective strategies in order to improve nurses' quality of work life. Future research can broaden the scope of the current results and offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' quality of work life. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Characterisation of work function fluctuations for high-precision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahlenberg, Jan; Bickmann, Edward; Heil, Werner; Otten, Ernst W.; Schmidt, Christian; Wunderle, Alexander [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Babutzka, Martin; Schoenung, Kerstin [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Beck, Marcus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For a wide range of high-precision experiments in physics, well-defined electric potentials for achieving high measurement accuracies are required. An accurate determination of the electric potential is crucial for the measurement of the neutrino mass (KATRIN) as well as the measurement of the e{sup -} anti ν{sub e} correlation coefficient a in free neutron decay (aSPECT). Work function fluctuations on the electrodes lead to uncertainties in the distribution of the electric potential. For aSPECT, the electric potential has to be known at an accuracy of 10 mV. However, due to the patch effect of gold, work function fluctuations of several 100 meV can occur. Therefore, the work function distributions of the gold-plated electrodes have been measured using a Kelvin probe. Furthermore, the change of work function distributions over time as well as the influence of relative humidity on the work function measurement have been investigated. For aSPECT, the work function distributions of the gold-plated electrodes have been measured using a Kelvin probe. Due to the patch effect of gold, work function fluctuations of up to 160 meV occur. This would lead to a significant uncertainty of the potential barrier, which should be known at an accuracy of 10 mV. Furthermore, the change of work function distributions over time as well as the influence of relative humidity on the work function measurement have been investigated.

  1. Professional Learning between Past Experience and Future Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about learning, qualification and possible professionalization in human service work. With human services we primarily refer to work related to health care, child care, social work, and education. I present empirical findings from different phases of training and workplace experience...... of Danish child care pedagogues. The investigation is part of a human resource centered research program studying the development of welfare institutions and systems in Denmark. Welfare institutions have been developing since World War II as an important aspect of and precondition for the socio...... reality as well as defensive “shyings-away”. It cannot be produced by a formal education alone, neither can it emerge from life experiences alone. In the development of research methodology we explore the interplay of regression and progression, the lifelong and everyday active functions of what was named...

  2. Construction experiences from underground works at Oskarshamn. Compilation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Anders (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (SE)); Christiansson, Rolf (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective with this report is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Oskarshamn, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the cooling water tunnels of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units 1,2 and 3, from the underground excavations of Clab 1 and 2 (Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel), and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. In addition, an account is given of the operational experience of Clab 1 and 2 and of the Aespoe HRL on primarily scaling and rock support solutions. This report, as being a compilation report, is in its substance based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. Approximately 8,000 m of tunnels including three major rock caverns with a total volume of about 550,000 m3 have been excavated. The excavation works of the various tunnels and rock caverns were carried out during the period of 1966-2000. In addition, minor excavation works were carried out at the Aespoe HRL in 2003. The depth location of the underground structures varies from near surface down to 450 m. As an overall conclusion it may be said that the rock mass conditions in the area are well suited for underground construction. This conclusion is supported by the experiences from the rock excavation works in the Simpevarp and Aespoe area. These works have shown that no major problems occurred during the excavation works; nor have any stability or other rock engineering problems of significance been identified after the commissioning of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units O1, O2 and O3, BFA, Clab 1 and 2, and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The underground structures of these facilities were built according to plan, and since than been operated as planned. Thus, the quality of the rock mass within the construction area is such that it lends itself to excavation of large rock caverns with a minimum of rock support

  3. Construction experiences from underground works at Oskarshamn. Compilation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Christiansson, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    The main objective with this report is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Oskarshamn, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the cooling water tunnels of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units 1,2 and 3, from the underground excavations of Clab 1 and 2 (Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel), and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. In addition, an account is given of the operational experience of Clab 1 and 2 and of the Aespoe HRL on primarily scaling and rock support solutions. This report, as being a compilation report, is in its substance based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. Approximately 8,000 m of tunnels including three major rock caverns with a total volume of about 550,000 m 3 have been excavated. The excavation works of the various tunnels and rock caverns were carried out during the period of 1966-2000. In addition, minor excavation works were carried out at the Aespoe HRL in 2003. The depth location of the underground structures varies from near surface down to 450 m. As an overall conclusion it may be said that the rock mass conditions in the area are well suited for underground construction. This conclusion is supported by the experiences from the rock excavation works in the Simpevarp and Aespoe area. These works have shown that no major problems occurred during the excavation works; nor have any stability or other rock engineering problems of significance been identified after the commissioning of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units O1, O2 and O3, BFA, Clab 1 and 2, and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The underground structures of these facilities were built according to plan, and since than been operated as planned. Thus, the quality of the rock mass within the construction area is such that it lends itself to excavation of large rock caverns with a minimum of rock support

  4. A New Transition Radiation Detector for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Malinin, A; Angelaszek, D

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment is designed to investigate the source, propagation and acceleration mechanism of high energy cosmic-ray nuclei, by directly measuring their energy and charge. Incorporating a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) provides a model independent energy measurement complementary to the calorimeter, as well as additional track reconstruction capability. A new TRD design provides a compact, robust, reliable, low density detector to measure incident nucleus energy for 3 < Z < 26 nuclei in the Lorentz gamma factor range of 10 2 -10 5. The TRD design, R&D;, construction milestones, beam test results and a progress of the final TRD integration in the CREAM instrument are reported.

  5. Operation of the radiation dose registration system for decontamination and related works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tsubasa; Yasutake, Tsuneo; Itoh, Atsuo; Miyabe, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    The radiation dose registration system for decontamination and related works was established on 15 November 2013. Radiation dose registration center and primary contractors of decontamination and related works manage decontamination registration and management system. As of 31 March 2017, 384 primary contractors joined in the radiation dose registration system for decontamination and related works. 383,087 quarterly exposure dose records for decontamination and related works were registered. Based on the registered data provided by the primary contractors, radiation dose registration center has released the statistical data that represent the radiation control status for workers engaged in radiation work at the work areas of decontamination and related works, etc. The statistical data shows that there were 40,377 workers engaged in decontamination and related works in 2015. The average exposure dose for workers was 0.6 mSv in 2015. The maximum exposure dose for workers was 7.8 mSv in 2015. Dose distribution by age of workers shows the range of 60 to 64 years old were most engaged in decontamination and related works in 2015. Dose distribution by gender of workers shows 97% of workers were male in 2015. From 2012 to 2015, about 95% of workers were exposed to radiation less than 3 mSv. And about 80% of workers were exposed to radiation less than 1 mSv. The average exposure dose per year was ranged from 0.5 to 0.7 mSv. (author)

  6. The experience of demanding work environments in younger workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winding, T N; Labriola, M; Nohr, E A; Andersen, J H

    2015-06-01

    Investigating whether certain individual or background characteristics are associated with an increased risk of experiencing an excessively demanding work environment in younger workers may help to reduce future inequality in health and maximize their labour market participation. To describe the work environment of Danish 20- to 21-year olds and to investigate the influence of family socioeconomic background and individual characteristics at age 14-15 on later experience of physical and psychosocial work environments. We obtained information on subjects' school performance, vulnerability, health and parental socioeconomic status from registers and a questionnaire completed in 2004. A questionnaire concerning eight measures of subjects' psychosocial and physical work environment in 2010 was used to determine the outcomes of interest. The study population consisted of 679 younger workers aged 20-21. The psychosocial work environment was in general good but younger workers experienced more demanding physical work than the general working population. Overall, individual as well as family factors had a limited impact on their assessment of the work environment. Low self-esteem at age 14-15 was associated with experiencing high demands and lack of trust and fairness at work, whereas low parental socioeconomic status was associated with a demanding physical work environment. This study showed a social gradient in experiencing a demanding physical work environment at age 20-21. The psychosocial work environment experienced by younger workers was generally good, but vulnerable young people may need special attention to protect them from or prepare them for psychosocially demanding jobs later in life. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Knowledge deficiency of work-related radiation hazards associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Wang, Yueye; Guo, Changfeng; Lei, Xuefeng; He, Shisheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge and concern degree about work-related radiation hazards remained unknown among orthopedic surgeons. The aim of the cross-sectional study is to investigate whether the knowledge degree of work-related radiation is associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons. This cross-sectional study sent electronic questionnaire via WeChat to orthopedic surgeons nationwide. Concern and knowing degree over radiation exposure was evaluated by a single self-reported question. Professional evaluation of concern degree was reflected by general psychological distress, which was assessed with the Kessler 10 scale (K10) and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Only 43.23% (115/266) respondents knew well about radiation and a total of 78.20% (208/266) respondents considered radiation exposure as a great concern. Among those who reported concerns about radiation exposure, a total of 57.69% (120/208) respondents reported knowing little about radiation. Respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure were significantly associated with higher scores on CES-D and K10 (P < .05). Among respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure, those who have fewer knowledge about radiation, had higher CES-D and K10 scores than those who knew well about radiation (P < .05). Among respondents who reported no concerns over radiation exposure, those who knew little about radiation still had higher CES-D and K10 scores (P < .05). Fewer radiation knowledge tends to induce more radiation concerns associated with higher psychological distress in orthopedic surgeons. Radiation knowledge should be enhanced for surgeons who daily work with radiation-related fluoroscopy. PMID:28538368

  8. Managing a work-life balance: the experiences of midwives working in a group practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereday, Jennifer; Oster, Candice

    2010-06-01

    To explore how a group of midwives achieved a work-life balance working within a caseload model of care with flexible work hours and on-call work. in-depth interviews were conducted and the data were analysed using a data-driven thematic analysis technique. Children, Youth and Women's Health Service (CYWHS) (previously Women's and Children's Hospital), Adelaide, where a midwifery service known as Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) offers a caseload model of care to women within a midwife-managed unit. 17 midwives who were currently working, or had previously worked, in MGP. analysis of the midwives' individual experiences provided insight into how midwives managed the flexible hours and on-call work to achieve a sustainable work-life balance within a caseload model of care. it is important for midwives working in MGP to actively manage the flexibility of their role with time on call. Organisational, team and individual structure influenced how flexibility of hours was managed; however, a period of adjustment was required to achieve this balance. the study findings offer a description of effective, sustainable strategies to manage flexible hours and on-call work that may assist other midwives working in a similar role or considering this type of work setting. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. JET Radiative Mantle Experiments in ELMy H-Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.; Coffey, I.; Dumortier, P.; Grisolia, C.; Strachan, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    Radiative mantle experiments were performed on JET ELMy H-mode plasmas. The Septum configuration was used where the X-point is embedded into the top of the Septum. Argon radiated 50% of the input power from the bulk plasma while Z eff rose from an intrinsic level of 1.5 to about 1.7 due to the injected Argon. The total energy content and global energy confinement time decreased 15% when the impurities were introduced. In contrast, the effective thermal diffusivity in the core confinement region (r/a = .4--.8) decreased by 30%. Usually, JET ELMy H-mode plasmas have confinement that is correlated to the edge pedestal pressure. The radiation lowered the edge pedestal and consequently lowered the global confinement. Thus the confinement was changed by a competition between the edge pedestal reduction lowering the confinement and the weaker RI effect upon the core transport coefficients raising the confinement. The ELM frequency increased from 10 Hz Type I ELMs, to 200 Hz type III ELMs. The energy lost by each ELM reduced to 0.5% of the plasma energy content

  10. Field experience in use of radiation instruments in Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, N.; Sharma, R.C.; Agarwal, S.K.; Sawant, D.K.; Yadav, R.K.B.; Prasad, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Cirus, located at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is a 40 MW (Th) research reactor fuelled by natural uranium, moderated by heavy water and cooled by de-mineralized light water. Graphite is used as reflector in this reactor. The reactor, commissioned in the year 1960, was in operation with availability factor of about 70% till early nineties. There after signs of ageing started surfacing up. After ageing studies, refurbishment plan was finalized and executed during the period from 1997-2002. after successful refurbishment, the reactor is in operation at full power. A wide range of radiation instruments have been used at Cirus for online monitoring of the radiological status of various process systems and environmental releases. Also, variety of survey meters, counting systems and monitors have been used by the health physics unit of the reactor for radiation hazard control. Many of these instruments, which were originally of Canadian design, have undergone changes due to obsolescence or as part of upgradation. This paper describes the experience with the radiation instruments of Cirus, bringing out their effectiveness in meeting the design intent, difficulties faced in their field use, and modifications carried out based on the performance feed back. Also, this paper highlights the areas where further efforts are needed to develop nuclear instrumentation to further strengthen monitoring and surveillance. (author)

  11. Romanian Radiation Protection Training Experience in Medical Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steliana Popescu, F.; Milu, C.; Naghi, E.; Calugareanu, L.; Stroe, F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Studies conducted by the Institute of Public Health Bucharest during the last years emphasised the need of appropriate radioprotection training in the medical field. With the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, the Pilot Centre on Clinical Radio pathology in the Institute of Public Health-Bucharest, provided, from 2000 a 7 modular courses (40 hours each), covering the basic topics of ionizing radiation, biological and physical dosimetry, effects of exposure to ionising radiation, radioprotection concepts, planning and medical response in case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. The courses are opened for all health specialists, especially for occupational health physicians, focusing on health surveillance of radiation workers and medical management of overexposed workers. Each module is followed up by an examination and credits. The multidisciplinary team of instructors was trained within several train-the-trainers courses, organised by IAEA. The paper discusses the evaluation of these 3 years experience in training and its feedback impact, the aim of the program being to develop a knowledge in the spirit of the new patterns of radiological protection, both for safety and communication with the public. (Author)

  12. Units for radiation protection work; Storheter foer straalskyddsarbete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindborg, L

    1997-06-01

    ICRU has defined special measurable (operational) quantities for radiation protection. A consequence of using the operational quantities is that hand-held and personal dosemeters can give different measuring results in the same radiation situation. The differences vary and are caused by the geometry of the radiation field. The units have well documented relations to e.g. the ICRP effective dose and equivalent dose to an organ or tissue. Therefore, it is possible to estimate these doses from a measured value of e.g. the ambient dose equivalent. ICRU and ICRP have recently reviewed these relations in two important commonly issued reports (Report 57 and Publication 74). This report tries to show the value of understanding these units and their relations and is primarily meant to be used for educational purposes. 11 refs.

  13. Discrimination against Visible Minority Immigrants: The Role of Work Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yoshida

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There are two methods for estimating the earnings disadvantage of groups: the residual difference method and the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition. Each method infers disadvantage from differences in earnings of visible minority immigrants and other Canadians, after controls for human capital and job characteristics. We: i summarize the logic of these methods; ii critically examine the character of the experience measures used in most of the research; iii apply the residual difference method to the Workplace and Employee Survey to show how a more thorough approach to the measurement of work experience modifies estimates of earnings disadvantage.

  14. Radiation therapists' perceptions of the minimum level of experience required to perform portal image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybovic, Michala [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: mryb6983@mail.usyd.edu.au; Halkett, Georgia K. [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care, Curtin University of Technology, Health Research Campus, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)], E-mail: g.halkett@curtin.edu.au; Banati, Richard B. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute - Ramaciotti Centre for Brain Imaging, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: r.banati@usyd.edu.au; Cox, Jennifer [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.cox@usyd.edu.au

    2008-11-15

    Background and purpose: Our aim was to explore radiation therapists' views on the level of experience necessary to undertake portal image analysis and clinical decision making. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed to determine the availability of portal imaging equipment in Australia and New Zealand. We analysed radiation therapists' responses to a specific question regarding their opinion on the minimum level of experience required for health professionals to analyse portal images. We used grounded theory and a constant comparative method of data analysis to derive the main themes. Results: Forty-six radiation oncology facilities were represented in our survey, with 40 questionnaires being returned (87%). Thirty-seven radiation therapists answered our free-text question. Radiation therapists indicated three main themes which they felt were important in determining the minimum level of experience: 'gaining on-the-job experience', 'receiving training' and 'working as a team'. Conclusions: Radiation therapists indicated that competence in portal image review occurs via various learning mechanisms. Further research is warranted to determine perspectives of other health professionals, such as radiation oncologists, on portal image review becoming part of radiation therapists' extended role. Suitable training programs and steps for implementation should be developed to facilitate this endeavour.

  15. Radiation and Radon Survey of Akchatau (Khazakstan) and Experience with Radon Remedial Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroka, Y.; Molchanov, A.

    1998-01-01

    A radiation survey of the territory of Akchatau settlement has been carried out. The main factors affecting the high content of radon in dwelling houses were revealed. The experiment on isolation of under floor spaces was carried out to prevent the entry of radon-containing soil gas into living rooms. The repair works efficiency for decreasing of the radon content in hazardous houses was analysed. The survey showed a need for regulation of the value of 222 Rn exhalation on the territories planned for construction works. (author)

  16. The experience of work in a call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanet Hauptfleisch

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study explored the work experience in a call centre environment in an information technology call centre based in South Africa, which service foreign customers exclusively. Three data collection methods were used, namely narratives, in-depth interviews with call centre consultants, and observation. Following a grounded theory approach, four themes were elicited, namely the perceptions of team members, uncertainty created by a constantly changing environment, perceived distances due to management practices, and depersonalisation experienced while actually dealing with customers. In addition to this, the reported impact of these themes on work performance was explored and compared to existing research.

  17. Work reality perceived by individuals with impairments: a biopsychosocial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Cecília Martins; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira; Luz, Madel Therezinha; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with different impairments are working in the formal and/or informal market despite physical and attitudinal barriers. To date, few studies have addressed this situation from the perspective of the individuals. Apprehend factors that restrict work performance in the perspective of workers with impairments and identify the strategies employed and the difficulties faced. Individuals with impairment who exercised paid activities. Thirty semi-structured interviews and eleven observations of individuals in work activities. Limitations stemming from participants' disability and health status had an influence over their execution of tasks, but did not compromise work performance. Environmental factors that impacted as facilitators or barriers were: lack of preparation of colleagues, employers, education and rehabilitation systems; attitudes and coexistence; accessibility, implementation of land use policies, urban structures and transportation; products and technology; and distributive policies. Personal factors (upbringing, self-esteem, good mood, outgoingness, communicability, willpower, age and how the disability was acquired) also influenced participation at work. Important strategies included recognizing and sharing capabilities and needs, which minimized or eliminated difficulties at work. Workers with impairments developed effective strategies for dealing with adverse situations, which remained in the individual realm. Working with impairments is a complex experience that demands overcoming old paradigms.

  18. Work and Career Experiences of Men from Families without College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Marianne; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Davison, John; Hannon, Christine; Sweeney, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    A dearth of research exists exploring the career and work development of adult men and the influence of family-of-origin on that development. In this qualitative study, the researchers used a phenomenological approach to examine the career and work experiences of men whose parents have no education beyond high school and the influences of family…

  19. A factorial experiment on image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrman, E.; Persliden, J.

    2005-01-01

    To find if factorial experiments can be used in the optimisation of diagnostic imaging, a factorial experiment was performed to investigate some of the factors that influence image quality, kerma area product (KAP) and effective dose (E). In a factorial experiment the factors are varied together instead of one at a time, making it possible to discover interactions between the factors as well as major effects. The factors studied were tube potential, tube loading, focus size and filtration. Each factor was set to two levels (low and high). The influence of the factors on the response variables (image quality, KAP and E) was studied using a direct digital detector. The major effects of each factor on the response variables were estimated as well as the interaction effects between factors. The image quality, KAP and E were mainly influenced by tube loading, tube potential and filtration. There were some active interactions, for example, between tube potential and filtration and between tube loading and filtration. The study shows that factorial experiments can be used to predict the influence of various parameters on image quality and radiation dose. (authors)

  20. Aspects of radiation effects due to visual display units at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, N.

    1988-01-01

    The introduction and acceptance of video display units at work have led to a huge flood of information, rumours, and half-truths about those units. As the population became increasingly sensitized to 'radioactive radiation', there was, and in part still is, a tendency to consider particularly effects of unclear origin, first of all ionizing radiation and later on also non-ionizing radiation, as the main threat from video display units at work. Such important issuses as ergonomics, stress load, visual stress load, and social hygiene are often effaced by the question for 'the radiation load from visual display units'. The paper is an attempt to deal with aspects of radiation effects of visual display units at work. The discussion also extends to hazards, respectively the 'radiation environment', at the site of the visual display unit. (orig./DG) [de

  1. Protection during work with ionizing radiation sources; Ochrana pri praci se zdroji ionizujiciho zareni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for training courses dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation, designed for supervisory staff and persons directly responsible for activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The book consists of a preface and the following chapters: (1) Fundamentals of ionizing radiation physics; (2) Quantities and units used in ionizing radiation protection; (3) Principles of ionizing radiation dosimetry; (4) Biological effects of ionizing radiation; (5) An overview of sources of public irradiation; (6) Principles and methods of health protection against ionizing radiation; (7) Examples of technical applications of sources of ionizing radiation; (8) Personnel and working environment monitoring; (9) Documentation maintained at sites with ionizing radiation sources; (10) Methods of personnel protection against external irradiation and internal radionuclide contamination; (11) Radiation incidents and accidents; (12) Health care of personnel exposed to the ionizing radiation risk; (12) Additional radiation protection requirements in handling radioactive substances other than sealed sources; (13) Measurement and metrology. (P.A.).

  2. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  3. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  4. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Michael.Krumrey@ptb.de; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-11

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  5. Bilateral Benefits: Student Experiences of Work-Based Learning during Work Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Dermot

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the varied learning experiences among third-year students undertaking a structured work placement module in the furniture and wood manufacturing industries. Using situated learning theory, the article considers the outcomes of in-depth interviews with 10 students and offers an insight into the multifaceted interactions…

  6. The work of ICRP Committee 1 on radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rëhm, W.

    2018-01-01

    Among the four ICRP Committees, Committee 1 deals with the effects of ionizing radiation. For example, this committee considers the risks and mechanisms of induction of cancer and heritable disease; discusses the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects; and reviews effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota on a population level. The present paper gives an overview on the recent activities of the committee including the last meetings in Chennai, India, in 2016, and in Paris, France, in 2017. The paper also discusses briefly the focus of the currently active C1 Task Groups on alpha emitters, low-dose and low-dose-rate effects, and detriment calculation methodology

  7. Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS?; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry

  8. Optimising work practices to minimise the radiation exposure of PET radiopharmacists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickson, K.; Chan, G.; O'Keefe, G.; Young, K.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Poniger, S.; Scott, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The recent installation of a new medical cyclotron at Austin Health has given justification to install an automatic radiopharmaceutical dispenser. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the automatic radiopharmaceutical dispenser on the radiation exp sure of the PET radiopharmacist. Radiation measurements performed can be divided into two distinct examinations. These are; a survey of the ambient radiation levels and an estimation of the personal radiation dose to the radiopharmacist. Shielding around the automatic dispenser was modified and radiation levels were then compared pre and post optimisation. Using real time monitoring methods, the yearly projected radiation dose to the radiopharmacist for FOG production was found. For whole body exposure this was approximately 4.1 mSv per year and a dose of 221 mS v per year to the hands. The radiation dose burden from all duties was recorded using TLD's and was found to be 4.5 and 321 mSv for whole body and hand radiation doses respectively. Since the implementation of an automatic radiopharmaceutical dose dispenser, radiation exposure recorded to the hands by TLD measurements have fallen by 39%. Further optimisation has seen the ambient radiation levels fall by 15%. Conclusion It has been shown that by reviewing work practices, radiation exposure continues to remain below the radiation dose constraints required by law. Continuing optimization and reviewing ensures that radiation exposure is kept as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  9. Working group 6: Health. 2. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Health hazards associated with the increasing development of nuclear energy have been evaluated for the Belgian population. Nuclear industry has been shown to be safer than conventional industry, epidemiological and toxicological data connected with the nuclear energy being more complete than those related to the conventional energy. Somatic and genetic effects of small and high doses of ionizing radiations on the Belgian population have been estimated. Small doses of ionizing radiations are expected to promote only carcinogenic effects. The latent period of cancers, the plateau region (period of high risk) and the absolute and relative risk expressed per rem per 10 6 people per year for leukaemia (having the highest risk) and for the ''other cancers'' have been also estimated. These estimations were obtained by linear extrapolation to the 1 rem level from observations made after irradiation at relatively high dose levels and much higher dose rates. Strict protective regulations have been recommended in order to reduce to a minimum the exposure of population to ionizing radiations as well as to get more information on the radioactive genetic and somatic consequences on population. (G.C.)

