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Sample records for radiation protection icrp

  1. Radiation protection. Basic concepts of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The title subject is easily explained. Main international organizations for radiation protection are United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The UNSCEAR objectively summarizes and publishes scientific findings; ICRP, an NGO, takes part in recommending the radiological protection from the expertized aspect; and IAEA, a UN autonomy, aims at peaceful usage of atomic power. These organizations support the legal regulation and standard of nations. The purpose of the ICRP recommendation (Pub. 103, 2007) is to contribute to the appropriate protection of radiation hazardous effects, which are assumed to be linearly proportional (the model of linear no-threshold, LNT) that radiation risk exists even at the lowest dose. When a change in the single cell results in hazardous alteration, the causative effects are called stochastic effects, which include the mutation leading to cancer formation and genetic effect in offspring (not observed in man). ICRP says the validity of LNT for the stochastic effects essentially from the protective aspect, although epidemiological data support it at >100 mSv exposure. The deterministic effects are caused by loss of cell itself or of its function, where the threshold is defined to be the dose causing >1% of disorder or death. Radiation protective system against exposure is on the situation (programmed, emergent and natural), category (occupational, public and medical) and 3 principles of justification, optimization and application of dose limit. (T.T.)

  2. Environmental radiation protection. The new ICRP concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaps, C.; Lorenz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the environment regarding radiation protection was so far reduced to the concept: if man is protected the environment is protected well enough. This was derived from the radiosensitivity curve, according to which highly developed organisms are more sensible to radiation than less highly developed. ICRP publication 103 put this simple concept in question. Even before, ICRP set up a committee to discuss this theme. End of 2012 ICRP released a new concept of environmental protection regarding different exposure situations and brought it up for discussion in the internet. This concept is based on Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) and analogous to the concept of the protection for man. The exposure for representative organisms regarding ionizing radiation shall be estimated and compared with Derived Consideration Reference Levels (DCRLs). If the DCRLs are reached or exceeded there is a need to react. This concept raises several questions. (orig.)

  3. A perspective on the ICRP approach to Radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRP, in response to concerns by the environmental community, has begun the process of addressing radiation protection of non-human species. Concerns have been raised that the current framework for radiation protection fails to adequately protect the environment. Although most everyone agrees that some change to the ICRP radiation protection framework is called for, the extent of the revision is debatable. In May 2000, the ICRP set up a Task Group to provide advice on the development of a policy for the protection of the environment and to suggest a framework for environmental protection based on scientific, ethical, and philosophical principles. Based on Task Group input, ICRP intends to develop a framework for protection of the environment that can be integrated into an overall system of protection. This paper explores four major issues that serve to identify questions that ICRP should consider in its 2005 recommendations regarding radiation protection of the environment: (1) the role of ICRP, (2) defining the environment and criteria for protection, (3) the framework for environmental protection, and (4) risk management. (author)

  4. ICRP-Radiation protection principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the history of ICRP, its basic standards and recommendations and their rationale, from its foundation in 1928 to the latest major review of its recommendation in 1977. In this time the basic radiation standard for whole body irradiation of a radiation worker has dropped from the equivalent of 50 r per year (in 1934) through 15 rem per year (1954) to 5 rem per year in 1958. ICRP recommendations include maximum permissible doses for particular organs and a comprehensive list of derived limits governing the intake of radionuclides into the body, and dose limits for members of the public. Emphasis in current radiation protection practice is on avoiding all unnecessary exposures and keeping doses as far below dose limits as is reasonably achievable. The use of cost-benefit analysis to optimize protection and some of its inherent difficulties, is discussed

  5. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  6. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection norm and ICRP recommendations published in 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Servico de Radioprotecao. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Campus Pocos de Caldas; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (GETA/LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos. Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais; Mortagua, Valter, E-mail: Valter@inb.gov.br [Usina de lnterlagos (USIN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Coordenacao

    2013-07-01

    In the year 2007, ICRP published a set of recommendations (The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 103), which changed some important concepts. This work aims to compare the Brazilian radiation protection basic norm with the new ICRP recommendations, by checking the existing differences. The main difference between ICRP publication 60 and ICRP publication 103 is the changing of the concept of protection based on process, by using the concepts of practice and intervention, to the protection based in the exposition situation, by using the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existing situation. Other important difference lies in the values of the radiation and tissue weighting factors, in the quantities equivalent and effective dose, and updating the radiation detriment based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure. At last, the demonstration of the environment radiation protection must be clear, and this concept is not found in Brazilian nuclear legislation. Also some similarities were found. The fundamental principles of the Brazilian norms are the same as that of ICRP 103, which are the justification principle, the optimization principle and the application of dose limits. The individual effective dose limit of Brazilian norm is the same of the ICRP 103, established as 20 mSv per year. In order to adequate the Brazilian norm it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation and tissue weighting, and updating the radiation detriment, besides making clear the concept of protection of the environment. It is important to notice that although the Brazilian norm is not in complete agreement with all international recommendations, it must be completely followed as the norm which is in use in the country. (author)

  7. International radiation protection recommendations. Five years experience of ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Beninson, D.; Sowby, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has issued radiation protection recommendations since 1928. The latest set of basic recommendations was adopted by the Commission on 17 January 1977, and subsequently published as ICRP Publication 26. This document has met with a wider interest than any of the previous ICRP recommendations. It has been considered to mark a radical change in the protection policy advocated by ICRP. It is not often appreciated that recommendations which are believed to be 'new' in ICRP Publication 26 had already been made in ICRP Publication 9 more than ten years earlier. In any event, ICRP Publication 26 has had a substantial impact on regulatory work in countries all over the world. It forms the basis for the Basic Safety Standards of the international organizations IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and WHO. The paper refers to the experience gained in using the new ICRP recommendations over the five years that have passed since ICRP Publication 26 was adopted and discusses some of the problems that have arisen in the practical application of the new recommendations in various countries. (author)

  8. On revision of definition of doses for radiation protection in ICRP 1990 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Michio

    1995-01-01

    The recommendation of ICRP is to give the guideline to the organizations and experts concerned to radiation protection including regulatory authorities on the basic rule which becomes the basis of proper radiation protection, and the radiation protection in respective countries has been carried out, respecting this ICRP recommendation. In 1990, ICRP revised this basic recommendation, and published as Publication 60. In this 1990 recommendation, as the matters that give impact to the dose evaluation of external exposure, the introduction of the new concept of dose, namely radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose, the revision of radiation quality factor and so on are enumerated. As to the 1990 recommendation, absorbed dose and organ dose, radiation weighting factor, equivalent dose, effective dose, quality factor-LET relation, the summation with the former quantities and the operational quantity of ICRU are described. The reason why radiation weighting factor and equivalent dose were introduced are discussed, including the inference of the author. (K.I.)

  9. ICRP proposal on radiation protection of non-human species - with TAEA perspective-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okyar, H. B.

    2006-01-01

    Interest in the protection of the environment has greatly increased in recent years, in relation to all aspects of human activities. Such interest has been accompanied by the development and application of various means of assessing and managing the many forms of human impact upon it. Up to now, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has not published any recommendations on how to assess or manage radiation effects in non-human species. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) which is the regulatory body of Turkey in radiation protection also recognises that there is a current lack of consistency at international level with respect to addressing such issues in relation to radioactivity, and therefore believes that a more proactive approach is now necessary. The Commission has decided to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species in order to fill a conceptual gap in radiation protection. The proposed system does not intend to set regulatory standards, but rather to provide guidance and help regulators and operators demonstrate compliance with existing legislation. ICRP developed a small set of reference animals and plants, plus their relevant data bases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. This concept is similar to that of the reference individual (reference man) used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decisions. The Commission has now established a system to continue the work with defining effects end-points of interest, the types of reference organisms to be used by ICRP, and defining a set of reference dose models for assessing and managing radiation exposure in non-human species. This talk will provide a review of ICRP proposed framework for radiation protection of the environment with TAEA comments

  10. ICRP 's view on protection of non-human species from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing its existing recommendations for radiological protection. Up till now, it has not published any recommendations as to how assessment or management of radiation effects in non-human organisms should be carried out. The Commission set up a Task Group in the year 2000 to address this issue, and recently adopted the Task Group's report. The report addresses the role that ICRP could play in this important and developing area, building on the approach that has been developed for human protection. ICRP will develop a small set of Reference Fauna and Flora, plus their relevant databases to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose, and between dose and certain categories of effect. The concept of Reference Fauna and Flora is similar to that of Reference Man used for human radiological protection, in that it is intended to act as a basis for calculations and decision-making. The decision by the Commission to develop a framework for the assessment of radiation effects in non-human species has not been driven by any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. It has rather been developed to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection, and to clarify how ICRP can contribute to the attainment of society's goals of environmental protection by developing a protection policy based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles. (author)

  11. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium; ICRP 2015. 3. Internationales Symposium zum System des Strahlenschutzes. Bericht und Reflexion ueber ein bedeutsames Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  12. Application of the ICRP recommendations to revised secondary radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    In 1977, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued Publication No. 26 containing its recommendations for major changes in the conceptual basis for radiation protection. The new recommendations consider total risk (to the whole body) instead of controlling (critical-organ) risk. Subsequent publications and explanatory statements most useful for providing clarification of the intent of the new recommendations have not resolved practical problems encountered in attempting to apply them to either occupational or public exposures. Some of the problems that still exist in applying these recommendations for estimating doses to members of the public include the following: allowance for age differences within an exposed population group, definition of 50-y dose versus lifetime (70-y) dose, definition of negligible risk levels for individual and collective doses, and derivation of appropriate concentration guidelines. The United States is in the process of adopting the revised recommendations of the ICRP. In addition to adopting versions of the primary radiation protection standards, both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed draft secondary standards that are similar to the Derived Air Concentration values given by the ICRP. This paper presents a brief history of the development of these revised secondary standards, discusses their technical bases, provides a comparison of them, and discusses their limitations and potential misapplication

  13. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, S.; Mattsson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors)

  14. Transition of radiation protection standards in ICRP recommendations and Japan's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirabe, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation protection standards are the standards set for the purpose of preventing radiation hazard and other damage. This paper confirm what the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended against the standard value on public exposure in Japan's laws and regulations, and how the Japanese government responded in introducing it into Japan's laws and regulations. There were delays of 6 to 12 years for the introduction of ICRP recommendations into the laws and regulations. Compared with response to the copyright treaty, which was extremely quick with the delays of only 1 to 2 years, these delays were very large. In Japan's laws and regulations, there are no regulations on the standard value for public exposure, and introduction of the recommended standard value of 1 mSv/year from ICRP has been avoided by the government. It is supposed that the reason for not introducing radiation dose limit and dose constraint value of public exposure was due to the lobbying of electric companies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, the former Nuclear Safety Commission set the reference level for emergency exposure situation at 20 mSv/year. Although there is the long-term target of 1 mSv/year for existing exposure, no reference level has been set yet. Due to these delays or avoidances, the rights of people suffering from radiation exposure are restricted, while perhaps the benefits of electric companies are being protected. (A.O.)

  15. Radiation protection recommendations on dose limits: the role of the NCRP and the ICRP and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, Warren K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the role of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in making recommendations on dose limits for ionizing radiation exposure for workers and for the public. The text describes the new limits for workers and public recommended by ICRP in 1991 and NCRP in 1993 and the composition of the radiation health detriment on which they are based. The main component of this detriment is the risk of radiation induced cancer which is now estimated to be about three times greater than a decade or so earlier. Uncertainties in these risk estimates are discussed. Some special radiation protection problems, such as those for the embryo or fetus are described. The article also addresses future progress in radiation protection particularly with regard to future improvements in the scientific basis for radiation protection recommendations

  16. ICRP Recommendations to the Protection of People Living in Long-Term Contaminated Areas ICRP publication 111 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Rashad, S.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to through some lights on ICRP free release publication at 4 April 2011-Internationally Known as ICRP publication 111. The title of the publication is (application of the commission's recommendations to the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency). Nuclear accidents or a radiation emergency may cause contamination. The contamination may be spread on a large area. There are people living in these areas. For many factors the people refuse to leave their homes. They want to stay along their life as in the case of the normal conditions. So, it is important to facilitate their stay and make it safe. This is not easy. But it is possible without neglect the radiation hazard. The radiation hazard is effective on the life fields. It is harmful in plants, animals, foods, water, milk and the buildings it self. With considering the radiological protection principles the living of the people for a long time could be a fact of the life and will be more easy and safe. Optimization principle has priority to apply. This publication achieves these purposes.The ICRP-111 is translated into Arabic at August 2012. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the ICRP radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translations include, ICRP-105 (radiation protection in medicine) and ICRP -113 (education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures).

  17. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, S [Department of Medical Physics, s-451 80 Uddevalla (Sweden); Mattsson, S [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Lund, S-214 01 Malmo (Sweden)

    1994-12-31

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors). 7 refs.

  18. The implications of the new ICRP recommendations on the legislation community radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriskat, H.

    1992-01-01

    One of the fundamental tasks attributed to the European Community by the Euratom Treaty is to establish uniform safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation. Ever since 1959, when for the first time, following a proposal by the Commission, the Council of Ministers issued the Basic Safety Standards under form of a Directive, they were reviewed and amended on a regular basis taking into account to a large extent the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The aim of the ongoing revision of the Basic Safety Standards Directives (80/836 EURATOM and 84/466 EURATOM) is to reinforce radiation protection thoughout the Community to assure the best possible protection of the workers and public. This partial revision of the basic safety standards needs careful interpretation of the ICRP recommendations, taking into account existing legislation in Member States and an evaluation of the applicability of such a revision in both implementation in legislation and in the daily practice of radiation protection. At the same time, the actual revision's impact on other community Directives in the area of radiation protection has to be considered and, if necessary, these Directives have to be brought in line with the modified Basic Safety Standards. Finally, this revision has to take into account as well the possible repercussion on radiation protection of the future single European Market in order to continue to assure the high level of protection obtained until now. (author)

  19. The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 3 on radiological protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D L; Martin, C J; Rehani, M M

    2018-01-01

    The mandate of Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionising radiation is used in medical diagnosis, therapy, and biomedical research. Protection in veterinary medicine has been newly added to the mandate. Committee 3 develops recommendations and guidance in these areas. The most recent documents published by ICRP that relate to radiological protection in medicine are 'Radiological protection in cone beam computed tomography' (ICRP Publication 129) and 'Radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy' (ICRP Publication 127). A report in cooperation with ICRP Committee 2 entitled 'Radiation dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals: a compendium of current information related to frequently used substances' (ICRP Publication 128) has also been published. 'Diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging' (ICRP Publication 135), published in 2017, provides specific advice on the setting and use of diagnostic reference levels for diagnostic and interventional radiology, digital imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, paediatrics, and multi-modality procedures. 'Occupational radiological protection in interventional procedures' was published in March 2018 as ICRP Publication 139. A document on radiological protection in therapy with radiopharmaceuticals is likely to be published in 2018. Work is in progress on several other topics, including appropriate use of effective dose in collaboration with the other ICRP committees, guidance for occupational radiological protection in brachytherapy, justification in medical imaging, and radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals (an update to ICRP Publication 128). Committee 3 is also considering the development of guidance on radiological protection in medicine related to individual radiosusceptibility, in collaboration with ICRP Committee 1.

  20. Implications of ICRP recommendations on the management of radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations [1] give a slightly revised definition of occupational exposure. Guidance is given with respect to the exposure at work related no natural radiation sources. Where ICRP recommends a source related definition of occupational exposure, the Basic Safety Standards of the European Communities [3] and consequently legislation in member states depart from an effect related definition of workers. Mutual divergence regarding this identification issue will be discussed in this paper. Operational radiation protection is commonly based on the principles of classification of workers, classification of working conditions and classification of places of work. From the management view point, the rationale for applying classification is to balancing the nature and the scale of control measures, monitoring and surveillance, using resources in the most appropriate way. In previous recommendations [2] ICRP has given criteria for classification, based on the projected level of individual annual dose, relative to the recommended dose limits for occupational exposure. This guidance is now regarded as crude and arbitrary and therefore withdrawn. This paper will address some consequences of the revised recommendations as well as options for implementation in the European Community basic safety standards. (author)

  1. Radiobiological basis of radiation protection and ICRP 2007 general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The ICRP 2007 General Recommendations are based on the detailed review of the new information on the biological effects and risk evaluation done during the last decade. Most of this information reinforces the validity of earlier findings. Since the publication of ICRP 60 general recommendations in 1991(ICRP 1991b), sufficient new information on the health effects of ionizing radiations has accrued based on radiobiological and epidemiological studies (UNSCEAR 2000, ICRP Publication 99). There is an improvement in understanding the mechanistic aspects of the induction of radiation damage at cellular level. Biophysical studies based on Monte Carlo track structure codes have provided information on the nature of critical damage to DNA leading to the radiation effects at cellular level. Experimental work with model animal systems has provided information on the role of post irradiation repair processes and the genes influencing the process of radiation carcinogenesis. Longer follow up of A-Bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provides a more reliable risk estimate based on the cancer incidence data and also a better model for the transfer of risk among different populations with varying frequency of background incidence. At present it is clear that the breast cancer contributes substantially to the radiation risk and provides quantitative risk estimates for brain and salivary glands. In the light of the new information, Tissue Weighting factors (WT) have been revised

  2. Intercomparison between ICRP60 and ICRP103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, M. T. A.

    2014-04-01

    In this project inter-comparison between the recommendations from ICRP publication 60, 1900 and the recommendations from ICRP publication 103, 2007 is made. The present 2007 recommendations is an update based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure .This comparison covers the Exposure situations, Tissue Weighting Factors wT, Radiation Weighting Factors wR, and the three Fundamental Principles of Radiological Protection and the protection of the environment. ICRP has retained its fundamental hypothesis for the induction of stochastic effects of linearity of dose and effect without threshold and a dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of 2 to derive nominal risk coefficients for low doses and low dose rates. While the overall detriment from low radiation doses has remained unchanged, ICRP has made adjustments to the values of the radiation and tissue weighting factors. In particular, the tissue weighting factor for breast has increased while that for gonads has decreased. There are some presentational changes to the system of protection. While ICRP has maintained the three fundamental principles-justification, optimization of protection, and dose limitation-it has attempted to develop a more holistic approach to radiological protection covering all exposure situations-planned, existing and emergency and all radiation sources, whether of natural or artificial origin. Dose constraints and reference levels are categorized into three bands which should assist in rationalizing the many values of dose restrictions given in earlier ICRP publications. (au)

  3. Recommendations of ICRP for radiation protection in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L. E.

    2004-01-01

    The present recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were published in 1991, and since then, the ICRP has provided additional recommendations. The system of protection has become increasingly co plex with time, and the Commission has decided to adopt a new set of recommendations in 2005- These should be seen as a consolidation of earlier recommendations. The new recommendations will recognize where the responsibility for justifying the introduction of a new practice lies, maintain the existing dose limits for individuals, develop the concept of dose constraints, require optimisation of protection from any source to ensure that exposures are as law as reasonably achievable, include of a policy for protection of non-human species, and clarify the dramatics quantities. The Commission intends to adopt the new recommendations in 2005, and this will be 15 years after the current recommendations were adopted. (Author) 13 refs

  4. Radiological protection in medicine: work of ICRP Committee 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vañó, E.; Cosset, J.M.; Rehani, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with protection in medicine, and develops recommendations and guidance on the protection of patients, staff, and the public against radiation exposure in medicine. This paper presents an overview of the work of Committee 3 over recent years, and the work in progress agreed at the last annual meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 2011. The reports published by ICRP dealing with radiological protection in medicine in the last 10 years cover topics on: education and training in radiological protection; preventing accidental exposures in radiation therapy; dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals; radiation safety aspects of brachytherapy; release of patients after therapy with unsealed radionuclides; managing patient dose in digital radiology and computed tomography; avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures; pregnancy and medical radiation; and diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging. Three new reports will be published in the coming months dealing with aspects of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures outside imaging departments; cardiology; and paediatric radiology. The work in progress agreed by Committee 3 is also described.

  5. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment.

  6. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment

  7. Radiological protection: a summary handbook of ICRP publications and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaratnam, A.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation and potential risks therefrom far exceeds the knowledge of any other hazardous agent, whether in the industrial field, or in the general environment affecting members of the public. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been playing a pioneering role for decades in this direction. The extensive database that has been established over the decades by the ICRP, the methodologies, techniques and the organizational structures that have been developed to control radiation hazards, and, above all, the philosophy of risk evaluation and management that has been evolved by ICRP, would serve as valuable guides not only to those concerned with radiological protection but to scientist, technologist and administrators involved in all facets of occupational and industrial safety, as well as those concerned with environmental protection. From 1959 to the end of 1993 ICRP has brought out 64 publications running to around 9000 pages. It is important that everyone connected with the uses of ionizing radiations should be familiar with at least the basic features of the thinking of ICRP as embodied in these publications. The present handbook attempts to give in a concise, consolidated and codified form the salient features of all the relevant information contained in the voluminous ICRP publications. The material has been presented in 7 parts, each dealing with one major aspect of the recommendations, and summarizing the various publications connected with it. A separate note following the preface gives a brief summary of the way the contents of the handbook have been arranged. refs., tabs., figs

  8. Views from the japanese nuclear industry and radiation protection professionals on the draft ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Y.; Choi, H.S.; Muto, S.; Oda, K.; Ishiguchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    The views of the Japanese nuclear industry, radiation protection professionals, and medical professionals on the concepts of the draft recommendations were presented. Specific concerns and suggestions were expressed in each of these fields based on practical considerations and experiences in operational radiation protection. It was noted that there is no need to complicate the current system, in particular without effectively expressed and rational reasoning. However, in general, speakers and participants in these discussions showed an understanding of ICRP publications. (authors)

  9. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  10. Environmental protection against ionizing radiations: the way proposed by the ICRP, its origin and its analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.

    2003-01-01

    Face to the conceptual lack relative to the radiation protection of environment and when numerous legislative texts begin to come about the species protection, the ICRP began a thought that aims to recommend a frame according to evaluate the impact of ionizing radiations on environment. This choice emphasizes the parallel man-environment by putting the two parts to protect at the same level. The unknown part is essentially the interactions of ecosystem but the future knowledge will be progressively integrated as they will be known. (N.C.)

  11. Protection of the Environment: Current ICRP Work and EC-Funded Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.M.; Holm, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    The requirement for assessments of the environmental effects of radiation, i.e. effects on non-human biota, is increasing due to growing public concern for environmental protection issues and integration of environmental impact assessments into the regulatory process. Thus, there is a strong need to establish a framework for the assessment of environmental impact of ionising radiation, as well as a system for protection of the environment from ionising radiation. These ambitions are reflected in a number of international efforts and various 'systems' have been proposed or are under development. This paper considers the current discussions on environmental protection within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), as part of the Commission's ongoing revision of its recommendations as laid out in Publication 60. Furthermore, the paper reviews work within the EC-funded FASSET (Framework for ASSessment of Environmental impacT) project. The concepts developed both by ICRP and FASSET are similar, and the FASSET approach and results may illustrate how forthcoming ICRP recommendations could be turned into practical application. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of Radiation Dose Rates with the Flux to Dose Conversion Factors Recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kil, A Reum; Lee, Jo Eun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation shielding has been performed for the design and maintenance of various facilities using radioactive sources such as nuclear fuel, accelerator, and radionuclide. The conversion of flux to dose mainly used in nuclear and radiation fields has been generally made with the dose coefficients presented in ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP- 74), which are produced based on ICRP Publication 60. On the other hand, ICRP Publication 116 (ICRP-116), which adopts the protection system of ICRP Publication 103, has recently been published and provides the dose conversion coefficients calculated with a variety of Monte Carlo codes. The coefficients have more than an update of those in ICRP-74, including new particle types and a greatly expanded energy range. In this study, a shielding evaluation of a specific container for neutron and gamma sources was performed with the MCNP6 code. The dose rates from neutron and gamma-ray sources were calculated using the MCNP6 codes, and these results were based on the flux to dose conversion factors recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116. As a result, the dose rates evaluated with ICRP-74 were generally shown higher than those with ICRP-116. For neutrons, the difference is mainly occurred by the decrease of radiation weighting factors in a part of energy ranges in the ICRP-116 recommendations. For gamma-rays, the ICRP-74 recommendation applied with the kerma approximation leads to overestimated results than the other assessment

  13. ZZ NUCDECAY, Nuclear Decay Data for Radiation Dosimetry Calculation for ICRP and MIRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: - ICRP38: Format: Special format. Number of groups: Energies and intensities of radiations emitted; designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Nuclides: 825 + 13 radionuclides. Origin: ENSDF (data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38). - MIRD: Format: Special format. Number of groups: Energies and intensities of radiations emitted; designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Nuclides: 242 radionuclides. Origin: ENSDF (monograph of the MIRD Committee). The unabridged data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38 and a monograph of the MIRD Committee are distributed in electronic form in this package. The data are assembled in two collections. The collection referred to as ICRP38 consists of data on the energies and intensities of radiations emitted by the 825 radionuclides reported, although abridged, in ICRP Publication 38 plus an additional 13 radionuclides evaluated during preparation of a monograph for the MIRD Committee. The second collection, denoted as MIRD, contains data for the 242 radionuclides in the MIRD monograph noted above. Each collection consists of three ASCII files: (1) the index file (ICRP38.IDX or MIRD.IDX) is a sorted list of the radionuclides with pointers into the data files; (2) the radiation file (ICRP38.RAD or MIRD.RAD) contains data on the energies and intensities of the emitted radiations; (3) the beta spectra file (ICRP38.BET or MIRD.BET) contains the spectra for all beta emitters in the collection. 161 radionuclides of the MIRD collection have later ENSDF dates than those in the ICRP38 collection. In most instances, the differences are of no dosimetric significance, but considerable differences may exist for some nuclides. 2 - Method of solution: This data base has been designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. Calculations of the spatial

  14. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 μm, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated

  15. Proceedings of the 15th nuclear safety research association symposium ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This is the document of the Symposium in the title, held in Tokyo, 2003. The document contains the greeting by chairperson (Toshiso Kosako, International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) member, Tokyo University): lecture 1; for the title subject presented as ''ICRP's 2005 Recommendations on Radiological Protection'' with its slides entitled ''The Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection-The Justification for ICRP's 2005 Recommendations'' by L.-E. Holm (ICRP Vice-Chairman, Swedish Radiation Protection Authority): lecture 2; ''Protection of the Environment: from Ethics to Genetics''' with slides, ''Ionising Radiation and the Environment'', by R. J. Pentreath (ICRP member, The University of Reading, the United Kingdom (UK)): respectively followed by discussion with 3 Japanese panelists for each lecture: and chairperson's summary. The chair's greeting is about the rise of interest in environmental radiation protection, its background, and related trends in The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). L-EH's presentation involves sections of the background of the recommendations and protection of the environment, mentioning some of the proposed changes in the Commission's recommendations for its 2005 Recommendations. RJP's presentation involves sections of a philosophical platform, environmental management, relevance to radiation and its effects, points of reference and discussion where the impact of radionuclides and radiation in environment on various biological systems is mentioned in view for future. (R.T.)

  16. A nuclear power plant operator's view on the effects of ICRP recommendation 26 upon his radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selleslagh, E.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ICRP recommendation 26 on rules to be implemented by nuclear power plant operators in their radiation protection program, are examined from various points of view: legal and para-legal aspects such as implementation by local authorities and interference with the regulatory process, external and internal irradiation control and limitation, ALARA and cost-benefit aspects, and the record keeping and monitoring requirements. It appears that certain parts of ICRP 26 were not retained by Euratom and thus have little chance of appearing in modified European law. Nonetheless, they are applied through licensing practices. ICRP 26 itself either confirms existing practice, which was often more conservative than law, or relaxes limits, and provides a more logical context for non-whole body exposures. ALARA-rules and practices cause an additional administrative burden, but this already existed and provides useful data for the plant management. The problem of ''zero dose'' and of converting in vivo measurements to dose in case the intakes are unknown, are addressed briefly. It is concluded that ICRP 26 brings no real changes for radiation protection in nuclear power plants, except maybe some increased flexibility, and that the operators are pretty happy with it, but less so with the way it is being imposed on them. (author)

  17. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  18. Safety philosophy of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuaki

    1995-01-01

    Measures are important as the means to realize philosophy. Accordingly, it is meaningful to take measures as the object when the philosophy of ICRP is considered. As to controllable risk factors, restraint shall be done so as to make the risk being brought about as small as possible. When it is not necessary to limit restraining means, risk-free is ideal. Ionizing radiation is one of risk factors. The risk that ICRP speaks is the loss of the probability of maintaining life. The object of radiation protection is limited to the exposure to controllable radiation, and the aim of protection is to minimize risk under the condition of as low as reasonably achievable. The philosophy of ICRP and the problems in the measures are discussed. ICRP and ICRU must reconfirm the allotment of roles. Radiation protection system is composed of system of radiation dosimetry and system of dose limitation. The mission of ICRP is to recommend political decision, and it may make the political declaration 'The radiation below a certain amount may be regarded as safe'. It is better only to recommend the conversion relation of radiation dose and risk. The desire and demand to ICRP are mentioned. (K.I.)

