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Sample records for radiation threshold isub

  1. Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation in superionic conductor RbAg/sub 4/I/sub 5/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovanesyan, N.S.; Goffman, V.G.; Sokolov, V.B.; Tkachev, V.V. (AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Otdelenie Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki)

    1984-04-01

    The dynamical properties of RbAg/sub 4/I/sub 5/ has been investiaated by Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation (RSMR) with wave-length lambda = 0.86 A. The character of Ag/sup +/ ion oscillatory motion and diffusion in RbAg/sub 4/I/sub 5/ depending on temperature including the phase transitions region is studied. It is shown that in the superionic crystal RbAg/sub 4/I/sub 5/ the diffusion process is strongly correlated, i.e. a great number of initial and final states at diffusion jumps coincide. The observed broadening can be less than the expected one by value orders. Diffusion correlation can strongly reduce the activation barrier and lead to anomalously high ionic conduction.

  2. The relationship between I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}){sup 2} and crystalline volume fraction in microcrystalline silicon growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantana, Jakapan; Higuchi, Takuya; Nagai, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Shota; Sobajima, Yasushi; Toyama, Toshihiko; Sada, Chitose; Matsuda, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Optical-emission-intensity ratio of I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) during film growth has been used as a simple indicator to predict crystallinity (crystal-volume fraction: X{sub C}) in the resulting microcrystalline silicon ({mu}c-Si:H) thin films. The relationship between I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) and X{sub C} has been checked under a wide variety of film-preparation conditions including low-deposition-rate (<0.1 nm/s) and high-deposition-rate (>5 nm/s) cases. On the basis of theoretical consideration, we have proposed optical-emission-intensity ratio of I{sub H{sub {alpha}}} /(I{sub SiH}{sup *}) {sup 2} as a new indicator of X{sub C} during film growth of {mu}c-Si:H. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Absorption and luminescence characteristics of {sup 5}I{sub 7} ↔ {sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions of the holmium ion in Ho{sup 3+}-doped aluminosilicate preforms and fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabochkina, P A; Chabushkin, A N [N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk (Russian Federation); Kosolapov, A F [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurkov, A S [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We have obtained the spectral dependences of the absorption cross sections for the Ho{sup 3+} {sup 5}I{sub 8} → {sup 5}I{sub 6} and {sup 5}I{sub 8} → {sup 5}I{sub 7} transitions in Ho{sup 3+}-doped aluminosilicate fibres and the spectral dependence of the stimulated emission cross section for the Ho{sup 3+} {sup 5}I{sub 7} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} laser transition in Ho{sup 3+}-doped aluminosilicate fibre preforms. The lifetime of the Ho{sup 3+} {sup 5}I{sub 7} upper laser level in the preforms has been determined. (lasers)

  4. Competitive behavior of photons contributing to junction voltage jump in narrow band-gap semiconductor multi-quantum-well laser diodes at lasing threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Liefeng, E-mail: fengliefeng@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn; Yang, Xiufang; Wang, Cunda; Yao, Dongsheng [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Faculty of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Yang [Business and Vocational College of Hainan, Haikou 570203 (China); Li, Ding; Hu, Xiaodong [Research Center for Wide Band Gap Semiconductors, State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Hongru, E-mail: fengliefeng@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: lihongru@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Medicinal Chemistry and Biology, College of Pharmacy, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-15

    The junction behavior of different narrow band-gap multi-quantum-well (MQW) laser diodes (LDs) confirmed that the jump in the junction voltage in the threshold region is a general characteristic of narrow band-gap LDs. The relative change in the 1310 nm LD is the most obvious. To analyze this sudden voltage change, the threshold region is divided into three stages by I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}, as shown in Fig. 2; I{sub th}{sup l} is the conventional threshold, and as long as the current is higher than this threshold, lasing exists and the IdV/dI-I plot drops suddenly; I{sub th}{sup u} is the steady lasing point, at which the separation of the quasi-Fermi levels of electron and holes across the active region (V{sub j}) is suddenly pinned. Based on the evolutionary model of dissipative structure theory, the rate equations of the photons in a single-mode LD were deduced in detail at I{sub th}{sup l} and I{sub th}{sup u}. The results proved that the observed behavior of stimulated emission suddenly substituting for spontaneous emission, in a manner similar to biological evolution, must lead to a sudden increase in the injection carriers in the threshold region, which then causes the sudden increase in the junction voltage in this region.

  5. Effect of glass composition on the relaxation of the 4Isub(13/2) level of erbium ions in borate and silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Jezowska-Trzebiatowska, B.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of glass nerwork formers and glass modifiers on radiative transition probabilities and quantum efficiencies of the 4 Isub(13/2) level of Er +3 ions in ternary borate and silicate glasses was studied by both absorption and emission spectroscopy. It was found that the transition probabilities may be widely varied by changes glass network former and alkali ion substitution. The role of multiphonon emission and O-H vibration in the relaxation of the 4 Isub(13/2) level is discussed. (author)

  6. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ''false negative or false positive'' indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments

  7. The missing binary tungsten iodide archetype cluster W{sub 4}I{sub 10}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroebele, Markus; Meyer, H. Juergen [Section for Solid State and Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The tungsten iodide cluster W{sub 4}I{sub 10} is obtained by thermal conversion of W{sub 4}I{sub 13}. The crystal structure of W{sub 4}I{sub 10} was solved and refined by means of powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The structure is based on a tetrahedral tungsten cluster core, two face capping, five edge-bridging, and four apical iodido ligands of which two have bridging functionalities with adjacent clusters. Cluster chains in the structure are arranged following the motive of a kinked chain. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. A practical threshold concept for simple and reasonable radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Masahito

    2002-01-01

    A half century ago it was assumed for the purpose of protection that radiation risks are linearly proportional at all levels of dose. Linear No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis has greatly contributed to the minimization of doses received by workers and members of the public, while it has brought about 'radiophobia' and unnecessary over-regulation. Now that the existence of bio-defensive mechanisms such as DNA repair, apoptosis and adaptive response are well recognized, the linearity assumption can be said 'unscientific'. Evidences increasingly imply that there are threshold effects in risk of radiation. A concept of 'practical' thresholds is proposed and the classification of 'stochastic' and 'deterministic' radiation effects should be abandoned. 'Practical' thresholds are dose levels below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or hereditary effects are not expected. There seems to be no evidence of deleterious health effects from radiation exposures at the current dose limits (50 mSv/y for workers and 5 mSv/y for members of the public), which have been adopted worldwide in the latter half of the 20th century. Those limits are assumed to have been set below certain 'practical' thresholds. As any workers and members of the public do not gain benefits from being exposed, excepting intentional irradiation for medical purposes, their radiation exposures should be kept below 'practical' thresholds. There is no use of 'justification' and 'optimization' (ALARA) principles, because there are no 'radiation detriments' as far as exposures are maintained below 'practical' thresholds. Accordingly the ethical issue of 'justification' to allow benefit to society to offset radiation detriments to individuals can be resolved. And also the ethical issue of 'optimization' to exchange health or safety for economical gain can be resolved. The ALARA principle should be applied to the probability (risk) of exceeding relevant dose limits instead of applying to normal exposures

  9. I{sub 2}: a pedagogical molecule; I{sub 2} - uma molecula didatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Oswaldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental]. E-mail: oswsala@iq.usp.br

    2008-07-01

    Iodine vapor is a very suitable substance to learn about molecular energy levels and transitions, and to introduce spectroscopic techniques. As a diatomic molecule its spectra are relatively simple and allow straightforward treatment of the data leading to the potential energy curves and to quantum mechanics concepts. The overtone bands, in the resonance Raman scattering, and the band progressions, in the electronic spectra, play an important role in the calculation of the Morse potential curves for the fundamental and excited electronic state. A weaker chemical bond in the electronic excited state, compared to the fundamental state, is evidenced by the increase in the equilibrium interatomic distance. The resonance Raman scattering of I{sub 2} is highlighted due to its importance for obtaining the anharmonicity constant in the fundamental electronic state. (author)

  10. The problem of the detection threshold in radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, E.; Wueneke, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    In all cases encountered in practical radiation measurement, the basic problem is to differentiate between the lowest measured value and the zero value (background, natural background radiation, etc.). For this purpose, on the mathematical side, tests based on hypotheses are to be applied. These will show the probability of differentiation between two values having the same random spread. By means of these tests and the corresponding error theory, a uniform treatment of the subject, applicable to all problems relating to measuring technique alike, can be found. Two basic concepts are found in this process, which have to be defined in terms of semantics and nomenclature: Decision threshold and detection threshold, or 'minimum detectable mean value'. At the decision threshold, one has to decide (with a given statistical error probability) whether a measured value is to be attributed to the background radiation, accepting the zero hypothesis, or whether this value differs significantly from the background radiation (error of 1rst kind). The minimum detectable mean value is the value which, with a given decision threshold, can be determined with sufficient significance to be a measured value and thus cannot be mistaken as background radiation (alternative hypothesis, error of 2nd kind). Normally, the two error types are of equal importance. It may happen, however, that one type of error gains more importance, depending on the approach. (orig.) [de

  11. An experimental test of the linear no-threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    There is a substantial body of quantitative information on radiation-induced cancer at high dose, but there are no data at low dose. The usual method for estimating effects of low-level radiation is to assume a linear no-threshold dependence. if this linear no-threshold assumption were not used, essentially all fears about radiation would disappear. Since these fears are costing tens of billions of dollars, it is most important that the linear no-threshold theory be tested at low dose. An opportunity for possibly testing the linear no-threshold concept is now available at low dose due to radon in homes. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to use this data to test the linear no-threshold theory

  12. Radiation hormesis and the linear-no-threshold assumption

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    Current radiation protection standards are based upon the application of the linear no-threshold (LNT) assumption, which considers that even very low doses of ionizing radiation can cause cancer. The radiation hormesis hypothesis, by contrast, proposes that low-dose ionizing radiation is beneficial. In this book, the author examines all facets of radiation hormesis in detail, including the history of the concept and mechanisms, and presents comprehensive, up-to-date reviews for major cancer types. It is explained how low-dose radiation can in fact decrease all-cause and all-cancer mortality an

  13. Gamin partable radiation meter with alarm threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payat, Rene.

    1981-10-01

    The Gamin Radiation meter is a direct reading, portable, battery-powered gamma doserate meter featuring alarm thresholds. Doserate is read on a micro-ammeter with a millirad-per-hour logarithmic scale, covering a range of 0,1 to 1000 millirads/hour. The instrument issues an audible warning signal when dose-rate level exceeds a threshold value, which can be selected. The detector tube is of the Geiger-Muller counter, energy compensated type. Because of its low battery drain, the instrument can be operated continously for 1000 hours. It is powered by four 1.5 volt alcaline batteries of the R6 type. The electronic circuitry is housed in a small lightweight case made of impact resistant plastic. Applications of the Gamin portable radiation monitor are found in health physics, safety departments, medical facilities, teaching, civil defense [fr

  14. Reversible flexible structural changes in multidimensional MOFs by guest molecules (I{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) and thermal stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Libo; Yang, Jiangfeng; Wang, Shuang; Li, Jinping, E-mail: Jpli211@hotmail.com

    2015-03-15

    Three metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), [Cu(INA){sub 2}], [Cu(INA){sub 2}I{sub 2}] and [Cu(INA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}], were synthesized with 3D, 2D, and 0D structures, respectively. Reversible flexible structural changes of these MOFs were reported. Through high temperature (60–100 °C) stimulation of I{sub 2} or ambient temperature stimulation of NH{sub 3}, [Cu(INA){sub 2}] (3D) converted to [Cu(INA){sub 2}I{sub 2}] (2D) and [Cu(INA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}] (0D); as the temperature increased to 150 °C, the MOFs changed back to their original form. In this way, this 3D MOF has potential application in the capture of I{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} from polluted water and air. XRD, TGA, SEM, NH{sub 3}-TPD, and the measurement of gas adsorption were used to describe the changes in processes regarding the structure, morphology, and properties. - Graphical abstract: Through I{sub 2}, NH{sub 3} molecules and thermal stimulation, the three MOFs can achieve reversible flexible structural changes. Different methods were used to prove the flexible reversible changes. - Highlights: • [Cu(INA){sub 2}] can flexible transform to [Cu(INA){sub 2}I{sub 2}] and [Cu(INA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}] by adsorbing I{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}. • The reversible flexible transformation related to material source, temperature and concentration. • Potential applications for the capture of I{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} from polluted water or air.

  15. Colloidal synthesis and photophysics of M{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} (M=Cs and Rb) nanocrystals. Lead-free perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Jaya; Manna, Suman; Nag, Angshuman [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune (India); Mondal, Anirban; Adarsh, K.V. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Bhopal (India); Das, Shyamashis [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2017-11-06

    Herein we report the colloidal synthesis of Cs{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} and Rb{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} perovskite nanocrystals, and explore their potential for optoelectronic applications. Different morphologies, such as nanoplatelets and nanorods of Cs{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9}, and spherical Rb{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} nanocrystals were prepared. All these samples show band-edge emissions in the yellow-red region. Exciton many-body interactions studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of Cs{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} nanorods reveals characteristic second-derivative-type spectral features, suggesting red-shifted excitons by as much as 79 meV. A high absorption cross-section of ca. 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2} was estimated. The results suggest that colloidal Cs{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} and Rb{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}I{sub 9} nanocrystals are potential candidates for optical and optoelectronic applications in the visible region, though a better control of defect chemistry is required for efficient applications. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Intrinsic radioactivity of KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust, M.; Melcher, C.; Lukosi, E., E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu

    2016-10-11

    A current need in nuclear security is an economical, yet high energy resolution (near 2%), scintillation detector suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy. For current scintillators on the market, there is an inverse relationship between scintillator energy resolution and cost of production. A new promising scintillator, KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+}, under development at the University of Tennessee, has achieved an energy resolution of 2.4% at 662 keV at room temperature, with potential growth rates exceeding several millimeters per hour. However, the internal background due to the {sup 40}K content could present a hurdle for effective source detection/identification in nuclear security applications. As a first step in addressing this question, this paper reports on a computational investigation of the intrinsic differential pulse height spectrum (DPHS) generated by {sup 40}K within the KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} scintillator as a function of crystal geometry. It was found that the DPHS remains relatively equal to a constant multiplicative factor of the negatron emission spectrum with a direct increase of the 1.46 MeV photopeak relative height to the negatron spectrum with volume. Further, peak pileup does not readily manifest itself for practical KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} volumes.

  17. ENTRIA workshop. Determine threshold values in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diener, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Threshold values affect our daily lives. Whether it concerns traffic or noise regulations, we all experience thresholds on a regular basis. But how are such values generated? The conference ''Determine Thres-hold Values in Radiation Protection'', taking place on January 27th 2015 in Braunschweig, focused on this question. The conference was undertaken in the context of the BMBF-funded interdisciplinary research project ''ENTRIA - Disposal Options for Radioactive Residues''. It aimed to stimulate a cross-disciplinary discussion. Spea-kers from different disciplinary backgrounds talked about topics like procedures of setting threshold values, standards for evaluating dosages, and public participation in the standardization of threshold values. Two major theses emerged: First, setting threshold values always requires considering contexts and protection targets. Second, existing uncertainties must be communicated in and with the public. Altogether, the conference offered lots of input and issues for discussion. In addition, it raised interesting and important questions for further and ongoing work in the research project ENTRIA.

  18. Recent advances with quiescent power supply current (I(sub DDQ)) testing at Sandia using the HP82000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, A. W.; Leong, D. J.; Cox, L. B.

    Last year at the HP82000 Users Group Meeting, Sandia National Laboratories gave a presentation on I(sub DDQ) testing. This year, some advances are presented on this testing including DUT board fixturing, external DC PMU measurement, and automatic IDD-All circuit calibration. Implementation is examined more than theory, with results presented from Sandia tests. After a brief summary I(sub DDQ) theory and testing concepts, how the break (hold state) vector and data formatting present a test vector generation concern for the HP82000 is described. Fixturing of the DUT board for both types of I(sub DDQ) measurement is then discussed, along with how the continuity test and test vector generation must be taken into account. Results of a test including continuity, IDD-All and I(sub DDQ) Value measurements is shown. Next, measurement of low current using an external PMU is discussed, including noise considerations, implementation and some test results showing nA-range measurements. A method is presented for automatic calibration of the IDD-All analog comparator circuit using RM BASIC on the HP82000, with implementation and measurement results. Finally, future directions for research in this area is explored.

  19. Enhanced ~2.7 µm emission investigation of Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition in Yb,Er,Pr:SrLaGa{sub 3}O{sub 7} crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhang, Baotong [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350007 (China); Li, Jianfu; Zhu, Zhaojie; You, Zhenyu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Tu, Chaoyang, E-mail: tcy@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The bulk crystal of 5at% Yb{sup 3+}, 20 at% Er{sup 3+} and 0.2 at% Pr{sup 3+} triply doped SrLaGa{sub 3}O{sub 7} (abbr. as Yb,Er,Pr:SLGO) was grown by the Czochralski method. The effects of co-dopant Yb{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} on the spectroscopic properties and the mutual energy transfer mechanism were investigated, via the measurements of its absorption, near-infrared and mid-infrared fluorescence spectra, as well as the fluorescence decay curves of Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} levels at room temperature. As compared with 20at% Er{sup 3+} singly doped SrLaGa{sub 3}O{sub 7} crystal, ~2.7 µm emission intensity corresponding to Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition is enhanced greatly in the Yb,Er,Pr:SLGO crystal. Spectral analyses indicate that the sensitization of Yb{sup 3+} to Er{sup 3+} improves the ~2.7 µm emission in Yb,Er,Pr:SLGO crystal, meanwhile, the depopulation of Pr{sup 3+} from Er{sup 3+} decreases the ~1.5 µm emission and inhibits the self-termination effect. The energy transfer efficiencies of Yb{sup 3+}→Er{sup 3+} (ET1), Er{sup 3+}→Pr{sup 3+} (ET2) and Er{sup 3+}→Pr{sup 3+} (ET3) were estimated and discussed. The above results conclude that Yb,Er,Pr:SLGO crystal is a good candidate for LD pumped mid-infrared laser. - Graphical abstract: As compared with Er: SrLaGa{sub 3}O{sub 7} crystal, ~2.7 µm MIR emissions corresponding to Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition were enhanced in Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} triply doped SrLaGa{sub 3}O{sub 7} crystal owing to the sensitization of co-dopant Yb{sup 3+} via ET1, at the same time, ~1.5 µm NIR emissions were weakened owing to the depopulation of co-dopant Pr{sup 3+} via ET3.

  20. Elevated voltage level I{sub DDQ} failure testing of integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, A.W.

    1996-05-21

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC`s is eliminated by I{sub DDQ} testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip. 4 figs.

  1. Low level radiation: how does the linear without threshold model provide the safety of Canadian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The linear without threshold model is a model of risk used worldwide by the most of health organisms of nuclear regulation in order to establish dose limits for workers and public. It is in the heart of the approach adopted by the Canadian commission of nuclear safety (C.C.S.N.) in matter of radiation protection. The linear without threshold model presumes reasonably it exists a direct link between radiation exposure and cancer rate. It does not exist scientific evidence that chronicle exposure to radiation doses under 100 milli sievert (mSv) leads harmful effects on health. Several scientific reports highlighted scientific evidences that seem indicate a low level of radiation is less harmful than the linear without threshold predicts. As the linear without threshold model presumes that any radiation exposure brings risks, the ALARA principle obliges the licensees to get the radiation exposure at the lowest reasonably achievable level, social and economical factors taken into account. ALARA principle constitutes a basic principle in the C.C.S.N. approach in matter of radiation protection; On the radiation protection plan, C.C.S.N. gets a careful approach that allows to provide health and safety of Canadian people and the protection of their environment. (N.C.)

  2. Preparation of niobium thioiodide NbSsub(4)Isub(0,33)(Nbsub(3)Ssub(12)I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.E.; Evstaf'ev, V.K.

    1981-01-01

    A new niobium thioiodide is prepared by the interaction of Nb 3 I 8 with sulphur at 350-360 deg for several days. The thioiodide NbSsub(4)Isub(0.33) is crystallized in the form of green-blue long fibres. However, the X-ray graphic identification of the thioiodide prepared is hampered as fibrous crystals are difficult to grind and their powder pattern is very texturized. During the heating in the sealed ampoule NbSsub(4)Isub(0.33) decomposes in the range of 650-680 deg C, during the heating in helium flux the decomposition starts considerably earlier and ends with the formation of niobium disulphide [ru

  3. Production of gaseous radiotracers CH{sub 3}I and I{sub 2} through Na{sup 123}I salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candeiro, R.E.M., E-mail: ricardocandeiro@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIFOR/CNEN-CE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Distrito de Fortaleza; Brandao, L.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, W.P. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop, separately, methodology for production of two gaseous tracers through the sodium iodide NaI marked with {sup 123}I. Found in the nature in form different, the iodine has been used in diverse works in the area of the industry and health. These two forms of the gaseous iodine, the methyl iodide, CH{sub 3}I, and molecular iodine, I{sub 2}, are very unstable and volatile in the ambient temperature and presents different problems in clean-up and monitoring systems. The syntheses were processed with sodium iodide (NaI) 1M aqueous solution marked with 1{sup 23I}. The production of gas I{sub 2} was realized with in chlorine acid (HCl) and sodium iodate salt (NaIO{sub 3}) and the CH{sub 3}I was used, the salt of NaI and the reagent (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The production of gases was initially realized through in unit in glass with an inert material and the purpose was to study the kinetic of reaction and to determine the efficiency of production. The two synthesis occurs in the reaction bottle and after of produced, the gas is stored in the collect bottle that contains a starch solution for fixed the I{sub 2}, and in syntheses of CH{sub 3}I contains a silver nitrate solution for your fixation. To determine the efficiency of production of gases, analytic tests were realized, where the consumption of iodide ions of the bottle of reaction are measured. The optimization of production of the each gaseous tracer was studied varying parameter as: concentration of iodide, concentration of acid and temperature. After, the syntheses of the radiotracers were realized in the compact unit, having been used as main reagent the salt radiated of sodium iodide, Na{sup 123}I. The transportation of elementary iodine and methyl iodine was studied by a scintillation detector NaI (2 x 2)' positioned in the reaction bottle. (author)

  4. Donor-acceptor interaction between non-aqueous solvents and I{sub 2} to generate I{sup -}{sub 3}, and its implication in dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebede, Zerihun [Department of Chemistry, Kotebe College of Teacher Education, P.O. Box 31248, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Lindquist, Sten-Eric [Department of Physical Chemistry, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 532, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-03-16

    The spectrophotometric properties of I{sup -}, I{sub 2} and the I{sup -}/I{sub 2} mixture were studied in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), acetone (AC), acetonitrile (ACN), ethanol (EtOH), methanol (MeOH), tertiary-butanol (t-BuOH), dimethylformamide (DMF), propylenecarbonate (PC), 3-methoxypropionitrile (MePN), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dioxane (DIO) and pyridine (PY) solutions. From the investigation it has been realized that in DCE, I{sup -}, I{sub 2} and I{sup -}/I{sub 2} mixture have the same absorption peak at 500 nm. I{sup -} gives rise to the absorption spectra at about 220, 290 and 360 nm in t-BuOH and in PY solutions. However, in all other solvents the I{sup -} generates peaks only around 220 nm. Similarly I{sub 2} and the I{sup -}/I{sub 2} mixture in all solvents except DCE have indicated similar absorption peaks around 220, 290 and 360 nm. On the other hand, except in PC and DMF, I{sub 2} shows the additional peaks in the range of 380-500 nm which are assigned to the formation of a I{sub 2}-solvent complex. The peaks around 290 and 360 nm indicate the presence of I{sup -}{sub 3} and around 220 nm is the peak of I{sup -}. The spectral shift of the I{sub 2} solutions in the visible region is interesting and is the core of this report. It points to the importance of donor-acceptor interaction between solvents and iodine. The data obtained in these solvents were well correlated to the donor number (DN) of the solvents. From this correlation the DN of MePN was estimated to 14.6. The absorption peak of I{sub 2} in DCE(DN=0.0) is 500 nm and in PY(DN=33.1) is 378 nm. This peak shift due to solvent effects corresponds to an energy difference close to 0.8 eV. The absorption peak shift due to addition of the 0.0080 vol%. PY(1 mM) in 1 mM I{sub 2}-ACN solutions corresponds to ca. 0.6 eV. The blue shift of I{sub 2} absorption in basic solvents indicates the tendency to form a complex. The increase of the efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell by addition of PY to I

  5. Computer simulation of threshold radiation damage in rutile, TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulation methods have been used to study threshold radiation damage structures in rutile. It was found Ti ions have threshold energies much larger than O ions. Basal plane displacements for oxygen were shown to be complex, and focuson behaviour was only found at energies several times the threshold energy. Oxygen ions do not have simple interstitials or vacancies, but rather a three-ion crowdion and divacancy-interstitial combination were found, respectively. Threshold energies were found to be highly dependent on crystallographic direction, being as low as 10 eV in one instance, but often much higher. Oxygen ions were seen to defocus along the c-axis. (author)

  6. Particle identification using the time-over-threshold method in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Assamagan, K.; Baker, K.; Barberio, E.; Barberis, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Catinaccio, A.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Froidevaux, D.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, J.R.; Keener, P.T.; Kekelidze, G.; Konovalov, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Krivchitch, A.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Lucotte, A.; Lundberg, B.; Luehring, F.; Mailov, A.; Manara, A.; McFarlane, K.; Mitsou, V.A.; Morozov, S.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F.M.; Olszowska, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S.H.; Peshekhonov, V.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rust, D.R.; Schegelsky, V.; Sapinski, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnova, L.N.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, S.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Wang, C.; Williams, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    Test-beam studies of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) straw tube performance in terms of electron-pion separation using a time-over-threshold method are described. The test-beam data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations of charged particles passing through the straw tubes of the TRT. For energies below 10 GeV, the time-over-threshold method combined with the standard transition-radiation cluster-counting technique significantly improves the electron-pion separation in the TRT. The use of the time-over-threshold information also provides some kaon-pion separation, thereby significantly enhancing the B-physics capabilities of the ATLAS detector

  7. Linear, no threshold response at low doses of ionizing radiation: ideology, prejudice and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The linear, no threshold (LNT) response model assumes that there is no threshold dose for the radiation-induced genetic effects (heritable mutations and cancer), and it forms the current basis for radiation protection standards for radiation workers and the general public. The LNT model is, however, based more on ideology than valid radiobiological data. Further, phenomena such as 'radiation hormesis', 'radioadaptive response', 'bystander effects' and 'genomic instability' are now demonstrated to be radioprotective and beneficial. More importantly, the 'differential gene expression' reveals that qualitatively different proteins are induced by low and high doses. This finding negates the LNT model which assumes that qualitatively similar proteins are formed at all doses. Thus, all available scientific data challenge the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  8. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N.H.; Pradeep, T.M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India); Pushpa, N. [Department of PG Studies in Physics, JSS College, Ooty Road, Mysore 570025 (India); Krishna, J.B.M. [IUC-DAE CSR, Kolkota 700098 (India); Gnana Prakash, A.P., E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India)

    2016-07-15

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (V{sub th}), density of interface trapped charges (ΔN{sub it}), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔN{sub ot}), transconductance (g{sub m}), mobility (μ), leakage current (I{sub L}) and drain saturation current (I{sub D} {sub Sat}) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔN{sub it} and ΔN{sub ot} and decrease in V{sub th,}g{sub m}, μ, and I{sub D} {sub Sat} was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  9. Investigation of the radiative efficiency and threshold in InGaN laser diodes under the influence of efficiency droop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Han-Youl

    2012-01-01

    Based on the rate equation model of semiconductor lasers, the radiative efficiency and threshold current density of InGaN-based blue laser diodes (LDs) are theoretically investigated, including the effect of efficiency droop in the InGaN quantum wells. The peak point of the radiative efficiency versus current density relation is used as the parameter of the rate equation analysis. The threshold current density of InGaN blue LDs is found to depend strongly on the maximum radiative efficiency at low current density, implying that improving the maximum efficiency is important to maintain a high radiative efficiency at a large current density and to achieve a low-threshold lasing action under the influence of efficiency droop.

  10. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loch, R.A.; Sobierajski, R.; Louis, Eric; Bosgra, J.; Bosgra, J.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for highintensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly

  11. Intrinsic radiation tolerance of ultra-thin GaAs solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L. C.; Yakes, M. K.; Warner, J. H.; Schmieder, K. J.; Walters, R. J.; Jenkins, P. P. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW., Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Bennett, M. F. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Inc., Annapolis Junction, Maryland 20701-1067 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Radiation tolerance is a critical performance criterion of photovoltaic devices for space power applications. In this paper we demonstrate the intrinsic radiation tolerance of an ultra-thin solar cell geometry. Device characteristics of GaAs solar cells with absorber layer thicknesses 80 nm and 800 nm were compared before and after 3 MeV proton irradiation. Both cells showed a similar degradation in V{sub oc} with increasing fluence; however, the 80 nm cell showed no degradation in I{sub sc} for fluences up to 10{sup 14 }p{sup +} cm{sup −2}. For the same exposure, the I{sub sc} of the 800 nm cell had severely degraded leaving a remaining factor of 0.26.

  12. Simulating threshold voltage shift of MOS devices due to radiation in the low-dose range

    CERN Document Server

    Wan Xin Heng; Gao Wen Yu; Huang Ru; Wang Yang Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An analytical MOSFET threshold voltage shift model due to radiation in the low-dose range has been developed for circuit simulations. Experimental data in the literature shows that the model predictions are in good agreement. It is simple in functional form and hence computationally efficient. It can be used as a basic circuit simulation tool for analysing MOSFET exposed to a nuclear environment up to about 1 Mrad(Si). In accordance with common believe, radiation induced absolute change of threshold voltage was found to be larger in irradiated PMOS devices. However, if the radiation sensitivity is defined in the way authors did it, the results indicated NMOS rather than PMOS devices are more sensitive, specially at low doses. This is important from the standpoint of their possible application in dosimetry

  13. Thresholds in radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.; Hofmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    Interpretations of biological radiation effects frequently use the word 'threshold'. The meaning of this word is explored together with its relationship to the fundamental character of radiation effects and to the question of perception. It is emphasised that although the existence of either a dose or an LET threshold can never be settled by experimental radiobiological investigations, it may be argued on fundamental statistical grounds that for all statistical processes, and especially where the number of observed events is small, the concept of a threshold is logically invalid. (U.K.)

  14. The I{sub c}(H)-T{sub c}(H) phase boundary of superconducting Nb thin films with periodic and quasiperiodic antidot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothner, D.; Kemmler, M.; Cozma, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D. [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Misko, V.; Peeters, F. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen (Belgium); Nori, F. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The magnetic field dependent critical current I{sub c}(H) of superconducting thin films with artificial defects strongly depends on the symmetry of the defect arrangement. Likewise the critical temperature T{sub c}(H) of superconducting wire networks is heavily influenced by the symmetry of the system. Here we present experimental data on the I{sub c}(H)-T{sub c}(H) phase boundary of Nb thin films with artificial defect lattices of different symmetries. For this purpose we fabricated 60 nm thick Nb films with antidots in periodic (triangular) and five different quasiperiodic arrangements. The parameters of the antidot arrays were varied to investigate the influence of antidot diameter and array density. Experiments were performed with high temperature stability ({delta}T<1 mK) at 0.5{<=}T/T{sub c}{<=}1. From the I-V-characteristics at variable H and T we extract I{sub c}(H) and T{sub c}(H) for different voltage and resistance criteria. The experimental data for the critical current density are compared with results from numerical molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Panel discussion on health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Scientific findings and non-threshold hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This is a record of a panel discussion in the IAEA Interregional Training Course. In current radiation work, protection measures are taken on the assumption that any amount of radiation, however small, entails a risk of deleterious effects. This so-called non-threshold assumption of radiation effects, on the one hand, creates public distrust of radiation use. However, because the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are difficult to verify, wide views ranging from the non-threshold hypothesis to one which sees small amounts of radiation as rather useful and necessary are presented. In this panel discussion, how the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation should be considered from the standpoint of radiation protection was discussed. Panelists included such eminent scientists as Dr. Sugahara and Dr. Okada, who are deeply interested in this field and are playing leading parts in radiobiology research in Japan, and Dr. Stather, deputy Director of NRPB, UK, who, in UNSCEAR and ICRP, is actively participating in the international review of radiation effects and the preparation of reports on radiation protection recommendations. They agreed with each other that although it is reasonable, under the current scientific understanding, to follow the recommendation of ICRP, research in this area should be strongly promoted hereafter, for basing radiation protection on firm scientific grounds. Many participants actively asked about and discussed problems in their own field. (author)

  16. Linear non-threshold (LNT) radiation hazards model and its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2011-01-01

    In order to introduce linear non-threshold (LNT) model used in study on the dose effect of radiation hazards and to evaluate its application, the analysis of comprehensive literatures was made. The results show that LNT model is more suitable to describe the biological effects in accuracy for high dose than that for low dose. Repairable-conditionally repairable model of cell radiation effects can be well taken into account on cell survival curve in the all conditions of high, medium and low absorbed dose range. There are still many uncertainties in assessment model of effective dose of internal radiation based on the LNT assumptions and individual mean organ equivalent, and it is necessary to establish gender-specific voxel human model, taking gender differences into account. From above, the advantages and disadvantages of various models coexist. Before the setting of the new theory and new model, LNT model is still the most scientific attitude. (author)

  17. Internal friction and microplasticity of ice Isub(h)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.; Mai, C.; Tatibouet, J.; Vassoille, R.

    1976-01-01

    This study is concerned with internal-friction measurements made at low frequency (torsion pendulum) on specimens of ice Isub(h). In the case of a single crystal, the spectrum of internal friction vs. temperature exhibits the classical relaxation peak. This peak is followed by an increase of damping above 260 K. Furthermore, in this temperature range, the internal friction delta is shown to be amplitude dependent: delta increases with shear strain γ as long as the temperature T is high. These features are strongly modified by plastic deformation of ice in particular i) high-temperature internal friction is increased as long as the plastic defomation ratio is important, ii) high-temperature internal friction becomes more amplitude dependent. In the high-temperature range the mobility of dislocations in ice increase quickly. During the internal-friction measurements the cyclic stress causes movement of linear defects and, hence, damping phenomena. Then, the theoretical analysis of the dynamic behaviour of dislocations in ice has been used to interpret the preceding results. This interpretation allows us to connect our damping data with the microplastic behaviour of ice

  18. Temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless steel exposed to curium-242 alpha radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.; Dillich, S.

    1981-01-01

    Implantation of helium in materials exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 242 Cm causes surface blistering at elevated temperatures. The temperature thresholds for such blistering are of practical importance to the selection of suitable container materials for radionuclides, and are of fundamental interest with regard to the mechanisms of helium blistering of materials in radiation environments. The purpose of this investigation was to establish temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless-steel container materials by post-irradiation heating of specimens exposed at room temperature to alpha particles from an external 242 Cm source. These thresholds were compared with (1) the analogous temperature thresholds for surface blistering of materials exposed to external beams of accelerator helium ions, and (2) thresholds for swelling and grain-boundary cracking of materials in which helium is generated internally by (n,α) reactions during reactor exposures

  19. Test of the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that testing the linear-no threshold theory (L-NT) of radiation carcinogenesis is extremely important and that lung cancer resulting from exposure to radon in homes is the best tool for doing this. A study of lung cancer rates vs radon exposure in U.S. Counties, reported in 1975, is reviewed. It shows, with extremely powerful statistics, that lung cancer rates decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the prediction of L-NT, with a discrepancy of over 20 standard deviations. Very extensive efforts were made to explain an appreciable part of this discrepancy consistently with L-NT, with no success; it was concluded that L-NT fails, grossly exaggerating the cancer risk of low level radiation. Two updating studies reported in 1996 are also reviewed. New updating studies utilizing more recent lung cancer statistics and considering 450 new potential confounding factors are reported. All updates reinforce the previous conclusion, and the discrepancy with L-NT is increased. (author)

  20. Spectral properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal for laser application around 1.55 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.H.; Gong, X.H.; Chen, Y.J.; Lin, Y.F; Luo, Z.D.; Huang, Y.D., E-mail: huyd@fjirsm.ac.cn

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • Detailed spectral properties of the Er:CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal have been investigated. • Multi-phonon relaxation rate of Er{sup 3+} ions in the Er:CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal is estimated. • The quantum efficiency of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} level in the Er:CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal is near 100%. -- Abstract: Room-temperature polarized spectral properties of the Er:CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal are reported. The Judd–Ofelt theory was applied to analyze the polarized absorption spectra and then calculate the spontaneous emission probabilities, radiative lifetimes, and branch ratios. Room-temperature fluorescence lifetimes of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} multiplets for Er{sup 3+} ions were measured. Stimulated emission cross-sections of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition obtained by the Fuchtbauer–Ladenberg formula and the reciprocity method were compared. The results show that the Er:CaGdAlO{sub 4} crystal may be a potential gain medium for a low-threshold 1.55 μm laser.

  1. Coexistence of Dirac and massive carriers in α-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarin, Fabien; Tisserond, Emilie [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502, CNRS-Université Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Auban-Senzier, Pascale, E-mail: pascale.senzier@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502, CNRS-Université Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Mézière, Cécile; Batail, Patrick [MOLTECH-Anjou, UMR 6200, CNRS-Université d' Angers, Bat. K, Angers F-49045 (France); Pasquier, Claude; Monteverde, Miguel [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502, CNRS-Université Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France)

    2015-03-01

    We present magnetotransport measurements of α-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}I{sub 3} crystals under hydrostatic pressure larger than 1.5 GPa where Dirac carriers are present. We show not only the existence of high-mobility Dirac carriers but we also prove experimentally the presence of low-mobility massive carriers, in agreement with band-structure calculations.

  2. Casualties and threshold effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, C.W.; National Cancer Inst., Bethesda

    1988-01-01

    Radiation effects like cancer are denoted as casualties. Other radiation effects occur almost in everyone when the radiation dose is sufficiently high. One then speaks of radiation effects with a threshold dose. In this article the author puts his doubt about this classification of radiation effects. He argues that some effects of exposure to radiation do not fit in this classification. (H.W.). 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Study of threshold energy registration of alpha particles on lexan nuclear track detector (passive) by Kr F laser pre-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvin, P.; Jaleh, B.; Hashemi, M. M.; Katoozi, M.; Amiri Rad, N.; Zamanipour, Z.; Zarea, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of Kr F laser pre-radiation has been investigated on both alpha track density and threshold energy of track registration. While no significant difference was observed on track density an nevertheless ∼100 keV shift of threshold energy occurred due to UV superficial hardening of Lexan detector

  4. Effect of infrared radiation on the threshold behavior of scattering (and decay) processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, A.K.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is given of the effect of radiative corrections on the threshold behavior of the cross section for the inelastic scattering of a light charged particle by a neutral composite system. Explicit results are obtained for a model problem where the target consists of a proton and antiproton bound under their mutual Coulomb interaction and excited to a 2p state from its 1s ground state by electron impact, but the conclusions drawn are applicable, qualitatively, to a wide range of problems. It is found that when the energy resolution Δepsilon-c of the electron detector is small compared with the kinetic energy K' of the electron in the final state, the more careful treatment given here, which properly accounts for the rapid variation of the cross section for scattering energies near threshold, leads to only small modifications in the standard form of the radiative correction factor δ. For sufficiently high resolution in energy of a (high-energy) incident beam, the modification could be significant if Δepsilon-c is comparable with K'. The above considerations are applicable not only to scattering cross sections but to endpoints of the energy spectrum of the charged particle in a decay process in which only one charged particle is emitted

  5. Doubly excited helium. From strong correlation to chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yuhai

    2006-03-15

    In the present dissertation, the double excitation states of helium including the autoionization decay of these states were studied experimentally and theoretically in a broad energy region, which includes the transition from strong correlation below the low single ionization thresholds (SIT) to the region of quantum chaos at energies very close to the double-ionization threshold. Two kind of experiments were performed, namely total-ion-yield measurements with the aim to observe total cross sections (TCS) and electron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements to obtain partial cross sections (PCS) as well as angular distribution parameters (ADP). Both types of measurements were performed at the third generation synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin. The TCSs were recorded up to the SIT I{sub 15}, and they were found to be in in excellent agreement with state-of-the-art complex-rotation calculations performed recently by D. Delande. These experimental and theoretical data on the TCSs were analyzed in order to study quantum chaos in doubly excited helium, and interesting signatures of quantum chaos were found. The TOF technique allowed to measure PCSs and ADPs in the energy regions from I{sub 5} to I{sub 9} and I{sub 7}, respectively. These experimental data provide a critical assessment of theoretical models that can be used to explore the dynamics of strong correlation as well as quantum chaos in helium. In the theoretical part of this dissertation, the n- and l-specific PCSs and ADPs below I{sub 4} were calculated employing the R-matrix method. The present theoretical results agree well with a recent experimental study of l-specific PCSs below I{sub 4} by J.R. Harries et al. An analysis of patterns in the PCSs and ADPs on the basis of the present experimental and theoretical l-specific data allowed to improve the present understanding of autoionization decay dynamics in this two-electron atom. (orig.)

  6. Anomalous transition strength in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Scholey, C.; Ruotsalainen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Angus, L. [University of The West of Scotland, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Dewald, A.; Fransen, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Grahn, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Greenlees, P.T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hackstein, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937, Koeln (Germany); Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Liotta, R. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lumley, N.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-13

    A lifetime measurement has been made for the first excited 11/2{sup +} state in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}{sub 53}I{sub 56} using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method in conjunction with recoil-proton tagging. The experimental reduced transition probability is considerably smaller than the prediction of theoretical shell-model calculations using the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental reduced transition strengths in this work most likely arises from the inability of the current shell-model calculations to accurately account for the behavior of the unbound nuclear states.

  7. Effects of ligand substitution on the excited state dynamics of the Ru(dcbpy)(CO){sub 2}I{sub 2} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtovuori, Viivi; Kallioinen, Jani; Myllyperkioe, Pasi; Haukka, Matti; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko

    2003-11-15

    Spectroscopic evidence suggest [PCCP 3 (2001) 1992] that illumination with visible light of the [trans-I-Ru(dcbpy)(CO){sub 2}I{sub 2}] (dcbpy4,4{sup '}-dicarboxy-2,2{sup '}-bipyridine) complex in solution induces dissociation of a CO group followed by reorganization of the ligands and attachment of a solvent molecule. In the present study, we report results on excited state dynamics of this ruthenium complex and its photoproduct. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements reveal dominance of excited state absorption of the reactant and the photoproduct [cis-I-Ru(dcbpy)(CO)(Sol)I{sub 2}] (Sol=ethanol or acetonitrile) in the visible spectral region. The time-resolved measurements for the reactant at 77 K indicate interligand charge transfer from mixed Ru-I states to empty dcbpy orbitals. For the photoproduct, no such transfer was observed. In both complexes recovery from the lowest energy excited triplet state to the ground state occurs via two channels: radiative relaxation and a parallel barrier controlled non-radiative relaxation. The barrier is much higher in the reactant (about 850 cm{sup -1}) than in the product. A combination of DFT and ZINDO/CI calculations was used to estimate excited singlet and triplet spectra of the reactant and the product molecules. Calculated singlet-triplet difference spectra qualitatively match the observed transient spectra 500 fs after excitation supporting the idea that observed excited state relaxation occurs from the triplet states in both complexes.

  8. Stochastic Threshold Exponential (TE) Model for Hematopoietic Tissue Reconstitution Deficit after Radiation Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, B R; Potter, C A

    2014-07-01

    Whole-body exposure to large radiation doses can cause severe loss of hematopoietic tissue cells and threaten life if the lost cells are not replaced in a timely manner through natural repopulation (a homeostatic mechanism). Repopulation to the baseline level N 0 is called reconstitution and a reconstitution deficit (repopulation shortfall) can occur in a dose-related and organ-specific manner. Scott et al. (2013) previously introduced a deterministic version of a threshold exponential (TE) model of tissue-reconstitution deficit at a given follow-up time that was applied to bone marrow and spleen cellularity (number of constituent cells) data obtained 6 weeks after whole-body gamma-ray exposure of female C.B-17 mice. In this paper a more realistic, stochastic version of the TE model is provided that allows radiation response to vary between different individuals. The Stochastic TE model is applied to post gamma-ray-exposure cellularity data previously reported and also to more limited X-ray cellularity data for whole-body irradiated female C.B-17 mice. Results indicate that the population average threshold for a tissue reconstitution deficit appears to be similar for bone marrow and spleen and for 320-kV-spectrum X-rays and Cs-137 gamma rays. This means that 320-kV spectrum X-rays could successfully be used in conducting such studies.

  9. Determination of prospective displacement-based gate threshold for respiratory-gated radiation delivery from retrospective phase-based gate threshold selected at 4D CT simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedam, S.; Archambault, L.; Starkschall, G.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2007-01-01

    and delivery gate thresholds to within 0.3%. For patient data analysis, differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are reported as a fraction of the total respiratory motion range. For the smaller phase interval, the differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are 8±11% and 14±21% with and without audio-visual biofeedback, respectively, when the simulation gate threshold is determined based on the mean respiratory displacement within the 40%-60% gating phase interval. For the longer phase interval, corresponding differences are 4±7% and 8±15% with and without audio-visual biofeedback, respectively. Alternatively, when the simulation gate threshold is determined based on the maximum average respiratory displacement within the gating phase interval, greater differences between simulation and delivery gate thresholds are observed. A relationship between retrospective simulation gate threshold and prospective delivery gate threshold for respiratory gating is established and validated for regular and nonregular respiratory motion. Using this relationship, the delivery gate threshold can be reliably estimated at the time of 4D CT simulation, thereby improving the accuracy and efficiency of respiratory-gated radiation delivery

  10. Threshold effect under nonlinear limitation of the intensity of high-power light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshchenko, S A; Podgaetskii, V M; Gerasimenko, A Yu; Savel'ev, M S

    2015-01-01

    A model is proposed to describe the properties of limiters of high-power laser radiation, which takes into account the threshold character of nonlinear interaction of radiation with the working medium of the limiter. The generally accepted non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model if the threshold radiation intensity is zero. Experimental z-scan data are used to determine the nonlinear optical characteristics of media with carbon nanotubes, polymethine and pyran dyes, zinc selenide, porphyrin-graphene and fullerene-graphene. A threshold effect of nonlinear interaction between laser radiation and some of investigated working media of limiters is revealed. It is shown that the threshold model more adequately describes experimental z-scan data. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Extensions of I{sub X}T{sub E}T and its application to electric power network supervision; Extensions d`I{sub X}T{sub E}t pour son application a la supervision d`un reseau electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despouys, O.; Ingrand, F.; Ghallab, M.; Gouyon, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    A chronicle model describes a set of possible behaviours for a given dynamic system. I{sub X}T{sub E}T uses a reified logic and temporal constraints to describe chronicles. It also uses algorithms which allow it to recognize all the instances of theses chronicles through a stream of time-stamped events given as an input. I{sub X}T{sub E}T is used in a number of complex supervision applications. Recent extensions to I{sub X}T{sub E}T, enabling its application at the national utility Electricite de France for electric network supervision and more especially for event and fault diagnosis. The new approach, notably based on facultative events or non-events, is compared to the FONSYNT previous supervision approach used at EDF

  12. Thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry; Olschowka, John A

    2013-10-01

    The consequences of radiation exposure alone are relatively well understood, but in the wake of events such as the World War II nuclear detonations and accidents such as Chernobyl, other critical factors have emerged that can substantially affect patient outcome. For example, ~70% of radiation victims from Hiroshima and Nagasaki received some sort of additional traumatic injury, the most common being thermal burn. Animal data has shown that the addition of thermal insult to radiation results in increased morbidity and mortality. To explore possible synergism between thermal injury and radiation on brain, C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to either 0 or 5 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. Irradiation was immediately followed by a 10% total-body surface area full thickness thermal burn. Mice were sacrificed 6 h, 1 week or 6 month post-injury and brains and plasma were harvested for histology, mRNA analysis and cytokine ELISA. Plasma analysis revealed that combined injury synergistically upregulates IL-6 at acute time points. Additionally, at 6 h, combined injury resulted in a greater upregulation of the vascular marker, ICAM-1 and TNF-α mRNA. Enhanced activation of glial cells was also observed by CD68 and Iba1 immunohistochemistry at all time points. Additionally, doublecortin staining at 6 months showed reduced neurogenesis in all injury conditions. Finally, using a novel object recognition test, we observed that only mice with combined injury had significant learning and memory deficits. These results demonstrate that thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and long-term cognitive dysfunction.