  10. Validation method training: nurses' experiences and ratings of work climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Mona; Norberg, Astrid; Hansebo, Görel

    2014-03-01

    Training nursing staff in communication skills can impact on the quality of care for residents with dementia and contributes to nurses' job satisfaction. Changing attitudes and practices takes time and energy and can affect the entire nursing staff, not just the nurses directly involved in a training programme. Therefore, it seems important to study nurses' experiences of a training programme and any influence of the programme on work climate among the entire nursing staff. To explore nurses' experiences of a 1-year validation method training programme conducted in a nursing home for residents with dementia and to describe ratings of work climate before and after the programme. A mixed-methods approach. Twelve nurses participated in the training and were interviewed afterwards. These individual interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed, then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The Creative Climate Questionnaire was administered before (n = 53) and after (n = 56) the programme to the entire nursing staff in the participating nursing home wards and analysed with descriptive statistics. Analysis of the interviews resulted in four categories: being under extra strain, sharing experiences, improving confidence in care situations and feeling uncertain about continuing the validation method. The results of the questionnaire on work climate showed higher mean values in the assessment after the programme had ended. The training strengthened the participating nurses in caring for residents with dementia, but posed an extra strain on them. These nurses also described an extra strain on the entire nursing staff that was not reflected in the results from the questionnaire. The work climate at the nursing home wards might have made it easier to conduct this extensive training programme. Training in the validation method could develop nurses' communication skills and improve their handling of complex care situations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Falls From Agricultural Machinery: Risk Factors Related to Work Experience, Worked Hours, and Operators' Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, Federica; Roccato, Michele; Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2018-02-01

    Objective We investigated the risk factors for falls when egressing from agricultural tractors, analyzing the role played by worked hours, work experience, operators' behavior, and near misses. Background Many accidents occur within the agricultural sector each year. Among them, falls while dismounting the tractor represent a major source of injuries. Previous studies pointed out frequent hazardous movements and incorrect behaviors adopted by operators to exit the tractor cab. However, less is known about the determinants of such behaviors. In addition, near misses are known to be important predictors of accidents, but they have been under-investigated in the agricultural sector in general and as concerns falls in particular. Method A questionnaire assessing dismounting behaviors, previous accidents and near misses, and participants' relation with work was administered to a sample of Italian tractor operators ( n = 286). Results A mediated model showed that worked hours increase unsafe behaviors, whereas work experience decreases them. Unsafe behaviors in turn show a positive association with accidents, via the mediation of near misses. Conclusions We gave a novel contribution to the knowledge of the chain of events leading to fall accidents in the agricultural sector, which is one of the most hazardous industries. Applications Besides tractor design improvements, preventive training interventions may focus on the redesign of the actual working strategies and the adoption of engaging training methods in the use of machinery to optimize the learning of safety practices and safe behaviors.

  12. Return to work and cancer: the Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Georgina; Knott, Vikki; Delfabbro, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Research suggests that for many cancer survivors, returning to work has a range of benefits. However, considerable barriers have been identified as influencing the quality of return to work outcomes. This study explored the perspectives of Australian cancer survivors, managers and employee assistance program (EAP) professionals to gain an understanding of the return to work process and factors that affect the experience. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with cancer survivors (n = 15), managers (n = 12), and EAP professionals / psychologists (n = 4) from public and private sectors. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data to identify common and unique themes from the three participant groups. A range of drivers were identified including maintaining normality and regaining identity, which could act positively or negatively depending on survivors' coping ability and self awareness. Analysis revealed communication difficulties in the workplace that impact on emotional and practical support. Negotiating an employee's return is complex, influenced by the level of consultation with the employee and use of an ad hoc or structured process. Direct and indirect ways of supporting employees with cancer were identified, as was the need for colleague and manager support. This study supports previous research findings of the impact of cancer on work, and reveals managers' lack of knowledge on how to respond appropriately. The process of returning to work is complex, influenced by employees' and managers' attitudes, communication skills and coping abilities. Areas for workplace interventions to optimise support for the cancer survivor are described.

  13. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Pardo, M.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. postal 18-1027, Col. Escandon 11801 Mexico DF (Mexico)], E-mail: memp@nuclear.inin.mx; Ley-Chavez, E. [ISSEMYM Toluca, Mexico DF (Mexico); Reyes-Frias, M.L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. postal 18-1027, Col. Escandon 11801 Mexico DF (Mexico); Rodriguez-Ferreyra, P. [Hospital ' Dr. Nicolas San Juan' , Toluca, Mexico DF (Mexico); Vazquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M.A. [Hospital General de Mexico, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is 'Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation'. At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  14. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  15. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, Daniel [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Bromwich, David H [Ohio State University; Vogelmann, Andrew M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verlinde, Johannes [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Russell, Lynn M [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography

    2017-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) is the most technologically advanced atmospheric and climate science campaign yet fielded in Antarctica. AWARE was motivated be recent concern about the impact of cryospheric mass loss on global sea level rise. Specifically, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is now the second largest contributor to rising sea level, after the Greenland Ice Sheet. As steadily warming ocean water erodes the grounding lines of WAIS components where they meet the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the retreating grounding lines moving inland and downslope on the underlying terrain imply mechanical instability of the entire WAIS. There is evidence that this point of instability may have already been reached, perhaps signifying more rapid loss of WAIS ice mass. At the same time, the mechanical support provided by adjacent ice shelves, and also the fundamental stability of exposed ice cliffs at the ice sheet grounding lines, will be adversely impacted by a warming atmosphere that causes more frequent episodes of surface melting. The surface meltwater damages the ice shelves and ice cliffs through hydrofracturing. With the increasing concern regarding these rapid cryospheric changes, AWARE was motivated by the need to (a) diagnose the surface energy balance in West Antarctica as related to both summer season climatology and potential surface melting, and (b) improve global climate model (GCM) performance over Antarctica, such that future cryospheric projections can be more reliable.

  16. Argentine Radiation Protection Society Experience in RP education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A. M.; Ciallella, N. R.; Thomasz, E.; Rudelli, M.; Gisone, P.; Ventura, M.; Gomez Parada, I.; Signoretta, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since its creation in 1967, the Argentine Radiation Protection Society (SAR) promotes all the radiation protection and nuclear safety aspects not only within the scientific, technical and academic areas, but also to general public. To fulfill this objective, SAR organised training and refresher courses, seminars and workshops on RP subjects. During 2002, SAR organised 7 basic and specialized courses regarding the uses of radioactive materials in industrial applications and the course on medical response in radiological accidents, that was attended by Argentine and other Latin American participants. The programmes of the courses are developed in compliance with the legal requirements and also considering specifics needs. In this paper, the characteristics of the courses are enunciated and basic statistics regarding courses and participants are presented. For the 2003 and 2004, SAR foresees the organisation of 18 courses per year and has the capacity to deliver other courses by request. all the courses are delivered in Spanish language. Based on this educational experience SAR consider a priority the inclusion, of a RP module in all the scientific graduate programmes to generate awareness on the importance of RP. Taking into account the migration of professionals to Europe and North America and the Globalization, SAR advocates the harmonization of RP syllabus to attain an international recognition. (Author)

  17. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Pardo, M.E.; Ley-Chavez, E.; Reyes-Frias, M.L.; Rodriguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vazquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is 'Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation'. At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders

  18. Education, training and work experience among nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.; Doggette, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses a unique data set to examine the prior work experience, training, and education of skilled and technical workers in United States nuclear power plants. The data were collected in the latter half of 1977 by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) in a survey of union locals in nuclear power plants. The survey results provided substantial evidence that workers in United States nuclear power plants have a relatively high level of education, training, and skill development. Analysis of average education by age did not reveal any significant differences in years of schooling between younger and older workers. Very high rates of participation in formal training programmes were reported by all types of workers. The most common type of training programme was held on-site at the power plant and was provided by utility personnel. The majority of workers reported previous work experience related to nuclear power plant activities. Almost one-third of the workers had been directly involved in nuclear energy in a previous job, the majority of these through the United States Navy nuclear programme. However, the newer plants are hiring relatively fewer persons with previous nuclear experience. (author)

  19. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Supervisor's experiments on radiation safety trainings in school of engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Radiation safety training courses in School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, were introduced. The number of radiation workers and the usage of radiation and radioisotopes have been surveyed for past 14 years. The number of radiation workers in School of Engineering has increased due to the treatment of X-ray analysis of materials, recently. It is important for workers to understand the present situation of School of Engineering before the treatment of radiation and radioisotopes. What the supervisor should tell to radiation workers were presented herewith. The basic questionnaires after the lecture are effective for radiation safety trainings. (author)

  1. Learning experiences for the transition to professional work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh N. Wood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A better educated workforce contributes to a more informed and tolerant society with higher economic output, and this is also associated with higher levels of personal health, interpersonal trust and civic and social engagement. Against this backdrop, the role of universities has expanded, as university learning has moved beyond providing an education to preparing students for leadership positions within society. This article examines the effectiveness of final-year learning experiences from the perception of recent graduates. The aim is to improve undergraduate curriculum to facilitate the transition to professional employment. An online quantitative and qualitative survey instrument was developed to investigate graduates’ perceptions of their different learning experiences and assessment types in their senior year. Four hundred and twelve alumni from five universities completed the survey. Our results indicate that graduates value case studies, group work and oral presentations, and that graduates rate lectures and guest lectures from practitioners as the least important in their transition to work. The results validate the use of graduate capability frameworks and mapping the development of the skills over the curriculum. These results are useful for curriculum designers to assist with designing programmes on the transition to professional work.

  2. Google Docs: an experience in collaborative work in the University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa DELGADO BENITO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The educational environment contains multiple reasons to make use of the new possibilities that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT as an educational resource offer. The educational experience presented here has been realized in the subject of New Technologies applied to Education, which forms part of the study plans for primary school teachers in the University of Burgos (UBU, and which has as its main goal to facilitate the acquisition of generic competences of ICT to work online. To reach this proposed goal, we have cultivated active learning of the students, from individual to collective learning. At first, they were given a text to work individually, to read and review. After that, groups were created to work on the document cooperatively, online, through the use of the office tool Google Docs. After sharing and editing the document, every group made a multimedia presentation in which all of their contributions are bundled. Finally, all of the presentations made by every one of the groups were made public. When the practical part of the course was done, the students answered a short questionnaire in which they were asked about their initial knowledge, and the level of dominion and didactic usefulness of the tool Google Docs. It is worth noting that 75% of the class did not know the application before the course and that, after using it, 92% say they would use it in the educational and professional future. This educational experience has been very satisfactory for students and professors alike.

  3. Particle and photon detection for a neutron radiative decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, T.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: thomas.gentile@nist.gov; Dewey, M.S.; Mumm, H.P.; Nico, J.S.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Chupp, T.E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cooper, R.L. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)], E-mail: cooperrl@umich.edu; Fisher, B.M.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F.E. [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Kiriluk, K.G.; Beise, E.J. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    We present the particle and photon detection methods employed in a program to observe neutron radiative beta-decay. The experiment is located at the NG-6 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. Electrons and protons are guided by a 4.6 T magnetic field and detected by a silicon surface barrier detector. Photons with energies between 15 and 750 keV are registered by a detector consisting of a bismuth germanate scintillator coupled to a large area avalanche photodiode. The photon detector operates at a temperature near 80 K in the bore of a superconducting magnet. We discuss CsI as an alternative scintillator, and avalanche photodiodes for direct detection of photons in the 0.1-10 keV range.

  4. Cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of return to work and continuation of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, Saskia F A; van Egmond, Martine P; Gits, Maxime; van der Beek, Allard J; Bleiker, Eveline M

    2017-10-01

    Supportive interventions to enhance return to work (RTW) in cancer survivors hardly showed positive effects so far. Behavioral determinants might have to be considered in the development of interventions to achieve sustained employability. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of RTW and continuation of work. In this qualitative study, semi-structured telephone interviews were held with 28 cancer survivors. All participants were at working age, 1-2 years after diagnosis and employed at time of diagnosis. Thematic content analysis was performed. Work turned out to be a meaningful aspect of cancer survivors' life, and most participants reported a positive attitude towards their job. Social support to RTW or to continue working was mainly received from family and friends, but pressure to RTW from the occupational physician was also experienced. Changes in expectations regarding work ability from negative to positive during the treatment process were observed. Those who applied active coping mechanisms felt equipped to deal with difficulties regarding work. Behavioral determinants should be taken into account in the development of future interventions to support cancer survivors' RTW. However, the causal relationship still has to be determined. Implications for rehabilitation Factors influencing occupational motivation among cancer survivors need to be understood in more detail. Previous studies in non-cancer populations have demonstrated that behavioral determinants, such as a positive attitude towards work, high social support and self-efficacy may increase return to work rates or shorten the time to return to work. Addressing behavioral determinants in future development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors is essential in achieving sustained employability.

  5. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for Tevatron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korjenevski, Sergey

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Microstrip Tracking detectors at the CDF and D0 experiments have now been operating for almost three years at Fermilab. These detectors were designed originally for an integrated luminosity of 2fb -1 . As the expected luminosity for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider was initially envisioned to reach 15fb -1 , radiation tolerances of both devices were revisited, culminating in proposals for new systems. With reduced expectations for total luminosity at ∼6fb -1 , the full detector-replacement projects were terminated. The CDF detector is expected nevertheless to cope efficiently with the lower anticipated dose, however, the D0 experiment is planning a smaller-scale project: a Layer-0 (L0) upgrade of the silicon tracker (D0SMT). The new device will fit between the beam line and the inner layer of the current Tracker. Built of single-sided sensors, this upgrade is expected to perform well in the harsh radiation environment, and be able to withstand an integrated luminosity of 15fb -1 . Prototypes of Run IIb sensors were irradiated using 10MeV protons at the tandem Van de Graaff at the James R. McDonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. A fit to the 10MeV proton data yields a damage parameter αp=11x10-17Acm. This is consistent with results from RD48 (αp=9.9x10-17Acm). The scaling of damage to 1MeV neutron fluence uses a hardness factor (κ) derived from the non-ionizing components of the energy loss (NEIL). NEIL predicts a hardness factor of 3.87 for 10MeV protons. We obtained an experimental value of this factor of 2.54, or 34% smaller than scaling predictions from NEIL

  6. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.; Recht, Abram; Stevenson, Mary Ann; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating during 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased

  7. Methods of computer experiment in gamma-radiation technologies using new radiation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I; Rozhkov, V V

    2001-01-01

    Presented id the methodology of computer modeling application for physical substantiation of new irradiation technologies and irradiators design work flow. Modeling tasks for irradiation technologies are structured along with computerized methods of their solution and appropriate types of software. Comparative analysis of available packages for Monte-Carlo modeling of electromagnetic processes in media is done concerning their application to irradiation technologies problems. The results of codes approbation and preliminary data on gamma-radiation absorbed dose distributions for nuclides of conventional sources and prospective Europium-based gamma-sources are presented.

  8. Comparative characteristic of published works on radiation hygiene to optimise information ensuring on the above problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skaya, G.V.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of investigation of 4 data files on radiation hygiene a topical and geographic structure of data files was determined. Dosimetric and radiobiological aspects were prevailing. Distinguis hing features are present in works on radiation hygiene of various countries. Works on dosimetry are prevailing in the FRG, France. Works on radiobiology are prevailing in Japan, England and in the USSR. Revealing of main primary and secondary sources in radiation hygiene permits to carry out more precisely information research. 12 refs.; 1 tab

  9. Radiation protection during backfitting or dismantling work in the controlled area of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, J.; Kausch, S.; Palmowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Backfitting measures or dismantling activities within the controlled area put special requirements on radiological protection. This is to be shown by the example of the following cases. Sanitation of the general decontamination services of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center; waste water, equipment decontamination, incineration and packaging facility; dismantling and disposal of high-radiation components including decontamination of buildings of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant at Mol; reconstruction of the HDR plant for safety experiments together with waste management for components and systems, as e.g. pressure vessel internals, pipes etc.; exchange of the steam dryer and the water separator including planning of the conditioning process in the Wuergassen nuclear power plant. This lecture deals with the engineering and organizational problems, especially accounting for radiological protection and enters into planning of measures for radiological protection, their organization and execution, problems of direct and remote-controlled work also being discussed. The question of personnel qualification is also commented on. (orig.) [de

  10. Neoliberalism, the Third Way and Social Work: the UK experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available For most of the past two decades, the notion that there is no alternative to the market as a basis for organising society has constituted a kind of global 'common sense', accepted not only by the neo-liberal Right but also by social democratic thinkers and politicians, in the form of 'the Third Way'. This paper will critically assess the central claims of neoliberalism in the light of experience in the UK and internationally, evaluate the ways in which Third Way policies are shaping social work in the UK, and in the final section, begin to explore some of the ways in which the anti-capitalist movement which has emerged in recent years might contribute to the development of a new, engaged social work, based on social justice.

  11. Organization and methods of radiation monitoring while working at nuclear critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkin, G.V.; Komissarov, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and methods of environmental radiation monitoring while working at nuclear critical assemblies, are described. Necessary equipment for critical assemblies (signal and Ventilation systems, devices for recording accidental radiation levels of and for measuring radiation field distribution) and the personnel program of actions in case of nuclear accident. The dosimetric control at critical assemblies is usually ensured by telesystems. 8004-01 multi-channel dosimetric device is described as an example of such-system [ru

  12. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil; Ryu, Jae Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity

  13. A study on exposure dose from injection work and elution work for radiation workers and frequent workers in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yong Jin; Chung, Woon Kwan [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin; Kwak, Jong Gil [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Compared to other occupations, there is a greater risk of exposure to radiation due to the use of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluations and therapy. To consider ways to reduce exposure dose for those in nuclear medicine involved in injection work and elution work among radiation workers as well as for sanitation workers and trainees among frequent workers an investigation into exposure dose and situational analysis from changes in yearly exposure dose evaluations, changes in work environment and changes in forms of inspection were conducted. Exposure dose measurements were taken by using EPD MK2 worn during working hours for one injection worker, one elution worker, two sanitation workers, and one trainee at a general hospital in the Seoul area for three days from July 18th to 20th 2016. Radiation from radioisotopes which are a part of nuclear medicine can significantly affect not only radiation workers who deal with radioisotopes directly but also frequency works as well. According to this study the annual dose limit for elution workers and injection workers were considered safe as the amount of exposure was not large enough to have a signifcant effect. The limits of this study consist in the duration of this study and the quantity of participants. Also there was a limitation of the measurement device involving accumulated exposure, where the EPD MK2 cannot check the changes in exposure according to a particular activity.

  14. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow (Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240). Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher (Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233) and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of β-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development (Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805). Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time. According to background on

  15. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department's ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE's historical records to independent research and analysis

  16. HAW simulation experiments with cobalt-60 radiation sources in the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Wieczorek, K.; Feddersen, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes the experimental work and the measured data of the joint German-American project for the HAW simulation experiment with cobalt-60 radiation sources in the Asse salt mine, covering the period up to the end of the third quarter 1986. The experiment is intended to yield information on the synergistic effects of heat and ionizing radiation on the salt rock under representative waste repository conditions. The investigations aim at the migration, release, and radiolytic decomposition of the water and gas components in the rock salt, and at the thermally induced strain and deformation processes. In addition, corrosion tests are planned to be made on various container test materials, and analyses of salt rock core samples for assessing the effect of heat and radiation on the rock. The report in hand presents all data obtained during the experiment. The results of the subsequent evaluation and verification studies will be presented in another report, the programme being given in an annex to the report in hand. (orig./RB) [de

  17. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

  18. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. A Platform for X-Ray Thomson Scattering Measurements of Radiation Hydrodynamics Experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Heath; Ma, Kevin; Belancourt, Patrick; MacDonald, Michael; Doeppner, Tilo; Keiter, Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn

    2017-10-01

    A recent experiment on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) radiographed the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability under high and low drive cases. This experiment showed that under a high drive the growth rate of the RT instability is reduced relative to the low drive case. The high drive launches a radiative shock, increases the temperature of the post-shock region, and ablates the spikes, which reduces the RT growth rate. The plasma parameters must be measured to validate this claim. We present a target design for making X-Ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) measurements on radiation hydrodynamics experiments on NIF to measure the electron temperature of the shocked region in the above cases. Specifically, we show that a previously fielded NIF radiation hydrodynamics platform can be modified to allow sufficient signal and temperature resolution for XRTS measurements. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956 and the National Science Foundation through the Basic Plasma Science and Engineering program.

  20. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of specialty training and future work practice preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36-55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  1. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of speciality training and future work practice preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36–55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  2. A note on some behavioral aspects of radiation protection staff working in hospitals around Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to collect information concerning radiation protection staff working in hospitals in and around Delhi. The information included the organization of the department, the status and involvement of the radiation protection staff and their performance and job satisfaction. Answers received from departments of Radiotherapy, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine were used to assess the relationship between involvement, performance and job satisfaction. (author)

  3. How do musical tonality and experience affect visual working memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Lu, Jing; Gong, Diankun; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-20

    The influence of music on the human brain has continued to attract increasing attention from neuroscientists and musicologists. Currently, tonal music is widely present in people's daily lives; however, atonal music has gradually become an important part of modern music. In this study, we conducted two experiments: the first one tested for differences in perception of distractibility between tonal music and atonal music. The second experiment tested how tonal music and atonal music affect visual working memory by comparing musicians and nonmusicians who were placed in contexts with background tonal music, atonal music, and silence. They were instructed to complete a delay matching memory task. The results show that musicians and nonmusicians have different evaluations of the distractibility of tonal music and atonal music, possibly indicating that long-term training may lead to a higher auditory perception threshold among musicians. For the working memory task, musicians reacted faster than nonmusicians in all background music cases, and musicians took more time to respond in the tonal background music condition than in the other conditions. Therefore, our results suggest that for a visual memory task, background tonal music may occupy more cognitive resources than atonal music or silence for musicians, leaving few resources left for the memory task. Moreover, the musicians outperformed the nonmusicians because of the higher sensitivity to background music, which also needs a further longitudinal study to be confirmed.

  4. Morfofunctional indices of peripheric blood for persons working within the strict radiation control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Yukhimuk, L.N.; Egorova, D.M.; Pogontseva, I.M.

    1992-01-01

    The blood of 118 people permanently working within the area of strict radiation control has been investigated. Erythrocyte morphofunctional value has been estimated taking into consideration the erythrocyte morphological index as well as mechanical and osmotic resistivity of erythrocytes. For people permanently working within the area of strict radiation control intensity of signals of EPR for blood paramagnetic centres essentially changes. It proves profound changes in functioning of blood plasma antioxidant system for people working in the area of strict radiation control. For the people permanently working within the area of strict radiation control in peripheric blood growth of echynocytes and spherocytes as well as lowering of mechanical resistivity of erythrocytes is observed. 4 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  5. The new atomic act. Radiation exposure from radon and natural radiation sources in workplaces and the experience of surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinaglova, R.

    2018-01-01

    In this presentation the new atomic act approved in the Czech republic is analyzed from the point of view of irradiation from radon and natural radiation sources in workplaces. Experience of supervision are also discussed. (authors)

  6. Indonesia's experience with IAEA-CRP on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    2001-01-01

    IAEA-CRP on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction has as participants some Asian and East European countries. Indonesia is one of participants that followed the IAEA program. This paper is not a discussion of CRP-results since it will be published as a TECDOC soon. But the work on evaluation of examination frequencies, film reject rate analysis, patient dose measurements, image quality before and after Quality Control (QC) and QC itself, gave some experiences to investigators to be explored and presented. Experiences could be in the form of problems, how to solve problems and some suggestions, starting from no QC up to complicated QC to be faced in conventional radiography to CT-scan and fluoroscopy units. These valuable experiences of Indonesia are proven exercise of IAEA-CRP as a good start for next CRP or national projects in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  7. Canadian space agency discipline working group for space dosimetry and radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, Anthony; Waller, Edward; Lewis, Brent; Bennett, Leslie; Conroy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the great technical challenges in the human and robotic exploration of space is the deleterious effect of radiation on humans and physical systems. The magnitude of this challenge is broadly understood in terms of the sources of radiation, however, a great deal remains to be done in the development of instrumentation, suitable for the space environment, which can provide real-time monitoring of the complex radiation fields encountered in space and a quantitative measure of potential biological risk. In order to meet these research requirements collaboration is needed between experimental nuclear instrumentation scientists, theoretical scientists working on numerical modeling techniques and radiation biologists. Under the auspices of the Canadian Space Agency such a collaborative body has been established as one of a number of Discipline Working Groups. Members of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science working group form a collaborative network across Canada including universities, government laboratories and the industrial sector. Three central activities form the core of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science DWG. An instrument sub-group is engaged in the development of instruments capable of gamma ray, energetic charged particle and neutron dosimetry including the ability to provide dosimetric information in real-time. A second sub-group is focused on computer modeling of space radiation fields in order to assess the performance of conceptual designs of detectors and dosimeters or the impact of radiation on cellular and sub-cellular biological targets and a third sub-group is engaged in the study of the biological effects of space radiation and the potential of biomarkers as a method of assessing radiation impact on humans. Many working group members are active in more than one sub-group facilitating communication throughout the whole network. A summary progress-report will be given of the activities of the Discipline Working Group and the

  8. Operating experience and radiation protection in RAPS-3 and 4 operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, Narendra; Dhakar, P.C.; Singh, G.K.; Gupta, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS)-3 and 4 was designed and constructed using latest technological advancements in the field of nuclear energy. Operating experience of the station have taught many lessons and provided opportunities to take proactive corrective actions. Design modifications, effective implementation of radiological surveillance program and improvements in work culture have helped in achieving continual reduction in radiation exposures and effluent releases at the station. This paper discusses some of the modifications carried out at the station along with their radiological impacts. (author)

  9. Detecting Structural Features in Metallic Glass via Synchrotron Radiation Experiments Combined with Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Guo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the essential structural features of metallic glasses (MGs will enhance the understanding of glass-forming mechanisms. In this work, a feasible scheme is provided where we performed the state-of-the-art synchrotron-radiation based experiments combined with simulations to investigate the microstructures of ZrCu amorphous compositions. It is revealed that in order to stabilize the amorphous state and optimize the topological and chemical distribution, besides the icosahedral or icosahedral-like clusters, other types of clusters also participate in the formation of the microstructure in MGs. This cluster-level co-existing feature may be popular in this class of glassy materials.