  19. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  20. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    2000-03-01

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report

  1. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Lars (ed.)

    2000-03-15

    Ethical theories are relevant to the current recommendations and standards for radiation protection. Radiation protection is not only a matter for science. It is also a problem of philosophy. In order for protection regulations to be respected, it must correspond to widely accepted ethical values among those who are affected by the regulations. The workshop covered the following issues: Problems in Present Protection Policy, ICRP Protection Policy - A Historical Perspective, Radiation Risk - What we know and what we believe, Present ICRP Recommendations, Ethical Values in the Context of ICRP Recommendations, Collective Responsibility for Invisible Harm, Environmental Protection - Ethical Issues, The Global Change of Values, and Procedural justice and Radiation Protection. Six workshop contributions and a workshop summary are presented in this report.

  2. Current Activities and Plans of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is established to advance for the public benefit the science of (ionising) radiation protection by providing recommendations and guidance, aiming at an appropriate standard of protection without unduly limiting beneficial practices. The Main Commission of ICRP recently launched a Task Group on new, consolidated Recommendations, based on world-wide consultations through IRPA on concepts proposed by the ICRP Chairman. It has also established a Task Group on protection of the environment, to review the Commission's policy that if humans are protected to the degree thought necessary, then other species are adequately protected. Task Groups of Committee 1 (Radiation effects) are planning reports on cancer risks at low doses; radiation effects on the embryo/fetus; and radiation quality effects. Committee 2 (Doses from radiation exposures) has Task Groups on internal dosimetry and on dose calculations, currently drafting reports on embryo/fetus dose coefficients; application of the ICRP lung model, and radionuclide transfer to breast milk. Task Groups on the human alimentary tract and on reference man are also preparing reports. Committee 3 (Protection in medicine) has initiated a series of practical reports on pregnancy and medical radiation; interventional radiology; accident prevention in radiotherapy; computed tomography; and release of patients after therapy with unsealed sources; as well as its series on new radiopharmaceuticals. Committee 4 (Application of ICRP recommendations) is providing input to the Main Commission Task Groups and is proposing a Task Group on radiation in space flight. Information about ICRP activities is available at www.icrp.org. (author)

  3. ICRP - history and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    A brief history is presented of the evolution of radiation protection concepts, largely through the activities of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and their adoption in Australia by the National Health and Medical Research Council. Changes which have taken place since the preparation of the Code of Practice for Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1980) are described, and likely future directions in radiation protection are suggested. A list of the ICRP publications since ICRP-26 is provided. 4 refs

  4. Policy and technical matters for the application of ICRP 1977 recommendations to Japanese radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsuji

    1987-01-01

    Tens years has passed since 1977 when the ICRP recommendations were made, and the work of revising the Japanese radiation regulations in response to the recommendations is almost completed. The work has been conducted mainly by an elemental group established under the Radiation Council. The elemental group submitted the first interim report to the Council in 1980, which presented recommendations on the objectives of radiation protection, dose equivalent limits for the general public, facilities inspection and products testing, medical surveillance, etc. After making deliberations in response to studies by the ICRP working group, the elemental group compiled the second interim report in July 1981. Further studies were conducted and the final report was submitted to the Council in March 1983. The final report covered the definitions of such terms as 'dose equivalent', dose equivalent limit for workers, exposure dose in the event of emergency, dose equivalent limit for the general public, various standards for protection, classification of workers by working conditions, classification of work sites monitoring of exposure dose, and implementation of medical surveillance. After making deliberations, the Council submitted a report in 1986 to government agencies concerned, whose contents are almost the same as those of the above final report except for some amendments. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Derived limits for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Si Young; Lee, Byung Soo

    2000-01-01

    In Korea the dose limits are reduced and are set at the ICRP-60 limits. However, derived limits tabulated as MPC in air and water are sill specified in Notice Nol 98-12. There are some discrepancies between the primary dose limits and MPCs in air and water. Therefore, in order to accept ICRP-60 recommendations fully, derived limits such as ALI, DAC, ECL for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations were calculated using modified methods of those of 10 CFR part 20, dose limits and committed effective dose coefficients of the Basic Safety Standards of the IAEA. The derived limits in this study were also compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as MPCs of Notice No.98-12 in order to analyze the impact of implementing derived limits on nuclear facilities. ECLs in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment in this study are shown to have lower values (i.e. more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12. Especially, for uranium elements, ECLs in water are approximately a magnitude in the order of two lower than those in Notice No. 98-12. (author)

  6. Evolution of the radiation protection system; L'evolution du systeme de protection radiologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, R.H. [International Commission on Radiological Protection, Stockholm (Sweden); Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S. [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Brechignac, F. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    The evolution of the system of radiological protection: justification for new ICRP recommendations, thoughts of the SFRP work group about the evolution of the system of radiation protection proposed by the ICRP, protection of environment against ionizing radiations seen by the ICRP are the three parts of this chapter. (N.C.)

  7. Pregnancy and medical irradiation. ICRP-84; Embarazo e irradiacion medica. ICRP-84

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A translation to Spanish of the ICRP document number 84. The exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant patients and radiation workers is a relevant subject in radiation protection, concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. Great anxiety and unnecessary termination of pregnancies may be the consequences of the lack of correlation between the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals and their real magnitude. The International Commission on Radiation Protection has edited in 2000 the document ICRP 84 'Pregnancy and Medical Irradiation', addressed to medical and sanitary personnel. This document has been written as a practical guide which describes the effects of prenatal exposure to ionising radiation , the dose-thresholds and their relationship with the gestational age. It includes occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. With the aim of facilitating the diffusion of this document in the Ibero-American community , the Argentine Society of Radiation Protection (SAR) and the Spanish Society of Radiation Protection (SEPR) have worked together to producing a spanish version of ICRP84 , that is now presented in this publication, authorized by the ICRP.

  8. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with: Objectives and basic concepts of radiation protection, basic radiobiological considerations, the ICRP system of dose limitation and with operational radiation protection (limits, reference levels, occupational exposure). (RW)

  9. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on the transportation regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.; Eckerman, K.F.; Wangler, M.E.; Punch, F.; Carriker, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has been providing recommendations for limitations on radiation exposure for decades. The ICRP recommendations address ionizing radiation and are concerned with protecting humans from its effects. These recommendations assist regulatory and advisory agencies in establishing and promulgating national regulations and practices in radiation Protection. Most countries have incorporated at least some aspect of the recommendations in their regulations since about 1956 when the first basic prowdon standard was Published in ICRP 2. Since that time ICRP has issued two major revisions to the recommendations. ICRP 26 was published in 1977 and ICRP 60 was published in 1991. These last two publications have companion works, ICRP 30 atid ICRP 61, that contain Annual Limits of Intake (ALI) for radiation workers. This report discusses the impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transport regulations

  10. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection standard and the recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007; Comparacao entre a norma brasileira de radioprotecao e a recomendacao da International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP, publicadas em 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Itatiaia, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica do Combustivel Nuclear. Servico de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Pereira, J.R.S. [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Graduacao em Direito

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the differences between the CNEN's standard and the publication of ICRP-103, analyzing the philosophy for radiation protection, dose limits and other relevant aspects of radiation protection.

  11. Justification and optimization in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1980-01-01

    Two requirements of the system recommended by the ICRP for radiation protection are discussed: 1) justification of practices involving radiation exposures and 2) optimization of the level of protection for such practices. The ICRP recommended the use of cost-benefit analysis in justification and optimization. The application of cost-benefit analysis and the quantification of the radiation detriment are also discussed. (H.K.)

  12. ICRP-26, the recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the last ICRP recommendations on radiological protection was pubished in 1966 as it's publication 9, the revised edition of the recommendations had first been published in 1977, accommodating up-to-date knowledge of radiobiology and operational experiences of radiation protection built up for over a decade. In this article, the new version of the recommendations is reviewed in comparison with those of the publication 9, while the corrections and modifications made afterward are introduced together with the recent trends and responses of the experts in various countries for the pracical adoption or legislation of the recommendations. (Author)

  13. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (4). Current activities of ICRP and ICU: External dosimetric concepts for the lens of the eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) have been defined operational quantities and protection quantities. Dose limits have been also recommended by the ICRP using protection quantities. These quantities and some related values for main radiation such as photons, electrons, and neutrons, are summarized in this article with some historical considerations. The ICRP indicated conversion coefficients for the lens of the eye as absorbed dose per fluence as protection quantities. equivalent dose is not used because a protection quantity that uses radiation weighting factors is not intended to be calculated for tissue reactions. So far, the ICRP has not indicated a specific RBE value for cataract formation. Operational quantities are used for measurements. There have been three types of phantoms, namely a slab phantom, a reduced phantom, and a cylindrical phantom, but none of them has been definitely recommended for the lens of the eye by the ICRP or the ICRU. Although conversion coefficients to personal dose equivalent, H p (3), for electrons have been recommended, no other conversion coefficients to personal dose equivalent for the lens of the eye has been indicated by the ICRP or the ICRU. However, there have been several studies described personal dose equivalent. Ambient dose equivalent, H * (3), and directional dose equivalent, H(3, α), have been indicated in several limited conditions by the ICRP and the ICRU. These status are overviewed in this article. (author)

  14. Analysis of the criteria used by the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) to justify the setting of numerical reference values. Report No. 277

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.; Lochard, J.; Crouail, P.

    2005-05-01

    Following its Publication 60, ICRP has proposed nine reports specifying quantified values for dose constraints, action levels, etc. Some 25 values have been identified in all these publications. Since a few years, ICRP is preparing new recommendations in order to provide 'a more coherent and comprehensible system'. The objective of ICRP is to propose to select among the existing quantified values, a few values that could encompass all the other ones. These values are not intended to replace the currently recommended values which remain valid. In this perspective, IRSN has asked CEPN to make a review of all the values introduced in the ICRP publications in order to obtain a broad view of the rationalities proposed by ICRP in the determination of these values. The following Publications of ICRP have been reviewed: - ICRP 60 - 1990 - 1990 Recommendations of ICRP, - ICRP 62 - 1992 - Radiological protection in biomedical research, - ICRP 63 - 1992 - Principles for intervention for protection of the public in a radiological emergency, - ICRP 64 - 1993 - Protection from potential exposure: a conceptual framework, - ICRP 65 - 1993 - Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, - ICRP 68 - 1994 - Dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by workers, - ICRP 75 - 1997 - General principles for the radiation protection of workers, - ICRP 77 - 1997 - Radiological protection policy for the disposal of radioactive waste, - ICRP 81 - 2000 - Radiation protection recommendations as applied to the disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste, - ICRP 82 - 2000 - Protection of the public in situations of prolonged radiation exposure. The different quantitative values found in these publications are presented in this report, grouped by type of value: individual dose limits, 'maximum' individual dose, dose constraints, exemption, action and intervention levels. The rationalities proposed by ICRP for setting these values are presented, mainly based on the quotation of ICRP

  15. ICRP Publication 116—the first ICRP/ICRU application of the male and female adult reference computational phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Eckerman, Keith F; Endo, Akira; Hertel, Nolan; Hunt, John; Menzel, Hans G; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Schlattl, Helmut; Zankl, Maria

    2014-01-01

    ICRP Publication 116 on `Conversion coefficients for radiological protection quantities for external radiation exposures', provides fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for organ-absorbed doses and effective dose for various types of external exposures (ICRP 2010 ICRP Publication 116). The publication supersedes the ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74, ICRU 1998 ICRU Report 57), including new particle types and expanding the energy ranges considered. The coefficients were calculated using the ICRP/ICRU computational phantoms (ICRP 2009 ICRP Publication 110) representing the reference adult male and reference adult female (ICRP 2002 ICRP Publication 89), together with a variety of Monte Carlo codes simulating the radiation transport in the body. Idealized whole-body irradiation from unidirectional and rotational parallel beams as well as isotropic irradiation was considered for a large variety of incident radiations and energy ranges. Comparison of the effective doses with operational quantit...

  16. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  17. Possible implications of draft ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has, since its inception, worked to develop and improve international norms in the area of radiological protection of the public, workers and the environment. International radiological protection norms continue to evolve, with significant new steps having been taken by the International Radiological Protection Commission (ICRP). Since the issuance of its 1990 recommendations, which form the basis of the international system of radiological protection, the ICRP has continued to add to them. The sum of these recommendations has become overly complicated and at times incoherent. In 1999 the ICRP therefore began to re-evaluate its recommendations with the aim of consolidation, simplification and clarification. New ICRP recommendations are due to be published in 2005. The CRPPH is contributing to the development of these new recommendations by providing the views of regulators and practitioners from its member countries. This report summarises the views of the CRPPH regarding the conceptual framework that the ICRP has recently proposed as the basis for its forthcoming detailed recommendations. The CRPPH highly appreciates the open stakeholder process that the ICRP has initiated to gather input for the development of new recommendations. This document, which is supported by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and by the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee, provides detailed suggestions with regard to the proposed ICRP framework. The stakeholder views expressed in this report have been presented to the ICRP at the second NEA/ICRP Forum in April 2003, and have persuaded the ICRP to reintroduce several key concepts into its proposed new system. (author)

  18. UK experience with ICRP26 and ICRP30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dray, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    ICRP26 was adopted in January 1977 which took into account information emerging since the adoption of ICRP9 in September 1969 and specified the basic criteria for dose limitation which still apply today. ICRP30 defines the limits for intakes for radionuclides for workers, and enables the health physicist and regulatory bodies to make appropriate limits for annual intake, air contamination etc, to comply requirements of dose-equivalent commitment and committed dose equivalent. The publication of ICRP26 is reflected in European Communities directive 80/836/Euratom. Council Directive of 15th July 1980 amending the Directive laying down the basic safety standards for the health protection of general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiations. This document being required the member states to bring the requirements of the directive within their legislation. In the United Kingdom this was accomplished by the publication of the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1985

  19. Application in the Nordic countries of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The radiation protection institutes of the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, published in 1976 a joint report on the applicability of international radiation protection recommendations in the Nordic countries. The report was mainly based on the set of recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In the report it was stated that 'if the basic recommendations of ICRP are subsequently revised, it is the intention of the radiation protection institutes to consider equivalent changes in the recommended basis for regulatory texts and, if there is full agreement, jointly to announce changes which may be made in respect to the principles which have been recommended here'. In 1977 ICRP published its revised basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) which resulted from the examination of new information during the last decade and since the Commission's previous basic recommendations (ICRP Publication 9 adopted in 1965. In 1978 the representatives of the radiation protection institutes of the Nordic countries agreed at their meeting in Helsinki to prepare a joint policy document on the application of the revised ICRP recommendations in the Nordic countries. In common with the previous joint report of the Nordic radiation protection institutes of 1976 the present recommendations deal only with ionizing radiation. In the new recommendations ICRP has more clearly than in the previous recommendations systematized the basic principles in radiation protection by crystallizing its system of dose limitation in three main points: a) no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit; b) all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; and C) the dose equivalent to individuals shall not exceed the limits recommended for the appropriate circumstances by the Commission. The levels for basic dose

  20. Philosophy of radiological protection and radiation hazard protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection and the human safety in radiation facilities are strictly controlled by law. There are rules on the radiation measurement, too. In the present review, philosophy of the radiological protection and the radiation hazard protection law is outlined with reference to ICRP recommendations. (J.P.N.)

  1. The regulatory consequences of Publication 60 of the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, Annie

    1992-01-01

    The system of radiological protection recommended by the ICRP for future and existing proposed and continuing practices is based on the following general principles: justification, optimisation and limitation of exposure levels. This means that no practice involving exposures to radiation should be adopted unless it produces sufficient benefit to the exposed individuals or to the society to offset the radiation detriment it causes. In relation to any particular source within a practice, the magnitude of individual doses, the number of people exposed, and the likelihood of incurring exposures where these are not certain to be received should all be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. The exposure of individuals resulting from the combination of all the relevant practices should be subject to dose limits, or to some control of risk in the case of potential exposures. The system for radiological protection and the values of the limits associated with it, are related the state of knowledge of the effects of radiation. This explains the periodic revision of the corresponding regulatory texts. In a field of such complexity, concerned by disciplines as diverse as medicine, biology, chemistry, statistics, etc., the question naturally arises as to which authority has the capacity to determine an agreed policy. As far as the European Community is concerned, the basic standards related to radiation protection are the subject of Directives which have to be incorporated into national laws by each member state. These directives are under review taking into account explicitly the ICRP recommendations. International agencies whose mission is concerned with the effects of ionising radiation, publish also basic standards related to radiological protection which are not imposed to the participating states except when they collaborate with those bodies, and which mainly act as international references. Such norms also comply with

  2. Implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is about to publish new recommendations on radiation protection. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is also under process in revising its International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) to take into account of the changes of the ICRP recommendations. As soon as the revision of the BSS is completed, Korean government is considering to implement those changes in the BSS and the ICRP recommendations into its national radiation protection laws and regulations. This paper introduces the current activities and future prospects in this matter. In the 2007 ICRP recommendations, there are some new concepts, principles and quantities such as the changes in the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, new definitions on the tissue weighting factors and radiation weighting factors for neutron and proton, extended application of the dose constraints in all exposure situations in source-related radiation protection, and the introduction of new system of protection for non-human species. Based on the study carried out by KINS so far, the following points are identified as major areas that need for further in-depth review and consideration for the implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations into Korean radiation protection laws and regulations; changes in the radiation risk factors, radiation weighting factors and tissue weighting factors, maintenance of the ICRP 60 dose limits, practical application of the dose constraints and determination of the reference levels in many source to individual exposure relationships, change from process-based system to exposure situation-based system, strengthening of the principle of optimization in all exposure situations, system of radiation protection for the environment, practical application of the exclusion and exemption principles, active participation of the stake holders, changes in glossary etc. The study for the implementation of the ICRP

  3. Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosske, C.; Karcher, K.

    2003-01-01

    ICRP Publication 88 recommends doses to embryo and fetus from intakes of radionuclides by the mother for various intake scenarios. Mainly by answering the question 'Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?' it has been assessed if the intake scenarios given in ICRP Publication 88 are adequate for radiation protection purposes. This is generally the case, but the consideration of an additional chronic intake scenario for early pregnancy would be helpful. It is demonstrated that following chronic intake by inhalation, for most radionuclides radiation protection for (female) workers is also adequate for protection of the unborn child, considered as a member of the public. However, there are a number of radionuclides for which possible intakes in routine operations should be more restricted (up to 1% of the annual limits on intake for workers in the case of nickel isotopes) to ensure radiation protection for the unborn child. (author)

  4. Radiation protection in education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, Elemer

    1985-01-01

    The education of secondary school students in the fields of nuclear sciences was strictly limited according to the 9th recommendations of the ICRP issued in 1966 saying that people under age 18 are not allowed to deal with ionizing radiations. Due to the changes concerning the concept of radiation protection, new opportunities for teaching nuclear technology even in the secondary schools were opened. The 36th recommendations of the ICRP published in 1983 dealing with the maximum permissible doses and the measures taken for radiation protection should be kept in mind while organizing the education of the pupils between age 16 and 18. (V.N.)

  5. New ICRP recommendations and radiation safety of an NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2007-01-01

    In March 2007 the fundamental radiation protection recommendations used world-widely in nuclear facilities were approved by the ICRP. Implementation of radiation safety standards in an NPP is a challenging issue related to all NPP phases from planning a site and its design to its decommissioning also because if neglected it could be very difficult if not impossible to implement improvement of radiation safety later during operation or decommissioning without a substantial cost. The standards are changing with a period of 15 years which is small regarding a prolonged lifetime of many NPPs and also foreseen lifetime of new NPPs, i.e. 60 years. The new recommendations are actually an upgrading of the ICRP 60. Among other changes new sets of wR and wT are given, as well as an update of around 50 different values related to doses. Two new concepts are also tackled i.e. terrorist attacks and protection of the environment. The influence of the new recommendations on the radiation safety of NPPs can be analysed by a selection of four renewed or new concepts: types of exposure situation, dose constraints, source-related approach and safety and security. Their implementation could lead to upgrading the radiation safety of future or existing NPPs as well as of decommissioning processes. Some of the concepts were already extensively and successfully used by designers of modifications or of new NPPs, as well as by operators. (author)

  6. An approach to the new ICRP recommendations on protection of the environment for the control of radioactive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telleria, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full text: For many years it has been agreed at the international level that the regulations for the control of discharges during normal operation from nuclear installation shall be based in the principles of individual dose limitation and optimization of the radiation protection focused on man. These regulations using a process of constrained optimization of protection, when properly applied to limit the discharges of radionuclides, were assumed to protect also other species than man and, within the available level of scientific knowledge, this assumption is still likely to be certain. After the International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Stockholm, 2003, many national, international, regional and non-governmental organizations have been working to develop a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to exposures to ionizing radiation. One of the key issues to solve is how to include in the analysis and judgment process explicitly non-human species. Most of the organizations, particularly at the international level, have expressed their expectative in connection with the results of the work of the ICRP. In December 2007 the ICRP published its new recommendations and during 2008 key documents for the international community like the UNSCEAR document on effects of radiation on non-human biota and the ICRP publication on the approach to a framework for non-human protection using the concept of reference plants and animals could close, at least, the first chapter in this complex evolutionary process in the field of radiation protection. While some of the relevant topics for the protection of the environment from all the pollutants, like the global distribution patterns, the long term bioaccumulation effects, the relation of the individual effects regarding the communities and populations, Etc are still not fully discerned and noting that ICRP in its

  7. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.

    1983-11-01

    Topics covered include biological radiation effects, radiation protection principles, recommendations of the ICRP and the National Health and Medical Research Council, and dose limits for individuals, particularly the limit applied to the inhalation of radon daughters

  8. The USA prepares to change its radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing to revise its basic regulation on protection of people from ionizing radiation. The current regulation, ''Standards for protection against radiation'' -commonly referred to as ''Part 20'' - was originally published for comment in 1955. The regulation was based on early recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1977, the ICRP made major changes in its recommendations, known as ICRP-26. In 1990, the NRC Commissioners approved a new Part 20 reflecting ICRP-26, but improvements are to be specified and considered before a new regulation is published. (author)

  9. Radiation protection in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1990-01-01

    Switzerland's present radiation protection regulations are based on only two paragraphs of the atomic law but have been very successful in practice. A new radiation protection law, separated from nuclear legislation and valid for all application of ionizing radiation and radioctive materials, was proposed and drafted by the Federal Commission on Radiation Protection and has now been accepted by parliament with only minor modifications. The draft of the revised regulations which also will cover all applications, should be ready for consultations next year. Both the law (which contains principles but no figures such as limits) and the regulations incorporate the latest state of ICRP recommendations and are formulated in such a way as to allow application of or quick adaptation to the new basic ICRP recommendation expected for 1991. The legislation is flexible, with a relatively low regulation density and leaves sufficient room for professional judgement on a case by case basis both for authorities and for the specialists responsible for radiation protection in practice. (orig./HSCH)

  10. Pregnancy and medical irradiation. ICRP-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    A translation to Spanish of the ICRP document number 84. The exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant patients and radiation workers is a relevant subject in radiation protection, concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. Great anxiety and unnecessary termination of pregnancies may be the consequences of the lack of correlation between the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals and their real magnitude. The International Commission on Radiation Protection has edited in 2000 the document ICRP 84 'Pregnancy and Medical Irradiation', addressed to medical and sanitary personnel. This document has been written as a practical guide which describes the effects of prenatal exposure to ionising radiation , the dose-thresholds and their relationship with the gestational age. It includes occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. With the aim of facilitating the diffusion of this document in the Ibero-American community , the Argentine Society of Radiation Protection (SAR) and the Spanish Society of Radiation Protection (SEPR) have worked together to producing a spanish version of ICRP84 , that is now presented in this publication, authorized by the ICRP

  11. What is good radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation protection is based on the ICRP-System with its pillars justification, limitation and optimization. From this radiation protection should be the same irrespective of the application of radiation. But radiation protection in the nuclear industry is much different from the use of radiation sources or X-ray units. This is by far not due to the different technologies. It originates from the different interpretation of the system. For one person good radiation protection would mean to have no radiation exposures, to avoid radiation at all as best option and to use it only if there are no alternatives. For another person the best radiation protection would be the one which does not produce much efforts and costs. So what is reasonable? In reality the first interpretation prevails, at least in Germany. A change is needed. If we continue to exercise radiation protection as we do it today the beneficial application of radiation will be restricted unduly and might become impossible at all. A stronger orientation towards the naturally occurring radiation would help instead to regulate natural radiation in the same way as it is done for artificial radiation. The system of ICRP has to be changed fundamentally.

  12. The work of ICRP on the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Woo

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established Task Group 94 (TG 94) to develop a publication on the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection aiming to consolidate the basis of ICRP's recommendations, to improve the understanding of the system and to provide a basis for communication on radiation risk and its perception. Through the review of the publications of the Commission and the conduct of a series of workshops, TG 94 has identified the key components of the ethical theories and principles relevant to the system of radiological protection. The purpose of eliciting the ethical values underpinning the system of radiological protection is not only to clarify the rationale of the recommendations made by the Commission, but also to assist in discussions related to its practical implementation. The report nearing completion by TG 94 will present the key steps concerning the scientific, ethical and practical evolutions of the system of radiological protection since the first ICRP publication in 1928, describe the core ethical values underpinning the present system and address the key procedural aspects for its implementation. (authors)

  13. Review of ICRP Publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinmiller, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP were last formulated in 1977. The ICRP has periodically reviewed the recommendations and issued supplementary reports on specific topics. Over the last several years, enough new information accumulated on health effects from exposure to ionizing radiation to change appreciably the assumed risk estimates from such exposure, and to prompt the ICRP to reassess its recommendations for radiological protection. The resulting recommendations were approved by the ICRP in 1990 November. This report examines the recommendations from three perspectives. The first section of the report presents background information on the development of the recommendations and the risk estimates on which they are based. The main reasons for the increase in current risk estimates from previous estimates are given. The second section of the report outlines the basic ICRP recommendations that are relevant to occupational and public radiological protection, and offers interpretation where needed. The third section of the report examines implications of the recommendations for dosimetry. the ICRP is currently working on improvements to some metabolic and dosimetric models. Because it is difficult, in some instances, to decouple the implications of this modelling work and the implications of the new recommendations, both are examined in this third section. This report documents why radiological protection standards have changed recently, what the current standards are, and how they might affect radiation dosimetry. (4 tabs., 15 refs.)

  14. Intercomparison of concepts in ICRP 60 and ICRP 103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssif, B. E.

    2013-04-01

    The ICRP has produced recommendation three times in the last 30 years, In 2007, the ICRP approved new recommendations, These revised Recommendations for a System of Radiological Protection formally replace the Commission’s previous, 1990, Recommendations; and updated, consolidated, and developed the additional guidance on the control of exposure from radiation sources issued since 1990. The purpose of this study is to highlight and review some of major changes that have taken place. To compare between the 1990 recommendations (ICRP 60) and the 2007 recommendations (ICRP 103) according to radiological studies updated. The 2007 Recommendations update the radiation and tissue weighting factors in the quantities equivalent and effective dose .The major differences for tissue weighting factors increased by about a factor of two for breast and remainder tissues. Whilst the gonads are decreased by about a factor of two. The major change of WR for protons is a reduction from five to two reflecting a better understanding of the dosimetry of proton. For neutrons there is a reduction of WR of about a factor of two for thermal neutrons. An update on the radiation detriment has been made; based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure. The detrimental nominal risk coefficient in 2007 Recommendations is lower by about 25% compared to 1990 Recommendations. Publication 103 maintains the Commission’s three fundamental principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and the application of dose limits, clarifying how they apply to radiation sources delivering exposure and to individuals receiving exposure. The 2007 Recommendations evolve from the previous process-based protection approach using practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the exposure situation. The recommendations recognise planned, emergency, and existing exposure situations, and apply the fundamental principles

  15. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations; Nuovo modello polmonare della ICRP per radioprotezione (ICRP 66)azioni e confronti con la modellistica precedenteIl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.; Luciani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 {mu}m, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated.