  13. Mathematical model to determine the dimensions of superconducting cylindrical coils with a given central field – the case study for MgB{sub 2} conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitel, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.pitel@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Melišek, Tibor [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tropeano, Matteo; Nardelli, Davide; Tumino, Andrea [Columbus Superconductors, Via delle Terre Rosse 30, I-16133 Genova (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Influence of the winding geometry on central field of cylindrical coils is studied. • Procedure to determine dimensions of coils with a given central field is developed. • The model is applied to MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. • Influence of the thickness of stabilizing copper on coil parameters is analyzed. • Optimization with respect to coil operating current and wire length is discussed. - Abstract: In this work, we present a mathematical model which enables to design cylindrical coils with a given central field, made of the superconducting conductor with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. The model results in a computer code that enables to find out the coil dimensions, and to calculate the coil parameters such as critical current, maximum field in the winding and field non-uniformity on the coil axis. The I{sub c}(B) characteristic of the conductor is represented by the set of data measured in discrete points. This approach allows us to express the I{sub c}(B) as a function linearized in parts. Then, it is possible to involve the central field of the coil, coil dimensions, and parameters of the conductor, including its I{sub c}(B) characteristic, in one equation which can be solved using ordinary numerical non-linear methods. Since the coil dimensions and conductor parameters are mutually linked in one equation with respect to a given coil central field, it is possible to analyze an influence of one parameter on the other one. The model was applied to three commercially available MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors produced by Columbus Superconductors. The results of simulations with the I{sub c}(B) data at 20 K illustrate that there exists a set of winding geometries that generate a required central field, changing from a disc shape to long thin solenoid. Further, we analyze how the thickness of stabilizing copper influences the coil dimensions, overall conductor length, coil critical current, maximum

  14. A factorization approach to next-to-leading-power threshold logarithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonocore, D. [Nikhef,Science Park 105, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Laenen, E. [Nikhef,Science Park 105, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); ITFA, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Amsterdam (Netherlands); ITF, Utrecht University,Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht (Netherlands); Magnea, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125, Torino (Italy); Melville, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow,Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Vernazza, L. [Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); White, C.D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow,Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-03

    Threshold logarithms become dominant in partonic cross sections when the selected final state forces gluon radiation to be soft or collinear. Such radiation factorizes at the level of scattering amplitudes, and this leads to the resummation of threshold logarithms which appear at leading power in the threshold variable. In this paper, we consider the extension of this factorization to include effects suppressed by a single power of the threshold variable. Building upon the Low-Burnett-Kroll-Del Duca (LBKD) theorem, we propose a decomposition of radiative amplitudes into universal building blocks, which contain all effects ultimately responsible for next-to-leading-power (NLP) threshold logarithms in hadronic cross sections for electroweak annihilation processes. In particular, we provide a NLO evaluation of the radiative jet function, responsible for the interference of next-to-soft and collinear effects in these cross sections. As a test, using our expression for the amplitude, we reproduce all abelian-like NLP threshold logarithms in the NNLO Drell-Yan cross section, including the interplay of real and virtual emissions. Our results are a significant step towards developing a generally applicable resummation formalism for NLP threshold effects, and illustrate the breakdown of next-to-soft theorems for gauge theory amplitudes at loop level.

  15. A different approach to evaluating health effects from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Absorbed dose D is shown to be a composite variable, the product of the fraction of cells hit (I/sub H/) and the mean /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ (hit size) /ovr z/ to those cells. D is suitable for use with high level (HLE) to radiation and its resulting acute organ effects because, since I/sub H/ = 1.0, D approximates closely enough the mean energy density in the cell as well as in the organ. However, with low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation and its consequent probability of cancer induction from a single cell, stochastic delivery of energy to cells results in a wide distribution of hit sizes z, and the expected mean value, /ovr z/, is constant with exposure. Thus, with LLE, only I/sub H/ varies with D so that the apparent proportionality between /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ and the fraction of cells transformed is misleading. This proportionality therefore does not mean that any (cell) dose, no matter how small, can be lethal. Rather, it means that, in the exposure of a population of individual organisms consisting of the constituent relevant cells, there is a small probabililty of particle-cell interactions which transfer energy. The probability of a cell transforming and initiating a cancer can only be greater than zero if the hit size (/open quotes/dose of energy/close quotes/) to the cell is large enough. Otherwise stated, if the /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ is defined at the proper level of biological organization, namely, the cell and not the organ, only a large dose z to that cell is effective. The above precepts are utilized to develop a drastically different approach to evaluation oif risk from LLE, that holds promise of obviating any requirement for the components of the present system: absorbed organ dose, LET, a standard radiation, REB(Q), dose equivalent and rem. 12 refs., 11 figs

  16. A different approach to evaluating health effects from radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Absorbed dose D is shown to be a composite variable, the product of the fraction of cells hit (I/sub H/) and the mean /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ (hit size) /ovr z/ to those cells. D is suitable for use with high level (HLE) to radiation and its resulting acute organ effects because, since I/sub H/ = 1.0, D approximates closely enough the mean energy density in the cell as well as in the organ. However, with low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation and its consequent probability of cancer induction from a single cell, stochastic delivery of energy to cells results in a wide distribution of hit sizes z, and the expected mean value, /ovr z/, is constant with exposure. Thus, with LLE, only I/sub H/ varies with D so that the apparent proportionality between /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ and the fraction of cells transformed is misleading. This proportionality therefore does not mean that any (cell) dose, no matter how small, can be lethal. Rather, it means that, in the exposure of a population of individual organisms consisting of the constituent relevant cells, there is a small probabililty of particle-cell interactions which transfer energy. The probability of a cell transforming and initiating a cancer can only be greater than zero if the hit size (/open quotes/dose of energy/close quotes/) to the cell is large enough. Otherwise stated, if the /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ is defined at the proper level of biological organization, namely, the cell and not the organ, only a large dose z to that cell is effective. The above precepts are utilized to develop a drastically different approach to evaluation oif risk from LLE, that holds promise of obviating any requirement for the components of the present system: absorbed organ dose, LET, a standard radiation, REB(Q), dose equivalent and rem. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Non-abelian factorisation for next-to-leading-power threshold logarithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonocore, D.; Laenen, E.; Magnea, L.; Vernazza, L.; White, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    Soft and collinear radiation is responsible for large corrections to many hadronic cross sections, near thresholds for the production of heavy final states. There is much interest in extending our understanding of this radiation to next-to-leading power (NLP) in the threshold expansion. In this

  18. Validity of the linear no-threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    A great deal is known about the cancer risk of high radiation doses from studies of Japanese A-bomb survivors, patients exposed for medical therapy, occupational exposures, etc. But the vast majority of important applications deal with much lower doses, usually accumulated at much lower dose rates, referred to as 'low-level radiation' (LLR). Conventionally, the cancer risk from LLR has been estimated by the use of linear no-threshold theory (LNT). For example, it is assumed that the cancer risk from 0 01 Sr (100 mrem) of dose is 0 01 times the risk from 1 Sv (100 rem). In recent years, the former risk estimates have often been reduced by a 'dose and dose rate reduction factor', which is taken to be a factor of 2. But otherwise, the LNT is frequently used for doses as low as one hundred-thousandth of those for which there is direct evidence of cancer induction by radiation. It is the origin of the commonly used expression 'no level of radiation is safe' and the consequent public fear of LLR. The importance of this use of the LNT can not be exaggerated and is used in many applications in the nuclear industry. The LNT paradigm has also been carried over to chemical carcinogens, leading to severe restrictions on use of cleaning fluids, organic chemicals, pesticides, etc. If the LNT were abandoned for radiation, it would probably also be abandoned for chemical carcinogens. In view of these facts, it is important to consider the validity of the LNT. That is the purpose of this paper. (author)

  19. Synthesis, vibrational and optical properties of a new three-layered organic-inorganic perovskite (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 4}Pb{sub 3}I{sub 4}Br{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammak, T., E-mail: thameurlpa@yahoo.f [Laboratoire de Physique appliquee (LPA), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3018, BP 802 (Tunisia); Elleuch, S. [Laboratoire de Physique appliquee (LPA), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3018, BP 802 (Tunisia); Bougzhala, H. [Laboratoire de cristallochimie et des materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia); Mlayah, A. [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Chtourou, R. [Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie CRTEn BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050, Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et de Semiconducteur (Tunisia); Abid, Y. [Laboratoire de Physique appliquee (LPA), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3018, BP 802 (Tunisia)

    2009-09-15

    An organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 4}Pb{sub 3}I{sub 4}Br{sub 6} was synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman and infrared spectroscopies, optical transmission and photoluminescence. The title compound, abbreviated (C{sub 4}){sub 4}Pb{sub 3}I{sub 4}Br{sub 6}, crystallises in a periodic two-dimensional multilayer structure with P2{sub 1}/a space group. The structure is built up from alternating inorganic and organic layers. Each inorganic layer consists of three sheets of PbX{sub 6} (X=I, Br) octahedra. Raman and infrared spectra of the title compound were recorded in the 100-3500 and 400-4000 cm{sup -1} frequency ranges, respectively. An assignment of the observed vibration modes is reported. Optical transmission measurements, performed on thin films of (C{sub 4}){sub 4}Pb{sub 3}I{sub 4}Br{sub 6}, revealed two absorption bands at 474 and 508 nm. Photoluminescence measurements have shown a green emission peak at 519 nm.

  20. Bayesian-statistical decision threshold, detection limit, and confidence interval in nuclear radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, K.

    1998-01-01

    When a contribution of a particular nuclear radiation is to be detected, for instance, a spectral line of interest for some purpose of radiation protection, and quantities and their uncertainties must be taken into account which, such as influence quantities, cannot be determined by repeated measurements or by counting nuclear radiation events, then conventional statistics of event frequencies is not sufficient for defining the decision threshold, the detection limit, and the limits of a confidence interval. These characteristic limits are therefore redefined on the basis of Bayesian statistics for a wider applicability and in such a way that the usual practice remains as far as possible unaffected. The principle of maximum entropy is applied to establish probability distributions from available information. Quantiles of these distributions are used for defining the characteristic limits. But such a distribution must not be interpreted as a distribution of event frequencies such as the Poisson distribution. It rather expresses the actual state of incomplete knowledge of a physical quantity. The different definitions and interpretations and their quantitative consequences are presented and discussed with two examples. The new approach provides a theoretical basis for the DIN 25482-10 standard presently in preparation for general applications of the characteristic limits. (orig.) [de

  1. Effects of controlling the interface trap densities in InGaZnO thin-film transistors on their threshold voltage shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, S-W.; Lee, J-T.; Roh, Y. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, the threshold voltage stability characteristics of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFT) are discussed. The IGZO TFTs were found to induce a parallel threshold voltage (V{sub th}) shift with changing field effect mobility (μ{sub FE}) or a sub-threshold gate voltage swing (SS) due to various thermal annealing conditions. The IGZO TFT that was post-annealed in an O{sub 2} ambient was found to be more stable for use in oxide-based TFT devices and to have better performance characteristics, such as the on/off current ratio (I{sub on/off} ), SS, and V{sub th}, than other TFTs did. The mechanism for improving the V{sub th} stability in the post-annealed IGZO TFT is a decrease in the number of trap sites for the electrons and the weak oxygen bonding in the IGZO thin films. The device's performance could be significantly affected by adjusting the annealing conditions. This mechanism is closely related to that of modulation annealing, where the number of localized trapped carriers and defect centers at the interface or in the channel layer are reduced.

  2. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young [Kyungbook National University Chilgok Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Buk-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); MacFall, James R. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Payne, Martha E. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Jae Hyoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Woong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I{sub O}) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V{sub WMH}), and we establish the I{sub O} -V{sub WMH} relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  3. L-H Power Threshold, Pedestal Stability and Confinement in JET with a Metallic Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beurskens, M.; Alper, B.; Challis, C.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Kempenaars, M.; Lomas, P.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M. L.; Snyder, P. B.; Saarelma, S., E-mail: marc.beurskens@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM /CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Frassinetti, L. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-VR , Stockholm (Sweden); Maggi, C.; Angioni, C.; Hobirk, J.; Neu, R. [IPP Garching, Garching (Germany); Calabro, G.; Buratti, P.; Giovannozzi, E. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Bourdelle, C.; Joffrin, E. [Association Euratom-CEA, IRFM, St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Groth, M. [Association EURATOM/Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Leyland, M. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); De la Luna, E. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Mantica, P. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ' P. Caldirola' , Milano (Italy); Nunes, I. [Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Associacao EURATOM-IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Osborne, T. [General Atomics, San Diego (United States); De Vries, P. [FOM DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: After the change-over from the Carbon-Fibre Composite (CFC) wall to an ITER-like metallic wall (ILW) the baseline type I ELMy H-mode scenario has been re-established in JET with the new plasma-facing materials Be and W. A key finding for ITER is that the power required to enter H-mode has reduced with respect to that in JET with the CFC wall. In JET with the ILW the power threshold to enter H-mode (P{sub L-H}) is below the international L-H power threshold scaling P{sub Martin-08}. The minimum threshold is P{sub L-H} = 1.8 MW compared to P{sub Martin-08} = 4 MW with a pedestal density of n{sub ped} = 2 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in plasmas with I{sub p} = 2.0 MA, B{sub t} = 2.4 T. However the threshold depends strongly on density; using slow ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) power ramps P{sub L-H} varies from 1.8 to 4.5 MW in a range of lower and upper plasma triangularity ({delta}{sub L} = 0.32 - 0.4, {delta}{sub U} = 0.19 - 0.38). Stationary Type I ELMy H-mode operation has been re-established at both low and high triangularity with I{sub p} {<=} 2.5 MA, q{sub 95} = 2.8 - 3.6 and H{sub 98} {<=} 1. The achieved plasma collisionality is relatively high, in the range of 1 < v{sub eff} < 4 due to the required strong gas dosing. Stability analysis with the linear MHD stability code ELITE show that the pedestal is marginally unstable with respect to the Peeling Ballooning boundary. Due to the stabilising effect of the global pressure on the pedestal stability, a strong coupling between core and edge confinement is expected. Indeed in an H-mode profile database comparison with 119 CFC- (0.1 < v{sub eff} < 1) and 40 ILW-H-modes a strong coupling of the core versus edge confinement is found, independent of wall material. In addition, the pedestal predictions using the EPED predictive pedestal code coincide with the measured pedestal height over a wide range of normalised pressure 1.5 < {beta}{sub N} < 3.5. Due to the strong core-edge coupling, beneficial effects of core

  4. An investigation of the thermoluminescence of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibres for application in interface radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T., E-mail: a.t.abdulrahman@surrey.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia (UiTM), Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Hugtenburg, R.P. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg UHB and School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Abdul Sani, Siti Fairus; Alalawi, A.I.M. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Issa, Fatma [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Department of Radiotherapy, Tripoli Medical Centre (TMC), Tripoli (Libya); Thomas, R. [Radiation Dosimetry Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Barry, M.A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Guildford, GU2 7XX Surrey (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, The Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Guildford, GU2 7XX Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Department of Radiological Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11432 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-07-15

    We investigate the ability of high spatial resolution ({approx} 120 {mu}m) Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} TL dosimeters to measure photoelectron dose enhancement resulting from the use of a moderate to high-Z target (an iodinated contrast media) irradiated by 90 kVp X-rays. We imagine its application in a novel radiation synovectomy technique, modelled by a phantom containing a reservoir of I{sub 2} molecules at the interface of which the doped silica dosimeters are located. Measurements outside of the iodine photoelectron range are provided for using a stepped-design that allows insertion of the fibres within the phantom. Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX) is used for verification. At the phantom medium I{sub 2}-interface additional photoelectron generation is observed, {approx}60% above that in the absence of the I{sub 2}, simulations providing agreement to within 3%. Percentage depth doses measured away from the iodine contrast medium reservoir are bounded by published PDDs at 80 kVp and 100 kVp. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Studies of dosimetric characteristic of commercially available doped silica optical fibres. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Investigation of the potential of the dosimeter in dose enhancement measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Use of photoelectron dose enhancement as might be applied in radiation synovectomy. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Measurement of the percentage depth dose recorded by Ge-doped silica optical fibres. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle The Monte Carlo simulation provides comparison against measured data.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation, measurements and safety evaluations for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witew, B.; Fischer, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet radiation, one has to study that photobiologically effective radiation which induces a just measurable threshold reaction. For practical radiation protection, one has to determine the permissible duration of exposure at the end of which the threshold reaction is induced. This time limit is derived by means of spectral measurements and determination of radiation intensity. Detrimental photobiological effects can be avoided, and favourable effects optimized, by observing the time limit. Thus these measurements are used to determine the threshold at which the desired effects of ultraviolet radiation will be accompanied by unwanted effects or damage to persons, as for instance in the use of ultraviolet radiation for operating room sterilization, arc welding work, or cosmetic purposes. (orig.) [de

  6. The linear non threshold conception 'Dose-effect' as a base for standardization of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Arguments pro and con

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2000-01-01

    Examples and argument are presented for reconsidering of the application of the threshold conception in low dose risk assessment. Some of the reasons mentioned are: inapplicability of the quantity 'collective dose' for low doses; serious reassessment of risk coefficients for radiation mutagenesis; report on increasing data on the so called hormesis - stimulation and potential effects from exposure of test animals nas humans to low doses of ionizing radiation

  7. Some remarks on non-monotonic effects at low radiation intensities, on the problem of extrapolating doses between high and low intensities and on the problem of thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, P.

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of a general descriptive framework which takes into account the intensity factor and the time distribution of radiation, a detailed justification for which is to be found in earlier publications, the three fundamental problems mentioned in the title of this paper can be approached in a new way. If the biological effect e for a given dose D delivered at different radiation intensities phi is studied, we find that the curve e=f(phi) can exhibit non-monotonic shapes. This type of phenomenon is known in pharmacology and toxicology and may well exist also for low- or medium-intensity radiation effects. Extrapolation of the effects of a given dose between high and low radiation intensities phi is usually carried out by means of an empirical linear or linear-quadratic formulation. This procedure is insufficiently justified from a theoretical point of view. It is shown here that the effects can be written in the form e=k(phi)D and that the factor of proportionality k(phi) is a generally very complicated function of phi. Hence, the usual extrapolation procedures cannot deal with certain ranges of values of phi within which the effects observed at a given dose may be greater than when the dose is delivered at higher intensity. The problem of thresholds is actually far more difficult than the current literature on the subject would suggest. It is shown here, on the basis of considerations of qualitative dynamics, that several types of threshold must be defined, starting with a threshold for the radiation intensity phi. All these thresholds are interrelated hierarchically in fairly complex ways which must be studied case by case. These results show that it is illusory to attempt to define a universal notion of threshold in terms of dose. The conceptual framework used in the proposed approach proves also to be very illuminating for other studies in progress, particularly in the investigation of phenomena associated with ageing and carcinogenesis. (author)

  8. A FTIR/chemometrics approach to characterize the gamma radiation effects on iodine/epoxy-paint interactions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombani, Juliette, E-mail: juliette.colombani@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES/SEREX/L2EC, CEN Cadarache BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Chauvet, Elodie [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES/SEREX/L2EC, CEN Cadarache BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS ICR UMR 7273, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Amat, Sandrine; Dupuy, Nathalie [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IRD, Avignon Université, IMBE UMR 7263, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Gigmes, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS ICR UMR 7273, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2017-04-01

    The effects of radiation on polymeric materials are a topic of concern in a wide range of industries including the sterilization, and the nuclear power industry. While much work has concentrated on systems like polyolefins that are radiation sterilized, some work has been done on epoxy systems. The epoxy system studied is an epoxy/amine paint which is representative of the paint that covers the inner surfaces of the French nuclear reactor containment buildings. In case of a severe accident on a Nuclear Power Plant, fission products can be released from the nuclear fuel to the reactor containment building. Among them, volatile iodine (I{sub 2}) can be produced and can interact with the epoxy-paint. This paint is also subjected to gamma radiation damages (due to the high dose in the containment coming from radionuclides released from the fuel). So the epoxy-paint studied was exposed to gamma radiation under air atmosphere after being loaded with I{sub 2} or not. The aim of this study is to characterize by FTIR spectroscopy the iodine-paint interactions, then to identify the radiation damages on the epoxy-paint, and to check their effects on these iodine-paint interactions. This work shows the potential of multi-block analysis method (ANOVA-PCA and COMDIM = AComDim) for such a study as it allows to identify the nature of iodine/epoxy-paint interactions and to characterize the gamma radiation damages on the epoxy-paint. AComDim method conduces to the extraction of Common Components to different tables and highlights factors of influence and their interactions.

  9. Non-abelian factorisation for next-to-leading-power threshold logarithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonocore, D.; Laenen, E.; Magnea, L.; Vernazza, L.; White, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    Soft and collinear radiation is responsible for large corrections to many hadronic cross sections, near thresholds for the production of heavy final states. There is much interest in extending our understanding of this radiation to next-to-leading power (NLP) in the threshold expansion. In this paper, we generalise a previously proposed all-order NLP factorisation formula to include non-abelian corrections. We define a non-abelian radiative jet function, organising collinear enhancements at NLP, and compute it for quark jets at one loop. We discuss in detail the issue of double counting between soft and collinear regions. Finally, we verify our prescription by reproducing all NLP logarithms in Drell-Yan production up to NNLO, including those associated with double real emission. Our results constitute an important step in the development of a fully general resummation formalism for NLP threshold effects.

  10. Non-abelian factorisation for next-to-leading-power threshold logarithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonocore, D. [Nikhef, Science Park 105, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Laenen, E. [Nikhef, Science Park 105, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); ITFA, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, Amsterdam (Netherlands); ITF, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Magnea, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Vernazza, L. [Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); White, C.D. [Centre for Research in String Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, 327 Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-22

    Soft and collinear radiation is responsible for large corrections to many hadronic cross sections, near thresholds for the production of heavy final states. There is much interest in extending our understanding of this radiation to next-to-leading power (NLP) in the threshold expansion. In this paper, we generalise a previously proposed all-order NLP factorisation formula to include non-abelian corrections. We define a non-abelian radiative jet function, organising collinear enhancements at NLP, and compute it for quark jets at one loop. We discuss in detail the issue of double counting between soft and collinear regions. Finally, we verify our prescription by reproducing all NLP logarithms in Drell-Yan production up to NNLO, including those associated with double real emission. Our results constitute an important step in the development of a fully general resummation formalism for NLP threshold effects.

  11. Acute alteration of cardiac ECG, action potential, I{sub Kr} and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K{sup +} channel by PCB 126 and PCB 77

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi-Hyeong; Park, Won Sun; Jo, Su-Hyun, E-mail: suhyunjo@kangwon.ac.kr

    2012-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been known as serious persistent organic pollutants (POPs), causing developmental delays and motor dysfunction. We have investigated the effects of two PCB congeners, 3,3′,4,4′-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) on ECG, action potential, and the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K{sup +} current (I{sub Kr}) of guinea pigs' hearts, and hERG K{sup +} current expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PCB 126 shortened the corrected QT interval (QTc) of ECG and decreased the action potential duration at 90% (APD{sub 90}), and 50% of repolarization (APD{sub 50}) (P < 0.05) without changing the action potential duration at 20% (APD{sub 20}). PCB 77 decreased APD{sub 20} (P < 0.05) without affecting QTc, APD{sub 90}, and APD{sub 50}. The PCB 126 increased the I{sub Kr} in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes held at 36 °C and hERG K{sup +} current amplitude at the end of the voltage steps in voltage-dependent mode (P < 0.05); however, PCB 77 did not change the hERG K{sup +} current amplitude. The PCB 77 increased the diastolic Ca{sup 2+} and decreased Ca{sup 2+} transient amplitude (P < 0.05), however PCB 126 did not change. The results suggest that PCB 126 shortened the QTc and decreased the APD{sub 90} possibly by increasing I{sub Kr}, while PCB 77 decreased the APD{sub 20} possibly by other modulation related with intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The present data indicate that the environmental toxicants, PCBs, can acutely affect cardiac electrophysiology including ECG, action potential, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, and channel activity, resulting in toxic effects on the cardiac function in view of the possible accumulation of the PCBs in human body. -- Highlights: ► PCBs are known as serious environmental pollutants and developmental disruptors. ► PCB 126 shortened QT interval of ECG and action potential duration. ► PCB 126 increased human ether-a-go-go-related K{sup +} current and I{sub Kr}.

  12. Threshold double photoionization of atoms with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armen, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In this dissertation, probabilities of M-shell excitation accompanying K-shell photoionization in argon are examined from both an experimental and theoretical standpoint. In the limit of high excitation energy, the conventional sudden approximation is applied to the problem. Threshold behavior of these probabilities is examined in the central-field dipole approximation, which is seen to reduce to the sudden approximation at larger excitation energies. Auger satellites were measured to determine these double-excitation probabilities as a function of incident photon energy. The theoretically predicted difference between the dependence of shake-up and shake-off probabilities on the photon energy near threshold is demonstrated. The present theory is seen to provide adequate predictions for shake-up probabilities, but to underestimate shake-off

  13. Judd–Ofelt modeling, emission lifetimes and non-radiative relaxation for Er{sup 3+} doped Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} elpasolite crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiko, P.A. [ITMO University, 49 Kronverkskiy pr., St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Vilejshikova, E.V. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Khaidukov, N.M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, 31 Leninskii Prospekt, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Méndez-Ramos, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna 38206, Tenerife (Spain); Mateos, X. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n., Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Yumashev, K.V., E-mail: k.yumashev@tut.by [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2017-05-15

    Absorption and emission properties of Er{sup 3+} ions in a cubic elpasolite crystal, Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6}, are modeled within the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory. The J-O intensity parameters have been determined: Ω{sub 2} = 0.665, Ω{sub 4} = 0.217 and Ω{sub 6} = 0.029 ×10{sup –20} cm{sup 2}. The elpasolite structure of Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} containing isolated [YF{sub 6}] polyhedra allows high Er{sup 3+} doping levels up to 100 at% without considerable concentration quenching of luminescence and exceptionally long lifetimes of the excited states (in particular, the radiative lifetimes of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} states are as long as 36.7 ms and 113.4 ms, respectively). It also shows weak non-radiative relaxation. Stimulated-emission cross-sections have been determined for the Er{sup 3+} transitions in Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} at ~2.7 and ~1.5 μm as well as in the visible spectral range.

  14. Hyperfine structure investigation of the first excited state 4Isub(13/2) (5,418-1) in Holmium-165 by the atomic beam resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldenhoven, R.

    1976-01-01

    By the method of atomic beam resonance the hyperfine structure of the first excited state 4 Isub(13/2) (5418 cm -1 ) of 165 Holmium was studied for the first time. Using a suitable ΔF = 0 transition, the gsub(J)-factor was measured. After a determination of estimates for the hyperfine constants A and B from two suitably chosen ΔF = 0 transitions, the hyperfine splittings have been measured. (orig./WL) [de

  15. [Electromagnetic radiation of non-thermal intensity and short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk'ianova, S N

    2013-01-01

    This work represents generalization and the analysis of the long-term own materials characterizing reaction of the brain on electromagnetic radiation of low intensity (energy flow density in the continuous regime or in the impulse approximately 500 microW/sm2) and a short exposition (approximately 30 min). A set of the experimental results received on separate neurons, formations and brain as a whole give an idea about the reaction of the central nervous system to the studied influence. Comparison of these data with the corresponding responses to the known incentives (light, sound, electric current) testifies to the electromagnetic radiation of low energy flow density and a short exposition as a sub-threshold irritant for the central nervous system.

  16. Radiation tolerance of amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaides, R.V.; DeFeo, S.; Doremus, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the threshold radiation damage in amorphous semiconductors, radiation tests were performed on amorphous semiconductor thin film materials and on threshold and memory devices. The influence of flash x-rays and neutron radiation upon the switching voltages, on- and off-state characteristics, dielectric response, optical transmission, absorption band edge and photoconductivity were measured prior to, during and following irradiation. These extensive tests showed the high radiation tolerance of amorphous semiconductor materials. Electrical and optical properties, other than photoconductivity, have a neutron radiation tolerance threshold above 10 17 nvt in the steady state and 10 14 nvt in short (50 μsec to 16 msec) pulses. Photoconductivity increases by 1 1 / 2 orders of magnitude at the level of 10 14 nvt (short pulses of 50 μsec). Super flash x-rays up to 5000 rads (Si), 20 nsec, do not initiate switching in off-state samples which are voltage biased up to 90 percent of the threshold voltage. Both memory and threshold amorphous devices are capable of switching on and off during nuclear radiation transients at least as high as 2 x 10 14 nvt in 50 μsec pulses

  17. Ionizing radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  18. Threshold reduction through photon recycling in semiconductor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigase, Y.B.; Harder, C.S.; Kesler, M.P.; Meier, H.P. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland)); Van Zeghbroeck, B. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1990-09-24

    The threshold pump power of an AlGaAs-GaAs ridge quantum well laser diode has been reduced by 42% by recycling the spontaneous emission. An integrated photodiode absorbs the spontaneous radiation emitted by the laser diode and converts it back into electrical power. The recycling of this power results in a reduction of the electrical power required to reach the lasing threshold.

  19. Characterization of radiative properties of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped phosphate and silicate glasses for solid state laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, P., E-mail: pnandi@barc.gov.in; Shukla, R., E-mail: pnandi@barc.gov.in; Goswami, M., E-mail: pnandi@barc.gov.in [Glass and Advanced Materials Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped calcium aluminium phosphate and calcium aluminium silicate glasses prepared to compare their absorption and emission properties. Radiative lifetime of the excited state {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} derived by Judd-Ofelt theory applied to the absorption spectra. Using the photoluminescence spectrometer the steady state emission and relaxation time from excited energy level recorded under green light excitation. Phosphate glass has higher emission cross-section, higher radiative lifetime but less quantum efficiency due to non-radiative quenching through hydroxyl ions compared to silicate glass for Nd{sup 3+}:{sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 9/2} emission.

  20. Comparison of different approaches to determine the bursting threshold at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeldt, Patrik; Hiller, Nicole; Judin, Vitali; Mueller, Anke-Susanne [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The synchrotron light source ANKA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology provides a dedicated low-α-optics. In this mode bursting of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) is observed for bunch charges above a threshold that depends on beam parameters. This threshold can be determined by several approaches, e.g. bunch lengthening or changes in the THz radiation spectra. This talk compares different methods and their implementation at the ANKA storage ring outlining their advantages, disadvantages and limitations, including reliability and possibility of real time analysis.

  1. The shielding against radiation produced by powder metallurgy with tungsten copper alloy applied on transport equipment for radio-pharmaceutical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cione, Francisco C.; Sene, Frank F.; Souza, Armando C. de; Betini, Evandro G.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: fceoni@hotmail.com, E-mail: ffsene@hotmail.com, E-mail: armandocirilo@yahoo.com, E-mail: evandrobetini@gmail.com, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzuto, Marcia A., E-mail: marizzutto@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    Safety is mandatory on medicine radiopharmaceutical transportation and dependent on radiation shielding material. The focus of the present work is to minimize the use of harmful materials as lead and depleted uranium usually used in packages transportation. The tungsten-copper composite obtained by powder metallurgy (PM) is non-toxic. In powder metallurgy the density and the porosity of the compacted parts depends basically upon particle size distribution of each component, mixture, compacting pressure and sintering temperature cycle. The tungsten-copper composite, when used for shielding charged particles, X-rays, gamma photons or other photons of lower energy require proper interpretation of the radiation transport phenomena. The radioactive energy reduction varies according to the porosity and density of the materials used as shielding. The main factor for radiation attenuation is the cross section value for tungsten. The motivation research factor is an optimization of the tungsten and cooper composition in order to achieve the best linear absorption coefficient given by equation I{sub (x)} = I{sub 0}e{sup (-ux)}. Experiments were conducted to quantify the effective radiation shielding properties of tungsten-copper composite produced by PM, varying the cooper amount in the composite. The studied compositions were 15%, 20% and 25% copper in mass. The Compaction pressure was 270 MPa and the sintering atmosphere was in 1.1 atm in N{sub 2}+H{sub 2}. The sintering temperature was 980 deg C for 2 h. The linear absorption coefficient factor was similar either for the green and the sintered compacts, due the amount of porosity did not affect the radiation attenuation. Thus the sintered was meant for size reduction and mechanical properties enhancement. (author)

  2. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  3. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignoni, K.

    1986-01-01

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Factors modifying sensitivity to carcinogens and the problem of threshold in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of chemical carcinogens and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been under extensive study both experimentally and epidemiologically. The problem of the carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation is a very difficult one: in epidemiological studies it is hard to take into account the many factors (e.g. diseases, diet, genetic peculiarities) that may affect sensitivity to radiation; in experimental studies it is hard to extrapolate with accuracy from one species to another or from the individual threshold to that of the whole population. Age, enzyme activity, sex, and DNA repair capability also modify sensitivity to radiation; when factors such as these are better understood it is expected that epidemiological studies will give a solution that allows estimation of the carcinogenic risk from low-level radiation and hence establishment of a threshold dose. (author)

  5. Re-examination of the threshold energy surface in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.E.; Benedek, R.; Merkle, K.L.; Meshii, M.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation-induced defect production in copper has been studied using in-situ electrical resistivity damage-rate measurements in the HVEM and molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the results yields a threshold energy surface characterized by two isolated pockets of low threshold energy centered at and surrounded by regions of much higher threshold energy; the corresponding damage function exhibits a plateau at 0.65 Frenkel pairs. A Frenkel pair resistivity of (2.75/sub -0.2/ + 0 6 ) x 10 - 4 Ω-cm is proposed. A model damage function is constructed and compared to results from ion irradiation damage-rate measurements. 7 figures

  6. Radiative corrections in neutrino-deuterium disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurylov, A.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.; Vogel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The radiative corrections of order α for the charged- and neutral-current neutrino-deuterium disintegration for energies relevant to the SNO experiment are evaluated. Particular attention is paid to the issue of the bremsstrahlung detection threshold. It is shown that the radiative corrections to the total cross section for the charged current reaction are independent of that threshold, as they must be for consistency, and amount to a slowly decreasing function of the neutrino energy E ν , varying from about 4% at low energies to 3% at the end of the 8 B spectrum. The differential cross section corrections, on the other hand, do depend on the bremsstrahlung detection threshold. Various choices of the threshold are discussed. It is shown that for a realistic choice of the threshold and for the actual electron energy threshold of the SNO detector, the deduced 8 B ν e flux should be decreased by about 2%. The radiative corrections to the neutral-current reaction are also evaluated

  7. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, H; Dawber, G; Gulley, N; King, G C; Bowring, N; Ward, R

    2013-01-01

    The threshold photoelectron spectrum of mercury has been recorded over the energy range (10–40 eV) which covers the region from the lowest state of the singly charged ion, 5d 10 6s( 2 S 1/2 ), to the double charged ionic state, 5d 9 ( 2 D 3/2 )6s( 1 D 2 ). Synchrotron radiation has been used in conjunction with the penetrating-field threshold-electron technique to obtain the spectrum with high resolution. The spectrum shows many more features than observed in previous photoemission measurements with many of these assigned to satellite states converging to the double ionization limit. (paper)

  8. Electrical pulse burnout of transistors in intense ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, E.F.; Evans, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    Tests examining possible synergistic effects of electrical pulses and ionizing radiation on transistors were performed and energy/power thresholds for transistor burnout determined. The effect of ionizing radiation on burnout thresholds was found to be minimal, indicating that electrical pulse testing in the absence of radiation produces burnout-threshold results which are applicable to IEMP studies. The conditions of ionized transistor junctions and radiation induced current surges at semiconductor device terminals are inherent in IEMP studies of electrical circuits

  9. The threshold of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis of 116 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Odawara, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the risk factors for developing thyroid disorders based on a dose–volume histograms (DVHs) analysis. Data from a total of 116 consecutive patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy for head and neck cancers was retrospectively evaluated. Radiation therapy was performed between April 2007 and December 2010. There were 108 males and 8 females included in the study. The median follow-up term was 24 months (range, 1–62 months). The thyroid function was evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels. The mean thyroid dose, and the volume of thyroid gland spared from doses ≥10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy (VS10, VS20, VS30 and VS40) were calculated for all patients. The thyroid dose and volume were calculated by the radiotherapy planning system (RTPS). The cumulative incidences of hypothyroidism were 21.1% and 36.4% at one year and two years, respectively, after the end of radiation therapy. In the DVH analyses, the patients who received a mean thyroid dose <30 Gy had a significantly lower incidence of hypothyroidism. The univariate analyses showed that the VS10, VS20, VS30 and VS40 were associated with the risk of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism was a relatively common type of late radiation-induced toxicity. A mean thyroid dose of 30 Gy may be a useful threshold for predicting the development of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. (author)

  10. The risk of low doses of ionising radiation and the linear no threshold relationship debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Masse, R.; Vathaire, F. de; Averbeck, D.; Aurengo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP and the B.E.I.R. VII reports recommend a linear no threshold (L.N.T.) relationship for the estimation of cancer excess risk induced by ionising radiations (IR), but the 2005 report of Medicine and Science French Academies concludes that it leads to overestimate of risk for low and very low doses. The bases of L.N.T. are challenged by recent biological and animal experimental studies which show that the defence against IR involves the cell microenvironment and the immunologic system. The defence mechanisms against low doses are different and comparatively more effective than for high doses. Cell death is predominant against low doses. DNA repairing is activated against high doses, in order to preserve tissue functions. These mechanisms provide for multicellular organisms an effective and low cost defence system. The differences between low and high doses defence mechanisms are obvious for alpha emitters which show several greys threshold effects. These differences result in an impairment of epidemiological studies which, for statistical power purpose, amalgamate high and low doses exposure data, since it would imply that cancer IR induction and defence mechanisms are similar in both cases. Low IR dose risk estimates should rely on specific epidemiological studies restricted to low dose exposures and taking precisely into account potential confounding factors. The preliminary synthesis of cohort studies for which low dose data (< 100 mSv) were available show no significant risk excess, neither for solid cancer nor for leukemias. (authors)

  11. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, A. Vinod [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-23

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  12. Kinetic study of the substitution of pyridine by cyanide in the bis(pyridine)cobalt(III)hematoporphyrin-IX: distinguishing between Isub(d) and D mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birush, M.; Pribanicj, M.

    1977-01-01

    ''Mass-law (rate) retardation'' effect shows that the reaction between the cyanide ion and bis(pyridine)cobalt(III)hematoporphyrin-IX complex to give (CN) 2 cobalt(III)hematoporphyrin-IX occurs by a purely dissociative (D but not Isub(d)) mechanism in chloroform. Limiting rate constant at the excess of cyanide ion concentration at 25 deg C was found to be 2.5x10 -3 S -1 and the competition ratio of pyridine (ksub(-) 1 ) and the cyanide ion (k 2 ) for a five coordinate intermediate (pyridin) cobalt(III)hematoporphyrin-IX complex was obtained as ksub(-) 1 /k 2 =0.35. (author)

  13. Study on the ablation threshold induced by pulsed lasers at different wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrisi, L.; Borrielli, A.; Margarone, D.

    2007-01-01

    A study of the effects induced by pulsed laser ablation on different materials as a function of the laser wavelength is presented. In particular the ablation at low laser fluence, of the order of 10 8 -10 10 W/cm 2 with ns pulse width, is investigated experimentally on different metals, semiconductors and polymers. Two theoretical models, explain the experimental results about the fluence threshold value measurements, as depending on the laser wavelength are discussed. The photothermal process is valid for the estimation of the threshold fluence for IR and visible radiation, both inducing thermal heating in metals and semiconductors through the photon-free electron energy transfer. This model is not valid for polymers. The photochemical process is valid for the estimation of the threshold fluence for UV radiation, which photon energy is higher with respect to the chemical binding energy. This radiation induces chemical bond breaking in insulators and scission and cross linking effects can be produced. This last model is not valid for metals and semiconductors

  14. Abnormal photothermal effect of laser radiation on highly defect oxide bronze nanoparticles under the sub-threshold excitation of absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, P.; Kotvanova, M.; Omelchenko, A.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of abnormal photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on nanoparticles of oxide bronzes has been proposed in this paper. The basic features of the observed effect are: a) sub-threshold absorption of laser radiation by the excitation of donor-like levels formed in the energy gap due to superficial defects of the oxide bronze nano-crystals; b) an interband radiationless transition of energy of excitation on deep triplet levels and c) consequent recombination occurring at the plasmon absorption. K or Na atoms thermally intercalated to the octahedral crystal structure of TiO2 in the wave SHS combustion generate acceptor levels in the gap. The prepared oxide bronzes of the non-stoichiometric composition NaxTiO2 and KxTiO2 were examined by high resolution TEM, and then grinded in a planetary mill with powerful dispersion energy density up to 4000 J/g. This made it possible to obtain nanoparticles about 50 nm with high surface defect density (1017-1019 cm-2 at a depth of 10 nm). High photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on the defect nanocrystals observed after its impregnation into cartilaginous tissue exceeds 7 times in comparison with the intact ones.

  15. Application of a VMI spectrometer to near-threshold photoionization with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keeffe, P; Bolognesi, P; Ovcharenko, E; Avaldi, L; Mihelic, A; Richter, R; Moise, A; King, G C

    2011-01-01

    A new developed velocity map imaging spectrometer has been used to study the photoionization of atoms near threshold. The application of the spectrometer to the measurement of the angular distributions of the photoelectrons emitted in the photoionization of the Ne 2p 3/2 state between the 2p spin orbit thresholds and of polarised Ne atoms are presented.

  16. Determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for detectors used with an 800 MU/min CyberKnife{sup ®} system equipped with fixed collimators and a study of detector response to small photon beams using a Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, C., E-mail: cyril.moignier@free.fr; Huet, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Service de Dosimétrie Externe, 92260, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Makovicka, L. [IRMA/CE UMR 6249 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 25200, Montbéliard (France)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In a previous work, output ratio (OR{sub det}) measurements were performed for the 800 MU/min CyberKnife{sup ®} at the Oscar Lambret Center (COL, France) using several commercially available detectors as well as using two passive dosimeters (EBT2 radiochromic film and micro-LiF TLD-700). The primary aim of the present work was to determine by Monte Carlo calculations the output factor in water (OF{sub MC,w}) and the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors. The secondary aim was to study the detector response in small beams using Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: The LINAC head of the CyberKnife{sup ®} was modeled using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code system. The primary electron beam was modeled using a monoenergetic source with a radial gaussian distribution. The model was adjusted by comparisons between calculated and measured lateral profiles and tissue-phantom ratios obtained with the largest field. In addition, the PTW 60016 and 60017 diodes, PTW 60003 diamond, and micro-LiF were modeled. Output ratios with modeled detectors (OR{sub MC,det}) and OF{sub MC,w} were calculated and compared to measurements, in order to validate the model for smallest fields and to calculate k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors, respectively. For the study of the influence of detector characteristics on their response in small beams; first, the impact of the atomic composition and the mass density of silicon, LiF, and diamond materials were investigated; second, the material, the volume averaging, and the coating effects of detecting material on the detector responses were estimated. Finally, the influence of the size of silicon chip on diode response was investigated. Results: Looking at measurement ratios (uncorrected output factors) compared to the OF{sub MC,w}, the PTW 60016

  17. Radiation and cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M. M.; Vano, E.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Kleiman, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    When this paper was about to go to press, the International Commission on Radiological Protection released a statement recommending a change in the threshold dose for the eye lens and dose limits for eye for occupationally exposed persons. It is clear that the earlier published threshold for radiation cataract is no longer valid. Epidemiological studies among Chernobyl clean-up workers, A bomb survivors, astronauts, residents of contaminated buildings, radiological technicians and recent surveys of staff in interventional rooms indicate that there is an increased incidence of lens opacities at doses below 1 Gy. Nevertheless, eye lens dosimetry is at a primitive stage and needs to be developed further. Despite uncertainties concerning dose threshold and dosimetry, it is possible to significantly reduce the risk of radiation cataract through the use of appropriate eye protection. By increasing awareness among those at risk and better adoption and increased usage of protective measures, radiation cataract can become preventable despite lowering of dose limits. (authors)

  18. Radiation losses and global energy balance for Ohmically heated discharges in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.R.; Behringer, K.; Niedermeyer, H.

    1982-01-01

    Global energy balance, radiation profiles and dominant impurity radiation sources are compared for Ohmically heated limiter and divertor discharges in the ASDEX tokamak. In discharges with a poloidal stainless-steel limiter, total radiation from the plasma is the dominant energy loss channel. The axisymmetric divertor reduces this volume-integrated radiation to 30-35% of the heating power and additional Ti-gettering halves it again to 10-15%. Local radiation losses in the plasma centre, which are mainly due to the presence of iron impurity ions, are reduced by about one order of magnitude. In high-current (Isub(p) = 400 kA) and high-density (nsub(e)-bar = 6 x 10 13 cm -3 ) ungettered divertor discharges, up to 55% of the heating power is dumped into a cold-gas target inside the divertor chambers. The bolometrically detected volume power losses in the chambers can mainly be attributed to neutral hydrogen atoms with kinetic energies of a few eV. In this parameter range, the divertor plasma is dominated by inelastic molecular and atomic processes, the main process being Franck-Condon dissociation of H 2 molecules. (author)

  19. 1090 nm infrared radiation at close to threshold dose induces cataract with a time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per G

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether infrared radiation (IRR)-induced cataract is instant or is associated with a time delay between the exposure and the onset of lens light scattering after an exposure to just above threshold dose. Six-weeks-old albino Sprague-Dawley female rats were unilaterally exposed to 197 W/cm2 IRR at 1090 nm within the dilated pupil. In the first experiment, the animals were exposed with four exposure times of 5, 8, 13 and 20 second, respectively. At 24 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both exposed and contralateral not exposed lenses was measured. Based on the first experiment, four postexposure time groups were exposed unilaterally to 1090 nm IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second. At 6, 18, 55 and 168 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both lenses was measured. A 197 W/cm2 IRR-induced light scattering in the lens with exposures of at least 8 second. Further, after exposure to IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second, the light-scattering increase in the lens was delayed approximately 16 hr after the exposure. There is a time delay between the exposure and the onset of cataract after exposure to close to threshold dose implicating that either near IRR cataract is photochemical or there is a time delay in the biological expression of thermally induced damage. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sigmoidal response model for radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei

    1995-01-01

    From epidemiologic studies, we find no measurable increase in the incidences of birth defects and cancer after low-level exposure to radiation. Based on modern understanding of the molecular basis of teratogenesis and cancer, I attempt to explain thresholds observed in atomic bomb survivors, radium painters, uranium workers and patients injected with Thorotrast. Teratogenic injury induced by doses below threshold will be completely eliminated as a result of altruistic death (apoptosis) of injured cells. Various lines of evidence obtained show that oncomutations produced in cancerous cells after exposure to radiation are of spontaneous origin and that ionizing radiation acts not as an oncomutation inducer but as a tumor promoter by induction of chronic wound-healing activity. The tissue damage induced by radiation has to be repaired by cell growth and this creates opportunity for clonal expansion of a spontaneously occurring preneoplastic cell. If the wound-healing error model is correct, there must be a threshold dose range of radiation giving no increase in cancer risk. (author)

  1. Background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of background radiation, whether natural or caused by man's activities, are discussed. The known biological effects of radiation in causing cancers or genetic mutations are explained. The statement that there is a threshold below which there is no risk is examined critically. (U.K.)

  2. Effects after prenatal radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian organism is highly radiosensitive during all prenatal developmental periods. For most effects a dose relationship with a threshold is observed. These threshold doses are generally above the exposures from medical diagnostic procedures. The quality and extent of radiation effects are very much dependent on the developmental stage during which an exposure takes place and on the radiation dose. An exposure during the preimplantation period will cause lethality. Malformations are usually induced after exposures during the major organogenesis. Growth retardation is also possible during the late organogenesis and foetal periods. The lower limits of threshold doses for these effects are in the range of 100 mGy. A radiation exposure during the early foetal period can lead to severe mental retardation and impairment of intelligence. There are very serious effects with radiation doses above 0.3 Gy. Carcinogenesis can apparently occur after radiation exposures during the total prenatal development period. The radiation risk factor up to now has not been clear, but it seems that it is in the range of risk factors for cancer that are observed after exposures during childhood. For radiation doses that are used in radiological diagnostics the risk is zero or very low. A termination of pregnancy after doses below 100 mGy should not be considered. (author)

  3. Development of a wave-induced forcing threshold for nearshore impact of Wave Energy Converter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.

    2016-02-01

    Wave-induced forcing is a function of spatial gradients in the wave radiation stresses and is the main driver of alongshore currents, rip currents, and nearshore sediment transport. The installation of nearshore Wave Energy Converter (WEC) arrays may cause significant changes in the surf zone radiation stresses and could therefore impact nearshore littoral processes. In the first part of this study, a new threshold for nearshore hydrodynamic impact due to the presence of WEC devices is established based on changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients shoreward of WEC arrays. The threshold is defined based on the relationship between nearshore radiation stresses and alongshore currents as observed in field data. Next, we perform a parametric study of the nearshore impact of WEC arrays using the SWAN wave model. Trials are conducted on an idealized, alongshore-uniform beach with a range of WEC array configurations, locations, and incident wave conditions, and conditions that generate radiation stress gradients above the impact threshold are identified. Finally, the same methodology is applied to two wave energy test sites off the coast of Newport, OR with more complicated bathymetries. Although the trends at the field sites are similar to those seen in the parametric study, the location and extent of the changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients appear to be heavily influenced by the local bathymetry.

  4. Computer simulation of ionizing radiation burnout in power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavarz, A.A.; Fischer, T.A.; Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Hawkins, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The transient response of a power MOSFET device to ionizing radiation was examined using the BAMBI device simulator. The radiation rate threshold for burnout was determined for several different cases. The burnout mechanism was attributed to current-induced avalanche. The effects of the applied drain-source voltage and the base width of the parasitic bipolar device on the threshold level were modeled. It was found that the radiation rate threshold is lower at higher drain-source voltages or narrower bases. 8 refs., 17 figs

  5. Nano-material size dependent laser-plasma thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Sherbini, Ashraf M.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2016-10-01

    The reduction of laser fluence for initiation of plasma was measured for zinc monoxide nanoparticles of diameters in the range of 100 to 20 nm. In a previous work by EL Sherbini and Parigger [Wavelength Dependency and Threshold Measurements for Nanoparticle-enhanced Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 116 (2016) 8-15], the hypothesis of threshold dependence on particle size leads to the interpretation of the experiments for varying excitation wavelengths with fixed, 30 nm nanomaterial. The experimental results presented in this work were obtained with 1064 nm Nd:YAG radiation and confirm and validate the suspected reduction due to quenching of the thermal conduction length to the respective sizes of the nanoparticles.