  10. Goiania radiation accident: activities carried out and lessons learned based on personal experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Goiânia Radiological Accident, on September 13, 1987, with a radioactive source of cesium-137 with 50.9 TBq, used in radiotherapy, is one of the most important accidents in the scientific area, representing a milestone for all workers in the areas of radiation protection and radiological emergency that worked during the event. A personal view of the Goiânia Radiological Accident is presented, showing some activities carried out in contaminated areas and lessons learned based on own experience during the event

  11. Order no 206 concerning medical surveillance of work with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This Order implements Council Directive 80/836/Euratom on radiation protection as amended by Directive 84/467/Euratom. It entered into force on 4 April 1990, replacing the Decree of 29 February 1972. It prescribes in particular that persons required to perform work exposing them to ionizing radiation must first undergo a medical examination to determine their fitness for this work. They must also be subject to routine surveillance [fr

  12. Assessment and improvement on system of licensing for work with ionizing radiation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaobo

    1998-01-01

    The article outlined regulations, authorities and responsibilities for licensing in China. The health departments at provincial level issue the license certificates to the units engaging in the production, use or sale of radioisotopes or apparatus equipped with radiation source or radiation-emitting apparatus, and have the duty of supervising and monitoring the security about radiation work. For the particular dangers of radiation sources, there is deficiency and shortage of the current licensing system, such as ignorance of the importance of keeping detail records about sources, poor communications among every health department, poor actions to prevent illegal and secret radiation work such as secret use and sale. We are going to improve our licensing system by hardware (computer technology) and software (management). (author)

  13. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Beam and Radiation Generation, Monitoring, and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, Mike; Kim, Kiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  14. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves` ophthalmopathy. (author)

  15. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  16. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, Parul N.; Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig; Hertz, Rosanna; Hanna, Nevine; Dragun, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  17. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Miller, Karen H.; Ziegler, Craig [Department of Graduate Medical Education, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hertz, Rosanna [Departments of Women' s and Gender Studies and Sociology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts (United States); Hanna, Nevine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Dragun, Anthony E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.

  18. Children's Experiences of Time when a Parent Travels for Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvonkovic, Anisa; Swenson, Andrea; Cornwell, Zoë

    2017-08-01

    This qualitative study focuses on different ways time is experienced by children in families who face time challenges due to a family member's job that required work travel. Data are from a family-level study that includes interviews of all family members over the age of 7. Using grounded theory methodology, this study illustrates ways in which job demands and family processes interact. Analysis centers on the 75 children's perspectives from 43 families. Holding together assessments of having enough time while wanting more time with their parents, children express emotion, generally unrecognized by parents, around the topic of family time. Children's experience of time with parents is rushed or calm, depending on the activities done in time and the gender of the parent with whom they spend time. Findings are interpreted through a feminist social constructionist lens.

  19. Direct Observation of Radiation Defects: Experiment and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    at low cost in comparison with the mock-up tests, offer scientific insight and make it possible to perform, in combination with experimental information derived from fission and ion-beam irradiation experiments, the preliminary assessment of power plant operating scenarios. Defining the limits of visibility of small defect clusters and dislocation loops, and optimal diffraction conditions for electron microscope imaging, remains one of the central problems of electron microscopy of irradiated materials. Using computer image simulations based on the propagation- interpolation algorithm for solving the Howie-Basinski equations, it is possible to investigate the relation between the actual and the 'observed' size of small loops, the part played by many-beam dynamical diffraction effects, and limitations of electron microscope imaging in identifying the structure of small defects. A particularly impressive and useful application of electron microscopy is given by recent in situ electron microscope observations, providing real-time visualization of dynamics of defects produced by ultra-high-energy electron irradiation, or showing microstructural evolution occurring under ion beam irradiation. Such observations have revolutionized our understanding of how properties of metals and alloys change in the extreme radiation and thermal environments of a fission or a fusion power plant. The key feature of in situ electron microscopy is its ability to exhibit the time-dependent dynamics of migration, interaction, and transformation of radiation defects, and to visualize the entire complexity of evolving defect and dislocation networks. For example, in situ electron microscope observations provided evidence of violation of the Burgers vector conservation law for dislocations on the nanoscale. This gave a vital clue needed for modeling microscopic processes responsible for the formation of unusual high temperature dislocation structures in iron, and for explaining the origin of the

  20. UV radiation emitted by selected sources at work stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, C.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of UV effective irradiance measurements at work stands for sources such as: welding arcs, gas blowpipes, exposure processes, printing machines and insecticide lamps. The irradiance measurements were performed using broad-band instruments with detector heads corrected to the Polish action spectra (erythematous and conjunctivitis). The obtained values of effective irradiance for above sources ranged from 0.2 to 8000 mW/m2. Safe exposure time corresponding to irradiance was calculated for the Polish threshold limit values. For welding processes the spectra of selected welding arcs are presented additionally. These spectra were measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer. (author)

  1. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  2. Enforcement of radiation safety standards and experience in the regulatory control of exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthi, T N [Health and Safety Div., Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    1997-11-01

    Regulatory provisions for radiation protection and their enforcement in India are discussed in this paper. The rules and regulations framed for radiation safety cover all the nuclear fuel cycle activities as well as the application of radiation sources in industrial, medical and research institutions. The enforcement aspects and experience in the control of exposures are presented. (author). 3 refs, 2 tabs.

  3. Enforcement of radiation safety standards and experience in the regulatory control of exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthi, T.N.

    1997-01-01

    Regulatory provisions for radiation protection and their enforcement in India are discussed in this paper. The rules and regulations framed for radiation safety cover all the nuclear fuel cycle activities as well as the application of radiation sources in industrial, medical and research institutions. The enforcement aspects and experience in the control of exposures are presented. (author)

  4. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Jung [Graduate School of Public Health, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  5. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Jung; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  6. Maintenance experiences with hand and foot monitor for monitoring alpha and beta radiation of personnel in NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandra Rao, A.; Kulkarni, R.S.; Banerjee, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    NFC is producing natural uranium and enriched uranium fuels for various reactors including PHWR etc. Monitoring of α and β radiations in the active plants of NFC is very much essential in many aspects. The personnel who are handling radiation materials have to be monitored for α radiation of hands and cloths and β radiation of feet. So the Alpha and Beta Monitor became important monitoring equipment for monitoring α and β radiations of persons working in active plants of NFC. Many Alpha and Beta Monitors of make, ECIL, PLA, and Nucleonix etc. were being used in active plants in NFC. Basically α and β radiation monitors consists of four PMT (Photo Multiplier Tubes) for detection of radiation of hands and one PMT for monitoring clothes. The PMT use ZnS (Ag) as the scintillator for detection of α radiation. GM tubes are used to detect β radiation of feet. The latest Hand and Foot Monitors have been incorporated with PC based monitoring system along with software for making the monitoring process more efficient and user friendly. As an instrumentation maintenance team for these monitors, our experiences are varied. These monitors are to be periodically maintained and tested for its effective functioning in monitoring the nuclear radiation. The monitors procured from M/s. ECIL were being used since long time in these areas. The instrumentation maintenance had faced some problems with these monitors such as frequent failure of High Voltage cards, Amplifier and Counter PCB cards. Modifications were made in the circuits of High Voltage and Counter cards to minimize the failure rate and for loading of Display and Monitoring Software through Hard disk instead of from floppy disk. So the availability of monitors for monitoring radiation got improved. Later the introduction of more sophisticated α and β radiation monitors of M/s. PLA make in these areas further improved monitoring of radiation of personnel working in active areas. These monitors are more user

  7. Calibration and application of medical particle accelerators to space radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kwangsun; Park, Miyoung; Chae, Jangsoo; Yoon, Sangpil; Shin, Dongho

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce radioisotope facilities and medical particle accelerators that can be applied to space radiation experiments and the experimental conditions required by the space radiation experiments. Space radiation experiments on the ground are critical in determining the lifetimes of satellites and in choosing or preparing the appropriate electrical parts to assure the designated mission lifetime. Before the completion of building the 100-MeV proton linear accelerator in Gyeongju, or even after the completion, the currently existing proton accelerators for medical purposes could suggest an alternative plan. We have performed experiments to calibrate medical proton beam accelerators to investigate whether the beam conditions are suitable for applications to space radiation experiments. Based on the calibration results, we propose reference beam operation conditions for space radiation experiments.

  8. Activities in Retirement: Individual Experience of Silver Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Maxin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of demographic change is a longer average remaining lifetime after retirement. Many people, however, remain able and willing to continue work after reaching the statutory retirement age. Given the predicted shortage of skilled workers in the future, post-retirement activities have the potential to contribute to both organisations and society. This article elaborates the prerequisites for productivity in retirement age and the changed nature of retirement at present.It also quantifies the extent to which activities are continued at retirement age. Paid employment still occurs beyond the applicable retirement age, whereby with increasing age, self-employed persons and assistant family members make up the lion’s share of the statistics. An empirical study shows the concrete situation of active retirees and the prerequisites for post-retirement activities. At the explorative level, individual experiences of the transition into retirement, the reasons for and the framework of post-retirement activities, motivational factors in job design, and physical and intellectual demands before and after retirement are characterised. The qualitative data indicate that retirement entails changes towards more flexible structures in everyday life. Decisive reasons for taking up post-retirement activities are the desire to help, pass on knowledge or remain active; personal development and contact with others; and gaining appreciation and recognition. Flexible job design and freedom to make decisions constitute major elements in shaping post-retirement working activities. Offering autonomy, skill variety, and task significance is important for the design of post-retirement activities. The paper closes with identifying relevant research fields and the concrete need to take action at individual,  organisational, and societal levels. All in all, the transition from working life to retirement should be made flexible enough to do greater justice to the

  9. Argentine regulatory experience concerning radiation protection in industrial gammagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermacora, Marcela G.

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gammagraphy has always been responsible for the highest rates of radiological incidents in almost every part of the world. This is mainly due to the high activities of the radioactive sources used, which are constantly transported in the equipment that contains them between the storage and the areas of work, and is also due to workload pressures which may induce to negligence in following the operational procedures, if a strong Safety Culture does not exist. The purpose of this paper is to present the main aspects of the Argentine Regulations relating to radiation protection to control this practice and to contribute in this way to reduce the associated risks. In addition, some incidents occurred in Argentina during the latest years, the causes that led to those events and their relation to the in observance of the regulations in force, their consequences and the measures taken to repair them are described. Finally, the importance of the role that education and training has in the strengthening of Safety Culture, key element of all undertaking, is highlighted. (author) [es

  10. Technetium-99m in nuclear medicine and radiation protection experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J. J.; Pavlovic, S.; Glisic, R.

    2002-01-01

    The one of the major contributors to personnel exposure whithin nuclear medicine laboratories is primarily now ubiquitous 99 Mo- 99m Tc generators. These generators, first available about more than forthy years ago, are now providing large quantities of 99m Tc radioactive source daily in the most laboratories, both for direct injection, as a per-technetate ion, and through the utilization of the kits for the preparation of dipherent radiopharmaceuticals. The safe and efficient utilization of technetium-99m in nuclear medicine, as other radionuclides, begin with the design, construction and operation of the 'Hot'Laboratory area, where radionuclide are stored and patient doses are prepared. Regardless of the specific physical configuration, suitable facilities need to be provided and good working practices established in order to get these principal objectives: (a) keep radiation exposure to personnel at ALARA levels; (b) prevent contamination of personnel; (c) prevent contamination of measuring instruments (including imaging devices such as gamma cameras and rectilinear scanners), and (d) prevent spread of contamination to places or persons outside the laboratory

  11. All in a Day's Work: Job Experiences, Self-Esteem, and Fathering in Working-Class Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm-Thomas, Karen; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    1994-01-01

    Examined how working-class fathers' job experiences affected their self-esteem and parenting styles. Conducted home interviews with 59 working-class fathers in dual-earner families and their target child, who was aged 8 to 12 years. Found that more positive fathers' work experiences, higher their self-esteem, which predicted more accepting…

  12. Own experiences in genetic counselling of radiation exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, G.; Bruening, L.

    1995-01-01

    An outline is given of genetic counselling provided to 46 radiation-exposed persons during the period from 1978 to 1994. The radiation exposure had, in most cases, been due to radiation-therapeutic measures (n=22). To a low extent, counselling was carried out because of fear of genetic consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident (n=11), preceding radiation exposure from X-ray (n=9) and nuclear diagnosis (n=1) as well as occupation radiation exposure (n=3). During counselling, information was given on the genetic risk to be expected, taking into consideration the risk factor that is valid at present and the malformation doubling dose. After performance of radiation therapy, an avoidance of conception for 2 years has been recommended. After termination of this period, in the case of an urgent wish of having children, pregnancy was not discouraged if no further risk factors existed. (orig.) [de

  13. Pioneer 10/11 data analysis of the trapped radiation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W.

    1982-01-01

    The data handling operations and the database produced by the Trapped Radiation Experiment on the NASA Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are outlined. In situ measurements of trapped radiation at both Jupiter and Saturn, the extension of cosmic ray observations to the outer heliosphere, the presence of Jovian electrons in interplanetary space, analyses of the interaction between planetary satellites and the trapped radiation that engulfs them, and further investigations of the radiation enviroments of both planets are reported.

  14. Radiation control report on intermediate heat exchanger replacement and related works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanou, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Sasajima, T.; Hoshiba, H.; Emori, S.; Shindou, K.

    2002-03-01

    The 13th periodical inspection of the experimental fast reactor JOYO is being made from Jun. 2000 to Jan. 2003. While this inspection, from the end of Oct. 2000 to Nov. 2001, the MK-III modification work on heat transport system was made in lower region of the reactor containment vessel in the reactor facility (under floor area). In the MK-III modification work, the works important to radiation control were the replacement of intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) and fixtures, and the picking out of the surveillance material from primary heat transport piping carried out in the maintenance building. Because the working areas of these works were executed in small space around the complicated primary heat transport piping, workability was bad and dose rate from the corrosion products (CP) in piping or fixtures was high. In such condition, radiation control was performed mainly concerned about external exposure. The planted total external exposure of the IHX replacement and related works was 7135 man-mSv (target of total dose control: less than 5708 man-mSv, 80% of the plan), derived from special radiation work plants for segmental works, concerned about work procedure, number of workers, period of work, dose rate of working area and surface dose rate of equipments. The special radiation control organization was established for such long and large-scale work. The spatial organization held detailed discussion about radiation control of this work with the execution section and contractors appropriately, performance careful external/internal exposure control and surface contamination control and made efforts to reduce te external exposure thoroughly. As a result of these action, the total external exposure was 2386 man·mSv (≅33% of the plan, ≅42% of the target) and the maximum individual exposure were 24.7 mSv for staffs and 21.7mSv for contractors. The dose rate, surface contamination and air contamination while the works were kept under the control level with the

  15. Science and regulation 50 years hand in hand in radiation safety work in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, Jukka; Mustonen, Raimo; Ikaheimonen, Tarja

    2008-01-01

    The first predecessor of the present Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) was founded in 1958 to regulate the use of radiation and to study artificial radiation in the environment. In those days radiation was used only in medical and industrial applications and there were also first indications that atmospheric nuclear tests might cause significant exposure to radiation, especially in the Northern Finland. Focusing activities of the new Institute of Radiation Physics, as STUK was called in those days, to these two activities laid foundation for the operations culture where regulators and scientists work together to achieve the optimum level of safety. Since those early days STUK has continued this operations model and developed it to include also other activities. Today STUK is the national regulatory body for both radiation protection and nuclear safety, but at the same time it is a research organisation and an expert body, supporting for instance the national emergency preparedness for nuclear and radiation accidents. This has brought great synergy benefits and given STUK an opportunity to use the limited national resources in the most effective way. This paper describes the main functions of STUK in its fifty years' operation and highlights the arguments favouring to keep regulatory and research activities as close to each other as possible. In today's world nuclear safety, radiation protection, and radiological preparedness and security issues are so closely connected with each other that organisations dealing with them should have comprehensive knowledge about all of them. (author)

  16. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, D [National Science Foundation; Bromwich, DH [Ohio State University; Russell, LM [Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Verlinde, J [The Pennsylvania State University; Vogelmann, AM [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2015-10-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and this warming is closely connected with global sea level rise. The discovery of rapid climate change on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has challenged previous explanations of Antarctic climate change that focused on strengthening of circumpolar westerlies in response to the positive polarity trend in the Southern Annular Mode. West Antarctic warming does not yet have a comprehensive explanation: dynamical mechanisms may vary from one season to the next, and these mechanisms very likely involve complex teleconnections with subtropical and tropical latitudes. The prime motivation for this proposal is that there has been no substantial atmospheric science or climatological field work on West Antarctica since the 1957 International Geophysical Year and that research continued for only a few years. Direct meteorological information on the WAIS has been limited to a few automatic weather stations for several decades, yet satellite imagery and meteorological reanalyses indicate that West Antarctica is highly susceptible to advection of warm and moist maritime air with related cloud cover, depending on the location and strength of low pressure cells in the Amundsen, Ross, and Bellingshausen Seas. There is a need to quantify the role of these changing air masses on the surface energy balance, including all surface energy components and cloud-radiative forcing. More generally, global climate model simulations are known to perform poorly over the Antarctic and Southern Oceans, and the marked scarcity of cloud information at southern high latitudes has so far inhibited significant progress. Fortunately, McMurdo Station, where the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility’s (ARM’s) most advanced cloud and aerosol instrumentation is situated, has a meteorological relationship with the WAIS via circulation patterns in the Ross and Amundsen Seas. We can therefore gather sophisticated data with cloud

  17. Legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations in the arab counties a comparative analytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baroudy, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the developments taking place in nuclear sciences and technologies during the twentieth century and the resulting increase of useful applications of these technologies, the international efforts aiming at helping different countries to establish nuclear safety systems. This was also increased through the promulgation of legislations that render the practices, which could be accompanied with exposure to ionizing radiations, more safe within a firm legal system that is also backed by promulgating suitable executive regulations. Most Arab countries are keen to promulgate their legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations and protection against their dangers. Those legislations usually get their genesis and provisions from the international recommendations as well as from the general legal system of the country. The present work consists of four chapters. The first chapter deals with the definition of legislations for regulating the work with ionizing radiations. Chapter two discusses the international trend to promulgate legislations for protection against ionizing radiations. Chapter three includes an analytical comparative study on the legislations that regulates the work with ionizing radiations in the Arab countries. Finally, chapter four deals with the legislations for protection against ionizing radiations in the Arab Republic of Egypt

  18. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, Kavita, E-mail: kavita.phy@mnit.ac.in [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) Jaipur, Jaipur-302017 (India); Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh [University of Delhi (DU), Delhi-110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  19. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  20. Clinical experience in 89 consecutive cases of chronic radiation enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Chen

    2011-02-01

    Conclusions: We confirmed that as compared with recently developed innovative techniques, early primitive radiotherapy techniques were associated with more severe radiotherapy complications that required surgery. Smoking may enhance patients’ vulnerability to severe radiation injury. Surgery for radiation-induced intestinal obstruction, intestinal fistula and perforation is warranted because QOL, serum albumin level and body mass index were similar between the surgical and nonsurgical groups.

  1. Photoelectric effect experiment for understanding the concept of quantization of radiation energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimy Gerardine Berrios Saavedra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study forms part of research on the teaching of physics. The question that directed it was: How a proposed classroom, based on the photoelectric effect experiment helps pres-service teachers of physics of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional to expand their understanding of the concept of quantization energy of radiation? The construction of the theoretical framework developed on the one hand, with scientific ideas about the quantization of energy, and moreover, with the educational proposals of teaching for understanding. This pedagogical approach was guided by the investigative gaze of the study methodology based on design, taking as main element the use of learning tools such as the task to Predict, Experiment and Explain (PEE. It was found that these tasks fomented the initial understandings of students about the concept, while they enriched and transformed progressively their models and scientific ideas, promoting aspects of scientific work in developing curiosity, imagination and motivation.

  2. The predictive mind and the experience of visual art work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Among the main challenges of the predictive brain/mind concept is how to link prediction at the neural level to prediction at the cognitive-psychological level and finding conceptually robust and empirically verifiable ways to harness this theoretical framework toward explaining higher-order mental and cognitive phenomena, including the subjective experience of aesthetic and symbolic forms. Building on the tentative prediction error account of visual art, this article extends the application of the predictive coding framework to the visual arts. It does so by linking this theoretical discussion to a subjective, phenomenological account of how a work of art is experienced. In order to engage more deeply with a work of art, viewers must be able to tune or adapt their prediction mechanism to recognize art as a specific class of objects whose ontological nature defies predictability, and they must be able to sustain a productive flow of predictions from low-level sensory, recognitional to abstract semantic, conceptual, and affective inferences. The affective component of the process of predictive error optimization that occurs when a viewer enters into dialog with a painting is constituted both by activating the affective affordances within the image and by the affective consequences of prediction error minimization itself. The predictive coding framework also has implications for the problem of the culturality of vision. A person's mindset, which determines what top-down expectations and predictions are generated, is co-constituted by culture-relative skills and knowledge, which form hyperpriors that operate in the perception of art.

  3. The predictive mind and the experience of visual art work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Among the main challenges of the predictive brain/mind concept is how to link prediction at the neural level to prediction at the cognitive-psychological level and finding conceptually robust and empirically verifiable ways to harness this theoretical framework toward explaining higher-order mental and cognitive phenomena, including the subjective experience of aesthetic and symbolic forms. Building on the tentative prediction error account of visual art, this article extends the application of the predictive coding framework to the visual arts. It does so by linking this theoretical discussion to a subjective, phenomenological account of how a work of art is experienced. In order to engage more deeply with a work of art, viewers must be able to tune or adapt their prediction mechanism to recognize art as a specific class of objects whose ontological nature defies predictability, and they must be able to sustain a productive flow of predictions from low-level sensory, recognitional to abstract semantic, conceptual, and affective inferences. The affective component of the process of predictive error optimization that occurs when a viewer enters into dialog with a painting is constituted both by activating the affective affordances within the image and by the affective consequences of prediction error minimization itself. The predictive coding framework also has implications for the problem of the culturality of vision. A person’s mindset, which determines what top–down expectations and predictions are generated, is co-constituted by culture-relative skills and knowledge, which form hyperpriors that operate in the perception of art. PMID:25566111

  4. Instruments for radiation measurement in biosciences. Series 3. radioluminography. 13. Application of imaging plate for radiation control works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamadera, Akira

    2000-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) is useful for measurement of both distribution and intensity of radiation. This paper described application of IP in radiation control works. Since IP has the 500 times higher sensitivity than the film badge for X-ray-range radiation of 12-120 keV, it can be useful as a personnel dosemeter in medical field. IP is suitable for measurement of radioactivity in a lot of samples and it can be useful for measurement of smear test papers although a problem concerning 3 H monitoring remains. Since IP gives the two-dimensional information of radiation distribution, IP can be useful for monitoring of contamination status such as its site and area. A contamination accident occurred by 68 Ge in PET apparatus is described for instance. IP can be also useful for measurement of the low level radioactivity in solutions, such as waste water. The author made an apparatus for drain monitoring which composed from acryl-box and IP. The surface of the former box, containing the water, is stuck by various shields of acryl- and lead-plates and is in contact with IP. Both measurement of radioactivity concentration and identification of radionuclide are possible. The important defect is pointed out to be fading phenomenon in those works above. (K.H.)

  5. Performance of Radiation Hard Pixel Sensors for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dorokhov, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors in particle physics experiments are used for the detection of the particles trajectory produced in high energy collisions. To study physics phenomena at high energies the high particle interaction rate is unavoidable, as the number of interesting events falls with the energy and the total number of events is dominated by the soft processes. The position resolution of vertex detectors has to be of few microns in order to distinguish between particle tracks produced in b-quark or tau-decays, because of the short flight path before the decay. The high spatial position resolution and the ability to detect a large number of superimposed track are the key features for tracking detectors. Modern silicon microstrip and pixel detectors with high resolution are currently most suitable devices for the tracking systems of high energy physics experiments. In this work the performance of the sensors designed for the CMS pixel detector are studied and the position resolution is estimated. In the...