  16. A framework for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on non-human species ICRP Publication 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2003-01-01

    In its 1990 Recommendations, the ICRP indicated that it believed that the standards of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable would ensure that other species are not put at risk. The ICRP considers that its system of radiological protection has provided a fairly good indirect protection of the human habitat. However, no internationally agreed criteria or policies explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation, and it is difficult to determine or demonstrate whether or not the environment is adequately protected from potential impacts of radiation under different circumstances. The present report suggests a framework, based on scientific and ethical-philosophical principles, by which a policy for the protection of non-human species could be achieved. The primary purpose of developing such a framework is to fill a conceptual gap in radiological protection; it does not reflect any particular concern over environmental radiation hazards. The proposed framework is designed to harmonise with the ICRP's approach to the protection of human beings, but does not intend to set regulatory standards. Instead, the proposed framework is intended to be a practical tool to provide high-level advice and guidance for regulators and operators. An agreed set of quantities and units, a set of reference dose models, reference dose-per-unit-intake (or unit exposure), and reference fauna and flora are required to serve as a basis for the more fundamental understanding and interpretation of the relationships between exposure and dose and between dose and certain categories of effect, for a few, clearly defined types of animals and plants. As a first step, a small set of reference fauna and flora with supporting databases will be developed by the ICRP. Others can then develop more area- and situation-specific approaches to assess and manage risks to non-human species

  17. The radiation protection policy of the ICRP: new approaches and false debates, by the Dr Nenot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The thoughts led within the ICRP during the last months and the new approach for the radiation protection policy presented by its president Roger Clarke arouse in the specialized media, numerous debates and interpretations. In an article called 'Low and very low doses: towards a change of regulation?' the R.G.N. has evoked some aspects of themes in discussion(number 3 - 1999 - may-june). In this article, the Dr Jean-Claude Nenot relates the context in which the debate has been developed and gives some interpretation errors that if they should last, would risk to maintain a sterile controversy. (N.C.)

  18. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansruedi Voelkle

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  19. Radiation Protection of Environment under the Light of the New Concept of Radiation Protection of Non-Human Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansruedi Voelkle [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Environmental Radioactivity Section, c/o Physics Department, University of Fribourg Chemin du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the question of whether radiation protection should be extended to plants and animals. Until now the recommendations of ICRP have been focused exclusively on the protection of man from ionizing radiation. It was assumed that, if man is protected, the quality of the living environment is not impaired. In recent years adequate principles, recommendations and laws have become necessary in order to protect the environment from man made toxins. These recommendations aimed to conserve plants and animals, to maintain the diversity of species, the health and status of natural habitats and the natural resources of our planet, to warrant natural evolution and selection processes in order to transmit a healthy world to future generations. Reflections have been made as to whether particular protection of fauna and flora from ionizing radiation should be included. This article presents some considerations from the point of view of operational radiation protection and some comments to the work already done by ICRP committee 5. The final purpose is to invite the audience to make its own reflections and to communicate any criticisms, comments or suggestions to committee 5 of ICRP. (author)

  20. Radiation protection guidelines for the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of radiation protection standards for the skin with particular reference to past recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limits to the skin and the work of the ICRP Task Group appointed in 1987. Data are also presented on the effect of radiation on Langerhans cells in the skin, and the effect of interaction of ultraviolet radiation and x-rays and of protraction of radiation on skin cancer induction in mice. (UK)

  1. 1990 recommendations of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Main Commission of ICRP finalised its new recommendations during its November 1990 meeting. The recommendations will appear in the Annals of the ICRP in 1991 as Publication 60. This paper represents a personal summary of these recommendations. It covers the basic biological risk estimates and the conceptual framework of the system of radiological protection, the definition of radiation detriment and its use both in the definition of radiation quantities and in the establishment of the dose limits adopted by the Main Commissions. (author)

  2. Some remarks on the Austrian radiation protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, H.

    1979-01-01

    Some of the provisions of the Austrian Radiation Protection Law and Radiation Protection Ordinance differ from those recommended by ICRP and IAEO. This is particularly true for the definition of working conditions, the categorization of radiation areas and the classification of radiation workers. It is suggested that the responsible authorities when considering a revision of the legislation in the light of ICRP 26 and the revised IAEA Basic Safety Standards, also study the desirability of adapting the currently applicable provisions to the universally accepted international norms. (Auth.)

  3. A constructive critique to the ICRP's system and counter proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, K.

    1998-01-01

    In the author's opinion, there is a need for continuous efforts in revising the systems of radiation protection designed and operated according to ICRP recommendations. The fundamentals of the ICRP system of radiation protection are analyzed and classified into scientific and political or strategic features. Several proposals for changes are presented, concerning the restoration of the causality relation for radiation protection, the criteria for safety controlling, and the methodology of exposure control. (A.K.)

  4. Dose concepts and the achievability of protection for the disposal of long-lived solid waste according to ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Schneider, Th.

    2010-01-01

    Th. Schneider introduced the subject explaining that the main strength of the ICRP is to set up a unified protection system applicable to all types of exposure situations. In 2007, the ICRP issued ICRP 103 which formally replaces the previous recommendations that were issued in 1991 as ICRP 60. One of the major features of the new recommendations is the evolution from 'the previous process-based protection approach using practices and interventions to a situation-based approach applying the fundamental principles of protection to all controllable exposure situations' in a similar way. In the case of radioactive waste disposal, the long timescale to be dealt with led ICRP to publish the dedicated recommendations ICRP 81 (1999) based on ICRP 60. Th. Schneider presented then a series of issues raised by the radioactive waste management community, relating the recommendations of ICRP 81 to the new orientations provided by ICRP 103. Radiation detriment is a complex construction based on not directly measurable quantities such as equivalent and effective doses. Effective dose is a risk-related quantity and should not be used in assessing health effects on a specific individual. Dose and risk as well as the radiation detriment are still appropriate for long term evaluation even though there are uncertainties associated with the assessment of the dose. It would be a mistake to consider that the ICRP dosimetric quantities and the radiation detriment are not appropriate for long term evaluations, but their meaning must be understood. What is at stake is not to evaluate the level of health of a group of population in 10 6 years from now, but to estimate through a comparison (risk indicator associated with several options of protection at the design level of the repository) the level of protection achieved by a radioactive waste strategy. Current radiological protection criteria are a reasonable basis to assess the disposal strategy. They give a general appreciation of the

  5. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  6. Radiation protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.

    1981-01-01

    This article first reviews the general radiation protection law at international and national level, with particular reference to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which, although not mandatory, are nevertheless taken into consideration by international organisations establishing basic radiation protection standards such as the UN, IAEA, NEA and Euratom, at Community level, and by national legislation. These standards are therefore remarkably harmonized. Radiation protection rule applied in France for the different activities and uses of radioactive substances are then described, and finally, a description is given of the regulations governing artificial radioisotopes and radioactive effluents. (NEA) [fr

  7. Procedure and methodology of Radiation Protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengde

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of Radiation Protection is one of the most important principles in the system of radiation protection. The paper introduces the basic principles of radiation protection optimization in general, and the procedure of implementing radiation protection optimization and methods of selecting the optimized radiation protection option in details, in accordance with ICRP 55. Finally, some economic concepts relating to estimation of costs are discussed briefly

  8. Remarks of the SFRP working group about ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.

    2005-01-01

    Remarks of the SFRP working group about ICRP recommendations. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has proposed last summer on its Web site the draft text of the 2005 ICRP recommendations for consultation. As it was done for the previous drafts, the French Society for Radiation Protection, has sent his comments to the ICRP, through a specific working group. The text sent to the ICRP is presented here to the readers of the SFRP's Journal. (author)

  9. The ICRP 2007 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    2007-01-01

    The last comprehensive International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations have been published in 1991(1). Since that time new data in physics and biology that are relevant for radiological protection have appeared in the scientific literature. Also, the general thinking about safety standards at the workplace as well as for the protection of the public has developed. Thus, a review of the recommendations is needed. However, as the present standards have worked well, these new recommendations should build on the present ones. Only a process of further development should take place allowing for the following key points: - new biological and physical information and trends in the setting of safety standards; - improvement in the presentation of the recommendations; as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information and environmental aspects will be included. The fundamental principles of radiological protection will remain the same as they have been described in ICRP publication 60(1): Justification: Actions involving new exposures or changes in exposures of individuals have to be justified in advance. A positive net benefit must result. Optimisation: Exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable and should be optimised in relation to with dose constraints. Dose limits: The values will not to be changed from Publication 60. Dose constraints: Development of the concept proposed in Publication 60 will be explained. The ICRP Committees have prepared foundation documents in the fields for which they are responsible and their members have the corresponding expertise. These foundation documents will support the decisions and explain the various statements of the Main Commission in a broader sense. Some of them will be published as Annexes to the recommendations (Annex A: Biological and Epidemiological Information on Health Risks Attributable to Ionising Radiation; Annex B: Quantities used in Radiological

  10. The ICRP 2007 recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Chairman of ICRP Committee 2, Institute of Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The last comprehensive International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations have been published in 1991(1). Since that time new data in physics and biology that are relevant for radiological protection have appeared in the scientific literature. Also, the general thinking about safety standards at the workplace as well as for the protection of the public has developed. Thus, a review of the recommendations is needed. However, as the present standards have worked well, these new recommendations should build on the present ones. Only a process of further development should take place allowing for the following key points: - new biological and physical information and trends in the setting of safety standards; - improvement in the presentation of the recommendations; as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information and environmental aspects will be included. The fundamental principles of radiological protection will remain the same as they have been described in ICRP publication 60(1): Justification: Actions involving new exposures or changes in exposures of individuals have to be justified in advance. A positive net benefit must result. Optimisation: Exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable and should be optimised in relation to with dose constraints. Dose limits: The values will not to be changed from Publication 60. Dose constraints: Development of the concept proposed in Publication 60 will be explained. The ICRP Committees have prepared foundation documents in the fields for which they are responsible and their members have the corresponding expertise. These foundation documents will support the decisions and explain the various statements of the Main Commission in a broader sense. Some of them will be published as Annexes to the recommendations (Annex A: Biological and Epidemiological Information on Health Risks Attributable to Ionising Radiation; Annex B: Quantities used in Radiological

  11. Development of derived limits for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Lee, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Derived limits such as the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), Derived Air Concentration (DAC) and Effluent Concentration Limit (ECL) for radiological protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendations were calculated using dose limits and committed effective dose coefficients of the basic Safety Standards of IAEA (i.e. safety series 115; BSS-96). Derived limits regarding occupational exposure were derived using methodologies of ICRP-61 and dose limit stated in ICRP -60. ECL in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment were derived using methodologies of 10 CFR part 20 and dose limit stated in ICRP-60. In order to analyze the impact of implementing derived limits on nuclear facilities, the derived values in this study were compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) of Notice No. 98-12 of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST). According to the comparison results, ECLs in air and water for the control of radioactive discharge into the environment in this study are shown to have lower values (i.e. more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12. These differences are due to the reduction of dose limit, adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, and application of new respiratory tract model and bio-kinetics model. Especially, for uranium elements (i.e., 235 U, 238 U, etc.), which are governing ones in the nuclear fuel industries, ECLs in water are approximately a magnitude in the order of two lower than those in Notice No. 98-12. These are attributable to the adoption of a weighting factor for age-dependency in dose coefficients, newly recommended dose coefficients for ingestion pathway, and reduction of dose limit. It was found out that the differences in ECLs in water for uranium elements originated mostly from ingestion dose coefficients recommended by BSS-96. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  12. The case against protecting the environment from ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the (rarely heard) argument in favour of retention of the present system of radiation protection of the environment. There has been a recent trend in the radioecological and radiation protection community towards greater regulation of the effects of ionising radiations on biota. In particular, the often quoted International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) hypothesis that: If humans are protected from the effects of ionising radiation, then flora and fauna are also adequately protected has been criticised as being too anthropocentric and not adequate for protection of the environment. In this paper I will challenge this view, arguing firstly that this statement is almost always quoted out of its proper context, and secondly that the ICRP hypothesis does adequately protect the environment from the effects of ionising radiations. In view of the relatively insignificant effect of regulated releases of ionising radiation on the environment, the economic cost of further regulation will not result in a significant environmental benefit. Whilst empirical research to test the ICRP hypothesis should continue, until there is clear evidence against it, this simple and cost-effective approach should be retained. This would benefit the environment by directing scarce resources to more urgent environmental problems. (author)

  13. The ICRP 66 Internal Radiation Exposure Control and Dose Evaluation of The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, H. F.; Hwang, W. S.; Chiu, J. H.

    2004-07-01

    The Atomic Energy Council (AEC) is the regulatory body of ionization radiation protection in Taiwan. To effectively control the safety in ionization radiation, AEC brought into force the Ionization Radiation Protection Act on 1 February, 2003 with clear statements of the penalty for violating the Law. The Article 5 of the Act provides: In order to limit the radiation exposure from radiation sources or practices, the Competent Authority shall refer to the latest standards of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to lay down the Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. Thus, AEC is going to draft new safety standards of ionization radiation protection of Taiwan according to ICRP Publication 60. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), the governmental institute working on ionization radiation research in Taiwan, took the responsibility of assisting AEC in establishing guidelines on the control of internal radiation exposure and responding to the regulations in the new standards as soon as possible. So, according to the recommendations of ICRP Publications 60, 66,67,68,69,71,78,88, and IAEA Safety Standard Series No. RS-G- 1.1 and 1.2, INER undertook researches on the internal radiation exposure control and dose evaluations for INER's radiation workers as well as dose evaluations for the general public. The research accomplishments not only can be the reference of AEC when making new standards, but also can be followed by other radiation protection businesses. (Author) 23 refs.

  14. The ICRP 66 Internal Radiation Exposure Control and Dose Evaluation of The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, H. F.; Hwang, W. S.; Chiu, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Council (AEC) is the regulatory body of ionization radiation protection in Taiwan. To effectively control the safety in ionization radiation, AEC brought into force the Ionization Radiation Protection Act on 1 February, 2003 with clear statements of the penalty for violating the Law. The Article 5 of the Act provides: In order to limit the radiation exposure from radiation sources or practices, the Competent Authority shall refer to the latest standards of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to lay down the Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. Thus, AEC is going to draft new safety standards of ionization radiation protection of Taiwan according to ICRP Publication 60. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), the governmental institute working on ionization radiation research in Taiwan, took the responsibility of assisting AEC in establishing guidelines on the control of internal radiation exposure and responding to the regulations in the new standards as soon as possible. So, according to the recommendations of ICRP Publications 60, 66,67,68,69,71,78,88, and IAEA Safety Standard Series No. RS-G- 1.1 and 1.2, INER undertook researches on the internal radiation exposure control and dose evaluations for INER's radiation workers as well as dose evaluations for the general public. The research accomplishments not only can be the reference of AEC when making new standards, but also can be followed by other radiation protection businesses. (Author) 23 refs

  15. Radiation Protection Procedures to Individuals According to Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The new recommendations of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) had been adopted in March 2007. Historically, the first main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1976. Hence, IAEA issued its publication (safety series no 9) entitled Basic safety standards for radiation protection, EU issued its legislative directive. Furthermore, U K issued its 1985 Ionizing Radiation Regulations . These recommendations were based upon system of dose limitation (justification, optimization and annual dose limits and Four types of exposures (occupational, medical, public and planned special exposure) The second main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1990. Hence, IAEA together with other international organizations issued its publication (safety series no 115) entitled International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources in 1996. Furthermore, EU issued its new legislative directive and UK issued its updated Ionizing radiation regulations in 1999. These recommendations based upon two systems of protection, these are system of protection in practice and system of protection in intervention. The new ICRP or 2007 recommendations is based upon situations 1- Planned situations, 2- Emergency situations, and 3- Existing situations. The 2007 recommendations rely also on Individuals 1- Occupational, 2- Public and 3- Patient and Furthermore, elements of Radiation Protection system are 1- Justification, 2- Optimization and 3- Dose limits. Updated numerical values for radiation weighting factors for proton is 2 instead of 5 and for neutron , its continuous function instead of discrete values . New numerical values for tissue weighting factors include value of 8% for Gonads instead of 20%. The recommended nominal probability is around 5 per cSv. IAEA as well other international organization are updating its Basic Safety Standards . National regulations shall also be updated accordingly

  16. Guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Danish National Institute of Radiation Protection (SIS) has published this, fourth edition of guidelines on radiation protection for work with open radiation sources. There are few changes compared to the previous edition, film doses are updated and preparation of the Danish legislation with respect to the 1991 ICRP recommendations (ICRP publication 60) is discussed. In this future recommendation the new dose limits will be proposed and new risk factors enlightened. (EG)

  17. Radiation protection glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation

  18. Radiation protection optimization without and with guide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.; Wuertemberger, M.

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of radiation protection is one of the well-known three pillars of the ICRP System of Radiation Protection and is part of the regulations in nearly all countries. Since ICRP Publication 103 in this context dose constraints are part of many discussions and often lead to confusion. A study of NEA 2011 about the use of dose constraints investigated the situation in Europe and revealed that values for doses are used but seldom in the sense of the ICRP. The draft of the new Euratom-BSS requires also dose constraints for occupational protection as well as for the protection of the public. Do we really need these Dose Constraints? Is it really important to invest resources into the definition of and compliance with figures? Is it not more important to bring the spirit of ALARA into practice? We believe, radiation protection can be done completely without dose constraints and nevertheless successfully. This is demonstrated by the development of occupational exposure worldwide. Especially, radiation protection optimization shall not be restricted to the establishment of dose constraints; it is much more. However, constraints in the sense of guide values can be useful e.g. as benchmark for 'good' radiation protection, but always taken into account the individual circumstances. The authors demonstrate by explaining their operational practice how to use dose constraints reasonable without creating new limits. (orig.)

  19. The national radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.

    1999-01-01

    The state system of radiation protection is still being created after Lithuania regained its independancy and in connection with recommendations laid in the ICRP-60 publication and requirements of legislation of European Community. A new regulation institutions was established and a number of laws and regulations related to radiation protection was prepared. The Radiation Protection Centre of Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for radiation protection of public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. A new Radiation Protection Law, Nuclear Energy Law, Radioactive Waste Management Law and different regulations was approved. Preparation of legislation, creation of state system of radiation protection and its upgrading allow to presume that the necessary level of radiation protection is to be achieved. (au)

  20. On ethical issues in radiation protection. Radiation protection recommendations and standards seen from an ethical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.H.; Persson, L.

    2004-01-01

    International radiation protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, the European Union and the ILO are surveyed from an ethical perspective. The authors come to the conclusion that the insights of ethical theories provide a number of ways in which current recommendations and standards for radiation protection could improve. (orig.) [de

  1. Basic concepts and assumptions behind the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1981-03-01

    The paper gives a review of the current radiation protection recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It discusses concepts like stochastic effects, radiation detriments, collective dose, dose equivalent and dose limits. (G.B.)

  2. Radiation Protection for Radon in Dwellings - Consequences of the ICRP Publication 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, Jai T.; Breckow, J.; Grimm, V.; Grund, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several epidemiological studies on risk estimations due to exposure to radon in dwellings revealed higher risks to radon exposure than estimated previously. Thus, in ICRP Publication 115 (ICRP, 2011) a revised nominal probability coefficient for radon and its progeny-induced lung cancer was propounded. Based on the results of the exposure from residential studies and underground miners, the risk of lung cancer was estimated as 5x10 -4 per WLM (lifetime excess absolute risk, LEAR) and 8x10 -1 0 per Bqxh/m 3 , respectively. In the former Publication 65 (ICRP, 1993), the coefficient has been 2.83x10 -4 per WLM and 4x10 -1 0 per Bqxh/m 3 , respectively. Typical radon activity concentration in dwellings is about 60 Bq/m? in many parts of Europe. According to the ICRP Publication 65-dose coefficients, this concentration leads to a mean annual effective dose of 1.2 mSv. If the new nominal risk coefficient from ICRP Publication 115 is applied, the effective dose due to radon in dwellings increases to approximately 2.3 mSv per year. Referring the reference level of 10 mSv/a for radon exposure in dwellings in ICRP Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) and based on the new recommendations in ICRP Publication 115, actions have to be taken to reduce the upper reference level for radon gas in dwellings from 600 Bq/m 3 to 300 Bq/m 3 .(author)

  3. National Sessions of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Radioproteccion

    2012-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Sessions on Radiation Protection 2012 in order to continue the exchange in the radiation protection community in the country, on work areas that present a challenge to the profession. The new recommendations of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Standards (2011), among others, includes several topics that are necessary to develop. The SAR wants to encourage different organizations from Argentina, to submit projects that are developing in order to strengthen radiation protection.

  4. Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients. The positions of the NCRP and the ICRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    For many years, protecting the fetus has been a concern of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Early recommendations focused on the possibility of a wide variety of detrimental developmental effects while later recommendations focused on the potential for severe mental retardation and/or reduction in the intelligence quotient (I.Q.). The latest recommendations also note that the risk of cancer for the fetus is probably two to three times greater per Sv than in the adult. For all these reasons, the NCRP and the ICRP have provided guidance to physicians on taking all reasonable steps to ascertain whether any woman requiring a radiological or nuclear medicine procedure is pregnant or nursing a child. The NCRP and the ICRP also advise the clinician to postpone such procedures until after delivery or cessation of nursing, if possible.

  5. Radiation safety concerns for pregnant or breast feeding patients. The positions of the NCRP and the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    For many years, protecting the fetus has been a concern of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Early recommendations focused on the possibility of a wide variety of detrimental developmental effects while later recommendations focused on the potential for severe mental retardation and/or reduction in the intelligence quotient (I.Q.). The latest recommendations also note that the risk of cancer for the fetus is probably two to three times greater per Sv than in the adult. For all these reasons, the NCRP and the ICRP have provided guidance to physicians on taking all reasonable steps to ascertain whether any woman requiring a radiological or nuclear medicine procedure is pregnant or nursing a child. The NCRP and the ICRP also advise the clinician to postpone such procedures until after delivery or cessation of nursing, if possible

  6. Reference methodologies and datasets of ICRP Committee 2 on doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovskyvl, V.; Harrison, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    A quantitative characterisation of exposures is a core element of the ICRP system of protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Such prospective and retrospective characterisations, or 'dose assessments', are required by international and national safety standards for public, occupational and medical exposures that can occur in various exposure situations

  7. International and national radiation protection standards and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and their basis are discussed with particular emphasis on the extensive review of its earlier recommendations undertaken by the ICRP during the 1970s. The new recommendations issued in 1977 after this review are described. The dose limits for various organs and tissues before and after 1977 are compared. The optimization principle contained in the 1977 recommendations is assessed. The implementation of the 1977 recommendations, the subsequent changes to them and the ICRP's 1987 statement on cancer risk assessments are discussed. The National Radiological Protection Board's October 1987 radiation protection recommendations are outlined. 8 refs., 1 fig

  8. What is good radiation protection?; Was ist guter Strahlenschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, B. [Lorenz Consulting, Essen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation protection is based on the ICRP-System with its pillars justification, limitation and optimization. From this radiation protection should be the same irrespective of the application of radiation. But radiation protection in the nuclear industry is much different from the use of radiation sources or X-ray units. This is by far not due to the different technologies. It originates from the different interpretation of the system. For one person good radiation protection would mean to have no radiation exposures, to avoid radiation at all as best option and to use it only if there are no alternatives. For another person the best radiation protection would be the one which does not produce much efforts and costs. So what is reasonable? In reality the first interpretation prevails, at least in Germany. A change is needed. If we continue to exercise radiation protection as we do it today the beneficial application of radiation will be restricted unduly and might become impossible at all. A stronger orientation towards the naturally occurring radiation would help instead to regulate natural radiation in the same way as it is done for artificial radiation. The system of ICRP has to be changed fundamentally.

  9. Some human-related problems in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo

    1980-01-01

    Radiation protection includes both human and source-related problems. The human problems have not only medical but also social aspects, such as labor management. Special attention should be paid to the fact that the subject of radiation protection is not a human being as living thing but as member of society. ICRP recommended that conditions of work can be divided into two classed, working condition A and B, according to annual exposure. This application is of great value to radiation protection practice. Nevertheless the legal regulations do not adopt it yet. The present condition of the medical surveillance of radiation workers is not appropriate from the scientific standpoint. This is the difficult problem which is caused by the delay of the legal application of ICRP recommendation. Compensation for occupational radiation hazards should be overlooked. This problem have been investigated by an authorized committee, but a number of unsolved problems still remain. (author)

  10. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued its ''1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection'' that provide guidance on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation (1). The ICRP recommendations and their incorporation into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ''Basic Safety Standards,'' Safety Series No. 9, provide the basis on which the IAEA ''Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials,'' Safety Series No. 6, are built. The transportation regulations are developed to ensure safety during the movement of radioactive materials and to provide reasonable assurance the transportation activities comply with the basic radiation protection principles of Safety Series No. 9. During the 1985 revision of the IAEA transport regulations, a comprehensive model was developed to derive Type A (non-accident resistant) package contents limits that were consistent with Safety Series No.9 and, consequently, the earlier ICRP recommendations (2). Now that ICRP 60 has been published, the IAEA and Member States are faced with the task of evaluating how the transport regulations need to be revised to conform with the new recommendations. Several potentially significant issues need to be addressed to determine whether the old linkages between the recommendations and the transport regulations require modification. This paper addresses the issues that arise from the revisions to the ICRP recommendations and how the transportation regulations may be affected

  11. Dosimetric methodology of the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1994-01-01

    Establishment of guidance for the protection of workers and members of the public from radiation exposures necessitates estimation of the radiation dose to tissues of the body at risk. The dosimetric methodology formulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to be responsive to this need. While developed for radiation protection, elements of the methodology are often applied in addressing other radiation issues; e.g., risk assessment. This chapter provides an overview of the methodology, discusses its recent extension to age-dependent considerations, and illustrates specific aspects of the methodology through a number of numerical examples

  12. Ethical issues in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, L.

    1997-01-01

    In this note the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection and risk assessment/management, the authors review ethical thinking on five key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these five issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) Equity vs. Efficiency, (2) Health vs. Economics, (3) Individual Rights vs. Societal Benefits, (4) Due Process vs. Necessary Sacrifice, and (5) Stakeholder Consent vs. Management Decisions (authors)

  13. ZZ NUCDECAYCALC, Nuclear Decay Data for Radiation Dosimetry Calculation for ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description or function: The Dosimetry Research Group (DRG) of the Health Sciences Research Division at ORNL has for several years maintained data bases of nuclear decay data for use in dosimetric calculations. The data on mean and unique energy plus intensity have been previously published, in abridged form, in Publication 38 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1983). This data base was designed to address the needs in medical, environmental, and occupational radiation protection. DLC-172/NUCDECAY is required by the CCC-620/SEECAL program to calculate age-dependent specific effective energies. 2 - Methods: The unabridged data used in preparing ICRP Publication 38 are distributed in electronic form in this package. The collection consists of data on the energies and intensities of radiations emitted by the 825 radionuclides reported, although abridged, in ICRP Publication 38 plus an additional 13 radionuclides evaluated during preparation of a monograph for the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Each collection is contained in an ASCII file (INDEXR.DAT) which is a sorted list of the radionuclides containing the decay chain information. The utility code DecayCalc extracts the decay data from the library for radionuclide(s) specified by the user. It computes the activities of radionuclides present after decay and ingrowth over a user-specified time period from 1 minute to 50 years. Decay data for any decay chain may be displayed and printed either in tabular form or graphically. DecayCalc, in a slightly modified version, will be a part of CCC-553/Rascal v3. DecayCalc is a Windows application that runs under Microsoft Windows 95 or 98, or Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or later. The Compac Fortran 77 compiler was used to compile the code. The full source for DecayCalc is not provided but will be distributed when Rascal V3 is released

  14. The new recommendations of ICRP and their possible consequences for operating nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Hesse, Johannes; Schwarz, Wolfgang; Kapteinat, Heinzpeter; Holl, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Full text: After an extensive and very open debate within the Radiation Protection Community the new recommendations of the ICRP on the basic principles of radiation protection have been issued in 2007. The German nuclear industry has watched the process intensively and tried to bring in their large amount of experience from the daily radiation protection practice in numerous nuclear installations. Notably the ICRP seemed to follow some of the comments given by those experienced operators. The ICRP key message 'stability and continuity' is highly welcomed by industry. The dose levels resulting from well managed operations today are far below the dose limits due to a working system of ALARA thinking and doing. The basic principles of radiation protection as pointed out by ICRP decades ago have been proven to be an effective tool and are an essential part of the legal system of most countries with developed nuclear industries. Unfortunately, not all of the comments of the experienced operators have been considered to the desirable extend. A mayor point of criticism is the central role ICRP devoted to the use of dose constraints for any source. Dose constraints do play a role in today's practice of radiation protection but they have been rather supplementary than central in the system. The idea that for all sources, and there might be Hundreds or Thousands sometimes very tiny sources in a practice, a dose constraint shall exist sounds quite inappropriate. Another example which might disturb the great vision of 'stability and continuity' is the change of ICRP into a different view on protection. Instead of processes now situations are in the focus. There are some doubts about the benefits of such a move. People will always ask if there is a change of content when using a different terminology. A lot of fruitless discussions will probably result. Nevertheless, in spite of some criticism the new ICRP will contribute to strengthen the protection regime and industry will

  15. Review of ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Events in both the scientific world and in the public domain have added pressure to review the recommendations of the ICRP on which radiation protection legislation in most countries is founded. A brief editorial pleads for clarity in ICRP recommendations, suggests the use solely of cumulative with age individual occupational dose limits, suggests that collective doses including both occupational and to the public should be kept as low as reasonably achievable, judged on quantitative economic grounds, and suggests the setting of a probability for serious accidents which may be disregarded in planning. (UK)

  16. Basis and rational for standardization in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besar, Idris

    1985-08-01

    The historical background for the standardization in radiation protection with special reference to the dose limits recommended by the ICRP which include tolerance dose, maximum permissible dose, and the present recommendation based on the ICRP 26 are presented. The basis and rational for the establishment of these limits are discussed.