  6. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram deals with all aspects of radiation carcinogenesis. The term radiation here includes U-V radiation and the entire electromagnetic spectrum, electron and other charged particle beams, neutrons, and alpha and beta radiation from radioactive substances. Abstracts included concern relationships between radiation and carcinogenesis in humans, experimental induction of tumors in animals by irradiation, studies on the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis at the cellular level, studies of RBE, dose response or dose threshold in relation to radiation carcinogenesis, and methods and policies for control of radiation exposure in the general population. In general, this Cancergram excludes abstracts on radio-therapy, radiologic diagnosis, radiation pathology, and radiation biology, where these articles have no bearing on radiation carcinogenesis

  8. Decreasing the apoptotic threshold with chelerythrine chloride enhances radiation cures in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmura, Steven J.; Mauceri, Helena; Quintans, Jose; Kufe, Donald W.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The induction of apoptosis following ionizing radiation (IR) is proposed to enhance tumor curability. No study to date, however, has demonstrated that increased tumor cell apoptosis overcomes radioresistance. We tested this hypothesis in a xenograft of a radioresistant (D 0 =2.3 Gy) human carcinoma line (SQ20-B) which lacks function p53 and fails to undergo apoptosis following single doses of IR as high as 20 Gy in vitro. We employed chelerythrine chloride, a selective PKC inhibitor of group A and B isoforms, which induces apoptosis from the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin. Materials and Methods: SQ20-B xenographts were grown to 300-900mm 3 in athymic mice. Tumors were injected four times with 1 mg/kg of body weight chelerythrine chloride (LD 50 = 20mg/kg) on days 0, 4, 7, and 10. Radiation was fractionated 5Gy/day, 4 days per week, for a total of 50 Gy. Apoptotic cells were scored from H and E tumor sections by an observer blinded to the treatment condition. In vitro determination of apoptosis was based on flowcytometric (FACS) analysis of propidium iodide uptake, cell size changes, and nuclear morphology. Results: Treatment of SQ20-B cells with 2.5μM chelerythrine chloride prior to irradiation in-vitro with 4 Gy resulted in over 80% of the cells undergoing apoptosis within 36 hours compared to <3% with IR alone. Activation of neutral and acidic sphingomyelinase activity preceded the induction apoptosis by chelerythrine and IR. Pharmacological inhibitors of the caspases (Ced3/CPP32 related proteases) prevented apoptosis by chelerythrine or the combination of chelerythrine and IR. Chelerythrine chloride enhanced the killing effects in animals of ionizing radiation in a xenograft SQ20-B tumor model through increased tumor cell apoptosis (p<.0001). Tumor cures were increased in the combined chelerythrine and IR treatment (44%) compared to either IR (5%) or chelerythrine (15%) alone (p<.001). Normal tissue architecture and limb function were preserved

  9. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bo-Liang [Advanced Display Technology Research Center, AU Optronics, No.1, Li-Hsin Rd. 2, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsin-Chu 30078, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-21

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  10. Femtosecond laser damage threshold and nonlinear characterization in bulk transparent SiC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DesAutels, G. Logan; Finet, Marc; Ristich, Scott; Whitaker, Matt; Brewer, Chris; Juhl, Shane; Walker, Mark; Powers, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Semi-insulating and conducting SiC crystalline transparent substrates were studied after being processed by femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (780 nm at 160 fs). Z-scan and damage threshold experiments were performed on both SiC bulk materials to determine each sample's nonlinear and threshold parameters. 'Damage' in this text refers to an index of refraction modification as observed visually under an optical microscope. In addition, a study was performed to understand the damage threshold as a function of numerical aperture. Presented here for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, are the damage threshold, nonlinear index of refraction, and nonlinear absorption measured values

  11. Influence of i{sub 13/2} proton and j{sub 15/2} neutron intruding orbitals on the behaviour of 190 mass region superdeformed nuclei; Influence des orbitales intruses proton i{sub 13/2} et neutron j{sub 15/2} sur le comportement des noyaux superdeformes de la region de masse 190

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprat, J

    1995-01-01

    This work concerns the study of the nuclear superdeformation phenomenon in the A = 190 mass region. The superdeformed (SD) states in {sup 193}Tl, {sup 194}Tl {sup 195}Tl were produced via heavy-ion induced reactions and studied with the EUROGAM gamma multidetector array. The analysis of high-multiplicity events allowed the study of the magnetic properties of the SD states in these nuclei. For the first time, the g-factor of a proton orbital in a SD nucleus in the A = 190 mass region has been extracted. This measurement indicates that the two known bands in {sup 195}Tl-SD are built on the i{sub 13/2} proton intruder orbital. A new SD band has been found in this isotope: it is the first SD band built on an excited proton state found in the A = 190 region. Finally an interaction between two pairs of bands has been established in {sup 194}Tl; this interaction indicate the crossing of two neutron orbitals above the N = 112 gap. The magnetic properties of the states of the SD bands in {sup 194}Tl reveals that these bands are built on configurations in which the single proton and neutron intrinsic spins are aligned. Comparison between different SD bands in the Thallium isotopes shows the prominent role of the i{sub 13/2} proton and the j{sub 15/2} neutron intruder orbitals in the smooth increase of the dynamical moment of inertia as a function of the rotational frequency. In addition, this work reports on the first observation of a SD rotational band produced in a (HI, {alpha}xn) reaction channel. The study of the maximum spin reached by the SD bands indicates both a competition between alpha emission and fission of the compound nucleus, and the limitation due to the fission process in the population of the SD nuclei in the A = 190 region. (author). 120 refs., 112 figs., 22 tabs., 2 ann.

  12. Corneal Damage from Infrared Radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCally, Russell

    2000-01-01

    ...) laser radiation at 10.6 (micrometer) and Tm: YAG laser radiation at 2.02 (micrometer). Retinal damage from sources with rectangular irradiance distributions was also modeled. Thresholds for CO(2...

  13. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 μm radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm 2 , sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10 8 nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then scaled to

  14. Threshold Studies of the Microwave Instability in Electron Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, Karl

    2010-01-01

    We use a Vlasov-Fokker-Planck program and a linearized Vlasov solver to study the microwave instability threshold of impedance models: (1) a Q = 1 resonator and (2) shielded coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), and find the results of the two programs agree well. For shielded CSR we show that only two dimensionless parameters, the shielding parameter Π and the strength parameter S csr , are needed to describe the system. We further show that there is a strong instability associated with CSR, and that the threshold, to good approximation, is given by (S csr )th = 0.5 + 0.12Π. In particular, this means that shielding has little effect in stabilizing the beam for Π ∼ -3/2 . We, in addition, find another instability in the vicinity of Π = 0.7 with a lower threshold, (S csr ) th ∼ 0.2. We find that the threshold to this instability depends strongly on damping time, (S csr ) th ∼ τ p -1/2 , and that the tune spread at threshold is small - both hallmarks of a weak instability.

  15. Radiation and mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    The editorial comments on a report published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima updating information on the induction of mental changes in the light of the revised and more detailed estimate of doses of radiation during pregnancies received by those exposed at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The estimated risks are little changed. The likelihood of a threshold for exposure during the 16th to 25th week is confirmed-at 700 mGy (with a lower 95% confidence interval of 200 mGy). For the more sensitive time between the eighth to 15th weeks a linear model with no threshold still gives a statistically adequate fit to the data. Now, however, if linear models are tested without the constraint of postulating a threshold of zero, fits are obtained indicating substantial thresholds below which mental retardation would not result. When data on all children are included the maximum likelihood threshold value averages about 250 mGy on the different criteria tested (with mean 95% confidence intervals of 0 and 550 mGy). Or if the analyses exclude five children with conditions that themselves sometimes cause mental retardation a threshold of about 400 mGy is indicated (with mean 95% confidence intervals of 150 and 600 mGy). (author)

  16. Checking the foundation: recent radiobiology and the linear no-threshold theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsh, Brant A

    2010-12-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) theory has been adopted as the foundation of radiation protection standards and risk estimation for several decades. The "microdosimetric argument" has been offered in support of the LNT theory. This argument postulates that energy is deposited in critical cellular targets by radiation in a linear fashion across all doses down to zero, and that this in turn implies a linear relationship between dose and biological effect across all doses. This paper examines whether the microdosimetric argument holds at the lowest levels of biological organization following low dose, low dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation. The assumptions of the microdosimetric argument are evaluated in light of recent radiobiological studies on radiation damage in biological molecules and cellular and tissue level responses to radiation damage. There is strong evidence that radiation initially deposits energy in biological molecules (e.g., DNA) in a linear fashion, and that this energy deposition results in various forms of prompt DNA damage that may be produced in a pattern that is distinct from endogenous (e.g., oxidative) damage. However, a large and rapidly growing body of radiobiological evidence indicates that cell and tissue level responses to this damage, particularly at low doses and/or dose-rates, are nonlinear and may exhibit thresholds. To the extent that responses observed at lower levels of biological organization in vitro are predictive of carcinogenesis observed in vivo, this evidence directly contradicts the assumptions upon which the microdosimetric argument is based.

  17. Radiation related cancer risk after ionization radiation exposure to the Bulgarian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Vasilev, G.; Hadjieva, T.

    2008-01-01

    Average annual individual effective dose of natural radiation background (NRB) for the Bulgarian population is estimated to be 2.33 mSv.a -1 (from 1.60 to 3.06). NRB has been considered nearly constant in time, but during the 20th century the radiation above NRB has gradually increased. It was mainly caused by the medical X-ray and radionuclide diagnostics, radiation treatment, occupational radiation, global radioactive fallout, Chernobyl accident, exploitation of thermal power and nuclear power stations, etc. For the years 1950-2000 collective dose from NRB represents 965 000 man.Sv and radiation over NRB gives 1 042 800 man.Sv. Population risk following radiation exposure is estimated mainly on stochastic health effect by implementation of the so-called Linear non-threshold model (LNM) dose-effect. It postulates no dose threshold for radiation-induced health effects. Using different models, assumptions and assessments, authors have determined the contribution of lethal radiogenic cancer to Bulgarian spontaneous cancer rate to be from 3.7% to 20.6%. Numerous contradictions and concepts about the LNM still persist, because from statistical point of view, LNM can neither be proved nor rejected. (authors)

  18. A Theoretical Evaluation of Secondary Atomization Effects on Engine Performance for Aluminum Gel Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, D. C.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a gel-fueled rocket combustion chamber has been developed. This model includes the processes of liquid hydrocarbon burnout, secondary atomization. aluminum ignition, and aluminum combustion. Also included is a model of radiative heat transfer from the solid combustion products to the chamber walls. Calculations indicate that only modest secondary atomization is required to significantly reduce propellant burnout distances, aluminum oxide residual size and radiation heat wall losses. Radiation losses equal to approximately 2-13 percent of the energy released during combustion were estimated. A two-dimensional, two-phase nozzle code was employed to estimate radiation and nozzle two-phase flow effects on overall engine performance. Radiation losses yielded a 1 percent decrease in engine I(sub sp). Results also indicate that secondary atomization may have less effect on two-phase losses than it does on propellant burnout distance and no effect if oxide particle coagulation and shear induced droplet breakup govern oxide particle size. Engine I(sub sp) was found to decrease from 337.4 to 293.7 seconds as gel aluminum mass loading was varied from 0-70 wt percent. Engine I(sub sp) efficiencies, accounting for radiation and two-phase flow effects, on the order of 0.946 were calculated for a 60 wt percent gel, assuming a fragmentation ratio of 5.

  19. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of acetaldehyde and acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yencha, Andrew J.; Siggel-King, Michele R.F.; King, George C.; Malins, Andrew E.R.; Eypper, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acrolein. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acrolein. •Determination of vertical ionization potentials in acetaldehyde and acrolein. -- Abstract: High-resolution (6 meV and 12 meV) threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra of acetaldehyde and acrolein (2-propenal) have been recorded over the valence binding energy region 10–20 eV, employing synchrotron radiation and a penetrating-field electron spectrometer. These TPE spectra are presented here for the first time. All of the band structures observed in the TPE spectra replicate those found in their conventional HeI photoelectron (PE) spectra. However, the relative band intensities are found to be dramatically different in the two types of spectra that are attributed to the different dominant operative formation mechanisms. In addition, some band shapes and their vertical ionization potentials are found to differ in the two types of spectra that are associated with the autoionization of Rydberg states in the two molecules

  20. Radiation biology and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    For protection purposes, the biological effects of radiation are separated into stochastic effects (cancer, hereditary effects) presumed to be unicellular in origin, and tissue reactions due to injury in populations of cells. The latter are deterministic effects, renamed ‘tissue reactions’ in the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection because of the increasing evidence of the ability to modify responses after irradiation. Tissue reactions become manifest either early or late after doses above a threshold dose, which is the basis for recommended dose limits for avoiding such effects. Latency time before manifestation is related to cell turnover rates, and tissue proliferative and structural organisation. Threshold doses have been defined for practical purposes at 1% incidence of an effect. In general, threshold doses are lower for longer follow-up times because of the slow progression of injury before manifestation. Radiosensitive individuals in the population may contribute to low threshold doses, and in the future, threshold doses may be increased by the use of various biological response modifiers post irradiation for reducing injury. Threshold doses would be expected to be higher for fractionated or protracted doses, unless doses below the threshold dose only cause single-hit-type events that are not modified by repair/recovery phenomena, or if different mechanisms of injury are involved at low and high doses.

  1. X-ray three beam cases and the influence of lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherz, W.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1981-01-01

    The three beam cases (111 anti 111; 200) (Case I) and (111, anti 1anti 11; 220) (Case II) in germanium were examined with CuKα 1 radiation from a bent quartz monochromator crystal. For the intensity relation Isub(O)/(Isub(L) + Isub(M)), excellent agreement with precious measurements (Uebach) resulted for Case I; small deviations from a calculated value could be explained by theoretical arguments, considering the crystal as slightly imperfect. In Case II, which reacted more sensitively upon lattice defects, these deviations were much larger and in an unexpexted direction. A first attempt of a 'Three Beam Lang Topography' is reported. (orig.)

  2. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ball

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I>2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I>2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I>2 when first exposed to air. I>2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I>2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv. A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I>2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I>2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I>2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I>2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I>2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently

  3. Anomalous radiation effects in fully depleted SOI MOSFETs fabricated on SIMOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Niu, Guofu; Cressler, J. D.; Patel, J.; Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Kim, H. S.; Reed, R. A.; Palmer, M. J.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the proton tolerance of fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs with H-gate and regular-gate structural configurations. For the front-gate characteristics, the H-gate does not show the edge leakage observed in the regular-gate transistor. An anomalous kink in the back-gate linear I/sub D/-V/sub GS/ characteristics of the fully depleted SOI nFETs has been observed at high radiation doses. This kink is attributed to charged traps generated in the bandgap at the buried oxide/silicon film interface during irradiation. Extensive two-dimensional simulations with MEDICI were used to understand the physical origin of this kink. We also report unusual self-annealing effects in the devices when they are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature.

  4. Avalanche breakdown and the probabilistic nature of laser failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitropol' skii, M M; Khote' enkov, V A; Khodakov, G S

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of the probabilistic aspects of the development of an electron avalanche arising under the influence of a powerful laser beam in a solid transparent dielectric. The distribution function of time and relative fluctuation of the number of electrons was found. The width of the probability function of failure was determined as a function of intensity. The relative dispersion of time of beginning of breakdown can also be determined. Its numerical value under identical conditions is +-7%. These results are similar to the experimentally defined dispersion from an earlier work. The data produced also show that, in spite of the clearly probabilistic nature of the development of an avalanche, the slight width of the distribution causes the use of the threshold criterion for rupture of transparent dielectrics by laser radiation to be practically correct. The dependence of I/sub 0/ on pulse length agrees with experimental data, whereas I/sub 0/ (V) is significantly weaker than the actually observed value. This disagreement can be explained by various imperfections in the structure of the crystals and by their contamination, the frequency of appearance of which, in the focal volume, is proportional to its size and which were not considered in the theoretical statements developed here.

  5. Effect of hypoiodous acid volatility on the iodine source term in reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routamo, T [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A FORTRAN code ACT WATCH has been developed to establish an improved understanding of essential radionuclide behaviour mechanisms, especially related to iodine chemistry, in reactor accidents. The accident scenarios calculated in this paper are based on the Loss of Coolant accident at the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant. The effect of different airborne species, especially HIO, on the iodine source term has been studied. The main cause of the high HIO release in the system modelled is the increase of I{sub 2} hydrolysis rate along with the temperature increase, which accelerates HIO production. Due to the high radiation level near the reactor core, I{sub 2} is produced from I{sup -}very rapidly. High temperature in the reactor coolant causes I{sub 2} to be transformed into HIO and through the boiling of the coolant volatile I{sub 2} and HIO are transferred efficiently into the gas phase. High filtration efficiency for particulate iodine causes I{sup -} release to be much lower than those of I{sub 2} and HIO. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  6. Radioactive sealed sources: Reasonable accountability, exemption, and licensing activity thresholds -- A technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.; Shingleton, K.L.

    1996-01-01

    Perhaps owing to their small size and portability, some radiation accidents/incidents have involved radioactive sealed sources (RSSs). As a result, programs for the control and accountability of RSSs have come to be recommended and emplaced that essentially require RSSs to be controlled in a manner different from bulk, unsealed radioactive material. Crucially determining the total number of RSSs for which manpower-intensive radiation protection surveillance is provided is the individual RSS activity above which such surveillance is required and below which such effort is not considered cost effective. Individual RSS activity thresholds are typically determined through scenarios which impart a chosen internal or external limiting dose to Reference Man under specified exposure conditions. The resultant RSS threshold activity levels have meaning commensurate with the assumed scenario exposure parameters, i.e., if they are realistic and technically based. A review of how the Department of Energy (DOE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have determined their respective accountability, exemption, and licensing threshold activity values is provided. Finally, a fully explained method using references readily available to practicing health physicists is developed using realistic, technically-based calculation parameters by which RSS threshold activities may be locally generated

  7. Decameter radio emission of Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabov, B.P.; Arkhipov, A.V.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent observations (1980 to 1982) at frequency band from 10 to 23 MHz have allowed large-scale dynamic spectra of S storms to be obtained for the overall duration of each storm. The observations were carried out with the East-West arm of the broad band decametric telescope UTB-2. The minimum-detectable flux density of the emission was 10 Jy. The occurrence probability of S-bursts has shown a periodic dependence on the observation frequency, with a period about 3.5 MHz. S-bursts appear at almost all values of the Jovian central meridian longitude and Io's phase angle PHIsub(Isub(0)), except the area PHIsub(i)O)=160 deg +- 40 deg. The appearance of powerful S-burst storms is controled by Io's orbital position. They concentrate near two values of PHIsub(Isub(0)), namely PHIsub9(Isub(01))=86 deg and PHIsub(Isub(02))=234 deg. All the S-bursts show a group frequency drift, with the rate varying from storm to storm between 60 and 600 kHz/min. The drift rate is positive in the strip near PHIsub(Isub(01)) and negative near PHIsub(Isub(02)). This implies that the conical radiation pattern of the decametric S-component is characterized by a frequency dependent angular structure

  8. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  9. Some properties of Cerenkov radiation due to the finite thickness of the radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Frank, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of Cerenkov radiation are analyzed for a small radiator thickness. It is shown that the directionality of the radiation, its threshold properties, and also the dependence on the electron energy and radiator thickness differ substantially from the well known characteristics of Cerenkov radiation corresponding to the case of an unlimited particle trajectory in an extended medium. We have experimentally studied the directionality and energy characteristics of radiation excited by electrons in a mica target of thickness 12 400 A at wavelength 4000 A. The experimental results are in good agreement with the calculations

  10. Non-linear conductivity of granular superconductors: a novel breakdown problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.M.; Strenski, P.N.; Kung, D.; Doniach, S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study a percolating network of highly hysteretic Josephson junctions in which each junction is modelled as a piecewise Ohmic hysteretic device. At the percolation threshold, the average voltage drop across a network on a large L x L grid is assumed to fall to zero as V approx. (I -Isub(c)(L))sup(η), as the applied current is reduced to the critical current Isub(c)(L). The present finite-size Monte Carlo study gives the value η = 2.0 +- 0.1. This value is remarkably close to the result η = 2 obtained by a scaling analysis of a continuum version of the model. (author)

  11. Carcinogenesis from ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, L.

    1992-01-01

    Additional cases of radiations-induced cancer resulting from an increase in the effective radiation dose to the public have become a matter of public interest after the Chernobyl 'disaster'. There has since been general concern in the minds of many people that they, their children and grandchildren would develop cancer after years or even decades because of the additional radiation exposure. An attempt has been made so settle this question for good by applying the 'dose-effect relationship', a principle generally accepted in radiation protection. This dose-effect relationship, which has been recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is used in radiation protection practice in Germany, implies the existence of a linear relationship between the added radiation dose and the relative rate of additional cases of cancer caused in the public. Any added dose, even the lowest dose, increases the rate of cancer in the public. There is no radiation dose threshold below which the cancer rate would not be increased. The new dose-effect relationship presented here, however, is not linear, contains a pronounced threshold level, but constitutes a better description of reality than the model used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The essence of the new concept is derived from principles of chaos theory. (orig.) [de

  12. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, B.L.; Lieberman, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold

  13. Stage I/sub E/ recovery of electron-irradiated pure silver and of its dilute alloys with cadmium and indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizk, R.; Vajda, P.; Maury, F.; Lucasson, A.; Lucasson, P.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiations of silver specimens with electrons in the energy range 0.4--1.7 MeV were performed at liquid-helium temperatures. A subthreshold phenomenon has been observed which is taking over below approx. 750 keV. After separation of this effect, we have studied the annealing spectra of pure silver and of AgCd (25 and 50 ppm Cd) and AgIn (15 and 50 ppm In) diluted alloys following irradiation with different doses of 1.7-MeV electrons and after irradiation doping. The stage I/sub E/ recovery has been analyzed in terms of the chemical reaction rate theory. The corresponding rate equations have been solved numerically, and and the following values for the capture radii of a silver self-interstitial atom by a Cd and an In impurity were obtained: r/sub Cd//sup Ag/ = 0.15r/sub v/, r/sub In//sup Ag/ = (0.05--0.10) r/sub v/, where r/sub v/ is its annihilation radius at a vacancy. The best fit was obtained with a value of E/sub m/ = 88 meV for the migration energy of a self-interstitial

  14. Test of the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    We recently completed a compilation of radon measurements from available sources which gives the average radon level, in homes for 1730 counties, well over half of all U.S. counties and comprising about 90% of the total U.S. population. Epidemiologists normally study the relationship between mortality risks to individuals, m, vs their personal exposure, r, whereas an ecological study like ours deals with the relationship between the average risk to groups of individuals (population of counties) and their average exposure. It is well known to epidemiologists that, in general, the average dose does not determine the average risk, and to assume otherwise is called 'the ecological fallacy'. However, it is easy to show that, in testing a linear-no threshold theory, 'the ecological fallacy' does not apply; in that theory, the average dose does determine the average risk. This is widely recognized from the fact that 'person-rem' determines the number of deaths. Dividing person-rem by population gives average dose, and dividing number of deaths by population gives mortality rate. Because of the 'ecological fallacy', epidemiology textbooks often state that an ecological study cannot determine a causal relationship between risk and exposure. That may be true, but it is irrelevant here because the purpose of our study is not to determine a causal relationship; it is rather to test the linear-no threshold dependence of m on r. (author)

  15. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  16. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  17. Irradiation aging of the electronics of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS TRT Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Talk for a workshop on April 23, 2018 about Radiation effects at the LHC experiments and impact on operation and performance. Plots show the threshold drift over 2 years as is seen in the TRT and ATLAS, showing saturation of threshold drift after run 1. Other slides are studies done in 2013/2014 showing the effects of a Co-60 source on the thresholds, showing threshold drift effects at 30 kRad (effective dose in ATLAS after Run 1) and beyond. The take away from these slides is that the radiation effects saturate and stabilize after around 30 kRads

  18. Impact of radiation technique, radiation fraction dose, and total cisplatin dose on hearing. Retrospective analysis of 29 medulloblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scobioala, Sergiu; Kittel, Christopher; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Wolters, Heidi; Eich, Hans Theodor; Parfitt, Ross; Matulat, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the incidence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) resulting from different radiation techniques, fractionation dose, mean cochlear radiation dose (D mean ), and total cisplatin dose. In all, 29 children with medulloblastoma (58 ears) with subclinical pretreatment hearing thresholds participated. Radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin had been applied sequentially according to the HIT MED Guidance. Audiological outcomes up to the latest follow-up (median 2.6 years) were compared. Bilateral high-frequency SNHL was observed in 26 patients (90%). No significant differences were found in mean hearing threshold between left and right ears at any frequency. A significantly better audiological outcome (p < 0.05) was found after tomotherapy at the 6 kHz bone-conduction threshold (BCT) and left-sided 8 kHz air-conduction threshold (ACT) than after a combined radiotherapy technique (CT). Fraction dose was not found to have any impact on the incidence, degree, and time-to-onset of SNHL. Patients treated with CT had a greater risk of SNHL at high frequencies than tomotherapy patients even though D mean was similar. Increase in severity of SNHL was seen when the total cisplatin dose reached above 210 mg/m 2 , with the highest abnormal level found 8-12 months after RT regardless of radiation technique or fraction dose. The cochlear radiation dose should be kept as low as possible in patients who receive simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The risk of clinically relevant HL was shown when D mean exceeds 45 Gy independent of radiation technique or radiation regime. Cisplatin ototoxicity was shown to have a dose-dependent effect on bilateral SNHL, which was more pronounced in higher frequencies. (orig.) [de

  19. Threshold quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding

  20. Model-dependence of the CO2 threshold for melting the hard Snowball Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Peltier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical issues of the Snowball Earth hypothesis is the CO2 threshold for triggering the deglaciation. Using Community Atmospheric Model version 3.0 (CAM3, we study the problem for the CO2 threshold. Our simulations show large differences from previous results (e.g. Pierrehumbert, 2004, 2005; Le Hir et al., 2007. At 0.2 bars of CO2, the January maximum near-surface temperature is about 268 K, about 13 K higher than that in Pierrehumbert (2004, 2005, but lower than the value of 270 K for 0.1 bar of CO2 in Le Hir et al. (2007. It is found that the difference of simulation results is mainly due to model sensitivity of greenhouse effect and longwave cloud forcing to increasing CO2. At 0.2 bars of CO2, CAM3 yields 117 Wm−2 of clear-sky greenhouse effect and 32 Wm−2 of longwave cloud forcing, versus only about 77 Wm−2 and 10.5 Wm−2 in Pierrehumbert (2004, 2005, respectively. CAM3 has comparable clear-sky greenhouse effect to that in Le Hir et al. (2007, but lower longwave cloud forcing. CAM3 also produces much stronger Hadley cells than that in Pierrehumbert (2005. Effects of pressure broadening and collision-induced absorption are also studied using a radiative-convective model and CAM3. Both effects substantially increase surface temperature and thus lower the CO2 threshold. The radiative-convective model yields a CO2 threshold of about 0.21 bars with surface albedo of 0.663. Without considering the effects of pressure broadening and collision-induced absorption, CAM3 yields an approximate CO2 threshold of about 1.0 bar for surface albedo of about 0.6. However, the threshold is lowered to 0.38 bars as both effects are considered.

  1. Epidemiology and risk assessment for radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwe, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    The hazard and exposures from radiation are known with reasonable accuracy. However, at 'low levels' uncertainty persists as to whether the dose response relationship is linear and whether there is a dose threshold, below which there is no risk. Some have proposed that 'low' exposures to radiation may be beneficial, a hypothesis referred to as 'hormesis'. Over recent decades, various expert groups have adopted linear no-threshold dose-response models for radiation and cancer, based on review of epidemiological and biological evidence. The unexpected epidemic of thyroid cancer among children following the Chernobyl disaster was noticed. The research with epidemiological data and knowledge of the radionuclides to which the children were exposed is needed. Currently a debate concerning potential risks of high frequency electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones illustrates another need for further research

  2. Perspectives on what we formerly called threshold limit values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    From the point of view of an epidemiologist with experience in community air quality standards, occupational health standards, radiation standards, and water quality standards, reasons are given for discarding the assumption that occupational health protection should be based on threshold concepts. The weakness of worker health protection based on prescription of maximal exposure levels is noted, regardless of whose judgement is used for such levels. 37 references

  3. Leukemia and ionizing radiation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler & Associates Inc., Vaughan, Ontario (Canada); Welsh, J.S. [Loyola University-Chicago, Dept. or Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 19508 to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. This brief article revisits the second of two key studies, which revolutionized radiation protection, and identifies a serious error that was missed. This error in analyzing the leukemia incidence among the 195,000 survivors, in the combined exposed populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, invalidates use of the LNT model for assessing the risk of cancer from ionizing radiation. The threshold acute dose for radiation-induced leukemia, based on about 96,800 humans, is identified to be about 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv. It is reasonable to expect that the thresholds for other cancer types are higher than this level. No predictions or hints of excess cancer risk (or any other health risk) should be made for an acute exposure below this value until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  4. Advanced p-MOSFET Ionizing-Radiation Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Circuit measures total dose of ionizing radiation in terms of shift in threshold gate voltage of doped-channel metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (p-MOSFET). Drain current set at temperature-independent point to increase accuracy in determination of radiation dose.

  5. Electrical resistivity and dechanneling study of radiation defects in iron by 235U fission fragments (F.F.). I - Study of damage induced by F.F. Irradiation at 20K. II - Recovery of radiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, Nicole.

    1979-09-01

    The irradiation by 235 U fission fragments (F.F.) of two iron samples of different purities (the essential impurity being C) have been studied. Comparative measurements of electrical resistivity and dechanneling of 5 MeV α-particles have been made during irradiation and subsequent recovery. The production curves provide, from their slopes at the origin, the following informations: 14000 Frenkel pairs by F.F. (from electrical resistivity); aggregate's rate: 5 per mille (from dechanneling). These curves do not follow a simple law: it seems that one observes the superposition of two saturation mechanisms with very different kinetics. During recovery, the same stages that after electrons or neutrons irradiation are observed, but with very different proportions. Dechanneling puts in evidence: -great modifications in cementite precipitation of an Fe-C alloy, by irradiation; - the recovery stage of loops starting from 800 K and with an activation energy approximately 1 eV; - the preponderant effect of clustering during stages Isub(D), Isub(E), IIsub(C) and IIsub(D) [fr

  6. Features and performance of a large gas Cherenkov detector with threshold regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Alvarez-Taviel, J.; Asenjo, L.; Colino, N.; Diez-Hedo. F.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Hernandez, J.J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Marquina, M.A.

    1988-01-15

    We present here the development, main features and calibration procedures for a new type of gas Cherenkov detector, based upon the ability to control its threshold by regulating the temperature of the gas used as radiator. We also include the performance of this detector in particle identification.

  7. Risk evaluation - conventional and low level effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1984-04-01

    Any discussion of the risk of exposure to potentially-hazardous agents in the environment inevitably involves the question of whether the dose effect curve is of the threshold or linear, non-threshold type. A principal objective of this presentation is to show that the function is actually two separate relationships, each representing distinctly different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different disciplines (i.e., the threshold function, of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Medicine [PTM]; the linear, non-threshold function, of Public Health including safety and accident statistics [PHS]). It is shown that low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation falls clearly in the PHS category. A function for cell dose vs. the fraction of single cell quantal responses is characterized, which reflects the absolute and relative sensitivities of cells. Acceptance of this function would obviate any requirement for the use in Radiation Protection of the concepts of a standard radiation, Q, dose equivalent and rem. 9 references, 4 figures

  8. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved

  9. Development of semiconductor radiation sensors for portable alarm-dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Moon, B. S.; Chung, C. E.; Hong, S. B.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Han, S. H.; Lee, W. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    We studied Semiconductor Radiation Sensors for Portable Alarm-Dosimeter. We calculated response functions for gamma energy 0.021, 0.122, 0.662, 0.835, 1.2 MeV using EGS4 codes. When we measured at various distance from source to detector, the detection efficiency of Si semiconductor detector was better than that of GM tube. The linear absorption coefficients of steel and aluminum plate were measured. These experimental results of the response of detector for intensity of radiation field coincide to the theoretical expectation. The count value of Si detector was changed with changing thickness of steel as changing threshold voltage of discriminator, and the linear absorption coefficient increased with increasing threshold voltage. Radiation detection efficiency shows difference at each threshold voltage condition. This results coincided to the theoretical simulation. 33 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  10. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, André L., E-mail: andre.moura@fis.ufal.br [Grupo de Física da Matéria Condensada, Núcleo de Ciências Exatas – NCEx, Campus Arapiraca, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57309-005, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Fewo, Serge I. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé (Cameroon); Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N. [Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  11. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  12. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  13. Energy window selection for a radiation signal processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, G.F.; Schrader, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus and method for selecting only meaningful information from signals produced by Anger-type radioisotope cameras producing positional information. It is an improvement in the means for determining energy threshold values as a function of radiation event positional information. The establishment of an energy threshold table begins by flooding the camera face with a uniform source of radiation and utilizing the pre-established spatial translation table to reposition detected radiation events according to their true spatial element coordinates. A histogram is compiled for each spatial element, the histogram comprising the number of radiation events occurring at several discrete energy levels. A peak centroid value is then determined for each element, and an initial energy window is set. Next, a specified region of the camera field of view is inspected to determine a target sum of radiation events to be accepted by each element, setting a standard for adjusting the energy windows of each element. Using this standard, the energy window for each element is progressively adapted so that each will accept nearly the same number of radiation events or counts in response to a flood or calibration image. Finally the energy window for each true spatial element is translated back to its apparent spatial element and incorporated into an energy threshold table accessible by the apparent spatial coordinates of each radiation event

  14. On the existence of a threshold in the dose-response relationship from the epidemiological data of atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tatsuo; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    2002-01-01

    Whether or not there is a threshold dose in the dose-response relationship for cancer incidence due to radiation is one of the most important but controversial issues in radiation protection and nuclear policy making. The epidemiological studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) group of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, conducted by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) have been regarded to be most authentic, and they keep the view that there is no evidence to deny the linear non-threshold (LNT) hypotheses. The authors have claimed the necessity of reassessment of exposure doses of survivors, by considering the contribution of chronic dose, which comes from fall-out, induced radioactivity, and early entrance near the center of the city. The authors also have stressed the importance of the cases of if 'not-in-city' survivors, frequently reported to be fatal by the heavy chronic exposure. Recently we have noticed that the appearance of acute radiation symptoms is an important index for estimating total dose. In this paper, based on Obos statistical data (in 1957) for the acute symptoms observed for various category of survivors, we present an estimation of the average chronic dose of survivors, which should be added to the instantaneous dose for the directly exposed groups. By assuming the threshold for the appearance of the acute symptom such as epilation as 0.5 Sv, average chronic dose of 0.32 Sv was estimated for all survivors. Then the present dose-response relationship for cancer incidence should be shifted to the right hand side by this amount, and the value of about 0.32 Sv or more is suggested as the threshold for cancer incidence in low radiation level region

  15. Radiation and Homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, T.; Nikaido, O.; Niwa, O.

    2002-01-01

    These proceedings aim to promote the understanding of the health hazard of radiation at low dose range and to construct a more solid basis for radiation safety policy. Radiation hazard has been the central issue of investigation in the field of radiation research. The two major approaches are mechanistic analysis by laboratory investigation and phenomenological analysis of radiation-exposed population as represented by epidemiology. In an increasingly safety-conscious society, the extremely low level risk associated with low dose of radiation has become an important issue. In this area, the phenomenological approach has a limit. DNA damage is the primary and direct cause of the risk. Tremendous progress has been made recently in the basic understanding of radiation effects on cells and tissues and the importance of damage response rather than damage itself. This challenges the classical linear non-threshold hypothesis

  16. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique. (author)

  17. Energy efficiency of the CTX magnetized coaxial plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Platts, D.A.; McKenna, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The energy efficiency of the CTX coaxial plasma source in creating spheromaks is determined experimentally to be in agreement with the theoretical prediction of lambda/sub sp//lambda/sub g/, where del x B = lambda/sub sp/ B in the spheromak, and lambda/sub g/ identical with μ 0 I/sub g//phi/sub g/ with I/sub g/ the source current and phi/sub g/ the magnetic flux through either source electrode. This is shown to be equivalent to magnetic helicity conservation. The spheromak impurity radiation was measured using an absolutely calibrated single chord bolometer system. The theoretical efficiency is within the experimental uncertainty of the ratio of spheromak radiated energy to source input energy in a group of ''dirty'' discharges. But the radiation measurement uncertainty is too large to determine whether a substantial part of the excess source energy not used in the production of spheromak magnetic energy is radiated from the spheromak volume

  18. The reduction of I{sub 2} by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J M; Hnatiw, J B [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.; Sims, H E [AEA Technology, Harwell Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    The reduction of iodine by hydrogen peroxide is an important process which leads to a lower amount of molecular iodine in irradiated solutions of iodide as the pH is increased. There is quite a large amount of information on the reaction now but no consensus in the literature on the mechanisms for reaction and the generally accepted mechanism does not appear to be correct. A number of studies of the kinetics of the reaction in the pH range 2-7 have been carried out where the iodine reduction process exhibited a 1/[H{sup +}]{sup 2} dependence consistent with the proposed mechanism which were attributed primarily to the reaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with IO{sup -}. Deviations were observed in the pH range 6-7 and were explained by incorporating the reaction of I{sub 2}OH{sup -} with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In some other experiments it was suggested that the failure to maintain a 1/[H{sup +}]{sup 2} dependence at high pH was due to the iodine hydrolysis being rate determining. Data from an experimental program performed at AECL described in this paper confirms that the 1/[H{sup +}]{sup 2} dependence does not hold at high pH. These studies were carried out as a function of acid, iodide, peroxide and buffer concentration for three buffers, barbital, citrate and phosphate. This paper discuss two mechanisms which involve the formation of an HOOI intermediate in the rate determining step and which adequately describe the experimental data. (author) 4 figs., 2 tabs., 23 refs.

  19. The influence of infrared radiation on short-term ultraviolet-radiation-induced injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidbey, K.H.; Witkowski, T.A.; Kligman, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because heat has been reported to influence adversely short- and long-term ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced skin damage in animals, we investigated the short-term effects of infrared radiation on sunburn and on phototoxic reactions to topical methoxsalen and anthracene in human volunteers. Prior heating of the skin caused suppression of the phototoxic response to methoxsalen as evidenced by an increase in the threshold erythema dose. Heat administered either before or after exposure to UV radiation had no detectable influence on sunburn erythema or on phototoxic reactions provoked by anthracene

  20. On the existence of a luminosity threshold of GRB jets in massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloy, M. A.; Cuesta-Martínez, C.; Obergaulinger, M.

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the many associations of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) with energetic supernova (SN) explosions, we study the propagation of relativistic jets within the progenitor star in which a SN shock wave may be launched briefly before the jets start to propagate. Based on analytic considerations and verified with an extensive set of 2D axisymmetric relativistic hydrodynamic simulations, we have estimated a threshold intrinsic jet luminosity, L_j^thr, for successfully launching a jet. This threshold depends on the structure of the progenitor and, thus, it is sensitive to its mass and to its metallicity. For a prototype host of cosmological long GRBs, a low-metallicity star of 35 M⊙, it is L_j^thr˜eq 1.35× 10^{49} erg s-1. The observed equivalent isotropic γ-ray luminosity, L_{γ ,iso,BO} ˜eq 4 ɛ _γ L_j θ _BO^{-2}, crucially depends on the jet opening angle after breakout, θBO, and on the efficiency for converting the intrinsic jet luminosity into γ-radiation, ɛγ. Highly energetic jets can produce low-luminosity events if either their opening angle after the breakout is large, which is found in our models, or if the conversion efficiency of kinetic and internal energy into radiation is low enough. Beyond this theoretical analysis, we show how the presence of a SN shock wave may reduce this luminosity threshold by means of numerical simulations. We foresee that the high-energy transients released by jets produced near the luminosity threshold will be more similar to llGRBs or XRFs than to GRBs.

  1. Information rates of radiation as a photon gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The information rates achievable with a photon-gas model of electromagnetic radiation are studied. At any frequency, information rates over the photon-gas model essentially coincide with the Shannon capacity when the signal-to-noise ratio is below a threshold. Only above the threshold does the

  2. Cancer and low dose responses in vivo: implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection practices assume that cancer risk is linearly proportional to total dose, without a threshold, both for people with normal cancer risk and for people who may be genetically cancer prone. Mice heterozygous for the Tp 53 gene are cancer prone, and their increased risk from high doses was not different from Tp 53 normal mice. However, in either Tp 53 normal or heterozygous mice, a single low dose of low LET radiation given at low dose rate protected against both spontaneous and radiation-induced cancer by increasing tumor latency. Increased tumor latency without a cancer frequency change implies that low doses in vivo primarily slow the process of genomic instability, consistent with the elevated capacity for correct DSB rejoining seen in low dose exposed cells. The in vivo animal data indicates that, for low doses and low dose rates in both normal and cancer prone adult mice, risk does not increase linearly with dose, and dose thresholds for increased risk exist. Below those dose thresholds (which are influenced by Tp 53 function) overall risk is reduced below that of unexposed control mice, indicating that Dose Rate Effectiveness Factors (DREF) may approach infinity, rather than the current assumption of 2. However, as dose decreases, different tissues appear to have different thresholds at which detriment turns to protection, indicating that individual tissue weighting factors (Wt) are also not constant, but vary from positive values to zero with decreasing dose. Measurements of Relative Biological Effect between high and low LET radiations are used to establish radiation weighting factors (Wr) used in radiation protection, and these are also assumed to be constant with dose. However, since the risk from an exposure to low LET radiation is not constant with dose, it would seem unlikely that radiation-weighting factors for high LET radiation are actually constant at low dose and dose rate

  3. Theory of threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2002-01-01

    Theory of Threshold Phenomena in Quantum Scattering is developed in terms of Reduced Scattering Matrix. Relationships of different types of threshold anomalies both to nuclear reaction mechanisms and to nuclear reaction models are established. Magnitude of threshold effect is related to spectroscopic factor of zero-energy neutron state. The Theory of Threshold Phenomena, based on Reduced Scattering Matrix, does establish relationships between different types of threshold effects and nuclear reaction mechanisms: the cusp and non-resonant potential scattering, s-wave threshold anomaly and compound nucleus resonant scattering, p-wave anomaly and quasi-resonant scattering. A threshold anomaly related to resonant or quasi resonant scattering is enhanced provided the neutron threshold state has large spectroscopic amplitude. The Theory contains, as limit cases, Cusp Theories and also results of different nuclear reactions models as Charge Exchange, Weak Coupling, Bohr and Hauser-Feshbach models. (author)

  4. The scientific basis for the establishment of threshold levels and dose response relationships of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency hosted a two day Symposium from 2-3 December 1974 at its Headquarters, organized by the 'International Academy for Environmental Safety and the Forum fur Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Politik' on the subject 'Scientific Basis for the Establishment of Threshold. Levels and Dose Response Relationships of Carcinogenesis'. Following an introductory paper by the Radiation Biology Section of the Agency on 'Radiation Carcinogenesis - Dose Response Relationship, Threshold and Risk Estimates', a series of papers dealt with this problem in chemical carcinogenesis.It was suggested that more experiments should be done using non-human primates for tests of carcinogens, especially chemicals. Preliminary experiments using monkeys with a potent carcinogen - nitrosoamine - indicate that there could possibly be a dose where no effect can be observed during the 5 year period of study. It was also pointed out that the overall cost/benefit and risk/ benefit relationships should be taken into consideration in determining limits for chemicals which are potentially carcinogenic but are used routinely by the public and industries; these considerations have been weighed in setting exposure limits for radiation

  5. [Electromagnetic fields of mobile telephone systems--thresholds, effects and risks for cochlear implant patients and healthy people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, F; Langer, J; Begall, K

    2008-11-01

    Every day life is detectably affected by manifold natural sources of electromagnetic fields (EMF), e. g. infrared radiation, light and the terrestrial magnetic field. However, there is still uncertainty about the consequences or hazards of artificial EMF, which emerge from mobile phone or wireless network (wireless local area network [WLAN]) services, for instance. Following recommendations of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) the German Commission on Radiation Protection (SSK) defined corresponding thresholds for high frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) in 2003. By observing those thresholds HF-EMF is thought to be innocent so far. However, there is still controversial discussion about induction of cancer or neurovegetative symptoms due to inconsistent study results. Patients with cochlea implants are of particular interest within the speciality of otorhinolaryngology due to specific hazards, which arise during mobile telephone use from the distance between brain and inductive metal implants (electrode) on the one hand and the electronic system of the cochlear implant and the source of HF-EMF on the other hand. Besides many studies about the impact of HF-EMF on common welfare, there are only very few surveys (n = 6) covering the effects on patients with cochlear implants. The purpose of this paper is to overview sources, thresholds and subsequently harmful or harmless effects of HFEMF. Due to the current state of knowledge about the impact of mobile phone use on health, we assume, that HF-EMF are harmless both for healthy people and patients with cochlea implants, provided that legal thresholds are observed.

  6. Time-over-threshold readout to enhance the high flux capabilities of single-photon-counting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Stoppani, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The MYTHEN photon-counting ASIC operated in time-over-threshold mode shows an innovative approach towards the development of a detector operating with very high photon intensities while maintaining the single-photon sensitivity for synchrotron radiation experiments. The MYTHEN single-photon-counting (SPC) detector has been characterized using the time-over-threshold (ToT) readout method, i.e. measuring the time that the signal produced by the detected X-rays remains above the comparator threshold. In the following it is shown that the ToT readout preserves the sensitivity, dynamic range and capability of background suppression of the SPC mode, while enhancing the count-rate capability, which is the main limitation of state-of-the-art SPC systems

  7. Time-over-threshold readout to enhance the high flux capabilities of single-photon-counting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, Anna, E-mail: anna.bergamaschi@psi.ch; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Stoppani, Laura [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-11-01

    The MYTHEN photon-counting ASIC operated in time-over-threshold mode shows an innovative approach towards the development of a detector operating with very high photon intensities while maintaining the single-photon sensitivity for synchrotron radiation experiments. The MYTHEN single-photon-counting (SPC) detector has been characterized using the time-over-threshold (ToT) readout method, i.e. measuring the time that the signal produced by the detected X-rays remains above the comparator threshold. In the following it is shown that the ToT readout preserves the sensitivity, dynamic range and capability of background suppression of the SPC mode, while enhancing the count-rate capability, which is the main limitation of state-of-the-art SPC systems.