  6. Hygienic aspects of the classification of works with ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.

    1978-01-01

    Classification is presented of ionizing radiation sources (IRS) the underlying principle of which is the effect of radiation on living organisms. The ways of improving the classification and expanding it by identifying more groups of IRS and defining the terminology more precisely are suggested. On this basis, a classification of IRS-handling activities has been developed and recommendations on conditions of work with each group have been given

  7. Negative emotional experiences arouse rumination and affect working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Antonietta; Lanciano, Tiziana; Soleti, Emanuela; Rimé, Bernard

    2013-10-01

    Following an emotional experience, individuals are confronted with the persistence of ruminative thoughts that disturb the undertaking of other activities. In the present study, we experimentally tested the idea that experiencing a negative emotion triggers a ruminative process that drains working memory (WM) resources normally devoted to other tasks. Undergraduate participants of high versus low WM capacity were administered the operation-word memory span test (OSPAN) as a measure of availability of WM resources preceding and following the presentation of negative emotional versus neutral material. Rumination was assessed immediately after the second OSPAN session and at a 24-hr delay. Results showed that both the individual's WM capacity and the emotional valence of the material influenced WM performance and the persistence of ruminative thoughts. Following the experimental induction, rumination mediated the relationship between the negative emotional state and the concomitant WM performance. Based on these results, we argue that ruminative processes deplete WM resources, making them less available for concurrent tasks; in addition, rumination tends to persist over time. These findings have implications for the theoretical modeling of the long-term effects of emotions in both daily life and clinical contexts.

  8. The characteristics of peripheral blood leukocytes in persons working with ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zykova, I.A.; Sokolova, N.B.; Yas'kova, V.Z.

    1984-01-01

    Functional and qualitative changes of peripheral blood cellular composition were studied in persons working over a long period of time with ionizing radiation sources under the action of various factors of production upon an organism. Appression of a function and increase of T-lymphocyte chromosome damages were revealed against the background of a decrease both of enzymatic activity level and leukocyte number in persons operating for a long time (more than 10 years) with ionizing radiation sources. Discovered changes occurred under the action upon a human being not only of small doses of ionizing radiation but a whole complex of industrial factors which may initiate changes of adapted character

  9. The Biostack experiment as an approach to high LET radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, D.; Buecker, H.; Facius, R.; Schaefer, M.; Toth, B.; Ruether, W.; Pfohl, R.; Kaiser, R.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation of biological effects of the penetrating cosmic radiation enforced new experimental techniques, not only to be used in space experiments, but according to theoretical considerations in accelerator experiments as well. Localization and individual evaluation are the main tools for the reduction of the sample space, which allows together with the multiple factorial analysis investigations in a ''dose'' region that is off limits for classical radiobiology. The results of the Biostack experiments proved that there is a serious radiation hazard during longer space flights, which we should be aware of under the aspects of radiation protection and consideration in biological experiments (investigating weightlessness as example)

  10. On the radiation exposure dose and health management history during 50 years of x-ray working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomihiro

    1981-01-01

    My X-ray working history has become 50 years at the end of April, 1980. At this chance, the following data were summarized; the case numbers of X-ray photographs (517,132 cases), total amounts of radiation exposure dose (66.85 roentgen) and the results of blood test, which were experienced during past 50 years. The amounts of exposure dose during 35 years till 1965 were measured using my own method, which measured the film blackening as 30 milli-roentgen per week by certain standard method. After 1966 till 1980, the exposure dose were recorded using that of the film-badge service of Nippon Hoan Yohin Kyokai. The total amounts of exposure dose during 50 years were about 1/4 of D = 5 (N - 18). The results of blood test during last 27 years were found to be normal values. Then, it is happy to say that my body has been protected completely, from radiation hazard as a result of taking radiation protection and checking blood test always at my daily radiation works. The data of my own experiences during 50 years are summarized and reported in this paper. (author)

  11. Bullying among radiation therapists: effects on job performance and work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Johnson, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    To identify the effects of workplace bullying in the radiation therapy department on job performance and explore the environment and morale of individuals who work with a bully. A quantitative research study was designed to assess the prevalence and effects of bullying in the radiation therapy workplace. A total of 308 radiation therapists participated in the study for a return rate of 46%. Of those, 194 indicated that workplace bullying was present either in their current workplace or in a previous radiation therapy environment and that it negatively affected job performance and satisfaction. Findings of this study indicate a need for evaluation of the radiation therapy workplace, education on how to identify and prevent bullying behavior, and better communication among members of the radiation therapy environment. Participants indicated that working in a hostile environment led to forgetfulness, ineffective communication, and perceived discrepancies in promotion and treatment by management. Any bullying behavior contributes to an overall toxic work environment, which is unhealthy and unsafe for patients and therapists. Those who manage therapists should promote a culture of safety and embrace their staff's independence.

  12. Towards happiness: Experiences of work-role fit, meaningfulness and work engagement of industrial/organisational psychologists in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn E. van Zyl

    2010-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to determine how I/O psychologists experience the meaning of their work and to investigate the relationships between their experiences of work-role fit, meaning of work, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement, utilising the happiness framework proposed by Seligman (2002. Motivation for the study: I/O psychologists spend more than 88% of their working day with people, and they are primary role models for happiness in the workplace. Information about their work engagement and experiences of meaning is therefore needed. Research design, approach and method: A survey design was used. A convenience sample (n = 106 was taken of I/O psychologists in South Africa. A biographical questionnaire, the Work-Role Fit Scale, the Work-Life Questionnaire, the Psychological Meaningfulness Scale, the Work Engagement Scale and a survey measuring the actual and desired time spent on six broad categories of work were administered. Main findings: Work-role fit predicted psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. The calling orientation to work predicted both psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. Work-role fit mediated the relationship between the meaning of work and psychological meaningfulness. Work-role fit partially mediated the relationship between a calling orientation to work and work engagement. Practical implications: A calling orientation to work should be fostered in I/O psychologists because it contributes to experiences of work-role fit, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. Contribution/value-add: The results of this study contribute to scientific knowledge about work-role fit, engagement and meaning as components of happiness of I/O psychologists.

  13. The radiat ion-epidemiological and cytogenetic study in group of participants of planned working on liquidation consequences Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'omyina, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Data of radiation anamnesis (beginning and duration of staying in zone of the Chernobyl radiation accident, kind of fulfilled works) as factors of risk are specific in relation to the basic classes of diseases. Works on burial of atomic pile, deactivation, evacuation and all dates of entrance into the one of radiation injury were recognized as hazardous factors for the development of malignant growth

  14. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  15. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  16. Depression of efficiency of neutrophils for Candida albicans phagocytosis in personnel working in radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The neutrophil functions, chemotaxis (direct and random migration), phagocytosis using Candida albicans (percent, index), phagocytosis by NBT (percent, score) and adherence were studied on 55 persons working in radiation field (group I) and 40 persons as control (group II). The effect of radiation on blood picture of persons working in this field with special references to leucocytic counts and neutrophil functions was studied. White and red cells counts were 6.275 +- 1.723 and 5.475 +- 1.039 (group I) and 6.440 +- 1.556, 4.704 +- 0.734 for group II, respectively with no significant difference, while in neutrophil function there was a statistically significant difference in all functions between two groups (P < 0.01). This indicates the importance of neutrophil functions in following up persons working in radiation field

  17. Experience with qualification examinations of workers handling ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokanova, K.

    1976-01-01

    The organization is described of examinations which have to be passed by supervising staff and workers using radioactive ionizing radiation sources. The requirements are listed of the examination in which these workers have to prove their professional knowledge and skills. The said examinations significantly contribute to the establishment of a system of safeguards at workplaces using ionizing radiation sources and may help economize operations at these workplaces

  18. Radiological Protection Experience with natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quindos, L. S.; Fernandez, P. L.; Vinuela, J.; Arteche, J.; Sainz, G.; Gomez, J.; Matarranz

    2003-01-01

    During the last twenty five years the research Radon Group of the Medical Physics Unit of the University of Cantabria has been involved in projects concerning the measurement of natural radiation, in special that coming from radon gas. At this moment we have available for this field a lot of information in different formats, as paper, video and CD, interesting not only for public in general but also for professionals interested in the evaluation of doses coming from natural sources of radiation. (Author)

  19. Astrophysical radiative shocks: From modeling to laboratory experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzales, N.; Stehlé, C.; Audit, E.; Busquet, M.; Rus, Bedřich; Thais, F.; Acef, O.; Barroso, P.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Bauduin, D.; Kozlová, Michaela; Lery, T.; Madouri, A.; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 24, - (2006), s. 535-540 ISSN 0263-0346 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 506350 - LASERLAB-EUROPE; European Commission(XE) 5592 - JETSET Grant - others:CNRS(FR) PNPS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laboratory astrophysics * laser plasmas * radiative shock waves * radiative transfer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.958, year: 2006

  20. An Experiment in Radiation Measurement Using the Depron Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghin, Victor V.; Nechaev, Oleg Y.; Zolotarev, Ivan A.; Amelyushkin, Alexander M.; Petrov, Vasiliy L.; Panasyuk, Milhail I.; Yashin, Ivan V.

    2018-02-01

    Most of the radiation measurements have been made onboard spacecraft flying along orbits with an inclination of up to 51.6 degrees. Due to the prospect of manned missions at orbits with larger inclinations, it is advisable to conduct preliminary detailed dosimetry measurements at a high-inclination orbit; due to its polar orbit, the Lomonosov satellite provides good opportunities for such study. We chose a method of cosmic radiation dosimetry based on semiconductor detectors. This method is widely used onboard spacecraft, including full-time radiation monitoring onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It should be noted that not only did the charged particles contribute significantly in the dose equivalent, but also did the neutrons. Semiconductor detectors have low sensitivity to neutron radiation and are not sufficient for detecting the expected flux of neutrons. We add a thermal neutron counter to the proposed device in order to provide an opportunity for estimation of neutron flux variations along the satellite trajectory. Thus, the design of the instrument DEPRON (Dosimeter of Electrons, PROtons and Neutrons) was determined. DEPRON is intended for registration of the absorbed doses and linear energy transfer spectra for high-energy electrons, protons and nuclei of space radiation, as well as registration of thermal neutrons. The present paper provides a brief description of the DEPRON instrument. Its calibration results and the first mission results of background radiation measurements are also presented.

  1. Regulation No. 0-27 on working conditions and privileges of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Work performed in an ionizing radiation environment is held to be harmful despite the protective measures provided. Such an occupational environment is taken to exist in cases where the unsealed radioactive materials being handled have an activity exceeding the minimum level specified in the Radiation Safety Standards, or where sealed sources produce a dose rate of above 0,1 mrem/hour at a distance of 0,1 m. To ascertain the time actually spent in areas of such ambient radioactivity levels, occupancy records are kept to serve as a base in assigning privileges. The latter may be as follows: shift-hour reductions, salary increments, food and/or clothing free of charge, and additional holidays. Radiation workers are classified into three general categories. First-category workers or employees are persons primarily engaged in tasks involving direct handling of ionizing radiation sources (as in exploration, mining, processing, constructing, testing, adjustment, assemblage, operation, repair, monitoring, application of radiation sources, etc.). This category covers four groups. The first, second and fourth groups include workers employed at radioactive-ore mining and milling facilities, nuclear power stations, nuclear reactors, and elementary-particle accelerators. The third group comprises the staff members at laboratories, workshops, and other sites where radioactive isotopes or X-ray machines are handled. Those workers or employees who are primarily engaged in off-site work but periodically in the course of the month do perform tasks on-site fall into the second category. The latter is subdivided into three groups, the criterion for assigning pertinence to one of these being the number of working days per month spent in the radiation environment with a minimum requirement of six days per month. The thrd category covers workers or employees who are included in the staff of establishment using radiation sources, without, however, being directly exposed to ionizing

  2. Six years working experience of the Marcoule plant for treatment of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouannaud, C.

    1964-01-01

    The irradiated fuel treatment plant at Marcoule began treating rods from the pile G 1 in July 1958. These six years experience of the plant in operation have led to the confirmation or revision of the original ideas concerning the process as well as the technology or methods of exploitation. The process as a whole has suffered little modification, the performances having proved better than originally foreseen; the only alterations made were justified by greater simplicity of operation, better nuclear security (criticality) or for technological reasons. The processes of plutonium reduction from valency IV to valency III by uranium IV, and of concentration of fission product solutions in the presence of formaldehyde, have always given complete satisfaction. The initial concept of direct maintenance of the installations has been justified by experience. Certain maintenance jobs, originally considered impossible after the start of operations, have proved feasible and have been carried out under acceptable conditions; a number of examples are given. From experience it has been possible to define optimal conditions for the design of these installations such as to provide a maximum in robustness and ease of maintenance. The advantages of continuously-operating equipment have been shown. Certain installations have been altered in accordance with these new ideas. Analytical checking in the laboratory has been profoundly modified, and the plans adopted are such that complete safety in work on radioactive solutions is compatible with a very good working speed. Experience has also shown the advantages of having a group on the spot to carry out short-term applied studies. Finally, a strict working discipline and excellent collaboration with the radiation protection service have enabled us to reach the end of these six years, during some of which the exploitation was intensive, without irradiation accident. (authors) [fr

  3. Helping others increases meaningful work: Evidence from three experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Blake A; Duffy, Ryan D; Collisson, Brian

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the current research was to examine whether manipulating task significance increased the meaningfulness of work among students (Study 1), an online sample of working adults (Study 2), and public university employees (Study 3). In Study 1, students completed a typing task for the benefit of themselves, a charity, or someone they knew would directly benefit from their work. People who worked to benefit someone else, rather than themselves, reported greater task meaningfulness. In Study 2, a representative, online sample of employees reflected on a time when they worked to benefit themselves or someone else at work. Results revealed that people who reflected on working to benefit someone else, rather than themselves, reported greater work meaningfulness. In Study 3, public university employees participated in a community intervention by working as they normally would, finding new ways to help people each day, or finding several new ways to help others on a single day. People who helped others many times in a single day experienced greater gains in work meaningfulness over time. Across 3 experimental studies, we found that people who perceived their work as helping others experienced more meaningfulness in their work. This highlights the potential mechanisms practitioners, employers, and other parties can use to increase the meaningfulness of work, which has implications for workers' well-being and productivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Annual report on activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kunihiko

    2002-08-01

    This annual report is summary of the activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001. This report consists of the introduction of the radiation control in working area of the reprocessing plant, the MOX fuel fabrication facilities and laboratories, the discharges control of these facilities, the personal dosimetry, the environmental monitoring, the control of radiation standards and calibration, the maintenance of radiation measurement instruments, the safety study, the technical support for outside organizations and other activities. (author)

  5. The experience of demanding work environments in younger workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Trine Nøhr; Labriola, Merete; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    younger workers aged 20-21. The psychosocial work environment was in general good but younger workers experienced more demanding physical work than the general working population. Overall, individual as well as family factors had a limited impact on their assessment of the work environment. Low self-esteem...... at age 20-21. The psychosocial work environment experienced by younger workers was generally good, but vulnerable young people may need special attention to protect them from or prepare them for psychosocially demanding jobs later in life....

  6. The Relationship Between Work Experience and Job Performance: A Conceptual and Meta-Analytic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quinones, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    .... To this end, we conducted a conceptual review of the work experience literature, developed a framework for measuring different facets of work experience, and conducted a meta-analysis to examine...

  7. X-ray optics, a vital aspect of work with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    The kind of optical components that have been developed over the centuries to make use of visible light won't work for x-rays. New ways must be found to manipulate the much shorter-wavelength x-ray beams to produce effects similar to those achieved with such familiar devices as mirrors, lenses, prisms, and gratings. This is the province of the field of x-ray optics. One challenge is to design optical elements that can focus, disperse, or reflect beams in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, where wavelengths are about a thousand times shorter than those in the region of visible light. A second problem is encountered in using the intense, high-energy x-radiation from a synchrotron: how to make the desired beam accessible to a user who is conducting an experiment in a shielded enclosure many meters away from the synchrotron storage ring. Depending on the application, one might want to pick out a single wavelength from the broad spectrum available from the synchrotron, or isolate a narrow band of wavelengths. Then the beam must be collimated. When samples to be exposed are of millimeter dimension or smaller, it may be desirable to increase the intensity by focusing the x-ray beam horizontally and vertically. All these manipulations are analogous to those done with visible light, but the shape and form of the optical components can be quite different

  8. Code of practice for conducting radiation work at PINSTECH (revised 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Atta, M.A.; Orfi, S.D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary objective of this code is to achieve standard of radiation protection and safety set by Pakistan Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (PNSRP) ordinance 1984 and PNSRP regulations 1990. Secondary objective remains to make all best efforts to implement latest ICRP recommendations. The revised code of practice sets forth the objective of adequate system radiological safety of radiation workers, environment and general public. The code provides the guidance to persons and authorities who are responsible for the protection of workers and those who are concerned with the planning and management of personnel monitoring services. The procedures set forth in the code are mandatory and in no case should any of them be deviated under normal conditions. All those supervising and performing any kind of radiation work are required to study and adhere to those procedures and shell make all possible efforts to keep the exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), social and economic factor being taken into account. (author)

  9. Open Loop Heat Pipe Radiator Having a Free-Piston for Wiping Condensed Working Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An open loop heat pipe radiator comprises a radiator tube and a free-piston. The radiator tube has a first end, a second end, and a tube wall, and the tube wall has an inner surface and an outer surface. The free-piston is enclosed within the radiator tube and is capable of movement within the radiator tube between the first and second ends. The free-piston defines a first space between the free-piston, the first end, and the tube wall, and further defines a second space between the free-piston, the second end, and the tube wall. A gaseous-state working fluid, which was evaporated to remove waste heat, alternately enters the first and second spaces, and the free-piston wipes condensed working fluid from the inner surface of the tube wall as the free-piston alternately moves between the first and second ends. The condensed working fluid is then pumped back to the heat source.

  10. Time-resolved experiments in the frequency domain using synchrotron radiation (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Giusti, A. M.; Parasassi, T.; Ravagnan, G.; Sapora, O.

    1992-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beam line in the world that performs time-resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and the dynamics of molecules. This technique measures fluorescence lifetimes with picosecond resolution in the near UV spectral range. Such accurate measurements are rendered possible by taking phase and modulation data, and by the advantages of the cross-correlation technique. A successful experiment demonstrated the radiation damage induced by low doses of radiation on rabbit blood cell membranes.

  11. Experiencing professional strains of nurses, radiation engineers and physicians working at the Institute of oncology in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skufca Smrdel, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Since 1974 the term burnout is used in psychology. Burnout describes the end result of stress and has been described by Maslach comprising three basic components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment. In this paper we would like to describe some aspects of burnout experiences of the employees of the Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana. Subjects and methods. We used Questionnaire of professional stress, created by Zunter Nagy and Kocmur. In our research 137 health workers from four professional groups participated: physicians, graduated nurses, nurses and radiation engineers, representing 38% of all employees. Results. We found out that in the experience the professional stressof all four professional groups is relatively equalized. The most prominent feelings are of fatigue, irritability and work overload. There were no signs of depersonalization - as described by Maslach - reported in our group. In nurses and in radiation engineers a distress is significantly more often displayed due to poorer personal income and poorer material status. Nurses reported significantly more often the intention to change work position (51%), institution (57%) or job (47%). Conclusions. Workstress impacts on the experience and on the thought patterns in those participating in the study. We can describe those signs as burnout signs. However, there are more new questions opening in the future as well as the need to a longitudinal approach to the research of this more and more prominent field. (author)

  12. Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: Recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-15

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY ...Assistance Medicine http://usuhs.mil U.S. Army www.nbc-med.org U.S. Department of Homeland Security Working Group on Radiological Dispersal Device...22. 97. Abbott B, Ippoliti C, Bruton J, Neumann J, Whaley R, Champlin R. Antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone in bone marrow

  13. Medical Managment of the Acute Radiation Syndrome: Recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-15

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY ...Humanitarian Assistance Medicine http://usuhs.mil U.S. Army www.nbc-med.org U.S. Department of Homeland Security Working Group on Radiological Dispersal...2002:11-22. 97. Abbott B, Ippoliti C, Bruton J, Neumann J, Whaley R, Champlin R. Antiemetic efficacy of granisetron plus dexamethasone in bone marrow

  14. Chinese Undergraduate Students' Work Values: The Role of Parental Work Experience and Part-Time Work Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Francis Yue-lok; Tang, Catherine So-kum

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the association of perceived parental job insecurity and students' part-time work quality on work values among 341 Hong Kong Chinese undergraduate students. Correlation and regression results showed that work values were strongly related to students' part-time work satisfaction and work quality. In…

  15. Pre-criticality testing of radiation monitors associated with protective and regulatory channels of PHWRs and related work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.M.; Rao, Suresh; Mahant, A.K.; Sathian, V.; Ghodke, Shobha; Satam, R.A.; Singh, Yashoda; Phadnis, U.V.; Shaha, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the various experiments that are regularly carried out for each PHWR since RAPS-2. The work involves performance evaluation of start-up counters and ion chambers used in Protective and Regulatory channels and start-up counters used both in-core and out of core. In addition, Radiation Safety Systems Division (RSSD) also carries out calibration of Delayed Neutron Monitors (DNM) and Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPND). Except SPND, all other detectors are tested not only at BARC but also at reactor sites prior to initial flushing of heavy water, using the actual circuitry and control instruments at site. The performance evaluation of SPNDs is carried out at A-1 location of APSARA reactor core. Apart from these, RSSD also carries out calibration of zonal classification monitors and health physics related radiation monitors at BARC. (author)

  16. Education and training in radiation protection in Morocco: experiences and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-07-01

    Education and training are of primary importance for achieving competence in radiation protection. Unfortunately, one records the absence of a national legislation specifying the training of the qualified expert. On the basis of the observation which there exists in the Faculties of Sciences of Morocco the courses in radiation protection within the framework of preparation of the D.E.S.A;/M.A.S.T.E.R., we will propose to create a master in radiation protection within the framework of the reform of the higher education in progress. This reform proposes three levels: licence, Master, Ph.D. According to the B.S.S., any person who is occupationally exposed to ionising radiation or who may be exposed in the course of the work should receive adequate training in radiation protection. The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Rabat (N.P.L.R.) has participated in the organisation of IAEA postgraduate educational and training courses in radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources since 1998. It is also pioneer in the preparation of the doctorate thesis in radiation protection. The objective of this work is to present the important points of national strategy for building competence in radiation protection and the role of Radiation Protection Group(R.P.D.), created recently at our Physics department, to ensure the organisation of a radiation protection master. (authors)

  17. Education and training in radiation protection in Morocco: experiences and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Education and training are of primary importance for achieving competence in radiation protection. Unfortunately, one records the absence of a national legislation specifying the training of the qualified expert. On the basis of the observation which there exists in the Faculties of Sciences of Morocco the courses in radiation protection within the framework of preparation of the D.E.S.A;/M.A.S.T.E.R., we will propose to create a master in radiation protection within the framework of the reform of the higher education in progress. This reform proposes three levels: licence, Master, Ph.D. According to the B.S.S., any person who is occupationally exposed to ionising radiation or who may be exposed in the course of the work should receive adequate training in radiation protection. The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Rabat (N.P.L.R.) has participated in the organisation of IAEA postgraduate educational and training courses in radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources since 1998. It is also pioneer in the preparation of the doctorate thesis in radiation protection. The objective of this work is to present the important points of national strategy for building competence in radiation protection and the role of Radiation Protection Group(R.P.D.), created recently at our Physics department, to ensure the organisation of a radiation protection master. (authors)

  18. Radiation risk assessment in professionals working in dental radiology area using buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatullah, Syed; Dawasaz, Ali Azhar; Luqman, Master; Assiry, Ali A; Almeshari, Ahmed A; Togoo, Rafi Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of micronuclei (MN) in buccal mucosal cells of professionals working in radiology area to determine the risk of stochastic effects of radiation. All the professionals and students working in King Khalid University - College of Dentistry radiology area were included in the Risk Group (RG = 27). The Control Group (CG = 27) comprised of healthy individual matching the gender and age of the RG. Buccal mucosal scraping from all the 54 subjects of RG and CG were stained with Papanicolaou stain and observed under oil immersion lens (×100) for the presence of micronuclei (MN) in the exfoliated epithelial cells. There was no significant difference between the incidence of MN in RG and CG (p = >0.05) using t-test. Routine radiation protection protocol does minimize the risk of radiation induced cytotoxicity, however, screening of professionals should be carried out at regular intervals.

  19. Effect of ultraviolet radiation absorbing film on pollination work of foreign bumblebee [Bombus terrestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, I.

    1999-01-01

    The transmitted light through the ultraviolet radiation absorbing (UVA) film has a preventing effect of disease and pest occurrence. To develop the agriculture harmonized with the ecosystem, we attempted to research a further possible utilization of the UVA film. Pollination work of foreign bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) in the greenhouses roofed with UVA film and with common film for agriculture was examined in growing fruit-vegetables. The bumblebees used were not acclimatized to environmental conditions of the greenhouses. They visited flowers and gathered pollen from flowered crops grown in both houses, irrespective of the kind of film covering over the greenhouse roof, and the pollen quantity gathered was far greater in crops which produced in large quantity of pollen. Thus, the bumblebees were capable to work under the condition lacking in ultraviolet radiation. This pollinating behavior is different from that of honeybees. Then we concluded that bumblebees functioned well as an efficient pollinator under the condition without ultraviolet radiation

  20. Daily recovery experiences: the role of volunteer work during leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojza, Eva J; Lorenz, Christian; Sonnentag, Sabine; Binnewies, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the role of volunteer work for daily recovery from work. In a 1-week diary study with 166 employees, we assessed the amount of time spent on volunteer work during leisure time, and the recovery facets of psychological detachment from work (i.e., mentally switching off from work), mastery experiences (i.e., pursuing challenging activities), and community experiences (i.e., cultivating relationships) every day before participants went to bed. Results from hierarchical linear modeling (n = 529 days) showed volunteer work during leisure time to be positively related to mastery experiences and community experiences suggesting volunteer work to contribute to successful recovery by creating new resources.