  17. Basis and rational for standardization in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris Besar

    1985-01-01

    The historical background for the standardization in radiation protection with special reference to the dose limits recommended by the ICRP which include tolerance dose, maximum permissible dose, and the present recommendation based on the ICRP 26 are presented. The basis and rational for the establishement of these limits are discussed

  18. Optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Optimisation of radiation protection is one of the key elements in the current radiation protection philosophy. The present system of dose limitation was issued in 1977 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and includes, in addition to the requirements of justification of practices and limitation of individual doses, the requirement that all exposures be kept as low as is reasonably achievable, taking social and economic factors into account. This last principle is usually referred to as optimisation of radiation protection, or the ALARA principle. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) organised an ad hoc meeting, in liaison with the NEA committees on the safety of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  19. Optimisation of Protection as applicable to geological disposal: the ICRP view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.

    2010-01-01

    Wolfgang Weiss (BfS), vice-chair of ICRP Committee 4, recalled that the role of optimisation is to select the best protection options under the prevailing circumstances based on scientific considerations, societal concerns and ethical aspects as well as considerations of transparency. An important role of the concept of optimisation of protection is to foster a 'safety culture' and thereby to engender a state of thinking in everyone responsible for control of radiation exposures, such that they are continuously asking themselves the question, 'Have I done all that I reasonably can to avoid or reduce these doses?' Clearly, the answer to this question is a matter of judgement and necessitates co-operation between all parties involved and, as a minimum, the operating management and the regulatory agencies, but the dialogue would be more complete if other stakeholders were also involved. What kinds of checks and balances or factors would be needed to be considered for an 'optimal' system? Can indicators be identified? Quantitative methods may provide input to this dialogue but they should never be the sole input. The ICRP considers that the parameters to take into account include also social considerations and values, environmental considerations, as well as technical and economic considerations. Wolfgang Weiss approached the question of the distinction to be made between system optimisation (in the sense of taking account of social and economic as well as of all types of hazards) and optimisation of radiological protection. The position of the ICRP is that the system of protection that it proposes is based on both science (quantification of the health risk) and value judgement (what is an acceptable risk?) and optimisation is the recommended process to integrate both aspects. Indeed, there has been evolution since the old system of intervention levels to the new system, whereby, even if the level of the dose or risk (which is called constraint in ICRP-81 ) is met

  20. Implementation of ICRP-60, BBS-115 and the patient directives in radiation safety regulations of TAEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okyar, H.B.; Vural, M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of radiation sources offers a wide range of benefits throughout the world in medicine, research and industry. Precautions are, however, necessary in order to limit the exposure of persons to the radiation that is emitted. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were published as IAEA Safety Series No 115 in 1996. This publication marks the culmination of efforts that have continued over the past decades towards harmonization of radiation protection and safety standards internationally. The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for the protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. The Standards are based primarily on the recommendations of the ICRP which is a non-governmental scientific organization to establish basic principles and recommendations for radiation protection; the most recent recommendations of the ICRP were issued in 1991. In 1997, the Council of the European Union published a new directive laying down the general principles of the radiation protection of individuals undergoing exposures to ionizing radiations related to medical exposures (Directive 97/43 Euratom). Directive 97/43 Euratom is a supplement to Directive 96/29 Euratom on the basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiations. The European Directives 96/29-97/43 Euratom and BSS-115 constitute a complete and coherent set of regulatory measures on radiation protection. In Turkey, the infrastructure exists to account for ionizing radiation sources by, for example, a system of licensing, legislative requirements on the user to keep appropriate records and perhaps to report to the TAEK on a periodic basis or, in the case of imported items (including re-export procedures) and customs

  1. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volodin, V; Hanson, G P

    1993-12-31

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  2. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, V.; Hanson, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  3. New ICRP recommendations 2005: without full consensus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ionising radiation is viewed as one of the most studied of all known carcinogens. Over the last 50 years Recommendations of International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been changed regularly every 10 years. At the beginning these changes were significant, sometimes even radical, according to quick acquiring of new scientific evidence on physical, biological and health effects of radiation. In order to handle each new situation evolution of the radiation protection system has been extended and new portions have been added (the ubiquitous exposure of public to radon gas and its progeny, and the need to develop an appropriate response to emergency situations, increasing social desire to participate in decision making processes, concern for the protection of non-human species and environment), that resulted in a system that is increasingly complicated. Over the last few years very broad discussions of major radiation protection concepts have been encouraged by the ICRP in order to achieve consensus on a more operational and coherent system of radiation protection elaborated in a transparent fashion, and presented in readily understandable terms. This process for the first time involves a broad spectrum of stake holders in these discussions. It is further assumed that these debates will eventually result in consensus on the basis for the next round of ICRP general recommendations, probably in the 2005. While now it is certain that the consensus is not yet reached within the international community and the discussion of these issues will continue for some time the new recommendations should be seen as a consolidation of recommendations from 1990 to give a single unified set that can be simply and coherently expressed. The paper presents essential issues of the outcome of the Commission discussions and improvement of the current system of radiation protection.(author)

  4. The implications of ICRP publication (60) 1990 for public exposure to natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughlin, J.Mc.

    1992-01-01

    The implications of the new ICRP recommendations on the control of public exposure to natural radiation are described. As ICRP differentiates between Practices and Interventions the application of the basic recommendations in the case of natural radiation exposures will be discussed in this context. Particular emphasis will be placed on public exposure to indoor radon with some discussion on situations in which occupational and public exposure to this source occur together. This major source of public exposure i discussed in relation to both ICRP 60 and ICRP 39. Some of the difficulties that the new recommendations may give rise to in the management of natural radiation exposures are discussed. One of the major changes in the new recommendations concerns the area of risk. This will be briefly discussed as regards the ways in which the risk arising from public exposure to natural radiation may be assessed. (author)

  5. Current Trends in Radiation Protection Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The third generation of the ICRP recommendations was adopted in April 2007. The recommendations rely on situations (planned, emergency and existing), individual (occupational, public and patient) and radiation protection system (justification, optimization and dose limits). In the present work attention is paid to discuss the new recommendations and role of IAEA in updating its Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources and its impact for the national regulations

  6. The new ICRP recommendations' project: A broader approach of the optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the preparation of its new recommendations ICRP has developed a new text on the optimisation of radiological protection. This text prolongs the previous publications on the principle (Publications 37 and 45) reminding the need to adopt a pragmatic approach combining quantitative techniques when they are relevant as well as know-how and past experience which are often sufficient to ensure good protection. Moreover, it aims at adapting the optimisation process to the recent evolutions of risk management with the increasing role of stakeholder involvement in the decision framing. (author)

  7. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine: fundamentals and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.; Roedler, H.D.; Freie Univ. Berlin

    1976-01-01

    Consequences for the protection of patients, protection of persons, and protection of the public are derived from the recommendations of the ICRP and the legal requirements for the handling of unsealed radioactive substances in diagnostics and therapy according to the First Radiation Protection Ordinance and its amended version, as well as from the 'guidelines for radiation protection when using radioactive substances in medicine'. (orig./LN) [de

  8. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards.

  9. Ethical problems in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader-Frechette, K.; Persson, Lars

    2001-05-01

    In this report the authors survey existing international radiation-protection recommendations and standards of the ICRP, the IAEA, and the ILO. After outlining previous work on the ethics of radiation protection, professional ethics, and the ethics of human radiation experiments, the authors review ethical thinking on seven key issues related to radiation protection and ethics. They formulate each of these seven issues in terms of alternative ethical stances: (1) equity versus efficiency, (2) health versus economics, (3) individual rights versus societal benefits, (4) due process versus necessary sacrifice, (5) uniform versus double standards, (6) stake holder consent versus management decisions, and (7) environmental stewardship versus anthropocentric standards

  10. Implementation of ICRP-60 recommendations on dose limits to radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    The handling of radioactive material and radiation generating plants in India is regulated by the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and rules issued under the Act. The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board enforces the rules. Currently, there are about 40,000 radiation workers in the country. Nearly half of them are employed in nuclear installations. During 1989, the Board considered the impact of restricting the maximum individual exposure to different values of dose limits. Through this analysis, the Board alerted all radiation users including persons responsible for radiation safety in nuclear facilities. When ICRP published ICRP-60, the Board issued directives to all radiation installations reducing the dose limit to occupational workers in a phased manner (40 mSv for 1991, 35 mSv for 1992 and 30 mSv for 1993). To meet the recommendations of ICRP-60, AERB issued a directive for the five year block 1994-1998, restricting the cumulative effective dose constraint to one hundred milliSievert (100 mSv) for individual radiation workers. Also, the annual effective dose to individual workers in any calendar year during the five-year block was restricted to thirty milliSievert (30 mSv). The stipulations of AERB are thus more conservative than those of ICRP. There was near total compliance with the dose limits by radiation installations in the country. For instance, in 1989, the number of radiation workers in nuclear power plants, who exceeded the dose level of 20 mSv/year was 9% of the total. This declined gradually to 2.2% in 1993 and 0.3% in 1997. During 1998, only 9 out of 10,145 exceeded 20 mSv/year. This has been achieved by the concerted efforts of the management, health physics staff and radiation workers. The health physicists regulated the radiation doses to workers by issuing work permits when the workers are assigned any job in high radiation areas. Appropriate training programmes are also in place. The broad guidelines to regulate radiation exposures in nuclear facilities

  11. Outlines of ICRP publication 74 and new dose conversion coefficients for external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Combined task group of ICRP and ICRU reported the ICRP Publication 74 (1996) which is a summary report of their collection, analysis and evaluation of many data and dose conversion coefficients. Concerning the new coefficients, the author described this review as follows: History until Publication 74. Doses recommended at present: for protection quantity, the mean absorption dose of organ and tissue, equivalent dose and effective dose and for operational quantity, the ambient dose equivalent, directional dose equivalent and individual dose equivalent. Changes which can have an influence on the dose evaluation; introduction of radiation weighting factor (WR), changing of tissue weighting factor (WR), changing of the equation for Q-L relation and updating of physical data. New dose conversion coefficients; for photon, neutron and electron. Comparison of new and present coefficients; concerning the quality factor Q, particularly for neutron Q. New relations of protection and operational quantities; for field and individual monitoring. General conclusion of Publication 74. The Publication gives a certain direction for problems in evaluation of external exposure dose which have been discussed since the ICRP Fundamental Recommendation 1990 was issued. However, there still remain many problems especially in validity of the WR and of equation for Q-L relation. (K.H.)

  12. Uses and limitations of dosimetric data in ICRP 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations of Publications 26 and 30 provide a well founded, logical approach to radiation protection. These recommendations lend themselves to scientific scrutiny and evaluation much more than the earlier recommendations. While there are many issues which national authorities may find necessary to address as they develop their national radiation protection guidance, the long awaited revision of the ICRP recommendations provides the technical bases upon which such guidance can be developed. The acceptance of the new recommendations by national authorities and the radiation protection community appears to be related to the lack of substantial departure in the numerical value of the secondry limits from the previous limits. This reflects an apparent concensus that the earlier recommendations provided an adequate level of protection. It thus appears reasonable to suggest that a similar level of protection is offered by the new recommendations. 24 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Board advice following publication of the 1990 Recommendations of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published new Recommendations and the Board has a statutory duty to advise Government and those with responsibilities for radiation protection on the acceptability to and the applicability in the UK of those Recommendations. The Board wishes to consult widely before finalising the advice which is proposed in this document. In general, the Board endorses the conceptual framework for radiological protection recommended by ICRP. In particular, the distinction between practices and intervention is useful and is consistent with the way in which the Board has presented its recent advice. A major new concept is that of a constraint. The Board believes that the introduction of constraints provides a powerful method for improving protection against ionising radiation. The advice in this consultative document is for maximum generic values of dose constraints for both workers and the public. Finally the Board proposes to endorse the use of the radiological quantities recommended by ICRP. (author)

  14. Radiation protection in Swiss nuclear installations; Strahlenschutz in Schweizer Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.; Brunell, M. [Eidgenoessisches Nuklearsicherheitsinspektorat ENSI, Brugg (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Well developed measures on operational radiation protection within Swiss nuclear installations will be presented. The focus lays on competent authority actions. Results of the last ten years, including events on radiation issues, will be discussed. Finally a view on challenges for radiation protection personnel with respect to a renewed Swiss radiation protection legislation based on recent ICRP recommendations will be given.

  15. The Way Forward in Radiation Protection: New Concepts from the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, T.; McHugh, J.

    2004-07-01

    Since the publication of the last main recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 60, 1990) experience has shown that in applying the system of radiological protection, whilst many aspects work reasonably well, some areas have been identified as being somewhat unclear, or seemingly incoherent. While the CRPPH has, in general, found the ICRP system to be robust, the Committee has continued to focus its attention on those aspects of the system that it judges would benefit from further refinement. Recognising the need for modernisation, Professor Roger Clarke, the Chair of the ICRP, has published several papers in the open literature (Clarke 2002) suggesting an evolutionary process that could be followed for the development of the next set of ICRP recommendations, due in the 2005 time frame, and has engaged with many in the radiation protection community to seek their comments. The CRPPH has been actively involved in developing its own consensus thoughts on how the system of radiation protection could be made more responsive to decision makers, regulators and practitioners, and has provided these directly to the ICRP and the international community for consideration. To further refine this work, the CRPPH commissioned the Expert Group on the Evolution of the System of Radiation Protection (EGRP) to produce a follow-up contribution, which has suggested specific modifications to the current system of radiological protection that, in the Group's view, would result in improvement and simplification. These suggestions include : the implementation of an umbrella concept of ''Authorisation''. based on a process of constrained optimisation with appropriate stakeholder input, and would supersede the concepts of exemption, exclusion, , and triviality; clear recognition of the boundaries between the scientific aspects of risk assessment, the social aspects of risk evaluation, management, and acceptance

  16. The Way Forward in Radiation Protection: New Concepts from the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; McHugh, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the publication of the last main recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 60, 1990) experience has shown that in applying the system of radiological protection, whilst many aspects work reasonably well, some areas have been identified as being somewhat unclear, or seemingly incoherent. While the CRPPH has, in general, found the ICRP system to be robust, the Committee has continued to focus its attention on those aspects of the system that it judges would benefit from further refinement. Recognising the need for modernisation, Professor Roger Clarke, the Chair of the ICRP, has published several papers in the open literature (Clarke 2002) suggesting an evolutionary process that could be followed for the development of the next set of ICRP recommendations, due in the 2005 time frame, and has engaged with many in the radiation protection community to seek their comments. The CRPPH has been actively involved in developing its own consensus thoughts on how the system of radiation protection could be made more responsive to decision makers, regulators and practitioners, and has provided these directly to the ICRP and the international community for consideration. To further refine this work, the CRPPH commissioned the Expert Group on the Evolution of the System of Radiation Protection (EGRP) to produce a follow-up contribution, which has suggested specific modifications to the current system of radiological protection that, in the Group's view, would result in improvement and simplification. These suggestions include : the implementation of an umbrella concept of A uthorisation , based on a process of constrained optimisation with appropriate stakeholder input, and would supersede the concepts of exemption, exclusion, , and triviality; clear recognition of the boundaries between the scientific aspects of risk assessment, the social aspects of risk evaluation, management, and acceptance, and the regulatory aspects

  17. Units for radiation protection work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, L.

    1997-06-01

    ICRU has defined special measurable (operational) quantities for radiation protection. A consequence of using the operational quantities is that hand-held and personal dosemeters can give different measuring results in the same radiation situation. The differences vary and are caused by the geometry of the radiation field. The units have well documented relations to e.g. the ICRP effective dose and equivalent dose to an organ or tissue. Therefore, it is possible to estimate these doses from a measured value of e.g. the ambient dose equivalent. ICRU and ICRP have recently reviewed these relations in two important commonly issued reports (Report 57 and Publication 74). This report tries to show the value of understanding these units and their relations and is primarily meant to be used for educational purposes. 11 refs

  18. ICRP PUBLICATION 123: Assessment of Radiation Exposure of Astronauts in Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Bartlett, D.T.; Cool, D.A.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Jia, X.; McAulay, I.R.; Pelliccioni, M.; Petrov, V.; Reitz, G.; Sato, T.

    2013-01-01

    During their occupational activities in space, astronauts are exposed to ionising radiation from natural radiation sources present in this environment. They are, however, not usually classified as being occupationally exposed in the sense of the general ICRP system for radiation protection of workers applied on Earth. The exposure assessment and risk-related approach described in this report is clearly restricted to the special situation in space, and should not be applied to any other exposure situation on Earth. The report describes the terms and methods used to assess the radiation exposure of astronauts, and provides data for the assessment of organ doses. Chapter 1 describes the specific situation of astronauts in space, and the differences in the radiation fields compared with those on Earth. In Chapter 2, the radiation fields in space are described in detail, including galactic cosmic radiation, radiation from the Sun and its special solar particle events, and the radiation belts surrounding the Earth. Chapter 3 deals with the quantities used in radiological protection, describing the Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) system of dose quantities, and subsequently presenting the special approach for applications in space; due to the strong contribution of heavy ions in the radiation field, radiation weighting is based on the radiation quality factor, Q, instead of the radiation weighting factor, w R . In Chapter 4, the methods of fluence and dose measurement in space are described, including instrumentation for fluence measurements, radiation spectrometry, and area and individual monitoring. The use of biomarkers for the assessment of mission doses is also described. The methods of determining quantities describing the radiation fields within a spacecraft are given in Chapter 5. Radiation transport calculations are the most important tool. Some physical data used in radiation transport codes are presented, and the various codes used for calculations in high

  19. Radiation Safety Analysis In The NFEC For Assessing Possible Implementation Of The ICRP-60 Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yowono, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation safety analysis of the 3 facilities in the nuclear fuel element center (NFEC) for assessing possible implementation of the ICRP-60 standard has been done. The analysis has covered the radiation dose received by workers, dose rate in the working area, surface contamination level, air contamination level and the level of radioactive gas release to the environment. The analysis has been based on BATAN regulation and ICRP-60 standard. The result of the analysis has showed that the highest radiation dose received has been found to be only around 15% of the set value in the ICRP-60 standard and only 6% of the set value in the BATAN regulation. Thus the ICRP-60 as radiation safety standard could be implemented without changing the laboratory design

  20. Potential impacts of ICRP 60 and 61 on transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (IGRP) has issued its '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection' that provide guidance on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation. The ICRP recommendations and their incorporation into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) 'Basic Safety Standards', Safety Series No. 9, provide the basis on which the IAEA 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials', Safety Series No. 6, are built. The transportation regulations are developed to ensure safety during the movement of radioactive materials and to provide reasonable assurance the transportation activities comply with the basic radiation protection principles of Safety Series No. 9. During the 1985 revision of the IAEA transport regulations, a comprehensive model was developed to derive Type A (non-accident resistant) package contents limits that were consistent with Safety Series No. 9 and, consequently, the earlier ICRP recommendations. Now that ICRP 60 has been published, the IAEA and Member States are faced with the task of evaluating how the transport regulations need to be revised to conform with the new recommendations. Several potentially significant issues need to be addressed to determine whether the old linkages between the recommendations and the transport regulations require modification. This paper addresses the issues that arise from the revisions to the ICRP recommendations and how the transportation regulations may be affected. (author)

  1. ICRP putting wealth before health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reductions in recommended dose limits for radiation workers set by the International Commission for Radiological Protection do not go far enough. The ICRP has put industry profitability before worker safety, and their recommendations should not be the basis for UK or European law. (author)

  2. Thought about ICRP TG84 report. What beyond it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2013-01-01

    Explained was the ICRP TG84 Report (Report of ICRP Task Group 84 on Initial Lessons Learned from the Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Japan vis-a-vis the ICRP System of Radiological Protection: Issues Identified from the NPP Accident in Japan and Recommendations to Improve the System of Radiation Protection; presented in October, 2012), together with author's thought about it. The Report contained 18 items and their related proposals: Inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients), Attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures, Quantifying radiation exposure, Assessing the importance of internal exposures, Managing emergency crisis, Protecting rescuers and volunteers, Responding with medical aid, Justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions, Transiting from an emergency to an existing situation, Rehabilitating evacuated areas, Categorizing public exposures due to an accident, Restricting individual doses of members of the public, Caring for infants and children, Considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos, Monitoring public protection, Dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues, and consumer products, Recognizing the importance of psychological consequences, and Fostering the sharing of information. The Report also contained 11 Recommendations of actions for the Commission to take. The author had been installed as the Chair of Radiation Council in February, 2011, just before the Accident in March, and had had to concern the definition of various post-Accident dose limits in Japan, having had often faced the inefficiency of measures. He thought the ICRP protecting system was difficult to understand due to 2 reasons: one was that the system had been written aiming at experts of radiological protection and the other, that the system had been composed not only from science but also from an incorporated standard of social values, which resulted in inconsiderateness to the general

  3. Radiation protection of the environment: anthropocentric and eco-centric principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexakhin, R.M.; Fesenko, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    The second half of the 20. century was dominated in the field of radiation protection by the anthropocentric concept stated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). According to this concept 'if radiation standards protect man then biota are also adequately protected from ionizing radiation'. At the end of the 20. beginning of the 21. centuries in the area of radiation protection of nature an eco-centric strategy is beginning to develop where emphasis has swung to the protection of biota in their environment. Inadequacy of ICRP's anthropocentric concept is reported. Issues are discussed such as ecological dosimetry, non-equi-dose irradiation of man and biota, criteria for estimating radiation induced changes in biota and man, as well as the need to harmonize permissible exposure doses to man and biota. An urgent need is stressed to develop a single (synthetic) concept of radiation protection which simultaneously ensures protection of human health and biota well-being in their environment. This concept is to be based on the recognition of the integrity of socio-natural ecosystems where man and biota are considered as a unity. (author)

  4. Occupational radiation exposure in international recommendations on radiation protection: Basic standards under review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1996-01-01

    The ICRP publication 60 contains a number of new recommendations on the radiological protection of occupationally exposed persons. The recommendations have been incorporated to a very large extent in the BSS, the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, a publication elaborated by the IAEA in cooperation with many other international organisations, and in the Euratom Basic Safety Standards (EUR) to be published soon. However, there exist some considerable discrepancies in some aspects of the three publications. The ICRP committee has set up a task group for defining four general principles of occupational radiation protection, and a safety guide is in preparation under the responsibility of the IAEA. ''StrahlenschutzPraxis'' will deal with this subject in greater detail after publication of these two important international publications. The article in hand discusses some essential aspects of the recommendations published so far. (orig.) [de

  5. The use of the ICRP principles for controlling risks from potential exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.; Gonzalez, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Heretofore, ICRP recommendations for radiation protection mainly apply to radiation exposures that are expected to occur with near certainty during normal operation of radiation sources. It is anticipated that the new ICRP recommendations will deal more comprehensively with radiation safety by including consideration of exposure which might or might not occur, but for which a probability of occurrence can be assigned (potential exposure). This paper discusses issues and principles for a system of radiation safety which accommodates both radiation protection and nuclear safety standards and covers both normal and potential exposures. The principles are formulated by interpreting and extrapolating the principles of justification, optimization and dose limitation currently employed for normal exposure

  6. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection standard and the recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Kelecom, A.; Pereira, J.R.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the differences between the CNEN's standard and the publication of ICRP-103, analyzing the philosophy for radiation protection, dose limits and other relevant aspects of radiation protection

  7. International recommendations on scope of radiological protection regulations - ICRP Publication 104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, Gabriel; Avadanei, Camelia; Ghilea, Simion

    2011-01-01

    The system of radiological protection applies, in principle, to all exposures to ionising radiation. Nevertheless, in practice, the measures taken in order to control these exposures should be limited for pragmatic reasons. ICRP Publication 104 deals with the scope of radiological protection control measures and describes the instruments that can be used for this purpose: exclusion, exemption, clearance. This paper aims to present the ICRP recommendations on scope of regulations in all types of exposure situations: planned, emergency and existing. Also, there are discussed the instruments available to regulators in different exposure situations. Exclusion refers to the deliberate omission of exposure situations from the scope of regulatory requirements, and exemption refers to waiving regulatory requirements if their application is not warranted. A special case of exemption, termed 'clearance', refers to the relinquishing of regulatory control if such a control becomes unwarranted. Societal attitudes to the control of exposure situations are taken into account in determining what can be excluded or exempted from regulatory control. People have higher demands for controlling 'artificial' exposure situations than for dealing with 'natural' exposure situations. Therefore, account should be taken not only of the justification and optimisation of controlling measures, but also of the different expectations of those affected by the exposure situations. The recommendations in this report are intended to assist in defining what needs to be the subject of regulatory requirements for radiological protection and what does not. The application of regulatory controls should achieve a net benefit in protection; otherwise, regulatory control is not justified. Similarly, regulatory requirements should be applied in a manner that optimises protection, otherwise the application of regulatory requirements is not warranted. (authors)

  8. Advances in radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirement to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, linked with the growing number of workers whose exposure to radiation must be strictly controlled, requires intensified efforts directed towards the provision of adequate radiation monitoring programmes. This symposium was intended to review the advances that have been made in methods, techniques and instrumentation for radiation protection monitoring. Thus the symposium complemented the detailed consideration that had already been given to two closely related topics, that of environmental monitoring and of monitoring radioactive airborne and liquid discharges from nuclear facilities. The first topic had been dealt with in detail in an Agency symposium held in November 1973 in Warsaw and the second was treated in an Agency symposium held in September 1977 in Portoroz. The present symposium covered a broad range of topics under the following main headings: Monitoring of external exposure (three sessions),Contamination monitoring (three sessions), Radiation monitoring programmes (one session), Calibration, and use of computers (two sessions). An introductory paper described the purpose of radiation protection monitoring and its historical development. It drew attention to the gradual change from the threshold dose hypothesis to the hypothesis of direct proportionality between dose and effect and discussed practical implications of the recommendations recently issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It became apparent that guidance on the application of these recommendations is urgently needed. This guidance is presently being prepared by ICRP

  9. The white paper on radiation protection at Electricite de France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, P.

    1996-01-01

    The general public is increasingly interested in questions concerning the environment, and people are particularly sensitive to the consequences arising from the operation of nuclear power plants. Radiation protection standards are becoming increasingly stringent: recommendations drafted in 1990 by ICRP (ICRP 60) will soon be applied on a general scale. In this context, EDF became aware of a deterioration in the results of dosimetry monitoring in its plants (an increase in the collective dose per nuclear power unit from 1989). This encouraged the company to undertake a critical analysis of the situation, and to comprehensively rethink all the questions linked to radiation protection. This work led to the publication of the White Paper on Radiation Protection in mid-1993. The White Paper deals with various aspects: - medical and biological fundamentals, - worker protection, -protection of the public and the environment, - information provision and training, - emergency situations. (author)

  10. Basic concepts and assumptions behind the new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of some of the basic concepts and assumptions behind the current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in ICRP Publications 26 and 28, which form the basis for the revision of the Basic Safety Standards jointly undertaken by IAEA, ILO, NEA and WHO. Special attention is given to the assumption of a linear, non-threshold dose-response relationship for stochastic radiation effects such as cancer and hereditary harm. The three basic principles of protection are discussed: justification of practice, optimization of protection and individual risk limitation. In the new ICRP recommendations particular emphasis is given to the principle of keeping all radiation doses as low as is reasonably achievable. A consequence of this is that the ICRP dose limits are now given as boundary conditions for the justification and optimization procedures rather than as values that should be used for purposes of planning and design. The fractional increase in total risk at various ages after continuous exposure near the dose limits is given as an illustration. The need for taking other sources, present and future, into account when applying the dose limits leads to the use of the commitment concept. This is briefly discussed as well as the new quantity, the effective dose equivalent, introduced by ICRP. (author)

  11. The evolution of the system of radiological protection: the programme of the Nea committee on radiation protection and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, S.