  8. Particles near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, T.; Willenbrock, S.

    1993-01-01

    We propose returning to the definition of the width of a particle in terms of the pole in the particle's propagator. Away from thresholds, this definition of width is equivalent to the standard perturbative definition, up to next-to-leading order; however, near a threshold, the two definitions differ significantly. The width as defined by the pole position provides more information in the threshold region than the standard perturbative definition and, in contrast with the perturbative definition, does not vanish when a two-particle s-wave threshold is approached from below

  9. Pros and cons of the revolution in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    In 1959, the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) chose the LNT (Linear No-Threshold) model as an assumption to form the basis for regulating radiation protection. During the 1999 UNSCEAR session, held in April in Vienna, the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis was discussed. Among other LNT-related subjects, the Committee discussed the problem of collective dose and dose commitment. These concepts have been introduced in the early 1960s, as the offspring of the linear no-threshold assumption. At the time they reflected a deep concern about the induction of hereditary effects by nuclear tests fallout. Almost four decades later, collective dose and dose commitment are still widely used, although by now both the concepts and the concern should have faded into oblivion. It seems that the principles and concepts of radiation protection have gone astray and have led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations. Revision of these principles and concepts is now being proposed by an increasing number of scientists and several organisations

  10. Future development of biological understanding of radiation protection: implications of nonstochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; McClellan, R.O.; Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-protection standards are based on minimizing or preventing biological effects in exposed populations. Radiation-induced biological effects can be classified as stochastic--malignant and hereditary diseases for which the probability of an effect occurring is a function of dose without threshold--and nonstochastic--inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which the severity and frequency of the effect varies with the dose and for which a threshold is present. The current International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) approach for setting limits for intakes of radionuclides by workers, which accounts for doses to significantly exposed organs of the body, is based on limitation of stochastic effects in most situations. When setting exposure limits, nonstochastic effects are generally considered to be unlikely at the limits for stochastic effects. In some situations, limits based on prevention of nonstochastic effects are lower than for stochastic effects. This review considers the threshold radiation doses for thyroid, bone, liver and lung and their relationship to the limits recommended by the ICRP and the cancer risks at the limits. This review indicates that the threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in thyroid and lung is much above the dose limit as advocated by ICRP. The threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in bone and liver is much closer to the dose limit, but protection from nonstochastic effects should still be afforded by the dose limits

  11. Radiation-induced changes in taste acuity in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.; Henkin, R.I.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in taste acuity were measured in 27 patients with various forms of cancer who received radiation to the head and neck region. In 9 of these patients (group I), measurements of taste acuity were made more than 1 year after completion of radiation therapy. In the other 18 patients (group II), taste measurements were made before, during, and approximately 1 month after radiation therapy. Taste acuity was measured for four taste qualities (salt, sweet, sour, and bitter) by a forced choice-three stimulus drop technique which measured detection and recognition thresholds and by a forced scaling technique which measured taste intensity responsiveness. In group II patients, impaired acuity, as indicated by elevated detection and recognition thresholds, was observed approximately 3 weeks after initiation of radiotherapy. The bitter and salt qualities showed the earliest and greatest impairment and the sweet quality the least. Taste intensity responsiveness also was impaired in group II patients. As for thresholds, scaling impairment was most severe for bitter and salt taste qualities. Scaling impairment occurred before changes in either detection or recognition thresholds. Detection and recognition thresholds determined in group I patients also showed salt and bitter qualities were affected more severely than either sweet or sour qualities. Zinc administration to group I patients in an uncontrolled study suggested that zinc therapy may be useful in ameliorating taste impairment in some patients. These results suggest that taste loss may be a factor in the anorexia and weight loss that is observed commonly in patients who have undergone radiation treatment. Correction of this abnormality may be useful in aiding the nutritional status of these patients

  12. RAMOS - the radiation monitoring system of the Umweltforschungsinstitut Global 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exler, M.; Schmittner, W.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation early warning system RAMOS (radiation monitoring system) measures the radioactivity of the areas surrounding nuclear technical facilities (at present, around the Nuclear Power Plants Dukovany and Mochovce). Measurements are taken with Gamma-radiation devices of the type RS 03/X by the firm BITT- Technology. These devices are measuring equipment of the type Proportion-count tube with a detection range of 10 nSv/h to 10 Sv/h. The measuring stations consist of this Gamma measuring equipment, a personal computer with modem, back-up electricity devices and meteorological measuring devices. Six such measuring stations surrounding the facility comprise a complete measuring ring. The values are measured each minute. Considering the normal fluctuation in radiation measurements due to geology and weather conditions and the average background radiation, a certain alarm threshold is defined (on all stations this threshold is under 230 nSv/h). If this threshold is breached, immediately the data is transmitted through telephone lines and is received by the central office. Because of the short reaction time and low threshold, valuable time is gained for an emergency response by government agencies and the population. Official warning of the government agencies occurs after fulfilling the commendation of the Austrian Radiation Protection Commission. In the continued measurements from the end of 1994 to 2000 at NPP Dukovany and continuous measurements from NPP Mochovce from mid-1999 to the end of 2000, there was not a detection of dangerous levels of radiation were released into the atmosphere. After close examination of the measured data, different types of fluctuations could be observed - such as during the day-time period and short-term peaks after rain-fall. Detailed knowledge about trends in these fluctuations, allows an easier continual evaluation of a potential accident. The measured data is given to the public in graphic form every month via the Internet

  13. Radiation hardening of MOS devices by boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchenko, V.

    1975-01-01

    A novel technique is disclosed for radiation hardening of MOS devices and specifically for stabilizing the gate threshold potential at room temperature of a radiation subjected MOS field-effect device of the type having a semiconductor substrate, an insulating layer of oxide on the substrate, and a gate electrode disposed on the insulating layer. In the preferred embodiment, the novel inventive technique contemplates the introduction of boron into the insulating oxide, the boron being introduced within a layer of the oxide of about 100A to 300A thickness immediately adjacent the semiconductor-insulator interface. The concentration of boron in the oxide layer is preferably maintained on the order of 10 atoms/ cm 3 . The novel technique serves to reduce and substantially annihilate radiation induced positive gate charge accumulations, which accumulations, if not eliminated, would cause shifting of the gate threshold potential of a radiation subjected MOS device, and thus render the device unstable and/or inoperative. (auth)

  14. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  15. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N 2 and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N 2 , C 2 H 4 , and CH 3 Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies

  16. Supra-threshold epidermis injury from near-infrared laser radiation prior to ablation onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Peterson, Amanda M.; Lile, Lily A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Stolarski, David J.; Zohner, Justin J.; Kumru, Semih S.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    With continued advancement of solid-state laser technology, high-energy lasers operating in the near-infrared (NIR) band are being applied in an increasing number of manufacturing techniques and medical treatments. Safety-related investigations of potentially harmful laser interaction with skin are commonplace, consisting of establishing the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) thresholds under various conditions, often utilizing the minimally-visible lesion (MVL) metric as an indication of damage. Likewise, characterization of ablation onset and velocity is of interest for therapeutic and surgical use, and concerns exceptionally high irradiance levels. However, skin injury response between these two exposure ranges is not well understood. This study utilized a 1070-nm Yb-doped, diode-pumped fiber laser to explore the response of excised porcine skin tissue to high-energy exposures within the supra-threshold injury region without inducing ablation. Concurrent high-speed videography was employed to assess the effect on the epidermis, with a dichotomous response determination given for three progressive damage event categories: observable permanent distortion on the surface, formation of an epidermal bubble due to bounded intra-cutaneous water vaporization, and rupture of said bubble during laser exposure. ED50 values were calculated for these categories under various pulse configurations and beam diameters, and logistic regression models predicted injury events with approximately 90% accuracy. The distinction of skin response into categories of increasing degrees of damage expands the current understanding of high-energy laser safety while also underlining the unique biophysical effects during induced water phase change in tissue. These observations could prove useful in augmenting biothermomechanical models of laser exposure in the supra-threshold region.

  17. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  18. Radiation Damage in Electronic Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Fetahović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behavior of semiconductor memories exposed to radiation in order to establish their applicability in a radiation environment. The experimental procedure has been used to test radiation hardness of commercial semiconductor memories. Different types of memory chips have been exposed to indirect ionizing radiation by changing radiation dose intensity. The effect of direct ionizing radiation on semiconductor memory behavior has been analyzed by using Monte Carlo simulation method. Obtained results show that gamma radiation causes decrease in threshold voltage, being proportional to the absorbed dose of radiation. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation interaction with material proved to be significant and can be a good estimation tool in probing semiconductor memory behavior in radiation environment.

  19. The development of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    The harm that might be caused by radiation exposure was recognised within months of Rontgen's discovery of X-rays, and recommendations for protection of patients and workers with radiation were formulated first in 1928. In the light of increasing radiobiological, genetic and human epidemiological evidence, it became clear that there might be no threshold, below which harmful effects did not occur. Recommendation and practice in radiation protection reflected this opinion from the early 1950's, and emphasised the consequent need for minimising exposures, quantifying risks and revising the dose limits appropriate for internal radiation of body organs. (author)

  20. Threshold effects on renormalization group running of neutrino parameters in the low-scale seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Johannes; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2011-01-01

    We show that, in the low-scale type-I seesaw model, renormalization group running of neutrino parameters may lead to significant modifications of the leptonic mixing angles in view of so-called seesaw threshold effects. Especially, we derive analytical formulas for radiative corrections to neutrino parameters in crossing the different seesaw thresholds, and show that there may exist enhancement factors efficiently boosting the renormalization group running of the leptonic mixing angles. We find that, as a result of the seesaw threshold corrections to the leptonic mixing angles, various flavor symmetric mixing patterns (e.g., bi-maximal and tri-bimaximal mixing patterns) can be easily accommodated at relatively low energy scales, which is well within the reach of running and forthcoming experiments (e.g., the LHC).

  1. Music effect on pain threshold evaluated with current perception threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Music relieves anxiety and psychotic tension. This effect of music is applied to surgical operation in the hospital and dental office. It is still unclear whether this music effect is only limited to the psychological aspect but not to the physical aspect or whether its music effect is influenced by the mood or emotion of audience. To elucidate these issues, we evaluated the music effect on pain threshold by current perception threshold (CPT) and profile of mood states (POMC) test. METHODS: Healthy 30 subjects (12 men, 18 women, 25-49 years old, mean age 34.9) were tested. (1)After POMC test, all subjects were evaluated pain threshold with CPT by Neurometer (Radionics, USA) under 6 conditions, silence, listening to the slow tempo classic music, nursery music, hard rock music, classic paino music and relaxation music with 30 seconds interval. (2)After Stroop color word test as the stresser, pain threshold was evaluated with CPT under 2 conditions, silence and listening to the slow tempo classic music. RESULTS: Under litening to the music, CPT sores increased, especially 2 000 Hz level related with compression, warm and pain sensation. Type of music, preference of music and stress also affected CPT score. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that the concentration on the music raise the pain threshold and that stress and mood influence the music effect on pain threshold.

  2. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, Laura Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N2 and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N2, C2H4, and CH3Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  3. Espectroscopia de fotoelétrons de limiares de átomos e moléculas Atomic and molecular threshold photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Andreolli Lopes

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A threshold photoelectron spectrometer applied to the study of atomic and molecular threshold photoionization processes is described. The spectrometer has been used in conjunction with a toroidal grating monochromator at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (LNLS, Brazil. It can be tuned to accept threshold electrons (< 20 meV and work with a power resolution of 716 (~18 meV at 12 eV with a high signal/noise ratio. The performance of this apparatus and some characteristics of the TGM (Toroidal Grating Monochromator beam line of LNLS are described and discussed by means of argon, O2 and N2 threshold photoelectron spectra.

  4. Analytical signals from cancer patients following radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Reinstein, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer patients are treated with high energy (8 to 30 MeV) gamma radiation. This treatment modality provides better depth dose distribution than more conventional low-energy gamma treatments, in particular for deeply located tumors. A by-product of the high-energy treatment is gamma-induced activity in the treatment volume following photonuclear reactions. These reactions are endogenic and require that the gamma radiation energy be above threshold value in order for the reaction to take place. For most elements, the threshold value is above 8 MeV; however, for low Z elements, this threshold may reach 18 MeV as is the case for oxygen. The cross sections for the (γ, n) reactions are few millibarns for low Z elements and increases up to few hundreds of millibarns for the heavy elements. The radionuclides resulting from photonuclear reaction are typically positron emitter or decay by electron capture. Thus, it is possible to monitor either the annihilation radiation (511 KeV) or the characteristic gamma radiation. The present work demonstrates that the activity induced in cancer patients following a single treatment (300 rad) enables the monitoring of nitrogen and phosphorus in the irradiated volume. The results from measurements in phantom, cadavers, and cancer patients from different regions in the body are presented. The hypothesis to be tested is whether there are local changes in these two elements during the course of radiation treatment which might correlate with the efficacy of the treatment

  5. Proton Irradiation of InAs/AlSb/GaSb Resonant Interband Tunneling Diodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magno, R; Weaver, B. D; Bracker, A. S; Bennett, B. R

    2001-01-01

    ...(+)/sq cm, respectively. The current due to radiation-induced defects has a nonlinear voltage dependence with a large increase occurring in the voltage range between the negative resistance peak and the valley. I(sub p...

  6. The Comparison Study of Quadratic Infinite Beam Program on Optimization Instensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning (IMRTP) between Threshold and Exponential Scatter Method with CERR® In The Case of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardiyanti, Y; Haekal, M; Waris, A; Haryanto, F

    2016-01-01

    This research compares the quadratic optimization program on Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning (IMRTP) with the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) software. We assumed that the number of beams used for the treatment planner was about 9 and 13 beams. The case used the energy of 6 MV with Source Skin Distance (SSD) of 100 cm from target volume. Dose calculation used Quadratic Infinite beam (QIB) from CERR. CERR was used in the comparison study between Gauss Primary threshold method and Gauss Primary exponential method. In the case of lung cancer, the threshold variation of 0.01, and 0.004 was used. The output of the dose was distributed using an analysis in the form of DVH from CERR. The maximum dose distributions obtained were on the target volume (PTV) Planning Target Volume, (CTV) Clinical Target Volume, (GTV) Gross Tumor Volume, liver, and skin. It was obtained that if the dose calculation method used exponential and the number of beam 9. When the dose calculation method used the threshold and the number of beam 13, the maximum dose distributions obtained were on the target volume PTV, GTV, heart, and skin. (paper)

  7. Threshold resummation and the total cross section for top quark production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.L.; Contopanagos, H.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the motivation for resummation of the effects of initial-state soft gluon radiation, to all orders in the strong coupling strength, for processes in which the near-threshold region in the partonic subenergy is important. We summarize our calculation of the total cross section for top quark production at hadron colliders. Comments are included on the differences between our treatment of subleading logarithmic terms and other methods

  8. Radiation area monitor device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Stowe, Ashley C.; Petrovic, Toni; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Kosicek, Andrej

    2018-01-30

    A radiation area monitor device/method, utilizing: a radiation sensor; a rotating radiation shield disposed about the radiation sensor, wherein the rotating radiation shield defines one or more ports that are transparent to radiation; and a processor operable for analyzing and storing a radiation fingerprint acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor. Optionally, the radiation sensor includes a gamma and/or neutron radiation sensor. The device/method selectively operates in: a first supervised mode during which a baseline radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor; and a second unsupervised mode during which a subsequent radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor, wherein the subsequent radiation fingerprint is compared to the baseline radiation fingerprint and, if a predetermined difference threshold is exceeded, an alert is issued.

  9. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: Possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers. PMID:25483826

  10. 21 century perspective in radiation protection of humans and human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2003-01-01

    In 21 century ionizing radiation is applied in all field of human activities. In parallel, the radiobiology and radiation medicine are developing as separate branches for the purposes of the radiation protection: for risk estimation and regulation of the human irradiation. Main features of radiation protection at the beginning of the century are: 1.Well developed conservative theoretical background, based on the linear non-threshold concept 'dose-effect' towards the carcinogenesis and genetic effects; 2. Developed international and national structures, including organizations as ICRP, UNSCEAR, ICRU, IAEA, WHO, FAO, BEIR, OECD/NEA, ILO, NCRP, NRPB etc. 3. Detailed regulative legislation for all cases of human irradiation, combines with effective control structures. Ionizing radiation is the most strictly regulated factor affecting humans among the all adverse impacts of the living environment. The expectations for the radiation protection in 21 century are: 1. A radical reassessment of the concept for low doses and the linear non-threshold concept since data for existing of a threshold on the human population level. 2. Taking into consideration of the the adaptation to the irradiation, comparable with the natural radiation background. 3. Taking into consideration of the radiation hormesis, which are now ignored by the risk theory. 4. Clarification of the questions of the genetic effects, which are not yet determined for the human population. 5. Radical solutions of the radioactive waste problem, which will be crucial for the future of the nuclear energy production. 6. Gradual overcoming of the fear from ionizing radiation, which is an important social factor

  11. Design optimization of radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts in CMOS integrated circuits will drastically degrade circuit performance unless the design parameters related to the fabrication process are properly chosen. To formulate an approach to CMOS design optimization, experimentally observed analytical relationships showing strong dependences between threshold voltage shifts and silicon dioxide thickness are utilized. These measurements were made using radiation-hardened aluminum-gate CMOS inverter circuits and have been corroborated by independent data taken from MOS capacitor structures. Knowledge of these relationships allows one to define ranges of acceptable CMOS design parameters based upon radiation-hardening capabilities and post-irradiation performance specifications. Furthermore, they permit actual design optimization of CMOS integrated circuits which results in optimum pre- and post-irradiation performance with respect to speed, noise margins, and quiescent power consumption. Theoretical and experimental results of these procedures, the applications of which can mean the difference between failure and success of a CMOS integrated circuit in a radiation environment, are presented

  12. Comparison of six methods of segmentation of tumor volume on the {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET scan with reference histological volume in non small cell bronchopulmonary cancers; Comparaison de six methodes de segmentation du volume tumoral sur la {sup 18}F-FDG TEP-TDM avec le volume de reference anatomopathologique dans les cancers bronchopulmonaires non a petites cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venel, Y.; Garhi, H.; Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier-Aesch, C. [CHRU de Tours-Bretonneau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 37 - Tours (France); Muret, A. de [CHRU de Tours-Bretonneau, Service de Radiotherapie, 37 - Tours (France); Barillot, I. [CHRU de Tours-Bretonneau, Service d' Anatomopathologie, 37 - Tours (France)

    2008-06-15

    The {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET has demonstrated its importance in oncology, for initial extension and efficacy of anti tumoral therapeutics. Several studies have attempted to prove its utility to define tumoral volumes for conformational radiotherapy in non small cell lung cancers. Some authors have suggested the use of threshold of tumor intensity uptake with 40 or 50% of maximal intensity. Black et al. have determined contouring with linear regression formula of mean semi-quantitative index of tumor uptake (standard uptake value): SUV{sub threshold} = 0.307 Sub{sub average} + 0.588. Nestle et al. have taken into account the background noise intensity and mean intensity of the tumor: I{sub threshold} = {beta} I{sub average} +I{sub noise} with {beta} 0.15. Our study was done in collaboration with Inserm U618 team and has compared volumes defined on PET scan defined according to different methods based on intensity or S.U.V. to the tumour volume determined on CT scan by radio physicist. We have compared those volumes with histological volume that we considered for reference. Four patients have been included. They had {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET scan followed by complete tumoral removal surgery. Specific histological procedure allowed to define complete size of the tumor in re expanded lung. Comparatively to pathology, the volumes obtained using I{sub max} 40 and I{sub max} 50 are all underestimated. The volumes defined by Black's et al. method are under evaluated for the two largest tumours (15.8% to 22%) and overestimated for the two smallest ones (17.9 to 82.9%). Nestle's et al. method, using {beta} = 0.15, correctly estimates two tumor volumes over 2 cm, but overestimates the two small tumors (79.6 to 124%). Finally, the corrected Nestle's et al. formula (using {beta} = 0.264) overestimates three tumours. Volumes defined on CT scan by radio physicist are correct for one lesion, underestimated for one and overestimated for two other ones (44 and 179.5%). Nestle

  13. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  14. Investigation of radiation skin dose in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, C.M.; Horrocks, J.; Hayes, D.

    2001-01-01

    Background - The study investigated the radiation skin doses for interventional patients in cardiology; two procedures which have the highest radiation dose are Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation (RFCA) and Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA). Methods and Results - 56 patients were randomly selected and investigated; 23 patients in the RFCA group and 33 in the PTCA group. Skin and effective dose were calculated from Dose Area Product (DAP). Thermoluminescent Dosimetry was the second method of dose measurement used. Patients were followed-up for a three month period to check for possible skin reactions resulting from the radiation dose during the procedure. Radiation skin doses in 14 patients were calculated to be more than 1 Gy, including three patients who received more than 2 Gy, the threshold dose for deterministic effects of radiation. 7 patients (12.5%) reported skin reactions as a result of the radiation received to their backs during the procedure. Mean DAP and estimated effective doses were 105 Gycm 2 and 22.5 mSv for RFCA, and 32 Gycm 2 and 6.2 mSv for PTCA procedures respectively. Conclusion - Complex procedures in Interventional Cardiology can exceed the threshold level for deterministic effects in the skin. (author)

  15. Occupational radiation hazards during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devik, F.

    1979-01-01

    The general principles in teratology are discussed and it is pointed out that ionising radiation is only one of many agents with teratogenic effects. Human experience with radiation induced congenital malformations is insufficient to warrant conclusions about dose and effect. The teratogenic effects are then discussed in more detail and indications of radiation doses said to produce these are given. The question of a threshold dose is briefly discussed, as is the possibility of carcinogenesis. Finally precautions to be taken and the recommendations of the ICRP and the CEC are presented. (JIW)

  16. Are low radiation doses Dangerous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Lima, O.; Cornejo, N.

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years the answers to this questions has been affirmative as well as negative from a radiation protection point of view low doses of ionizing radiation potentially constitute an agent causing stochasting effects. A lineal relation without threshold is assumed between dose and probability of occurrence of these effects . Arguments against the danger of probability of occurrence of these effects. Arguments again the danger of low dose radiation are reflected in concepts such as Hormesis and adaptive response, which are phenomena that being studied at present

  17. A lower dose threshold for the in vivo protective adaptive response to radiation. Tumorigenesis in chronically exposed normal and Trp53 heterozygous C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Burchart, P.; Wyatt, H.

    2008-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation to cells and animals may induce adaptive responses that reduce the risk of cancer. However, there are upper dose thresholds above which these protective adaptive responses do not occur. We have now tested the hypothesis that there are similar lower dose thresholds that must be exceeded in order to induce protective effects in vivo. We examined the effects of low dose/low dose rate fractionated exposures on cancer formation in Trp53 normal or cancer-prone Trp53 heterozygous female C57BL/6 mice. Beginning at 6 weeks of age, mice were exposed 5 days/week to single daily doses (0.33 mGy, 0.7 mGy/h) totaling 48, 97 or 146 mGy over 30, 60 or 90 weeks. The exposures for shorter times (up to 60 weeks) appeared to be below the level necessary to induce overall protective adaptive responses in Trp53 normal mice, and detrimental effects (shortened lifespan, increased frequency) evident for only specific tumor types (B- and T-cell lymphomas), were produced. Only when the exposures were continued for 90 weeks did the dose become sufficient to induce protective adaptive responses, balancing the detrimental effects for these specific cancers, and reducing the risk level back to that of the unexposed animals. Detrimental effects were not seen for other tumor types, and a protective effect was seen for sarcomas after 60 weeks of exposure, which was then lost when the exposure continued for 90 weeks. As previously shown for the upper dose threshold for protection by low doses, the lower dose boundary between protection and harm was influenced by Trp53 functionality. Neither protection nor harm was observed in exposed Trp53 heterozygous mice, indicating that reduced Trp53 function raises the lower dose/dose rate threshold for both detrimental and protective tumorigenic effects. (author)

  18. Near-infrared emission and upconversion in Er{sup 3+}-doped TeO{sub 2}–ZnO–ZnF{sub 2} glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Morea, R.; Gonzalo, J. [Instituto de Optica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arriandiaga, M.A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Apartado 644, Bilbao (Spain); Fernandez, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Materials Physics Center CSIC-UPV/EHU and Donostia International Physics Center, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Balda, R., E-mail: wupbacrr@bi.ehu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Materials Physics Center CSIC-UPV/EHU and Donostia International Physics Center, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    We have investigated the near infrared emission and upconversion of Er{sup 3+} ions in two different compositions of glasses based on TeO{sub 2}, ZnO, and ZnF{sub 2} for different ErF{sub 3} concentrations (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 wt%). Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters have been determined and used to calculate the radiative transition probabilities and radiative lifetimes. The infrared emission at around 1532 nm corresponding to the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition is broader by nearly 30 nm if compared to silica based glasses. The stimulated emission cross section is higher for the glass with the lowest content of ZnF{sub 2} which also shows higher values of the figure of merit for bandwidth. On the other hand, the lifetimes of the excited states are longer for the glass with the highest content of ZnF{sub 2}. Green and red emissions corresponding to transitions ({sup 2}H{sub 11/2},{sup 4}S{sub 3/2})→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} have been observed under excitation at 801 nm and attributed to a two photon process. The temporal evolution of the green emission suggests the presence of excited state absorption and energy transfer upconversion processes to populate the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} level. In the case of the red emission, its increase as ErF{sub 3} concentration increases together with its temporal behavior indicate that for ErF{sub 3} concentrations higher than 0.5 wt%, level {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} is populated by multiphonon relaxation from level {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and energy transfer processes. -- Highlights: ► High absorption and emission cross-sections for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}↔{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition suitable for EDFAs. ► The increase of fluorine content leads to longer lifetimes of excited levels of Er{sup 3+} ions. ► Increase of the red upconversion emission with concentration due to ETU processes.

  19. Homeopathy with radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    There are no reliable data to estimate radiation risk to humans below doses of about 100 mSv. The ICRP adopts for protection purposes the LNT(linear no threshold)-concept. As there is no evidence for its general validity there is room for other ideas. One is ''radiation hormesis'', i.e. the notion that low radiation doses are not harmful but rather beneficial to human health. This view is critically discussed and it is shown that there is no evidence to prove this conception neither from epidemiological studies nor convincingly from animal experiments or mechanistic investigations. There is, therefore, no reason to abandon the prudent approach of the ALARA-principle.

  20. Measurement of radiation damage on an optical reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Huang, H.C.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical white fluorocarbon reflector called Goretex, which is to be used for aerogel threshold counters and crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Reflectance of the Goretex surface was monitored to see any effect of the radiation damage. Maximum equivalent dose was 8.6 Mrad. No radiation damage is observed within measurement errors. (orig.)

  1. A threshold in the dose-response relationship for X-ray induced somatic mutation frequency in drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, Takao; Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, M.O.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds for a long time. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays using germ cells of male fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, cancer-causing activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. In this paper, we examined the dose-response relationship of X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation in drosophila, and found a threshold at approximately 1 Gy in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was five times steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (author)

  2. Protection criteria from the non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzet, Rodolfo E.

    2004-01-01

    The first objective of the protection philosophy is to determinate the relation reason-effect in order to establish the exposition thresholds to acceptable values. To establish the radioprotection criteria is important to considerate the following: a-) The damage and effects of the non-ionizing radiation; b-) The physical aspects of the fields exposition; and c-) The dosimetry of the involucrate tissues. The non-ionizing radiation includes the optics radiations (ultraviolet, visible, infrared and laser), and the electromagnetic radiations (microwave, radars, magnetic and electrostatics fields)

  3. Explanation of diagnosis criteria for radiation sickness from internal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Du Jianying; Bai Guang

    2012-01-01

    A revised edition of the Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation Sickness from Internal Exposure has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. It is necessary to research the internal radiation sickness to adapt to the current serious anti-terrorism situation. This standard was enacted based on the extensive research of related literature, from which 12 cases with internal radiation sickness and screened out were involving 7 types of radionuclide. The Development of Emergency Response Standard Extension Framework: Midterm Evaluation Report is the main reference which approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency and World Health Organization. This amendment contains many new provisions such as internal radiation sickness effects models and threshold dose, and the appendix added threshold dose of serious deterministic effects induced by radionuclide intake and radiotoxicology parameters of some radionuclides. In order to understand and implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the internal radiation sickness correctly, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  4. Radiation behavior of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Raymond, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    High energy neutron irradiations have been performed on Nb 3 Sn superconductors to assess their behavior in a fusion reactor environment. Irradiations were performed at 4.2 K and property measurements were made without warming the samples. The critical current I/sub c/ increased with irradiation to a level about 50% above the unirradiated value at the highest fluences reached in our experiments. These results are compared with the results of other low temperature irradiations of Nb 3 Sn

  5. Remedy for Radiation Fear — Discard the Politicized Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.

    2014-01-01

    While seeking a remedy for the crisis of radiation fear in Japan, the author reread a recent article on radiation hormesis. It describes the motivation for creating this fear and mentions the evidence, in the first UNSCEAR report, of a factor of 3 reduction in leukemia incidence of the Hiroshima atom-bomb survivors in the low dose zone. Drawing a graph of the data reveals a hormetic J-curve, not a straight line as reported. UNSCEAR data on the lifespan reduction of mice and Guinea pigs exposed continuously to radium gamma rays indicate a threshold at about 2 gray per year. This contradicts the conceptual basis for radiation protection and risk determination that was established in 1956-58. In this paper, beneficial effects and thresholds for harmful effects are discussed, and the biological mechanism is explained. The key point: the rate of spontaneous DNA damage (double-strand breaks) is more than 1000 times the rate caused by background radiation. It is the effect of radiation on an organism's very powerful adaptive protection systems that determines the dose-response characteristic. Low radiation up-regulates the adaptive protection systems, while high radiation impairs these systems. The remedy for radiation fear is to expose and discard the politicized science

  6. Remedy for radiation fear - discard the politicized science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Cuttler and Associates Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    While seeking a remedy for the ongoing crisis of radiation fear in Japan and everywhere else, the author reread a recent article on radiation hormesis. It describes the political motivation for creating this fear and mentions the evidence, in the first UNSCEAR report, of a factor of 3 reduction in leukemia incidence of the Hiroshima a-bomb survivors in the low dose zone. Producing a graph of the tabulated data reveals that they fit a hormetic J-curve, not a straight line as reported. UNSCEAR data on the lifespan reduction of mice and Guinea pigs exposed continuously to radium gamma rays indicate a threshold at about 2 gray per year. This information contradicts the conceptual basis for radiation protection and risk determination that was established in 1956-58. In this paper, beneficial effects and thresholds for harmful effects are discussed, and the biological mechanism is explained. The key point is the discovery that the rate of spontaneous DNA damage (double-strand breaks) is more than 1000 times the rate caused by average background radiation. It is the effect of radiation on an organism's very powerful adaptive protection systems that determines the dose-response characteristic. Low radiation up-regulates adaptive protection systems, while high radiation impairs these systems. The remedy for radiation fear is to expose and discard the politicized science. (author)

  7. What is ''ionizing radiation''?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.

    1997-01-01

    The scientific background of radiation protection and hence ''ionizing radiation'' is undergoing substantial regress since a century. Radiations as we are concerned with are from the beginning defined based upon their effects rather than upon the physical origin and their properties. This might be one of the reasons why the definition of the term ''ionizing radiation'' in radiation protection is still weak from an up to date point of view in texts as well as in international and national standards. The general meaning is unambiguous, but a numerical value depends on a number of conditions and the purpose. Hence, a clear statement on a numerical value of the energy threshold beyond a radiation has to be considered as ''ionizing'' is still missing. The existing definitions are, therefore, either correct but very general or theoretical and hence not applicable. This paper reviews existing definitions and suggests some issues to be taken into account for possible improvement of the definition of ''ionizing radiation''. (author)

  8. The purpose of radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1979-01-01

    In the early period (1942-1960) of nuclear energy programmes with which I was associated, most radiation protection standards seem to have been formulated on the assumption that there is a threshold dose of ionizing radiation below which no radiation damage is expected to result in the lifetime of the exposed individual. It was in this climate of opinion that health physics began as a profession, and levels of maximum permissible exposure (MPE) to external sources of radiation, maximum permissible concentrations in air, water and food, and maximum permissible body burdens of radionuclides inside the human body were set and enforced. Some of the levels of MPE were quite high in comparison with present standards but, fortunately, the health physicists at the national laboratories in which most radiation workers were employed were very conservative; in most cases the average annual exposures were less than 10% of the MPE levels. However, there was not much concern with the man-rem concept, as exemplified by rather high levels of radioactive waste discharged from the plants or placed in temporary holding facilities - where there was a likely possibility of seepage into the environment. This situation was understandable and justifiable at a time when the purpose of radiation protection monitoring was simply to prevent individuals from exceeding a threshold dose. The period of the recent past up to the present time (1978) has been one in which there has been a gradual change from the concept of a threshold dose hypothesis to the linear hypothesis. In this period the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the national standards setting bodies have pointed out that the levels they have selected are based on the linear hypothesis, but in most respects they leave us with the impression that this is most probably a conservative assumption, subject to revision when better data become available. Also, during this period, the concept of exposure As Low As

  9. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  10. Interaction of ultrashort laser pulses and silicon solar cells under short circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundus, M., E-mail: markus.mundus@ise.fraunhofer.de; Giesecke, J. A.; Fischer, P.; Hohl-Ebinger, J.; Warta, W. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-02-28

    Ultrashort pulse lasers are promising tools for numerous measurement purposes. Among other benefits their high peak powers allow for efficient generation of wavelengths in broad spectral ranges and at spectral powers that are orders of magnitude higher than in conventional light sources. Very recently this has been exploited for the establishment of sophisticated measurement facilities for electrical characterization of photovoltaic (PV) devices. As the high peak powers of ultrashort pulses promote nonlinear optical effects they might also give rise to nonlinear interactions with the devices under test that possibly manipulate the measurement outcome. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the nonlinearities affecting short circuit current (I{sub SC}) measurements of silicon (Si) solar cells. We derive a set of coupled differential equations describing the radiation-device interaction and discuss the nonlinearities incorporated in those. By a semi-analytical approach introducing a quasi-steady-state approximation and integrating a Green's function we solve the system of equations and obtain simulated I{sub SC} values. We validate the theoretical model by I{sub SC} ratios obtained from a double ring resonator setup capable for reproducible generation of various ultrashort pulse trains. Finally, we apply the model to conduct the most prominent comparison of I{sub SC} generated by ultrashort pulses versus continuous illumination. We conclude by the important finding that the nonlinearities induced by ultrashort pulses are negligible for the most common I{sub SC} measurements. However, we also find that more specialized measurements (e.g., of concentrating PV or Si-multijunction devices as well as highly localized electrical characterizations) will be biased by two-photon-absorption distorting the I{sub SC} measurement.

  11. Biological effects of ionizing radiation; Efectos biologicos de la radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  12. A test of the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    It has been pointed out that, while an ecological study cannot determine whether radon causes lung cancer, it can test the validity of a linear-no threshold relationship between them. The linear-no threshold theory predicts a substantial positive correlation between the average radon exposure in various counties and their lung cancer mortality rates. Data on living areas of houses in 411 counties from all parts of the United States exhibit, rather, a substantial negative correlation with the slopes of the lines of regression differing from zero by 10 and 7 standard deviations for males and females, respectively, and from the positive slope predicted by the theory by at least 16 and 12 standard deviations. When the data are segmented into 23 groups of states or into 7 regions of the country, the predominantly negative slopes and correlations persist, applying to 18 of the 23 state groups and 6 of the 7 regions. Five state-sponsored studies are analyzed, and four of these give a strong negative slope (the other gives a weak positive slope, in agreement with our data for that state). A strong negative slope is also obtained in our data on basements in 253 counties. A random selection-no charge study of 39 high and low lung cancer counties (+4 low population states) gives a much stronger negative correlation. When nine potential confounding factors are included in a multiple linear regression analysis, the discrepancy with theory is reduced only to 12 and 8.5 standard deviations for males and females, respectively. When the data are segmented into four groups by population, the multiple regression vs radon level gives a strong negative slope for each of the four groups. Other considerations are introduced to reduce the discrepancy, but it remains very substantial

  13. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P.; Roeser, A.

    2015-01-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  14. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  15. Universality of next-to-leading power threshold effects for colourless final states in hadronic collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duca, Vittorio del; Laenen, E.; Magnea, L.; Vernazza, L.; White, C.D.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the production of an arbitrary number of colour-singlet particles near partonic threshold, and show that next-to-leading order cross sections for this class of processes have a simple universal form at next-to-leading power (NLP) in the energy of the emitted gluon radiation. Our analysis

  16. A biological basis for the linear non-threshold dose-response relationship for low-level carcinogen exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter examines low-level dose-response relationships in terms of the two-stage mouse tumorigenesis model. Analyzes the feasibility of the linear non-threshold dose-response model which was first adopted for use in the assessment of cancer risks from ionizing radiation and more recently from chemical carcinogens. Finds that both the interaction of B(a)P with epidermal DNA of the mouse skin and the dose-response relationship for the initiation stage of mouse skin tumorigenesis showed a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship. Concludes that low level exposure to environmental carcinogens has a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship with the carcinogen acting as an initiator and the promoting action being supplied by the factors that are responsible for the background cancer rate in the target tissue

  17. Shifts in the relationship between motor unit recruitment thresholds versus derecruitment thresholds during fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Mota, Jacob A

    2017-12-01

    Muscle fatigue is associated with diminished twitch force amplitude. We examined changes in the motor unit recruitment versus derecruitment threshold relationship during fatigue. Nine men (mean age = 26 years) performed repeated isometric contractions at 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) knee extensor force until exhaustion. Surface electromyographic signals were detected from the vastus lateralis, and were decomposed into their constituent motor unit action potential trains. Motor unit recruitment and derecruitment thresholds and firing rates at recruitment and derecruitment were evaluated at the beginning, middle, and end of the protocol. On average, 15 motor units were studied per contraction. For the initial contraction, three subjects showed greater recruitment thresholds than derecruitment thresholds for all motor units. Five subjects showed greater recruitment thresholds than derecruitment thresholds for only low-threshold motor units at the beginning, with a mean cross-over of 31.6% MVC. As the muscle fatigued, many motor units were derecruited at progressively higher forces. In turn, decreased slopes and increased y-intercepts were observed. These shifts were complemented by increased firing rates at derecruitment relative to recruitment. As the vastus lateralis fatigued, the central nervous system's compensatory adjustments resulted in a shift of the regression line of the recruitment versus derecruitment threshold relationship. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  19. Public information in radiation emergencies - the messenger, the public and the message

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is based on experience as a lecturer on emergency planning courses in east and west Europe, in the USA and in Hong Kong. The complex language of radiation protection confuses the public and so the messenger must avoid unnecessary jargon. In some cases the messenger may have little experience of speaking in public but this can be remedied in exercise and the fear of speaking in public may be reduced. Communication would be more efficient and possibly cause less anxiety if the public was better educated about ionizing radiation. A European initiative is described and the author' s revision of the CEC teacher's manual is reported. The debate over the linear-no-threshold model seems to undermine the credibility of the radiological protection message. The author proposes that a dose threshold should be set, preferably internationally, so those individual doses below threshold could be excluded from records and research effort redirected to more hazardous factors. Copyright (1999) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  20. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. High-resolution modeling of thermal thresholds and environmental influences on coral bleaching for local and regional reef management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Naoki H; Yamano, Hiroya

    2018-01-01

    Coral reefs are one of the world's most threatened ecosystems, with global and local stressors contributing to their decline. Excessive sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) can cause coral bleaching, resulting in coral death and decreases in coral cover. A SST threshold of 1 °C over the climatological maximum is widely used to predict coral bleaching. In this study, we refined thermal indices predicting coral bleaching at high-spatial resolution (1 km) by statistically optimizing thermal thresholds, as well as considering other environmental influences on bleaching such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, water turbidity, and cooling effects. We used a coral bleaching dataset derived from the web-based monitoring system Sango Map Project, at scales appropriate for the local and regional conservation of Japanese coral reefs. We recorded coral bleaching events in the years 2004-2016 in Japan. We revealed the influence of multiple factors on the ability to predict coral bleaching, including selection of thermal indices, statistical optimization of thermal thresholds, quantification of multiple environmental influences, and use of multiple modeling methods (generalized linear models and random forests). After optimization, differences in predictive ability among thermal indices were negligible. Thermal index, UV radiation, water turbidity, and cooling effects were important predictors of the occurrence of coral bleaching. Predictions based on the best model revealed that coral reefs in Japan have experienced recent and widespread bleaching. A practical method to reduce bleaching frequency by screening UV radiation was also demonstrated in this paper.

  2. Epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    2010-01-01

    The health effects of low-level ionizing radiation are yet unclear. As pointed out by Upton in his review (Upton, 1989), low-level ionizing radiation seems to have different biological effects from what high-level radiation has. If so, the hazard identification of ionizing radiation should he conducted separately for low- and high-level ionizing radiation; the hazard identification of low-level radiation is yet to be completed. What makes hazard identification of ionizing radiation difficult, particularly in the case of carcinogenic effect, is the difficulty in distinguishing radiation-induced cancer from other cancers with respect to clinicopathological features and molecular biological characteristics. Actually, it is suspected that radiation-induced carcinogenesis involves mechanisms not specific for radiation, such as oxidative stress. Excess risk per dose in medium-high dose ranges can be extrapolated to a low-dose range if dose-response can be described by the linear-non-threshold model. The cancer risk data of atomic-bomb survivors describes leukemia risk with a linear-quadratic (LQ) model and solid-cancer risk with linear non-threshold (LNT) model. The LQ model for leukemia and the LNT model for solid cancer correspond to the two-hit model and the one-hit model, respectively. Although the one-hit model is an unlikely dose-response for carcinogenesis, there is no convincing epidemiological evidence supporting the LQ model or non-threshold model for solid cancer. It should be pointed out, however, even if the true dose response is non-linear various noises involved in epidemiological data may mask the truth. In this paper, the potential contribution of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers and residents in high background radiation areas will be discussed. (author)

  3. Threshold factorization redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2018-05-01

    We reanalyze the factorization theorems for the Drell-Yan process and for deep inelastic scattering near threshold, as constructed in the framework of the soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), from a new, consistent perspective. In order to formulate the factorization near threshold in SCET, we should include an additional degree of freedom with small energy, collinear to the beam direction. The corresponding collinear-soft mode is included to describe the parton distribution function (PDF) near threshold. The soft function is modified by subtracting the contribution of the collinear-soft modes in order to avoid double counting on the overlap region. As a result, the proper soft function becomes infrared finite, and all the factorized parts are free of rapidity divergence. Furthermore, the separation of the relevant scales in each factorized part becomes manifest. We apply the same idea to the dihadron production in e+e- annihilation near threshold, and show that the resultant soft function is also free of infrared and rapidity divergences.

  4. Review of the controversy on risks from low levels of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.

    2001-01-01

    The need for regulation of low levels of radiation exposure, and the estimation of risks from such exposures, are based on the assumption that risk is proportional to dose without a threshold, the 'linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis'. This assumption is not supported by scientific data. There is no clear evidence of harm from low levels of exposure, up to at least 20 mSv (acute dose) or total dose rates of at least 50 mSv per year. Even allowing for reasonable extrapolation from radiation levels at which harmful effects have been observed, the LNT assumption should not be used to estimate risks from doses less than 100 mSv. Laboratory and epidemiological evidence, and evolutionary expectations of biological effects from low level radiation, suggest that beneficial health effects (sometimes called 'radiation hormesis') are at least as likely as harmful effects from such exposures. Controversy on this matter strikes at the basis of radiation protection practice

  5. MOSFET and MOS capacitor responses to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, J. M.; Boesch, H. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The ionizing radiation responses of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) field-effect transistors (FETs) and MOS capacitors are compared. It is shown that the radiation-induced threshold voltage shift correlates closely with the shift in the MOS capacitor inversion voltage. The radiation-induced interface-state density of the MOSFETs and MOS capacitors was determined by several techniques. It is shown that the presence of 'slow' states can interfere with the interface-state measurements.

  6. Resonant photoemission at core-level shake-up thresholds: Valence-band satellites in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerneholm, O.; Andersen, J.N.; Wigren, C.; Nilsson, A.; Nyholm, R.; Ma; Ortensson, N.

    1990-01-01

    Three-hole satellites (3d 7 final-state configuration) in the nickel valence-band photoelectron spectrum have been identified at 13 and 18 eV binding energy with use of synchrotron radiation from the MAX storage ring. The three-hole satellites show resonances at photon energies close to the threshold for excitation of 3p 5 3d 9 core-hole shake-up states. The 13-eV satellite also shows a resonance directly at the 3p threshold. This is interpreted as an interference between the direct three-hole ionization and a shake-up transition in the Auger decay of the 3p hole. This shake-up process is also identified directly in the M 2,3 M 4,5 M 4,5 Auger spectrum

  7. A trend toward radical revaluation of the concept of radiation risk at the beginning of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.; Hadjieva, T.

    2003-01-01

    Seven postulates have been recognized in radiation effects on the man and human population: globalization, irreversibility, accumulation, non-threshold harm, stochastic, non-specificity and acceptance of the risk. Three of them provoke serious doubts. Uncertainties concern the irreversibility, accumulation of radiation injury and the luck of threshold for stochastic effects. Namely irreversibility and accumulation of radiation injury outline the quintessence of liner non-threshold model 'dose-effect'. The model was widely accepted for the radiation protection purpose in case of low dose and low dose-rate irradiation. Three groups of epidemiological data brought arguments for a threshold existence in stochastic effects after dose range 100-350 mSv. The first group includes population living in places with high natural background exposure (India, Iran, Brazil, China, France etc.). The occupational exposed personnel working in the industry of USA, Canada, Great Britain outline the second group. Japanese survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki and inhabitants of some islands in the Pacific Ocean form the third group. For the period of several decades such observations were collected on the significant cohorts of hundreds and thousands people. Moreover serious indications have been accumulated about the unfeasibility of the liner non-threshold model in low dose irradiation. For example, the concept of hormesis presumes a protective or simulating action of low dose irradiation. Such evidences might act toward a radical revaluation of the radiation risk concept and might lead to serious changes in the practice of radiation protection. (authors)

  8. Comparison between intensity- duration thresholds and cumulative rainfall thresholds for the forecasting of landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Rosi, Ascanio; Rossi, Guglielmo; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    This work makes a quantitative comparison between the results of landslide forecasting obtained using two different rainfall threshold models, one using intensity-duration thresholds and the other based on cumulative rainfall thresholds in an area of northern Tuscany of 116 km2. The first methodology identifies rainfall intensity-duration thresholds by means a software called MaCumBA (Massive CUMulative Brisk Analyzer) that analyzes rain-gauge records, extracts the intensities (I) and durations (D) of the rainstorms associated with the initiation of landslides, plots these values on a diagram, and identifies thresholds that define the lower bounds of the I-D values. A back analysis using data from past events can be used to identify the threshold conditions associated with the least amount of false alarms. The second method (SIGMA) is based on the hypothesis that anomalous or extreme values of rainfall are responsible for landslide triggering: the statistical distribution of the rainfall series is analyzed, and multiples of the standard deviation (σ) are used as thresholds to discriminate between ordinary and extraordinary rainfall events. The name of the model, SIGMA, reflects the central role of the standard deviations in the proposed methodology. The definition of intensity-duration rainfall thresholds requires the combined use of rainfall measurements and an inventory of dated landslides, whereas SIGMA model can be implemented using only rainfall data. These two methodologies were applied in an area of 116 km2 where a database of 1200 landslides was available for the period 2000-2012. The results obtained are compared and discussed. Although several examples of visual comparisons between different intensity-duration rainfall thresholds are reported in the international literature, a quantitative comparison between thresholds obtained in the same area using different techniques and approaches is a relatively undebated research topic.

  9. Judd-Ofelt analysis and temperature dependent upconversion luminescence of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongyu [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gao, Yachen [College of Electronic Engineering, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Hao, Haoyue; Shi, Guang [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Dongyu [Department of Physics, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang 524048 (China); Song, Yinglin [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Yuxiao, E-mail: wangyx@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Xueru, E-mail: xrzhang@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Although lanthanide doped luminescent materials have been extensively investigated, a quantitative analysis of how temperature affects upconversion luminescence is still incomplete. The Gd{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphor is synthetized by sol-gel method. Based on the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions, J-O intensity parameters and radiative transition probabilities are computed to estimate the optical properties. In view of ion-phonon interaction, the phonon-assisted energy transfer and multiphonon relaxation are responsible for the temperature dependent luminescence. Additionally, cross relaxation probability for {sup 4}I{sub 11/2}+{sup 4}I{sub 11/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}+{sup 4}F{sub 7/2} is determined to be 240 s{sup −1} through quantitative simulation of ion-ion interaction. These meaningful results are of vital values for the field of laser crystal and optical temperature sensing.

  10. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  11. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  12. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  13. Scaling of the H-mode power threshold for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the latest ITER H-mode threshold database is presented. The power necessary for the transition to H-mode is estimated for ITER, with or without the inclusion of radiation losses from the bulk plasma, in terms of the main engineering variables. The main geometrical variables (aspect ratio ε, elongation κ and average triangularity δ) are also included in the analysis. The H-mode transition is also considered from the point of view of the local edge variables, and the electron temperature at 90% of the poloidal flux is expressed in terms of both local and global variables. (author)

  14. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and methods: previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: in none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/ year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: in the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. (author)

  15. A new approach to the theory of Cherenkov radiation based on relativistic generalization of the Landau criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefranov, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    Relativistic generalization of the Landau criterion is obtained which, in contrast to the classical Tamm-Frank and Ginzburg theories, determines the primary energy mechanism of emission of nonbremsstrahlung Cherenkov radiation. It is shown that Cherenkov radiation may correspond to a threshold energetically favorable conversion of the condensate (ultimately long-wavelength) elementary Bose perturbations of a medium into transverse Cherenkov photons emitted by the medium proper during its interaction with a sufficiently fast charged particle. The threshold conditions of emission are determined for a medium with an arbitrary refractive index n, including the case of isotropic plasma with n < 1 for which the classical theory of Cherenkov radiation prohibits such direct and effective nonbremsstrahlung emission of these particular transverse high-frequency electromagnetic waves. It is established that these conditions of emission agree with the data of well-known experiments on the threshold for observation of Cherenkov radiation, whereas the classical theory only corresponds to the conditions of observation of the interference maximum of this radiation. The possibility of direct effective emission of nonbremsstrahlung Cherenkov radiation, not taken into account in the classical theory, is considered for many observed astrophysical phenomena (type III solar radio bursts, particle acceleration by radiation, etc.)