  1. One Step Forward, Two Steps Back? Work Experience, Equal Opportunities and TVEI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Sue

    1995-01-01

    A case study of work experience provided in a British project committed to gender equality shows that the nature of work experience--its alliance with labor market needs--makes it virtually impossible to meet equal opportunity objectives. Work experience tends to reinforce existing gender divisions in the labor market. (SK)

  2. Characteristics of Early Work Experiences and Their Association with Future Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele Capella; O'Mally, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Early work experiences are a key predictor of future employment for transition-age youths with visual impairments. We investigated how specific characteristics of early work experiences influence future employment and whether the receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits is associated with early work experiences among…

  3. Experiences in the design and teaching of a course on efficient occupational radiation protection for entities being users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Gonzalez, F.; Merayo Rodriguez, A.; Gonzalez Lopez, N.

    1996-01-01

    This papers offers the possibility to diagnose the real level of each of the persons either directly or indirectly related to practices in entities under study. This work is based on the experience accumulated during the preparation and teaching of training and updating courses in radiation protection as one of the services rendered in Holguin Province, The western part of the territory by CEAAN as part of the security measures implemented

  4. Radiation protection safety in Uganda -- Experience and prospects of the National Radiation Protection Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Uganda National Radiation Protection Service (NRPS) is a technical body under the Atomic Energy Control Board, established by Law - the Atomic Energy Decree of 1972, Decree No. 12, to oversee and enforce safety of radiation sources, practices and workers; and to protect the patients, members of the public and the environment from the dangers of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes. The Ionizing Radiation Regulations (Standards) - Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 21 of 1996 -- back up the Law. The Law requires all users, importers and operators of radiation sources and radioactive materials to notify the NRPS for registration and licensing. The NRPS is responsible for licensing and for the regulatory enforcement of compliance to the requirements for the safety of radiation sources and practices. There are about 200 diagnostic X-ray units, two radiotherapy centres, one nuclear medicine unit, several neutron probes, about three level gauges and two non-destructive testing sources and a number of small sealed sources in teaching and research institutions. About 50% of these sources have been entered in our inventory using the RAIS software provided by the IAEA. There are about 500 radiation workers and 250 underground miners. The NRPS covers about 50% of the radiation workers. It is planned that by June 2001, all occupational workers will be monitored, bringing coverage to 100%. The Government of Uganda is making the necessary legal, administrative and technical arrangements aimed at establishing the National Radiation Protection Commission as an autonomous regulatory authority. The Atomic Energy Decree of 1972 and Regulations of 1996 are being revised to provide for the National Radiation Protection Commission and to make it comply with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards Safety Series No. 115. (author)

  5. Experiences in the monitoring of radiation workers in industry and hospitals in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-08-01

    The task of monitoring of radiation doses among radiation workers employed either in industry and hospitals in the Philippines is presently being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. These radiation monitoring devices cover not only radioactive materials or sources but also x-ray machines. The most common dosimetry used is the film badge. This paper presents some of the experiences gained in the use of the film badge and other dosimeters

  6. An organic group contribution approach to radiative efficiency estimation of organic working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; He, Maogang; Wang, Jingfu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We use group contribution method to estimate radiative efficiency. • CFC, HCFC, HFC, HFE, and PFC were estimated using this method. • In most cases, the estimation value has a good precision. • The method is reliable for the estimation of molecule with a symmetric structure. • This estimation method can offer good reference for working fluid development. - Abstract: The ratification of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 and the Kyoto Protocol in 1997 mark an environment protection era of the development of organic working fluid. Ozone depletion potential (ODP) and global warming potential (GWP) are two most important indices for the quantitative comparison of organic working fluid. Nowadays, more and more attention has been paid to GWP. The calculation of GWP is an extremely complicated process which involves interactions between surface and atmosphere such as atmospheric radiative transfer and atmospheric chemical reactions. GWP of a substance is related to its atmospheric abundance and is a variable in itself. However, radiative efficiency is an intermediate parameter for GWP calculation and it is a constant value used to describe inherent property of a substance. In this paper, the group contribution method was adopted to estimate the radiative efficiency of the organic substance which contains more than one carbon atom. In most cases, the estimation value and the standard value are in a good agreement. The biggest estimation error occurs in the estimation of the radiative efficiency of fluorinated ethers due to its plenty of structure groups and its complicated structure compared with hydrocarbon. This estimation method can be used to predict the radiative efficiency of newly developed organic working fluids.

  7. Variation in the thermionic work function of semiconductor powders exposed to electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, S.; Martin, J. R.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The study of the variation of thermoelectronic work function potential of TiO2 in the presence of isobutane shows that this gas is not adsorbed on this solid, in either the presence or the absence of ultraviolet radiation. These results, as well as those obtained in a previous work, lead to the mechanism of the photo-oxidation of isobutane at room temperature, in which excited atomic oxygen is the active species.

  8. Initial employment experiences of 1997 graduates of radiation oncology training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushee, Gerald R.; Sunshine, Jonathan H.; Simon, Carol; Schepps, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To inform the profession of current trends in the job market, the American College of Radiology (ACR) sought to detail the job-hunting experiences and outcomes of 1997 graduates of radiation oncology training programs. Methods and Materials: In early 1998, questionnaires were mailed to all graduates; 67% responded. Results were compared with similar surveys of 1996 graduates. Results: Similar to past years, immediately after graduation, 13% of residency graduates and 1 of 10 fellowship graduates encountered serious employment difficulties - that is, spent some time working locums, working outside radiation oncology, or unemployed. By 6-12 months after graduation, approximately 2% of all residency graduates were working outside the profession and approximately 3% were not working at all. Eighty-five percent of residency graduates and 7 of 8 fellowship graduates reported that their employment reasonably matched their training and individual goals. On average, graduates' actual salaries approximately corresponded to expected salaries. Eleven percent of all graduates were in nonownership-track jobs, a significant decline since 1996. For residents and fellows combined, 46% had a job with at least one characteristic some observers associate with a weak job market, but fewer than half of those with one of these characteristics actually disliked it. These percentages are similar to 1996. Women graduates were more likely than men to have spouse-related restrictions on job location but less likely to end up in a self-reportedly undesirable location. Conclusion: Unemployment remained low. Some other indicators of the employment market showed improvement, while others did not

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for recurrent glioblastoma: single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; D’Abbiero, Nunziata; Pisanello, Anna; Botti, Andrea; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iori, Mauro; Iotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor control and survival have improved with the use of radiotherapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but the prognosis remain poor. In most cases the recurrence occurs within 7–9 months after primary treatment. Currently, many approaches are available for the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent GBM, including resection, re-irradiation or systemic agents, but no standard of care exists. We analysed a cohort of patients with recurrent GBM treated with frame-less hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with a total dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. Of 91 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed GBM treated between 2007 and 2012 with conventional adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy, 15 underwent salvage RT at recurrence. The median time interval between primary RT and salvage RT was 10.8 months (range, 6–54 months). Overall, patients undergoing salvage RT showed a longer survival, with a median survival of 33 vs. 9.9 months (p= 0.00149). Median overall survival (OS) from salvage RT was 9.5 months. No patients demonstrated clinically significant acute morbidity, and all patients were able to complete the prescribed radiation therapy without interruption. Our results suggest that hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is effective and safe in recurrent GBM. However, until prospective randomized trials will confirm these results, the decision for salvage treatment should remain individual and based on a multidisciplinary evaluation of each patient

  10. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugasu, V.

    Work oriented education has been tied to national development in Malaysia since the 1960's. Increasing population, unemployment, and shortages of skilled manpower led the government to relate education more closely to work and develop technical and vocational education. Malaysia extended basic education to lower secondary manpower needs; and…

  11. Experience in the Kola NPP start-up works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, S.I.; Omel'chuk, V.V.; Bodrukhin, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    Main stages and peculiar features of maintenance and start-up works at WWER-440 type reactor NPPs described. Remarks revealed during complex equipment testing, physical and power start-up will be useful for arrangement of maintenance and start-up works at newly built NPPs

  12. Experience of Social Support among Working Mothers: A Concept Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, A. Young; Lee, Ki-Hak

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify, categorize, and provide a model for the understanding of social support among Korean working mothers. The participants were interviewed and asked what kind of social support they received that allowed them to maintain work and family life. Using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering analysis…

  13. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Data Sets for Global Environment and Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, T. Dale; Carlson, Ann B.; Denn, Fredrick M.

    1997-01-01

    For a number of years there has been considerable interest in the earth's radiation budget (ERB) or energy balance, and entails making the best measurements possible of absorbed solar radiation, reflected shortwave radiation (RSW), thermal outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and net radiation. ERB data are fundamental to the development of realistic climate models and studying natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the climate. Much of the interest and investigations in the earth's energy balance predated the age of earth-orbiting satellites (Hunt et al., 1986). Beginning in the mid 1960's earth-orbiting satellites began to play an important role in making measurements of the earth's radiation flux although much effort had gone into measuring ERB parameters prior to 1960 (House et al., 1986). Beginning in 1974 and extending until the present time, three different satellite experiments (not all operating at the same time) have been making radiation budget measurements almost continually in time. Two of the experiments were totally dedicated to making radiation budget measurements of the earth, and the other experiment flown on NOAA sun-synchronous AVHRR weather satellites produced radiation budget parameters as a by-product. The heat budget data from the AVHRR satellites began collecting data in June 1974 and have operated almost continuously for 23 years producing valuable data for long term climate monitoring.

  14. Adjuvant radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer: a 15-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, Ralph R.; Merrick, Hollis W.; Khuder, Sadik; Battle, Joyce A.; Herron, Lisa M.; Pawlicki, Todd

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis to determine differences in survival of patients with pancreatic aden carcinoma treated by radical surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1995, 249 patients with pancreatic tumors were identified at the Medical College of Ohio. Forty-four of these patients underwent radical surgical procedures with curative intent. These patients were divided into four groups according to treatment: surgery alone (n = 14), surgery plus intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) (n = 6), surgery plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (n = 14), or surgery plus both IORT and EBRT (n = 10). Outcome and survival were analyzed among the four groups. Results: The median survival time of patients treated with radical surgery alone was 6.5 months. The median survival time for the surgery plus IORT group was 9 months; however, 33.3% (two of six) of these patients survived longer than 5 years. This survival pattern was borderline significantly better than that for the surgery alone group (p = 0.0765). The surgery plus EBRT and the surgery plus IORT and EBRT groups had median survival times of 14.5 and 17.5 months, respectively. These were significantly better than that of the surgery alone group (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0002, respectively). The addition of radiation therapy did not affect the treatment complication rate. Conclusion: The survival of patients who were treated with radical surgery alone was significantly poorer than that of patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. These results are consistent with other studies in the literature. Patients treated with all three modalities (surgery, IORT, and EBRT) displayed the best median survival time

  15. [Maternity leave and experience of working mothers in Lebanon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé, N; Barbour, B; Salameh, P

    2010-09-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study of 802 Lebanese mothers to evaluate effect of rapid return to work on their health and that of their child. Breastfeeding practices were also assessed. The duration of maternity leave was insufficient for 72.8% of the women. Rapid return to work could cause physical and psychological problems depending on the type of work. The average length of breastfeeding was 4.7 months and while the average desired length was 10.9 months. Breastfeeding depended on the duration of the maternity leave, the possibility of breaks for breastfeeding and the presence of nurseries at work. Urgent interventions are necessary to prolong maternity leave and promote breastfeeding among working women.

  16. Work-related limitations and return-to-work experiences in prolonged fatigue: workers' perspectives before and after vocational treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, Margot C W; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into fatigued workers' perspectives regarding work experience before and after receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) treatments. A qualitative survey was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 21 fatigued workers who attended an outpatient multi-component VR treatment. Six months after treatment, work-related limitations and employed VR strategies at work before treatment were explored. Next, VR treatment experiences regarding return-to-work (RTW) were explored. Two researchers performed partially independent, qualitative analyses that revealed topics, discussed by the project team, and organised into domains, categories and sub-categories. Work-related limitations were: symptoms of prolonged fatigue, personal limitations (e.g. lack of self-reflection on individual capacity and limitations), interpersonal factors, activities and conditions at work and life/work imbalance. Before the treatment, VR strategies such as work adaptations, well-intentioned advice and support, and/or referral to psychological or physical care were employed. VR treatment experiences on RTW were: personal challenges (e.g. gained awareness and coping skills), improved activities during work, work adaptations and unresolved problems (e.g. remaining fatigue symptoms and sickness absence). New information about work experiences before and after multi-component VR treatments in workers with prolonged fatigue may help employers, occupational physicians and other caregivers to develop VR strategies that better meet individuals' needs.

  17. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  18. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  19. The background of external γ radiation in the proportional counters in SAGE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Gorbachev, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of external γ radiation on the process of 71 Ge-decay counting in proportional counters in SAGE experiment of solar neutrino flux measurement is examined. One determines the systematic error of SAGE result, connected with radon decays inside the air volume surrounding the counters, and the background counting rate of proportional counters from γ radiation of passive and active shield [ru

  20. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Kristie; Wright, Caroline; Osborne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  1. The Baby and the Bathwater: Making a Case for Work Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Annette; Smith, Erica

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 1,451 Australian secondary students indicated that 18% participated in structured work placements, 54% in other paid work experience. Despite claims of the superiority of structured placements, other types of work experience also enhanced career awareness, improved self-esteem, and contributed to school-to-work transition. (Contains 28…

  2. Psychological career resources and subjective work experiences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Business Review Volume 13 Number 2 2009. Psychological .... results from certain perceptions about one's work and has behavioural consequences such as tenure ... Overall, the black (67%) and female (58%) participants.

  3. Career management: Taking control of the quality of work experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vianen, A.E.M.; de Pater, I.E.; Preenen, P.T.Y.; Athanasou, J.A.; Van Esbroeck, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to flatter and rapidly changing organisations, employees rather than employers will be responsible for employees’ development and careers. This chapter focuses on career management through personal development. Extant literatures have primarily addressed the quantity of employees’ work

  4. Science experiments via telepresence at a synchrotron radiation source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J. E.; Diakun, G.; Bushnell-Wye, G.; Fisher, S.; Thalal, A.; Helliwell, M.; Helliwell, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The application of a turnkey communication system for telepresence at station 9.8 of the Synchrotron Radiation Source, Daresbury, is described and demonstrated, including its use for inter-continental classroom instruction and user training. Station 9.8 is one of the most oversubscribed and high-throughput stations at the Synchrotron Radiation Source, Daresbury, whereby awarded experimental time is limited, data collections last normally no longer than an hour, user changeover is normally every 24 h, and familiarity with the station systems can be low. Therefore time lost owing to technical failures on the station has a dramatic impact on productivity. To provide 24 h support, the application of a turnkey communication system has been implemented, and is described along with additional applications including its use for inter-continental classroom instruction, user training and remote participation

  5. Micro-irradiation experiments in MOS transistors using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autran, J.L.; Masson, P.; Raynaud, C.; Freud, N.; Riekel, C.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially-resolved total-dose degradation has been performed in MOS transistors by focusing x-ray synchrotron radiation on the gate electrode with micrometer resolution. The influence of the resulting permanent degradation on device electrical properties has been analyzed using current-voltage and charge pumping measurements, in concert with optical characterization (hot-carrier luminescence) and one-dimensional device simulation. (authors)

  6. Experiment and research on materials irradiated by plasma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wenyu; Yao Lianghua; Tang Sujun; Chang Shufen; Li Guodong

    1992-08-01

    The TiC and SiC coating on the graphite substrate and wall carbonization were studied by plasma radiation in HL-1 tokamak. Samples were analysed with AES (auger electron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and XDS (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy). The results show that the TiC and SiC materials coated on limiter and wall and wall carbonization can reduce the metal and oxygen impurities and improve the plasma merit

  7. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavey, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low ( [de

  8. Change in the thermionic work function of semiconductor powders exposed to electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, S.; Martin, J. R.; Juillet, F.; Teichner, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The variations of the thermoelectronic work function of titanium dioxide, submitted to an ultraviolet or visible and infrared radiation, in the presence of oxygen, are studied by the vibrating condenser method. It is shown that during the ultraviolet irradiation, a desorption of a first species of oxygen simultaneously occurs with the adsorption of a second species of oxygen and that this phenomenon is found for any structure of TiO2 (anatase or rutile) any texture, oxygen pressure, radiation intensity, and nature of introduced dopes.

  9. Remote operation and automation of the maintenance works under the radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, T; Koga, A; Shirasu, I; Miida, T

    1983-06-01

    More than ninety per cent of the personnel radiation exposure at the nuclear power station is attributable to the maintenance works during the plant shutdown. The maintenance robots have effectively contributed in reducing the annual inspection and refueling schedule and the personnel radiation exposure. Future prospects of robotics depend on the grade of development in robot technology and plant engineering itself to accommodate such robot tools, since plant facilities and maintenance procedure today is difficult to replace with machines due to their diversified and complex nature.

  10. Remote operation and automation of the maintenance works under the radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Takashi; Koga, Akihiko; Shirasu, Isao; Miida, Toshiro [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1983-08-01

    More than ninety per cent of the personnel radiation exposure at the nuclear power station is attributable to the maintenence works during the plant shutdown. The maintenance robots have effectively contributed in reducing the annual inspection and refueling schedule and the personnel radiation exposure. Future prospects of robotics depend on the grade of development in robot technology and plant engineering itself to accommodate such robot tools, since plant facilities and maintenance procedure today are so difficult to replace with machines due to their deversified and complexed nature.

  11. Remote operation and automation of the maintenance works under the radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Takashi; Koga, Akihiko; Shirasu, Isao; Miida, Toshiro [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1983-01-01

    More than ninety per cent of the personnel radiation exposure at the nuclear power station is attributable to the maintenance works during the plant shutdown. The maintenance robots have effectively contributed in reducing the annual inspection and refueling schedule and the personnel radiation exposure. Future prospects of robotics depend on the grade of development in robot technology and plant engineering itself to accommodate such robot tools, since plant facilities and maintenance procedure today is so defficult to replace with machines due to their diversified and complexed nature.

  12. Remote operation and automation of the maintenance works under the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Takashi; Koga, Akihiko; Shirasu, Isao; Miida, Toshiro

    1983-01-01

    More than ninety per cent of the personnel radiation exposure at the nuclear power station is attributable to the maintenence works during the plant shutdown. The maintenance robots have effectively contributed in reducing the annual inspection and refueling schedule and the personnel radiation exposure. Future prospects of robotics depend on the grade of development in robot technology and plant engineering itself to accommodate such robot tools, since plant facilities and maintenance procedure today is so difficult to replace with machines due to their deversified and complexed nature. (author)

  13. Experience with the Surveyor mobile robot in radioactive work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; Darvish, A.R.; Irving, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development and implementation history of the Surveyor mobile robotic device from November 1985 through August 1986. This two-tracked remotely controlled tetherless device is used to conduct surveillance and inspection and light maintenance missions in nuclear power plants. Surveyor's relatively light weight (<400 lb) can easily be transported manually from location to location. The total maximum payload of the device, which is able to climb 40-deg stairs, is up to 300 lb when transported on a level floor. Surveyor can traverse through 14 in. of water and over 9-in.-high obstacles. Standard accessories include radiation detector, humidity monitor, temperature measurement, sound detection and position/ranging, and a standard video or CCD camera having a wide angle and telephoto lens. These devices are mounted on a 3 degree-of-freedom articulated arm with halogen lights

  14. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P S; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will cause damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 and fluences of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutrons and thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper measurements collected during two years of ATLAS data taking are presented and compared to predictions from radiation background simulations.

  15. Young women with PD: a group work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, J; Moore, O; Tassa, D S; Ginzburg, K; Drory, M; Giladi, N

    2000-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) prior to the age of 40 affects between 5-10% of the PD population. The psychosocial changes that patients with early PD encounter, may be more devastating and disabling than the actual motor disability. The paper describes a unique experience in groupwork with young female PD patients treated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. The paper focuses on the special issues which characterized this group's experience: stigma, body and sexual image, and personality traits.

  16. Practice and experience of radiation protection and optimization (ALARA) management system in Daya Bay NPP during the past 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Degan; He Yu; Yang Maochun; Gu Jingzhi

    2004-01-01

    With the practice of 10 years safe operation, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station has established and continuously improved the management system for radiation protection and optimization (ALARA) which contains 3 basic requirements: all workers are trained, all employees are engaged in totally, and work management is implemented for the whole process. At the same time, strong efforts have been made to build the 'infrastructure' as a platform for its effective operation. This article introduces the contents and characteristics of the system and basic experiences of its effective implementation. In order to implement the management system effectively, it is necessary for NPPs to strengthen the responsibility system for radiation protection and the leading role of the radiation protection personnel, especially the role of technical support and supervision during the work with high radiation risk, emphasize the organic combination and actively mutual action with the safe operation management system of the plant, and pay great attention to the formation of safety culture and the experience feedback to ensure the continuous improvement of the management system

  17. Transition radiation detector of the experience NOMAD for the τ identification in the channel: τ- → e-ν-bare ντ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, T.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents a work included in an experiment of research concerning neutrino oscillations in the channel ν μ → ν τ at CERN (NOMAD-WA96). This experiments need several detectors, and particularly a transition radiation detector with specific characteristics. The work consists, in a first part, in the study of neutrino physic and of the NOMAD detector. In a second part, the report presents how was implemented the transition radiation detector and how works the simulation of a such radiation. Then, the detector is optimised by comparing experiments and simulations; the thesis also presents how to control the detector. The last part talks about algorithms of pions-electrons separation. (TEC). 95 refs., 78 figs., 12 tabs

  18. Radiation exposure management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation exposure management includes administrative control, education and training, monitoring and dose assessments and planning of work and radiation protection. The information and discussion given in the paper are based on experiences in Sweden mainly from nuclear power installations. (Author)

  19. Parents' Working Hours: Adolescent Children's Views and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jane; Noden, Philip; Sarre, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    As dual-earner families have become the norm, the different kinds of "time" children spend with parents has become an important issue. We use the 2000 Time Use Survey to identify adolescent children spending time alone at home, and interviews with 50 children aged 14 and 15 to explore young people's experiences. We investigate their views on their…

  20. My Experience. My Perspective. Transportation to Work Presents Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegers, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Transportation challenges can often be one of the biggest stumbling blocks to having a successful vocational experience. The author presents a personal account of the difficulties people with disabilities encounter in trying to get themselves to their workplaces due to the limitations of various mobility services.

  1. Exploring the Work Experiences of School Counselors of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollarhide, Colette T.; Bowen, Nikol V.; Baker, Caroline A.; Kassoy, Felice R.; Mayes, Renae D.; Baughman, Amber V.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of research suggesting the importance of diverse professionals in education (Mattison & Aber, 2007), no studies have explored the professional experiences of school counselors of Color. In this exploratory grounded-theory qualitative study, researchers interviewed 19 school counselors of Color. Responses revealed both positive and…

  2. School Counselors' Experiences Working with Digital Natives: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    To better understand school counselors' experiences related to students' use of social media, the authors conducted a qualitative study, utilizing a phenomenological approach, with eight practicing high school counselors. Three major themes emerged from the study: "the digital cultural divide," "frustration and fear," and…

  3. Recovery, work-life balance and work experiences important to self-rated health: A questionnaire study on salutogenic work factors among Swedish primary health care employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlertsson, Lina; Heijbel, Bodil; Ejlertsson, Göran; Andersson, Ingemar

    2018-01-01

    There is a lack of information on positive work factors among health care workers. To explore salutogenic work-related factors among primary health care employees. Questionnaire to all employees (n = 599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health from the previously validated SHIS (Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale), psychosocial work environment and experiences, recovery, leadership, social climate, reflection and work-life balance. The response rate was 84%. A multivariable linear regression model, with SHIS as the dependent variable, showed three significant predictors. Recovery had the highest relationship to SHIS (β= 0.34), followed by experience of work-life balance (β= 0.25) and work experiences (β= 0.20). Increased experience of recovery during working hours related to higher self-rated health independent of recovery outside work. Individual experiences of work, work-life balance and, most importantly, recovery seem to be essential areas for health promotion. Recovery outside the workplace has been studied previously, but since recovery during work was shown to be of great importance in relation to higher self-rated health, more research is needed to explore different recovery strategies in the workplace.