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of radiological protection has always been to provide an appropriate standard of protection for the public and workers without unduly limiting the beneficial practices giving rise to radiation exposure. Over the past few decades, many studies concerning the effects of ionising radiation have been conducted, ranging from those that examine the effects of radiation on individual cells, to epidemiological studies that examine the effects on large populations exposed to different radiation sources. Using information gained from these studies to estimate the consequences of radiation exposure, together with the necessary social and economic judgements, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has put forward a series of recommendations to structure an appropriate system for radiological protection, and to ensure a high standard of protection for the public and for occupational exposed workers. The ICRP system of radiological protection that has evolved over the years now covers many diverse radiological protection issues. Emerging issues have been dealt with more or less on an individual basis resulting in an overall system, which while very comprehensive, is also complex. With such a complex system it is not surprising that some perceived inconsistencies or incoherence may lead to concerns that radiation protection issues are not being adequately addressed. Different stakeholders in decisions involving radiological protection aspects tend to focus on different elements of this perceived incoherence. To advance solutions to these issues, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has been working for some time to contribute to the evolution of a new radiological protection system, through its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). This group of senior regulators and expert practitioners has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the ICRP. Recently, this interest has

  12. The international standard for protection from ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, T [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1995-06-01

    This document is a review in hebrew of the new 1994 international standard of the IAEA. The new standard title is `Basic safety standards for radiation protection and for the safety of radiation sources`, which were published in the ICRP Pub. 9.

  13. Regulatory requirements for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.; Cunningham, R.E.; Hard, J.E.; Mattson, R.J.; Smith, R.D.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for radiation protection have evolved and matured over several decades. Due to the wide adoption of recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), there exists international agreement on the principles to be followed for radiation protection. This foundation will be increasingly important due to the growing need for international agreements and standards for radiation protection and radioactive materials management. During the infancy of the commercial nuclear industry, primary reliance was placed on the protection of the individual, both in the work force and as a member of the public. With the growth of nuclear power in the 1960's and 1970's, environmental impact assessments and expert reviews of bio-effects data have focused attention on statistical risks to large population groups and the use of the collective dose commitment concept to estimate potential effects. The potential release of long-lived radionuclides from the nuclear fuel cycle requires further consideration of radionuclide accumulation in the biosphere and calls for controls conceived and implemented at the international level. The initial development efforts for addressing these concerns already have been instituted by the ICRP and the IAEA. However, formal international agreements and a unified set of international standards may be required to implement the recommendations of these groups. Further international efforts in the field of radiation protection are also called for in developing waste management practices and radioactive effluent control technology, in site selection for fuel reprocessing plants and waste dispersal facilities, and for ensuring safe transport of high-level wastes in various forms. Since the regulation of very low dose rates and doses will be involved, it will be useful to reexamine dose-effect relationships and societal goals for health protection. Improved criteria and methodologies for ''as low as readily

  14. The recommendations of the ICRP: the reasons for a change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Nenot, J.C.; Lecomte, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has regularly produced recommendations on the protection against ionising radiation; these recommendations are currently taken up by international organisations and by states. Since 1990, date of issue of the most recent recommendations (Publication 60), advances in scientific knowledge, technical developments, feedback and desire to meet modern societal developments, have incited the ICRP to modify its system of protection. The latest draft, which was recently presented openly for consultation and proposals, is described and discussed. (author)

  15. The risk philosophy of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The processes of risk assessment and risk evaluation are described. The assumptions behind current radiation risk assessments, which are focused on the probability of attributable death from radiation-induced cancer, are reviewed. These assessments involve projection models to take account of future cancer death in irradiated populations, the transfer of risk estimates between populations and the assumptions necessary to derive risk assessments for low radiation doses from actual observations at high doses. The paper ends with a presentation of the basic radiation protection recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in the context of a risk philosophy. (author)

  16. Radiation-induced cataracts: the Health Protection Agency's response to the ICRP statement on tissue reactions and recommendation on the dose limit for the eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffler, Simon; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Gilvin, Phil; Harrison, John

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the response of the Health Protection Agency (HPA) to the 2011 statement from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on tissue reactions and recommendation of a reduced dose limit for the lens of the eye. The response takes the form of a brief review of the most recent epidemiological and mechanistic evidence. This is presented together with a discussion of dose limits in the context of the related risk and the current status of eye dosimetry, which is relevant for implementation of the limits. It is concluded that although further work is desirable to quantify better the risk at low doses and following protracted exposures, along with research into the mechanistic basis for radiation cataractogenesis to inform selection of risk projection models, the HPA endorses the conclusion reached by the ICRP in their 2011 statement that the equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye should be reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year, averaged over a five year period, with no year's dose exceeding 50 mSv.

  17. Implications of draft ICRP recommendations: the View of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, S.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has taken an active interest in the work being performed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop a new set of general recommendations. As several key junctures, the Nea, through the lead of its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) has performed in-depth analyses of the possible implications that draft ICRP materials, in order to inform policy makers of the regulatory and application implications that would result should draft ICRP Recommendations for a system of radiological protection be published. Comments from the Nea have constructively contributed to the ICRP development process, and it is hoped that the final ICRP recommendations in this area will be developed to best serve the needs of national and international radiation protection policy makers, regulators and implementers. Having assessed and commented on previous drafts, the C.R.P.P.H. has co-ordinated the views of all the relevant standing technical committees within the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide constructive suggestions as to how the text could be usefully improved. Comments were requested from the Nea committees dealing with radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, nuclear regulatory activities, nuclear development and nuclear science. The present paper summarises the results of the C.R.P.P.H. review process related to the new ICRP recommendations. (author)

  18. Some Current Problems in Optimisation of Radiation Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.; Prlic, I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The current system of radiation protection is generally based on recommendations promulgated in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 60. These principles and recommendations were subsequently adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). However, in recent years certain problems have arisen such as application of risk factors at low doses, use and interpretation of a collective dose, concept of dose commitment, optimisation of all types of occupational exposure and practices, implementation of ALARA approach in the common occupational as well as in quite complex situations etc. In this paper are presented some of the issues that have to be addressed in the development of the new ICRP Recommendations that are planned to be developed in next four or five years. As the new radiation protection philosophy shifts from society-based control of stochastic risks to an individual-based policy, consequently it will require introduction of modified approach to optimisation process and probably introduction of some new dosimetric quantities. (author)

  19. What we expect of ICRP new recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    We believe that it is essential for Japan to continue to maintain and promote nuclear power generation. To promote nuclear power generation, we believe it is important that the effect of low-level radiation on humans and the exposure dose limits have to be widely and properly understood by the general public and radiation workers. From such a point of view, we express our agreement with ICRP latest attempt that is aimed at preparing a simple and easy-to understanding radiological protection system. We would like to express some of our opinions about ICRP new recommendations. - The relation between PAL and the conventional dose limit should be shown clearly. - Optimisation on low-enough level (natural background level) should be omitted. - The process of optimisation must take the state of affairs in each country into consideration. - The dose limits (100 mSv/5 yrs and 50 mSv/yr) for workers should not be changed. (Single-year dose limit of 20 mSv/yr has no flexibility and has serious impact on nuclear power operators.). - Full discussion is necessary to establish the radiological protection criteria for environment. We appreciate ICRP's releases and calls for opinions regarding the new recommendations. We hope ICRP continues to disclose the status of discussion in a timely manner, and invite opinions. (author)

  20. The Philosophy of the New Radiation Protection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, P.

    2004-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has proposed a new philosophy of radiation protection. An important component in the proposed system of protection is the principle ''If the individual is sufficiently protected from a source, then society is also protected from that source''. This principle is here analysed and found to be subject to several problems. The principle reflects the controversial ethical position that the likely harm to several people can be ignored as long as the individual risk is small. The ICRP states that the new system involves a change from a previous utilitarian ethics to an individual-oriented philosophy. It is argued that a rights-based or a duty-based ethic requires a more risk avert interpretation of when an individual is sufficiently protected than what the proposal suggests. It is concluded that the proposed principle contradicts the other important principle in the new system - the optimisation principle. Due to these problems it is suggested that the ICRP ought to discard the proposed principle from the new system of radiation protection. (Author) 7 refs.

  1. The Philosophy of the New Radiation Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has proposed a new philosophy of radiation protection. An important component in the proposed system of protection is the principle I f the individual is sufficiently protected from a source, then society is also protected from that source . This principle is here analysed and found to be subject to several problems. The principle reflects the controversial ethical position that the likely harm to several people can be ignored as long as the individual risk is small. The ICRP states that the new system involves a change from a previous utilitarian ethics to an individual-oriented philosophy. It is argued that a rights-based or a duty-based ethic requires a more risk avert interpretation of when an individual is sufficiently protected than what the proposal suggests. It is concluded that the proposed principle contradicts the other important principle in the new system - the optimisation principle. Due to these problems it is suggested that the ICRP ought to discard the proposed principle from the new system of radiation protection. (Author) 7 refs

  2. General principles of radiation protection in hospital media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1993-01-01

    Principles of radiation protection given by ICRP in term of justification, optimization, limitation are applicable in hospital media. The medical act has to be justified and, in France, it is not possible to use ionizing radiations without a prescription from a doctor. The acceleration of technologies development make non radiological techniques more employed than radiologic ones, in an aim of efficiency more than an aim radiation protection. The second principle of optimization means to give medical care with the minimum of ionizing radiations for the patients as well the operators. For the principle of limitation which applied only for operators, we have the new recommends of ICRP, but it would be reasonable to give the most part of decision to the works doctor to decide if somebody has the aptitude to work at an exposed place. The last points concern the quality of equipment, the safety of installations, the organization of works which are under laws and regulations. 3 tabs

  3. Decision-making about chronic radiation exposure to the public. New recommendations from the ICRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.J. [Division of Radiation and Waste Safety, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2000-05-01

    The paper discusses decision-making in situations of chronic exposure within the framework of a forthcoming related ICRP report on the subject which has been produced by an ICRP Task Group chaired by the author. This ICRP report will provide guidance on the application of the ICRP System of Radiological Protection to prolonged exposure situations afflicting members of the public. It will address the general application of the System to the control of prolonged exposures resulting from practices and to the undertaking of interventions in prolonged exposure situations, and will provide recommendations on generic reference levels for such interventions. It will also consider some specific situations and will discuss a number of issues that have been of concern, namely: natural radiation sources that may give rise to high doses; the restoration and rehabilitation of sites where human activities involving radioactive substances have been carried out; the return to 'normality' following an accident that has released radioactive substances to the environment; and the global marketing of commodities for public consumption that contain relatively high levels of radioactive substances. Annexes will provide some examples of prolonged exposure situations and will discuss the radiological protection quantities, radiation-induced health effects and aspects of the System of Radiological Protection relevant to prolonged exposure. The quantitative recommendations for prolonged exposures provided in the report will be as follows: generic reference levels for intervention, in terms of existing annual doses, of < or approx. 100 mSv, above which intervention is almost always justifiable (situations for which the annual dose threshold for deterministic effects in relevant organs is exceeded will almost always require intervention), and of < or approx.10 mSv, below which intervention is not likely to be justifiable (and above which it may be necessary); intervention exemption

  4. Radiation protection: Principles, recommendations and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation protection is a highly international dicipline with a high degree of international harmonization. Especially within the Nordic countries there is general agreement upon principles and standards, despite the actual practice may differ slightly. The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) are accepted by the regulatory bodies and should be followed by all users of radiation. The users are in principle responsible for the radiation protection standard and activities themselves. Because most companies or hospitals lack sufficient expertise by themselves, they must rely upon recommendations from others. Primarily they should contact the national radiation protection agency. However, due to the international harmonization of radiation protection, information from other national or international agencies may be used with confidence. All users of radiation in the Nordic countries are obliged to act according to recognition and assessment of both risks and benefits, and they are responsible for updating their knowledge

  5. New trends in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1977-10-01

    The introduction of new concepts such as the effective dose equivalent, the collective dose and the dose commitment, and the application of the basic principles of justification, optimization and individual dose limitation has had a major impact on the planning and implementation of radiation protection during the last few years. The basic principles are summarized in ICRP Publication 26. It is a chalenge to research in radiobiology, genetics and health physics to explore the scientific foundation of the current principles of radiation protection. The most interesting trend to-day, however, is the observation that the principles applied in radiation protection have now been generally recognized and accepted to the extent that they become utilized in the protection of man against non-radioactive carcinogenic substances and environmental pollutants. (author)

  6. Rethinking basic concepts in ICRP's system of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.; Mossman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The present criterion for radiation protection appears to be exposure reduction rather than adequate protection of health. The 1990 ICRP draft recommendations for a system of dose limitation would further implement this more restrictive criterion by implementing certain academic concepts and assumptions. These concepts and assumptions are discussed and the suggestion is made that the radiation protection community needs to carefully examine the need for the complex system proposed

  7. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (1). Overview of the lens, radiogenic cataract, and equivalent dose limit for the lens newly recommended by the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2014-01-01

    In April 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the statement on tissue reactions. This stimulated interest in many countries. The Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye was established in the Japanese Health Physics Society, and in April 2013, started discussion about the international developments and recent studies related to the dosimetry of the lens of the eye. This committee now publishes the interim report consisting of parts I-VI. Of these, this Part I overviews the structure of the eye and lens, cataract types and the scientific evidence of its new dose threshold and equivalent dose limit newly recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  8. XXXVI. Days of Radiation Protection. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 93 abstracts are published. The Conference consists of following sections: (I) General aspects and new trends of radiation protection); (II) Radiation protection in medicine; (III): Dosimetry and metrology of external and internal radiation exposure; (IV) Regulation of radiation exposure to natural sources and control of radon exposure; (V) Radiation protection in nuclear power plants, their decommissioning and waste management; (VI) Application of radiation protection standards in the emergency management; (VII) Biological effects of ionizing radiation and risk estimation; (VIII) Education and training in radiation protection in the light of new recommendations of EU, ICRP and IAEA.

  9. Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protecion (1977) ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: principles of radiation protection (the reports of ICRP; basis for establishing dose limits; types of radiation harm; occupational dose limits; estimates of tissue dose equivalent; uniformity of tissue dose equivalent; systems of dose limitation; protection of members of the public; exposure of the population); radiation protection in practice (protection standards, types of exposure). (U.K.)

  10. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  11. ICRP new recommendations. Committee 2's efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) may release new primary radiation protection recommendation in 2007. Committee 2 has underway reviews of the dosimetric and biokinetic models and associated data used in calculating dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides and exposures to external radiation fields. This paper outlines the work plans of Committee 2 during the current term, 2005-2009, in anticipation of the new primary recommendations. The two task groups of Committee 2 responsible for the computations of dose coefficients, INDOS and DOCAL, are reviewing the models and data used in the computations. INDOS is reviewing the lung model and the biokinetic models that describe the behavior of the radionuclides in the body. DOCAL is reviewing its computational formulations with the objective of harmonizing the formulation with those of nuclear medicine, and developing new computational phantoms representing the adult male and female reference individuals of ICRP Publication 89. In addition, DOCAL will issue a publication on nuclear decay data to replace ICRP Publication 38. While the current efforts are focused on updating the dose coefficients for occupational intakes of radionuclides plans are being formulated to address dose coefficients for external radiation fields which include consideration of high energy fields associated with accelerators and space travel and the updating of dose coefficients for members of the public. (author)

  12. Effect of new ICRP guidelines on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The new limits proposed by ICRP and under consideration (at the time of writing) by AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada) reduce the maximum exposure of atomic radiation workers from 50 to 20 mSv per year, and that of the general public from 5 to 1 mSv. The new guidelines will have three main effects: first, some licensees may have difficulty in complying; secondly, many workers may have to be reclassified as atomic radiation workers; thirdly, extensive retraining will be needed. Activities affected include reactor retubing and underground uranium mining

  13. How to understand the radiation effects of small dose - some critical comments on ICRP recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, T. [Radiation Education Forum, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The widespread feeling of `radiophobia` by the general public has its basis on the ICRP`s `linear no-threshold` hypothesis in dose-response relationship for low dose radiation from the standpoint of radiation protection. Although this common feeling served as a merit for constructing the `safety culture` of society, it has now become a large obstacle for the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology as a demerit. Recently many data have been accumulated for the radiation effects of low dose, both epidemiologically and experimentally. Although in general it is very difficult to obtain clear evidence of presence or absence of threshold, it seems to be true that the risk by radiation exposure at low level (the definition of which is below 0.2 Gy) is not so large as that of extrapolation from the high or medium dose range. In fact, many data suggest that some quite different mechanisms are working in low dose from high dose, such as `adaptive response`, and a new concept, `radiation hormesis`, has emerged, that the low level radiation is not only quite harmless but is rather necessary for living cells or beneficial for human health. In this paper, some critical comments on ICRP recommendations are given as a personal view by the author. These include: (1) a question of exact assessment of exposed dose by A-bomb survivors used for the epidemiological data, which are regarded to be the most authentic and important; (2) a brief summary of effects at the natural radiation level, including the high background area data; (3) the importance of dose rate effect, which reflects the living matter`s repairability from radiation injury, and (4) the proposal of new paradigm by adopting the reasonable `de minimis` level (below which there is no harm) both for low dose and at low dose rate. A simple mathematical analysis for representative data of dose rate effect was shown as an appendix 50 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  14. Environmental radiation protection - a brief history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapantis, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of ionising radiation on man has been studied intensely for decades, and the system of radiation protection for man has been continually refined in the light of those studies. That system assumes that if man is protected, non-human biota at the species level will also be adequately protected. However, an increasing recognition of the need to protect the environment, and international agreements signed in 1992, have resulted in that paradigm being questioned, with the onus shifting slowly towards demonstrating that the environment is protected. Further, radiation protection agencies and environmental protection agencies around the world have now started considering the issue of developing a system of radiation protection for the environment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are also active in this area. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline some of the issues confronting environmental and radiation protection specialists, and to mention some of the initiatives being taken by the international community to resolve those issues

  15. Cost benefit analysis for optimization of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1984-01-01

    ICRP recommends three basic principles for radiation protection. One is the justification of the source. Any use of radiation should be justified with regard to its benefit. The second is the optimization of radiation protection, i.e. all radiation exposure should be kept as low as resonably achievable. And the third principle is that there should be a limit for the radiation dose that any individual receives. Cost benefit assessment or cost benefit analysis is one tool to achieve the optimization, but the optimization is not identical with cost benefit analysis. Basically, in principle, the cost benefit analysis for the optimization of radiation protection is to find the minimum sum of the cost of protection and some cost of detriment. (Mori, K.)

  16. Practical implications of the ICRP recommendations (1977) and the revised IAEA basic safety standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: The Seminar provided a forum for exchange of views concerning the practical problems associated with the implementation of the recommendations published in ICRP report No. 26 The papers presented and the discussions which followed will greatly help the IAEA, WHO, ILO and OECD/NEA to finalize the draft of the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection. The papers and discussions centered mainly on three items - risk assessments and the associated detriment which might result from exposure to ionizing radiation as encountered in radiation work, optimization of protection; and some practical difficulties associated with the implementation of the recommendations Examples of the application of optimization were presented which helped clarify the methodology of optimizing protection. General and panel discussions helped to clarify the question of intuitive versus quantitative optimization. The consensus was that optimization of protection is mainly an intuitive operation, the quantitative tools being an aid to the process. These tools are more important in optimizing the design of installations and equipment, while the process is less quantitative in the case of optimization of operations. The value of the man-rem was discussed in a few papers and in panel and other discussions. It became clear that its value can be different in different cases of justification and different again in justification and optimization assessments. Therefore a range of values is needed rather than a single universal value. However, for optimization assessments where parts of the collective dose occur in different countries, the principal of geographical equity was advocated, implying the same value to the man-rem in all countries. Some papers and discussions centered around the identification and evaluation of detriment. Two types of detriment were identified, namely 'objective' detriment (composed of stochastic effects which could be assessed f r om knowledge of the

  17. Status of ICRP recommendations at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Masahito

    1996-01-01

    Results of actual radiation exposure in nuclear power plants and related matters were presented for discussion of the principle of radiation protection involved in ICRP recommendations, which is prerequisite for safe operation of the plants and for treatment of radioactive waste. There were no personnel with actual exposure dose exceeding 50 mSv/y in 1995. Total exposure dose was 66.32 psn.Sv. and mean dose equivalent/personnel, 1.0 mSv. The amount of radioactive gasses and liquids released in the environment was far lower (<1/7,000) than that for the exposure index of 50 microSv/y in the public around the plant. The marked decrease in the amount of radioactive solid waste was noted in the plants. The laws and ICRP recommendations have been the basis for agreement between labor and management in the plant: e.g., the proposed voluntary dose was 30 mSv/y. This was also true for the recommendations in 1990. Finally, followings were proposed to ICRP: re-examination of linear theory without threshold, consideration for the balance between the radiation and other kind of hazardous materials and factors, carefulness in changing the recommendation concept, and exclusion of more severe limitations than those included in ICRP recommendations. (K.H.)

  18. Strategies of NSC in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramos, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Spanish radiation protection model is consistent with the recommendations established in the ICRP-60, and it is strongly implemented in all practices and related activities of the country. the practical implementation of that model is assuring a high level of protection of workers, public and environment. The Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), as Spanish regulator, is currently involved in the implementation of a new Strategic Plan, which contains, among others, strategic and operational objectives to improve the national system of radiation protection, so they will drive the activities of the CSN in this field during the coming years. A summary of those objectives and the related action plan are described. (Author)

  19. Overview of ICRP Committee 4: application of the Commission's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, D A

    2016-06-01

    Committee 4 develops principles and recommendations on radiological protection of people in all exposure situations. The committee meeting in 2014 was hosted by GE Healthcare in Arlington Heights, IL, USA on 27 July-1 August 2014. The programme of work of Committee 4 encompasses several broad areas, including a series of reports covering various aspects of existing exposure situations, leading the efforts of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to update and elaborate recommendations in light of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant for emergencies and living in contaminated areas, elaborating the underpinnings of the system of radiological protection, and developing focussed reports on specific topic areas in consultation with ICRP's special liaison organisations. Committee 4 has six active Task Groups working on naturally occurring radioactive material; cosmic radiation in aviation; updates of ICRP Publications 109 and 111; ethics of radiological protection; surface and near-surface disposal of solid radioactive waste; and exposures resulting from contaminated sites from past industrial, military, and nuclear activities. In addition, there is a Working Party on tolerability of risk, and ongoing work with the various special liaison organisations of ICRP. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  20. Release of patients after radionuclide therapy. With contributions from the [International Commission on Radiological Protection] ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The use of unsealed radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of disease is common practice worldwide. This approach was widely employed some years ago and, following a decline, there has recently been a resurgence of interest in it. The combination of newly accessible radionuclides, improved labelling technology and developments in biotechnology has resulted in more enthusiasm and a wider range of applications for this form of therapy. Radionuclide treatments are performed with either the patient admitted to hospital or as an outpatient only. The criteria to determine which approach is best vary considerably, and are not always closely linked with the well established standards of radiation protection practice. Safety issues for the patient, their family, associated carers, staff and the general public arise with either approach. The potential risks are from both external irradiation and contamination. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) specify the dose constraints and limits for all of these groups, and their more general provisions with respect to the as low as reasonably achievable principle and justification also apply. One way of managing exposures of the various groups is to control when patients are released from hospital. While they are in hospital, it is relatively easy to control exposure. Once they have returned to their family in the community, they must be advised on how to restrict the exposure of those people that they will come into contact with. Until recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) did not provide specific advice in this area, and relied on the application of dose limits and constraints. However, regulators in some countries took a prescriptive approach, often using estimates of retained activity as a release criterion. These only loosely relate to dose limits. This publication attempts to bring newly available advice

  1. Three example applications of optimization techniques to Department of Energy contractor radiation protection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Martin, J.B.; Tawil, J.J.; Selby, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Six numerical examples of optimization of radiation protection are provided in the appendices of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 37 (ICRP83). In each case, the calculations are based on fairly well-defined parameters and assumptions that were well understood. In this paper, we have examined three different numerical examples that are based on empirical data and less certain assumptions. These examples are intended to represent typical applications of optimization principles to the evaluation of specific elements of a radiation protection program. In the first example, the optimum bioassay frequency for certain tritium workers was found to be once every 95 days, which compared well with the recommendations of ICRP Publication 10 (ICRP67). The second example showed that the optimum frequency for recalibrating a group of ''Cutie-Pie'' (CP)-type ionization chamber survey instruments was once every 102 days. In the third example, one continuous air monitor (CAM) was determined to be the optimum number in a workplace of a Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium facility. The optimum location of the CAM was determined from past glovebox release studies

  2. Radiation Protection and Civil defence Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Elshinawy, R.M.K.; Abdelfattah, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    This conference involves subjects of radiation protection, programming of civil defence, on the implementation of 1990 ICRP recommendation, thermoluminescence properties of bone equivalent calcium phosphate ceramics, potassium body burdens in occupational users of egyptian nuclear research centre, transport of radionuclides in fresh water stream, water treatment process for nuclear reactor, research activities related to internal contamination and bioassay and experience and environmental radiation monitoring in inshass. it contains of figures and tables

  3. Do we need radiation protection for the living environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefner, A.; Voelkle, H.

    2003-01-01

    The protection of the living environment, i.e. non human species or non human organisms, is a condition for the long term human survival. This certainly is true also for radioactivity and ionizing radiation. The ICRP statement that fauna und flora are sufficiently protected if man is protected is valid in many cases but not in every one. The article gives some reflections on this subject from the point of view of practical radiation protection and some suggestions on how, if necessary, protection of the living environment could be put into practice. (orig.) [de

  4. Application of the Commission’s recommendations: the activities of ICRP Committee 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Committee 4 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is responsible for developing principles, recommendations, and guidance on the protection of man against radiation exposure; and considering their practical application in all exposure situations. The Committee also acts as a major point of contact between ICRP and other international organisations and professional bodies concerned with protection against ionising radiation. The current work of the Committee involves the development of a series of reports on implementation of the 2007 Recommendations, and a reflection on the ethical foundations of the radiological protection system. Following the accident in Fukushima, Committee 4 also initiated an analysis of management of the consequences of the accident, with the objective of revising, if necessary, the Commission’s publications on emergency and post-accident situations.