  16. Threshold guidance update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Last years' activities (1984) included the development of a threshold guidance dose, the development of threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose, the development of supporting documentation, review by a technical peer review committee, and review by the DOE community. As a result of the comments, areas have been identified for more extensive analysis, including an alternative basis for selection of the guidance dose and the development of quality assurance guidelines. Development of quality assurance guidelines will provide a reasonable basis for determining that a given waste stream qualifies as a threshold waste stream and can then be the basis for a more extensive cost-benefit analysis. The threshold guidance and supporting documentation will be revised, based on the comments received. The revised documents will be provided to DOE by early November. DOE-HQ has indicated that the revised documents will be available for review by DOE field offices and their contractors

  17. Surveys of radon levels in homes in the United States: A test of the linear-no-threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Radon Project for large scale measurements of radon concentrations in homes is described. Its principal research is to test the linear-no threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis by determining average radon levels in the 25 U.S. counties (within certain population ranges) with highest and lowest lung cancer rates. The theory predicts that the former should have about 3 times higher average radon levels than the latter, under the assumption that any correlation between exposure to radon and exposure to other causes of lung cancer is weak. The validity of this assumption is tested with data on average radon level vs replies to items on questionnaires; there is little correlation between radon levels in houses and smoking habits, educational attainment, or economic status of the occupants, or with urban vs rural environs which is an indicator of exposure to air pollution

  18. Population sensitivities of animals to chronic ionizing radiation-model predictions from mice to elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G

    2018-02-01

    Model predictions of population response to chronic ionizing radiation (endpoint 'morbidity') were made for 11 species of warm-blooded animals, differing in body mass and lifespan - from mice to elephant. Predictions were made also for 3 bird species (duck, pigeon, and house sparrow). Calculations were based on analytical solutions of the mathematical model, simulating a population response to low-LET ionizing radiation in an ecosystem with a limiting resource (Sazykina, Kryshev, 2016). Model parameters for different species were taken from biological and radioecological databases; allometric relationships were employed for estimating some parameter values. As a threshold of decreased health status in exposed populations ('health threshold'), a 10% reduction in self-repairing capacity of organisms was suggested, associated with a decline in ability to sustain environmental stresses. Results of the modeling demonstrate a general increase of population vulnerability to ionizing radiation in animal species of larger size and longevity. Populations of small widespread species (mice, house sparrow; body mass 20-50 g), which are characterized by intensive metabolism and short lifespan, have calculated 'health thresholds' at dose rates about 6.5-7.5 mGy day -1 . Widespread animals with body mass 200-500 g (rat, common pigeon) - demonstrate 'health threshold' values at 4-5 mGy day -1 . For populations of animals with body mass 2-5 kg (rabbit, fox, raccoon), the indicators of 10% health decrease are in the range 2-3.4 mGy day -1 . For animals with body mass 40-100 kg (wolf, sheep, wild boar), thresholds are within 0.5-0.8 mGy day -1 ; for herbivorous animals with body mass 200-300 kg (deer, horse) - 0.5-0.6 mGy day -1 . The lowest health threshold was estimated for elephant (body mass around 5000 kg) - 0.1 mGy day -1 . According to the model results, the differences in population sensitivities of warm-blooded animal species to ionizing radiation are generally

  19. Calibration of the neutron scintillation counter threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, V.I.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1978-01-01

    A method for calibrating the threshold of a neutron counter in the form of a 10x10x40 cm plastic scintillator is described. The method is based on the evaluation of the Compton boundary of γ-spectrum from the discrimination curve of counter loading. The results of calibration using 60 Co and 24 Na γ-sources are given. In order to eValuate the Compton edge rapidly, linear extrapolation of the linear part of the discrimination curve towards its intersection with the X axis is recommended. Special measurements have shown that the calibration results do not practically depend on the distance between the cathode of a photomultiplier and the place where collimated γ-radiation of the calibration source reaches the scintillator

  20. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  1. Photoluminescence properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped alkaline earth titanium phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, D.V.R.; Babu, A. Mohan [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India); Jamalaiah, B.C. [Department of Physics, Sree Vidyanikethan Engineering College, Tirupati, 517 102 (India); Moorthy, L. Rama, E-mail: lrmphysics@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India); Jayasimhadri, M.; Jang, Kiwan; Lee, Ho Sueb [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Soung Soo [Department of Photonics, Silla University, Pusan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jung Hyun [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Pusan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-18

    Er{sup 3+}-doped alkaline earth titanium phosphate (RTP) glasses with molar composition of 24 (NaPO{sub 3}){sub 6} + 30 KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} + 25 TiO{sub 2} + 20 RCl{sub 2} + 1 Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters ({Omega}{sub 2,4,6}) were determined from the experimental oscillator strengths (f{sub exp}) of absorption bands. From these parameters spontaneous emission probabilities (A{sub R}), luminescence branching ratios ({beta}{sub R}) and radiative lifetimes ({tau}{sub R}) have been calculated. Visible and near infrared photoluminescence spectra has been recorded by exciting the samples at 380 and 970 nm respectively. An intense broad emission band at 1.53 {mu}m was observed corresponding to {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition. McCumber theory has been applied to determine the emission cross-sections ({sigma}{sub e}) of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition using the absorption cross-sections ({sigma}{sub a}). The lifetimes of {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} level were measured for the glasses by exciting the samples at 540 nm wavelength and the quantum efficiencies were also determined.

  2. A Threshold Exists in the Dose-response Relationship for Somatic Mutation Frequency Inducted by X-ray Irradiation of Drosophia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, T.; Takashima, Y.; Okada, M. O.; Ikehata, M.; Miyakoshi, J.; Sakai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays in the male germ cells of fruits fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, carcinogenic activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. Here, the dose-response relationship of X- ray irradiation and somatic mutation is examined in Drosophila. A threshold at approximately 1Gy was observed in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was much steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (Author) 35 refs

  3. Epidemiological and radio-biological studies in high background radiation areas of Kerala coast: implications in radiation protection science and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Birajalaxmi

    2018-01-01

    Till date, Linear No Threshold hypothesis (LNT) is well accepted in radiation protection science in spite of its limitations. However, dose response studies using multiple biological end points from high-background radiation areas have challenged the linearity. Radio-biological and epidemiological studies from high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast showed non-linearity as well as efficient repair of DNA damage in HLNRA indicating that dose limits for public exposure needs to be revisited which may have implications in radiation protection science, human health and low dose radiation biology. However, further studies using high throughput approach is required to identify chronic radiation signatures in human population exposed to elevated level of natural background radiation

  4. Effects of plasma-deposited silicon nitride passivation on the radiation hardness of CMOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plasma-deposited silicon nitride as a final passivation over metal-gate CMOS integrated circuits degrades the radiation hardness of these devices. The hardness degradation is manifested by increased radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts caused principally by the charging of new interface states and, to a lesser extent, by the trapping of holes created upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The threshold voltage shifts are a strong function of the deposition temperature, and show very little dependence on thickness for films deposited at 300 0 C. There is some correlation between the threshold voltage shifts and the hydrogen content of the PECVD silicon nitride films used as the final passivation layer as a function of deposition temperature. The mechanism by which the hydrogen contained in these films may react with the Si/SiO 2 interface is not clear at this point

  5. Clinical observation of radiation urinary bladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Liu Libo; Zhang Haiying; Liang Shuo; Chen Dawei; Wu Zhenfeng; Dong Lihua; Lu Xuejun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Clinical characteristic, diagnosis and treatment of radiation urinary bladder disease induced by radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvis were inquired into for providing diagnostic basis. Methods: Statistical analysis for the clinical cases was carried out. Results: The incidence of radiation bladder diseases induced by radiation therapy of cervix cancer are about 0.8%-2.96%, with an average of 2.14%. Radiation bladder disease is divided into acute radiation cystitis, chronic radiation cystitis and radiation vesical fistula. Chronic radiation cystitis is seen most often in the clinic and its main clinical symptom is painless macroscopic hematuria, which is again subdivided into slight and severe degrees. Diagnosis should include history of exposure to radiation, which dose exceed the dose threshold, and typical clinical characteristics. Conclusion: The characteristics, types and diagnostic basis of radiation urinary bladder disease analyzed in this study can provide the reference for drawing up diagnostic standard

  6. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  7. Dose-response models for the radiation-induction of skin tumours in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papworth, D.G.; Hulse, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive data on radiation-induced skin tumours in mice were examined using 8 models, all based on the concept that incidences of radiation-induced tumours depend on a combination of two radiation effects: a tumour induction process and the loss of reproductive integrity by the potential tumour cells. Models with and without a threshold were used, in spite of theoretical objections to threshold models. No model fitted well both the epidermal and the dermal tumour data and models which proved to be statistically satisfactory for some of the data were rejected for biological reasons. It is concluded that, for skin tumours, dose-response curves depending on a combination of cancer induction and loss of cellular reproductive integrity are distorted by some special, relatively radio-resistant, factor which we have previously postulated as being involved in radiation skin carcinogenesis. (author)

  8. A national survey of HDR source knowledge among practicing radiation oncologists and residents: Establishing a willingness-to-pay threshold for cobalt-60 usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot Vega, Raymond; Talcott, Wesley; Ishaq, Omar; Cohen, Patrice; Small, Christina J; Duckworth, Tamara; Sarria Bardales, Gustavo; Perez, Carmen A; Schiff, Peter B; Small, William; Harkenrider, Matthew M

    Ir-192 is the predominant source for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in United States markets. Co-60, with longer half-life and fewer source exchanges, has piloted abroad with comparable clinical dosimetry but increased shielding requirements. We sought to identify practitioner knowledge of Co-60 and establish acceptable willingness-to-pay (WTP) thresholds for additional shielding requirements for use in future cost-benefit analysis. A nationwide survey of U.S. radiation oncologists was conducted from June to July 2015, assessing knowledge of HDR sources, brachytherapy unit shielding, and factors that may influence source-selection decision-making. Self-identified decision makers in radiotherapy equipment purchase and acquisition were asked their WTP on shielding should a more cost-effective source become available. Four hundred forty surveys were completed and included. Forty-four percent were ABS members. Twenty percent of respondents identified Co-60 as an HDR source. Respondents who identified Co-60 were significantly more likely to be ABS members, have attended a national brachytherapy conference, and be involved in brachytherapy selection. Sixty-six percent of self-identified decision makers stated that their facility would switch to a more cost-effective source than Ir-192, if available. Cost and experience were the most common reasons provided for not switching. The most common WTP value selected by respondents was decision makers to establish WTP for shielding costs that source change to Co-60 may require. These results will be used to establish WTP threshold for future cost-benefit analysis. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biocrust spatial distribution at landscape scale is strongly controlled by terrain attributes: Topographic thresholds for colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raúl Román Fernández, José; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Chamizo de la Piedra, Sonia; Roncero Ramos, Bea; Cantón Castilla, Yolanda

    2017-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are spatially variable components of soil. Whereas biogeographic, climatic or soil properties drive biocrust distribution from regional to global scales, biocrust spatial distribution within the landscape is controlled by topographic forces that create specific microhabitats that promote or difficult biocrust growth. By knowing which are the variables that control biocrust distribution and their individual effect we can establish the abiotic thresholds that limit natural biocrust colonization on different environments, which may be very useful for designing soil restoration programmes. The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of topographic-related variables in the distribution of different types of biocrust within a semiarid catchment where cyanobacteria and lichen dominated biocrust represent the most important surface components, El Cautivo experimental area (SE Spain). To do this, natural coverage of i) bare soil, ii) vegetation, iii) cyanobacteria-dominated soil crust and iv) lichen-dominated soil crust were measured on 70 experimental plots distributed across 23 transect (three 4.5 x 4.5 m plots per transect). Following that, we used a 1m x 1m DEM (Digital Elevation Model) of the study site obtained from a LiDAR point cloud to calculate different topographic variables such as slope gradient, length slope (LS) factor (potential sediment transport index), potential incoming solar radiation, topographic wetness index (WI) and maximum flow accumulation. Canonical Correspondence Analysis was performed to infer the influence of each variable in the coverage of each class and thresholds of biocrust colonization were identified mathematically by means of linear regression analysis describing the relationship between each factor and biocrust cover. Our results show that the spatial distribution of cyanobacteria-dominated biocrust, which showed physiological and morphological adaptation to cope with drought and UVA

  10. Responses of a grassland arthropod community to chronic beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styron, C.E.; Dodson, G.J.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A long-term project was initiated in 1968 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess effects of mixed beta and gamma radiation from simulated fallout on a grassland ecosystem. Beta and gamma radiation dose rates in microhabitats of the experimentally contaminated enclosure were measured with LiF thermoluminescent microdosimeters. Extensive statistical analyses of data on numbers of individuals collected for each of 76 arthropod and 2 molluscan taxa have identified no lasting significant changes in similarity or species diversity of experimental versus control communities as the result of the long-term irradiation at low dose rates. Natural fluctuations in community dynamics obscured any possible radiation effects. Thus, the apparent threshold for mixed beta and gamma radiation inducing changes in community structure must be above the exposure rate range of 2.3 to 13 rad/day delivered during the 5 yr of observation. Establishing such a threshold is of importance in assessing the impact of communities subjected to chronic, low level environmental exposure to ionizing radiation

  11. A study on the life extension of polymer materials under radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. J.; Park, S. W.; Cho, S. H.; Hong, S. S

    2000-12-01

    The object of this study is to improve the stability and the economic profit by reducing the radiation-induced degradation rate of polymer material used under the radiation environment. So far, the resistance to radiation-induced oxidation of a polymer has been improved by the stabilizers. They can play an important role in the anti-oxidants that interrupt the radical-mediated oxidation chain reaction. The stabilization effect could be larger than that achieved in an inert-atmosphere irradiation. Stabilization is a function of stabilizer concentration up to a certain threshold, but it is not further improved above this concentration. Beyond the threshold, the rate of radiation-induced oxidation goes up to the rate that is characteristic for the unstabilized polymer. To make up for this weakness, a technique depositing a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the polymer surface was developed for protecting the radiation-induced oxidation in the air.

  12. A study on the life extension of polymer materials under radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. J.; Park, S. W.; Cho, S. H.; Hong, S. S.

    2000-12-01

    The object of this study is to improve the stability and the economic profit by reducing the radiation-induced degradation rate of polymer material used under the radiation environment. So far, the resistance to radiation-induced oxidation of a polymer has been improved by the stabilizers. They can play an important role in the anti-oxidants that interrupt the radical-mediated oxidation chain reaction. The stabilization effect could be larger than that achieved in an inert-atmosphere irradiation. Stabilization is a function of stabilizer concentration up to a certain threshold, but it is not further improved above this concentration. Beyond the threshold, the rate of radiation-induced oxidation goes up to the rate that is characteristic for the unstabilized polymer. To make up for this weakness, a technique depositing a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the polymer surface was developed for protecting the radiation-induced oxidation in the air

  13. Radiation protection. Basic concepts of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained. Main international organizations for radiation protection are United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The UNSCEAR objectively summarizes and publishes scientific findings; ICRP, an NGO, takes part in recommending the radiological protection from the expertized aspect; and IAEA, a UN autonomy, aims at peaceful usage of atomic power. These organizations support the legal regulation and standard of nations. The purpose of the ICRP recommendation (Pub. 103, 2007) is to contribute to the appropriate protection of radiation hazardous effects, which are assumed to be linearly proportional (the model of linear no-threshold, LNT) that radiation risk exists even at the lowest dose. When a change in the single cell results in hazardous alteration, the causative effects are called stochastic effects, which include the mutation leading to cancer formation and genetic effect in offspring (not observed in man). ICRP says the validity of LNT for the stochastic effects essentially from the protective aspect, although epidemiological data support it at >100 mSv exposure. The deterministic effects are caused by loss of cell itself or of its function, where the threshold is defined to be the dose causing >1% of disorder or death. Radiation protective system against exposure is on the situation (programmed, emergent and natural), category (occupational, public and medical) and 3 principles of justification, optimization and application of dose limit. (T.T.)

  14. Effect of radiation on the long term productivity of a plant based CELSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, B.G.; Lake, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations occur at a higher rate in space than under terrestrial conditions, primarily due to an increase in radiation levels. These mutations may effect the productivity of plants found in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Computer simulations of plants with different ploidies, modes of reproduction, lethality thresholds, viability thresholds and susceptibilities to radiation induced mutations were performed under space normal and solar flare conditions. These simulations identified plant characteristics that would enable plants to retain high productivities over time in a CELSS

  15. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  16. Intermediate structure and threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2004-01-01

    The Intermediate Structure, evidenced through microstructures of the neutron strength function, is reflected in open reaction channels as fluctuations in excitation function of nuclear threshold effects. The intermediate state supporting both neutron strength function and nuclear threshold effect is a micro-giant neutron threshold state. (author)

  17. Nuclear threshold effects and neutron strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia

    2003-01-01

    One proves that a Nuclear Threshold Effect is dependent, via Neutron Strength Function, on Spectroscopy of Ancestral Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the Nuclear Threshold Effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function. Evidence for relation of Nuclear Threshold Effects to Neutron Strength Functions is obtained from Isotopic Threshold Effect and Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly. The empirical and computational analysis of the Isotopic Threshold Effect and of the Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly demonstrate their close relationship to Neutron Strength Functions. It was established that the Nuclear Threshold Effects depend, in addition to genuine Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, on Spectroscopy of (Ancestral) Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function, in their dependence on mass number. This result constitutes also a proof that the origins of these threshold effects are Neutron Single Particle States at zero energy. (author)

  18. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefonov, O V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Il'ina, I V; Agranat, M B

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 10 11 – 10 13 W cm -2 . (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Epidemiology and ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourguignon, M.; Masse, R.; Slama, R.; Spira, A.; Timarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Billon, S.; Rogel, A.; Telle Lamberton, M.; Catelinois, O.; Thierry, I.; Grosche, B.; Ron, E.; Vathaire, F. de; Cherie Challine, L.; Donadieu, J.; Pirard, Ph.; Bloch, J.; Setbon, M.

    2004-01-01

    The ionizing radiations have effects on living being. The determinist effects appear since a threshold of absorbed dose of radiation is reached. In return, the stochastic effects of ionizing radiations are these ones whom apparition cannot be described except in terms of probabilities. They are in one hand, cancers and leukemia, on the other hand, lesions of the genome potentially transmissible to the descendants. That is why epidemiology, defined by specialists as the science that studies the frequency and distribution of illness in time and space, the contribution of factors that determine this frequency and this distribution among human populations. This issue gathers and synthesizes the knowledge and examines the difficulties of methodologies. It allows to give its true place to epidemiology. (N.C.)

  20. Non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    The still growing use of non-ionizing radiation such as ultraviolet radiation laser light, ultrasound and infrasound, has induced growing interest in the effects of these types of radiation on the human organism, and in probable hazards emanating from their application. As there are up to now no generally approved regulations or standards governing the use of non-ionizing radiation and the prevention of damage, it is up to the manufacturers of the relevant equipment to provide for safety in the use of their apparatus. This situation has led to a feeling of incertainty among manufacturers, as to how which kind of damage should be avoided. Practice has shown that there is a demand for guidelines stating limiting values, for measuring techniques clearly indicating safety thresholds, and for safety rules providing for safe handling. The task group 'Non-ionizing radiation' of the Radiation Protection Association started a programme to fulfill this task. Experts interested in this work have been invited to exchange their knowledge and experience in this field, and a collection of loose leaves will soon be published giving information and recommendations. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Growth, spectroscopy and laser operation of Ho:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambunathan, V. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n. E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Mateos, X., E-mail: xavier.mateos@urv.cat [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n. E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 2A Max-Born-Str., D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Loiko, P.A. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n. E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Center for Optical Materials and Technologies, Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Serres, J.M. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, c/ Marcellí Domingo, s/n. E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Griebner, U.; Petrov, V. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, 2A Max-Born-Str., D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Yumashev, K.V. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies, Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., 220013 Minsk (Belarus); and others

    2016-11-15

    Monoclinic Ho:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals doped with up to 7.5 at.% Ho are grown by the Top Seeded Solution Growth-Slow Cooling method. The evolution of their unit cell parameters in dependence on the Ho doping and temperature is studied. The polarized low-temperature (6 K) optical absorption of the Ho{sup 3+} ion is investigated in detail to determine the energy of the Stark sub-levels. Room-temperature absorption, stimulated-emission and gain cross-section spectra of Ho:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals are derived for polarizations parallel to the principal optical axes, E||N{sub p}, N{sub m} and N{sub g}. The maximum absorption cross-section for the {sup 5}I{sub 8}→{sup 5}I{sub 7} transition is 1.60×10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} at 1961.0 nm and the maximum stimulated-emission cross-section for the {sup 5}I{sub 7}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is 2.65×10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} at 2056.3 nm (for E||N{sub m}). The radiative lifetime of the upper laser level of the Ho{sup 3+} ion ({sup 5}I{sub 7}) amounts to 4.8 ms. Continuous-wave Ho{sup 3+} laser operation is achieved under in-band pumping by a Tm laser at 1946 nm. In the microchip configuration, the maximum output power reached 205 mW at 2105 nm with a slope efficiency as high as 85%.

  2. The threshold vs LNT showdown: Dose rate findings exposed flaws in the LNT model part 1. The Russell-Muller debate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, Edward J., E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu

    2017-04-15

    This paper assesses the discovery of the dose-rate effect in radiation genetics and how it challenged fundamental tenets of the linear non-threshold (LNT) dose response model, including the assumptions that all mutational damage is cumulative and irreversible and that the dose-response is linear at low doses. Newly uncovered historical information also describes how a key 1964 report by the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) addressed the effects of dose rate in the assessment of genetic risk. This unique story involves assessments by two leading radiation geneticists, Hermann J. Muller and William L. Russell, who independently argued that the report's Genetic Summary Section on dose rate was incorrect while simultaneously offering vastly different views as to what the report's summary should have contained. This paper reveals occurrences of scientific disagreements, how conflicts were resolved, which view(s) prevailed and why. During this process the Nobel Laureate, Muller, provided incorrect information to the ICRP in what appears to have been an attempt to manipulate the decision-making process and to prevent the dose-rate concept from being adopted into risk assessment practices. - Highlights: • The discovery of radiation dose rate challenged the scientific basis of LNT. • Radiation dose rate occurred in males and females. • The dose rate concept supported a threshold dose-response for radiation.

  3. The threshold vs LNT showdown: Dose rate findings exposed flaws in the LNT model part 1. The Russell-Muller debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper assesses the discovery of the dose-rate effect in radiation genetics and how it challenged fundamental tenets of the linear non-threshold (LNT) dose response model, including the assumptions that all mutational damage is cumulative and irreversible and that the dose-response is linear at low doses. Newly uncovered historical information also describes how a key 1964 report by the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) addressed the effects of dose rate in the assessment of genetic risk. This unique story involves assessments by two leading radiation geneticists, Hermann J. Muller and William L. Russell, who independently argued that the report's Genetic Summary Section on dose rate was incorrect while simultaneously offering vastly different views as to what the report's summary should have contained. This paper reveals occurrences of scientific disagreements, how conflicts were resolved, which view(s) prevailed and why. During this process the Nobel Laureate, Muller, provided incorrect information to the ICRP in what appears to have been an attempt to manipulate the decision-making process and to prevent the dose-rate concept from being adopted into risk assessment practices. - Highlights: • The discovery of radiation dose rate challenged the scientific basis of LNT. • Radiation dose rate occurred in males and females. • The dose rate concept supported a threshold dose-response for radiation.

  4. A ram-pressure threshold for star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    In turbulent fragmentation, star formation occurs in condensations created by converging flows. The condensations must be sufficiently massive, dense and cool to be gravitationally unstable, so that they start to contract; and they must then radiate away thermal energy fast enough for self-gravity to remain dominant, so that they continue to contract. For the metallicities and temperatures in local star-forming clouds, this second requirement is only met robustly when the gas couples thermally to the dust, because this delivers the capacity to radiate across the full bandwidth of the continuum, rather than just in a few discrete spectral lines. This translates into a threshold for vigorous star formation, which can be written as a minimum ram pressure PCRIT ˜ 4 × 10-11 dyne. PCRIT is independent of temperature, and corresponds to flows with molecular hydrogen number density n_{{H_2.FLOW}} and velocity vFLOW satisfying n_{{H_2.FLOW}} v_{FLOW}^2≳ 800 cm^{-3} (km s^{-1})^2. This in turn corresponds to a minimum molecular hydrogen column density for vigorous star formation, N_{{H_2.CRIT}} ˜ 4 × 10^{21} cm^{-2} (ΣCRIT ˜ 100 M⊙ pc-2), and a minimum visual extinction AV, CRIT ˜ 9 mag. The characteristic diameter and line density for a star-forming filament when this threshold is just exceeded - a sweet spot for local star formation regions - are 2RFIL ˜ 0.1 pc and μFIL ˜ 13 M⊙ pc-2. The characteristic diameter and mass for a prestellar core condensing out of such a filament are 2RCORE ˜ 0.1 pc and MCORE ˜ 1 M⊙. We also show that fragmentation of a shock-compressed layer is likely to commence while the convergent flows creating the layer are still ongoing, and we stress that, under this circumstance, the phenomenology and characteristic scales for fragmentation of the layer are fundamentally different from those derived traditionally for pre-existing layers.

  5. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Comic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Degenhardt, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 μm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The custom-made radiation-hard front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The TRT was successfully commissioned with data collected from several million cosmic ray muons. A specia...

  6. Solar energy R + D programme, 1979-1983. Project F: solar radiation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Individual presentations report work in the following areas: production of test reference years for model simulation of solar systems and components; global radiation atlas for horizontal surfaces; radiation data on inclined surfaces; intensity thresholds and cumulative frequency curves; useful energy output from solar collectors; network comparison of pyranometers; measurements of turbidity, spectral radiation, etc.; satellite data. (LEW)

  7. Mn{sub 0.95}I{sub 0.02}[PO{sub 3}(OH)] · 2H{sub 2}O phosphate–iodate, an inorganic analogue of phosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belokoneva, E. L., E-mail: elbel@geol.msu.ru; Dimitrova, O. V.; Volkov, A. S. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The new Mn{sub 0.95}I{sub 0.02}[PO{sub 3}(OH)] · 2H{sub 2}O phosphate–iodate (space group Pnam = Pnma, D{sub 2h}{sup 16}) is obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure is determined without preliminary knowledge of the chemical formula. The structure consists of layers of MnO{sub 6} octahedra connected with PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Water molecules are located between the layers. [IO3]{sup –} groups having a typical umbrella-like coordination are statistically implanted in layers of MnO{sub 6} octahedra at a distance of 1.2 Å from Mn atoms. Their content in the crystal is minor. The structures of the phosphate–iodate coincides with the structures of phosphonates with consideration for the replacement of one (OH) vertex of the PO{sub 4} tetrahedron by the organic methyl radical CH{sub 3}. In the structures of phosphonates and earlier studied phosphates, identical layers are distinguished and the cause of the existence of two MDO varieties is established based on the analysis within the OD theory. Possible hybrid structures derived from the prototypes under consideration are predicted.

  8. Impact of environmental radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhawat, Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    A clean environment is essential for human health because the interaction between the environment and human health shows the complexity. Air pollution, less water quality, noise etc directly affects the health. Climate change, depletion of ozone layer, loss of biodiversity and degradation of land can also affect human health. Most of the modern technologies produce radiations in the environment having both beneficial and harmful effects through radioactive material. Natural radioactive sources include Cosmic radiation comes from the sun and outer space is absorbed by the atmosphere, a small amount reaches the earth's surface to which we are exposed. The exposure to this type of radiation is higher for people living above sea level. Radon is produced through the decay of uranium and thorium that are found naturally in the earth's crust. Primordial and terrestrial radiation are present in rocks and soils and occur when naturally radioactive isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium decay within the earth's crust. Artificial (or man-made) radioactive sources include Fallout radiation, which results from past atmospheric nuclear bomb tests (1950s and 1960s many test explosions). Each environmental change, whether occurring as a natural phenomenon or through human intervention, changes the ecological balance and context within which disease hosts or vectors and parasites breed, develop, transmit disease. Today, radiation is a common used in medicine to diagnose illnesses, research to treat diseases and industry to generate electricity in nuclear power reactors. Radiation is energy that moves through space or matter at a very high speed. This energy can be in the form of particles, such as alpha or beta particles, which are emitted from radioisotopes. Radioactive Material is material that contains an unstable atomic nucleus releases radiation in the process of changing to a stable form. There are two types of health effects from radiation - threshold and non threshold

  9. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Ganguly, Ranjan [Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700098 (India); Puri, Ishwar K., E-mail: ikpuri@vt.ed [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Peclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Peclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction I{sub T} of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio I{sub N} of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters I{sub T}and I{sub N} but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged. - Research highlights: > Analytical model of magnetic fluid hyperthermia of tumor tissue perfused with magnetic nanoparticles that is surrounded

  10. Perspectives in the paradigm of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugakhara, T.; Vatanabe, M.; Niva, O.; Nikajdo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is analysed as a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression. This model includes the mutation of oncogenes and the loss of hetrezygosity by tumor-suppressor genes. The threshold concept of radiation cancerogenesis is proposed, under which ionizing radiation can induce in somatic cell genetic effects a s result of DNA damage and epigenetic changes as well. The epigenetic changes (through DNA or cytoplasma) can be stabilized as mutations observed in many cancer cells and play a dominant role in radiation cancerogenesis induction. The ration of epigenetic and genetic effects largely depends on radiation doses

  11. Method and apparatus for logging a borehole employing dual radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for logging a characteristic of a borehole in an earth formation employing nuclear count rate data selectively compensated for non-standard borehole conditions, comprising: a sonde, movable in a borehole, having: a radiation source for emitting radiation into earth formations adjacent the wellbore; first detector, spaced longitudinally from the radiation source, for detecting radiation scattered back to the detector and generating a first signal representative of a first count rate value, C/sub SS/; and second detector spaced a different longitudinal distance from the radiation source, for detecting radiation scattered back to the detector and generating a second signal representative of a count rate value, C/sub LS/; memory means for storing a predetermined threshold value, first predetermined relationships between the borehole characteristic and count rate values C/sub LS/, C/sub SS/; and second predetermined relationships between the borehole characteristic and ratios of C/sub LS/ to C/sub SS/; electronic means for producing a signal related in value to the borehole characteristic, which electronic means compares at least one of the first and second count rate value signals with the predetermined threshold value; means for recording the signal generated by the electronic means

  12. A New Wavelet Threshold Function and Denoising Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the effects of denoising, this paper introduces the basic principles of wavelet threshold denoising and traditional structures threshold functions. Meanwhile, it proposes wavelet threshold function and fixed threshold formula which are both improved here. First, this paper studies the problems existing in the traditional wavelet threshold functions and introduces the adjustment factors to construct the new threshold function basis on soft threshold function. Then, it studies the fixed threshold and introduces the logarithmic function of layer number of wavelet decomposition to design the new fixed threshold formula. Finally, this paper uses hard threshold, soft threshold, Garrote threshold, and improved threshold function to denoise different signals. And the paper also calculates signal-to-noise (SNR and mean square errors (MSE of the hard threshold functions, soft thresholding functions, Garrote threshold functions, and the improved threshold function after denoising. Theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that the proposed approach could improve soft threshold functions with constant deviation and hard threshold with discontinuous function problems. The proposed approach could improve the different decomposition scales that adopt the same threshold value to deal with the noise problems, also effectively filter the noise in the signals, and improve the SNR and reduce the MSE of output signals.

  13. A local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation for PET target volume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drever, Laura; Robinson, Don M.; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Current radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy rely on the precise delivery of high doses of radiation to well-defined volumes. CT, the imaging modality that is most commonly used to determine treatment volumes cannot, however, easily distinguish between cancerous and normal tissue. The ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to more readily differentiate between malignant and healthy tissues has generated great interest in using PET images to delineate target volumes for radiation treatment planning. At present the accurate geometric delineation of tumor volumes is a subject open to considerable interpretation. The possibility of using a local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation to accurately delineate PET target cross sections is investigated using well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes. Contrast levels which yield correct volumetric quantification are found to be a function of the activity concentration ratio between target and background, target size, and slice location. Possibilities for clinical implementation are explored along with the limits posed by this form of segmentation

  14. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Yong [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belinsky, Steven [Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung, and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis, which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  15. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marcilei A.G.; Cirne, K.H.; Gimenez, S.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Medina, N.H.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de; Seixas Junior, L.E.; Melo, W. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Paulo Archer, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with

  16. Effect of active-region “volume” on the radiative properties of laser heterostructures with radiation output through the substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekorkin, S. M.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Baidus, N. V.; Dikareva, N. V., E-mail: dnat@ro.ru; Vikhrova, O. V. [Nizhny Novgorod State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation); Afonenko, A. A.; Ushakov, D. V. [Belarussian State University (Belarus)

    2017-01-15

    The radiative properties of InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP laser structures with radiation output through the substrate depending on the number of quantum wells in the active region and laser diodes on their basis are investigated. It is established that the presence of six–eight quantum wells in the active region is optimum from the viewpoint of observable values of the threshold current and the output optical power of lasers.

  17. Tissue misrepair hypothesis for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei

    1991-01-01

    Dose-response curves for chronic leukemia in A-bomb survivors and liver tumors in patients given Thorotrast (colloidal thorium dioxide) show large threshold effects. The existence of these threshold effects can be explained by the following hypothesis. A high dose of radiation causes a persistent wound in a cellrenewable tissue. Disorder of the injured cell society partly frees the component cells from territorial restraints on their proliferation, enabling them to continue development of their cellular functions toward advanced autonomy. This progression might be achieved by continued epigenetic and genetic changes as a result of occasional errors in the otherwise concerted healing action of various endogeneous factors recruited for tissue repair. Carcinogenesis is not simply a single-cell problem but a cell-society problem. Therefore, it is not warranted to estimate risk at low doses by linear extrapolation from cancer data at high doses without knowledge of the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. (author) 57 refs

  18. Threshold behavior in electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghpour, H.R.; Greene, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Ever since the classic work of Wannier in 1953, the process of treating two threshold electrons in the continuum of a positively charged ion has been an active field of study. The authors have developed a treatment motivated by the physics below the double ionization threshold. By modeling the double ionization as a series of Landau-Zener transitions, they obtain an analytical formulation of the absolute threshold probability which has a leading power law behavior, akin to Wannier's law. Some of the noteworthy aspects of this derivation are that the derivation can be conveniently continued below threshold giving rise to a open-quotes cuspclose quotes at threshold, and that on both sides of the threshold, absolute values of the cross sections are obtained

  19. Radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuszer, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    A circuit is disclosed that detects radiation transients and provides a clamping signal in response to each transient. The clamping signal is present from the time the transient rises above a given threshold level and for a known duration thereafter. The system includes radiation sensors, a blocking oscillator that generates a pulse in response to each sensor signal, and an output pulse duration control circuit. The oscillator pulses are fed simultaneously to the output pulse duration control circuit and to an OR gate, the output of which comprises the system output. The output pulse duration is controlled by the time required to magnetize a magnetic core to saturation in first one direction and then the other

  20. A comparison of ionizing radiation damage in CMOS devices from 60Co gamma rays, electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi

    2009-01-01

    Radiation hardened CC4007RH and non-radiation hardened CC4011 devices were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays, 1 MeV electrons and 1-9 MeV protons to compare the ionizing radiation damage of the gamma rays with the charged particles. For all devices examined, with experimental uncertainty, the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays are equal to that of 1 MeV electron and 1-7 MeV proton radiation under 0 gate bias condition. Under 5 V gate bias condition, the distinction of threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays and 1 MeV electrons irradiation are not large, and the radiation damage for protons below 9 MeV is always less than that of 60 Co gamma rays. The lower energy the proton has, the less serious the radiation damage becomes. (authors)

  1. Epistemological limitation for attributing health effects to natural radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, Abel J.

    2010-01-01

    The attribution of health effects to prolonged radiation exposure situations, such as those experienced in nature, is a challenging problem. The paper describes the epistemological limitations for such attribution it demonstrate that in most natural exposure situations, the theory of radiation-related sciences is not capable to provide the scientific evidence that health effects actually occur (or do not occur) and, therefore, that radiation effects are attributable to natural exposure situations and imputable to nature. Radiation exposure at high levels is known to provoke health effects as tissue reactions. If individuals experience these effects they can be attributed to the specific exposure with a high degree of confidence under the following conditions: the dose incurred have been higher that the relevant dose-threshold for the specific effect; and an unequivocal pathological diagnosis is attainable ensuring that possible competing causes have been eliminated. Only under these conditions, the occurrence of the effect may be properly attested and attributed to the exposure. However, even high levels of natural radiation exposure are lower than relevant dose-thresholds for tissue reactions and, therefore, natural radiation exposure is generally unable to cause these type of effects. One exception to this general rule could be situations of high levels of natural radiation exposure that might be sufficient to induce opacities in the lens of the eyes (which could be considered a tissue-reaction type of effect)

  2. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  3. Near infrared and upconversion luminescence behaviour of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped boro-tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheshvaran, K. [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute - Deemed University, Gandhigram - 624302, India and Department of Physics, K.S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Trichengode - 637215 (India); Arunkumar, S., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Vijayakumar, R., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Marimuthu, K., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute − Deemed University, Gandhigram - 624302 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The broadband NIR and upconversion luminescence behavior in a new series of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped TeO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SrO-BaO-Li{sub 2}O-LiF glasses have been studied exciting at a wavelength of 980 nm using semiconductor laser. A broadband emission is observed from 1450 to 1650 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) around 165 nm in 0.5wt% Yb{sup 3+} ion content E0.5YLTB glass. The radiative parameters such as transition probability (A), stimulated emission cross-section (σ{sup E}), experimental and calculated branching ratios (β{sub R}), optical gain width (σ{sub p}×FWHM) and radiative lifetime (τ{sub cal}) have been calculated for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} NIR emission. Upconversion luminescence spectra of the prepared glasses have been studied and the ESA and ET processes have also been discussed and reported.

  4. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  5. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify kera...

  6. The biological effects of exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios for exposure to ionising radiation range from natural background radiation (chronic) to the explosions of atomic bombs (acute), with some medical, industrial and research exposures lying between these extremes. Biological responses to radiation that predominate at high doses incurred at high dose rates are different from those that predominate at low doses and low dose rates. Single doses from bomb explosions ranged up to many thousand mGy. Acute doses greater than about 1000 mGy cause acute radiation syndrome (ARS). Below this threshold, radiation has a variety of potential latent health effects: Change to the incidence of cancer is the most usual subject of attention but change to longevity may be the best overall measure because decreased incidences of non-cancer mortality have been observed to coincide with increased incidence of cancer mortality. Acute doses greater than 500 mGy cause increased risks of cancer and decreased life expectancy. For doses less than 100 mGy, beneficial overall health effects ('radiation hormesis') have been observed. At the other end of the spectrum, chronic exposure to natural radiation has occurred throughout evolution and is necessary for the normal life and health of current species. Dose rates greater than the present global average of about 2 mGy per year have either no discernible health effect or beneficial health effects up to several hundred mGy per year. It is clearly not credible that a single health effects model -- such as the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of risk estimation -- could fit all latent health effects. A more realistic model is suggested.

  7. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    , called Threshold Activation Detection (TAD), is to utilize appropriate substances that can be selectively activated by the fission neutrons and not by the source radiation and then measure the radioactively decaying activation products (typically beta and gamma rays) well after the source pulse. The activation material should possess certain properties: a suitable half-life of the order of seconds; an energy threshold below which the numerous source neutrons will not activate it (e.g., 3 MeV); easily detectable activation products (typically >1 MeV beta and gamma rays) and have a usable cross-section for the selected reaction. Ideally the substance would be a part of the scintillator. There are several good material candidates for the TAD, including fluorine, which is a major constituent of available scintillators such as BaF 2, CaF 2 and hydrogen free liquid fluorocarbon. Thus the fluorine activation products, in particular the beta particles, can be measured with a very high efficiency in the detector. The principles, applications and experimental results obtained with the fluorine based TAD are discussed.

  8. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    , called Threshold Activation Detection (TAD), is to utilize appropriate substances that can be selectively activated by the fission neutrons and not by the source radiation and then measure the radioactively decaying activation products (typically beta and gamma rays) well after the source pulse. The activation material should possess certain properties: a suitable half-life of the order of seconds; an energy threshold below which the numerous source neutrons will not activate it (e.g., 3 MeV); easily detectable activation products (typically >1 MeV beta and gamma rays) and have a usable cross-section for the selected reaction. Ideally the substance would be a part of the scintillator. There are several good material candidates for the TAD, including fluorine, which is a major constituent of available scintillators such as BaF 2 , CaF 2 and hydrogen free liquid fluorocarbon. Thus the fluorine activation products, in particular the beta particles, can be measured with a very high efficiency in the detector. The principles, applications and experimental results obtained with the fluorine based TAD are discussed.

  9. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozani, Tsahi, E-mail: tgozani@rapiscansystems.com [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Stevenson, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    material. The technique, called Threshold Activation Detection (TAD), is to utilize appropriate substances that can be selectively activated by the fission neutrons and not by the source radiation and then measure the radioactively decaying activation products (typically beta and gamma rays) well after the source pulse. The activation material should possess certain properties: a suitable half-life of the order of seconds; an energy threshold below which the numerous source neutrons will not activate it (e.g., 3 MeV); easily detectable activation products (typically >1 MeV beta and gamma rays) and have a usable cross-section for the selected reaction. Ideally the substance would be a part of the scintillator. There are several good material candidates for the TAD, including fluorine, which is a major constituent of available scintillators such as BaF{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and hydrogen free liquid fluorocarbon. Thus the fluorine activation products, in particular the beta particles, can be measured with a very high efficiency in the detector. The principles, applications and experimental results obtained with the fluorine based TAD are discussed.

  10. Some nonscientific influences on radiation protection standards and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The theme of this lecture is that we have sufficient knowledge about the biomedical effects of ionizing radiation for adequate radiation protection but the problem of controlling radiation uses is complicated by philosophical, sociological, political, economic and moral considerations. The scientific problem of 'thresholds' and some nonscientific factors which may influence protection practices and hence influence the setting of numerical protection standards are discussed. The influence of the media on public opinion and the need for public education is stressed. (U.K.)

  11. Protection of the skin against occupational and operational ultraviolet and thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1980-01-01

    When irradiation with short wave ultraviolet (UVB) exceed the threshold doses, the eye as well as the skin react with an acute inflammation. After chronic exposure to both radiations the skin is altered as a farmers skin. Thermal visible and infrared radiation may produce a local combustion or a livedo or a general hyperthermia. Many possibilities of an occupational exposition to natural or artificial optical radiation are listed. Until now no exposure limits have been recommended in the Federal Republic of Germany. The biologic effective radiant exposure can be calculated from the spectral distribution of the irradiance. The resulting value should be clearly lower than the threshold doses for the UV-keratoconjunctivitis and for the UV-erythema of the skin. Artificial light sources have to be closed exept the useful radiation beam. When this is impossible and in case of natural radiation, the skin must be shielded by clothing and/or by sunscreen preparations. Photosensitizers as tar products have to be kept away from the skin. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 HIS [de

  12. Problems of dose rate in radiation protection regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Some modern problems of Radiation Safety Standards are discussed. It is known that Standards are based on the Linear-Non-Threshold Concept (LNTC) of radiation risk, which is now called by many experts as conservative. It is thought it is necessary to include in the Standards such factor as dose rate or duration of irradiation. Some model of effects of radiation exposure with taking into account the reparation of cell damage is presented. The practical method for assessment of effects of duration of irradiation on detriments is proposed.(author)

  13. Determination of the detection limit and decision threshold for ionizing radiation measurements. Part 2: Fundamentals and application to counting measurements with the influence of sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This part of ISO 11929 addresses the field of ionizing radiation measurements in which events (in particular pulses) on samples are counted after treating them (e.g. aliquotation, solution, enrichment, separation). It considers, besides the random character of radioactive decay and of pulse counting, all other influences arising from sample treatment, (e.g. weighing, enrichment, calibration or the instability of the test setup). ISO 11929 consists of the following parts, under the general title Determination of the detection limit and decision threshold for ionizing radiation measurements: Part 1: Fundamentals and application to counting measurements without the influence of sample treatment; Part 2: Fundamentals and application to counting measurements with the influence of sample treatment; Part 3: Fundamentals and application to counting measurements by high resolution gamma spectrometry, without the influence of sample treatment; Part 4: Fundamentals and application to measurements by use of linear scale analogue ratemeters, without the influence of sample treatment. This part of ISO 11929 was prepared in parallel with other International Standards prepared by WG 2 (now WG 17): ISO 11932:1996, Activity measurements of solid materials considered for recycling, re-use or disposal as non radioactive waste, and ISO 11929-1, ISO 11929-3 and ISO 11929-4 and is, consequently, complementary to these documents

  14. Dose effect relationships in cervical and thoracic radiation myelopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdorff, B.

    1980-01-01

    The course and prognosis of radiation myelopathies are determined by 3 factors: the segmental (vertical) location of the lesion, the extent of the transverse syndrome (complete or incomplete) and the radiation dose. The median spinal dose in cervical radiation myelopathies with fatal outcome was higher than in survivals with an incomplete transverse syndrome. In thoracic radiation myelopathies a dose difference between complete and incomplete transverse syndromes could be found as well. Incomplete transverse syndromes as submaximum radiation injuries are more suitable for the determination of the spinal tolerance dose than complete transverse syndromes. The lowest threshold could be stated for cases following high-volume irradiation of the lymphatic system. (Auth.)

  15. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  16. Allopurinol gel mitigates radiation-induced mucositis and dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Junichi; Nasu, Masanori; Okumura, Hayato; Matsumoto, Shigeji; Shibata, Akihiko; Makino, Kimiko; Terada, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    It has not been verified whether allopurinol application is beneficial in decreasing the severity of radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. Rats were divided into 4 groups and received 15 Gy irradiation on the left whisker pad. Group 1 received only irradiation. Group 2 was maintained by applying allopurinol/carrageenan-mixed gel (allopurinol gel) continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. Group 3 had allopurinol gel applied for 20 days after radiation. Group 4 was maintained by applying carrageenan gel continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. The intra oral mucosal and acute skin reactions were assessed daily using mucositis and skin score systems. The escape thresholds for mechanical stimulation to the left whisker pad were measured daily. In addition, the irradiated tissues at the endpoint of this study were compared with naive tissue. Escape threshold in group 2 was significantly higher than that in group 1, and mucositis and skin scores were much improved compared with those of group 1. Concerning escape threshold, mucositis and skin scores in group 3 began to improve 10 days after irradiation. Group 4 showed severe symptoms of mucositis and dermatitis to the same extent as that observed in group 1. In the histopathological study, the tissues of group 1 showed severe inflammatory reactions, compared with those of group 2. These results suggest that allopurinol gel application can mitigate inflammation reactions associated with radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. (author)

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on the human body are the consequences of biological ones. They have been observed from the first few years after the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity: between 1902 and 1907, 170 cases of various lesions attributable to radiation were described. The pathological manifestations which result from a radio-exposure are of two kinds: short-term effects which inevitably occur after certain thresholds have been exceeded. More often than not they are reversible, their severity being a function of the dose; and delayed effects, slowly evolving, apparently random, more often than not irreversible. Here it is not the severity but the probability of their appearance which is proportional to the dose. It is, at the present time, impossible statistically, to prove the existence or non-existence of thresholds for delayed effect; thus, in the fixing of norms, the ICRP has cautiously chosen the hypothesis of the absence of thresholds, assuming a linear dose/effect relationship. This has probably led to an over-estimation of the risks associated with weak doses. Radio-exposure can be total, affecting the entire body, or may be localized in all or part of a specific organ or tissue

  18. About the principles of radiation level normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    The paper highlights the impact being made by the radiation level normalization principles upon the social and economic indicators. The newly introduced radiation safety standards - 97 are taken as an example. It is emphasized that it is necessary to use a sound approach while defining radiation protection standards, taking into consideration economic and social factors existing in Ukraine at the moment. Based on the concept of the natural radiation background and available results of the epidemiological surveys, the dose limits are proposed for the radiation protection standards. The paper gives a description of the dose limitation system recommended by the International Committee for Radiation Protection. The paper highlights a negative impact of the line non threshold concept, lack of special knowledge in the medical service and mass media to make decisions to protect people who suffered from the Chernobyl accident

  19. Effect of Tritium on Cracking Threshold in 7075 Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Morgan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-02-28

    The effect of long-term exposure to tritium gas on the cracking threshold (KTH) of 7075 Aluminum Alloy was investigated. The alloy is the material of construction for a cell used to contain tritium in an accelerator at Jefferson Laboratory designed for inelastic scattering experiments on nucleons. The primary safety concerns for the Jefferson Laboratory tritium cell is a tritium leak due to mechanical failure of windows from hydrogen isotope embrittlement, radiation damage, or loss of target integrity from accidental excessive beam heating due to failure of the raster or grossly mis-steered beam. Experiments were conducted to investigate the potential for embrittlement of the 7075 Aluminum alloy from tritium gas.

  20. Small-threshold behaviour of two-loop self-energy diagrams: two-particle thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berends, F.A.; Davydychev, A.I.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow; Smirnov, V.A.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow

    1996-01-01

    The behaviour of two-loop two-point diagrams at non-zero thresholds corresponding to two-particle cuts is analyzed. The masses involved in a cut and the external momentum are assumed to be small as compared to some of the other masses of the diagram. By employing general formulae of asymptotic expansions of Feynman diagrams in momenta and masses, we construct an algorithm to derive analytic approximations to the diagrams. In such a way, we calculate several first coefficients of the expansion. Since no conditions on relative values of the small masses and the external momentum are imposed, the threshold irregularities are described analytically. Numerical examples, using diagrams occurring in the standard model, illustrate the convergence of the expansion below the first large threshold. (orig.)