  4. Radiation protection experience in Yugoslavia from the Vinca accident to nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M

    2000-01-01

    This Paper is the expression of the author opinion about development of radiation protection in Yugoslavia from its beginning forty years ago, which might affect its status in the foreseeable future at the first decades of the 21st century. It focuses on key events in this field starting from the Vinca Accident, which happened in the October 1958, to nowadays. Shortly reviewed some of key events are: Vinca Accident; Foundation of the Radiation Protection Laboratory in the Vinca Institute; International Vinca Dosimetry Experiment; First National Symposium and foundation of the Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association; International Intercomparison Experiment on Nuclear Accident Dosimetry and, International Summer Schools and Symposium on Radiation Protection organized in Yugoslavia. Finally, some specific experimental data obtained during and after Chernobyl Accident up to nowadays in radiation protection action in Yugoslavia are presented also. (author)

  5. Health risk for workers who work with different ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojevic-Tisma, V.; Pavlovic, S.; Milacic, S.; Radisavljevic, B.; Tisma, J.; Celeketic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This is retrospective study in which laboratory parameters are monitored and compared within subjects occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and in comparison with control group. Data are collected from files for periodical exams for 2005 year. The average annual absorbed dose, measured by TDL dosimeters, for all groups did not exceed 2mSv. Collected results show changes in number of erythrocytes, white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood in some groups. Soil decontamination of poor uranium did not have influence in relative radiation risk. The highest occupational risk appears to be for the subjects who work in radioisotope production. Found changes pointing out the need for continued health control of subjects who are professionally exposed to ionizing radiation in the same time dynamic. (author) [sr

  6. Radiation protection aspects of the repair work at Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujtas, T.; Nenyei, A.

    2006-01-01

    On the Unit 2 at Paks Nuclear Power Plant accident occurred on 10th April 2003. Thirty fuel assemblies damaged in the cleaning tank installed in the Pit No. 1. Due to the accident casing of the fuel elements and uranium-dioxide pellets inside them damaged. The scratched fuel assemblies and nuclear fuel fragments should be removed and safely deposited. In order to restore the operational condition of the Pit No. 1 a lot of complicated activities with radiation hazard should be implemented. These tasks bring up both technical difficulties and serious radiation protection problems, and it is essential to resolve them in order to reduce radiation exposure of the working personnel and to minimize the amount of off-site radioactive releases.There was a serious incident (An INES level 3 event) at Paks Nuclear Power plant in april 10, 2003. (TRA)

  7. Parents' experiences of flexible work arrangements in changing European workplaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lewis (Suzan); L. den Dulk (Laura)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractVarious leaves and other forms of flexible working arrangements have been implemented in workplaces to support employees with family commitments. Some are a response to public policy, others developed voluntarily. However, research examining the effectiveness of these policies in a

  8. Gender and Equity: Experience of the Working Women's Forum, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Nandini

    1996-01-01

    Illustrates how poor women were able to move out of poverty and dehumanization through a process of mobilization and organization. The process was catalyzed by the intervention of a non-governmental organization, the Working Women's Forum. Outlines the Forum's program of economic, social, and technological empowerment. (MJP)

  9. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  10. Working at Congress : a Sandian's experience.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    During the 110th Congress (calendar years 2007 and 2008), Matthew Allen, a Sandian nuclear scientist, served as a Congressional Fellow on the Committee on Homeland Security in the House of Representatives. This report is an informative account of the role staffers play in assisting the members of Congress in their oversight and legislative duties. It is also a personal account of Matthew Allen's experience as a committee staffer in the House of Representatives.

  11. ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) Solar Radiation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) was conducted at the Department of Energy's ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility between September 22, 1995...

  12. Knowledge deficiency of work-related radiation hazards associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Wang, Yueye; Guo, Changfeng; Lei, Xuefeng; He, Shisheng

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge and concern degree about work-related radiation hazards remained unknown among orthopedic surgeons. The aim of the cross-sectional study is to investigate whether the knowledge degree of work-related radiation is associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons. This cross-sectional study sent electronic questionnaire via WeChat to orthopedic surgeons nationwide. Concern and knowing degree over radiation exposure was evaluated by a single self-reported question. Professional evaluation of concern degree was reflected by general psychological distress, which was assessed with the Kessler 10 scale (K10) and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Only 43.23% (115/266) respondents knew well about radiation and a total of 78.20% (208/266) respondents considered radiation exposure as a great concern. Among those who reported concerns about radiation exposure, a total of 57.69% (120/208) respondents reported knowing little about radiation. Respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure were significantly associated with higher scores on CES-D and K10 (P < .05). Among respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure, those who have fewer knowledge about radiation, had higher CES-D and K10 scores than those who knew well about radiation (P < .05). Among respondents who reported no concerns over radiation exposure, those who knew little about radiation still had higher CES-D and K10 scores (P < .05). Fewer radiation knowledge tends to induce more radiation concerns associated with higher psychological distress in orthopedic surgeons. Radiation knowledge should be enhanced for surgeons who daily work with radiation-related fluoroscopy.

  13. Pilot scale experiments on radiation vulcanization of NR latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwan, M.

    The potential of irradiated latex as raw material of commercial use is under testing on pilot plant scale in Indonesia which has 225 kCi Co-60 irradiation facility and can irradiate 1000 tonnes of centrifuged latex per annum. The facility was jointly designed by BATAN of Indonesia and JAERI of Japan and was jointly financed by UNDP/IAEA, Government of Japan and Government of Indonesia under UNDP/IAEA Regional Cooperative Agreement Project on Industrial Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology. The facility is a water pool type and can accomodate 400 kCi Co-60. The Co-60 rack has two shapes, plate and cylindrical shapes. The plate shape source is used for natural rubber latex irradiation and the cylindrical one is used for other irradiation services. The vulcanization system consists of three major components : emulsification unit ( height : 650 mm, diameter 500 mm ), mixing unit ( height : 1900mm, diameter 1200 mm ) and vulcanization reactor ( height : 1800 mm, diameter 1300 mm ). The first two components are located outside shielded room while the third one-in irradiation room. The radiation vulcanization process is a much simpler energy saving process comparedto the conventional thermal process which has two vulcanization steps before and after dipping. The physical and mechanical properties of irradiated NR Latex are comparable to those of sulfur vulcanized, and depend on many factors such as irradiation dose, sensitizer content, dry rubber content and storage time.

  14. Pilot scale experiments on radiation vulcanization of NR latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridwan, M.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of irradiated latex as raw material of commercial use is under testing on pilot plant scale in Indonesia which has 225 kCi Co-60 irradiation facility and can irradiate 1000 tonnes of centrifuged latex per annum. The facility was jointly designed by BATAN of Indonesia and JAERI of Japan and was jointly financed by UNDP/IAEA, Government of Japan and Government of Indonesia under UNDP/IAEA Regional Cooperative Agreement Project on Industrial Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology. The facility is a water pool type and can accommodate 400 kCi Co-60. The Co-60 rack has two shapes, plate and cylindrical shapes. The plate shape source is used for natural rubber latex irradiation and the cylindrical one is used for other irradiation services. The vulcanization system consists of three major components: emulsification unit, mixing unit and vulcanization reactor. The first two components are located outside shielded room while the third one in irradiation room. The radiation vulcanization process is a much simpler energy saving process compared to the conventional thermal process which has two vulcanization steps before and after dipping. The physical and mechanical properties of irradiated NR latex are comparable to those of sulfur vulcanized. (author)

  15. Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment (MICRE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, RT [University of Washington; Protat, A [Australian Bureau of Meterology; Alexander, SP [Australian Antarctic Division

    2015-12-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are poorly represented in present day reanalysis products and global climate model simulations. Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) broadband radiative fluxes in this region are among the largest globally, with large implications for modeling both regional and global scale climate responses (e.g., Trenberth and Fasullo 2010, Ceppi et al. 2012). Recent analyses of model simulations suggest that model radiative errors in the Southern Ocean are due to a lack of low-level postfrontal clouds (including clouds well behind the front) and perhaps a lack of supercooled liquid water that contribute most to the model biases (Bodas-Salcedo et al. 2013, Huang et al. 2014). These assessments of model performance, as well as our knowledge of cloud and aerosol properties over the Southern Ocean, rely heavily on satellite data sets. Satellite data sets are incomplete in that the observations are not continuous (i.e., they are acquired only when the satellite passes nearby), generally do not sample the diurnal cycle, and view primarily the tops of cloud systems (especially for the passive instruments). This is especially problematic for retrievals of aerosol, low-cloud properties, and layers of supercooled water embedded within (rather than at the top of) clouds, as well as estimates of surface shortwave and longwave fluxes based on these properties.

  16. Romanian experience on safety and security of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botgros, Madalina; Coroianu, Anton; Negreanu, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    Romania has established the first administrative structure for controlling the deployment of the nuclear activities in 1961 and the first Romanian nuclear law was published in 1974. In the present, it is in force the Law no. 111, published in 1996 and republished in 2003. Moreover, there are available facilities and services to the persons authorized to manage radioactive sources. The regulation for safety and security of radioactive sources was amended two times in order to implement the international recommendations for setting up the national system for accounting and control of radiation sources and to coordinate the recovery activities. As part of national control programme, the national inventory of sources and devices is updated permanently, when issuing a new authorization, when modifying an existing one, or when renewing an authorization system and records in the database. The government responsibility for the orphan sources is stated in the law on radioactive waste management and decommissioning fund. There is a protocol between CNCAN, Ministry of Internal and Ministry of Health and Family regarding the co-operation in the case of finding orphan sources. When a radiation source is spent, it becomes radioactive waste that has to be disposed off properly. Depending on the case, the holder of a spent source has the possibility either to return the radioactive source to its manufacturer for regeneration or to transfer it to the Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility. (author)

  17. Bullying nurses at work: theorizing a gendered experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, C

    2001-03-01

    This paper is about bullying among nurses at work. It presents the psychoanalytically based theory that workplace bullies, impaired during infancy by primary caregivers who were less than loving, project their own hostile personalities onto others and then relate to others without empathy or understanding, in demeaning ways. When these hostile people are employed in a masculine workplace, they protest against the gendered imperatives imposed upon them, hysterically. Because of the masculinization of the workplace, hysterical bullying varies according to gender, with women bullying in a hostile connected way, and men bullying in a hostile separated way. Research data gathered in Canada in the 1990s is utilised in presenting the theories. Suggestions about anti-bullying practices that arise from this theoretical analysis conclude the work.

  18. Ion pressure and work function in an effusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between ion flow and ion pressure is examined from the point of view of the existence of a plasma in an effusion chamber. It is shown that this relationship is nonlinear, and a method is described to calculate it for specific experimental conditions. An analysis is made of the dependence of ion pressure and the work function of the inside surface of the effusion chamber on the composition of the condensed or gas phase

  19. Safety assessment of RF and microwave radiation emitted by the mobile telephone base station (MTBS) in Malaysia: experience and challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roha Tukimin; Rozaimah Abd Rahim; Mohamad Amirul Nizam; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali

    2007-01-01

    Non-ionising radiation (NIR) is known to be hazardous if the amount received is excessive. It is a fact that NIR, including extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation can be found almost everywhere generated by both natural and man-made source. This is due to increase in demand for telecommunication and wireless technology which is become very important and as part of our lives. However, the widespread of the relevant technology contributed more NIR man-made sources exposure to the human. Due to public concern their potential of causing such health hazard, members of public and companies approached and request NIR Group of Nuclear Malaysia to carry out surveys and safety assessments of radiofrequency and microwave radiation emitted by the mobile telephone base station (MTBS) erected near the residential area or installed on the rooftop of the commercial building. Objective of the survey was to assess the presence of radiofrequency and microwave radiation and to identify radiation level which may lead to significant personnel exposure. Findings of the survey was compared to the standard guidelines issued by Malaysian Communication and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) and International Committee on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). This paper highlights the works that had been carried out by NIR Group of Nuclear Malaysia from 1997 to 2007. We will share the experience and challenge in carried out the NIR safety assessment at mobile telephone base station. Results of the assessment work will be used to develop non-ionising radiation database for future reference in Malaysia. (Author)

  20. Experimental Investigation to Heat Transfer Augmentation in A Car Radiator Worked with (Water - Magnesium Oxide Nanofluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed K. Hamzah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, effect of adding MgO nanoparticle to base fluid (water in car radiator has been implemented experimentally. In this investigation, an experimental test rig has been designed to study effect inlet temperature of nanofluid, the flow rate and nanoparticle volume fraction on heat transfer rates. Six different concentrations of nanofluid of 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%,1% ,1.5% and 2% have been prepared by mixed of MgO nanoparticles with water. Reynolds number of nanofluid was between 4500 and 19000.Thermal behavior of an automobile radiator worked with nanofluid has been compared with using pure water in it. So, the fluid circulating rate in radiator has been varied in the extent of the range of 1-8 L/min and fluid inlet temperature is also varied for all experimental. Results emphasized that Nusselt number increases with an increase of liquid inlet temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction and Reynolds number. As well as, the enhancement in heat transfer coefficient due to presence of nanoparticles is more than that without noanoparticles. These results can be achieved to optimize the dimension of an automobile radiator. A good agreement was seen with theoretical and experimental results with many authors

  1. French experience with Uranium compounds: conclusions of medical working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, P.; Mazeyrat, C.; Auriol, B.; Montegue, A.; Estrabaud, M.; Grappin, L.; Giraud, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The authors who represent several organisations and industrial firms, present observations conducted for some thirty years in France, including routine monitoring or special measurements following contamination by uranium compounds. They propose recommendations for radio toxicological monitoring of workers exposed to industrial uranium compounds and they comment on urine and faecal collections in relation to specific exposures. Our working group, set up by the CEA Medical Adviser in 1975, consists of French specialists in uranium radio toxicology. Their role is to propose recommendations for the monitoring of working conditions and exposed workers. The different plants process chemically and metallurgically, and machine large quantities of uranium with various 235U enrichments. Radio toxicological monitoring of workers exposed to uranium compounds requires examinations prescribed according to the kind of product manipulated and the industrial risk of the workplace. The range of examinations that are useful for this kind of monitoring includes lung monitoring, urine analyses and faecal sampling. The authors present the frequency of the monitoring for routine or special conditions according to industrial exposure, time and duration of collection of excreta (urine and faeces), the necessity of a work break, precautions for preservation of the samples and the ways in interpreting excretion analysis according to natural food intakes

  2. Transition Program: The Challenges Faced by Special Needs Students in Gaining Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Aliza

    2014-01-01

    Transition program for special needs students is known to open opportunities for students with learning disabilities to gain work experience in actual work environment. The program provides training activities and also an opportunity to go for internship to gain work experience. Therefore, this study is to identify the challenges faced by special…

  3. Balancing Work with Study: Impact on Marketing Students' Experience of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Steven; Volet, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 57% of students in the United States work while attending college. For most of these students (81%), this is more than 20 hours a week. There has been shown to be a negative relationship between hours worked and academic achievement in studies in the United States as well as the United Kingdom and Australia. There is, however, no…

  4. Clinical Experiences with Radiation Induced Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Reiners

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The risk of developing thyroid cancer increases considerably after exposure to external or internal radiation, especially in children below the age of 10. After the Chernobyl reactor accident, the yearly incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus increased to approximately 40 per 1.000.000 in girls and to roughly 20 per 1.000.000 in boys compared to approximately 0.5 cases per 1.000.000 prior to the accident. Typically, young children with thyroid cancer after radiation exposure present in ≈95% of the cases as papillary cancers, in ≈50% as invasive tumors growing outside the thyroid capsule, in ≈65% with lymph node metastases and in ≈15% with distant metastases. A joint Belarusian-German project starting in April 1993 that combined treatment with surgery and radioiodine was organized in 237 selected children from Belarus who were exposed to the Chernobyl fallout and had advanced stages of thyroid cancer. The study group included 141 girls and 96 boys. Their median age at the time of the accident was 1.7 years; whereas the median age at the time of diagnosis was 12.4 years. With the exception of two cases with follicular histology, the majority of the patients had been diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancers. In 63%, the tumor had grown outside the thyroid capsule and invaded the tissue of the neck (pT4. Nearly all of the selected cases (96% showed-up with lymph node metastases (pN1 and 43% of the patients with distant metastases mainly to the lungs (pM1. In 58% of the children, complete remissions of thyroid cancer could be achieved until December 31st 2010 and in 34% of the children, stable partial remissions; in the remaining 8% of the patients, partial remissions were observed. The risk of radiation-induced thyroid cancer increased considerably in children and adolescents who were affected by the Chernobyl reactor accident. In spite of the fact, that thyroid cancers in young children seem to behave more aggressively than in

  5. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric adenocarcinoma: an institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftimos, Philippe G; Nasr, Elie A; Nasr, Dolly I; Noun, Roger J; Nasr, Fady L; Ghosn, Marwan G; El Helou, Joelle A; Chahine, Georges Y

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that surgery alone is less than satisfactory in the management of early gastric cancer, with cure rates approaching 40%. The role of adjuvant therapy was indefinite until three large, randomized controlled trials showed the survival benefit of adjuvant therapy over surgery alone. Chemoradiation therapy has been criticized for its high toxicity. 24 patients diagnosed between September 2001 and July 2007 were treated with adjuvant chemoradiation. 18 patients had the classical MacDonald regimen of 4500 cGy of XRT and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and leucovorin, while chemotherapy consisted of 5FU/Cisplatin for 6 patients. This series consisted of non-metastatic patients, 17 females and 7 males with a median age of 62.5 years. 23 patients (96%) had a performance status of 0 or 1. The full course of radiation therapy (4500 cGy) was completed by 22 patients (91.7%). Only 7 patients (36.8%) completed the total planned courses of chemotherapy. 2 local relapses (10%), 2 regional relapses (10%) and 2 distant relapses (10%) were recorded. Time to progression has not been reached. 9 patients (37.5%) died during follow-up with a median overall survival of 75 months. Patients lost a mean of 4 Kgs during radiation therapy. We recorded 6 episodes of febrile neutropenia and the most frequent toxicity was gastro-intestinal in 17 patients (70.8%) with 9 (36%) patients suffering grade 3 or 4 toxicity and 5 patients (20%) suffering from grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. 4 (17%) patients required total parenteral nutrition for a mean duration of 20 days. 4 patients suffered septic shock (17%) and 1 patient developed a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolus. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric cancer is a standard at our institution and has resulted in few relapses and an interesting median survival. Toxicity rates were serious and this remains a harsh regimen with only 36.8% of patients completing the full planned courses of chemotherapy. This is due to

  6. Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric adenocarcinoma: an institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosn Marwan G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that surgery alone is less than satisfactory in the management of early gastric cancer, with cure rates approaching 40%. The role of adjuvant therapy was indefinite until three large, randomized controlled trials showed the survival benefit of adjuvant therapy over surgery alone. Chemoradiation therapy has been criticized for its high toxicity. Methods 24 patients diagnosed between September 2001 and July 2007 were treated with adjuvant chemoradiation. 18 patients had the classical MacDonald regimen of 4500 cGy of XRT and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU and leucovorin, while chemotherapy consisted of 5FU/Cisplatin for 6 patients. Results This series consisted of non-metastatic patients, 17 females and 7 males with a median age of 62.5 years. 23 patients (96% had a performance status of 0 or 1. The full course of radiation therapy (4500 cGy was completed by 22 patients (91.7%. Only 7 patients (36.8% completed the total planned courses of chemotherapy. 2 local relapses (10%, 2 regional relapses (10% and 2 distant relapses (10% were recorded. Time to progression has not been reached. 9 patients (37.5% died during follow-up with a median overall survival of 75 months. Patients lost a mean of 4 Kgs during radiation therapy. We recorded 6 episodes of febrile neutropenia and the most frequent toxicity was gastro-intestinal in 17 patients (70.8% with 9 (36% patients suffering grade 3 or 4 toxicity and 5 patients (20% suffering from grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. 4 (17% patients required total parenteral nutrition for a mean duration of 20 days. 4 patients suffered septic shock (17% and 1 patient developed a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolus. Conclusions Adjuvant chemo-radiation for gastric cancer is a standard at our institution and has resulted in few relapses and an interesting median survival. Toxicity rates were serious and this remains a harsh regimen with only 36.8% of patients completing the

  7. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law.

  8. Experiments on the Making(T32 work in progress)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    . This mode of operation entails production of derivative variations accommodating a reading of differences in the material as well as in the space in between, facilitating possibilities of chance encounters, discoveries. The work is developed as a fragmented assemblage of representations of T32 (acronym......, facilitator) of memories of the places of obliteration it exposes; the erasure of significance of the past, and possesses their validity in the present and the future. Methodological approaches explored in the contextual, the serial, relating to T32 its heterogeneous representations; the findings...

  9. Experiments on the Making(T32 work in progress)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    of operation entails production of derivative variations accommodating a reading of differences in the material as well as in the space in between, facilitating possibilities of chance encounters, discoveries. The work is developed as a fragmented assemblage of representations of T32 (acronym – a road, 32......) of memories of the places of obliteration it exposes; the erasure of significance of the past, and possesses their validity in the present and the future.Methodological approaches explored in the contextual, the serial, relating to T32 its heterogeneous representations; the findings, the manipulated drawings...

  10. Diamond Ordinance Radiation Facility (DORF) reactor operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseler, Walter

    1970-01-01

    The Diamond Ordnance Radiation Facility Mark F Reactor is described and some of the problems encountered with its operation are discussed. In a period from reactor startup in September 1961 to June 1964, when the aluminum-clad core was changed to a stainless-steel clad core, a total of 30 fuel elements were removed from reactor service because of excessive growth. One leaking fuel element was detected during the lifetime of the aluminum- clad core. In June 1964, the core was changed to the stainless-steel-clad high hydride fuel elements. Since the installation of the stainless-steel-clad fuel element core, there has been a gradual decline of excess reactivity. Various theories were discussed as the cause but the investigations have resulted in no definitive conclusion that could account for the total reactivity loss

  11. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  12. Radiation effects in nematodes: Results from IML-1 experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Richards, G. F.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1994-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events. This configuration was used to isolate mutations in a set of 350 essential genes as well as in the unc-22 structural gene. From flight samples 13 mutants in the unc-22 gene were isolated along with 53 lethal mutations from autosomal regions balanced by a translocation eT1(III;V). Preliminary analysis suggests that mutants from worms correlated with specific cosmic ray tracks may have a higher proportion of rearrangements than those isolated from tube cultures on a randomly sampled basis. Flight sample mutation rate was approximately 8-fold higher than ground controls which exhibited laboratory spontaneous frequencies.

  13. Final result of the Munich-Frascati gravitational radiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, P.; Schnupp, L.

    1977-02-01

    Within 580 days of usable common observation time between July 1973 and February 1976, this Weber-type coincidence experiment had set the lowest upper limits to the rates of gravitational wave pulses. We report the total result up to the dismantling of the detectors. We also describe a reevaluation of our data using Weber's preferred algorithm for two months in 1974 during which Weber communicated to have found a particularly significant effect in his own experiment. Finally, we confront the negative results with the far aims of gravitational pulse astronomy. (orig.) [de

  14. Final result of the Munich-Frascati gravitational radiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, P.; Schnupp, L.

    1978-01-01

    Within 580 days of usable common observation time between July 1973 and February 1976, this Weber-type coincidence experiment had set the lowest upper limits to the rates of gravitational wave pulses. We report the total result up to the dismantling of the detectors. We also describe a re-evaluation of our data using Weber's preferred algorithm for two months in 1974 during which Weber communicated to have found a particularly significant effect in his own experiment. Finally, we confront the negative results with the far aims of gravitational pulse astronomy. (orig.) [de

  15. High Performance and the Transformation of Work? The Implications of Alternative Work Practices for the Experience and Outcomes of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, John

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 508 Canadian workers showed that moderate levels of high-performance work practices were associated with increased belonging, empowerment, job satisfaction, and organizational citizenship behavior. At higher levels, the association became negative. Work was more stressful with these practices. Team autonomy, just-in-time practices, and…

  16. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromswold, D. C.; McCormick, K.; Todd, L.; Ashbaker, E. D.; Evans, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm × 10-cm × 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm × 173 cm × 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site, the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site, the trains contained bulk cargo in tanker cars and hopper cars or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting portion of the program GADRAS developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For most of the NORM, the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases.

  17. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromswold, David C.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Evans, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm x 10-cm x 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm x 173 cm x 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site the trains contained bulk cargo or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting program GADRAS/FitToDB from Sandia National Laboratories. For much of the NORM the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases

  18. Experiences of work ability in young workers: an exploratory interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Maria; Holmgren, Kristina; Sluiter, Judith K; Hagberg, Mats; Grimby-Ekman, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of and influences on work ability in young workers related to their work and life situation. In a qualitative study of a strategic sample of 12 young female and 12 young male workers, aged 25-30 years, in work or recently left work, recruited from the 5-year follow-up of a Swedish cohort, semi-structured interviews were performed to explore the experiences of work ability in these young workers. Systematic text condensation inspired by phenomenology was used in the analysis. Work ability was experienced as complex, consisting of four themes, each with three subthemes. To be alert and have energy, to possess sufficient education, skills and working life experience and experience meaningfulness and engagement in work, were perceived to be fundamental for work ability and were seen as the worker's own responsibility. Moreover, work ability can be improved or reduced by the psychosocial work climate, the work organization and the private life. Optimal work ability was experienced when all themes integrated in a positive way. Work ability was experienced as the worker's own responsibility that could be influenced by work circumstances and private life. To promote good work ability among young workers, work ability has to be understood in its specific context. Whether the understanding of work ability found in this study is explicit for the group of young adults needs to be explored in a more general population in further research.