  5. Radiation protection: Philosophy, recommendations and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The philosophy developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the control of human radiation exposure will be described. The application of the ICRP recommendations to the authorization and control of the disposal of radioactive wastes to the sea will be discussed in the context of the practice in the United Kingdom. (author)

  6. A stake holder dialogue on the implications of the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since its inception the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has been involved in the assessment and implementation of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The development of new general ICRP recommendations, to replace those of the 1990 ICRP Publication 60, was thus of great interest to the NEA and its member countries. As a result, the NEA initiated a process of interaction and dialogue with the ICRP to ensure that the views and concerns of NEA member countries could be voiced and appropriately addressed in the new ICRP recommendations. The new ICRP recommendations were approved by the ICRP Main Commission in March 2007, by which point the NEA had sponsored 7 international conferences and produced 13 publications on the subject. This report is the summary of the three international dialogue conferences (held in Tokyo, 5-6 July 2006, Washington, DC, 28-29 August 2006, and Prague, 24-25 October 2006) that were organised to provide the ICRP with feedback regarding the June 2006 draft of its new recommendations. It includes a presentation of the key points of the draft recommendations, a summary of the suggestions made during the three conferences, and an assessment of the significant evolution that has been seen in the ICRP presentation of its draft recommendations over the course of the conference series. (authors)

  7. Squares of the natural numbers in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, H.M.

    1977-01-01

    An informal history of radiation protection is given. The following topics are included: the discovery of x rays and their effects, the formation of the International Committee on X-ray and Radium Protection, the Manhattan Project and its plutonium aspects, dose limits and their origin, the increase in antinuclear writings, the publication of reports on radiation levels and effects, the role of the EPA in medical radiation, and the Oklo phenomenon. Recommendations for NCRP and ICRP actions are given. The publication also contains brief biographies of Lauriston S. Taylor and Herbert M. Parker

  8. The recommendations 2007 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Nenot, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), in particular in the situations of emergency exposure, after an accident or to natural radioactivity. (authors)

  9. Justification, optimization and classification of exposure situations in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrabalek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Inspiration to this brief information was the experience of studying the draft Radiation Protection Act submitted by the Ministry of Health to the Interdepartmental Annotation Procedure (IAP) on July 20, 2017 and of the IRP itself. The bill was drafted by officials from the Public Health Service. People who are expected to be well aware of the issue because they form national safety standards and laws, and manage and direct treatment of ionizing radiation sources, and oversee observing rules of protecting humans from the hazardous effects of ionizing radiation sources. Rules on the handling and protection of radiation sources for dangerous effects are recommended by multinational organizations. They are headed by ICRP International Radiological Protection Committee, which periodically issues updated radiation protection guidelines around the 10-year period. In line with ICRP recommendations, other professional organizations, such as the IAEA, WHO, EURATOM, and, ultimately, national governments, update their basic safety standards, translating recommendations into the national legal system. Most of interested know that ICRP 103 (2007) has brought some changes to the radiation protection system. In particular, there was an increased emphasis on the comprehensive optimization of radiation protection, and in the context of the recitals principle, the meaning of the word 'harm' was broadened. In addition to health damage, in the sense of which we have long been accustomed, it includes all economic and social losses to which comes from the introduction of the radiation source and introduction of protective measures around it. To simplify access to protect people from the effects of radiation and radiation sources, three basic models of human irradiation - exposure situations: - Exposure scenarios are the result of the optimization of human irradiation due to the operation of the radiation source or the performance of activities where the risk of irradiation is not

  10. Considerations on radiation protection of aircraft crew in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, C.A.; Goncalez, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discuss the guidelines existing in the ICRP documents related to radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew and it is presented a brief report on the evolution of these studies in this field, and also the regulations already adopted by the integrating of the European Union, Canada and USA. Also, are presented some peculiarities of Brazilian air space and the legislation applied to work with ionizing radiation, discussing the general aspects of radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew in Brazil

  11. ICRP PUBLICATION 122: radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W; Larsson, C-M; McKenney, C; Minon, J-P; Mobbs, S; Schneider, T; Umeki, H; Hilden, W; Pescatore, C; Vesterlind, M

    2013-06-01

    This report updates and consolidates previous recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) related to solid waste disposal (ICRP, 1985, 1997b, 1998). The recommendations given apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the ICRP system of radiological protection described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. Although the report is written as a standalone document, previous ICRP recommendations not dealt with in depth in the report are still valid. The 2007 ICRP system of radiological protection evolves from the previous process-based protection approach relying on the distinction between practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the distinction between three types of exposure situation: planned, emergency and existing. The Recommendations maintains the Commission's three fundamental principles of radiological protection namely: justification, optimisation of protection and the application of dose limits. They also maintain the current individual dose limits for effective dose and equivalent dose from all regulated sources in planned exposure situations. They re-enforce the principle of optimisation of radiological protection, which applies in a similar way to all exposure situations, subject to restrictions on individual doses: constraints for planned exposure situations, and reference levels for emergency and existing exposure situations. The Recommendations also include an approach for developing a framework to demonstrate radiological protection of the environment. This report describes the different stages in the life time of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that

  12. ICRP PUBLICATION 122: Radiological Protection in Geological Disposal of Long-lived Solid Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.; Larsson, C-M.; McKenney, C.; Minon, J-P.; Mobbs, S.; Schneider, T.; Umeki, H.; Hilden, W.; Pescatore, C.; Vesterlind, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report updates and consolidates previous recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) related to solid waste disposal (ICRP, 1985, 1997b, 1998). The recommendations given apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the ICRP system of radiological protection described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. Although the report is written as a standalone document, previous ICRP recommendations not dealt with in depth in the report are still valid. The 2007 ICRP system of radiological protection evolves from the previous process-based protection approach relying on the distinction between practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the distinction between three types of exposure situation: planned, emergency and existing. The Recommendations maintains the Commission’s three fundamental principles of radiological protection namely: justification, optimisation of protection and the application of dose limits. They also maintain the current individual dose limits for effective dose and equivalent dose from all regulated sources in planned exposure situations. They re-enforce the principle of optimisation of radiological protection, which applies in a similar way to all exposure situations, subject to restrictions on individual doses: constraints for planned exposure situations, and reference levels for emergency and existing exposure situations. The Recommendations also include an approach for developing a framework to demonstrate radiological protection of the environment. This report describes the different stages in the life time of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that

  13. Dose evaluation and protection of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Satoshi; Takagi, Toshiharu

    2004-01-01

    This paper explained the effects of cosmic radiation on aircraft crews and astronauts, as well as related regulations. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the practice of radiation exposure management for the handling/storage of radon and materials containing natural radioactive substances, as well as for boarding jet aircraft and space flight. Common aircraft crew members are not subject to radiation exposure management in the USA and Japan. In the EU, the limit value is 6 mSv per year, and for the crew group exceeding this value, it is recommended to keep records containing appropriate medical examination results. Pregnant female crewmembers are required to keep an abdominal surface dose within 1 mSv. For astronauts, ICRP is in the stage of thinking about exposure management. In the USA, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement has set dose limits for 30 days, 1 year, and lifetime, and recommends lifetime effective dose limits against carcinogenic risk for each gender and age group. This is the setting of the dose limits so that the risk of carcinogenesis, to which space radiation exposure is considered to contribute, will reach 3%. For cosmic radiation environments at spacecraft inside and aircraft altitude, radiation doses can be calculated for astronauts and crew members, using the calculation methods for effective dose and dose equivalent for tissue. (A.O.)

  14. Units for radiation protection work; Storheter foer straalskyddsarbete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindborg, L

    1997-06-01

    ICRU has defined special measurable (operational) quantities for radiation protection. A consequence of using the operational quantities is that hand-held and personal dosemeters can give different measuring results in the same radiation situation. The differences vary and are caused by the geometry of the radiation field. The units have well documented relations to e.g. the ICRP effective dose and equivalent dose to an organ or tissue. Therefore, it is possible to estimate these doses from a measured value of e.g. the ambient dose equivalent. ICRU and ICRP have recently reviewed these relations in two important commonly issued reports (Report 57 and Publication 74). This report tries to show the value of understanding these units and their relations and is primarily meant to be used for educational purposes. 11 refs.

  15. ICRP: Engaging with the RP profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Just as the ICRP system of radiological protection must adapt to changes in scientific understanding, social and ethical values, and practical experience, ICRP itself continues to adapt as an organisation. One aspect of the continual modernisation of ICRP is a greater emphasis on engaging with the radiological protection profession.Ten years ago, on August 8, 2004, ICRP formally began open consultation on what was then referred to as the draft “2005 Recommendations of ICRP”. As most readers will know, this was published in due course as ICRP Publication 103, “The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection” (ICRP, 2007).Being managed through the ICRP website, it opened up the possibility for anyone, anywhere, with an internet connection and an interest in radiological protection, to review the draft document and submit comments directly to ICRP.Open consultation on draft publications is but one aspect of ICRP’s efforts to become a more open and transparent organisation, and to increase engagement with the radiological protection profession. A modern arrangement for formal relations with other international organisations was established in 2012 with the objective of being more inclusive, effective, and efficient. In addition, there are efforts underway to seek the support needed to enable ICRP to broaden awareness of our recommendations, particularly in the medical field, and to increase engagement through social media and at relevant conferences, symposia, meetings, etc

  16. Board advice following publication of the 1990 Recommendations of ICRP

    CERN Document Server

    United Kingdom. At. Energy Res. Establ. Nat. Radiolog. Protect. Board. Harwell

    1991-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published new Recommendations and the board has a statutory duty to advise Government and those with responsibilities for radiation protection on the acceptability to and the applicability in the UK of those Recommendations. The Board wishes to consult widely before finalising the advice which is proposed in this document. In general, the Board endorses the conceptual framework for radiological protection recommended by ICRP. In particular, the distinction between practices and intervention is useful and is consistent with the way in which the Board has presented its recent advice. A major new concept is that of a constraint. The Board believes that the introduction of constraints provides a powerful method for improving protection against ionising radiation. The advice in this consultative document is for maximum generic values of dose constraints for both workers and the public. Finally the Board proposes to endorse the use of the radiologic...

  17. New radiobiological findings bearing on the 1977 ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Recent experiments on low-level irradiation during development raise questions relevant to ICRP Publication 26. Mice and monkeys were studied; the measured endpoint was the radiation-induced loss of female germ cells. Three issues are examined. The first is the numerical value of Q (quality factor) appropriate for low-energy beta rays. Comparisons of tritium with gamma radiation were made under conditions of chronic, low-level exposure, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was found to approach 3. Its bearing on ICRP's recommendations concerning Q applicable to tritium is discussed. Second, female germ cells in squirrel monkeys before birth were discovered to be extraordinarily radiosensitive, more easily destroyed than those of mice. If this holds for other primates too, it has radiation-protection implications hitherto overlooked. Third, the contrast between massive germ-cell loss from chronic exposure in prenatal squirrel monkeys and reported radioresistance of oocytes to acute exposure in rhesus monkeys, unless due to species difference, suggests that during development protracted irradiation may be especially injurious. This also could have important radiation-protection implications and is under investigation

  18. ICRP and UNSCEAR: Their roles in defining the most important biomedical effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.

    The history of ICRP from its origin in the British X-ray and Radiation Protection Committee (1921) to the present is described. Particular attention is directed to the evolution of occupational dose limits, which show a gradual decline, and to the perceptions of the most important effects on human beings. Recent developments in derived (or secondary) dose limits are also described. Basic to the dose limits are the risk estimates. UNSCEAR, since its establishment in 1955, has provided leadership in estimating numerically the risks of genetic defects and malignancy from exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of providing risk estimates for public education has severe limitations. (author)

  19. Organization for radiation protection. Operations of the ICRP and NCRP: 1928-1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.S.

    1979-09-01

    The protection of people against the real or possible harmful effects of ionizing radiation reflects a unique combination of efforts involving art, science, engineering and philosophy. The existence of the potential hazard was recognized within a few weeks after the discovery in November 1895, of x rays, the first form of ionizing radiation known to man. Since that early time, almost continuous attention has been directed, in varying degree, to the problem of protecting man against any harmful effects of radiation, with the result that the nature of the problem and its amelioration is probably better understood than for any other toxic agent of such great value to mankind and yet of concomitant possible great harm. Hence is is felt that many valuable lessons may be learned from a detailed understanding of the methods, strategies, mistakes, and successes involved in the development of radiation protection practices that may be usefully applied in cases of other potentially harmful agents. Throughout the development of radiation protection standards, there has been steady growth in the understanding of radiation effects but many uncertainties and important differences of interpretation yet remain. Some of these points of issue will be touched upon, but their evaluation and reconciliation will not be attempted; that is the role of a treatise on radiobiology, since the ultimate solutions bear on many areas other than radiation protection. As events have shown, certain biomedical conclusions have become accepted, within the overall knowledge of the time, only to be radically altered as new knowledge has been developed. Changes in accepted conclusions have importantly influenced the philosophy and practice of radiation protection

  20. New Croatian Act on Ionizing Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, S.

    1998-01-01

    According to the new Croatian Act on ionizing radiation protection which is in a final stage of genesis, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia is the governmental body responsible for all aspects relating sources of ionizing radiation in Croatia: practices, licenses, users, transport, in medicine and industry as well, workers with sources of ionizing radiation, emergency preparedness in radiological accidents, storage of radioactive wastes, x-ray machines and other machines producing ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in the environment. Ministry of Health is responsible to the Government of the Republic of Croatia, closely collaborating with the Croatian Radiation Protection Institute, health institution for the performance of scientific and investigation activities in the field of radiation protection. Ministry of Health is also working together with the Croatian Institute for the Occupational Health. More emphasis has been laid on recent discussion among the world leading radiation protection experts on justification of the last recommendations of the ICRP 60 publication. (author)

  1. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Zankl, Maria; Schlattl, Helmut; Bolch, Wesley E.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Hunt, John G.; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Menzel, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors. This paper briefly reviews the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures that were published jointly by ICRP and ICRU. Both these publications appeared as a consequence of the ICRP 2007 Recommendations; to implement these recommendations, the ICRP has developed reference computational phantoms representing the adult male and female. These phantoms are used to calculate reference dose conversion coefficients for external and internal sources. Using the reference phantoms and methodology consistent with the 2007 Recommendations, dose conversion coefficients for both effective doses and organ-absorbed doses for various types of idealised external exposures have been calculated. These data sets supersede the existing ICRP/ICRU data sets and expand the particle types and energy ranges. For neutrons, the new effective dose conversion coefficients become smaller compared with those in ICRP74, for energies below hundreds of keV. This is mainly

  2. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (5). Current occupational radiation exposure of the lens of the eye in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    For many Japanese radiation workers in the medical, nuclear and other industrial fields, the equivalent dose of the lens of the eye will be sufficiently lower than the new ICRP dose limit. However, the dose of the eye for medical staff members who are engaged in interventional radiology and cardiology may exceed the new ICRP dose limit, especially when they are exposed closely to higher scatter radiation for a long time. In addition, the radiation dosimetry and radiation protection for emergency and recovery workers in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) are important issues. Thus gathering information related to the radiation dose and protection for Japanese radiation workers is important to a discussion regarding implementation of the new ICRP dose limit for the lens of the eye for Japanese regulations and planning radiation dose reduction measures. In this paper, recent studies and issues regarding radiation exposure and protection in the medical, nuclear and other industrial fields, as well as for emergency and recovery workers in the FNPP1 were summarized. (author)

  3. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (original ICRP reference phantoms, it is believed that the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms properly developed will not only provide the same or similar dose values (say, difference <5 or 10%) for highly penetrating radiations, but also provide correct dose values for the weakly penetrating

  4. Protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident: the guidance of ICRP Publication 111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection provides guidance for the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies in ICRP Publication 111 (Ann. ICRP 2009, 39(3)). The prolonged exposures resulting from such events are defined as existing exposure situations and the driving principle for managing exposure situations is the optimization of protection. In conjunction with optimization, the Commission recommends the use of reference levels to restrict individual doses. To be effective, protection strategies to maintain and reduce exposure as low as reasonably achievable should include actions implemented by public authorities and private businesses, but also by the affected population itself. The process through which inhabitants living in a contaminated environment identify problems and apply their own protective actions has been named 'self-help protection' by the Commission. Such a process supposes that affected individuals are fully aware of the situation and are well informed. It is the responsibility of the authorities to establish programmes for continuous radiation monitoring, information and education of the population. The involvement of local professionals and inhabitants in the definition and implementation of protection strategies is a key factor for the sustainability of long-term rehabilitation programmes. (note)

  5. Rule concerning sanitary protection against ionizing radiations: novelties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercedo, A.; Carmena, P.; Prieto, J. A.; Rubio, G.; Sollet, E.; Sustacha, D.

    2002-01-01

    Last July the a new legal Rule concerning Sanitary Protection against Ionising Radiation was published, as a transposition of the EU Directive about the Basic Norms related to the sanitary protection of workers and population against the risks resultant of the ionising radiation. The origin of this legislation goes back to the revision of the protection doctrine by the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) en the year 1990. El scope of the revised Rule is the regulation of the protection of population and workers against ionising radiation, the establishment of the national protection system with its exposition and dose limits and the correspondent penalty regime. It also modifies the maximum radiation dose limits and reinforces the application of the optimisation principle in the use of ionising radiation. In this article, the novelties introduced by the new Rule are commented in detail, ordered by the Titles I to IX in which the Rule is divided. (Author)

  6. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  7. Future development of biological understanding of radiation protection: implications of nonstochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; McClellan, R.O.; Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-protection standards are based on minimizing or preventing biological effects in exposed populations. Radiation-induced biological effects can be classified as stochastic--malignant and hereditary diseases for which the probability of an effect occurring is a function of dose without threshold--and nonstochastic--inflammatory and degenerative diseases for which the severity and frequency of the effect varies with the dose and for which a threshold is present. The current International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) approach for setting limits for intakes of radionuclides by workers, which accounts for doses to significantly exposed organs of the body, is based on limitation of stochastic effects in most situations. When setting exposure limits, nonstochastic effects are generally considered to be unlikely at the limits for stochastic effects. In some situations, limits based on prevention of nonstochastic effects are lower than for stochastic effects. This review considers the threshold radiation doses for thyroid, bone, liver and lung and their relationship to the limits recommended by the ICRP and the cancer risks at the limits. This review indicates that the threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in thyroid and lung is much above the dose limit as advocated by ICRP. The threshold dose for nonstochastic effects in bone and liver is much closer to the dose limit, but protection from nonstochastic effects should still be afforded by the dose limits

  8. Documentation of medical findings in radiation workers in the GDR to meet the requirements of ICRP publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.R.; Neumeister, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on ICRP Publication 26, the future organization of the medical surveillance system for radiation workers in the GDR is considered in this paper. These radiation workers will also in future be medically supervised by means of pre-employment and routine examinations. It is considered necessary to have as extensive a registration as possible of information on medical examinations, working place analyses and incidents. Such data have to be collected and stored to be compared with other national and international projects (e.g. in the field of occupational health). In addition, they should permit epidemiological studies to be internationally co-ordinated. For this purpose, a documentation system has been prepared in the German Democratic Republic which is based on GDR experiences and makes it possible to specify the requirements of ICRP Publication 26. This system forms a new basis for mass examinations of occupationally exposed persons. Uniform examination methods tailored to meet the task of assuring occupational health in the GDR will be introduced. The documentation cards are meant to be used as clear-text cards suited for automatic reading by optical character recognition. The examination form consists of ten parts and comprises all details from working place situation to medical findings to laboratory results. It is felt that this new documentation system permits registration of all relevant data required for the effective radiation protection of man. On the basis of this documentation of findings, participation is scheduled in the respective international IAEA programmes and the studies proposed by the ICRP for problems of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and radiogenetics

  9. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  10. Development of Australia's radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.; Lokan, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Australia is revising its existing recommendations concerning radiation protection in the light of guidance from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Publication 60 and the International Atomic Energy Agency's revision of its Basic Safety Standards. The paper discusses the major refinements of the ICRP's recommendations and the additional guidance on its practical implementation offered by the IAEA's new Basic Safety Standards. Following public comment, the revised Australian recommendations are expected to be adopted by the end of 1994. 15 refs

  11. The translation of the new ICRP recommendations into practice: a new challenge for International Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilari, O.; Gonzalez, A.; Boutrif, E.; Hanson, G.; Borras, C.

    1992-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations have introduced several elements of novelty which may have a significant impact on the requirements and costs of radiation protection in Member countries. There is now a need for a conversion of the ICRP guidance into terms that are sufficiently practical and straightforward to facilitate their transfer into regulatory texts and operational practices at the national level. The paper discusses the strategy adopted for the revision of the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection and highlights the main issues to be considered in this work.(author)

  12. Dosimetric radiation protection quantities. Impact of the forthcoming ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.; Lee, J.I.; Kim, J.L.; Kim, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    The physical quantities namely fluence, kerma and absorbed dose provide the base for the operational and the protection quantities. The absorbed dose continues to be the fundamental physical quantity for the radiological protection. The most striking feature relating the quantities in the forthcoming recommendations is the updating of the radiation and tissue weighting factors based on the latest available scientific information on radiobiology and the physics of radiation exposure. This is bound to make a significant impact in arriving at the equivalent doses and effective dose. For external exposures of neutrons, the forthcoming recommendations are going to improve the relationship between the operational and protection quantities. The changes in the tissue weighting factors of some tissues/organs, the inclusion of several new tissues/organs for the consideration of tissue weighting factors and the use of the proposed Reference Male and Reference Female voxel phantoms would require new conversion coefficients and dose coefficients for external and internal exposures. The other striking feature appears to be the details of the concepts to ensure that the protections quantities are used for the appropriate and intended purposes only and the misuse is avoided. (author)

  13. Implications of the 1990 ICRP recommendations for the mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Significant radiological protection problems arise in the mining and processing of uranium and thorium bearing ores, beach sands and other materials that have enhanced levels of uranium (e.g. phosphate). They are at their most extreme in the underground mining of uranium. Under the new ICRP 60 occupational dose limits it may be necessary to subject virtually all mining operations to some degree of radiological surveillance. There are three principal modes of radiation exposure in uranium mining operations: gamma rays, an external whole body radiation hazard; the inhalation of radon daughter products; and the inhalation of ore dust containing the long-lived alpha emitting daughter products of uranium, principally 230Th and 226Ra. A number of the new recommendations in ICRP60 considered to have significant implications for the mining industry in general and the above mentioned issues in particular are discussed. These include the definition of occupational exposure occupational dose limit, the review of the radon dose limits, the system of radiological protection. The major conclusions and recommendation of the IAEA Technical Committee to Explore the Impact of the new ICRP Occupational Dose Limits in the operation of underground mines are also summarized. 18 refs., 1 tab

  14. Data for radiation protection and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Endo, Akira; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    Various conversion coefficients have been used in external and internal dosimetry in radiation protection practices. Radiation doses in the human body cannot be directly measured in general situation and the conversion coefficient has been used to correlate the human body dose with physical quantities such as radioactivity, particle fluence and other dosimetric quantities to be used to describe the radiation field. Fluence-to-organ dose conversion coefficients have been calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in conjunction with an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom. Neutron and photon interaction cross-section libraries are indispensable for these calculations. ICRP Publication 74 gives tables of conversion coefficients for estimation of organ doses and effective dose for photons, neutrons and electrons. Based on these results, shielding calculation parameters have been prepared for simple and easy dose estimation in radiation facilities. Dose factors, organ doses and effective dose per unit intake of radionuclide, have been also calculated for internal dosimetry purpose. ICRP Publications 68 and 72 give tables of dose factors for a variety of radionuclides. Revision of radiation data library has been made to reflect updated information on radionuclides to internal dosimetry. (author)

  15. Comments on ICRP-60 rationale for dose limits for the pregnant worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1992-06-01

    ICRP Publication 60 has recently recommended new dose limits for the radiation exposure of pregnant workers. These new dose limits for pregnant workers are more restrictive than the current limits in force in Canada. Recent presentations by Dr. R.H. Mole have faulted the arguments provided by ICRP as justification for reducing the previously recommended limits for pregnant radiation workers. The present paper provides a brief review of the development of the human conceptus, of the biological effects of low doses of radiation on the foetus, and discusses R.H. Mole's comments on ICRP-60. On the critical issues concerning the presence or absence of threshold doses for induction of specific biological endpoints, Dr. Mole and ICRP-60 appear to be in agreement. The basic disagreement between Dr. Mole and ICRP-60 seems to revolve around the philosophical question of whether dose limits should be based on quantitative risks to the foetus or whether dose limits to the pregnant worker should provide a standard of protection to the foetus which is broadly comparable with that provided for members of the general public. Further research is recommended on one of the topics raised by Dr. Mole, namely, foetal doses from radionuclides inhaled or ingested by the mother

  16. The view of the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Magnusson, S.

    2004-01-01

    The NEA's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Recently, this interest has included a very active CRPPH programme to develop ideas and suggestions that the ICRP can take into account in its work, and the CRPPH has become an active partner with the ICRP to provide the views of regulators and experts from the NEA's 28 member countries. During 2002, the ICRP Main Commission released two documents for broad stakeholder review and comment. These framework documents presented the key concepts and approaches that the ICRP was, at that time, proposing to develop into more detailed general recommendations, covering public and worker radiological protection, and the protection of non-human species. The CRPPH performed a detailed analysis of these two framework documents, focusing on the possible implications that these concepts would have should they be translated into recommendations and issued by the ICRP (NEA 2003). This work was endorsed by the NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee, and presented during the 2nd NEA/ICRP Forum, Lanzarote, Spain, in April 2003, where it was further broadly endorsed. Some key findings of this work were as follows: There is broad agreement that the ICRP should simplify, clarify and consolidate its recommendations. However, the goal of the ICRP to publish new recommendations by 2005 is seen as being ambitious, and not absolutely necessary. The ICRP will need to provide a clear and compelling justification as to why any significant changes are needed at this time. Costs, as well as legal and regulatory implications should be considered prior to the implementation of new recommendations. Several key ideas and concepts seem to be either completely new, or to have significantly evolved from their previous manifestations (in ICRP Publication and its subsequent

  17. Basic standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic standards for radiation protection have been based, for many years, on the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. The three basic standards recommended by the Commission may be summarized as ''justification, optimization of protection and adherence to dose limitations. The applications of these basic principles to different aspects of protection are briefly summarized and the particular ways in which they have been applied to waste described in more detail. The application of dose limits, both in the control of occupational exposure and in regulating routine discharges of radioactive effluents is straight forward in principle although the measurement and calculational requirements may be substantial. Secondary standards such as derived limits may be extremely useful and the principles underlying their derivation will be described. Optimization of protection is inherently a more difficult concept to apply in protection and the various techniques used will be outlined by with particular emphasis on the use of cost benefit analysis are recommended by the ICRP. A review will be given of the problems involved in extending these basic concepts of the ICRP to probabilistic analyses such as those required for assessing the consequences of accidents or disruptive events in long term repositories. The particular difficulties posed by the very long timescales involved in the assessment of waste management practices will be discussed in some detail. (orig./RW)

  18. Future issues in radiation protection: a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation protection has always been a key effectiveness area in Ontario Hydro's nuclear power program. The overall collective and individual dose performance continues to be amongst the best in the world. However, several important issues are emerging and will continue to impact the way in which the radiation protection program is managed. These include proposed reductions in regulatory dose limits based on ICRP 60, worker and public perception of an increased level of radiation risk, an increased presence of organised labour in the formulation of radiation protection policy, our philosophy of self protection coming under challenge and the impact of heavily audited radiation protection practices and programs. Each of these issues will be discussed further in this paper. The Ontario Hydro ALARA program is briefly covered although it is considered not to be a future issue but rather a principle which has been incorporated into the design and operation of our stations for many years. (author). 10 figs

  19. ICRP risk estimates - an alternative view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1987-01-01

    This criticism of the worth of the ICRP Main Commission spans 60 years, reviewed by a member of the Commission. Beginning in 1960 two serious radiation exposure problems (occupational exposure in uranium mines and population exposure from testing of nuclear weapons) came to their attention. One might have expected ICRP to be the first to try to reduce these exposures but it was conspicuous by its silence. In 1958 ICRP set limits of exposure for radiation workers and member of the public. Nineteen years later (1977) when it was realized that the risk of radiation induced cancer was ten to thirty times what it was perceived to be in 1958, ICRP might have been expected to recommend a major reduction in permissible exposure levels, but to the dismay of some it increased them. It was also a great disappointment when in 1977, levels of MPC of radionuclides in air, water and food were increased for a large fraction of the more dangerous radionuclides. The reactor accident at Chernobyl calls for a number of new ICRP recommendations. When can we expect them? (author)

  20. Radiation protection glossary. Selected basic terms used in IAEA publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation.

  1. Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In execution of the new Atomic Energy Act the Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection was put into force on 1 February 1985. It takes into account all forms of peaceful nuclear energy and ionizing radiation uses in nuclear installations, irradiation facilities and devices in research, industries, and health services, and in radioactive isotope production and laboratories. It covers all aspects of safety and protection and defines atomic safety as nuclear safety and nuclear safeguards and physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, whereas radiation protection includes the total of requirements, measures, means and methods necessary to protect man and the environment from the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. It has been based on ICRP Recommendation No. 26 and the IAEA's Basic Safety Standards and supersedes the Radiation Protection Ordinance of 1969

  2. Non-stochastic effects: compatibility with present ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.B.; Upton, A.C.; New York Univ., NY

    1985-01-01

    The present recommendations of the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) are almost entirely based on 'stochastic effects' of ionizing radiation, i.e. cancer induction and heritable effects. In a recent report the compatibility of present recommendations with non-stochastic effects has been considered. The present paper is a summary of these findings. (author)

  3. Basic safety standards for radiation protection and their application to internal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.

    Following a summary of the basic concepts on radiation protection units, the safety standards now in effect in France and those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 9, 1965) to be used as a basis to the next Euratom regulations are developed [fr

  4. Implementation of the 1990 Recommendations of ICRP in the countries of the European community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; Clarke, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published new Recommendations in ICRP Publication 60. These 1990 Recommendations provide a System of Radiological Protection that takes account of the most recent information on the effects on health of exposure to ionizing radiation and trends in the setting of safety standards. Within the European Community the Recommendations of ICRP are implemented through a Euratom Directive which is binding on Member States and which is at present being revised by the Article 31 Group and must eventually be ratified by the Council of Ministers. It is expected that the new Directive will broadly endorse the principles of protection given in the 1990 recommendations together with the dose limits for both workers and members of the public. There are likely to be some modifications to the 1990 Recommendations that are mainly related to their practical application. As it will be some time before the Directive is incorporated in national regulations a number of Member States have taken independent initiatives. The development of dose constraints for occupational, medical and public exposure is being seen by national organizations in many countries as a significant new approach to improving standards of radiation protection. (author)

  5. Towards a new radiation protection system. Report of an expert group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The regulations and the standards of national and international radiation protection are based on the recommendations published by the International Commission of radiological protection (ICRP). New recommendations, that would replace these ones edited 1990, are actually developed with a foreseen date for 2005 and it is of interest for each country member of Nea to make these recommendations take into account the need of national regulatory authorities. This report is based on a preliminary study of two years, and proposes specific improvements that would make easy the understanding and application of the system and would be considered for the compiling of new ICRP recommendations. (N.C.)

  6. Application to an Internet site in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Baum, T.P.; Spector, M.; Elgard, M.C.; Mechaly, Y.; Grainer, R.; Barritault, L.