  1. Determining color difference thresholds in denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiabao; Lin, Hong; Huang, Qingmei; Zheng, Gang

    2015-11-01

    In restorative prostheses, color is important, but the choice of color difference formula used to quantify color change in acrylic resins is not straightforward. The purpose of this in vitro study was to choose a color difference formula that best represented differences between the calculated color and the observed imperceptible to unacceptable color and to determine the corresponding perceptibility and acceptability threshold of color stability for denture base acrylic resins. A total of 291 acrylic resin denture base plates were fabricated and subjected to radiation tests from zero to 42 hours in accordance with ISO 7491:2000. Color was measured with a portable spectrophotometer, and color differences were calculated with 3 International Commission on Illumination (CIE) formulas: CIELab, CMC(1:1), and CIEDE2000. Thirty-four observers with no deficiencies in color perception participated in psychophysical perceptibility and acceptability assessments under controlled conditions in vitro. These 2 types of assessments were regressed to each observer by each formula to generate receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Areas under the curves (AUCs) were then calculated and analyzed to exclude observers with poor color discrimination. AUCs were subjected to 1-way ANOVA (α=.05) to deter the statistical significance of discriminability among the 3 formulas in terms of perceptibility and acceptability judgments. Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α=.05) were used for post hoc comparison. CMC(1:1) and CIEDE2000 formulas performed better for imperceptible to unacceptable color differences, with corresponding CMC(1:1) and CIEDE2000 values for perceptibility of 2.52 and 1.72, respectively, and acceptability thresholds of 6.21 and 4.08, respectively. Formulas CMC(1:1) and CIEDE2000 possess higher discriminability than that of CIELab in the assessment of perceptible color difference threshold of denture base acrylic resin. A statistically significant difference exists

  2. Radiation monitoring data representation for duty personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.L.; Kiselev, V.P.; Krasnoperov, S.N.; Kudeshov, E.V.; Maslov, S.Y.; Semin, N.N.; Sirotinskiy, S.E.; Yakovlev, V.Y. [Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (NSI RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Currently, Web-GIS technologies are widely used to generate a reliable and intuitive web-based interface to monitor the current radiation situation in various regions of the Russian Federation. The developed 'Server Web-Monitoring' web-application is intended for duty personnel and can operate not only on desktop computers but also on mobile devices. The subsystem of duty personnel notification about any Off-Normal Situation (ONS) (such as: critical threshold exceedances or failures in operation of monitoring systems) is also considered in the paper. Three types of Automated Radiation Monitoring Systems (ARMS) are available for monitoring: - regional ARMS; - facility-level ARMS; - ARMS of nuclear power plant surveillance areas. Google Maps and Google Maps API toolbox are used as the cartographic basis. In the general-monitoring window only general information on each of the local systems is available. Next, the operator can move to monitoring of local ARMS he is interested in. The operator can either view a list of Radiation Situation Monitoring Posts (RSMP) showing the current data in the right frame or hide it and use the map only. Viewing the log of critical threshold exceedances for 24 hours and a report on all RSMPs of a given system over the last 7 days is also possible. The report contains maximum values of measurements for every day and for each RSMP. The developed web-application includes: - monitoring of the radiation situation and its changes on the general map of the Russian Federation and on maps of local ARMS; - displaying 7-day reports for all RSMPs of the selected ARMS; - displaying the log of critical threshold exceedances recorded over the past day. The notification subsystem informs duty personnel on all ONS, namely, on critical threshold exceedances in the incoming data and failures in operation of monitoring systems. The key features of the notification subsystem are: - round-the-clock functioning; - automatic notification in case of

  3. Treatment Effects and Sequelae of Radiation Therapy for Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu, E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Tomita, Naoto [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Iijima, Yasuhito [Department of Ophthalmology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Minagawa, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Among extranodal lymphomas, orbital mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a relatively rare presentation. We performed a review to ascertain treatment efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy for orbital MALT lymphoma. We also evaluated changes in visual acuity after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with orbital MALT lymphoma underwent radiation therapy with curative intent. Clinical stages at diagnosis were stage I{sub E}A in 29 patients and stage II{sub E}A in 1 patient. Total doses of 28.8 to 45.8 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 15 to 26 fractions (median, 16 fractions) were delivered to the tumors. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period of 2 to 157 months (median, 35 months) after treatment. Two patients had relapses that arose in the cervical lymph node and the ipsilateral palpebral conjunctiva outside the radiation field at 15 and 67 months after treatment, respectively. The 5-year local progression-free and relapse-free rates were 100% and 96%, respectively. All 30 patients are presently alive; the overall and relapse-free survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 96%, respectively. Although 5 patients developed cataracts of grade 2 at 8 to 45 months after irradiation, they underwent intraocular lens implantation, and their eyesight recovered. Additionally, there was no marked deterioration in the visual acuity of patients due to irradiation, with the exception of cataracts. No therapy-related toxicity of grade 3 or greater was observed. Conclusions: Radiation therapy was effective and safe for patients with orbital MALT lymphoma. Although some patients developed cataracts after irradiation, visual acuity was well preserved.

  4. Optimum structures for gamma-ray radiation resistant SiC-MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitomo, Satoshi; Matsuda, Takuma; Murata, Koichi; Yokoseki, Takashi [Saitama University, Sakuraku (Japan); National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Takasaki (Japan); Makino, Takahiro; Takeyama, Akinori; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Takasaki (Japan); Okubo, Shuichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Kandori, Mikio; Yoshie, Toru [Sanken Electric Co., Ltd., Niiza, Saitama (Japan); Hijikata, Yasuto [Saitama University, Sakuraku (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    In order to develop highly radiation-tolerant SiC MOSFETs, we investigated the dependence of the gamma-ray radiation response on the gate oxide thickness and nitridation processes, used for oxide growth and p-well implantation. SiC MOSFETs with a thick gate oxide (60 nm) showed a rapid decrease in the threshold voltage shift ΔV{sub th} of more than 400 kGy, and transitioned to the normally-on state at lower doses than those with a thin gate oxide (35 nm). The MOSFETs with gate oxides treated with lower concentrations of N{sub 2}O (10%) demonstrated a higher radiation tolerance (ΔV{sub th}, channel mobility, and subthreshold swing) than with a 100% N{sub 2}O treatment. The MOSFETs with more p-well implantation steps (three steps) showed a smaller negative shift of the threshold voltage relative to those implanted with two steps. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. [Effects of radiation exposure on human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Sasatani, Megumi

    2012-03-01

    There are two types of radiation health effect; acute disorder and late on-set disorder. Acute disorder is a deterministic effect that the symptoms appear by exposure above a threshold. Tissues and cells that compose the human body have different radiation sensitivity respectively, and the symptoms appear in order, from highly radiosensitive tissues. The clinical symptoms of acute disorder begin with a decrease in lymphocytes, and then the symptoms appear such as alopecia, skin erythema, hematopoietic damage, gastrointestinal damage, central nervous system damage with increasing radiation dose. Regarding the late on-set disorder, a predominant health effect is the cancer among the symptoms of such as cancer, non-cancer disease and genetic effect. Cancer and genetic effect are recognized as stochastic effects without the threshold. When radiation dose is equal to or more than 100 mSv, it is observed that the cancer risk by radiation exposure increases linearly with an increase in dose. On the other hand, the risk of developing cancer through low-dose radiation exposure, less 100 mSv, has not yet been clarified scientifically. Although uncertainty still remains regarding low level risk estimation, ICRP propound LNT model and conduct radiation protection in accordance with LNT model in the low-dose and low-dose rate radiation from a position of radiation protection. Meanwhile, the mechanism of radiation damage has been gradually clarified. The initial event of radiation-induced diseases is thought to be the damage to genome such as radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Recently, it is clarified that our cells could recognize genome damage and induce the diverse cell response to maintain genome integrity. This phenomenon is called DNA damage response which induces the cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, cell senescence and so on. These responses act in the direction to maintain genome integrity against genome damage, however, the death of large number of

  6. States and properties of metallic systems at a threshold breakdown of the through holes under power laser action (part 2. Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikov E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Threshold breakdown of the through holes by power laser radiation of metallic foils is considered as response of metallic system to laser radiation. Binding experimentally determined response to the absolute temperature scale allows to determine the value of the imaginary part of the generalized susceptibility depending on temperature, the critical temperature of the transition “liquid metal - gas”, states of the electronic subsystems at this temperature, and the reflectance coefficient values.

  7. Photoionization studies of atoms and molecules using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Photoionization studies of free atoms and molecules have undergone considerable development in the past decade, in large part due to the use of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of synchrotron radiation has permitted the study of photoionization processes near valence-and core-level ionization thresholds for atoms and molecules throught the Periodic Table. A general illustration of these types of study will be presented, with emphasis on a few of the more promising new directions in atomic and molecular physics being pursued with synchrotron radiation. (author) [pt

  8. Proposal of radiation exposure index, REXI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki

    2002-01-01

    As a measure of harmful effect of radiation, radiation exposure index (REXI) is proposed. It is an integer expression of logarithmic ratio of radiation dose to a standard value. REXI is a dimensionless quantity and is free from the requirement of additivity, in contrast with dose. Not a few kinds of doses are used in the field of radiation protection and among them the effective dose plays main role, since the main target of radiation control is of the so-called stochastic effect and the effective dose is used as the controlling quantity. Effective dose is a radiation dose, namely, a quantity of caused to describe the effect, but it cannot be a representation of the effect itself. It is nothing but a measure of possibility of the effect. In addition, the LNT (linearity and non threshold) Postulation adopted by ICRP makes it difficult to understand the foreseen associated effect quantitatively. (author)

  9. Test of the linear-no threshold theory of radiation carcinogenesis for inhaled radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations - rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers - are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found. (author)

  10. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Desouky; Nan Ding; Guangming Zhou

    2015-01-01

    For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT), possible ris...

  11. Current features on risk perception and risk communication of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1997-01-01

    Health effects and risks of radiation and radionuclides are being misunderstood by many members of general public. Many peoples have fear and anxieties for radiation. So far, the health effects from radiation at low dose and low dose rate have not been cleared on biological aspects. Then, we have quantitatively estimated health risks of low-dose radiation on the basis of linear dose response relationship without threshold from the viewpoints of radiation protection by using both epidemiological data, such as atomic bomb survivors, and some models and assumptions. It is important for researchers and relevant persons in radiation protection to understand the process of risk estimation of radiation and to communicate an exact knowledge of radiation risks of the public members. (author)

  12. Observation of parametric X-ray radiation in an anomalous diffraction region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, V.I., E-mail: vial@x4u.lebedev.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Eliseyev, A.N., E-mail: elisseev@pluton.lpi.troitsk.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Irribarra, E., E-mail: esteban.irribarra@epn.edu.ec [Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ladrón de Guevara E11-253, Quito (Ecuador); Kishin, I.A., E-mail: ivan.kishin@mail.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Kubankin, A.S., E-mail: kubankin@bsu.edu.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation); Nazhmudinov, R.M., E-mail: fizeg@bk.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belgorod National Research University, 85 Pobedy st., Belgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-19

    A new possibility to expand the energy region of diffraction processes based on the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline structures is presented. Diffracted photons related to parametric X-ray radiation produced by relativistic electrons are detected below the low energy threshold for the X-ray diffraction mechanism in crystalline structures for the first time. The measurements were performed during the interaction of 7 MeV electrons with a textured polycrystalline tungsten foil and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal. The experiment results are in good agreement with a developed model based on the PXR kinematical theory. The developed experimental approach can be applied to separate the contributions of real and virtual photons to the total diffracted radiation generated during the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline targets. - Highlights: • Parametric X-ray radiation below the low energy threshold for diffraction of free X-rays. • Experimental separation of the contributions from different radiation mechanisms. • PXR from relativistic electrons in mosaic crystals and textured polycrystlas.

  13. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Woods

    Full Text Available Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water, a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1 and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2 were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  14. Changes in smell acuity induced by radiation exposure of the olfactory mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophir, D.; Guterman, A.; Gross-Isseroff, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on smell acuity were assessed in 12 patients in whom the olfactory mucosa was exposed to radiation in the course of treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma or pituitary adenoma. Olfactory detection thresholds for two odorants (amyl acetate and eugenol) were determined before the start of radiation therapy, within a week of termination of therapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months later. The results show clearly that smell acuity is profoundly affected by therapeutic irradiation. Thresholds had increased in all 12 patients by the end of treatment and were still high one month later. Varying degrees of recovery were noted in most patients three to six months after cessation of treatment. The fate of the sense of smell deserves more attention when considering the disability caused by irradiation to certain head and neck tumors

  15. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  16. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  17. A numerical study of threshold states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ata, M.S.; Grama, C.; Grama, N.; Hategan, C.

    1979-01-01

    There are some experimental evidences of charged particle threshold states. On the statistical background of levels, some simple structures were observed in excitation spectrum. They occur near the coulombian threshold and have a large reduced width for the decay in the threshold channel. These states were identified as charged cluster threshold states. Such threshold states were observed in sup(15,16,17,18)O, sup(18,19)F, sup(19,20)Ne, sup(24)Mg, sup(32)S. The types of clusters involved were d, t, 3 He, α and even 12 C. They were observed in heavy-ions transfer reactions in the residual nucleus as strong excited levels. The charged particle threshold states occur as simple structures at high excitation energy. They could be interesting both from nuclear structure as well as nuclear reaction mechanism point of view. They could be excited as simple structures both in compound and residual nucleus. (author)

  18. Homeopathy with radiation?; Homoeopathie mit Strahlen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Juergen

    2017-07-01

    There are no reliable data to estimate radiation risk to humans below doses of about 100 mSv. The ICRP adopts for protection purposes the LNT(linear no threshold)-concept. As there is no evidence for its general validity there is room for other ideas. One is ''radiation hormesis'', i.e. the notion that low radiation doses are not harmful but rather beneficial to human health. This view is critically discussed and it is shown that there is no evidence to prove this conception neither from epidemiological studies nor convincingly from animal experiments or mechanistic investigations. There is, therefore, no reason to abandon the prudent approach of the ALARA-principle.

  19. Impact of PET reconstruction algorithm and threshold on dose painting of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudtsen, Ingerid Skjei; Elmpt, Wouter van; Öllers, Michel; Malinen, Eirik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the current work, we investigate the impact of PET reconstruction methods (RMs) and threshold on two types of dose painting (DP) prescription strategies for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Sixteen patients with NSCLC underwent an 18F-FDG-PET/CT examination prior to radiotherapy. Six different RMs were used. For both a dose painting by contours (DPBC) and a dose painting by numbers (DPBN) strategy, the prescribed radiation dose within the gross tumor volume (GTV) was mapped according to the spatial distribution of standardized uptake values (SUVs). SUV max and SUV peak were used for volume thresholding in DPBC and a linear SUV-dose scaling approach was used for DPBN. Deviations from the dose prescription as determined by the standard RM was scored by a quality factor (QF). Results: For DPBC, the mean difference in thresholded boost volume between RMs was typically within 10%. The difference in dose prescription was systematically lower for thresholding based on SUV peak (largest mean QF 2.8 ± 2.0%) compared to SUV max (largest mean QF 3.6 ± 3.0%). For DPBN, the resulting dose prescriptions were less dependent on RM and threshold; the largest mean QFs were 1.3 ± 0.3% both for SUV max and SUV peak . Conclusions: PET reconstruction algorithms will both influence DPBC and DPBN, although the impact is smaller for DPBN. For some patients, the resulting variations in dose prescriptions may result in clinically different dose distributions. SUV peak is a more robust thresholding parameter than SUV max

  20. Assessment of radioactive contaminations of the ground in Hanover-List with scales and methods of the German Federal Ordinance on Soil Protection and Contaminated Sites (BBodSchV). Pt. 2. Application of test thresholds and determination of need for actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellermann, Rainer; Guenther, Petra; Evers, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper test thresholds for radionuclides in soil have been derived on the basis of methods and scales of the German Ordinance on Soil Protection (BBodSchV). In this paper, these test thresholds are checked with regard to their plausibility. Materials, methods, results are described in Part 1 of this paper. This contribution demonstrates that the test thresholds derived in Part 1 are plausible and feasible according to the requirements of the established methods. The epidemiological basis for the treatment of ionizing radiation is well founded. Risks can be quantified via the knowledge of cancer risks due to radiation. As a reference value the overall fatal risk coefficient of 5 % per Sv recommended by ICRP is used. The test thresholds obtained are sufficiently far from background levels in soils of northern Germany. Consequently, the test thresholds are applicable without any background corrections. Exposures by external radiation outdoors and exposures by inhalation of radon in cellar rooms result in calculated test thresholds in the order of background levels. Nevertheless, feasible results are obtained because in the case of toxic substances without threshold levels the additional exposures are considered for determination of test thresholds. The approach of test thresholds for radioactive soil contamination presented in Part 1 of this paper complies with the criteria of the German methods for calculation of test thresholds in soil protection regarding plausibility and feasibility. It enables the soil protection authorities to assess radioactive contaminations of the ground according to the established rules in the field of soil protection and to make decisions according to Articles 9 and 10 of the German Soil Protection Act. Part 3 of this paper discusses the application of the test thresholds and the possibilities of determining the need for remediation actions. (orig.)

  1. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisko Salomaa

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  2. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  3. Emergency Entry with One Control Torque: Non-Axisymmetric Diagonal Inertia Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Eduardo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In another work, a method was presented, primarily conceived as an emergency backup system, that addressed the problem of a space capsule that needed to execute a safe atmospheric entry from an arbitrary initial attitude and angular rate in the absence of nominal control capability. The proposed concept permits the arrest of a tumbling motion, orientation to the heat shield forward position and the attainment of a ballistic roll rate of a rigid spacecraft with the use of control in one axis only. To show the feasibility of such concept, the technique of single input single output (SISO) feedback linearization using the Lie derivative method was employed and the problem was solved for different number of jets and for different configurations of the inertia matrix: the axisymmetric inertia matrix (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) = I(sub zz)), a partially complete inertia matrix with I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I(sub zz), I(sub xz) not = 0 and a realistic complete inertia matrix with I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I)sub zz), I(sub ij) not= 0. The closed loop stability of the proposed non-linear control on the total angle of attack, Theta, was analyzed through the zero dynamics of the internal dynamics for the case where the inertia matrix is axisymmetric (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) = I(sub zz)). This note focuses on the problem of the diagonal non-axisymmetric inertia matrix (I(sub xx) > I(sub yy) > I(sub zz)), which is half way between the axisymmetric and the partially complete inertia matrices. In this note, the control law for this type of inertia matrix will be determined and its closed-loop stability will be analyzed using the same methods that were used in the other work. In particular, it will be proven that the control system is stable in closed-loop when the actuators only provide a roll torque.

  4. Conceptions of nuclear threshold status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews some alternative definitions of nuclear threshold status. Each of them is important, and major analytical confusions would result if one sense of the term is mistaken for another. The motives for nations entering into such threshold status are a blend of civilian and military gains, and of national interests versus parochial or bureaucratic interests. A portion of the rationale for threshold status emerges inevitably from the pursuit of economic goals, and another portion is made more attraction by the derives of the domestic political process. Yet the impact on international security cannot be dismissed, especially where conflicts among the states remain real. Among the military or national security motives are basic deterrence, psychological warfare, war-fighting and, more generally, national prestige. In the end, as the threshold phenomenon is assayed for lessons concerning the role of nuclear weapons more generally in international relations and security, one might conclude that threshold status and outright proliferation coverage to a degree in the motives for all of the states involved and in the advantages attained. As this paper has illustrated, nuclear threshold status is more subtle and more ambiguous than outright proliferation, and it takes considerable time to sort out the complexities. Yet the world has now had a substantial amount of time to deal with this ambiguous status, and this may tempt more states to exploit it

  5. Judd–Ofelt analysis and transition probabilities of Er{sup 3+} doped KY{sub 1−x−y}Gd{sub x}Lu{sub y}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon, E-mail: jon.martinez@uam.es [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lifante, Ginés [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pujol, Maria Cinta; Aguiló, Magdalena; Díaz, Francesc [Física i Cristalografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Cantelar, Eugenio [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    In this work the transition probabilities, radiative lifetimes and branching ratios of Er{sup 3+} ions in KY{sub 1−x−y}Gd{sub x}Lu{sub y}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals have been determined. With this aim, Er{sup 3+} doped KY{sub 1−x−y}Gd{sub x}Lu{sub y}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals have been grown by means of the high temperature Top-Seeded Solution Growth. A spectroscopic analysis of Er{sup 3+} ions in this crystal has been performed following anisotropic Judd–Ofelt analysis to obtain basic spectroscopic properties. A quantum efficiency over 97% has been determined for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition, indicating that this material is adequate for the development of lasers and amplifiers working in the third telecommunication window. - Highlights: • Er{sub 0.01}:KY{sub 1−x−y}Gd{sub x}Lu{sub y}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystals have been grown. • Anisotropic Judd Ofelt analysis has been carried out. • Optical transition probabilities and branching ratios have been calculated. • Radiative and non-radiative lifetimes have been obtained.

  6. Radiation-resistant requirements analysis of device and control component for advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tai Gil; Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. Y.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    It is known that high levels of radiation can cause significant damage by altering the properties of materials. A practical understanding of the effects of radiation - how radiation affects various types of materials and components - is required to design equipment to operate reliably in a gamma radiation environment. When designing equipment to operate in a high gamma radiation environment, such as will be present in a nuclear spent fuel handling facility, several important steps should be followed. In order to active test of the advanced spent fuel management process, the radiation-resistant analysis of the device and control component for active test which is concerned about the radiation environment is conducted. Also the system design process is analysis and reviewed. In the foreign literature, 'threshold' values are generally reported. the threshold values are normally the dose required to begin degradation in a particular material property. The radiation effect analysis for the device of vol-oxidation and metalization, which are main device for the advanced spent fuel management process, is performed by the SCALE 4.4 code. 5 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  7. Photodissociation thresholds of OH produced from CH sub 3 OH in solid neon and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, B M; Lo, W J; Lee, Y P

    2001-01-01

    Photodissociation thresholds of OH from CH sub 3 OH in solid Ne and Ar were determined via photolysis of CH sub 3 OH/Ne and CH sub 3 OH/Ar (1/200) samples in situ at 4 K. The samples were irradiated with VUV synchrotron radiation after dispersion by a Seya-Namioka monochromator. The OH photo-product was detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence technique. The increase of fluorescent intensity of OH was monitored and recorded after the matrix sample was irradiated at different wavelengths for 3-5 min. Photodissociation threshold energies of 7.13+-0.02 eV (174.0+-0.5 nm) and 7.08+-0.04 eV (175.0+-1.0 nm) were measured for OH production of CH sub 3 OH in solid Ne and Ar, respectively.

  8. On the radiation of electric, magnetic and toroidal dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.; Stepanovskij, Yu.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the radiation of electric, magnetic and toroidal dipoles uniformly moving in unbounded medium (this corresponds to the Tamm-Frank problem). The densities of these dipoles are obtained from the corresponding charge-current densities in an infinitesimal limit. The behaviour of radiation intensities in the neighbourhood of the Cherenkov threshold β = 1/n is investigated. The frequency and velocity regions are defined where radiation intensities are maximal. The comparison with previous attempts is given. We consider also the radiation of electric, magnetic and toroidal dipoles uniformly moving in medium, in a finite space interval (this corresponds to the Tamm problem). The properties of radiation arising from the precession of a magnetic dipole are studied

  9. On the Radiation of Electric, Magnetic and Toroidal Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, G N

    2002-01-01

    We consider the radiation of electric, magnetic and toroidal dipoles uniformly moving in unbounded medium (this corresponds to the Tamm-Frank problem). The densities of these dipoles are obtained from the corresponding charge-current densities in an infinitesimal limit. The behaviour of radiation intensities in the neighbourhood of the Cherenkov threshold beta=1/n is investigated. The frequency and velocity regions are defined where radiation intensities are maximal. The comparison with previous attempts is given. We consider also the radiation of electric, magnetic and toroidal dipoles uniformly moving in medium, in a finite space interval (this corresponds to the Tamm problem). The properties of radiation arising from the precession of a magnetic dipole are studied.

  10. Classification of radiation effects for dose limitation purposes: history, current situation and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes cancer and non-cancer health effects, each of which differs greatly in the shape of the dose–response curve, latency, persistency, recurrence, curability, fatality and impact on quality of life. In recent decades, for dose limitation purposes, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has divided such diverse effects into tissue reactions (formerly termed non-stochastic and deterministic effects) and stochastic effects. On the one hand, effective dose limits aim to reduce the risks of stochastic effects (cancer/heritable effects) and are based on the detriment-adjusted nominal risk coefficients, assuming a linear-non-threshold dose response and a dose and dose rate effectiveness factor of 2. On the other hand, equivalent dose limits aim to avoid tissue reactions (vision-impairing cataracts and cosmetically unacceptable non-cancer skin changes) and are based on a threshold dose. However, the boundary between these two categories is becoming vague. Thus, we review the changes in radiation effect classification, dose limitation concepts, and the definition of detriment and threshold. Then, the current situation is overviewed focusing on (i) stochastic effects with a threshold, (ii) tissue reactions without a threshold, (iii) target organs/tissues for circulatory disease, (iv) dose levels for limitation of cancer risks vs prevention of non-life-threatening tissue reactions vs prevention of life-threatening tissue reactions, (v) mortality or incidence of thyroid cancer, and (vi) the detriment for tissue reactions. For future discussion, one approach is suggested that classifies radiation effects according to whether effects are life threatening, and radiobiological research needs are also briefly discussed. PMID:24794798

  11. Use of radiation and radiation practices 1994. Events and statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havukainen, R.

    1995-05-01

    In Finland, there were 1,745 valid safety licences for the use of radiation at the end of 1994. In addition, 2,050 sites were included in the compulsory registration for dental x-ray diagnostics. The register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety listed 12,794 radiation sources and 316 radionuclide laboratories. The import of radioactive substances amounted to 4.6x10 15 Bq and export to 2.2x10 13 Bq. A total of 1.4x10 13 Bq of short-lived radionuclides were produced in Finland. Workers monitored for radiation exposure included 11,147 employees on 1,294 work sites. Of these, 27% received an annual dose exceeding the recording threshold. The total dose recorded in the dose register (sum of personal dosemeter readings) was 75 man Sv in 1994, nuclear power plant employees accounting for 70% of this total. The annual dosemeter reading of ten medical doctors (radiologists, international radiologists and cardiologists) and five nuclear power plant employees was equal to or in excess of 20 mSv. Effective dose, however, did not exceed the dose limit of 50 mSv established for a one-year monitoring period

  12. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  13. Low-threshold amplitude discriminator circuit with tunnel diode and two transistors in differential connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba, J.; Volny, J.

    1973-01-01

    The connection is designed of a low-threshold amplitude discriminator and a tunnel diode with two transistors in differential connection. The discriminator is by its simple connection, its low consumption and high temperature stability suitable especially for portable radiation detectors. The tunnel diode is connected by one pole to a collector clamp and by the other to the supply voltage. A suitable resistor is connected in parallel with the tunnel diode to meet demands for higher sensitivity. (Z.S.)

  14. Compartmentalization in environmental science and the perversion of multiple thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, W. [Institute of Radiation Hygiene of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, D 85716 Oberschleissheim, Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-04-17

    Nature and living organisms are separated into compartments. The self-assembly of phospholipid micelles was as fundamental to the emergence of life and evolution as the formation of DNA precursors and their self-replication. Also, modern science owes much of its success to the study of single compartments, the dissection of complex structures and event chains into smaller study objects which can be manipulated with a set of more and more sophisticated equipment. However, in environmental science, these insights are obtained at a price: firstly, it is difficult to recognize, let alone to take into account what is lost during fragmentation and dissection; and secondly, artificial compartments such as scientific disciplines become self-sustaining, leading to new and unnecessary boundaries, subtly framing scientific culture and impeding progress in holistic understanding. The long-standing but fruitless quest to define dose-effect relationships and thresholds for single toxic agents in our environment is a central part of the problem. Debating single-agent toxicity in splendid isolation is deeply flawed in view of a modern world where people are exposed to low levels of a multitude of genotoxic and non-genotoxic agents. Its potential danger lies in the unwarranted postulation of separate thresholds for agents with similar action. A unifying concept involving toxicology and radiation biology is needed for a full mechanistic assessment of environmental health risks. The threat of synergism may be less than expected, but this may also hold for the safety margin commonly thought to be a consequence of linear no-threshold dose-effect relationship assumptions.

  15. Thresholding magnetic resonance images of human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-mao HU; Wieslaw L NOWINSKI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, methods are proposed and validated to determine low and high thresholds to segment out gray matter and white matter for MR images of different pulse sequences of human brain. First, a two-dimensional reference image is determined to represent the intensity characteristics of the original three-dimensional data. Then a region of interest of the reference image is determined where brain tissues are present. The non-supervised fuzzy c-means clustering is employed to determine: the threshold for obtaining head mask, the low threshold for T2-weighted and PD-weighted images, and the high threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Supervised range-constrained thresholding is employed to determine the low threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Thresholding based on pairs of boundary pixels is proposed to determine the high threshold for T2- and PD-weighted images. Quantification against public data sets with various noise and inhomogeneity levels shows that the proposed methods can yield segmentation robust to noise and intensity inhomogeneity. Qualitatively the proposed methods work well with real clinical data.

  16. Near threshold fatigue testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, D. C.; Strum, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) behavior provides a basis for the design and evaluation of components subjected to high cycle fatigue. Typically, the near-threshold fatigue regime describes crack growth rates below approximately 10(exp -5) mm/cycle (4 x 10(exp -7) inch/cycle). One such evaluation was recently performed for the binary alloy U-6Nb. The procedures developed for this evaluation are described in detail to provide a general test method for near-threshold FCGR testing. In particular, techniques for high-resolution measurements of crack length performed in-situ through a direct current, potential drop (DCPD) apparatus, and a method which eliminates crack closure effects through the use of loading cycles with constant maximum stress intensity are described.

  17. Radiation-sensitive material and method of recording information upon radiation-sensitive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.V.; Krjuchin, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    The invention can be employed for recording binary information in memory units of electronic computers, in video-recording equipment, laser recording devices and other recording means. The proposed radiation-sensitive material comprises a metallic layer made of silver, or copper, or nickel, or thallium, or alloy thereof, an inorganic material layer made of arsenic chalcogenide, or antimony chalcogenide, or bismuth chalcogenide, and a separation layer disposed between the metallic layer and the inorganic material layer made of a material which is inert relative to said layers, which separation layer has a thickness sufficient for preventing interaction between the metallic layer and the inorganic material layer when the radiation-sensitive materials is exposed to electromagnetic or corpuscular radiation having a power density lower than a threshold value required for the breakdown of the separation layer in the area exposed to radiation. The separation layer can be made from As, Sb, Si or Ge or their oxides, metallic oxides of e.g. Al, Ti, V or Fe, or from polyorganosiloxane films. (author)

  18. Individual radiation response of parotid glands investigated by dynamic 11C-methionine PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buus, Simon; Grau, Cai; Munk, Ole Lajord; Rodell, Anders; Jensen, Kenneth; Mouridsen, Kim; Keiding, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Previously, we showed that the net metabolic clearance of 11 C-methionine of the parotid gland, K, calculated from dynamic 11 C-methionine PET, can be used as a measure of parotid gland function. The aim of this study was to investigate by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET the individual radiation dose response relationship of parotid glands in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients were examined by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET after radiotherapy. Parametric images of K were generated, co-registered and compared voxel-by-voxel with the 3D radiation dose plan within the parotid gland to assess the individual radiation dose-function relationship. Results: In each patient, voxel-values of K decreased with increasing radiation dose. Population based analysis showed a sigmoid dose response relationship of parotid gland, from which we estimated a threshold radiation dose of 16 Gy and a mean TD 5 of 30 Gy. TD 5 ranged from 7 to 50 Gy in the group of patients. Conclusions: Individual radiation dose response of parotid glands can be measured by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET. The dose response analysis revealed a sigmoid relationship, a threshold radiation dose of 16 Gy, and a mean TD 5 of 30 Gy

  19. The transient radiation effects and hardness of programmed device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chuanhua; Xu Xianguo; Zhao Hailin

    2014-01-01

    A review and summary of research and development in the investigation of transient ionizing radiation effects in device and cirviut is presented. The transient ionizing radiation effects in two type of programmed device, that's 32 bit Microcontroller and antifuse FPGA, were studied. The expeiment test data indicate: The transient ionizing radiation effects of 32 bit Microcontroller manifested self-motion restart and Latchup, the Latchup threshold was 5 × 10"7 Gy (Si)/s. The transient ionizing radiation effects of FPGA was reset, no Latchup. The relationship of circuit effects to physical mechanisms was analized. A new method of hardness in circiut design was put forward. (authors)

  20. Beta Radiation Enhanced Thermionic Emission from Diamond Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Croot

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-based thermionic emission devices could provide a means to produce clean and renewable energy through direct heat-to-electrical energy conversion. Hindering progress of the technology are the thermionic output current and threshold temperature of the emitter cathode. In this report, we study the effects on thermionic emission caused by in situ exposure of the diamond cathode to beta radiation. Nitrogen-doped diamond thin films were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on molybdenum substrates. The hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond was studied using a vacuum diode setup with a 63Ni beta radiation source-embedded anode, which produced a 2.7-fold increase in emission current compared to a 59Ni-embedded control. The emission threshold temperature was also examined to further assess the enhancement of thermionic emission, with 63Ni lowering the threshold temperature by an average of 58 ± 11 °C compared to the 59Ni control. Various mechanisms for the enhancement are discussed, with a satisfactory explanation remaining elusive. Nevertheless, one possibility is discussed involving excitation of preexisting conduction band electrons that may skew their energy distribution toward higher energies.

  1. Long term variations of the decimetric radio emission of Jupiter (and Saturn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, E.

    1975-01-01

    The Jovian total flux density at decimeter wavelengths is known to possess a short modulation due to the beaming of the synchrotron radiation of the relativistic electrons trapped in the dipole nagnetic field of the planet. The maximum flux (later called Isub(max)) occurs twice per rotation when the Earth is at zero magnetic declination. It has been a matter of dispute for many years to know whether Isub(max) was variable over long periods of time i.e. months and years. After more than a decade of observations it is clear that the flux density of Jupiter is variable (Roberts and Huguenin, 1963; Gerard, 1970; Klein et al., 1972; Berge, 1974; Gerard, 1974, in preparation) at 21, 11 and 6 cm wavelength. (Auth.)

  2. At-Risk-of-Poverty Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Táňa Dvornáková

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC is a survey on households’ living conditions. The main aim of the survey is to get long-term comparable data on social and economic situation of households. Data collected in the survey are used mainly in connection with the evaluation of income poverty and determinationof at-risk-of-poverty rate. This article deals with the calculation of the at risk-of-poverty threshold based on data from EU-SILC 2009. The main task is to compare two approaches to the computation of at riskof-poverty threshold. The first approach is based on the calculation of the threshold for each country separately,while the second one is based on the calculation of the threshold for all states together. The introduction summarizes common attributes in the calculation of the at-risk-of-poverty threshold, such as disposable household income, equivalised household income. Further, different approaches to both calculations are introduced andadvantages and disadvantages of these approaches are stated. Finally, the at-risk-of-poverty rate calculation is described and comparison of the at-risk-of-poverty rates based on these two different approaches is made.

  3. Non-Linear Adaptive Phenomena Which Decrease The Risk of Infection After Pre-Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Motamedifar, M.; Namdari, G.; Taheri, M.; Mortazavi, A.R.; Shokrpour, N.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation can result in resistance to the damage caused by a subsequently high-dose radiation or cause cross-resistance to other non-radiation stressors. Adaptive response contradicts the linear-non-threshold (LNT) dose-response model for ionizing radiation. We have previously reported that exposure of laboratory animals to radiofrequency radiation can induce a survival adaptive response. Furthermore, we ha...

  4. Impact of view reduction in CT on radiation dose for patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcero, E.; Flores, L.; Sánchez, M.G.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.

    2017-01-01

    Iterative methods have become a hot topic of research in computed tomography (CT) imaging because of their capacity to resolve the reconstruction problem from a limited number of projections. This allows the reduction of radiation exposure on patients during the data acquisition. The reconstruction time and the high radiation dose imposed on patients are the two major drawbacks in CT. To solve them effectively we adapted the method for sparse linear equations and sparse least squares (LSQR) with soft threshold filtering (STF) and the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA) to computed tomography reconstruction. The feasibility of the proposed methods is demonstrated numerically. - Highlights: • A method for CT reconstruction is proposed: LSQR-STF-FISTA. • Our method achieve good results in reconstruction of few-view CT. • The reconstruction of projections with Gaussian noise is possible. • Our reconstruction process allows a reduction of time in the data acquisition process. • Our reconstruction process allows a reduction in the radiation exposure in the patients.

  5. In-vivo singlet oxygen threshold doses for PDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Kim, Michele M; Liang, Xing; Finlay, Jarod C; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetry of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is of particular interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects for type-II photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy (PDT). An in-vivo model to determine the singlet oxygen threshold dose, [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh , for PDT was developed. An in-vivo radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor mouse model was used to correlate the radius of necrosis to the calculation based on explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and photosensitizer concentrations. Inputs to the model include five photosensitizer-specific photochemical parameters along with [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh . Photosensitizer-specific model parameters were determined for benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and compared with two other type-II photosensitizers, Photofrin ® and m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) from the literature. The mean values (standard deviation) of the in-vivo [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh are approximately 0.56 (0.26) and 0.72 (0.21) mM (or 3.6×10 7 and 4.6×10 7 singlet oxygen per cell to reduce the cell survival to 1/e) for Photofrin ® and BPD, respectively, assuming that the fraction of generated singlet oxygen that interacts with the cell is 1. While the values for the photochemical parameters (ξ, σ, g , β) used for BPD were preliminary and may need further refinement, there is reasonable confidence for the values of the singlet oxygen threshold doses. In comparison, the [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh value derived from in-vivo mouse study was reported to be 0.4 mM for mTHPC-PDT. However, the singlet oxygen required per cell is reported to be 9×10 8 per cell per 1/ e fractional kill in an in-vitro mTHPC-PDT study on a rat prostate cancer cell line (MLL cells) and is reported to be 7.9 mM for a multicell in-vitro EMT6/Ro spheroid model for mTHPC-PDT. A theoretical analysis is provided to relate the number of in-vitro singlet oxygen required per cell to reach cell killing of 1/ e to in-vivo singlet

  6. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated and Proton Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthan, Anju; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Davies, Diane; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Pawar, Vivek; Bijlani, Akash; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publicly available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusion: Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  7. ITEM Project: Risk Communication on Exposure to Electromagnetic Radiation from Mobile Communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carla; Carpinteiro, Goncalo; Correia, Luis M.; Fernandes, Carlos A.; Serralha, Afonso; Marques, Nuno

    2004-01-01

    The ITEM Project is a pioneer project in Portugal, providing public information on exposure to electromagnetic radiation, essentially due to mobile communication systems. The motivation, the main goals and the Project description are presented in this paper, as well as the website that provides the public dissemination of results and further significant information (www.lx.it.pt/item). This site provides information on different issues related to exposure to radiation, namely results of measurement campaigns conducted by a team on several locations in Portugal, and results of continuous measurements performed by autonomous stations located in public places in collaboration with municipal authorities. The global overview of the results from the measurement campaigns carried out up to present shows that all the analysed locations are in compliance with the radiation thresholds, i.e., all the electric field measured values are below the most restrictive threshold established at European level. (author)

  8. Summary of DOE threshold limits efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.; Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste in DOE sanitary landfills. Waste above a threshold level could be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. After extensive review of a draft threshold guidance document in 1985, a second draft threshold background document was produced in March 1986. The second draft included a preliminary cost-benefit analysis and quality assurance considerations. The review of the second draft has been completed. Final changes to be incorporated include an in-depth cost-benefit analysis of two example sites and recommendations of how to further pursue (i.e. employ) the concept of threshold quantities within the DOE. 3 references

  9. Evidence for beneficial low level radiation effects and radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Low doses in the mGy range cause a dual effect on cellular DNA. One effect concerns a relatively low probability of DNA damage per energy deposition event and it increases proportional with dose, with possible bystander effects operating. This damage at background radiation exposure is orders of magnitudes lower than that from endogenous sources, such as ROS. The other effect at comparable doses brings an easily obeservable adaptive protection against DNA damage from any, mainly endogenous sources, depending on cell type, species, and metabolism. Protective responses express adaptive responses to metabolic perturbations and also mimic oxygen stress responses. Adaptive protection operates in terms of DNA damage prevention and repair, and of immune stimulation. It develops with a delay of hours, may last for days to months, and increasingly disappears at doses beyond about 100 to 200 mGy. Radiation-induced apoptosis and terminal cell differentiation occurs also at higher doses and adds to protection by reducing genomic instability and the number of mutated cells in tissues. At low doses, damage reduction by adaptive protection against damage from endogenous sources predictably outweighs radiogenic damage induction. The analysis of the consequences of the particular low-dose scenario shows that the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for cancer risk is scientifically unfounded and appears to be invalid in favor of a threshold or hormesis. This is consistent with data both from animal studies and human epidemiological observations on low-dose induced cancer. The LNT hypothesis should be abandoned and be replaced by a hypothesis that is scientifically justified. The appropriate model should include terms for both linear and non-linear response probabilities. Maintaining the LNT-hypothesis as basis for radiation protection causes unressonable fear and expenses. (author)

  10. Xenon spectator and diagram L3-M4,5M4,5 Auger intensities near the L3 threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armen, G.B.; Levin, J.C.; Southworth, S.H.; LeBrun, T.; Arp, U.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Calculations based on the theory of radiationless resonant Raman scattering are employed in the interpretation of new XeL 3 -M 4,5 M 4,5 Auger spectra recorded using synchrotron radiation tuned to energies across the L 3 edge. Fits of theoretical line shapes to the spectra are employed in separating intensities due to nd spectator (resonant) and diagram Auger processes. Near-threshold Auger intensity, previously attributed to diagram decay, is found to be due to the large-n spectator lines that result from postcollision-interaction endash induced open-quotes recaptureclose quotes of threshold photoelectrons to nd orbitals. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Radiation protection: concepts and trade offs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedell, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    The acceptance of the non-threshold concept, that some degree of harm results from any exposure to radiation, is stressed in this lecture. The non-threshold basis forces the use of risk estimates for any level of radiation exposure. At low levels this will be possible only by establishing a model which must take into account measurements of biological effect at high doses, the nature of the cellular response to ionizing radiation, and the nature and the character of the ionizing radiation itself. The effects must be consonant with known alterations to the structure and function of the cell. The identification of risk invites a risk benefit interchange which may take several forms: (a) assigning values to hazards and values to benefits and establishing an appropriate balance; (b) creating an array of risk benefit ratios or relationships in appropriate categories. The establishment of a de minimis level which requires no additional determination of benefits should be considered. Since benefit and hazard may have opposing vectors, reconciliation between the two may be required. A format is suggested which includes: (a) individuals with credentials for identifying hazards and determining risk estimates; (b) individuals who may have credentials for assessing benefits; and (c) individuals who will determine whether the interchange between groups has been appropriate and adequate, and whether the needs of the individual and society are being met. Zero risk does not exist. Benefits cannot be obtained without some hazard. It is axiomatic that benefits must fully compensate for any risk

  12. Photoionization study of doubly-excited helium at ultra-high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, G.; Schulz, K.; Domke, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ever since the pioneering work of Madden & Codling and Cooper, Fano & Prats on doubly-excited helium in the early sixties, this system may be considered as prototypical for the study of electron-electron correlations. More detailed insight into these states could be reached only much later, when improved theoretical calculations of the optically-excited {sup 1}P{sup 0} double-excitation states became available and sufficiently high energy resolution ({delta}E=4.0 meV) was achieved. This allowed a systematic investigation of the double-excitation resonances of He up to excitation energies close to the double-ionization threshold, I{sub infinity}=79.003 eV, which stimulated renewed theoretical interest into these correlated electron states. The authors report here on striking progress in energy resolution in this grazing-incidence photon-energy range of grating monochromators and its application to hitherto unobservable states of doubly-excited He. By monitoring an extremely narrow double-excitation resonance of He, with a theoretical lifetime width of less than or equal to 5 {mu}eV, a resolution of {delta}E=1.0 meV (FWHM) at 64.1 eV could be achieved. This ultra-high spectral resolution, combined with high photon flux, allowed the investigation of new Rydberg resonances below the N=3 ionization threshold, I{sub 3}, as well as a detailed comparison with ab-initio calculations.

  13. Bias dependent charge trapping in MOSFETs during 1 and 6 MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinde, N.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Mie University, 5148507 (Japan); Kulkarni, V.R.; Mathakari, N.L.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, Univeristy of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, Univeristy of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)], E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2008-06-15

    To study irradiation-induced charge trapping in SiO{sub 2} and around the SiO{sub 2}-Si interface, depletion n-MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor) were used. The devices were gate biased during 1 and 6 MeV pulsed electron irradiation. The I{sub D}-V{sub DS} (drain current versus drain voltage) and I{sub D}-V{sub GS} (drain current versus gate voltage) characteristics were measured before and after irradiation. The shift in threshold voltage {delta}V{sub T} (difference in threshold voltage V{sub T} before and after irradiation) exhibited trends depending on the applied gate bias during 1 MeV electron irradiation. This behavior can be associated to the contribution of irradiation-induced negative charge {delta}N{sub IT} buildup around the SiO{sub 2}-Si interface to {delta}V{sub T}, which is sensitive to the electron tunneling from the substrates. However, only weak gate bias dependence was observed in 6 MeV electron irradiated devices. Independent of the energy loss and applied bias, the positive oxide trapped charge {delta}N{sub OT} is marginal and can be associated to thin and good quality of SiO{sub 2}. These results are explained using screening of free and acceptor states by the applied bias during irradiation, thereby reducing the total irradiation-induced charges.

  14. New data on the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man: crisis of the prevailing concept of exposure regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.

    1997-01-01

    New data on adaptation to radiation; on the hormesis including hormesis by lung cancer by about 200 mln Americans; on the absence of excess solid cancers by about 100 mln workers of atomic units in the USA; on the equal threshold function for leucemia yield by this cohort and by Japanese AB cohort- are analyzed. The inaccuracy of the linear threshold-free concept of the radiation hazard risk and the equidosimetric values is shown

  15. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvini, Marco; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculation. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  16. Effect of threshold quantization in opportunistic splitting algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Haewoon

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses algorithms to find the optimal threshold and also investigates the impact of threshold quantization on the scheduling outage performance of the opportunistic splitting scheduling algorithm. Since this algorithm aims at finding the user with the highest channel quality within the minimal number of mini-slots by adjusting the threshold every mini-slot, optimizing the threshold is of paramount importance. Hence, in this paper we first discuss how to compute the optimal threshold along with two tight approximations for the optimal threshold. Closed-form expressions are provided for those approximations for simple calculations. Then, we consider linear quantization of the threshold to take the limited number of bits for signaling messages in practical systems into consideration. Due to the limited granularity for the quantized threshold value, an irreducible scheduling outage floor is observed. The numerical results show that the two approximations offer lower scheduling outage probability floors compared to the conventional algorithm when the threshold is quantized. © 2006 IEEE.

  17. Radiation doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Butler, P.; Horrocks, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Patient radiation doses during interventional radiology (IR) procedures may reach the thresholds for radiation-induced skin and eye lens injuries. This study investigates the radiation doses received by patients undergoing cerebral embolization. Measurements were conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Radiotherapy verification films were used in order to visualise the radiation field. For each procedure the fluoroscopic and digital dose-area product, the fluoroscopic time, the total number of acquired images and entrance-skin dose calculated by the angiographic unit were recorded. In this paper, the skin, eye and thyroid glands doses on a sample of patients are presented. From a preliminary study of 13 patients having undergone cerebral embolization, it was deduced that six of them have received a dose above 1 Gy. Detailed dose data from patients undergoing IR procedures will be collected in the future with the aim of developing a model to allow estimation of the dose prior to the procedure as well as to look at techniques of dose reduction. (author)

  18. Thresholds for human detection of patient setup errors in digitally reconstructed portal images of prostate fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Brooke L.; Jiroutek, Michael R.; Tracton, Gregg; Elfervig, Michelle; Muller, Keith E.; Chaney, Edward L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-assisted methods to analyze electronic portal images for the presence of treatment setup errors should be studied in controlled experiments before use in the clinical setting. Validation experiments using images that contain known errors usually report the smallest errors that can be detected by the image analysis algorithm. This paper offers human error-detection thresholds as one benchmark for evaluating the smallest errors detected by algorithms. Unfortunately, reliable data are lacking describing human performance. The most rigorous benchmarks for human performance are obtained under conditions that favor error detection. To establish such benchmarks, controlled observer studies were carried out to determine the thresholds of detectability for in-plane and out-of-plane translation and rotation setup errors introduced into digitally reconstructed portal radiographs (DRPRs) of prostate fields. Methods and Materials: Seventeen observers comprising radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents, physicists, and therapy students participated in a two-alternative forced choice experiment involving 378 DRPRs computed using the National Library of Medicine Visible Human data sets. An observer viewed three images at a time displayed on adjacent computer monitors. Each image triplet included a reference digitally reconstructed radiograph displayed on the central monitor and two DRPRs displayed on the flanking monitors. One DRPR was error free. The other DRPR contained a known in-plane or out-of-plane error in the placement of the treatment field over a target region in the pelvis. The range for each type of error was determined from pilot observer studies based on a Probit model for error detection. The smallest errors approached the limit of human visual capability. The observer was told what kind of error was introduced, and was asked to choose the DRPR that contained the error. Observer decisions were recorded and analyzed using repeated

  19. Radiation and mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    A brief article discusses mental retardation in children who had been exposed to ionizing radiation in utero. The time of greatest sensitivity is between the 8th and 15th week after conception and the time of lesser sensitivity between the 16th and 25th weeks. An examination of the thresholds for exposure indicate that severe mental retardation would not result from any present environmental exposures of the public. (U.K.)

  20. Up-conversion luminescent properties of La{sub (0.80−x)}VO{sub 4}:Yb{sub x}, Er{sub 0.20} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Hwa; Kang, Deok Hwa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Soung Soo, E-mail: ssyi@silla.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kiwan [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jung Hyun [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel green and red emitting LaVO{sub 4}:Yb{sub x}{sup 3+}, Er{sub 0.20}{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized. • Their structures, luminescent properties have also been investigated. • Major laser transition for Er{sup 3+} ion is {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (525 nm). • These results suggest the possibility as photonic devices. - Abstract: Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} co-doped LaVO{sub 4} phosphors were synthesized by solid state reaction method. Yb{sup 3+} concentrations were changed from 0.01 to 0.20 mol for the fixed Er{sup 3+} concentration at 0.2 mol. The crystalline structure of samples was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The red and green up-conversion emissions were observed in Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} co-doped LaVO{sub 4} phosphors under the excitation of 980 nm laser diode. Several emissions in green and red regions of the spectrum were observed near 525 nm, 553 nm and 659 nm radiated by {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, and {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions, respectively.