  19. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department

  20. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonett, Jotham [Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  1. The work experience of undocumented Mexican migrants in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R J; Deley, M

    1984-01-01

    This study, based on interviews with Mexican documented and undocumented women workers in Los Angeles county, finds that most of the women in both categories work in factories. Contrary to popular impression, only 10% of the undocumented women in this survey are engaged in private household employment, although 19% were so employed when they 1st came to the US. Despite this obvious change in occupation, in general occupational mobility from 1st jobs is insignificant. On the average, undocumented women's hourly rate of pay was 40 US cents higher than the minimum wage, and US$1.57 lower than the average documented women's wages. Within the same occupational category, the undocumented women earned less per hour. The smallest difference occured in the 'laborer's' category. Another departure from popular impression was that, 76% of undocumented workers were paid by check. The figure was 94% for documented women workers. The respondents who said they were paid in cash were most likely to be in the private household sector. 80% of the undocumented workers did not think that they were discriminated against in their jobs, suggesting that they are a rather timid group of workers who believe that they have no real options regarding their work life, and are relatively satisfied with what they have. Almost all the women said that they came to the US with the intention of staying permanently, or as long as they are not caught and sent back to Mexico, which is their biggest fear. Better job and better pay are the most important reasons given by most women for coming. Being temporarily laid off would not prompt them to return to Mexico, as they are confident that their chances of finding another minimum wage paying job are better in the US. A closek knit network of support usually tides them over during their period of joblessness.

  2. Measurements of Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure at Work and at Leisure in Danish Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Kasper; Eriksen, Paul; Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2018-03-30

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of skin cancer and may well present an occupational health and safety problem. In Denmark, skin cancer is a common disease in the general population, but detailed data on solar ultraviolet radiation exposure among outdoor workers are lacking. The aim of this study was to provide objective measurements of solar ultraviolet radiation exposure on working days and at leisure and compare levels of exposure between groups of mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers. To this end, UV-B dosimeters with an aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) photodiode detector were used to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation exposure of 457 workers in the Danish summer season. Presented as semi-annual standard erythemal dose (SED) on working days, respectively, at leisure, the results are for mainly outdoor workers 214.2 SED and 64.8 SED, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor workers 131.4 SED and 64.8 SED, indoor workers 55.8 SED and 57.6 SED. The daily SED by month is significantly different (α = 0.05) between mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers and across professional groups; some of which are exposed at very high levels that is roofers 361.8 SED. These findings substantiate that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is indeed an occupational health and safety problem in Denmark. © 2018 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Photobiology.

  3. Radiation protection in hemodynamics work process: the look of the multidisciplinary team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Laurete Medeiros; Klauberg, Daniela; Huhn, Andrea; Melo, Juliana Almeida Coelho de

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted in a hemodynamics service of a public hospital in Florianopolis, SC, Brazil. Qualitative research with the participation of 13 professionals from a multidisciplinary team: doctors, technicians, technologists in radiology and nurses. The research material was extracted from the observations, semi-structured interviews and documentary analysis. The responses were grouped into three categories relating to: training of hemodynamic professionals and the perception of radiological protection in the work process; occupational exposure and safety of the professionals of Hemodynamics; and continuing education in hemodynamic service. Professionals are daily exposed to ionizing radiation, and for being long procedures, lead to high levels of exposure in workers. In hemodynamic services the risk of biological effects are cumulative, because radiodiagnostic procedures include issuing the higher doses of ionizing radiation in which the personnel exposure is critical. The workforce in the service researched mostly consists of technical professionals who reported little knowledge of radiation protection and ionizing radiation and that this issue was not addressed during their training. However, despite mention little knowledge about radiological protection, participants demonstrated understand the biological effects, especially with regard to pathologies caused by frequent exposure without protection to ionizing radiation. These professionals said they have no knowledge of the proper use of radiological protection equipment and the dosimeter, and that the institution does not provide all individual protective equipment required for the procedures performed in the hemodynamic service. Permanent education in hemodynamic service is very important part in the work process, though, cited by participants as little effectiveness in the institution, even when the professionals show interest in the area. Knowledge of the team providing hemodynamic service calls

  4. Precision dosimetry system suited for low temperature radiation damage experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Hanke, C.C.; Sørensen, H.

    1967-01-01

    A calorimetric system for dosimetry on a beam of charged particles is described. The calorimeter works at liquid helium temperature. The total dose may be measured with an accuracy of 0.3%, and the dose per area with 0.4%. No theoretical corrections are needed. © 1967 The American Institute...

  5. Work, gender, and social networks: work experiences of fashion fair managers on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea González Medina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article questions the classical paradigms of work society, which emphasized the industrial-worker-men. In contrast, it affirms the existence of a reorganization of the work world, reflected in many ways, such as non-industrial and labor regulation activities, as well as the introduction of information and communication technologies. The research focused on two fundamental aspects of said reorganization; the proliferation of activities in the informal sector and the use of information and communication technologies at work. In order to understand these lines of analysis, we selected the case of e-commerce carried out on the Facebook platform. Although this platform has been co-opted by big companies to advertise products, it is also possible to observe the emergence of an informal work market made up of women who use that technological tool to carry out business on Facebook through ‘fashion fairs’. The article argues that the work carried out in such fairs is permeated by gender stereotypes. Therefore, its objective is to understand the configuration of subjectivities on the basis of gender stereotypes in the current work environment. In order to achieve this, it proposed a qualitative methodology to analyze labor aspects, use of time, and interaction with technology. The understanding of the work included the following central themes: production of services, de-territorialization of work, and production of symbols, and each one of these was related to a gender stereotype: women in the informal sector; the articulation between domestic-extra- omestic/productive-reproductive work; and the feminization of the products market, respectively. The article seeks to make evident the processes involved in the production of services and the conditions of informality in which women are involved. The article is structured as follows: the first section conceptualizes the activity according to the categories of nontraditional work

  6. The GBT-SCA, a radiation tolerant ASIC for detector control applications in SLHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, A; Kloukinas, K; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Ranieri, A; De Robertis, D

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the architecture of the GigaBit Transceiver – Slow Control Adapter (GBT–SCA) ASIC suitable for the control and monitoring applications of the embedded front-end electronics in the future SLHC experiments. The GBT–SCA is part the GBT chipset currently under development for the SLHC detector upgrades. It is designed for radiation tolerance and it will be fabricated in a commercial 130 nm CMOS technology. The paper discusses the GBT-SCA architecture, the data transfer protocol, the ASIC interfaces, and its integration with the GBT optical link. The GBT–SCA is one the components of the GBT system chipset. It is proposed for the future SLHC experiments and is designed to be configurable matching different front-end system requirements. The GBT-SCA is intended for the slow control and monitoring of the embedded front end electronics and implements a point-to-multi point connection between one GBT optical link ASIC and several front end ASICs. The GBT-SCA connects to a dedicated electrica...

  7. Transverse momentum at work in high-energy scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signori, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    I will review some aspects of the definition and the phenomenology of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent distributions (TMDs) which are potentially interesting for the physics program at several current and future experimental facilities. First of all, I will review the definition of quark, gluon and Wilson loop TMDs based on gauge invariant hadronic matrix elements. Looking at the phenomenology of quarks, I will address the flavor dependence of the intrinsic transverse momentum in unpolarized TMDs, focusing on its extraction from Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. I will also present an estimate of its impact on the transverse momentum spectrum of W and Z bosons produced in unpolarized hadronic collisions and on the determination of the W boson mass. Moreover, the combined effect of the flavor dependence and the evolution of TMDs with the energy scale will be discussed for electron-positron annihilation. Concerning gluons, I will present from an effective theory point of view the TMD factorization theorem for the transverse momentum spectrum of pseudoscalar quarkonium produced in hadronic collisions. Relying on this, I will discuss the possibility of extracting precise information on (un)polarized gluon TMDs at a future Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC).

  8. Experience of the use of radiation measuring instruments for Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kawaguti, H.

    1994-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, among a series of international cooperations, also from our company T.OHSHIMA visited Russia in October, 1991 as a member of the USSR and Japan Joint Specialist Meeting on Environmental Radiation and Shelter Structure of Chernobyl-4 Nuclear Power Plant, and a few members including H.KAWAGUTI visited there in December, 1991 for the handling instructions of the apparatus delivered to Sasagawa Memorial Health Cooperation Foundation. During these visits to Russia they carried electronic personal dosimeters and pocketsize dose ratemeters, measured the doses and dose rate of some areas including the actual polluted areas and gained interesting data. Especially T.OHSHIMA entered the turbine structure of Chernobyl No.4 Reactor and experienced 7m Sv/h. I introduce these measurement data and the instruments used for the measurement. Also H.KAWAGUTI and others explained the maintenance and handling of the whole body counter loaded into the medical examination car offered to Russia for Chernobyl Sasagawa Medical Care Cooperation Project of Sasagawa Memorial Health Cooperation Foundation. I introduce the outline of this medical examination car laying stress on the whole body counter and present a part of the data by the whole body counter measured during the medical care cooperation. (author)

  9. A radiation-hardened two transistor memory cell for monolithic active pixel sensors in STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, X; Dorokhov, A; Hu, Y; Gao, D

    2011-01-01

    Radiation tolerance of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) is dramatically decreased when intellectual property (IP) memories are integrated for fast readout application. This paper presents a new solution to improve radiation hardness and avoid latch-up for memory cell design. The tradeoffs among radiation tolerance, area and speed are significantly considered and analyzed. The cell designed in 0.35 μm process satisfies the radiation tolerance requirements of STAR experiment. The cell size is 4.55 x 5.45 μm 2 . This cell is smaller than the IP memory cell based on the same process and is only 26% of a radiation tolerant 6T SRAM cell used in previous contribution. The write access time of the cell is less than 2 ns, while the read access time is 80 ns.

  10. Experiences of work ability in young workers: an exploratory interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boström, Maria; Holmgren, Kristina; Sluiter, Judith K.; Hagberg, Mats; Grimby-Ekman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of and influences on work ability in young workers related to their work and life situation. In a qualitative study of a strategic sample of 12 young female and 12 young male workers, aged 25-30 years, in work or recently left work, recruited from

  11. Social Class and the Experience of Work-Family Conflict during the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, Samantha K.; Kelly, Erin L.

    2008-01-01

    The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. This chapter explores how class affects young adults' exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using…

  12. Background of external γ radiation in the proportional counters of the SAGE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Gorbachev, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of external γ radiation on the process of counting 71 Ge decays in the proportional counters of the SAGE experiment measuring the solar-neutrino flux is considered. The systematic uncertainty in the SAGE result due to radon decays inside the air volume surrounding the counters is estimated. The background counting rate in the proportional counters that is caused by γ radiation from the enclosing shield is also determined

  13. Neurosurgical Work during the Napoleonic Wars: George James Guthrie's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Franck-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Involved in what is still considered, along with the two world wars of the 20th century, as one of the major conflicts in Europe, George James Guthrie (1785-1856) was the most famous English army surgeon of the Napoleonic wars. After treating the injured throughout the Peninsular Campaign (1808-1814), in 1815 and then in 1842 he published two major books dealing with cranial and brain injuries, among other topics. In these books, we can find, for example, an early description of the plantar reflex further described by Joseph Babinsky, accurate descriptions of the clinical signs of intracranial hypertension, and details of the physiopathology of subdural and epidural haematomas. Skull fractures are also discussed intensively, along with the indications for trepanation, a much-debated issue at the turn of the 19th century. The dura was often the limit of the surgical field for Guthrie. Nevertheless, he tried to rationalize the use of trepanation and favoured its use in two main cases: in cases of depressed skull bones, jammed bone fragments or debris irritating the dura or the brain and in cases of life-threatening cerebral compression caused by supposed blood clots. In their works, Guthrie and his contemporaries did not address neurosurgery in the modern sense of the word, but rather 'cranial surgery' in most cases. Guthrie, who saw so many patients with brain injuries and amputations, failed to understand that cerebral functions could be localized to the cortex and neglected to describe the phantom limb phenomenon, as did most of his contemporaries. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Jagiellonian University Radiation Damage in Silicon Particle Detectors in High Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation damage is nowadays the most serious problem in silicon particle detectors placed in the very harsh radiation environment. This problem will be even more pronounced after the LHC Upgrade because of extremely strong particle fluences never encountered before. In this review, a few aspects of radiation damage in silicon trackers are presented. Among them, the change in the silicon lattice and its influence on the detector performance are discussed. Currently applied solutions and the new ideas for future experiments will be also shown. Most of the results presented in this summary were obtained within the RD50 Collaboration

  15. Making ionising radiation a real experience for high school science students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.; Lang, P.; De La Matter, D.; Hinman, P.; White, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian public has little understanding of ionising radiation due in part to its treatment in popular media. In principle, students learn about ionising radiation in their school science classes. Developments in science curricula are providing more education opportunities for this subject. The Canadian Nuclear Society's program for introducing real, personal experience with ionising radiation in the classroom is starting to make a difference. The demand is expected to exceed the resources of the CNS and the program is being developed to facilitate external support. This paper summarizes the need, the history of this program development, and the path forward. (author)

  16. Basic radiation protection training for nurses and paramedical personnel: Belgian experience and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarijs, T.; Coeck, M.; Van Bladel, Lodewijk; Fremout, An

    2015-01-01

    When using ionising radiation for medical diagnosis or treatment of patients, understanding of relevant radiation protection principles and issues is indispensable. In Belgium, nurses and paramedical staff are required to acquire knowledge for protecting the patient against the detrimental effects of ionising radiation by means of a vocational training course. The experience with and challenges for this training course are presented here from a lecturer's point of view, together with a proposal for a future approach that harmonises the training content, its level and quality, according to European recommended standards. (authors)

  17. First Results from the Online Radiation Dose Monitoring System in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration; Deliyergiyev, M; Gorišek, A; Kramberger, G; Mikuž, M; Franz, S; Hartert, J; Dawson, I; Miyagawa, P; Nicolas, L

    2011-01-01

    High radiation doses which will accumulate in components of ATLAS experiment during data taking will causes damage to detectors and readout electronics. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the doses to estimate the level of degradation caused by radiation. Online radiation monitoring system measures ionizing dose in SiO2 , displacement damage in silicon in terms of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence and fluence of thermal neutrons at several locations in ATLAS detector. In this paper design of the system, results of measurements and comparison of measured integrated doses and fluences with predictions from FLUKA simulation will be shown.

  18. The Motherhood Wage Penalty Revisited: Experience, Heterogeneity, Work Effort, and Work-Schedule Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deborah J.; Binder, Melissa; Krause, Kate

    2003-01-01

    Controlling for human capital inputs and unobserved heterogeneity explained 55-57% of the wage gap between mothers and nonmothers. Mothers faced the highest wage penalty at return to work. High school graduates suffered more prolonged, severe losses than women with lower or higher attainment. Their jobs were less likely to offer flexibility needed…

  19. Cytogenetic studies in women with menstrual disturbances, working in an environment of ionizing radiation (external irradiation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, G.; Dimcheva, M.; Kyncheva, V.

    1976-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood lymphocytes involved a sample of 30 female radiation workers with menstrual disorders from a total of 400 subjects (female physicians, laboratory technicians, and attendant personnel) included in dispensary polyclinic supervision records for a five-year period. Clinical conditions were distributed as follows: 16 patients, with oligomenorrhea; 8, with irregular bleedings; 3, with hypermenorrhea; 2, with a history of obstetric pathology; and 1, with ovarian cyst. Length of occupational experience in a radiation environment (external exposure) varied from 2 to 25 years; patient age, from 21 to 45 years. Chromosome anomalies were found in 17 of the 30 subjects investigated. Types of chromosome abnormalities detected: aneuploidy, fragments and gaps, and in one case, dicentric aberrations. Amounts of chromosome damage induced were shown to be related to years at risk. (A.B.)

  20. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member's technical work and projects will be presented

  1. The 1987 radiation accident in Goiania: medical and organizational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de; Souza, P.C. de

    1989-12-01

    The present works describes the circumstances of the accident occurred on 13 September 1987, in Goiania (Brazil), when two scavengers removed a teletherapy device a 50.9 TB q (1375Ci) cesium source, from a clinic. They took the apparatus home and tried to dismantled it. The authors describe the circumstances of the event, the first aid measures taken on the site, and the medical structure organized to triage and treat the casualties. Aspects relating to hospital contamination control, the environment, and radioprotection and decontamination procedures are also discussed. (L.M.J.) [pt

  2. The `Chocolate Experiment' - A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using their bare hands in this experiment because they learned in early science lessons that skin is not a reliable detector of heat transfer. Moreover, when the experiment is conducted in a school laboratory, it is often difficult for students to perceive the slight differences in heat transfer on the dull black and silvery aluminum leaves attached to their hands. Rather than replacing students' bare hands with such sophisticated apparatus as a data logger and temperature probe, I suggest using a simple (and delicious!) low-cost instrument, i.e., chocolate, which simply melts when it receives radiation.

  3. Development of working methods used inside reactor pressure vessel at Oskarshamn from the radiation protection point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solstrand, C.

    2005-01-01

    When performing maintenance and repair work in the beginning of 1970's conventional work tools and working methods mostly were used. The focus was on how to protect workers sufficiently in a proper way to keep the doses ALARA. During the last years the focus has turned more towards construction of special work tools in order to minimise personnel doses without any special arrangements for radiation shielding. Three examples will be presented to show that the optimisation of radiation protection can lead to the development of work tools and working methods, reducing the doses, time and money. (author)

  4. Work-related behaviour and experience pattern in nurses: impact on physical and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M; Damkröger, A; Voltmer, E; Löwe, B; Driessen, M; Ward, M; Wingenfeld, K

    2011-06-01

    Nursing is associated with high levels of emotional strain and heavy workloads. Changing working conditions raise the importance of investigating job satisfaction, stress and burnout and its consequences for nurses. The aim of the study was to investigate whether work-related behaviour and experience patterns are associated with mental and physical health status in nurses. A sample of 356 nurses in four German hospitals were interviewed using questionnaires regarding work-related behaviour and experience patterns, work stress, depression, anxiety and physical symptoms ('Work-related Behaviour and Experience Pattern'--AVEM and ERI). The main result of this study is that unhealthy work-related behaviour and experience patterns (i.e. the excessive ambitious type and the resigned type) are associated with reduced mental and physical health. Preventive, as well as intervention, strategies are needed that focus both on the individual as well as on working conditions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  5. Overview of the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Flight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission addresses the need to reduce the uncertainty in predicting human exposure to cosmic radiation in the aircraft environment. Measurements were taken that characterize the dosimetric properties of cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure, and the cosmic ray secondary radiations that are produced and transported to aviation altitudes. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. RaD-X was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5 N, 104.2 W), on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of science data were obtained from a total of four different type dosimeters at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X flight mission was supported by laboratory radiation exposure testing of the balloon flight dosimeters and also by coordinated radiation measurements taken on ER-2 and commercial aircraft. This paper provides the science background and motivation for the RaD-X flight mission, a brief description of the balloon flight profile and the supporting aircraft flights, and a summary of the articles included in the RaD-X special collection and their contributions to the science goals of the RaD-X mission.

  6. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  7. Production of iridium-192 radiation sources: Indian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, K.V.S.; Kolhe, O.T.; Nagarja, P.S.; Paramr, Y.D.

    2002-01-01

    Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), a unit under the Department of Atomic Energy is fabricating and supplying Ir-192 industrial radiography sources for various models of radiography cameras for use in the industry for non-destructive testing. Basically these sources are fabricated by encapsulating the required quantity of the activity in stainless steel 316 L capsules using Tungsten Inert gas welding process and crimping/attaching to the respective pigtail assemblies of the radiography cameras. The inactive iridium pellets are irradiated in the DHRUVA reactor at a flux on 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. The performance classification of these source encapsulation for various conditions of normal and accidental nature are tested by subjecting the prototype sources as per the standard laid down by the regulatory authority, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in India. The sources are fabricated as per the national and international standards. Activity of the sources varies from 37O GBq (10 Ci ) to 2.96 TBq (80 Ci ) source strength depending on the requirement of the user. The specific activity of the Ir-192 sources supplied is around 7.4 TBq/gm (200 Ci/gm ). Quality control /Assurance for the manufacture of the source begins from the procurement of the raw material and ends with the finished source. Ir- 192 in the form of -0.3 mm diameter (0.1 mm dia wire of Ir-25 % and Pt-75% sheathed in pure platinum of 0.1 mm thick) is being supplied for use in the treatment of cancer of cervix, tongue etc. by brachytherapy. This is supplied in lengths of 50 cm / 100 cm with 37 - 185 GBq/cm ( 1-5 mCi/cm) activity. Annually 925 TBq (25 kCi) of Ir-192 for industrial radiography and about 60 meters of wire for brachytherapy are being fabricated and supplied. Because of the quality of these sources BRIT not only caters to the Indian industry but also is able to export sources to the third world countries. (Author)

  8. Medical surveillance according to the resolution radiation protection nuclear-power-law in working with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The rules with regard to the medical surveillance of persons who, during the execution of their duties, may be exposed to certain amounts of ionizing radiation are treated. After an explanation of the general starting points of the policy with regard to radiation hygiene, two governing tools are reviewed: the set of licences and the radiation hygiene standards. 10 refs.; 1 table

  9. Protection against Natural Radiation at Home and at Work Exclusion, Practice, Intervention-Theory and Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Kock, J.

    2004-01-01

    The issues related to protection against natural radiation at home and at work are addressed in the last fifteen years by various international organizations, professional bodies and national laws and regulations. The ICRP and the IAEA outlined theoretical principles, basic recommendations and some practical instructions for the classification of exposure situations to natural radiation sources into those that are dealt in the framework of practices and interventions and those that are excluded from the framework because they are un-amenable to control. However, in many practical cases, this classification appears to be a complex task, which has to be tackled by the national competent authorities in each country. When trying to convert the principles and guidance outlined by the international bodies into national regulations and practical instructions, we discover that some issues are undecided upon and guidance is lacking relating to sources and practices that were not explicitly addressed. Furthermore, some ambiguities in the principles and guidelines can be detected and difficulties encountered in their implementation. The recommendations and instructions of the ICRP and the IAEA related to natural radiation sources and chronic exposure and their interpretation by the European Commission are reviewed and analyzed. Their implications on the possible ways to handle issues such as the protection against radon at home and at work, the limits to be set on natural radioactive substances in building materials and the radiation risks related to the phosphate and coal ash industries are discussed. Recent decisions of the competent authorities in Israel and Israeli regulations and standardization related to some of these issues are presented. (Author) 12 refs

  10. Understanding Accounting as a Career: An Immersion Work Experience for Students Making Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Dianne; Murphy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a project which is designed to increase the participation of high school students in accounting work experience placements. The focus of the paper is on an Australian-based project which overcomes the identified barriers to offering high school accounting work experience placements with a resultant increase in the number and…

  11. Work-related experiences of head and neck cancer survivors: an exploratory and descriptive qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study contributes to the growing knowledge about the return-to-work (RTW) experience of head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Viewing RTW as a process, participants were asked to consider the work-related experience with HNC at different phases: (1) at

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV-eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm"3 (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm"3). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 92% (V_9_2_% _P_D) and 95% (V_9_5_% _P_D) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 105% (V_1_0_5_% _P_D) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the PTV-eval are 0.09 (range: 0

  13. Interagency task force on the health effects of ionizing radiation: report of the work group on public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    The health effects of ionizing radiation recently have been the focus of increased public concern. In response to this concern, in a May 9, 1978, memorandum the White House requested the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to coordinate an interagency program that would, among other things, ensure public awareness and knowledge of the health effects of ionizing radiation. As a result, the Interagency Task Force on Ionizing Radiation was formed. The Information Work Group of the Task Force was asked to outline a public information program to meet the needs of the general public, the health and scientific community, workers, and other persons exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation in the past and at present or who may be exposed in the future. The Work Group is composed of 16 members, each representing an agency participating on the Interagency Task Force on Ionizing Radiation. The Work Group members used the draft Reports of the Science Work Group, the Radiation Exposure Reduction Work Group, the Care and Benefits Work Group, and the Privacy Work Group as a basis for developing the Information Report. In addition, the Information Work Group conducted a preliminary review of existing federal information programs. Meetings were held with representatives of environmental and trade groups, unions, and professional societies to help define the dimensions and priorities of a public information program

  14. Primary radiation therapy for early breast cancer: the experience at the joint center for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.R.; Botnick, L.; Bloomer, W.D.; Chaffey, J.T.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of primary radiation therapy in 176 consecutive patients with clinical State I and II carcinoma of the breast were reviewed. Median follow-up time was 47 months. The overall breast relapse rate was 7%. Patients undergoing interstitial implantation had a significantly lower breast relapse rate (1%) than patients not undergoing implantation (11%). Breast relapse was more common in patients undergoing incisional or needle biopsy (17%), compared to patients treated after excisional biopsy (5%). In patients undergoing excisional biopsy, but not interstitial implantation, breast relapse was related to external beam dose. Twelve percent of the patients who received less than 1600 ret dose relapsed in the breast, compared to none of the 19 patients who received more than 1700 ret dose. These results imply that supplemental irradiation to the primary tumor area is required following excisional biopsy of a primary breast cancer when 4500-5000 rad is delivered to the entire breast

  15. Work-related limitations and return-to-work experiences in prolonged fatigue: workers' perspectives before and after vocational treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, Margot C. W.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into fatigued workers' perspectives regarding work experience before and after receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) treatments. A qualitative survey was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 21 fatigued workers who attended an outpatient multi-component VR treatment.