    1997-01-01

    Training specialists in medical radiation protection is ensured by the Continuous Training Center of University Rene Descartes since 1990. The necessity of updating knowledge has urged us to develop an Internet site (http://www.citi2.fr/RADIO). Besides the mandatory functions of the educational management (secretariat, information on the stages, registrations, etc.) this site provides: 1. Practical information (addresses of administrative and technical organisms, presentation of radiation protection programs); 2. Scientific information (bibliographic bulletin of the EDF service of radiation protection, updated every two months, description of recent radiation protection works); 3. Institutional documentation (analysis of recent basic texts, ICRP publications, European directives). The interrogation of general interest asked via e-mail and forum allowing communication between experts, graduated students and the education faculty will be available on the site. The communication will be augmented by tele-formation modules for continuous distant training

  7. ICRP guidance on radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued recommendations for a system of radiological protection in 1991 as the 1990 Recommendations. Guidance on the application of these recommendations in the general area of waste disposal was issued in 1997 as Publication 77 and guidance specific to disposal of solid long-lived radioactive waste was issued as Publication 81. This paper summarises ICRP guidance in radiological protection requirements for waste disposal concentrating on the ones of relevance to the geological disposal of solid radioactive waste. Suggestions are made for areas where further work is required to apply the ICRP guidance. (author)

  8. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Zankl, M; Bolch, W E; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E; Hunt, J G; Pelliccioni, M; Schlattl, H; Menzel, H-G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors.

  9. New radiation protection concept as important safety factor of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.

    1998-01-01

    Industrial radiography is a method for non destructive testing of homogeneity of various materials based on different absorption of radiation in different material. X and γ radiation are the most often used. Detrimental effects of radiation are observed since its discovery. In order to prevent harmful effects of radiation without unduly limitations of its use, International Commission on Radiological Protection in collaboration with International Atomic Energy Agency have developed International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, Safety Series No 115, adopted in 1996. based on ICRP recommendations from 1991. Besides a lot of changes in radiation protection concept and philosophy, decrement of annual dose limits for occupational exposure from 50 to 20 mSv. (author)

  10. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  11. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kojima, Noboru; Hayashi, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  12. ICRP Publication 138: Ethical Foundations of the System of Radiological Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K-W; Cantone, M-C; Kurihara-Saio, C; Le Guen, B; Martinez, N; Oughton, D; Schneider, T; Toohey, R; ZöLzer, F

    2018-02-01

    Despite a longstanding recognition that radiological protection is not only a matter of science, but also ethics, ICRP publications have rarely addressed the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection explicitly. The purpose of this publication is to describe how the Commission has relied on ethical values, either intentionally or indirectly, in developing the system of radiological protection with the objective of presenting a coherent view of how ethics is part of this system. In so doing, it helps to clarify the inherent value judgements made in achieving the aim of the radiological protection system as underlined by the Commission in Publication 103. Although primarily addressed to the radiological protection community, this publication is also intended to address authorities, operators, workers, medical professionals, patients, the public, and its representatives (e.g. NGOs) acting in the interest of the protection of people and the environment. This publication provides the key steps concerning the scientific, ethical, and practical evolutions of the system of radiological protection since the first ICRP publication in 1928. It then describes the four core ethical values underpinning the present system: beneficence/ non-maleficence, prudence, justice, and dignity. It also discusses how these core ethical values relate to the principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and limitation. The publication finally addresses key procedural values that are required for the practical implementation of the system, focusing on accountability, transparency, and inclusiveness. The Commission sees this publication as a founding document to be elaborated further in different situations and circumstances.

  13. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowser, K.E.; Snyder, W.S.; Struxness, E.G.

    1969-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  14. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowser, K E; Snyder, W S; Struxness, E G [Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  15. Basic knowledge from legal provisions of radiation protection for staff members in radiological facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Based on ICRP recommendations the GDR legislation of radiation protection is performed by the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. The legal regulations of radiation protection in biomedical radiography and radiotherapy are specified. The main content of the atomic energy law and of the regulation on guarantee of nuclear safety and radiation protection is outlined. Basic principles such as radiation workers, operating personnel of nuclear facilities and the categories of their working conditions, areas of radiation protection and unusual events are defined. Responsibility, tasks of responsive staff members, measures of control by state and plant, guarantee of radiation protection, limitation of radiation doses and last not least regulations of sentences and fines, resp., are specified

  16. The new ICRP general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Ch.; Kosako, T.; Kuniyoshi, H.; Kiryu, Y.; Choi, H.S.; Burns, P.A.; Pan, Z.Q.; Xia, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory views from Japan, South Korea, Australia, China and Indonesia were explained based on their regional context. Some issues, for example 'optimisation', 'dose constrains', 'natural radioactivity', were addressed from the viewpoint of how each country's current regulation system would adopt these new recommendations. It was noted that there would be a need for some flexibility in applying these new recommendations since different countries have different regulatory criteria and benchmarks as well different decision-making processes. It was also noted that definitions and terminologies should be given serious consideration with regard to non-English speaking countries to assure that the new ICRP recommendations are clearly understood, not misinterpreted, easily translated and finally applied in the field of radiation protection. In addition, some recent radiation protection activities, as well as views on utilisation of nuclear power in several countries were presented. (authors)

  17. Radiation protection training courses for physicians. 5. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    The material for the basic course has been reviewed and updated in response to the 1987 amendment of the X-ray Ordinance and the 1989 amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, and also takes into account the related directives and recommendations, including the ICRP recommendations published in 1990. The main subjects covered by the basic course are: (1) Fundamentals of radiation physics. (2) Fundamentals of radiobiology, genetic effects. (3) Basic principles of radiation protection. (4) Principles and concepts of dosimetry. (5) Natural and man-made radiation exposure. (6) Radiation accident management. (7) International and national legislation and sub-ordinate legislation. (8) Quality assurance and quality testing. (9) Tasks of the radiological safety officer. (10) Exercises and new units and quantities. (HP) [de

  18. Potential impact of ICRP-30 on the calculated risk from waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the large body of information that has been gathered since ICRP-2 was published (1959), the ICRP has undertaken the task of updating its radiation protection guidance. This update involves revision of the primary radiation guidance as well as the recalculation of intake limits (ICRP-30) based on update biological models, updated nuclide decay schemes, and a new method accounting for simultaneous dose to more than one organ. A detailed analysis of the impacts of ICRP-30 on waste repository safety and risk analyses would require an extensive and detailed study that has not yet been undertaken. Nevertheless, it is possible to identify, in an approximate manner, the impact of using ICRP-30 instead of 10 CFR 20/ICRP-2 in calculating the risk from radioactive repositories. Toward this end, the numerical guidance of ICRP-30 has been obtained and converted into RCG values for the general public using the same methods that were employed in deriving 10 CFR 20. The conversion was cross-checked by comparing 10 CFR 20 and ICRP-30-based values that were known to have remained the same. The most restrictive ICRP-30 RCGs were incorporated into the ORIGEN2 computer code, which was then used to calculate the toxicity of some radioactive materials of interest in waste repository considerations. As a basis for discussion, the toxicities of the spent fuel from a PWR and of the uranium ore required to make the fuel are given for both the 10 CFR 20 and ICRP-30-based RCGs. As is evident, the use of the revised RCGs reduces the toxicity of the spent fuel at times less than 100 years and increases the toxicity at times thereafter

  19. International recommendations[General radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, Bo [Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection (Sweden)

    1986-07-01

    Full text: This short presentation will indicate the general radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances. A number of international organizations are involved in various aspects of radiation protection, for example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Two international organizations, however, provide the basic background. These are the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). UNSCEAR provides the scientific information on radiation levels and effects. It consists of 21 member countries, with truly international coverage. It issues reports to the UN General Assembly, including comprehensive scientific annexes. Its latest comprehensive report was issued in 1982, the next is expected to be published in 1988. That report will include an assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The ICRP is a non-governmental organization. It has issued recommendations on radiation protection since 1928. The postulated biological basis for radiation protection recommendations involves two types of biological effects. The so-called non-stochastic effects, mainly due to cell death, appear only when the radiation doses exceed a certain threshold value. These effects, therefore, can only appear after high accidental exposures. After the Chernobyl accident, they only affected about 200 individuals involved in fire extinction and rescue work at the damaged nuclear power plant. Stochastic effects, with some simplification, may be seen as the result of initial changes in the genetic code of some surviving cells. If these cells are germ cells, this may lead to hereditary harm. If they are somatic cells, the result could be cancer

  20. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  1. Optimization and radiation protection culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, In Young; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Chan Mi [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Safety culture or radiation protection culture is based in common on the term, 'culture'. Culture is defined as the learned, shared set of symbols and patterns of basic assumptions, which is invented, discovered, or developed by a given group as it learns to cope with its problem of external adaptation and internal integration. Safety culture generally refers to the attitude and behaviors affecting safety performance. The concept of 'Safety Culture' was introduced after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For the accident, nuclear society reached the conclusion that the cause was the wrong management attitude of the NPP, that is, deficient 'Safety Culture'. Recently, 'Radiation Protection Culture' was introduced as the core concept of nuclear safety culture. There have been many efforts to establish definition and develop assessment tool for radiation protection culture in international level such as ICRP and IRPA as well as NRC. In the same context with the safety culture, radiation protection culture is defined as 'the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individual's to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.' It is worthwhile to recognize that regulatory enforcement in establishing healthy radiation protection culture of operators should be minimized because culture is not in the domain of regulatory enforcement. However, as 'ALARA', the most important concept in radiation protection, may be successfully achieved only in well established radiation protection culture, the least regulatory intervention would be needed in promoting and nurturing radiation protection culture in licensee. In addition, the concept of radiation protection culture should be addressed in plant operational policy to achieve the goals of ALARA. The pre-condition of the successful radiation protection culture is a healthy organizational

  2. protection against radon at home and at work; recommendations of the Israel national advisory committee on radiation protection and their practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Margaliot, M.

    1997-01-01

    Existing legislation in Israel related to protection of the worker and the public from ionizing radiation excludes certain natural radiation sources from control by national authorities. Among these sources are radon and radon daughters. Employers are not required, by law to intervene in order to reduce radon levels in the working place, even when these levels exceed the action levels recommended by the ICRP or by the International Basic Safety Standards for protection Against Ionizing radiation. The Israel National Advisory Committee for radiation protection - INACRP (appointed by the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health) recommended, in 1993, to rectify this lack and proposed that the above two ministers issue guidelines for protecting the public and the worker from hazards of radon and radon daughters. The proposed guidelines are based on recent 1993 recommendations of the ICRP related to Radon at Home and at Work.The guidelines establish activity concentration levels, in homes and at work premises, above which remedial actions are recommended, and specify a time-table for these actions, depending on the extent to which the activity concentrations in the building exceed the remedial action levels specified. (authors)

  3. Report of ICRP Task Group 80: 'radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W

    2012-01-01

    The report of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group 80 entitled 'Radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste' updates and consolidates previous ICRP recommendations related to solid waste disposal (ICRP Publications 46, 77, and 81). The recommendations given in this report apply specifically to geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report explains how the 2007 system of radiological protection, described in ICRP Publication 103, can be applied in the context of the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste. The report is written as a self-standing document. It describes the different stages in the lifetime of a geological disposal facility, and addresses the application of relevant radiological protection principles for each stage depending on the various exposure situations that can be encountered. In particular, the crucial factor that influences application of the protection system over the different phases in the lifetime of a disposal facility is the level of oversight that is present. The level of oversight affects the capability to reduce or avoid exposures. Three main time frames have to be considered for the purpose of radiological protection: time of direct oversight when the disposal facility is being implemented and active oversight is taking place; time of indirect oversight when the disposal facility is sealed and indirect oversight is being exercised to provide additional assurance on behalf of the population; and time of no oversight when oversight is no longer exercised because memory is lost. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The evolution of the international system of radiological protection: stakeholder views from the 1st and 2nd NEA/ICRP fora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Ted

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA's) Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has collaborated closely with the ICRP in its efforts to develop new recommendations for radiological protection at the start of the 21st century. As part of this effort, the NEA organised, in collaboration with the ICRP, two fora to discuss the radiological protection of the environment (Taormina, February 2002) and the future policy for radiological protection (Lanzarote, April 2003). Both these meetings were attended by a broad representation of stakeholders. The CRPPH and other stakeholders universally appreciated the opportunity to speak directly with the ICRP on these important subjects. This report summarises the main conclusions made during these two meetings to advance the deliberations of the ICRP to create a new set of recommendations responsive to stakeholder needs, firmly rooted in science, and that can be implemented in a timely, efficient and cost-effective manner. (memorandum)

  5. How to understand the radiation effects of small dose - some critical comments on ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.

    1997-01-01

    The widespread feeling of 'radiophobia' by the general public has its basis on the ICRP's 'linear no-threshold' hypothesis in dose-response relationship for low dose radiation from the standpoint of radiation protection. Although this common feeling served as a merit for constructing the 'safety culture' of society, it has now become a large obstacle for the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology as a demerit. Recently many data have been accumulated for the radiation effects of low dose, both epidemiologically and experimentally. Although in general it is very difficult to obtain clear evidence of presence or absence of threshold, it seems to be true that the risk by radiation exposure at low level (the definition of which is below 0.2 Gy) is not so large as that of extrapolation from the high or medium dose range. In fact, many data suggest that some quite different mechanisms are working in low dose from high dose, such as 'adaptive response', and a new concept, 'radiation hormesis', has emerged, that the low level radiation is not only quite harmless but is rather necessary for living cells or beneficial for human health. In this paper, some critical comments on ICRP recommendations are given as a personal view by the author. These include: (1) a question of exact assessment of exposed dose by A-bomb survivors used for the epidemiological data, which are regarded to be the most authentic and important; (2) a brief summary of effects at the natural radiation level, including the high background area data; (3) the importance of dose rate effect, which reflects the living matter's repairability from radiation injury, and (4) the proposal of new paradigm by adopting the reasonable 'de minimis' level (below which there is no harm) both for low dose and at low dose rate. A simple mathematical analysis for representative data of dose rate effect was shown as an appendix

  6. The reference individual of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Cristy, M.

    1995-01-01

    The 70-kg open-quotes standard manclose quotes representing a typical Western adult male has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s. In 1949 at the Chalk River conference, health physicists from the U.S., UK, and Canada agreed on the concept of a standard man to facilitate comparison of internal dose estimates. The 70-kg standard man included specifications of the masses of 25 organs and tissues, total body content of 15 elements, total water intake and output, water content of the body, and some anatomical and physiological data for the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. In 1959, in its Publication 2 2 on permissible doses for internal radiation the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) modified standard man. In 1963 the ICRP established a task group to revise and extend the standard man concept. The name was changed later to Reference Man and the task group's work was published in 1975 as ICRP Publication 23 3 . Publication 23 similar to Publication 2, updates and documents the sources of the data. Data on women, children, and fetuses were also collected, where available, but these data were limited primarily to anatomical data and only a few reference values were established for these groups. Information assembled during the course of the effort on the Reference Man report was used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to construct a mathematical representation of the body (a phantom) that was suitable for use with Monte Carlo methods in the calculation of organ doses. That effort was undertaken to improve estimates of dose from photon-emitting radionuclides residing within organs, so-called internal emitters. The phantom, although updated throughout the years, remains today as the basis for organ dose estimates in nuclear medicine and radiation protection and underlies the radiation risk data derived from the epidemiologic studies of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  7. The role of the international radiation protection association in development and implementation of radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.; Lochard, J.; Webb, G.

    2002-01-01

    The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) is an affiliation of national and regional professional societies. Its individual membership is approaching some 20 000 professionals from 42 societies and covering 50 countries. Its primary objective is to provide a platform for collaboration between members of its affiliate societies to further radiation protection and safety. The IRPA is mandated to promote and facilitate the establishment of radiation protection societies, support international meetings and to encourage international publications, research and education and the establishment and review of standards. Through its membership base and its observer status on bodies such as the ICRP and the safety standards committees of the IAEA, the IRPA is in a position to provide valuable input to the safety standards development process. This factor has been increasingly recognised more recently within the IRPA and the various organisations involved in the development of safety standards. This paper addresses the mechanisms that have been established to enhance the input of the IRPA into the safety standards development process and for their subsequent implementation. (author)

  8. Radiation protection aspects of waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1992-01-01

    Waste disposal, particularly of high level waste and some alpha-waste, involves very long times of isolation from the biosphere. The basic radiation protection requirements of 'optimisation of protection' and 'limitation of individual risk' must be complemented with policy decisions regarding the level of ambition of protection for future individuals and populations. Decisions are also necessary for the risk assessments applicable to different time periods. These assessments include considerable uncertainty and determinations of compliance with regulatory requirements must contemplate a policy for taking account of such uncertainties. The paper deals with 'normal' scenarios and with disruptive events as mechanisms for the return of nuclides to the biosphere, in the framework of the Recommendations of the ICRP. (author)

  9. The evolution of the international system of radiological protection: stakeholder views from the 1st and 2nd NEA/ICRP fora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, Ted [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, Boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2003-12-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA's) Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has collaborated closely with the ICRP in its efforts to develop new recommendations for radiological protection at the start of the 21st century. As part of this effort, the NEA organised, in collaboration with the ICRP, two fora to discuss the radiological protection of the environment (Taormina, February 2002) and the future policy for radiological protection (Lanzarote, April 2003). Both these meetings were attended by a broad representation of stakeholders. The CRPPH and other stakeholders universally appreciated the opportunity to speak directly with the ICRP on these important subjects. This report summarises the main conclusions made during these two meetings to advance the deliberations of the ICRP to create a new set of recommendations responsive to stakeholder needs, firmly rooted in science, and that can be implemented in a timely, efficient and cost-effective manner. (memorandum)

  10. The work of ICRP Committee 1 on radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rëhm, W.

    2018-01-01

    Among the four ICRP Committees, Committee 1 deals with the effects of ionizing radiation. For example, this committee considers the risks and mechanisms of induction of cancer and heritable disease; discusses the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects; and reviews effects of ionizing radiation on non-human biota on a population level. The present paper gives an overview on the recent activities of the committee including the last meetings in Chennai, India, in 2016, and in Paris, France, in 2017. The paper also discusses briefly the focus of the currently active C1 Task Groups on alpha emitters, low-dose and low-dose-rate effects, and detriment calculation methodology

  11. A regulatory perspective on whether the system of radiation protection is fit for purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The system of radiation protection has its origins in the early efforts to protect people from x rays and radium. It was at the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928 where the first radiation protection recommendations were adopted. The system of protection steadily evolved as new sources of exposure arose and understanding of radiation-related health risks improved. Safeguarding against these risks has required regulators to set enforceable (i.e. measurable) standards. From erythema dose to tolerance dose, critical organ dose to effective dose equivalent, and now effective dose, the units used to set these limits have evolved along with the science underpinning them. Similarly, the definition of the person or group being protected has changed – from Standard Man to Reference Man to Reference Person, with age and gender differences now considered explicitly. As regulators look towards implementing the changes in the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there remain questions about how to translate an optimisation-based system of constraints and reference levels into the more familiar regime of enforceable limits. Nevertheless, as the new ICRP Recommendations are refinements of a system that did the job it was designed to do more than adequately, so too will the new system of radiation protection be fit for purpose.

  12. An introduction to the Ethical Foundations of the Radiation Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Jacques Lochard reminded participants about the long tradition of the system of radiological protection to combine science and values. He also reminded the background of the ICRP initiative on ethics, from the establishment of a Working Party in 2009 to the recent creation of Task Group (TG 94) through the workshop in Daejeon, Korea, in August 2013. The objective of ICRP TG 94 is to develop a publication referring to the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection recommended by the Commission. The presentation went on by presenting the importance of value judgements in the structuration of the scientific basis on the system and how models, default options and expert judgments are necessary to cope with the various uncertainties associated with radiological risk. Among the structuring values, the old ethical virtue of prudence is playing a key role by allowing the system to drive affectively the daily activities in radiation protection in the absence of a full knowledge of the risk associated to radiation. Benevolence, justice and equity were also presented as ethical and social values underlying the system of protection and a special attention was given on the value of dignity, as an attribute of the human condition, with autonomy as a corollary. Autonomy, in turn, implies freedom and the ability to deliberate, decide and act. Even if the word dignity is not present in ICRP Recommendations, the radiological protection system is promoting dignity through a set of requirements like the duty of informing stakeholders, the right to know and informed consent principles or the encouragement of self-help protection actions. These elements of the system are, closely related to the process of stakeholder engagement to promote their empowerment and autonomy, maintain their vigilance and finally contributing to the development of the radiation protection culture within the society. Overall the presentation emphasises the importance of making explicit the

  13. The view of the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, T.; Magnusson, S.

    2004-07-01

    The NEA's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Recently, this interest has included a very active CRPPH programme to develop ideas and suggestions that the ICRP can take into account in its work, and the CRPPH has become an active partner with the ICRP to provide the views of regulators and experts from the NEA's 28 member countries. During 2002, the ICRP Main Commission released two documents for broad stakeholder review and comment. These framework documents presented the key concepts and approaches that the ICRP was, at that time, proposing to develop into more detailed general recommendations, covering public and worker radiological protection, and the protection of non-human species. The CRPPH performed a detailed analysis of these two framework documents, focusing on the possible implications that these concepts would have should they be translated into recommendations and issued by the ICRP (NEA 2003). This work was endorsed by the NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee, and presented during the 2nd NEA/ICRP Forum, Lanzarote, Spain, in April 2003, where it was further broadly endorsed. Some key findings of this work were as follows: There is broad agreement that the ICRP should simplify, clarify and consolidate its recommendations. However, the goal of the ICRP to publish new recommendations by 2005 is seen as being ambitious, and not absolutely necessary. The ICRP will need to provide a clear and compelling justification as to why any significant changes are needed at this time. Costs, as well as legal and regulatory implications should be considered prior to the implementation of new recommendations. Several key ideas and concepts seem to be either completely new, or to have significantly evolved from their previous manifestations (in ICRP Publication and its

  14. Discussion on several problems in evolution of radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziqiang, P.

    2004-01-01

    As viewed from the standpoint of radiation protection practice, it is necessary that the current system of radiological protection should be made more simple and coherent. The human-based protective measures alone are far from having met the requirements of environmental protection in many circumstances. Protecting the environment from ionising radiation would be implicated in radiation protection. Collective dose is an useful indicator, of which applicable extent should be defined. Using such an quantity could help improve radiation protection level, but applicable conditions should be indicated, temporal or spatial. Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the radiation exposure of human. Occupational exposure from natural radiation should be controlled, for occupations such as underground miners and air crew. Controlling both man-made and natural radiation exposure of pregnant women and children needs to be enhanced, especially radiological diagnosis and treatment. China radiation protection community, as a whole, is paying considerable attention to the ICRP's new Recommendations. Prof. Clarke's article 'A Report on Progress towards New Recommendations', a communication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, has been translated into Chinese and published on Radiation Protection, the Official Journal of China Radiation Protection Society with a view of intensifying awareness of the new Recommendations within more radiation protection workers and people concerned. In addition, a special meeting was convened in early 2002 to address the comments on the new Recommendations. (author)

  15. Ethical issues in radiation protection. Sievert lecture 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silini, Giovanni

    1992-09-01

    Present radiation protection doctrine (ICRP 1990) is based on a body of scientific knowledge, one underlying assumption and three general principles. My objective is to discuss first the adequacy of the existing scientific information for the purpose of setting safety standards; then to consider the foundation of the underlying assumption; and finally, to discuss a few aspects of the general principles in the light of ethical considerations.

  16. Ethical issues in radiation protection. Sievert lecture 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silini, Giovanni

    1992-09-01

    Present radiation protection doctrine (ICRP 1990) is based on a body of scientific knowledge, one underlying assumption and three general principles. My objective is to discuss first the adequacy of the existing scientific information for the purpose of setting safety standards; then to consider the foundation of the underlying assumption; and finally, to discuss a few aspects of the general principles in the light of ethical considerations

  17. Experience in the application of the new ICRP recommendations in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.; Bojtor, I.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the introduction of nuclear power in Hungary and the increasing use of radioactive substances and other sources of ionizing radiation for industrial, medical and research purposes, comprehensive legislation on the use of atomic energy has recently been introduced. An Atomic Energy Act was passed by Parliament, the supreme legislative body of the country, in 1980. Accompanying this, an enacting clause was issued by the Council of Ministers, and several ministerial orders were published subsequently on particular rules and regulations for atomic energy applications. In preparing this legislation, the new principles and recommendations of the ICRP on radiation protection were taken into consideration as much as possible. The basic principles of radiation protection, including justification of the proposed operation or practice, reduction of any necessary exposure to a level as low as is reasonably achievable, and limitation of dose to individuals to the values recommended by the ICRP have been adopted and incorporated into the text of the Act. Disagreement has been found, however, when the balancing of costs and benefits as well as the acceptability of the level of risk were proposed for inclusion. In the latter question some professional objections have also been encountered. Limitation of individual monitoring and assessment of dose to workers designated to work in Condition A, as recommended by the ICRP, seems to involve a risk that a major proportion of ''overexposures'', i.e. exposures exceeding the investigation level, remains undiscovered. (author)

  18. The dose limits in radiation protection: foundations and evolution perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this article is devoted to the evolution of dose limits in radiation protection since 1928. The second part tackles the difficulties to whom the ICRP system of limitation collides with. The notions of dose limits, ALARA principle are explained and the concept of dose constraints is introduced. (N.C.)

  19. Europe's contribution to implementation of a radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    What is commonly referred to as a radiation protection system is a range of scientific considerations, principles and rules, the aim of which is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection of individuals and the environment against the harmful effects of exposure to ionising radiation, without excessively limiting desirable human activities which can be associated with such exposure (see ICRP Publication 103). This system is essentially based on an international consensus. The European level only concerns the Member States of the Union but it is crucial that it constitute the final, legally binding step prior to the definition of national regulations. The European radiation protection system (the EURATOM Treaty and its derived legislation) is presented below, not from the legal perspective but from a contextual viewpoint. Research activities are not discussed here. (author)

  20. Accidents and emergency conditions: Tasks of the radiation protection expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews and explains the tasks of the radiation protection expert at a given site in the event of accidents or emergencies involving a radiation hazard to the personnel. The various measures recommended discriminate between the main two types of hazards, namely external radiation or internal radiation. The paper discusses the first-aid and emergency measures recommended in various publications (BG, 1982; ICRP, 1980; MO, 1972; ME, 1980) and also cites recommendations contained therein, referring to preventive means and measures and to communications to the press and the general public. (DG) [de

  1. Some methodologies for the optimization of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Uzzan, G.

    1979-01-01

    Optimization of radiation protection in the nuclear power sector calls for decision-making studies with a view to elucidating the balance between expenditure on protection and health risks. The quantitative methods used for reaching such decisions are numerous and the cost-benefit analysis suggested by the ICRP is only one example. Others are cost-effectiveness analysis, multi-attribute analysis, utility functions and so on. The paper summarizes the principles of these different methods and describes the different aspects of a decision study as well as the manner in which they are interrelated. It emerges that optimization, or rather rationalization, of radiation protection options can be approached via many different quantitative methods, some of which differ appreciably from cost-benefit analysis. An exploratory investigation of these methods in particular decision-making contexts may in the future show some to be superior to others and better suited to general use in radiation protection. (author)

  2. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalaksh Shenoy, K.