  1. Electromagnetic theory of the radiative Pierce instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkov, D.N.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The radiative Pierce instability of a relativistic electron beam in a waveguide stabilized by an infinite strong magnetic field is considered. the increment and conditions for instability development in a wide interval of the beam currents are determined on the basis of the perturbation theory. It is shown that the instability has always the Raman character and is threshold less in current for the Pierce boundary conditions. It permits sufficiently strictly to define the instability saturation level from breaking the resonance condition and to estimate the radiation efficiency

  2. Log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheltsov, Ivan A; Shramov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01

    The complex singularity exponent is a local invariant of a holomorphic function determined by the integrability of fractional powers of the function. The log canonical thresholds of effective Q-divisors on normal algebraic varieties are algebraic counterparts of complex singularity exponents. For a Fano variety, these invariants have global analogues. In the former case, it is the so-called α-invariant of Tian; in the latter case, it is the global log canonical threshold of the Fano variety, which is the infimum of log canonical thresholds of all effective Q-divisors numerically equivalent to the anticanonical divisor. An appendix to this paper contains a proof that the global log canonical threshold of a smooth Fano variety coincides with its α-invariant of Tian. The purpose of the paper is to compute the global log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds (altogether, there are 105 deformation families of such threefolds). The global log canonical thresholds are computed for every smooth threefold in 64 deformation families, and the global log canonical thresholds are computed for a general threefold in 20 deformation families. Some bounds for the global log canonical thresholds are computed for 14 deformation families. Appendix A is due to J.-P. Demailly.

  3. Regulatory aspects of the radiation safety in the medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajaroff, P.M.; Arias, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    The biological effects of the ionizing radiations can be stochastic and non-stochastic. These latter show a dose-effect relation with defined level of threshold dose. The stochastic effects lack of the threshold dose and the possibility of their occurrence is proportional to the received dose. The radiation protection objetive is to avoid the occurrence of the non-stochastic effects and to limit the probability of the stochastic effects, based on three principles: justification, dose limitation and optimization. All use of radiation source must be justified by real benefits; nevertheless, the risks are not limited, so dose limits to reduce them must be adopted. In the medical practice, both worker and patient expositions are considered. In case of patients, the concept of dose limits is not applied, but justification and optimization, are used. The Authorities of Radiological Inspection are: the National Atomic Energy Comission for the use of radioactive sources, and the Secretary of Health for X-ray equipments. Both organisms work in coordination since 1967 (M.E.L.) [es

  4. Radiation risks in the 20. Century: reality, illusions and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Average global natural ionizing radiation dose for man is 2.4 mSv/year ranging in various geographical regions from about 1 to 220 mSv/year. At the dawn of life this dose was by a factor of three to five higher than now. The entire man-made contribution to radiation dose is only about 0.2% of natural radiation. From medical radiodiagnostics the average global dose is about 0.5 mSv/year, from nuclear explosions was in 1963 <0.2 mSv/year, from Chernobyl accident was in 1986-1987 0.05 mSv/year, and from nuclear power in 1995 about 0.007 mSv/year. Radiation is rather a weak noxious agent as compared with other natural and man-made hazards. Radiophobia has its source not in real peace-time radiation hazard to population, but in politics and group interests. Current excessive radiation protection standards, e.g. 1mSv/year, are based on an arbitrary assumption on linearity and a lack of threshold in dose/effect relationship, and on ignoring the beneficial effects of low doses of radiation. A whole body dose rate of 1mSv/year causes about 2 DNA damages in each cell. This can be compared with 70 million natural DNA damaging events occurring in each cell per year. Regulations based on this assumption lead to the wasting of resources desperately needed to deal with real health problems, and to strangulation of development of environmentally and human friendly nuclear technologies. Radiation standards should be based on 'practical threshold', one below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or genetic effects is not expected. (author)

  5. Isospin breaking in pion-nucleon scattering at threshold by radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, Torleif Eric Oskar

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dispersive contribution by radiative processes such as (pi- proton to neutron gamma) and (pi- proton to Delta gamma) to the pion-nucleon scattering lengths of charged pions in the heavy baryon limit. They give a large isospin violating contribution in the corresponding isoscalar scattering length, but only a small violation in the isovector one. These terms contribute 6.3(3)% to the 1s level shift of pionic hydrogen and give a chiral constant F_pi^2f_1=-25.8(8) MeV.

  6. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  7. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  8. Validity of the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis in setting radiation protection regulations for the inhabitants in high level natural radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Atefi, M.; Razi, Z.; Mortazavi Gh

    2010-01-01

    Some areas in Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, have long been known as inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation. Despite the fact that the health effects of high doses of ionizing radiation are well documented, biological effects of above the background levels of natural radiation are still controversial and the validity of the LNT hypothesis in this area, has been criticized by many investigators around the world. The study of the health effects of high levels of natural radiation in areas such as Ramsar, help scientists to investigate the biological effects without the need for extrapolating the observations either from high doses of radiation to low dose region or from laboratory animals to humans. Considering the importance of these studies, National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) of the Iranian Nuclear Regulatory Authority has started an integrative research project on the health effects of long-term exposure to high levels of natural radiation. This paper reviews findings of the studies conducted on the plants and humans living or laboratory animals kept in high level natural radiation areas of Ramsar. In human studies, different end points such as DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, blood cells and immunological alterations are discussed. This review comes to the conclusion that no reproducible detrimental health effect has been reported so far. In this paper the validity of LNT hypothesis in the assessment of the health effects of high levels of natural radiation is discussed. (author)

  9. Structural and luminescence studies of Ho{sup 3+}-doped zinc-aluminium-sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmachary, K.; Rajesh, D.; Ratnakaram, Y. C., E-mail: ratnakaramsvu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati-517502 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Trivalent holmium doped zinc-aluminium-sodium-phosphate (ZANP) glasses were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique and characterized for their structural and luminescence properties. The amorphous nature, elemental analysis and thermal stability of the glasses were studied by using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, respectively. The absorption and fluorescence spectra have been recorded at room temperature. Based on the absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt parameters and radiative parameters such as spontaneous transition probabilities (A{sub R}), branching ratios (β{sub R}), radiative lifetimes (τ{sub R}) were calculated and discussed. From the emission spectra emission peak positions (λ{sub P}), effective bandwidths (Δλ{sub eff}) and stimulated emission cross-sections (σ{sub P}) were calculated for the observed emission transitions,{sup 5}S{sub 2} ({sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}) and {sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} in all the glass samples. The stimulated emission cross-section is higher for ZANPHo10 glass matrix and so it may be useful for laser excitation.

  10. Quality in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-01-01

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years

  11. Iran: the next nuclear threshold state?

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A nuclear threshold state is one that could quickly operationalize its peaceful nuclear program into one capable of producing a nuclear weapon. This thesis compares two known threshold states, Japan and Brazil, with Iran to determine if the Islamic Republic could also be labeled a threshold state. Furthermore, it highlights the implications such a status could have on U.S. nonproliferation policy. Although Iran's nuclear program is mir...

  12. Coherent synchrotron radiation and bunch stability in a compact storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venturini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the effect of the collective force due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR in an electron storage ring with small bending radius. In a computation based on time-domain integration of the nonlinear Vlasov equation, we find the threshold current for a longitudinal microwave instability induced by CSR alone. The model accounts for suppression of radiation at long wavelengths due to shielding by the vacuum chamber. In a calculation just above threshold, small ripples in the charge distribution build up over a fraction of a synchrotron period, but then die out to yield a relatively smooth but altered distribution with eventual oscillations in bunch length. The instability evolves from small noise on an initial smooth bunch of rms length much greater than the shielding cutoff.

  13. Radiation tolerance of the FOXFET biasing scheme for AC-coupled Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchetta, N.; Gotra, Yu.; Bisello, D.; Da Ros, R.; Giraldo, A.; Fusaro, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Univ. di Cagliari; Verzellesi, G.; Univ. di Padova

    1993-01-01

    The radiation response of FOXFETs has been studied for proton, gamma and neutron exposures. The punch-through behavior, which represents the normal FET operating conditions in Si microstrip detectors, has been found to be much less sensitive to radiation damage than threshold voltage. The device performance has been elucidated by means of two-dimensional simulations. The main radiation effects have been also taken into account in the numerical analysis and separately examined

  14. Use of radiation and radiation practices 1994. Events and statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havukainen, R. [ed.

    1995-05-01

    In Finland, there were 1,745 valid safety licences for the use of radiation at the end of 1994. In addition, 2,050 sites were included in the compulsory registration for dental x-ray diagnostics. The register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety listed 12,794 radiation sources and 316 radionuclide laboratories. The import of radioactive substances amounted to 4.6x10{sup 15} Bq and export to 2.2x10{sup 13} Bq. A total of 1.4x10{sup 13} Bq of short-lived radionuclides were produced in Finland. Workers monitored for radiation exposure included 11,147 employees on 1,294 work sites. Of these, 27% received an annual dose exceeding the recording threshold. The total dose recorded in the dose register (sum of personal dosemeter readings) was 75 man Sv in 1994, nuclear power plant employees accounting for 70% of this total. The annual dosemeter reading of ten medical doctors (radiologists, international radiologists and cardiologists) and five nuclear power plant employees was equal to or in excess of 20 mSv. Effective dose, however, did not exceed the dose limit of 50 mSv established for a one-year monitoring period.

  15. Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis: A Critical Literature Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seals, Kevin F., E-mail: KSeals@mednet.ucla.edu; Lee, Edward W., E-mail: EdwardLee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States); Cagnon, Christopher H., E-mail: CCagnon@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Hakim, Ramsey A., E-mail: RAlhakim@mednet.ucla.edu; Kee, Stephen T., E-mail: SKee@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, UCLA Medical Center (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Extensive research supports an association between radiation exposure and cataractogenesis. New data suggests that radiation-induced cataracts may form stochastically, without a threshold and at low radiation doses. We first review data linking cataractogenesis with interventional work. We then analyze the lens dose typical of various procedures, factors modulating dose, and predicted annual dosages. We conclude by critically evaluating the literature describing techniques for lens protection, finding that leaded eyeglasses may offer inadequate protection and exploring the available data on alternative strategies for cataract prevention.

  16. Hydrometeorological threshold conditions for debris flow initiation in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Meyer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows, triggered by extreme precipitation events and rapid snow melt, cause considerable damage to the Norwegian infrastructure every year. To define intensity-duration (ID thresholds for debris flow initiation critical water supply conditions arising from intensive rainfall or snow melt were assessed on the basis of daily hydro-meteorological information for 502 documented debris flow events. Two threshold types were computed: one based on absolute ID relationships and one using ID relationships normalized by the local precipitation day normal (PDN. For each threshold type, minimum, medium and maximum threshold values were defined by fitting power law curves along the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the data population. Depending on the duration of the event, the absolute threshold intensities needed for debris flow initiation vary between 15 and 107 mm day−1. Since the PDN changes locally, the normalized thresholds show spatial variations. Depending on location, duration and threshold level, the normalized threshold intensities vary between 6 and 250 mm day−1. The thresholds obtained were used for a frequency analysis of over-threshold events giving an estimation of the exceedance probability and thus potential for debris flow events in different parts of Norway. The absolute thresholds are most often exceeded along the west coast, while the normalized thresholds are most frequently exceeded on the west-facing slopes of the Norwegian mountain ranges. The minimum thresholds derived in this study are in the range of other thresholds obtained for regions with a climate comparable to Norway. Statistics reveal that the normalized threshold is more reliable than the absolute threshold as the former shows no spatial clustering of debris flows related to water supply events captured by the threshold.

  17. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  18. 11 CFR 9036.1 - Threshold submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... credit or debit card, including one made over the Internet, the candidate shall provide sufficient... section shall not count toward the threshold amount. (c) Threshold certification by Commission. (1) After...

  19. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.

    1997-01-01

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author)

  20. SGR-76 gamma radiation level indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubinskij-Nadezhdin, I.V.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a gamma-radiation level indicator is described; the instrument is part of a mobile radiometric laboratory (MRL). The design of the instrument permits gamma-radiation dose rates recording at 0.2-200 R/hr, and signals on gamma-background levels. The instrument has two separate threshold levels of signalling actuation. The light signalling at the first level is precautionary, and the sound signalling at the second level indicates the necessity of taking a decision as to whether or not the MRL can remain in the gamma-radiation field. Halogenic counters operating in a current mode are used as detectors. The basic error in recording the dose rate amounts to +-25%. Overall dimensions of the instrument 150x280x100 mm; weight less than 2.5 kg

  1. High-frequency (8 to 16 kHz) reference thresholds and intrasubject threshold variability relative to ototoxicity criteria using a Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T

    2001-04-01

    The first purpose of this study was to determine high-frequency (8 to 16 kHz) thresholds for standardizing reference equivalent threshold sound pressure levels (RETSPLs) for a Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone. The second and perhaps more important purpose of this study was to determine whether repeated high-frequency thresholds using a Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone had a lower intrasubject threshold variability than the ASHA 1994 significant threshold shift criteria for ototoxicity. High-frequency thresholds (8 to 16 kHz) were obtained for 100 (50 male, 50 female) normally hearing (0.25 to 8 kHz) young adults (mean age of 21.2 yr) in four separate test sessions using a Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone. The mean and median high-frequency thresholds were similar for each test session and increased as frequency increased. At each frequency, the high-frequency thresholds were not significantly (p > 0.05) different for gender, test ear, or test session. The median thresholds at each frequency were similar to the 1998 interim ISO RETSPLs; however, large standard deviations and wide threshold distributions indicated very high intersubject threshold variability, especially at 14 and 16 kHz. Threshold repeatability was determined by finding the threshold differences between each possible test session comparison (N = 6). About 98% of all of the threshold differences were within a clinically acceptable range of +/-10 dB from 8 to 14 kHz. The threshold differences between each subject's second, third, and fourth minus their first test session were also found to determine whether intrasubject threshold variability was less than the ASHA 1994 criteria for determining a significant threshold shift due to ototoxicity. The results indicated a false-positive rate of 0% for a threshold shift > or = 20 dB at any frequency and a false-positive rate of 2% for a threshold shift >10 dB at two consecutive frequencies. This study verified that the output of high-frequency audiometers at 0 dB HL using

  2. Distinction between glioma progression and post-radiation change by combined physiologic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsusue, Eiji [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Fink, James R.; Maravilla, Kenneth R. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging (DSC), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) techniques provide specific physiologic information that may distinguish malignant glioma progression from post-radiation change, yet no single technique is completely reliable. We propose a simple, multiparametric scoring system to improve diagnostic accuracy beyond that of each technique alone. Fifteen subjects with lesions suspicious for glioma progression following radiation therapy who had also undergone 3-tesla DWI, DSC, and MRS studies of the lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratio, maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio, and maximum MRS choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho/NAA) metabolic peak-height ratios were quantified within each lesion. Each parameter (ADC ratio, rCBV ratio, and combined Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios) was scored as either glioma progression (one point) or radiation change (zero point) based upon thresholds derived from our own data. For each lesion, the combined parameters yielded a multiparametric score (0 to 3) for prediction of tumor progression or post-radiation change. Optimum thresholds for ADC ratio (1.30), rCBV ratio (2.10), and either combined Cho/Cr (1.29) and Cho/NAA (1.06) yielded diagnostic accuracies of 86.7%, 86.7%, and 84.6%, respectively (p < 0.05). A combined multiparametric score threshold of 2 improved diagnostic accuracy to 93.3% (p < 0.05). In this small series combining 3-T DWI, DSC, and MRS diagnostic results using a simple, multiparametric scoring system has potential to improve overall diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing glioma progression from post-radiation change beyond that of each technique alone. (orig.)

  3. Prenatal radiation exposure. Conclusions in the light of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppin, W.

    1987-01-01

    Within 6 years of the appearance of the guideline for action to be taken by doctors in the event of prenatal exposure to radiation, intended as a proposal for discussion, the following has turned out: in no case has termination of pregnancy become necessary following prenatal radiation exposure, prenatal radiation exposure was always low (about 20 mSv), there is no risk below respective threshold doses, teratogenesis is a non-stochastic process, which is why risk assessment was modified, the sensitivity of the human fetus to radiation is highest during the period of neuroblast development (9th to 16th week p.c.), and knowledge about an existing pregnancy can be taken for granted by that time, so radiation exposure is calculable and can be restricted to negligible quantities. (TRV) [de

  4. Thermotactile perception thresholds measurement conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Setsuo; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of posture, push force and rate of temperature change on thermotactile thresholds and to clarify suitable measuring conditions for Japanese people. Thermotactile (warm and cold) thresholds on the right middle finger were measured with an HVLab thermal aesthesiometer. Subjects were eight healthy male Japanese students. The effects of posture in measurement were examined in the posture of a straight hand and forearm placed on a support, the same posture without a support, and the fingers and hand flexed at the wrist with the elbow placed on a desk. The finger push force applied to the applicator of the thermal aesthesiometer was controlled at a 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 N. The applicator temperature was changed to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 degrees C/s. After each measurement, subjects were asked about comfort under the measuring conditions. Three series of experiments were conducted on different days to evaluate repeatability. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that warm thresholds were affected by the push force and the rate of temperature change and that cold thresholds were influenced by posture and push force. The comfort assessment indicated that the measurement posture of a straight hand and forearm laid on a support was the most comfortable for the subjects. Relatively high repeatability was obtained under measurement conditions of a 1 degrees C/s temperature change rate and a 0.5 N push force. Measurement posture, push force and rate of temperature change can affect the thermal threshold. Judging from the repeatability, a push force of 0.5 N and a temperature change of 1.0 degrees C/s in the posture with the straight hand and forearm laid on a support are recommended for warm and cold threshold measurements.

  5. DOE approach to threshold quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.; Kluk, A.F.; Department of Energy, Washington, DC)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Ideally, the threshold must be set high enough to significantly reduce the amount of waste requiring special handling. It must also be low enough so that waste at the threshold quantity poses a very small health risk and multiple exposures to such waste would still constitute a small health risk. It should also be practical to segregate waste above or below the threshold quantity using available instrumentation. Guidance is being prepared to aid DOE sites in establishing threshold quantity values based on pathways analysis using site-specific parameters (waste stream characteristics, maximum exposed individual, population considerations, and site specific parameters such as rainfall, etc.). A guidance dose of between 0.001 to 1.0 mSv/y (0.1 to 100 mrem/y) was recommended with 0.3 mSv/y (30 mrem/y) selected as the guidance dose upon which to base calculations. Several tasks were identified, beginning with the selection of a suitable pathway model for relating dose to the concentration of radioactivity in the waste. Threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose were determined for waste disposal sites at a selected humid and arid site. Finally, cost-benefit considerations at the example sites were addressed. The results of the various tasks are summarized and the relationship of this effort with related developments at other agencies discussed

  6. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  7. Some problems in the acceptability of implementing radiation protection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The three fundamentals that radiation protection programs are based upon are; 1) establishing a quantitative correlation between radiation exposure and biological effects in people; 2) determining a level of acceptable risk of exposure; and 3) establishing systems to measure the radiation dose to insure compliance with the regulations or criteria. The paper discusses the interrelationship of these fundamentals, difficulties in obtaining a consensus of acceptable risk and gives some examples of problems in identifying the most critical population-at-risk and in measuring dose. Despite such problems, it is recommended that we proceed with the existing conservative structure of radiation protection programs based upon a linear no threshold model for low radiation doses to insure public acceptability of various potential radiation risks. Voluntary compliance as well as regulatory requirements should continue to be pursued to maintain minimal exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  8. Routine medicare and radiation exposure (3) biology about radiation exposure for its understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Hirata, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced biological responses are easily explained as follows. The process of cancer formation is on the hypothesis of multi-step carcinogenesis of the initiation, promotion and progression. Radiation is an exogenous physical initiator. Physical process of ionization in biomaterials by radiation occurs within the time of 10 -12 sec order, which resulting in chemical process (10 -6 sec) leading to tissue response or to cancerous change (several tens hours to several decades). Direct and indirect effects on DNA are yielded with the high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation and low, through OH-radical formation, respectively. Double strand break of DNA induced by radiation is repaired by the error-free homologous recombination or error-prone non-homologous end-joining. At the early phase of the damage, DNA damage response begins to work for repairing, and when the response is inoperable, cellular response is induced to lead radiation apoptosis as an exclusion mechanism of abnormal cells. The biological effects differ even at the same dose of different radiations when their LET is different, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used. For correction of the stochastic radiation effect, the radiation weighting factor (W R ) is used for conversion to the single photon beam dose that ICRP defines as the equivalent dose (H T , Sv). ICRP (Pub. 103) also recommends the use of RBE (Gy) for the definitive effect. Radiation effects are known to be modified by such phenomena as the bystander effect, cluster damage of DNA, radiation adaptation, hormesis, dose rate effect and non-tumor inducing dose. ICRP employs linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for low dose and low dose rate carcinogenesis. (T.T.)

  9. [Socio-psychological and ecological aspects within the system of nuclear radiation risk mitigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, B I; Ushakov, I B; Zuev, V G

    2004-01-01

    The authors bring into light several aspects of nuclear radiation risks, i.e. physical safety of nuclear technologies and ecology, place of operator within the nuclear radiation safety system (proficiency, protective culture, safety guides) and consider approaches to the human factor quantification within the system of mitigation of risks from nuclear technologies, and IAEA recommendations on probable risk estimation. Future investigations should be aimed at extension of the radiation sensitivity threshold, personnel selection as by psychological so genetic testing for immunity to ionizing radiation, development of pharmachemical and physical protectors and methods of enhancing nonspecific resistance to extreme, including radiation, environments, and building of radiation event simulators for training.

  10. Doubler system quench detection threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Martin, P.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental study leading to the determination of the sensitivity needed for protecting the Fermilab Doubler from damage during quenches is presented. The quench voltage thresholds involved were obtained from measurements made on Doubler cable of resistance x temperature and voltage x time during quenches under several currents and from data collected during operation of the Doubler Quench Protection System as implemented in the B-12 string of 20 magnets. At 4kA, a quench voltage threshold in excess of 5.OV will limit the peak Doubler cable temperature to 452K for quenches originating in the magnet coils whereas a threshold of 0.5V is required for quenches originating outside of coils

  11. Reaction thresholds in doubly special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyman, Daniel; Major, Seth; Hinteleitner, Franz

    2004-01-01

    Two theories of special relativity with an additional invariant scale, 'doubly special relativity', are tested with calculations of particle process kinematics. Using the Judes-Visser modified conservation laws, thresholds are studied in both theories. In contrast with some linear approximations, which allow for particle processes forbidden in special relativity, both the Amelino-Camelia and Magueijo-Smolin frameworks allow no additional processes. To first order, the Amelino-Camelia framework thresholds are lowered and the Magueijo-Smolin framework thresholds may be raised or lowered

  12. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  13. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  14. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Desouky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT, possible risks from exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to higher doses of radiation. This model has been challenged by numerous observations, in which cells that were not directly traversed by the ionizing radiation exhibited responses similar to those of the directly irradiated cells. Therefore, it is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects.

  15. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  16. Electromagnetic theory of the radiative Pierce instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkov, D.N.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    A study is made of the radiative Pierce instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in a waveguide in the presence of an infinitely strong magnetic field. The perturbation theory is used to find the growth rates and conditions of instability over a broad range of the beam current. It is shown that, under the Pierce boundary conditions, the instability is Raman in nature, and there is no current threshold for the instability. This allows the instability saturation level to be accurately determined from the condition for the violation of the Cherenkov resonance and the radiation efficiency to be estimated

  17. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region

  18. Optimizing Systems of Threshold Detection Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banschbach, David C

    2008-01-01

    .... Below the threshold all signals are ignored. We develop a mathematical model for setting individual sensor thresholds to obtain optimal probability of detecting a significant event, given a limit on the total number of false positives allowed...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation on the formation and annihilation behaviors of radiation defects in Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuji Oda; Satoru Tanaka; Yasuhisa Oya

    2006-01-01

    The influence of radiation defects is one of the main factors that determine tritium release behavior from blanket breeding materials in fusion reactors. Classical molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is a powerful technique to investigate the radiation damage processes, because it can provide atomic-scale information on the defects. In this study, we conducted radiation simulation for Li 2 O using MD and analyzed formation and annihilation behaviors of radiation defects, as a fundamental research for radiation response of Li-containing oxides. Buckingham type two-body potential model was used. In order to remove the unphysical impulsive force at short inter-ionic distances in Buckingham model, each potential function was connected to that of the ZBL potential models at around 0.8 A. NEV ensemble was employed with the initial simulation temperature of 0 K. 10 x 10 x 10 supercell consisting of 4000 Li 2 O was used as a unit cell under 3D periodic boundary conditions. Radiation simulation was initiated by introducing an energy of a certain direction to an ion, as a displacement energy. The lowest displacement energy by which a defect was created and survived beyond 5 ps was regarded as the threshold energy. 42 and 21 displacement directions were surveyed for Li and O, respectively, based on the symmetry of the Li 2 O crystal. In both Li and O defect formations, [100] displacement shows significantly lower threshold energy than [111] displacement. Li defects were easily created than O defects almost in all directions. In fact, the average threshold energy except [111] displacement, which possesses extremely high threshold energy, was 21 eV for Li and 49 eV for O. In some cases, no defect could survive beyond 5 ps even by higher displacement energies than the threshold energy, due to the self-annealing effect. The self-annealing completed basically within 1 ps after introduction of displacement energy. At around this time, velocity distribution of all ions in the system

  20. Identifying Threshold Concepts for Information Literacy: A Delphi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Townsend

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study used the Delphi method to engage expert practitioners on the topic of threshold concepts for information literacy. A panel of experts considered two questions. First, is the threshold concept approach useful for information literacy instruction? The panel unanimously agreed that the threshold concept approach holds potential for information literacy instruction. Second, what are the threshold concepts for information literacy instruction? The panel proposed and discussed over fifty potential threshold concepts, finally settling on six information literacy threshold concepts.

  1. Denoising solar radiation data using coiflet wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my; Janier, Josefina B., E-mail: josefinajanier@petronas.com.my; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram, E-mail: mohana.muthuvalu@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Information Technology, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Hasan, Mohammad Khatim, E-mail: khatim@ftsm.ukm.my [Jabatan Komputeran Industri, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, Jumat, E-mail: jumat@ums.edu.my [Program Matematik dengan Ekonomi, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Beg Berkunci 2073, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia); Ismail, Mohd Tahir [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Signal denoising and smoothing plays an important role in processing the given signal either from experiment or data collection through observations. Data collection usually was mixed between true data and some error or noise. This noise might be coming from the apparatus to measure or collect the data or human error in handling the data. Normally before the data is use for further processing purposes, the unwanted noise need to be filtered out. One of the efficient methods that can be used to filter the data is wavelet transform. Due to the fact that the received solar radiation data fluctuates according to time, there exist few unwanted oscillation namely noise and it must be filtered out before the data is used for developing mathematical model. In order to apply denoising using wavelet transform (WT), the thresholding values need to be calculated. In this paper the new thresholding approach is proposed. The coiflet2 wavelet with variation diminishing 4 is utilized for our purpose. From numerical results it can be seen clearly that, the new thresholding approach give better results as compare with existing approach namely global thresholding value.

  2. Use of radiation and radiation practices in 1993. Events and statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havukainen, R.

    1994-05-01

    In the end of the year 1993 there were in force 1740 safety licences for the use of radiation granted by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). In addition to this there were 2100 places for dental x-ray activities in Finland. All together 12726 radiation sources and 313 radioisotope laboratories were in use. The import of radioactive substances was 3.9 x 10 15 Bq and the export 2.5 x 10 13 Bq. The production of short-lived isotopes was 1.3 x 10 13 Bq. The monitoring of personal radiation doses was organized for 11171 workers and 1299 working places. The annual dose (the integrated readings of dosemeters) was greater than registration threshold for 24% of workers. The collective dose (the sum of the results of the dose measurements) registered to the Finnish Dose Register was 6.9 manSv; 74% belonged to the workers of nuclear power plants. The sum of the personal doses measured in 1993 were for three interventional radiologists and fifteen workers in nuclear power plants 20 mSv or more. The effective doses were in each case under the annual dose limit of 50 mSv. The effective doses for the interventional radiologists were under 20 mSv. (7 figs., 16 tabs.)

  3. Multiuser switched diversity scheduling systems with per-user threshold

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Haewoon

    2010-05-01

    A multiuser switched diversity scheduling scheme with per-user feedback threshold is proposed and analyzed in this paper. The conventional multiuser switched diversity scheduling scheme uses a single feedback threshold for every user, where the threshold is a function of the average signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the users as well as the number of users involved in the scheduling process. The proposed scheme, however, constructs a sequence of feedback thresholds instead of a single feedback threshold such that each user compares its channel quality with the corresponding feedback threshold in the sequence. Numerical and simulation results show that thanks to the flexibility of threshold selection, where a potentially different threshold can be used for each user, the proposed scheme provides a higher system capacity than that for the conventional scheme. © 2006 IEEE.

  4. Influence of gamma-radiation on percolation threshold in PE/α-Fe2O3 composite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliyev, N.S.; Bayramov, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : In this work it has been studied the change of specific volume resistance and also percolation threshold shift of the samples exposed to initial and gamma-irradiation depending on volume share of the filler α-Fe 2 O 3 in PE/α-Fe 2 O 3 composite. On the other hand while the volume share of the filler increases, the dimensions of polymer layer decreases on the border between phases

  5. Control of radiation-induced emesis with promethazine, cimetidine, thiethylperazine, or naloxone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.; Mattsson, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Promethazine (2 mg/kg), cimetidine (4 mg;kg), thiethylperazine (0.86 mg/kg), and naloxone (0.08 mg/kg) were each evaluated for their ability to increase the threshold of radiation-induced emesis in the dog. Each dog was fed a can of dog food (ca 0.4 kg) and then injected IM with the appropriate drug 1 hour before being irradiated by a 60 Co teletherapy unit. Dogs were then observed continuously for 10 hours while the number, time of onset, and duration of each emetic episode were monitored. The dose of radiation causing emesis in 50% control dogs was 170 rad. The ED50 was increased to 402 rad by promethazine, to 331 rad by cimetidiene, and to 320 rad by thiethylperazine. The ED50 for naloxone was 262.5 rad, which was not a statistically significant increase in threshold

  6. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  7. Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of radiation: biological basis of radiation-environment interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined due to ambiguity at low doses caused by limitations in statistical power and information available on interplay with environment. To deal with these problems, a novel non-parametric statistics was developed based on artificial neural networks theorem and applied to cancer and non-cancer risk in A-bomb survivors. The analysis revealed several unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal radiation dose alone. They include (1) threshold that varies with organ, gender and age, including cardiovascular diseases, (2) prevalence of infectious diseases, and (3) suppression of pathogenesis of HTLV1. The threshold is unique as it is manifested as negative excess relative risk, a reduction of spontaneous rate at low doses. The response is consistent with currently emerging laboratory data on DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice and its sustainability as epigenetic memory in accordance with histone code theory. In response to DSB, of radiation or DNA replication arrest origin, distinct and competitively operating repair pathways are instigated. Activation by low doses of restitution-directed canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) suppresses both error-prone alternative end-joining (Alt-NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The latter two present major pathways to mutagenesis at stalled replication folk associated with endogenous and exogenous genotoxin such as tobacco smoke metabolites and AID-associated somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in Ig gene. Suppression of these error-prone pathways by low doses of low LET radiation is consistent with the reduction of cancer occurrence by environmental genotoxin, immunodiversity and stable integration of retrovirus DNA, providing a significant modulator of dose linearity at low doses. Whole picture may bring about a new landscape of cancer and non-cancer molecular epidemiology which

  8. Coherent synchrotron radiation and bunch stability in a compactstorage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, Marco; Warnock, Robert; Ruth, Ronald; Ellison, James A.

    2004-04-09

    We examine the effect of the collective force due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in an electron storage ring with small bending radius. In a computation based on time-domain integration of the nonlinear Vlasov equation, we find the threshold current for a longitudinal microwave instability induced by CSR alone. The model accounts for suppression of radiation at long wave lengths due to shielding by the vacuum chamber. In a calculation just above threshold, small ripples in the charge distribution build up over a fraction of a synchrotron period, but then die out to yield a relatively smooth but altered distribution with eventual oscillations in bunch length. The instability evolves from small noise on an initial smooth bunch of r.m.s.length much greater than the shielding cutoff. The paper includes a derivation and extensive analysis of the complete impedance function Z for synchrotron radiation with parallel plate shielding. We find corrections to the lowest approximation to the coherent force which involve ''off-diagonal'' values of Z, that is, fields with phase velocity not equal to the particle velocity.

  9. Pain thresholds, supra-threshold pain and lidocaine sensitivity in patients with erythromelalgia, including the I848Tmutation in NaV 1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helås, T; Sagafos, D; Kleggetveit, I P; Quiding, H; Jönsson, B; Segerdahl, M; Zhang, Z; Salter, H; Schmelz, M; Jørum, E

    2017-09-01

    Nociceptive thresholds and supra-threshold pain ratings as well as their reduction upon local injection with lidocaine were compared between healthy subjects and patients with erythromelalgia (EM). Lidocaine (0.25, 0.50, 1.0 or 10 mg/mL) or placebo (saline) was injected intradermally in non-painful areas of the lower arm, in a randomized, double-blind manner, to test the effect on dynamic and static mechanical sensitivity, mechanical pain sensitivity, thermal thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain sensitivity. Heat pain thresholds and pain ratings to supra-threshold heat stimulation did not differ between EM-patients (n = 27) and controls (n = 25), neither did the dose-response curves for lidocaine. Only the subgroup of EM-patients with mutations in sodium channel subunits Na V 1.7, 1.8 or 1.9 (n = 8) had increased lidocaine sensitivity for supra-threshold heat stimuli, contrasting lower sensitivity to strong mechanical stimuli. This pattern was particularly clear in the two patients carrying the Na V 1.7 I848T mutations in whom lidocaine's hyperalgesic effect on mechanical pain sensitivity contrasted more effective heat analgesia. Heat pain thresholds are not sensitized in EM patients, even in those with gain-of-function mutations in Na V 1.7. Differential lidocaine sensitivity was overt only for noxious stimuli in the supra-threshold range suggesting that sensitized supra-threshold encoding is important for the clinical pain phenotype in EM in addition to lower activation threshold. Intracutaneous lidocaine dose-dependently blocked nociceptive sensations, but we did not identify EM patients with particular high lidocaine sensitivity that could have provided valuable therapeutic guidance. Acute pain thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain in controls and patients with erythromelalgia do not differ and have the same lidocaine sensitivity. Acute heat pain thresholds even in EM patients with the Na V 1.7 I848T mutation are normal and only nociceptor

  10. When do price thresholds matter in retail categories?

    OpenAIRE

    Pauwels, Koen; Srinivasan, Shuba; Franses, Philip Hans

    2007-01-01

    textabstractMarketing literature has long recognized that brand price elasticity need not be monotonic and symmetric, but has yet to provide generalizable market-level insights on threshold-based price elasticity, asymmetric thresholds, and the sign and magnitude of elasticity transitions. This paper introduces smooth transition regression models to study threshold-based price elasticity of the top 4 brands across 20 fast-moving consumer good categories. Threshold-based price elasticity is fo...

  11. To manage the ionizing radiations risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Romerio, F.

    2000-01-01

    Mister Romerio's work tackles the problem of controversy revealed by the experts in the field of estimation and management of ionizing radiations risks. The author describes the three paradigms at the base of the debate: the relationship without threshold (typified by the ICRP and its adepts), these ones that think that low doses risks are overestimated ( Medicine Academia for example) or that ones that believe that dose limits are too severe and induce unwarranted costs; then that ones that think that these risks are under-estimated and limits should be more reduced, even stop these practices that lead to public exposure to ionizing radiations. The author details the uncertainties about the risk estimations, refreshes the knowledge in radiation protection with the explanations of the different paradigms. At the end a table summarize the positions of the three paradigms

  12. Radiation Hazard Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  13. High-order above-threshold dissociation of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peifen; Wang, Junping; Li, Hui; Lin, Kang; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Zhang, Wenbin; Ma, Junyang; Li, Hanxiao; Zeng, Heping; He, Feng; Wu, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Electrons bound to atoms or molecules can simultaneously absorb multiple photons via the above-threshold ionization featured with discrete peaks in the photoelectron spectrum on account of the quantized nature of the light energy. Analogously, the above-threshold dissociation of molecules has been proposed to address the multiple-photon energy deposition in the nuclei of molecules. In this case, nuclear energy spectra consisting of photon-energy spaced peaks exceeding the binding energy of the molecular bond are predicted. Although the observation of such phenomena is difficult, this scenario is nevertheless logical and is based on the fundamental laws. Here, we report conclusive experimental observation of high-order above-threshold dissociation of H2 in strong laser fields where the tunneling-ionized electron transfers the absorbed multiphoton energy, which is above the ionization threshold to the nuclei via the field-driven inelastic rescattering. Our results provide an unambiguous evidence that the electron and nuclei of a molecule as a whole absorb multiple photons, and thus above-threshold ionization and above-threshold dissociation must appear simultaneously, which is the cornerstone of the nowadays strong-field molecular physics.

  14. Attributability of health effects at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose-response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: 1) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either. In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  15. Attributability of Health Effects at Low Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: (i) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  16. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  17. Determinants of Change in the Cost-effectiveness Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulden, Mike; O'Mahony, James; McCabe, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    The cost-effectiveness threshold in health care systems with a constrained budget should be determined by the cost-effectiveness of displacing health care services to fund new interventions. Using comparative statics, we review some potential determinants of the threshold, including the budget for health care, the demand for existing health care interventions, the technical efficiency of existing interventions, and the development of new health technologies. We consider the anticipated direction of impact that would affect the threshold following a change in each of these determinants. Where the health care system is technically efficient, an increase in the health care budget unambiguously raises the threshold, whereas an increase in the demand for existing, non-marginal health interventions unambiguously lowers the threshold. Improvements in the technical efficiency of existing interventions may raise or lower the threshold, depending on the cause of the improvement in efficiency, whether the intervention is already funded, and, if so, whether it is marginal. New technologies may also raise or lower the threshold, depending on whether the new technology is a substitute for an existing technology and, again, whether the existing technology is marginal. Our analysis permits health economists and decision makers to assess if and in what direction the threshold may change over time. This matters, as threshold changes impact the cost-effectiveness of interventions that require decisions now but have costs and effects that fall in future periods.

  18. Low heat pain thresholds in migraineurs between attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zuniga, Leslie; Chong, Catherine D

    2015-06-01

    Between attacks, migraine is associated with hypersensitivities to sensory stimuli. The objective of this study was to investigate hypersensitivity to pain in migraineurs between attacks. Cutaneous heat pain thresholds were measured in 112 migraineurs, migraine free for ≥ 48 hours, and 75 healthy controls. Pain thresholds at the head and at the arm were compared between migraineurs and controls using two-tailed t-tests. Among migraineurs, correlations between heat pain thresholds and headache frequency, allodynia symptom severity, and time interval until next headache were calculated. Migraineurs had lower pain thresholds than controls at the head (43.9 ℃ ± 3.2 ℃ vs. 45.1 ℃ ± 3.0 ℃, p = 0.015) and arm (43.2 ℃ ± 3.4 ℃ vs. 44.8 ℃ ± 3.3 ℃, p pain thresholds and headache frequency or allodynia symptom severity. For the 41 migraineurs for whom time to next headache was known, there were positive correlations between time to next headache and pain thresholds at the head (r = 0.352, p = 0.024) and arm (r = 0.312, p = 0.047). This study provides evidence that migraineurs have low heat pain thresholds between migraine attacks. Mechanisms underlying these lower pain thresholds could also predispose migraineurs to their next migraine attack, a hypothesis supported by finding positive correlations between pain thresholds and time to next migraine attack. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Some considerations regarding the creep crack growth threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thouless, M.D.; Evans, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The preceding analysis reveals that the existence of a threshold determined by the sintering stress does not influence the post threshold crack velocity. Considerations of the sintering stress can thus be conveniently excluded from analysis of the post threshold crack velocity. The presence of a crack growth threshold has been predicted, based on the existence of cavity nucleation controlled crack growth. A preliminary analysis of cavity nucleation rates within the damage zone reveals that this threshold is relatively abrupt, in accord with experimental observations. Consequently, at stress intensities below K /SUB th/ growth becomes nucleation limited and crack blunting occurs in preference to crack growth

  20. When Do Price Thresholds Matter in Retail Categories?

    OpenAIRE

    Koen Pauwels; Shuba Srinivasan; Philip Hans Franses

    2007-01-01

    Marketing literature has long recognized that brand price elasticity need not be monotonic and symmetric, but has yet to provide generalizable market-level insights on threshold-based price elasticity, asymmetric thresholds, and the sign and magnitude of elasticity transitions. This paper introduces smooth transition regression models to study threshold-based price elasticity of the top 4 brands across 20 fast-moving consumer good categories. Threshold-based price elasticity is found for 76% ...

  1. Estimating the Threshold Level of Inflation for Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Jiranyakul, Komain

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. This paper analyzes the relationship between inflation and economic growth in Thailand using annual dataset during 1990 and 2015. The threshold model is estimated for different levels of threshold inflation rate. The results suggest that the threshold level of inflation above which inflation significantly slow growth is estimated at 3 percent. The negative relationship between inflation and growth is apparent above this threshold level of inflation. In other words, the inflation rat...

  2. Health effects of low level radiation exposure among radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Motoi

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, a cohort study of radiation workers has been conducted since 1990. The cohort population consisted of about 176,000 workers (mostly males) who had been registered in the centralized radiation dose registry system and engaged in various radiation works at nuclear facilities. Statistical analyses were performed mainly on the 2,934 deaths, of which 1,191 were cancer cases, detected among 119,000 male subjects during the prospective follow-up. The standardized mortality ratio showed that for any cancers mortality was not different between this population and Japanese general population. By the trend test, though significantly increasing trend in accord with increasing doses was not observed for both cancer in all sites and leukemia, it was highly significant for esophagus cancer and external causes of deaths. Results of the questionnaire survey study of lifestyle of radiation workers suggested that increasing trend of these diseases was at least partly due to the influence of some confounding factors. As a result of reviewing published studies, including the present work, trend of mortality from cancer in all sites with increasing doses seems still unclear, whereas for leukemia it appears to stay flat under 100 mSv but rapidly rise up in the doses higher than this as if fitting to either a linear-quadratic or threshold models. (author)

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  4. Time-efficient multidimensional threshold tracking method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Kowalewski, Borys; Dau, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, adaptive methods have been used to reduce the time it takes to estimate psychoacoustic thresholds. However, even with adaptive methods, there are many cases where the testing time is too long to be clinically feasible, particularly when estimating thresholds as a function of anothe...

  5. A light-powered sub-threshold microprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Ming; Chen Hong; Zhang Chun; Li Changmeng; Wang Zhihua, E-mail: lium02@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-11-15

    This paper presents an 8-bit sub-threshold microprocessor which can be powered by an integrated photosensitive diode. With a custom designed sub-threshold standard cell library and 1 kbit sub-threshold SRAM design, the leakage power of 58 nW, dynamic power of 385 nW - 165 kHz, EDP 13 pJ/inst and the operating voltage of 350 mV are achieved. Under a light of about 150 kLux, the microprocessor can run at a rate of up to 500 kHz. The microprocessor can be used for wireless-sensor-network nodes.

  6. Breast cancer induced by radiation. Relation to mammography and treatment of acne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.

    1977-01-01

    A report is given of cases of 16 women in whom cancer of the breast developed after radiation therapy for acne or hirsutism, suggesting another group at higher risk than is generally expected for cancer of the breast. It is prudent to regard the carcinogenic effect of radiation on the breast as proportional to dose without a threshold. Mammography in young women should be ordered only selectively, not for screening

  7. Threshold concepts in finance: student perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-10-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by finance academics. In addition, we investigate the potential of a framework of different types of knowledge to differentiate the delivery of the finance curriculum and the role of modelling in finance. Our purpose is to identify ways to improve curriculum design and delivery, leading to better student outcomes. Whilst we find that there is significant overlap between what students identify as important in finance and the threshold concepts identified by academics, much of this overlap is expressed by indirect reference to the concepts. Further, whilst different types of knowledge are apparent in the student data, there is evidence that students do not necessarily distinguish conceptual from other types of knowledge. As well as investigating the finance curriculum, the research demonstrates the use of threshold concepts to compare and contrast student and academic perceptions of a discipline and, as such, is of interest to researchers in education and other disciplines.

  8. Establishment and evolution of the radiation risk concept for the man and human population in the 20th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.; Hadjieva

    2003-01-01

    The concept of radiation risk (RR) is the main basis for human protection from the harmful effect of ionizing radiation. It concerns the expected unfavorable health effects upon the irradiated person and probably upon his/her progeny. The early period of the history of RR evaluation was grounded on the assessment of acute skin reactions (erythema, epilation, dermatitis, ulceration) and on the measures (erythema dose) taken to diminish them. The second period covers the appraisal, based on estimation of different somatic effects and expected heredity ( genetic effects). They could be avoided if irradiation does not exceed the maximum permissible dose - the concept of zero RR. The current (third) period estimates both irradiation effects: deterministic effects that have a dose-related threshold and stochastic non-threshold effects. The ultimate goal of radiation protection is to exclude all deterministic effects and to diminish probability of stochastic effects (carcinogenesis and heredity effects) down to an acceptable level. Seven postulates describe the modern concept of RR for the man and human population: globalization irreversibility, accumulation, non-threshold harm, stochastic, non-specificity and acceptance of the risk

  9. Effects of device scaling and geometry on MOS radiation hardness assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Schwank, J.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the authors investigate the effects of transistor scaling and geometry on radiation hardness. The total dose response is shown to depend strongly on transistor channel length. Specifically, transistors with shorter gate lengths tend to show more negative threshold-voltage shifts during irradiation than transistors with longer gate lengths. Similarly, transistors with longer gate lengths tend to show more positive threshold-voltage shifts during post-irradiation annealing than transistors with shorter gate lengths. These differences in radiation response, caused by differences in transistor size and geometry, will be important to factor into test-structure-to-IC correlations necessary to support cost-effective Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) hardness assurance. Transistors with minimum gate length (more negative ΔV th ) will have a larger effect on standby power supply current for an IC at high dose rates, such as in a weapon environment, where worst-case response is associated with negative threshold-voltage shifts during irradiation. On the other hand, transistors with maximum gate length (more positive ΔV th ) will have a larger effect on the timing parameters of an IC at low dose rates, such as in a space environment, where worst-case response is represented by positive threshold-voltage shifts after postirradiation anneal. The channel size and geometry effects they observe cannot be predicted from simple scaling models, but occur because of real differences in oxide-, interface-, and border-trap charge densities among devices of different sizes

  10. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S.; Schild, Steven E.; Stafford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 ± 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 ± 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 ± 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  11. Risk of Radiation Retinopathy in Patients With Orbital and Ocular Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Megha; Pulido, Jose S. [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Stafford, Scott, E-mail: stafford.scott@mayo.edu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation retinopathy is a potential long-term complication of radiation therapy to the orbit. The risk of developing this adverse effect is dose dependent; however, the threshold is unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the risk of developing radiation retinopathy at increasing radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A 40-year retrospective review was performed of patients who received external beam radiation therapy for ocular/orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Results: Sixty-seven patients who had at least one ophthalmic follow-up examination were included in this study. Most patients (52%) were diagnosed with NHL involving the orbit. Patients received external beam radiation therapy at doses between 1886 and 5400 cGy (mean, 3033 {+-} 782 cGy). Radiation retinopathy developed in 12% of patients, and the median time to diagnosis was 27 months (range, 15-241months). The mean prescribed radiation dose in patients with retinopathy was 3309 {+-} 585 cGy, and the estimated retinal dose (derived by reviewing the dosimetry) was 3087 {+-} 1030 cGy. The incidence of retinopathy increased with dose. The average prescribed daily fractionated dose was higher in patients who developed retinopathy than in patients who did not (mean, 202 cGy vs 180 cGy, respectively; P = .04). More patients with radiation retinopathy had comorbid diabetes mellitus type 2 than patients without retinopathy (P = .015). In our study, the mean visual acuity of the eyes that received radiation was worse than that of the eyes that did not (P = .027). Other postradiotherapy ocular findings included keratitis (6%), dry eyes (39%), and cataract (33%). Conclusions: Radiation retinopathy, a known complication of radiotherapy for orbital tumors, relates to vascular comorbidities and dose. Higher total doses and larger daily fractions (>180 cGy) appear to be related to higher rates of retinopathy. Future larger studies are required to identify a statistically significant threshold for the

  12. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  13. 40 CFR 68.115 - Threshold determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Regulated Substances for Accidental Release Prevention... process exceeds the threshold. (b) For the purposes of determining whether more than a threshold quantity... portion of the process is less than 10 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), the amount of the substance in the...