  16. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  17. Experimental Investigation to Heat Transfer Augmentation in A Car Radiator Worked with (Water - Magnesium Oxide) Nanofluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Hameed K. Hamzah; Qusay Rasheed Al-Amir

    2017-01-01

    In this work, effect of adding MgO nanoparticle to base fluid (water) in car radiator has been implemented experimentally. In this investigation, an experimental test rig has been designed to study effect inlet temperature of nanofluid, the flow rate and nanoparticle volume fraction on heat transfer rates. Six different concentrations of nanofluid of 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%,1% ,1.5% and 2% have been prepared by mixed of MgO nanoparticles with water. Reynolds number of nanofluid was between 4500 a...

  18. An investigation of emotion experiences at work : a critical incident technique approach / Natalie Booth

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: Emotions at work have been considered as an important facet of employees’ work life. However, research regarding the investigation of the emotion experiences at work per se has been lacking. Research Purpose: The general objective of this study is to critically investigate what emotion events are experienced and how these events are appraised for them to result in specific emotions. Motivation for the study: Currently a lack of research regarding emotion experiences as a pr...

  19. Impact of previous pharmacy work experience on pharmacy school academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Ellena; Barnett, Mitchell J; T-L Tang, Terrill; Sasaki-Hill, Debra; Kuperberg, James R; Knapp, Katherine

    2010-04-12

    To determine whether students' previous pharmacy-related work experience was associated with their pharmacy school performance (academic and clinical). The following measures of student academic performance were examined: pharmacy grade point average (GPA), scores on cumulative high-stakes examinations, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) grades. The quantity and type of pharmacy-related work experience each student performed prior to matriculation was solicited through a student survey instrument. Survey responses were correlated with academic measures, and demographic-based stratified analyses were conducted. No significant difference in academic or clinical performance between those students with prior pharmacy experience and those without was identified. Subanalyses by work setting, position type, and substantial pharmacy work experience did not reveal any association with student performance. A relationship was found, however, between age and work experience, ie, older students tended to have more work experience than younger students. Prior pharmacy work experience did not affect students' overall academic or clinical performance in pharmacy school. The lack of significant findings may have been due to the inherent practice limitations of nonpharmacist positions, changes in pharmacy education, and the limitations of survey responses.

  20. Impact of Previous Pharmacy Work Experience on Pharmacy School Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Ellena; T-L Tang, Terrill; Sasaki-Hill, Debra; Kuperberg, James R.; Knapp, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether students' previous pharmacy-related work experience was associated with their pharmacy school performance (academic and clinical). Methods The following measures of student academic performance were examined: pharmacy grade point average (GPA), scores on cumulative high-stakes examinations, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) grades. The quantity and type of pharmacy-related work experience each student performed prior to matriculation was solicited through a student survey instrument. Survey responses were correlated with academic measures, and demographic-based stratified analyses were conducted. Results No significant difference in academic or clinical performance between those students with prior pharmacy experience and those without was identified. Subanalyses by work setting, position type, and substantial pharmacy work experience did not reveal any association with student performance. A relationship was found, however, between age and work experience, ie, older students tended to have more work experience than younger students. Conclusions Prior pharmacy work experience did not affect students' overall academic or clinical performance in pharmacy school. The lack of significant findings may have been due to the inherent practice limitations of nonpharmacist positions, changes in pharmacy education, and the limitations of survey responses. PMID:20498735

  1. Paper on operation and maintenance experiences on radiation monitoring instrumentation at NAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, J.P.; Vinod Kumar; Sen, S.K.; Malhotra, S.

    2005-01-01

    Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) is the first standardized Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor in India commissioned in the year 1989. Many new Radiation Monitoring Systems like Portal Monitors and Ventilation Exhaust Activity Monitors were first time introduced at NAPS. All the Personnel Contamination Monitors and Area Radiation Monitors used at NAPS were designed and developed by Electronics Division, BARC. Only the Portal Monitor was supplied by M/S Herfurth, Germany. The paper highlights the operation and maintenance experiences on Radiation Monitoring Instrumentation at NAPS in the last 15 years of operation. The paper also highlights the different problems faced in Radiation Instruments and our suggestions for improvement in their design for their better availability and long term reliability. (author)

  2. Glance traceability – Web system for equipment traceability and radiation monitoring for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos de Azevedo Evora, L H; Pommes, K; Galvão, K K; Maidantchik, C

    2010-01-01

    During the operation, maintenance, and dismantling periods of the ATLAS Experiment, the traceability of all detector equipment must be guaranteed for logistic and safety matters. The running of the Large Hadron Collider will expose the ATLAS detector to radiation. Therefore, CERN must follow specific regulations from both the French and Swiss authorities for equipment removal, transport, repair, and disposal. GLANCE Traceability, implemented in C++ and Java/Java3D, has been developed to fulfill the requirements. The system registers and associates each equipment part to either a functional position in the detector or a zone outside the underground area through a 3D graphical user interface. Radiation control of the equipment is performed using a radiation monitor connected to the system: the local background gets stored and the threshold is automatically calculated. The system classifies the equipment as non radioactive if its radiation dose does not exceed that limit value. History for both location traceabi...

  3. Dosimetry problems when evaluating radiation effects on the personnel, restoration work participants, and human population due to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, Yu.V.; Osanov, D.P.; Gimadova, T.I.; Gus'kov, V.M.; Kruchkov, V.P.; Pavlov, D.A.; Shaks, A.I.

    1993-01-01

    System of radiation monitoring operations of the Chernobyl NPP personnel is described for the period from the date of accident up to present time as well as of persons worked in the Chernobyl NPP 30 km zone, servicemen, and human population. Unsatisfactory organization of radiation on monitoring is marked and causes of this fact are considered. 8 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Work Experiences, Job Performance, and Feelings of Personal and Family Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined interaction between job performance and specific work experiences on three indicators of personal and family well-being among 336 accountants. Perceptions of nonsupportive and inequitable work environment, role conflict, and extensive time commitment to work were each related to one or more indicators of well-being. (Author)

  5. The Work Experience of Undocumented Mexican Women Migrants in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Rita J.; DeLey, Margo

    1984-01-01

    Undocumented Mexican women workers in Los Angeles were interviewed about their work experience in the United States. Most of them work in factories, not in domestic service. Most earn a salary above minimum wage but below that earned by documented women, and 80 percent believe their treatment at work equals that of other workers. (KH)

  6. The influence of adjunctive treatment and metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia on the experience of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Renard, S. B.; van Donkersgoed, R. J. M.; van der Gaag, M.; Wunderink, Alexander; Pijnenborg, G. H. M.; Lysaker, P. H.

    Enhancing work function is now widely considered a core element of comprehensive schizophrenia treatment. While research efforts have illuminated factors that influence how well patients perform at work, less is known about the factors influencing the subjective experience of work. It is not known

  7. The influence of adjunctive treatment and metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia on the experience of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S.; Renard, S.B.; van Donkersgoed, R.J.M.; van der Gaag, M.; Wunderink, L.; Pijnenborg, G.H.M.; Lysaker, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing work function is now widely considered a core element of comprehensive schizophrenia treatment. While research efforts have illuminated factors that influence how well patients perform at work, less is known about the factors influencing the subjective experience of work. It is not known

  8. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note

  9. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

  10. International radiation protection recommendations. Five years experience of ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Beninson, D.; Sowby, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has issued radiation protection recommendations since 1928. The latest set of basic recommendations was adopted by the Commission on 17 January 1977, and subsequently published as ICRP Publication 26. This document has met with a wider interest than any of the previous ICRP recommendations. It has been considered to mark a radical change in the protection policy advocated by ICRP. It is not often appreciated that recommendations which are believed to be 'new' in ICRP Publication 26 had already been made in ICRP Publication 9 more than ten years earlier. In any event, ICRP Publication 26 has had a substantial impact on regulatory work in countries all over the world. It forms the basis for the Basic Safety Standards of the international organizations IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and WHO. The paper refers to the experience gained in using the new ICRP recommendations over the five years that have passed since ICRP Publication 26 was adopted and discusses some of the problems that have arisen in the practical application of the new recommendations in various countries. (author)

  11. Medical physics staffing for radiation oncology: a decade of experience in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Jerry J.; Patterson, Michael S.; Beaulieu, Luc; Sharpe, Michael B.; Schreiner, L. John; MacPherson, Miller S.; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The January 2010 articles in The New York Times generated intense focus on patient safety in radiation treatment, with physics staffing identified frequently as a critical factor for consistent quality assurance. The purpose of this work is to review our experience with medical physics staffing, and to propose a transparent and flexible staffing algorithm for general use. Guided by documented times required per routine procedure, we have developed a robust algorithm to estimate physics staffing needs according to center‐specific workload for medical physicists and associated support staff, in a manner we believe is adaptable to an evolving radiotherapy practice. We calculate requirements for each staffing type based on caseload, equipment inventory, quality assurance, educational programs, and administration. Average per‐case staffing ratios were also determined for larger‐scale human resource planning and used to model staffing needs for Ontario, Canada over the next 10 years. The workload specific algorithm was tested through a survey of Canadian cancer centers. For center‐specific human resource planning, we propose a grid of coefficients addressing specific workload factors for each staff group. For larger scale forecasting of human resource requirements, values of 260, 700, 300, 600, 1200, and 2000 treated cases per full‐time equivalent (FTE) were determined for medical physicists, physics assistants, dosimetrists, electronics technologists, mechanical technologists, and information technology specialists, respectively. PACS numbers: 87.55.N‐, 87.55.Qr PMID:22231223

  12. HOW TEACHERS EVALUATE THEIR WORK STYLE DEPENDING ON THE SUBJECT THEY TEACH AND YEARS OF WORK EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranka Perućica

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In previous works we presented the studies that discussed how students evaluate their teachers and their style of teaching. To what extent their styles affect the students’ attitudes to teaching, learning, success, motivation and the like. In this work we have tried to point out how teachers assess their style of work, depending on the subject they teach and years of work experience. In addition, the aim of this study was to examine whether there are differences in teachers’ estimation of the teaching styles depending on the subject they teach and years of work experience. The study sample consisted of 120 teachers in the final grades of primary schools in the Sarajevo – Romania region. Teachers responded to questions assessing which of the statements given are related to them. The questionnaire was designed for research purposes with the three styles that are commonly used in the classroom to a democratic, autocratic and laissez - fair style. Reliability of the instrument was tested using Cronbach - alpha coefficient, and amounted to 0.73 democratic style, the autocratic 0.73, and 0.63 for the indifferent style. In the study, we used two methods: survey method and the method of theoretical analysis. The obtained results show that there is a statistically significant difference in teachers’ assessments of democratic and laissez - fair style usage, depending on the subject they teach, while there was no statistically significant difference when it comes to the autocratic style. The second part of our results shows that there is no difference in teachers’ assessments of work styles, depending on years of work experience. We hope that these results will contribute to the already existing research dealing with this subject.

  13. Experience of wireless local area network in a radiation oncology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a wireless local area network (LAN) between different types of users (Radiation Oncologists, Radiological Physicists, Radiation Technologists, etc) for efficient patient data management and to made easy the availability of information (chair side) to improve the quality of patient care in Radiation Oncology department. We have used mobile workstations (Laptops) and stationary workstations, all equipped with wireless-fidelity (Wi-Fi) access. Wireless standard 802.11g (as recommended by Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ) has been used. The wireless networking was configured with the Service Set Identifier (SSID), Media Access Control (MAC) address filtering, and Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) network securities. We are successfully using this wireless network in sharing the indigenously developed patient information management software. The proper selection of the hardware and the software combined with a secure wireless LAN setup will lead to a more efficient and productive radiation oncology department.

  14. Determination of tin equilibrium isotope fractionation factors from synchrotron radiation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, VB; Mineev, SD; Clayton, RN; Hu, G; Mineev, KS

    2005-01-01

    A method of determination of the reduced isotopic partition function ratio (beta-factor) from the partial density of state (PDOS) obtained by inelastic nuclear resonant X-ray scattering (INRXS) in synchrotron radiation experiments has been established. The method has been demonstrated by the example

  15. Multiple Pyogenic Abscess of the Hybrid Mice on the Course of Radiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se; Choi, Won Hee; Kim, Seung Hoon [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Even though the mechanism and the nature of radiation induced pneumonitis, esophagitis and gastroenteritis were detailed by many authors, complicated secondary infection is still serious problem, sometimes fatal, even today. We experience a case of multiple pyogenic abscess in subcutaneous tissue of the back and both kidneys which could not differentiate from multiple metastatic sarcoma grossly, and report with review of literatures, lab. findings.

  16. Conservation experiments applying radiation-curable impregnating agents to intact and artifically decayed wood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.; Slais, E.

    1983-02-01

    Conservation experiments have been performed applying 10 selected impregnating agents to intact and chemically as well as biologically decayed wood samples. The quality of the radiation-curable impregnating agents could be valued by determination of the monomer uptake, the alteration of dimensions and volume and the deformation of the samples. The results are to be discussed. (Author) [de

  17. Stress and Fatigue in Operators Under Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation and Shift Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vangelova K.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR on stress indices, health complaints and fatigue of operators working fast-rotating extended shifts. Working conditions, job content, job control, social support, health complaints and fatigue were followed in 220 operators, 110 exposed to EMR and 110 control operators, matched by age and sex. The EMR was measured and time-weighted average (TWA was calculated. The excretion rates of stress hormones cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline were followed during the extended shifts in 36 operators, working at different levels of exposure and 24-hour exposure was calculated. The exposed group pointed more problems with the working conditions, including EMR, noise, currents and risk of accidents, more health complaints and higher level of fatigue. The most common health complaints were mental and physical exhaustion after work, pains in the chest, musculoskeletal complaints, headache, and apathy. High level EMR exposure (TWAmean = 3.10 μW/cm2, TWAmax = 137.00 μW/cm2 significantly increased the 24-hour excretion of cortisol and noradrenaline, whereas the increase of adrenaline excretion did not reach significance, as well as hormone excretion rates under low level exposure (TWAmean = 1.89 μW/cm2, TWAmax = 5.24 μW/cm2. In conclusion, higher number of health complaints, higher stress hormone excretion rates and fatigue were found in operators under EMR.

  18. Outdoor work and solar radiation exposure: Evaluation method for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenese, Alberto; Bisegna, Fabio; Borra, Massimo; Grandi, Carlo; Gugliermetti, Franco; Militello, Andrea; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    The health risk related to an excessive exposure to solar radiation (SR) is well known. The Sun represents the main exposure source for all the frequency bands of optical radiation, that is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging between 100 nm and 1 mm, including infrared (IR), ultraviolet (UV) and visible radiation. According to recent studies, outdoor workers have a relevant exposure to SR but few studies available in scientific literature have attempted to retrace a detailed history of individual exposure. We propose a new method for the evaluation of SR cumulative exposure both during work and leisure time, integrating subjective and objective data. The former is collected by means of an interviewer administrated questionnaire. The latter is available through the Internet databases for many geographical regions and through individual exposure measurements. The data is integrated into a mathematical algorithm, in order to obtain an esteem of the individual total amount of SR the subjects have been exposed to during their lives. The questionnaire has been tested for 58 voluntary subjects. Environmental exposure data through online databases has been collected for 3 different places in Italy in 2012. Individual exposure by electronic UV dosimeter has been measured in 6 fishermen. A mathematical algorithm integrating subjective and objective data has been elaborated. The method proposed may be used in epidemiological studies to evaluate specific correlations with biological effects of SR and to weigh the role of the personal and environmental factors that may increase or reduce SR exposure. Med Pr 2016;67(5):577-587. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  19. Radiation exposure to the staff working in PET/CT and Cyclotron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been available in number of centers for more than 25 years, but its use was not wide spread until 10 years ago. In Bulgarian PET/CT was installed for the first time in 2009 and the dose on demand cyclotron also for the first time – in 2013 in Nuclear Medicine Department in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria. Responsibility of every radiation protection officer is to educate the stuff how to protect their selves from radioactive exposure and to observe and calculate the dose to the people and the stuff. The purpose of this paper is to show how big the doses of the stuff working in Nuclear Medicine Center including PET/CT and Cyclotron facilities situated in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria are. The Department is working now with about 15 patients every day. The dose rates measured with personal TLD’s and personal dose rate meters for the last 5 years for the stuff are under 3 mSv. As the average dose is under 1 mSv, and the doses over 1mSv are only for nurses who injected the FDG. Keywords: radiation exposure, effective dose, PET/CT, Cyclotron, FDGbf

  20. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  1. Regulations No. 187 of 31 May 1988 amending section 7 of the regulations on protective measures during work involving ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These regulations amend regulations No. 1157 of 14 Jun 1985 on protective measures during radiation work. Henceforth workers simultaneously exposed to radiation and cytostatic substances must be given special work instructions to secure their safety. (NEA) [fr

  2. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee's final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE's two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information

  3. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee`s final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE`s two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information.

  4. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. On the choice of working conditions for isotope radiation sources in irradiation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrkus, N.P.; Breger, A.Kh.; Putilov, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of selecting an optimal regime for isotopic sources of radiation in powerful radiational installations depending on the costs, parameters of the radiational process (epsilon) and the radioactive isotope halflife are considered. When the radiation sources are simultaneusly replaced, then the optimal time of replacement of sources increases in the radiational installation with the radiation process parameter epsilon<0. Although the cost of a radiational product is lower during continuous replacement of radiation sources, the cost of products in the regime of simultaneous replacement of sources can be decreased, particularly, in the case of a secondary use of the radiactive sources

  6. 1991 implementation of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) administrative radiation exposure levels: Experiences and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Baumann, B.L.

    1993-06-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure levels were implemented on January 1, 1991, by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a prime US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, located in Richland, Washington. This paper describes the radiation exposure levels which were implemented and the associated experiences and lessons learned. The issue of a report from the Committee on Biological Effectiveness of Ionizing Radiation in 1989 prompted DOE to re-evaluate its position on radiation exposure limits and the resulting doses received by occupational radiation workers. DOE requested that all it's contractors determine the impacts to operations from reduced radiation exposure levels

  7. Annual report on the present state and activities of the radiation protection division, JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities on radiation control in the radiation facilities, personnel monitoring, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, safety research, and technical support, undertaken by the Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004. The major radiation facilities in the Tokai Works are the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), three MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotope and uranium research laboratories. The Radiation Protection Division is responsible for radiation control in and around these radiation facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, calibration, quality assurance, and safety research. The Division also provides technical support and cooperation to other international and domestic institutes in the radiation protection field. In fiscal 2004, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 6.1 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.1 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gas and liquid effluents from the TRP to members of the public around the Tokai Works was 4.4x10 -4 mSv. Environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. Research and development on radiation protection in nuclear fuel cycle are also performed actively. Safety audit and Nuclear Safety Inspection were made in accordance with the quality assurance system which had been introduced to safety regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  8. Walking a fine line: Forensic mental health practitioners' experience of working with correctional officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaretto-Green, Danille; Austin, Wendy; Goble, Erika; Buys, Lisa; Gorman, Tom; Rankel, Marlene

    2011-09-01

    This paper explores mental health professionals' experiences working with correctional staff--one aspect of an interdisciplinary phenomenological study of ethical practice in forensic psychiatry. Professionals describe this relationship as coexisting within the system, despite their often conflicting roles. In correctional officers' overt concern for custody and control, practitioners can perceive a "paramilitary mentality" with which they struggle to work. Conversely, practitioners can experience conflict with security personnel for appearing "too caring" or "too sympathetic" to offenders--being "con-lovers." The balance practitioners establish between working with inmates and working alongside facility security is one of walking a fine line. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  9. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  10. The breast cancer patient's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halkett, Georgia; Scutter, Sheila; Arbon, Paul; Borg, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have many decisions to make during the course of their treatment. The aims of this paper are to describe the women's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer and to explore how women feel about receiving radiation therapy. An in-depth understanding of the women's experience was developed using a qualitative research approach underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 women who had completed treatment for early breast cancer. The themes that emerged from the data were: being challenged, getting ready, beyond control, regaining a sense of control and getting through it. This study provides health professionals with an initial understanding of the women's perspective of the experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer. This study concludes by suggesting that further research needs to be conducted to gain an understanding of how other patients feel about treatment decision making and radiation therapy. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  11. IAEA experience in communicating radiation risks through the RPOP web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.; Holmberg, O.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report here their successful experience of communicating information to health professionals, patients and the public on benefits and risks of ionising radiation in medical applications. The approaches used have been based on giving importance to clinical benefits against risks, as well as safety in use against risk of use. Communicating brief messages against catchy questions with positive and pragmatic approach resulted in making web site on radiation protection of patients (RPOP) as the top web site of the world in this area. Credibility of information has been maintained. The results show immense outreach in 213 countries/territories. (authors)

  12. Experience in organizing and operating of local centers of radiation monitoring in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterenko, V.B.; Devojno, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The paper analyzes the experience in the arrangement and activity of local centres for the radiation monitoring of foods and of articles of daily use established under the control of the rural and urban area administrations at the contaminated territories. The measurement results obtained by the local centres show the deep contamination of food from the local farms and from the local fields and forests, in particular, milk, ferries and mushrooms. RAPIT information system was established automate the processing and analyse of data from the local centres of the radiation monitoring

  13. An example of radiation-education experiment using a new-type handy cloud chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushita, Kouhei

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new-type handy cloud chamber to overcome shortcomings in the conventional handy cloud chambers. The new-type handy cloud chamber has such advantages as: no dangerous parts or tools are used; can be assembled quickly; has a wider observation window; much less expensive, etc. We have also prepared a new text for this cloud-chamber kit to explain the basic theory of radiation and radioisotopes, which is divided into two levels for children and for adults. Using this new-type handy cloud chamber, we propose an example of an educational experiment on radiation and radioisotopes which can be carried out within one hour. (author)

  14. Biomarkers of exposition to ionizing radiation and hematology parameters in fitness for work. Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokovic, J.; Milacic, S.; Rakic, B.; Pajic, J.; Petrovic, D.; Vuckovic, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is frequently used in medicine, especially during diagnostic procedures. The workers who are exposed to radiation have obligation for periodic check up. Presented case shows changes in hematological parameters and biomarkers of exposition to ionizing radiation (chromosome aberrations, structural changes and micronucleus test). The aim of this case report is to indicate metodology of diagnostic procedures for chronicle radiation syndrome. (author) [sr

  15. School nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems : A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Julia; Maltestam, Malin; Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Garmy, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe school nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems. In this inductive qualitative study, interviews were conducted with 14 school nurses in Sweden. The content analysis revealed three themes:(1) sense of worriedness about working with students with mental health problems, (2) taking care of students with mental health issues was an opportunity for personal and professional development, and (3) the experience of making a difference for young pe...

  16. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  17. Experience and problems of the automated measuring and sorting of sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmidt, G.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that with the help of a serial device for samples changing and a mini-computer with a suitable software it is possible to organize the radioactivity measuring and sorting of sealed gamma-sources with activity in the microcuri region. Application of the computer permits to rise accuracy of the data on the radiation sources radioactivity, sorted according to the preset activity level groups and, in the casa of necessity, to perform the activity measurements with lower error. The method listed, gives the working-time economy of nearly 4 hours in measuring and sorting of some 500 sealed radiation sources [ru

  18. Ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant working with unsealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerulis, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    With the liberation of the use of the nuclear energy for peaceful applications, International Commission Radiological Protection, ICRP, founded in 1928, created a system of protection of the undesirable doses of ionizing radiation in 1958. This has been received by workers, members of the public and environment and hence it became possible for the introduction of these applications. This protection system is adopted by the International Agency of Energy Atomic, IAEA, that publishes recommendations in safety series, 88 and by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN, which publishes these regulations. The international recommendations and national regulations were adapted and they need to be applied in this way. The present paper uses recommendations of the publication 75 from ICRP, of the publication 115 from 88 and regulations of the regulation NN 3.01 from CNEN to present, through radiological protection measures, the ionizing radiation dose control for workers in a nuclear plant that works in the research, production, division and packing of unsealed sources to be used in clinical applications. In that way it is possible to prevent appropriately the undesirable doses and to confirm the received doses. (author)

  19. Learning through Experience: The Transition from Doctoral Student to Social Work Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The researchers conducted an exploratory study using grounded theory qualitative research methods to examine experiences of social work doctoral students as they learned to teach ("N"?=?14). A core category, "learning through experience," representing a basic social process, was identified. The doctoral students experienced…

  20. The impact of midlife educational, work, health and family experiences on men's early retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.; Kalmijn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. In empirical studies on predictors of retirement, midlife experiences have often remained implicit or been neglected. This study aims to improve our understanding of retirement by examining the impact of midlife educational, work, health, and family experiences on early retirement