  14. Radiation resistance of wide-bandgap semiconductor power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Popelka, Stanislav [Department of Microelectronics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation resistance of state-of-the-art commercial wide-bandgap power transistors, 1700 V 4H-SiC power MOSFETs and 200 V GaN HEMTs, to the total ionization dose was investigated. Transistors were irradiated with 4.5 MeV electrons with doses up to 2000 kGy. Electrical characteristics and introduced defects were characterized by current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Results show that already low doses of 4.5 MeV electrons (>1 kGy) cause a significant decrease in threshold voltage of SiC MOSFETs due to embedding of the positive charge into the gate oxide. On the other hand, other parameters like the ON-state resistance are nearly unchanged up to the dose of 20 kGy. At 200 kGy, the threshold voltage returns back close to its original value, however, the ON-state resistance increases and transconductance is lowered. This effect is caused by radiation defects introduced into the low-doped drift region which decrease electron concentration and mobility. GaN HEMTs exhibit significantly higher radiation resistance. They keep within the datasheet specification up to doses of 2000 kGy. Absence of dielectric layer beneath the gate and high concentration of carriers in the two dimensional electron gas channel are the reasons of higher radiation resistance of GaN HEMTs. Their degradation then occurs at much higher doses due to electron mobility degradation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Approach to DOE threshold guidance limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, R.D.; Wickham, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for less restrictive criteria governing disposal of extremely low-level radioactive waste has long been recognized. The Low-Level Waste Management Program has been directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to aid in the development of a threshold guidance limit for DOE low-level waste facilities. Project objectives are concernd with the definition of a threshold limit dose and pathway analysis of radionuclide transport within selected exposure scenarios at DOE sites. Results of the pathway analysis will be used to determine waste radionuclide concentration guidelines that meet the defined threshold limit dose. Methods of measurement and verification of concentration limits round out the project's goals. Work on defining a threshold limit dose is nearing completion. Pathway analysis of sanitary landfill operations at the Savannah River Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is in progress using the DOSTOMAN computer code. Concentration limit calculations and determination of implementation procedures shall follow completion of the pathways work. 4 references

  16. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  17. Towards a unifying basis of auditory thresholds: binaural summation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Absolute auditory threshold decreases with increasing sound duration, a phenomenon explainable by the assumptions that the sound evokes neural events whose probabilities of occurrence are proportional to the sound's amplitude raised to an exponent of about 3 and that a constant number of events are required for threshold (Heil and Neubauer, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:6151-6156, 2003). Based on this probabilistic model and on the assumption of perfect binaural summation, an equation is derived here that provides an explicit expression of the binaural threshold as a function of the two monaural thresholds, irrespective of whether they are equal or unequal, and of the exponent in the model. For exponents >0, the predicted binaural advantage is largest when the two monaural thresholds are equal and decreases towards zero as the monaural threshold difference increases. This equation is tested and the exponent derived by comparing binaural thresholds with those predicted on the basis of the two monaural thresholds for different values of the exponent. The thresholds, measured in a large sample of human subjects with equal and unequal monaural thresholds and for stimuli with different temporal envelopes, are compatible only with an exponent close to 3. An exponent of 3 predicts a binaural advantage of 2 dB when the two ears are equally sensitive. Thus, listening with two (equally sensitive) ears rather than one has the same effect on absolute threshold as doubling duration. The data suggest that perfect binaural summation occurs at threshold and that peripheral neural signals are governed by an exponent close to 3. They might also shed new light on mechanisms underlying binaural summation of loudness.

  18. Biological effect of low-dose application beta-radiation on the gingival mucosa of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ippolitov, Yu.A.; Kovtun, N.N.; Timofeev, L.V.

    1999-01-01

    Biological effect of low-dose application beta-radiation on the gingival mucosa of dogs is studied. Obtained data illustrate the interactions between tissues in local exposure of live tissue to beta-radiation and determine the threshold total dose as 400 sGy. Higher doses lead to secondary changes in the gingival mucosa after which the tissue barrier does not recover [ru

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soileau, M J; Mansour, N; Canto, E; Griscom, D L

    1988-05-01

    The effects of radiation damage on bulk laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/ were investigated. Samples studied included Spectrasil A, B, and WF (water free). Measurements of laser-induced breakdown were conducted with 532 and 1064 nm laser pulses of approximately 20 ns duration. Reductions of up to 40% in the laser-induced breakdown threshold were observed at 532 nm for samples exposed to 10/sup 8/ rad of ..gamma..-radiation. The decrease in breakdown threshold for irradiated SiO/sub 2/ samples at 532 nm was found to be proportional to the linear absorption of the specimen at 266 nm. These results are in good agreement with a proposed model which suggests that two-photon absorption initiated avalanche process is responsible for laser-induced breakdown for these materials.

  20. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  1. Spike-threshold adaptation predicted by membrane potential dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Fontaine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurons encode information in sequences of spikes, which are triggered when their membrane potential crosses a threshold. In vivo, the spiking threshold displays large variability suggesting that threshold dynamics have a profound influence on how the combined input of a neuron is encoded in the spiking. Threshold variability could be explained by adaptation to the membrane potential. However, it could also be the case that most threshold variability reflects noise and processes other than threshold adaptation. Here, we investigated threshold variation in auditory neurons responses recorded in vivo in barn owls. We found that spike threshold is quantitatively predicted by a model in which the threshold adapts, tracking the membrane potential at a short timescale. As a result, in these neurons, slow voltage fluctuations do not contribute to spiking because they are filtered by threshold adaptation. More importantly, these neurons can only respond to input spikes arriving together on a millisecond timescale. These results demonstrate that fast adaptation to the membrane potential captures spike threshold variability in vivo.

  2. Hawking radiation and the boomerang behavior of massive modes near a horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannes, G.; Maïssa, P.; Philbin, T. G.; Rousseaux, G.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the behavior of massive modes near a horizon based on a study of the dispersion relation and wave packet simulations of the Klein-Gordon equation. We point out an apparent paradox between two (in principle equivalent) pictures of black-hole evaporation through Hawking radiation. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the emission of positive-energy modes, one immediately obtains a threshold for the emission of massive particles. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the absorption of negative-energy modes, such a threshold apparently does not exist. We resolve this paradox by tracing the evolution of the positive-energy massive modes with an energy below the threshold. These are seen to be emitted and move away from the black-hole horizon, but they bounce back at a “red horizon” and are reabsorbed by the black hole, thus compensating exactly for the difference between the two pictures. For astrophysical black holes, the consequences are curious but do not affect the terrestrial constraints on observing Hawking radiation. For analogue-gravity systems with massive modes, however, the consequences are crucial and rather surprising.

  3. Statistical Algorithm for the Adaptation of Detection Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stotsky, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Many event detection mechanisms in spark ignition automotive engines are based on the comparison of the engine signals to the detection threshold values. Different signal qualities for new and aged engines necessitate the development of an adaptation algorithm for the detection thresholds...... remains constant regardless of engine age and changing detection threshold values. This, in turn, guarantees the same event detection performance for new and aged engines/sensors. Adaptation of the engine knock detection threshold is given as an example. Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  4. Keratomodelling with low-intensity ultraviolet radiation of excimer laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrishchak, I.B.; Vorontsov, V.V.; Murzin, A.G.; Polikarpov, S.S.; Soms, L.N.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of keratomodelling with low-intensive UV-radiation of excimer laser with subablation energy density in a pulse. Model specimens of polymers and cornea tissue were used. It is shown that the range of threshold energy density in a pulse expands with increase of UV-radiation wave length and contracts with increase of pulse repetition frequency. This range appeared to be different for polymers and cornea tissue. It was revealed that cornea tissue represented a complex high-molecular bipolymer with high water content

  5. An accelerated threshold-based back-projection algorithm for Compton camera image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, Daniel W.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    parallel to the image plane. This effect decreases the sum of the image, thereby also affecting the mean, standard deviation, and SNR of the image. All back-projected events associated with a simulated point source intersected the voxel containing the source and the FWHM of the back-projected image was similar to that obtained from the marching method. Conclusions: The slight deficit to image quality observed with the threshold-based back-projection algorithm described here is outweighed by the 75% reduction in computation time. The implementation of this method requires the development of an optimum threshold function, which determines the overall accuracy of the method. This makes the algorithm well-suited to applications involving the reconstruction of many large images, where the time invested in threshold development is offset by the decreased image reconstruction time. Implemented in a parallel-computing environment, the threshold-based algorithm has the potential to provide real-time dose verification for radiation therapy.

  6. Perspective: Uses and misuses of thresholds in diagnostic decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jeremy L; Najarian, Robert M; Tierney, Lawrence M

    2010-03-01

    The concept of thresholds plays a vital role in decisions involving the initiation, continuation, and completion of diagnostic testing. Much research has focused on the development of explicit thresholds, in the form of practice guidelines and decision analyses. However, these tools are used infrequently; most medical decisions are made at the bedside, using implicit thresholds. Study of these thresholds can lead to a deeper understanding of clinical decision making. The authors examine some factors constituting individual clinicians' implicit thresholds. They propose a model for static thresholds using the concept of situational gravity to explain why some thresholds are high, and some low. Next, they consider the hypothetical effects of incorrect placement of thresholds (miscalibration) and changes to thresholds during diagnosis (manipulation). They demonstrate these concepts using common clinical scenarios. Through analysis of miscalibration of thresholds, the authors demonstrate some common maladaptive clinical behaviors, which are nevertheless internally consistent. They then explain how manipulation of thresholds gives rise to common cognitive heuristics including premature closure and anchoring. They also discuss the case where no threshold has been exceeded despite exhaustive collection of data, which commonly leads to application of the availability or representativeness heuristics. Awareness of implicit thresholds allows for a more effective understanding of the processes of medical decision making and, possibly, to the avoidance of detrimental heuristics and their associated medical errors. Research toward accurately defining these thresholds for individual physicians and toward determining their dynamic properties during the diagnostic process may yield valuable insights.

  7. 'K' contribution to the biological effect of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissiere, Arnaud

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the importance of 'K' ionizations on DNA as critical physical events initiating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, in particular in human cells. Ultra-soft X-rays are used as a probe of core ionization events. A decisive test consists in comparing the biological effects at 250 eV and 350 eV (before and after the carbon K - threshold). The results show a sharp increase of the biological efficiency for both cellular inactivation and chromosomal exchange aberration above the carbon K-threshold, correlated with the one of core events occurring in DNA atoms. The heavy ion irradiation displays again the paradoxical behaviour of cellular inactivation cross sections as a function of LET. Finally, the 'K' event contribution to cellular inactivation of usual low LET radiation is estimated to be about 75%. (author) [fr

  8. Soft and Collinear Radiation and Factorization in Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, Einan

    2002-01-01

    Power corrections to differential cross sections near a kinematic threshold are analysed by Dressed Gluon Exponentiation. Exploiting the factorization property of soft and collinear radiation, the dominant radiative corrections in the threshold region are resummed, yielding a renormalization-scale-invariant expression for the Sudakov exponent. The interplay between Sudakov logs and renormalons is clarified, and the necessity to resum the latter whenever power corrections are non-negligible is emphasized. The presence of power-suppressed ambiguities in the exponentiation kernel suggests that power corrections exponentiate as well. This leads to a non-perturbative factorization formula with non-trivial predictions on the structure of power corrections, which can be contrasted with the OPE. Two examples are discussed. The first is event-shape distributions in the two-jet region, where a wealth of precise data provides a strong motivation for the improved perturbative technique and an ideal situation to study had...

  9. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Rozhko, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1 – absence of effects (stress recognition), 2 – activation (adaptive response), and 3 – inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. - Highlights: • Luminous bacteria demonstrate nonlinear dose-effect relation in radioactive solutions. • Response to low-dose radiation includes 3 stages: threshold, activation, inhibition. • ROS are responsible for low-dose effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides. • Luminous marine bacteria are a convenient tool to study radiation hormesis

  10. Is action potential threshold lowest in the axon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2008-01-01

    Action potential threshold is thought to be lowest in the axon, but when measured using conventional techniques, we found that action potential voltage threshold of rat cortical pyramidal neurons was higher in the axon than at other neuronal locations. In contrast, both current threshold and voltage

  11. Radiation effects and annealing of various power MOSFET applied in satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Gang; Niu Zhenhong; Gao Song; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yu Xuefeng; Ren Diyuan

    2007-01-01

    Two kinds of Power MOSFET applied in the space have been irradiated and tested, and from the view of the changes of oxide charges and interface states, their total dose radiation responses and characteristics have been analyzed. And the relations between breakdown voltage and threshold voltage in the experiment of total close radiation have been investigated and compared. Results of our experiment have provided foundation for the application of these two type devices in spaceflight system. (authors)

  12. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Jr; Charles, L [Alcoa, TN; Buckner, Mark A [Oak Ridge, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bryan, William L [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  13. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  14. TH-CD-201-12: Preliminary Evaluation of Organic Field Effect Transistors as Radiation Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, A [Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lin, H; Rubio-Sanchez, J; Perepichka, D [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic field effect transistors (OFETs) and evaluate their performance before and after exposure to ionizing radiation. To determine if OFETs have potential to function as radiation dosimeters. Methods: OFETs were fabricated on both Si/SiO{sub 2} wafers and flexible polymer substrates using standard processing techniques. Pentacene was used as the organic semiconductor material and the devices were fabricated in a bottom gate configuration. Devices were irradiated using an orthovoltage treatment unit (120 kVp x-rays). Threshold voltage values were measured with the devices in saturation mode and quantified as a function of cumulative dose. Current-voltage characteristics of the devices were measured using a Keithley 2614 SourceMeter SMU Instrument. The devices were connected to the reader but unpowered during irradiations. Results: Devices fabricated on Si/SiO2 wafers demonstrated excellent linearity (R{sup 2} > 0.997) with threshold voltages that ranged between 15 and 36 V. Devices fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate had substantially smaller threshold voltages (∼ 4 – 8 V) and slightly worse linearity (R{sup 2} > 0.98). The devices demonstrated excellent stability in I–V characteristics over a large number (>2000) cycles. Conclusion: OFETs have demonstrated excellent potential in radiation dosimetry applications. A key advantage of these devices is their composition, which can be substantially more tissue-equivalent at low photon energies relative to many other types of radiation detector. In addition, fabrication of organic electronics can employ techniques that are faster, simpler and cheaper than conventional silicon-based devices. These results support further development of organic electronic devices for radiation detection purposes. Funding Support, Disclosures, and Conflict of Interest: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  15. On radiative density limits in stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    2001-01-01

    Density limits in stellarators are caused mainly by enhanced impurity radiation leading to a collapse of the temperature. A simple model can be established, which computes the temperature in the plasma with a fixed heating profile and a temperature-dependent radiation profile. If the temperature-dependent radiation function has one or several extrema, multiple solutions of the transport equation exist and radiative collapse occurs when the high temperature branch merges with the unstable temperature branch. At this bifurcation point the temperature decreases to a stable low temperature solution. The bifurcation point is a function of the heating power and the plasma density. Thus a density limit can be defined as the point where bifurcation occurs. It is shown that bifurcation and sudden temperature collapse does not occur below a power threshold. Anomalous thermal conductivity and the details of the impurity radiation, which in the present model is assumed to be in corona equilibrium, determine the scaling of the density limit. A model of the anomalous transport is developed, which leads to Gyro-Bohm scaling of the confinement time. The density limit based on this transport model is close to experimental findings in Wendelstein 7-AS. (author)

  16. The asymmetry of U.S. monetary policy: Evidence from a threshold Taylor rule with time-varying threshold values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanli; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we revisit the issue whether U.S. monetary policy is asymmetric by estimating a forward-looking threshold Taylor rule with quarterly data from 1955 to 2015. In order to capture the potential heterogeneity for regime shift mechanism under different economic conditions, we modify the threshold model by assuming the threshold value as a latent variable following an autoregressive (AR) dynamic process. We use the unemployment rate as the threshold variable and separate the sample into two periods: expansion periods and recession periods. Our findings support that the U.S. monetary policy operations are asymmetric in these two regimes. More precisely, the monetary authority tends to implement an active Taylor rule with a weaker response to the inflation gap (the deviation of inflation from its target) and a stronger response to the output gap (the deviation of output from its potential level) in recession periods. The threshold value, interpreted as the targeted unemployment rate of monetary authorities, exhibits significant time-varying properties, confirming the conjecture that policy makers may adjust their reference point for the unemployment rate accordingly to reflect their attitude on the health of general economy.

  17. Model Threshold untuk Pembelajaran Memproduksi Pantun Kelas XI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Nura Murti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The learning pantun method in schools provided less opportunity to develop the students’ creativity in producing pantun. This situation was supported by the result of the observation conducted on eleventh graders at SMAN 2 Bondowoso. It showed that the students tend to plagiarize their pantun. The general objective of this research and development is to develop Threshold Pantun model for learning to produce pantun for elevent graders. The product was presented in guidance book for teachers entitled “Pembelajaran Memproduksi Pantun Menggunakan Model Threshold Pantun untuk Kelas XI”. This study adapted design method of Borg-Gall’s R&D procedure. The result of this study showed that Threshold Pantun model was appropriate to be implemented for learning to produce pantun. Key Words: Threshold Pantun model, produce pantun Abstrak: Pembelajaran pantun di sekolah selama ini kurang mengembangkan kreativitas siswa dalam memproduksi pantun. Hal tersebut dikuatkan oleh hasil observasi siswa kelas XI SMAN 2 Bondowoso yang menunjukkan adanya kecenderungan produk siswa bersifat plagiat. Tujuan penelitian dan pengembangan ini secara umum adalah mengembangkan model Threshold Pantun untuk pembelajaran memproduksi pantun kelas XI..Produk disajikan dalam bentuk buku panduan bagi guru dengan judul “Pembelajaran Memproduksi Pantun Menggunakan Model Threshold Pantun untuk Kelas XI”. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancangan penelitian yang diadaptasi dari prosedur penelitian dan pengembangan Borg dan Gall. Berdasarkan hasil validasi model Threshold Pantun untuk pembelajaran memproduksi pantun layak diimplementasikan. Kata kunci: model Threshold Pantun, memproduksi pantun

  18. Influences of various types of radiation on fetus and their significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yukio [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1991-01-01

    In an effort to provide not only risk estimation of various types of radiation but also basic materials of radiation protection for mankind, continuing research has been performed about (1) fetal lethal effects and tetragenic effects of various types of radiation, (2) oocyte killing effects and consequent decrease in pregnancy, (3) postnatal developmental disturabance of the cerebrum, and (4) the role of protooncogene involved in radiation-induced abnormality. This article reviews the previous outcome as part of the research. Both the telencephalon and oocytes were highly radiosensitive, which have an important implication for human risk of radiation. In studies on teratogenetic and fetal and oocyte lethal effects of radiation, both CF-252 and HTO were found to have high RBE. The involvement of protooncogenes is referred to in an attempt to elucidate the occurrence mechanism of anomaly. The spectrum of low radiation doses, low radiation dose rates, teratogenic threshold values, and risk estimation of low dose raditiaon must wait further studies. (N.K.).

  19. The H-mode power threshold in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D F.H.; Bhatnagar, V P; Campbell, D J; Cordey, J G; Esch, H P.L. de; Gormezano, C; Hawkes, N; Horton, L; Jones, T T.C.; Lomas, P J; Lowry, C; Righi, E; Rimini, F G; Saibene, G; Sartori, R; Sips, G; Stork, D; Thomas, P; Thomsen, K; Tubbing, B J.D.; Von Hellermann, M; Ward, D J [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    New H-mode threshold data over a range of toroidal field and density values have been obtained from the present campaign. The scaling with n{sub e} B{sub t} is almost identical with that of the 91/92 period for the same discharge conditions. The scaling with toroidal field alone gives somewhat higher thresholds than the older data. The 1991/2 database shows a scaling of P{sub th} (power threshold) with n{sub e} B{sub t} which is approximately linear and agrees well with that observed on other tokamaks. For NBI and carbon target tiles the threshold power is a factor of two higher with the ion {Nu}B drift away from the target compared with the value found with the drift towards the target. The combination of ICRH and beryllium tiles appears to be beneficial for reducing P{sub th}. The power threshold is largely insensitive to plasma current, X-point height and distance between the last closed flux surface and the limiter, at least for values greater than 2 cm. (authors). 3 refs., 6 figs.

  20. QRS Detection Based on Improved Adaptive Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanyu Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the first cause of death around the world. In accomplishing quick and accurate diagnosis, automatic electrocardiogram (ECG analysis algorithm plays an important role, whose first step is QRS detection. The threshold algorithm of QRS complex detection is known for its high-speed computation and minimized memory storage. In this mobile era, threshold algorithm can be easily transported into portable, wearable, and wireless ECG systems. However, the detection rate of the threshold algorithm still calls for improvement. An improved adaptive threshold algorithm for QRS detection is reported in this paper. The main steps of this algorithm are preprocessing, peak finding, and adaptive threshold QRS detecting. The detection rate is 99.41%, the sensitivity (Se is 99.72%, and the specificity (Sp is 99.69% on the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database. A comparison is also made with two other algorithms, to prove our superiority. The suspicious abnormal area is shown at the end of the algorithm and RR-Lorenz plot drawn for doctors and cardiologists to use as aid for diagnosis.

  1. Biological bases for radiation protection standards and implications for policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1987-01-01

    The author sums up the principles involved in radiation as being composed of three basic requirements: 1) the individual dose limitation 2) the justification of radiation sources or practices 3) the optimization of protection. This philosophy is more sophisticated than the old approach of threshold and safety factors, which, however, is still valid for protection against non-stochastic effects. Discussion following presentation of the paper ranged over cost benefit analysis and optimization of protection systems, uranium mining, and the varying reactions of different governments. (U.K.)

  2. Research of pulse gamma ray radiation effect on microcontroller system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shanchao; Ma Qiang; Jin Xiaoming; Li Ruibin; Lin Dongsheng; Chen Wei; Liu Yan

    2012-01-01

    An experimental result of power chip LM7805 and microcontroller EE80C196KC20 based on the EE80C196KC20 testing system was presented. The pulse gamma ray radiation effect was investigated using 'Qiangguang-Ⅰ' accelerator. Latchup threshold of the microcontroller was obtained, and the relationship of supply current and I/O output with the transient dose rate was observed. The result shows that the restrainability of power chip on pulse gamma ray radiation induces microcontroller latchup effect. (authors)

  3. Use of radiation and radiation practices in 1993. Events and statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havukainen, R [ed.

    1994-05-01

    In the end of the year 1993 there were in force 1740 safety licences for the use of radiation granted by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). In addition to this there were 2100 places for dental x-ray activities in Finland. All together 12726 radiation sources and 313 radioisotope laboratories were in use. The import of radioactive substances was 3.9 x 10 {sup 15} Bq and the export 2.5 x 10 {sup 13} Bq. The production of short-lived isotopes was 1.3 x 10 {sup 13} Bq. The monitoring of personal radiation doses was organized for 11171 workers and 1299 working places. The annual dose (the integrated readings of dosemeters) was greater than registration threshold for 24% of workers. The collective dose (the sum of the results of the dose measurements) registered to the Finnish Dose Register was 6.9 manSv; 74% belonged to the workers of nuclear power plants. The sum of the personal doses measured in 1993 were for three interventional radiologists and fifteen workers in nuclear power plants 20 mSv or more. The effective doses were in each case under the annual dose limit of 50 mSv. The effective doses for the interventional radiologists were under 20 mSv. (7 figs., 16 tabs.).

  4. Radiobiological input to radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of the radiobiological data relevant to radiation protection standards is given. In particular the nature of the dose-response relationships for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in animals and man is discussed with reference to the BEIR 1 1972, the NRC75, the UNSCEAR 77 and the NCRP80 Reports. It was concluded that the linear-no-threshold relationship for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is too simple and that the relationship is best described by curves of varying slopes depending on the dose rate. By examining the data on the incidence of actual tumour systems in animals and man in relation to radiation dose, it was shown that the relationships developed in the simple Tradescantia single-cell system appear to hold widely throughout radiobiology. In developing radiation protection standards, first animal and human radiobiological data were used in determining an appropriate risk coefficient for late and genetic effects for the human being, and second an appropriate comparison of radiation and other more common risks was used as a basis for setting limits of incidence in the exposed population/individual. (U.K.)

  5. Photoluminescence study of Er-doped zinc–sodium–antimonite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, J., E-mail: zavadil@ufe.cz [Institute of Photonics and Electronics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Ivanova, Z.G. [Institute of Solid State Physics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kostka, P. [Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Hamzaoui, M.; Soltani, M.T. [Laboratoire de Physique Photonique et Nanomatériaux, Universite de Biskra (Algeria)

    2014-10-25

    Highlights: • Optical gap found at around 3.1 eV and its compositional tendency was deduced. • Emission spectra are overwhelmed by narrow 4f–4f emission bands of Er{sup 3+}. • Fine structure of emission bands at 980 and 1530 nm measured at 300 and 4 K. • Schematic energy diagram of Stark levels for 3 lowest manifolds of Er{sup 3+} is proposed. • A nature of temperature broadening of 4f–4f PL bands was discussed. - Abstract: Bulk samples of Er-doped zinc–sodium–antimonite glasses have been investigated by transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Two series of compositions, (Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 90−x}(Na{sub 2}O){sub 10}(ZnO){sub x} and (Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 80−x}(Na{sub 2}O){sub 20}(ZnO){sub x}, doped with 0.25 mol% Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have been chosen for this study. Transmission spectra exhibit sharp absorption bands centred at 450, 489, 521, 545, 652, 795, 975 and 1530 nm, which correspond to absorption of Er{sup 3+} ions and they are attributed to the optical transitions from the ground state {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} to the excited states {sup 4}F{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, respectively. The optical gap has been found to vary from 3.09 to 3.15 eV with a tendency to decrease at higher Na{sub 2}O and/or ZnO contents. Four extrinsic bands due to OH{sup −}, Si–O, CO{sub 2}, and (CO{sub 3}){sup 2−} carbonate group vibrations have been identified in the infrared region. Emission spectra are overwhelmed by narrow 4f–4f emission bands. Fine structure of emission bands at 980 and 1530 nm, corresponding to radiative transitions from two lowest excited states of Er{sup 3+} ions to the ground state manifold have been investigated at room temperature and at 4 K. A schematic energy diagram of Stark levels splitting for the three lowest manifolds {sup 4}I{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} has been

  6. New developments on transition radiation detectors using superconducting granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, L.C.L.

    1977-01-01

    By raising slightly either the temperature or the magnetic field to above that of the critical temperature or the critical magnetic field, the type I superconducting granules would still remain in the superconducting state which becomes a metastable state and is called the superheated superconducting state. If a relativistic charged particle incident on such a granule which is located in a colloidal suspension has imported to it an energy that is above the threshold energy (for state flipping) of the granule then it would flip to the normal state. The threshold energy of a granule is a function of the square of its radius, whereas the energy loss of a charged particle due to ionization is linearly proportional to the radius. The size of the granule can be pre-determined to be such that its threshold energy is slightly above the ionization loss of a relativistic charged particle. Then the traversal of the charged particle through such a granule would not affect the superconducting state of the granule unless a transition x-ray radiation is emitted at the surface of the granule by the traversing particle and the x-ray transition radiation is immediately absorbed either in total or partially by the metallic granule causing it to flip to the normal state. The total intensity of the x-ray transition radiation is linearly proportional to the Lorentz factor γ of the traversing particle, and the number of granules flipped would also be a measure of γ. Three methods for detecting the flipping of granules from the superconducting state to the normal state are described. They include the frequency measuring method, the SQUID method, and the pulse method with low noise amplifier system

  7. Use of glasses as radiation detectors for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.

    1989-08-01

    Glass samples were tested in relation to the possibility of use in high dose dosimetry in medical and industrial areas. The main characteristics were determined: detection threshold, reproducibility, response to gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 6 Co and thermal decay at ambient temperature, with the use of optical absorption and thermoluminesce techniques. (author) [pt

  8. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  9. Effects of small radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G.

    1986-01-01

    The term 'small radiation dosis' means doses of about (1 rem), fractions of one rem as well as doses of a few rem. Doses like these are encountered in various practical fields, e.g. in X-ray diagnosis, in the environment and in radiation protection rules. The knowledge about small doses is derived from the same two forces, on which the radiobiology of human beings nearly is based: interpretation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki data, as well as the experience from radiotherapy. Careful interpretation of Hiroshima dates do not provide any evidence that small doses can induce cancer, fetal malformations or genetic damage. Yet in radiotherapy of various diseases, e.g. inflammations, doses of about 1 Gy (100 rad) do no harm to the patients. According to a widespread hypothesis even very small doses may induce some types of radiation damage ('no threshold'). Nevertheless an alternative view is justified. At present no decision can be made between these two alternatives, but the usefullness of radiology is definitely better established than any damage calculated by theories or extrapolations. Based on experience any exaggerated fear of radiations can be met. (author)

  10. Optical breakdown of helium in Bessel laser radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N E; Pleshanov, I V; Margolin, L Ya; Pyatnitskii, Lev N

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used to investigate the dynamics of formation of a helium plasma in Bessel beams, shaped by an axicon and a phase converter from a laser radiation pulse with Gaussian temporal and radial intensity profiles. The beam intensities at the breakdown threshold are determined as a function of the pulse duration for various radial field distributions in a beam characterised by Bessel functions of order m (m = 0 - 5). It is shown that in the investigated range of parameters the threshold intensity is independent of m. The temporal and spatial evolution of the resultant plasma, and the dependence of the plasma characteristics on the pulse parameters are considered. Conditions are found for the formation of tubular plasma channels in beams of orders m≥1. The adopted model of the optical breakdown of helium is shown to be satisfactory because of a good agreement between the results of calculations of the moment of breakdown in a zeroth-order Bessel beam and experimental results. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. Thresholds of ion turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Mourgues, F.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.; Zou, X.L.

    1991-01-01

    The linear thresholds of ionic turbulence are numerically calculated for the Tokamaks JET and TORE SUPRA. It is proved that the stability domain at η i >0 is determined by trapped ion modes and is characterized by η i ≥1 and a threshold L Ti /R of order (0.2/0.3)/(1+T i /T e ). The latter value is significantly smaller than what has been previously predicted. Experimental temperature profiles in heated discharges are usually marginal with respect to this criterium. It is also shown that the eigenmodes are low frequency, low wavenumber ballooned modes, which may produce a very large transport once the threshold ion temperature gradient is reached

  12. Effect of dissipation on dynamical fusion thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierk, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of dynamical thresholds to fusion in heavy nuclei (A greater than or equal to 200) due to the nature of the potential-energy surface is shown. These thresholds exist even in the absence of dissipative forces, due to the coupling between the various collective deformation degrees of freedom. Using a macroscopic model of nuclear shape dynamics, It is shown how three different suggested dissipation mechanisms increase by varying amounts the excitation energy over the one-dimensional barrier required to cause compound-nucleus formation. The recently introduced surface-plus-window dissipation may give a reasonable representation of experimental data on fusion thresholds, in addition to properly describing fission-fragment kinetic energies and isoscalar giant multipole widths. Scaling of threshold results to asymmetric systems is discussed. 48 refs., 10 figs

  13. Smartphone threshold audiometry in underserved primary health-care contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Josefin; Swanepoel, De Wet; Carel Myburgh, Hermanus; Laurent, Claude

    2016-01-01

    To validate a calibrated smartphone-based hearing test in a sound booth environment and in primary health-care clinics. A repeated-measure within-subject study design was employed whereby air-conduction hearing thresholds determined by smartphone-based audiometry was compared to conventional audiometry in a sound booth and a primary health-care clinic environment. A total of 94 subjects (mean age 41 years ± 17.6 SD and range 18-88; 64% female) were assessed of whom 64 were tested in the sound booth and 30 within primary health-care clinics without a booth. In the sound booth 63.4% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dB HL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 80.6% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.6 dB ± 9.9 SD. In primary health-care clinics 13.7% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dBHL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 92.9% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.0 dB ± 7.1 SD. Accurate air-conduction audiometry can be conducted in a sound booth and without a sound booth in an underserved community health-care clinic using a smartphone.

  14. Neutron dosimetry for radiation damage in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of materials subjected to the intense neutron radiation fields characteristic of fission power reactors or proposed fusion energy devices is a field of extensive current research. These investigations seek important information relevant to the safety and economics of nuclear energy. In high-level radiation environments, neutron metrology is accomplished predominantly with passive techniques which require detailed knowledge about many nuclear reactions. The quality of neutron dosimetry has increased noticeably during the past decade owing to the availability of new data and evaluations for both integral and differential cross sections, better quantitative understanding of radioactive decay processes, improvements in radiation detection technology, and the development of reliable spectrum unfolding procedures. However, there are problems caused by the persistence of serious integral-differential discrepancies for several important reactions. There is a need to further develop the data base for exothermic and low-threshold reactions needed in thermal and fast-fission dosimetry, and for high-threshold reactions needed in fusion-energy dosimetry. The unsatisfied data requirements for fission reactor dosimetry appear to be relatively modest and well defined, while the needs for fusion are extensive and less well defined because of the immature state of fusion technology. These various data requirements are examined with the goal of providing suggestions for continued dosimetry-related nuclear data research

  15. Is the diagnostic threshold for bulimia nervosa clinically meaningful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Danielle A N; Bohrer, Brittany K; Forbush, Kelsie T

    2018-01-01

    The DSM-5 differentiates full- and sub-threshold bulimia nervosa (BN) according to average weekly frequencies of binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors. This study was the first to evaluate the modified frequency criterion for BN published in the DSM-5. The purpose of this study was to test whether community-recruited adults (N=125; 83.2% women) with current full-threshold (n=77) or sub-threshold BN (n=48) differed in comorbid psychopathology and eating disorder (ED) illness duration, symptom severity, and clinical impairment. Participants completed the Clinical Impairment Assessment and participated in semi-structured clinical interviews of ED- and non-ED psychopathology. Differences between the sub- and full-threshold BN groups were assessed using MANOVA and Chi-square analyses. ED illness duration, age-of-onset, body mass index (BMI), alcohol and drug misuse, and the presence of current and lifetime mood or anxiety disorders did not differ between participants with sub- and full-threshold BN. Participants with full-threshold BN had higher levels of clinical impairment and weight concern than those with sub-threshold BN. However, minimal clinically important difference analyses suggested that statistically significant differences between participants with sub- and full-threshold BN on clinical impairment and weight concern were not clinically significant. In conclusion, sub-threshold BN did not differ from full-threshold BN in clinically meaningful ways. Future studies are needed to identify an improved frequency criterion for BN that better distinguishes individuals in ways that will more validly inform prognosis and effective treatment planning for BN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Derivation of soil screening thresholds to protect chisel-toothed kangaroo rat from uranium mine waste in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Otton, James K.; Finger, Susan E.; Little, Edward E.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical data from soil and weathered waste material samples collected from five uranium mines north of the Grand Canyon (three reclaimed, one mined but not reclaimed, and one never mined) were used in a screening-level risk analysis for the Arizona chisel-toothed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys microps leucotis); risks from radiation exposure were not evaluated. Dietary toxicity reference values were used to estimate soil-screening thresholds presenting risk to kangaroo rats. Sensitivity analyses indicated that body weight critically affected outcomes of exposed-dose calculations; juvenile kangaroo rats were more sensitive to the inorganic constituent toxicities than adult kangaroo rats. Species-specific soil-screening thresholds were derived for arsenic (137 mg/kg), cadmium (16 mg/kg), copper (1,461 mg/kg), lead (1,143 mg/kg), nickel (771 mg/kg), thallium (1.3 mg/kg), uranium (1,513 mg/kg), and zinc (731 mg/kg) using toxicity reference values that incorporate expected chronic field exposures. Inorganic contaminants in soils within and near the mine areas generally posed minimal risk to kangaroo rats. Most exceedances of soil thresholds were for arsenic and thallium and were associated with weathered mine wastes.

  17. Impact of radiation technique, radiation fraction dose, and total cisplatin dose on hearing. Retrospective analysis of 29 medulloblastoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scobioala, Sergiu; Kittel, Christopher; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Wolters, Heidi; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Muenster (Germany); Parfitt, Ross; Matulat, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To analyze the incidence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) resulting from different radiation techniques, fractionation dose, mean cochlear radiation dose (D{sub mean}), and total cisplatin dose. In all, 29 children with medulloblastoma (58 ears) with subclinical pretreatment hearing thresholds participated. Radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin had been applied sequentially according to the HIT MED Guidance. Audiological outcomes up to the latest follow-up (median 2.6 years) were compared. Bilateral high-frequency SNHL was observed in 26 patients (90%). No significant differences were found in mean hearing threshold between left and right ears at any frequency. A significantly better audiological outcome (p < 0.05) was found after tomotherapy at the 6 kHz bone-conduction threshold (BCT) and left-sided 8 kHz air-conduction threshold (ACT) than after a combined radiotherapy technique (CT). Fraction dose was not found to have any impact on the incidence, degree, and time-to-onset of SNHL. Patients treated with CT had a greater risk of SNHL at high frequencies than tomotherapy patients even though D{sub mean} was similar. Increase in severity of SNHL was seen when the total cisplatin dose reached above 210 mg/m{sup 2}, with the highest abnormal level found 8-12 months after RT regardless of radiation technique or fraction dose. The cochlear radiation dose should be kept as low as possible in patients who receive simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The risk of clinically relevant HL was shown when D{sub mean} exceeds 45 Gy independent of radiation technique or radiation regime. Cisplatin ototoxicity was shown to have a dose-dependent effect on bilateral SNHL, which was more pronounced in higher frequencies. (orig.) [German] Analyse von Inzidenz und Schweregrad einer sensorineuralen Schwerhoerigkeit (''sensorineural hearing loss'', SNHL) infolge der Wirkung unterschiedlicher Bestrahlungstechniken, Fraktionierungen, mittlerer

  18. NEUTRON SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS USING MULTIPLE THRESHOLD DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, William W.; Duffey, Dick

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. The use of threshold detectors, which simultaneously undergo reactions with thermal neutrons and two or more fast neutron threshold reactions, was applied to measurements of the neutron spectrum in a reactor. A number of different materials were irradiated to determine the most practical ones for use as multiple threshold detectors. These results, as well as counting techniques and corrections, are presented. Some materials used include aluminum, alloys of Al -Ni, aluminum-- nickel oxides, and magesium orthophosphates. (auth)

  19. Cost-effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost-effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost-effectiveness thresholds allow cost-effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost-effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country's per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this - in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost-effectiveness ratios - can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost-effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations - e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations - in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost-effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair.

  20. Cost–effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost–effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost–effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost–effectiveness thresholds allow cost–effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization’s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost–effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country’s per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this – in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost–effectiveness ratios – can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost–effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations – e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations – in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost–effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair. PMID:27994285

  1. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, M.B.; Davis, M.V.

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10 4 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10 5 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  2. Tumour induction by small doses of ionised radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionised radiation on tumour induction in animals is discussed. It is hypothesised that high doses of radiation can strongly advance tumour induction from the combination of a stimulated cell growth, as a reaction to massive cell killing, and damage to DNA in the cell nuclei. This effect has a limit below which the radiation dose causes a non-significant amount of dead cells. However in animals where through other reasons, a chronic growth stimulation already exists, only one effect, the damage of DNA, is necessary to induce tumours. A linear dose effect without a threshold level applies in these cases. Applying this hypothesis to man indicates that calculating low dose effects by linear extrapolation of high dose effects is nothing more than a reasonable approximation. (C.F.)

  3. Challenges in commercial manufacture of radiation shielding glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive hot-cells employ Radiation Shielding Windows (RSWs), assembled from specialty glasses, developed exclusively for nuclear industry. RSWs serve the twin purpose of direct viewing and shielding protection to the operator and use various types of radiation resistant and optically compatible glasses, such as low-density borosilicate glass; medium-density glass with up to 45% Lead and high-density glass with over 70% lead. Some glasses are Ceria-doped for enhancing their resistance threshold to radiation browning. A clear view of future requirement, capital and environmental costs could be the driving force towards bringing about changes in melting practices, encourage melting development, and enhancing collaboration. With DAE and CGCRI working in tandem, production of the entire range of RSW glasses by an Indian glass industry participant may no longer be a distant dream

  4. Common misinterpretations of the 'linear, no-threshold' relationship used in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Absorbed dose D is shown to be a composite variable, the product of the fraction of cells hit (I H ) and the mean ''dose'' (hit size) anti z to those cells. D is suitable for use with high level exposure (HLE) to radiation and its resulting acute organ effects because, since I H =1.0, it approximates closely enough the mean energy density in the cell as well as in the organ. However, the low level exposure (LLE) to radiation and its consequent probability of cancer induction from a single cell, stochastic delivery of energy to cells results in a wide distribution of hit sizes z, and the expected mean value, anti z, is constant with exposure. Thus, with LLE, only I H varies with D so that the apparent proportionality between ''dose'' and the fraction of cells transformed is misleading. This proportionality therefore does not mean that any (cell) dose, no matter how small, can be lethal. Rather, it means that, in the exposure of a population of individual organisms consisting of the constituent relevant cells, there is a small probability of particle-cell ineractions which transfer energy. The probability of a cell transforming and initiating a cancer can only be greater than zero if the hi t size (''dose'') to the cell is large enough. Otherwise stated, if the ''dose'' is defined at the proper level of biological organization, namely, the cell and not the organ, only a large dose z to that cell is effective. (orig.)

  5. Piezoelectric Materials Under Natural and Man-Made Radiation: The Potential for Direct Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wart, Megan; Simpson, Evan; Flaska, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Radiation detection systems used for monitoring long term waste storage need to be compact, rugged, and have low or no power requirements. By using piezoelectric materials it may be possible to create a reliable self-powered radiation detection system. To determine the feasibility of this approach, the electrical signal response of the piezoelectric materials to radiation must be characterized. To do so, an experimental geometry has been designed and a neutron source has been chosen as described in this paper, which will be used to irradiate a uranium foil for producing fission fragments. These future experiments will be aimed at finding the threshold of exposure of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) plates needed to produce and electrical signal. Based on the proposed experimental geometry the thermal neutron beam-line at the Breazeale Reactor at The Pennsylvania State University will be used as the neutron source. The uranium foil and neutron source will be able to supply a maximum flux of 1.5e5 fission fragments/second*cm2 to each of the PZT plates.

  6. Piezoelectric Materials Under Natural and Man-Made Radiation: The Potential for Direct Radiation Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wart Megan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation detection systems used for monitoring long term waste storage need to be compact, rugged, and have low or no power requirements. By using piezoelectric materials it may be possible to create a reliable self-powered radiation detection system. To determine the feasibility of this approach, the electrical signal response of the piezoelectric materials to radiation must be characterized. To do so, an experimental geometry has been designed and a neutron source has been chosen as described in this paper, which will be used to irradiate a uranium foil for producing fission fragments. These future experiments will be aimed at finding the threshold of exposure of lead zirconate titanate (PZT plates needed to produce and electrical signal. Based on the proposed experimental geometry the thermal neutron beam-line at the Breazeale Reactor at The Pennsylvania State University will be used as the neutron source. The uranium foil and neutron source will be able to supply a maximum flux of 1.5e5 fission fragments/second*cm2 to each of the PZT plates.

  7. Summary report of a workshop on establishing cumulative effects thresholds : a suggested approach for establishing cumulative effects thresholds in a Yukon context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, thresholds are being used as a land and cumulative effects assessment and management tool. To assist in the management of wildlife species such as woodland caribou, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs (DIAND) Environment Directorate, Yukon sponsored a workshop to develop and use cumulative thresholds in the Yukon. The approximately 30 participants reviewed recent initiatives in the Yukon and other jurisdictions. The workshop is expected to help formulate a strategic vision for implementing cumulative effects thresholds in the Yukon. The key to success resides in building relationships with Umbrella Final Agreement (UFA) Boards, the Development Assessment Process (DAP), and the Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Act (YESAA). Broad support is required within an integrated resource management framework. The workshop featured discussions on current science and theory of cumulative effects thresholds. Potential data and implementation issues were also discussed. It was concluded that thresholds are useful and scientifically defensible. The threshold research results obtained in Alberta, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories are applicable to the Yukon. One of the best tools for establishing and tracking thresholds is habitat effectiveness. Effects must be monitored and tracked. Biologists must share their information with decision makers. Interagency coordination and assistance should be facilitated through the establishment of working groups. Regional land use plans should include thresholds. 7 refs.

  8. ‘Soglitude’- introducing a method of thinking thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Barazon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘Soglitude’ is an invitation to acknowledge the existence of thresholds in thought. A threshold in thought designates the indetermination, the passage, the evolution of every state the world is in. The creation we add to it, and the objectivity we suppose, on the border of those two ideas lies our perceptive threshold. No state will ever be permanent, and in order to stress the temporary, fluent character of the world and our perception of it, we want to introduce a new suitable method to think change and transformation, when we acknowledge our own threshold nature. The contributions gathered in this special issue come from various disciplines: anthropology, philosophy, critical theory, film studies, political science, literature and history. The variety of these insights shows the resonance of the idea of threshold in every category of thought. We hope to enlarge the notion in further issues on physics and chemistry, as well as mathematics. The articles in this issue introduce the method of threshold thinking by showing the importance of the in-between, of the changing of perspective in their respective domain. The ‘Documents’ section named INTERSTICES, includes a selection of poems, two essays, a philosophical-artistic project called ‘infraphysique’, a performance on thresholds in the soul, and a dialogue with Israel Rosenfield. This issue presents a kaleidoscope of possible threshold thinking and hopes to initiate new ways of looking at things.For every change that occurs in reality there is a subjective counterpart in our perception and this needs to be acknowledged as such. What we name objective is reflected in our own personal perception in its own personal manner, in such a way that the objectivity of an event might altogether be questioned. The absolute point of view, the view from “nowhere”, could well be the projection that causes dogmatism. By introducing the method of thinking thresholds into a system, be it

  9. Identifying Threshold Concepts for Information Literacy: A Delphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lori Townsend; Amy R. Hofer; Silvia Lin Hanick; Korey Brunetti

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Delphi method to engage expert practitioners on the topic of threshold concepts for information literacy. A panel of experts considered two questions. First, is the threshold concept approach useful for information literacy instruction? The panel unanimously agreed that the threshold concept approach holds potential for information literacy instruction. Second, what are the threshold concepts for information literacy instruction? The panel proposed and discussed over fift...

  10. Melanin microcavitation threshold in the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Wharmby, Andrew W.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-02-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine and porcine melanosomes were determined using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the NIR (1000 - 1319 nm) wavelength regime. Average fluence thresholds for microcavitation increased non-linearly with increasing wavelength. Average fluence thresholds were also measured for 10-ns pulses at 532 nm, and found to be comparable to visible ns pulse values published in previous reports. Fluence thresholds were used to calculate melanosome absorption coefficients, which decreased with increasing wavelength. This trend was found to be comparable to the decrease in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer absorption coefficients reported over the same wavelength region. Estimated corneal total intraocular energy (TIE) values were determined and compared to the current and proposed maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe exposure levels. Results from this study support the proposed changes to the MPE levels.

  11. Evaluation of new 5 inch photomultiplier for use in threshold Cherenkov detectors with aerogel radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zorn, C.; Flyckt, S.O.

    2000-01-01

    A cost effective alternative to UV-sensitive 5 inch PMTs often used with threshold Aerogel Cherenkov detectors has been developed and tested. The photomultiplier -XP4572-is a variation of the Photonis XP4512 glass window tube with improved electron collection efficiency. Fast timing and high gain were only moderately compromised. The effective quantum efficiency has been measured as twice that of a Burle 8854 Quantacon when exposed to a Cherenkov spectrum generated by Ru-106 electrons (les;3.54 MeV) through 1 cm of high index, high transparency Matsushita Electric aerogel (n=1.05). This new phototube is being installed in an aerogel-based Cherenkov detector for Hall A at Jefferson Lab

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy in head and neck Cancer: a correlation study between suitable uptake value threshold and tumor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yu, Chun-Yen; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Yang, Shih-Neng; Wang, Yao-Ching; Liang, Ji-An; Chien, Chun-Ru; Chen, Shang-Wen

    2010-01-01

    To define a suitable threshold setting for gross tumor volume (GTV) when using 18 Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomogram (PET/CT) for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer (HNC). Fifteen HNC patients prospectively received PET/CT simulation for their radiation treatment planning. Biological target volume (BTV) was derived from PET/CT-based GTV of the primary tumor. The BTVs were defined as the isodensity volumes when adjusting different percentage of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), excluding any artifact from surrounding normal tissues. CT-based primary GTV (C-pGTV) that had been previously defined by radiation oncologists was compared with the BTV. Suitable threshold level (sTL) could be determined when BTV value and its morphology using a certain threshold level was observed to be the best fitness of the C-pGTV. Suitable standardized uptake value (sSUV) was calculated as the sTL multiplied by the SUVmax. Our result demonstrated no single sTL or sSUV method could achieve an optimized volumetric match with the C-pGTV. The sTL was 13% to 27% (mean, 19%), whereas the sSUV was 1.64 to 3.98 (mean, 2.46). The sTL was inversely correlated with the SUVmax [sTL = -0.1004 Ln (SUVmax) + 0.4464; R 2 = 0.81]. The sSUV showed a linear correlation with the SUVmax (sSUV = 0.0842 SUVmax + 1.248; R 2 = 0.89). The sTL was not associated with the value of C-pGTVs. In PET/CT-based BTV for HNC, a suitable threshold or SUV level can be established by correlating with SUVmax rather than using a fixed threshold

  13. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M. J., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Ng, G. I., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X. [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C. [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Research Techno Plaza, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2015-02-23

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R{sub DS[ON]}) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV{sub th}) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I{sub DS}-V{sub DS}) and drain current (I{sub D}) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L{sub gd}) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L{sub gd} = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a small ΔV{sub th} (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L{sub gd} = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a larger ΔV{sub th} (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV{sub th}. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I{sub D}-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  14. Nonlinear Scattering of VLF Waves in the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Ganguli, Guru; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering. Since the pitch-angle scattering rate is a strong function of the wave properties, a solid understanding of VLF wave sources and propagation in the magnetosphere is critical to accurately calculate electron lifetimes. Nonlinear scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is a mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation, and has not been accounted for in previous models of radiation belt dynamics. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Recent results show that the threshold for nonlinear scattering can often be met by naturally occur