    2013-01-01

    Three main pillars underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security - The IAEA helps countries to upgrade their infrastructure for nuclear and radiation safety and security, and to prepare for and respond to emergencies. Work is keyed to international conventions, the development of international standards and the application of these standards. The aim is to protect people and the environment from the harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Science and Technology - The IAEA is the world's focal point for mobilizing peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology for critical needs in developing countries. The work contributes to alleviating poverty, combating disease and pollution of the environment and to other goals of sustainable development. Safeguards and Verification - The IAEA is the nuclear inspectorate, with more than four decades of verification experience. Inspectors work to verify that nuclear material and activities are not diverted towards military purposes. Quantities and Units: Dose equivalent is the product of absorbed dose of radiation and quality factor (Q). For absorbed dose in rads, dose equivalent is in rems. If absorbed dose is in gray, the dose equivalent is in sievert. Quality factor is defined without reference to any particular biological end point. Quality factors are recommended by committees such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) or the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), based on experimental RBE values but with some judgment exercised. Effective Dose Equivalent: It is the sum of the weighted dose equivalents for all irradiated tissues, in which the weighting factors represent the different risks of each tissue to mortality from cancer and hereditary effects. Committed dose equivalent: It is the integral over 50 years of dose equivalent following the intake of a radionuclide. Collective effective dose equivalent: It is a quantity for a population and is

  3. Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values ICRP Publication 89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents detailed information on age- and gender-related differences in the anatomical and physiological characteristics of reference individuals. These reference values provide needed input to prospective dosimetry calculations for radiation protection purposes for both workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and unify in one publication, important new information on reference anatomical and physiological values that has become available since Publication 23 was published by the ICRP in 1975. There are two aspects of this work. The first is to revise and extend the information in Publication 23 as appropriate. The second is to provide additional information on individual variation among grossly normal individuals resulting from differences in age, gender, race, or other factors. This publication collects, unifies, and expands the updated ICRP reference values for the purpose of providing a comprehensive and consistent set of age- and gender-specific reference values for anatomical and physiological features of the human body pertinent to radiation dosimetry. The reference values given in this report are based on: (a) anatomical and physiological information not published before by the ICRP; (b) recent ICRP publications containing reference value information; and (c) information in Publication 23 that is still considered valid and appropriate for radiation protection purposes. Moving from the past emphasis on 'Reference Man', the new report presents a series of reference values for both male and female subjects of six different ages: newborn, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years, and adult. In selecting reference values, the Commission has used data on Western Europeans and North Americans because these populations have been well studied with respect to anatomy, body composition, and physiology. When appropriate, comparisons are made between the chosen reference values and data from several Asian

  4. Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values ICRP Publication 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, J

    2002-12-01

    This report presents detailed information on age- and gender-related differences in the anatomical and physiological characteristics of reference individuals. These reference values provide needed input to prospective dosimetry calculations for radiation protection purposes for both workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and unify in one publication, important new information on reference anatomical and physiological values that has become available since Publication 23 was published by the ICRP in 1975. There are two aspects of this work. The first is to revise and extend the information in Publication 23 as appropriate. The second is to provide additional information on individual variation among grossly normal individuals resulting from differences in age, gender, race, or other factors. This publication collects, unifies, and expands the updated ICRP reference values for the purpose of providing a comprehensive and consistent set of age- and gender-specific reference values for anatomical and physiological features of the human body pertinent to radiation dosimetry. The reference values given in this report are based on: (a) anatomical and physiological information not published before by the ICRP; (b) recent ICRP publications containing reference value information; and (c) information in Publication 23 that is still considered valid and appropriate for radiation protection purposes. Moving from the past emphasis on 'Reference Man', the new report presents a series of reference values for both male and female subjects of six different ages: newborn, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years, and adult. In selecting reference values, the Commission has used data on Western Europeans and North Americans because these populations have been well studied with respect to anatomy, body composition, and physiology. When appropriate, comparisons are made between the chosen reference values and data from several Asian

  5. Explanation of ICRP publication 81 in consideration of geologic disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection which has published various recommendations on the radiation protection describes the system of radiation protection on the disposal of radioactive waste in Publication 46, 77 and 81. Especially, Publication 81, Radiation Protection Recommendations as Applied to the Disposal of Long-lived Solid Radioactive Waste, was published in order to supplement, update and clarify the material in Publication 46 published in 1985 in consideration of the recent international progress in the disposal of radioactive waste. At present, the study is in progress to materialize the concept and the safety regulation of geologic disposal in Japan, and it is important to reflect appropriately these international publications. This paper explains each paragraph in Publication 81 in order to understand the system of radiation protection on the geologic disposal fully and concretely, paying attention to the mutual relationship among each paragraph, the development of ICRP recommendations and the relationship to other publications. (author)

  6. Protection from potential exposures: application to selected radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This ICRP Report begins with the general principles of radiation protection in the case of potential exposures, followed by special issues in application and compliance with regulatory aims. The rest of the report uses event trees or fault trees to derive the logical structure of six scenarios of potential exposure, i.e. two irradiators, a large research accelerator, an accelerator for industrial isotope production, an industrial radiography device using a mobile source of radiation, and finally a medical gamma radiotherapy device. (UK)

  7. Key issues concerning changes in the radiological protection system: some thoughts from the French Society for Radiation Protection (SFRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Cordoliani, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the International Radiological Protection Association (IRPA) asked for contributions to the debate on future changes to the radiological protection system proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In response, the Board of the French Society for Radiation Protection (SFRP) created a working group to deal specifically with this issue. It met on several occasions between April and July and its findings were presented at the IRPA Congress in May 2000. They were also published in the French journal Radioprotection and in the British Journal of Radiological Protection. To further its discussions, the Board of the SFRP decided to create a second working group which became operational in September 2001. It has around 20 members representing the major players in the radiological protection field in France: authorities, experts and professionals from the nuclear, medical and research fields as well as one association representative (the list of members can be found at the end of this document). The working group was set up to produce proposals relating to the key issues likely to be raised, particularly by the ICRP, concerning the development of new radiological protection recommendations. The members of the working group analysed the ICRP memorandum published in the June 2001 edition of the Journal of Radiological Protection and used their own experience to determine what these key issues would be. The following issues were discussed: General thoughts on the new radiological protection system proposed by the ICRP, Individual and collective approaches to the radiological risk, Comparison with chemical risk management, Radiological protection of the environment, Changes in exposure levels and units of measurement. This paper, which has been approved by the Board of the SFRP, gives the main conclusions of the working group on the key issues in these areas. It is intended to reflect the various opinions expressed during the groups

  8. Expert knowledge in radiation protection. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spang, A.

    1990-01-01

    This revised version of the first edition, which was published in 1983, incorporates the full scale of developments and changes made since then, as e.g.: the new Radiation Protection Ordinance, which introduces the concept and definition of effective dose, ED, and limits the maximum permissible occupational exposure to 400 mSv. Changes have become effective for instance in the transport regulations, in the regulations for radioactive waste delivery and collection, in the field of health physics, and with regard to activities under outside contract; b) the EURATOM basic standards and the new SI units: Becquerel and Sievert have replaced Curie and Rem; c) a number of ICRP recommendations, events and scientific results, which frequently make radiation protection more plausible, or sometimes even necessary; d) the new DIN standards and BMU regulations, which also are a valuable source of reference for the radiation protection officer. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Risk concepts in various fields including radiation protection. A historical review and some recent topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki

    2000-01-01

    This is a review by the expert group concerning risks in radiation protection and in chemical management, recent state of protection and of health-risk assessment of low dose radiation, and risk concepts in other fields. Risk concepts in radiation protection are described mainly on ICRP: Its history leading to its Publication 1 (1958), Pub. 9 (1965), Pub. 26 (1977) and Pub. 60 (1990). In that recent publication, the term, risk, is used only for the established one like estimated risk or excess relative risk. Risk management of chemicals involves that against pollution from environmental and ecological aspects, and assessment of dioxin and chemicals from toxicology and carcinogenicity aspects. Recently, risks of low dose radiation have been actively discussed conceivably because of possible reduction of the exposure limit in ICRP Recommendation 1990, Chernobyl accident, advances of radiation biology and radiation protection problem in the radioactive waste disposition. Globally, many academic societies such as American Health-Physics Society published Position Statements and Reports and there are activities like the Research program plan for the risk and an international conference of bridging radiation policy and science. Risk concepts involve technological and ecological ones, insurance ones and health ones. Risk assessment or analysis is done through recognition, measurement and prediction, thus through the scientific process based on objective facts. (K.H.)

  10. ICRP path forward to the next recommendations. WNA (World Nuclear Association) preliminary views on the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) proposed profound changes to the current RP system and on continuing to build an international consensus towards an improved proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    For several years, international policy on radiological protection has been under discussion with a view to a significant revision (recently delayed until 2006-2007). The focal point of this discussion has been an evolving draft proposal of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The ICRP's seminal role in its field is well-known. Generally, ICRP recommendations are translated into the international and national standards that govern industry operations worldwide. (author)

  11. Internal dosimetry data and methods of ICRP. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.R.; Bernard, S.R.; Dillman, L.T.; Watson, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology being used to update the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report of Committee 2, ICRP Publication 2 on Permissible Dose for Internal Radiation, is described. The system of differential equations, which is used to calculate the cumulated activity in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, other body organs, and the transfer compartment of reference man, is presented. These equations describe the physical decay and metabolism of a radionuclide as governed by the lung and gastrointestinal tract models adopted by Committee 2 from models developed for the ICRP. The equations also take into account organ uptake and retention following intake into blood and the contribution of activity from radioactive daughter nuclides. Additionally, the scheme for estimating the dose from immersion in a radioactive cloud and the scheme for computing the nuclear decay data needed for all of the dose computations are presented. In computing the immersion dose, estimates for both the infinite and the finite cloud are considered

  12. A regulatory view on the applicability of the new ICRP recommendations to nuclear safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Gomez, E.; Naegelin, R.; Vuorinen, A.P.U.

    1991-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations will cause several changes in the radiological practice. This paper discusses these changes from the point of regulatory view of nuclear safety. To avoid adverse short-term effects, the new risk estimates should be adopted in radiation protection standards with great care. The ultimate objective of nuclear safety is to protect people environment and property against radiological hazards. Improvements in principles and practices developed by the ICRP are important in reaching the primary goal. A severe nuclear accident must be prevented in advance. Every scientific and technical means have to used; optimization is not the solution of the problem

  13. The recommendations of ICRP Publication 111 in the light of the ICRP dialogue initiative in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochard, J

    2016-12-01

    Publication 111, published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 2009, provided the first recommendations for dealing with the long-term recovery phase after a nuclear accident. Its focus is on the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident, drawing on the experience of the Belarus population, Cumbrian sheep farmers in the UK, and Sami reindeer herders in Norway affected by the fallout from Chernobyl. The ICRP dialogue initiative in Fukushima confirmed what had been identified after Chernobyl, namely the very strong concern for health, particularly that of children, loss of control over everyday life, apprehension about the future, disintegration of family life and of the social and economic fabric, and the threat to the autonomy and dignity of affected people. Through their testimonies and reflections, the participants of the 12 dialogue meetings shed light on this complex situation. The ICRP dialogue initiative also confirmed that the wellbeing of the affected people is at stake, and radiological protection must focus on rehabilitation of their living conditions. The challenge is to incorporate the important clarifications resulting from the ICRP dialogue initiative into the updated version of Publication 111 that is currently in development. This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  14. The current state of science in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1985-01-01

    The qualification 'according to the current state of science and technology' is regularly found in radiation protection laws. It is assumed that the state of science and technology is codified in the publications of ICRP and ICRU, the International Comissions on Radiological Protection and - Units respectively, and in the UN publication USCEAR. An investigation is made on the extent the regulations of FRD comply with this requirement. Stochastic and non-stochastic damages are differentiated and the problem of assigning equivalent whole-body doses to exposures of specific body organs is considered. (G.Q.)

  15. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2016-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  16. International movement on radiation safety related to the ICRP and the IAEA-RADWASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso

    1994-01-01

    Nowadays discussion on Radiation Safety has a spread of world wide range. The main framework on radiation safety was constructed by ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), which was established in 1928. This term of the committee was from June 1993 to May 1997 and the first plenary meeting was held at the Queen's hotel in Bournemouth of the United Kingdom on September 1993. The outline of this meeting, especially related items to the Committee 4, were summarized in this paper. The second point of our workshop considerations is radioactive waste problems, which are now under discussion in RADWASS (Radioactive Waste Safety Standards) project of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). This IAEA-RADWASS will last nearly 10 years to cover whole subjects. These discussed items are arranged into various international standards; the safety fundamental, the safety standards, the safety guides and the safety practices. These systematic approach, if we could summarize, would be effective not only to the specialists but also to a general public to get an acceptance of radioactive waste problem. Here, this IAEA-RADWASS project is reviewed. (author)

  17. Radiation risk and radiation protection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1989-01-01

    The revised dosimetry for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki implies an increased risk from low LET radiation compared with that currently used. During its meeting in 1987 the ICRP stated that the new data at present do not require any change in the dose limits. However, two other factors can cause larger changes in the present risk estimates. Firstly, for some types of cancer the relative risk model seems to describe the observed data better than the absolute risk model currently used by the ICRP. Secondly, the shape of the dose-response relationship considerably influences the derived risks. In the present paper the factor causing a substantial increase in radiation risk are analyzed. Conclusions are drawn in how far a change in the currently recommended dose limits seems to be necessary. (author)

  18. What do we know? where do we go from here? implications for ICRP developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.

    2002-01-01

    This first Nea forum is ' in collaboration with ICRP' and we wanted views from participants regarding our initiative on radiological protection of the environment. The members of the main Commission of ICRP who have attended this forum have been delighted with the outcome. ICRP has a range of options for its future activity with regard to radiological protection of the environment, starting with withdrawing altogether from the subject, through maintaining our current assertion, to fully developing a new policy. The emerging consensus from this meeting would suggest that the key elements of a system would involve a clear set of objectives and principles, an agreed set of quantities and units, a reference set of dose models for a defined number of reference fauna and flora, basic knowledge of radiation effects, a means of demonstrating compliance, regular views and revisions as new knowledge develops. (N.C.)

  19. ICRP risk assessment-another view (24 november 1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning in 1960 two serious radiation exposure problems (occupational exposure in uranium mines and population exposure from testing of nuclear weapons) came to the attention. One might have expected ICRP to be the first to try to reduce these exposures but it was conspicuous by its silence. In 1958 ICRP set limits of exposure for radiation workers and members of the public. Nineteen years later (1977) when it was realized that the risk of radiation induced cancer was ten to thirty times what it was estimated to be in 1958, ICRP might have been expected to recommend a significant reduction in permissible exposure levels, but to the dismay of some it increased them. It was also a great disappointment when in 1977, levels of maximum permissible concentration of radionuclides in air, water and food were increased for a large fraction of the more dangerous radionuclides. The reactor accident at Chernobyl calls for a number of new ICRP recommendations [fr

  20. Protection of the patient in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the ICRP report (ICRP-Pub-44) a broad picture of radiotheraphy is presented useful to all involved in the care of cancer patients, for instance to physicians, including medical oncologists, and to medical physicists, radiographers, dosimetrists, and administrators. Information is given on the general principles of radiation therapy including external beam therapy and brachytherapy; the accuracy of radiation delivery and quality assurance; the biological radiation response; the expected risk to specific organs or tissues from therapeutic irradiation; the absorbed dose to tissues inside and outside the useful radiation beams; the organization and planning of radiation oncology services; radiation therapy staff education, training and duties; and finally medical research involving the use of radiation therapy. (orig./HP) [de

  1. ICRP recommendations and the safe disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; Barraclough, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    There are some special difficulties in setting up and applying radiological protection principle to the disposal of solid radioactive wastes. These were recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). One difficulty is the uncertain or probabilistic nature of some of the events or processes that could occur and affect the integrity of a waste repository. The other feature of solid waste disposal that causes difficulty is the length of time period of concern. The practical problem is the difficulties in predicting future conditions and in making the useful estimate of long term radiation impact with sufficient confidence. In this paper, the proposals made by the ICRP to deal with the above difficulties are briefly reviewed. Some suggestions are made as to how the criteria might be clarified, and the necessary calculation made to match the criteria. The reappraisal of the criteria for assessing the radiological safety of waste repositories is needed. (K.I.)

  2. Contribution to developing the environment radiation protection methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A. [Institute of Atomic Power Engineering NRNU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alexakhin, R.; Dubynina, M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The environment sustainable development and biota protection, including the environment radiation protection are issues of nowadays interest in the society. An activity is ongoing on the development of a system of radiation protection for non-human biota. Anthropocentric and eco-centric principles are widely discussed. ICRP Publications 103, 108, 114 and many other reports and articles refer to the topic of environmental protection, reference animals and plants set, corresponding transfer parameters, dose models and derived consideration reference levels. There is still an open field for discussion of methods and approaches to get well-established procedure to assess environmental risks of radiation impacts to different organisms, populations and ecosystems. A huge work has been done by the ICRP and other organizations and research groups to develop and systematize approaches for this difficult subject. This activity, however, is not everywhere well-known and perceived, and more efforts are needed to bring ideas of eco-centric strategy in the environment radiation protection not only to public but to specialists in many countries as well. One of the main points of interest is an assessment of critical doses and doses rates for flora and fauna species. Some aspects of a possible procedure to find their estimates are studied in this work, including criteria for datasets of good quality, models of dose dependence, sensitivity of different umbrella endpoints and methods of original massive datasets treatment. Estimates are done based on information gathered in a database on radiation-induced effects in plants. Data on biological effects in plants (umbrella endpoints of reproductive potential, survival, morbidity, morphological, biochemical, and genetic effects) in dependence on dose and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been collected from reviewed publications and maintained in MS Access format. The database now contains about 7000 datasets and 25000 records

  3. Discussion on Implementation of ICRP Recommendations Concerning Reference Levels and Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103, 'The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection', issued in 2007, defines emergency exposure situations as unexpected situations that may require the implementation of urgent protective actions and perhaps longer term protective actions. The ICRP continues to recommend optimisation and the use of reference levels to ensure an adequate degree of protection in regard to exposure to ionising radiation in emergency exposure situations. Reference levels represent the level of dose or risk above which it is judged to be inappropriate to plan to allow exposures to occur and for which protective actions should therefore be planned and optimised. National authorities are responsible for establishing reference levels. The Expert Group on the Implementation of New International Recommendations for Emergency Exposure Situations (EGIRES) performed a survey to analyse the established processes for optimisation of the protection strategy for emergency exposure situations and for practical implementation of the reference level concept in several member states of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The EGIRES collected information on several national optimisation strategy definitions, on optimisation of protection for different protective actions, and also on optimisation of urgent protective actions. In addition, national criteria for setting reference levels, their use, and relevant processes, including specific triggers and dosimetric quantifies in setting reference levels, are focus points that the EGIRES also evaluated. The analysis of national responses to this 2011 survey shows many differences in the interpretation and application of the established processes and suggests that most countries are still in the early stages of implementing these processes. Since 2011, national authorities have continued their study of the ICRP recommendations to incorporate them into

  4. The historical development of radiation protection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The present internationally largely corresponding radiation protection limits are based on recommendations given by the ICRP in 1965. In order to better understand the underlying concepts, a historical sketch of the development is presented including actual discussions of trends to be excepted. Although exposure of healthy individuals by man-made sources up to these maximum levels is legally permissible, it should be emphasized again and again that any unavoidable exposure must be justified by the need for its associated cause. (author)

  5. Radiation protection of workers in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    An ICRP report (publication 47) is presented which describes the principles and applications of methods by which radiation hazards may be controlled in mines, particularly in the uranium mining industry. Details are given of the dose limits for individual exposures from 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their decay products and ore dust. The measures described for controlling exposure are choice of mining method, source isolation, mechanical ventilation, air cleaning, backfitting, personal protective equipment and organization of work. Recommendations for air monitoring for radon and radon decay products and ore dust, external exposure monitoring and monitoring the quality of protective measures systems are also presented. Finally, recommendations on medical surveillance of miners are given. (UK)

  6. Aspects of practical radiation protection in professional and non-professional exposure in radon spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.

    1986-04-01

    The radiation protection legislation is generally based on the assumption of a linear dose-response relationship for stochastic effects, and of a dose-threshold for non stochastic effects, following a recommendation of the ICRP. The linear-dose-response relationship for the low dose range - and therefore for the exposure in Radon spas - is generally accepted. The paper discusses the consequences of this assumption and suggests guidlines for the practical performance of radiation protection in such locations. (Author)

  7. Standards for radiation protection and diagnostic radiology at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.; Andreo, P.; Meghzifene, A.; Czap, L.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    International standardization in dosimetry is essential for the successful exploitation of radiation technology. The IAEA dosimetry programme is focused into services provided to Member States through the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), to radiotherapy centres and radiation processing facilities. Radiation protection quantities defined by ICRU and ICRP are used to relate the risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation to a single quantity, irrespective of the type of radiation, which takes into account the human body as a receptor. Two types of quantities, limiting and operational, can be related to basic physical quantities which are defined without need for considering specific aspects of radiation protection, e.g. air kerma for photons and fluence for neutrons. The use of a dosimeter for measurements in radiation protection requires a calibration in terms of a physical quantity together with a conversion from physical into protection quantities by means of a factor or a coefficient

  8. The issue concerning the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limit for internal radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrable, K.W.; Chabot, G.E.; Alexander, E.L.; French, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific, technical, practical, and ethical considerations that relate to the use of an annual as opposed to a committed dose limitation system for internal radiation protection are evaluated and presented. The concerns about problems associated with the more recent ICRP committed dose recommendations that have been expressed by persons who are currently operating under an annual dose limitation system are reviewed and discussed in terms of the radiation protection programme elements that are required for an effective ALARA programme. We include in this and a follow-up article a comparison of how these alternative dose limitation systems affect the economic and professional livelihood of radiation workers and the requirements that they impose upon employers. Finally, we recommend the use of an ICRP based committed dose limitation system that provides protection of workers over an entire occupational lifetime without undue impact on their livelihood and without undue requirements for employers. (author)

  9. Key implications of the new ICRP recommendations: contribution of the C.R.P.P.H. expert group on the implications of ICRP recommendations (E.G.I.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) has embarked on a broad programme of consultation in order to collect concepts, ideas and views regarding how radiological protection should be managed at the start of the 21 st century. The results of this consultation will be a new set of comprehensive ICRP recommendations, updating and consolidating ICRP publication 60 and all subsequent ICRP recommendations. It is expected that the new ICRP general recommendations will be published in 2005 with additional more detailed building block recommendations being published in subsequent years. (N.C.)

  10. An outlook to radiation protection development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Strohal, P.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation protection and safety have developed over many decades as the effects of ionizing radiation have been better and better understood. Some events in the last decade had essential impact on radiation protection policy/philosophy and related safety standards. Among them are available data of some long term radio-epidemiological studies of populations exposed to radiation. Investigations of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki illustrated that exposure to radiation has also a potential for the delayed induction of malignancies. They also showed that irradiation of pregnant women may result with certain mental damage in foetus. Several big radiation accidents which appeared in the last decade also had an impact on developments in radiation protection philosophy and practices. A well known Chernobyl accident showed that limited knowledge was available at the time of the accident on transfer of radionuclides in a specific environment, radioecological effects and pathways of highly radioactive atmospheric precipitation generated during the accident on various components of the environment. New scientific data indicated also that in some parts of human environment there are measurable effects of chronic exposure resulting from natural radiation. UNSCEAR is periodically publishing the most valuable set of data as compilation, and disseminates information on the health effects of radiation and on levels of radiation exposure due to different sources. These data are also the best guidelines for the necessary improvements and updating of radiation protection practices and philosophies. The latest ICRP-60 publication and recently issued International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources are reflecting many of the above mentioned findings. On the other hand the use of radiation sources is increasing day by day, and many new facilities applying radiation in radiotherapy

  11. Approaches for protection standards for ionizing radiation and combustion pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The question ''can the approach used for radiation protection standards, i.e., to extrapolate dose--response relationships to low doses, be applied to combustion pollutants'' provided a basis for discussion. The linear, nonthreshold model postulated by ICRP and UNSCEAR for late effects of ionizing radiation is described and discussed. The utility and problems of applying this model to the effects of air pollutants constitute the focus of this paper. The conclusion is that, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, one should assume the same type of dose--effect relation for chemical air pollutants as for ionizing radiation

  12. Evaluation of radiation protection educational level of professional exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, O.; Krstev, S.; Jovanovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Serbia and Montenegro legislation concerning with radiation protection was upgrading after publication ICRP- 60 and B.S.S., No.115. Present Law on the Protection against Ionizing Radiation is in force from 1996. Among quite new issues in radiation protection regulations there was article relate to obligatory refresher training. Due to adverse political and economic situation through many years radiation protection regulations were not fulfill completely. The aim of this investigation was to get real view to education level of professional exposed workers. In Serbia and Montenegro the most of ionizing radiation sources are in medical use and the most exposed workers are radiographers and radiologists. The test was passed by 200 radiographers and 50 radiologists. Main groups of questions were: Radiation protection and safety; difference between safety and security; legislation: law and regulations; incidents, accidents and operational failures: recording, learning. Usually, knowledge from school pales. New quantities (as ambient and personal dose equivalent) are mostly unknown. It is easier to understand the real difference between safety and security than to understand linguistic differences. Discussing regulations workers are more interesting in syndicate regulations than radiation protection ones. Operational failures and incidents are hidden. Better to say: nobody dare to speak about them. The results imposed conclusion that regulatory body has to pay more attention to upraise safety culture and radiation protection education level of professional exposed workers. (authors)

  13. Some practical applications of fundamental standards in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhamel, Francis; Lavie, Jean-Marie

    1964-05-01

    After some general considerations on the recommendations made by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) regarding standards of internal or external exposure of organs or tissues to different types of radiations, and a recall of the main problems raised by acute radio-exposures (dose assessment in case of accident, assessment of the dose due to an emergency intervention in case of accident, classification of radio-elements), this report describes how ICRP recommendations have been implemented by the CEA, and tries to relate the problem of acute radio-exposures to the problem of chronic radio-exposures. This study is limited to the case of workers and to internal contamination by inhalation, but can be easily extended to other groups or other contamination types. The authors thus recall some fundamental data and definitions regarding values recommended by the ICRP for chronic radio-exposure and for acute exposure (acceptable exposure, accidental exposure, concerted exposure, units), present and comment how standards are practically applied for dose calculation and assessment. Formulas allow a quick assessment of radiological consequences of an acute radio-exposure, or vice-versa [fr

  14. International news about radiation protection of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.

    2016-01-01

    The new European Basic Safety Standards in Radiation Protection (2013/59/Euratom) introduce 'environmental criteria' to protect human health in the long term. This innovation results from work in progress and from the recent positioning of international organizations and authorities in charge of radiation protection and its implementation, regarding the protection of wildlife against ionizing radiation. On the basis of the international state of the art, from the current regulatory context to existing approaches, the ERICA method has been identified as fully consistent with the ICRP approach and the most operational at the moment, due to its richness, flexibility and traceability. Most of the radiological risk assessments for wildlife published in the 5 last years used part or all of the ERICA approach, generally screening the radiological risk for wildlife from the first stage of the assessment, except for a few areas among those most impacted by radioactive contamination (Chernobyl area, uranium mining sites in Central Asia, etc.). This update of the knowledge in the field at the international level and the feedback on the analysis of regulatory files presented by nuclear operators led to 10 recommendations from the IRSN on the radiation protection of the environment and its implementation. (authors)

  15. Recent international regulations: low dose-low rate radiation protection and the demise of reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkalides, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    The radiation protection measures suggested by the International Committee for Radiation Protection (ICRP), national regulating bodies and experts, have been becoming ever more strict despite the decrease of any information supporting the existence of the Linear no Threshold model (LNT) and of any adverse effects of Low Dose Low Rate (LDLR) irradiation. This tendency arises from the disproportionate response of human society to hazards that are currently in fashion and is unreasonable. The 1 mSv/year dose limit for the public suggested by the ICRP corresponds to a 1/18,181 detriment-adjusted cancer risk and is much lower than other hazards that are faced by modern societies such as e.g. driving and smoking which carry corresponding rate risks of 1/2,100 and 1/2,000. Even worldwide deadly work accidents rate is higher at 1/ 8,065. Such excessive safety measures against minimal risks from man made radiation sources divert resources from very real and much greater hazards. In addition they undermine research and development of radiation technology and tend to subjugate science and the quest for understanding nature to phobic practices.

  16. Radiation and your patient: A guide for medical practitioners ICRP Supporting Guidance 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2001-01-01

    effect would obtain). The text provides ample information on opportunities to minimise doses, and therefore the risk from diagnostic uses of radiation. This objective may be reached by avoiding unnecessary (unjustified) examinations, and by optimising the procedures applied both from the standpoint of diagnostic quality and in terms of reduction of the excessive doses to patients. Optimisation of patient protection in radiotherapy must depend on maintaining sufficiently high doses to irradiated tumours, securing a high cure rate, while protecting the healthy tissues to the largest extent possible. Problems related to special protection of the embryo and fetus in the course of diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation are presented and practical solutions are recommended. This issue of the Annals of the ICRP also includes a brief report concerning Diagnostic Reference Levels in medical imaging: Review and additional advice

  17. Optimization of radiological protection and dose constraints in the new draft ICRP Recommendations 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    2007-01-01

    The overall concept of the new ICRP Recommendations 2006 is analyzed, the concept of dose constraints as a basic tool of radiological protection management is described, arguments and criticisms against the current proposal are cited and points of dispute highlighted, and perspectives of the Recommendations are assessed. (author)

  18. Pros and cons of the revolution in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    In 1959, the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) chose the LNT (Linear No-Threshold) model as an assumption to form the basis for regulating radiation protection. During the 1999 UNSCEAR session, held in April in Vienna, the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis was discussed. Among other LNT-related subjects, the Committee discussed the problem of collective dose and dose commitment. These concepts have been introduced in the early 1960s, as the offspring of the linear no-threshold assumption. At the time they reflected a deep concern about the induction of hereditary effects by nuclear tests fallout. Almost four decades later, collective dose and dose commitment are still widely used, although by now both the concepts and the concern should have faded into oblivion. It seems that the principles and concepts of radiation protection have gone astray and have led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations. Revision of these principles and concepts is now being proposed by an increasing number of scientists and several organisations

  19. Radiation protection training: twenty year experience in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, Sandor; Kanyar, Bela; Zagyvay, Peter; Solymosi, Jozsef; Bujtas, Tibor; Feher, Istvan; Giczi, Ferenc; Deme, Sandor; Uray, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    In Hungary, radiation protection training for radiation workers has been introduced in very early, just following the publication of the ICRP recommendation No. 26. Before that, in some of the institutions, radiation protection training was recommended for technicians and medical doctors working in nuclear medicine, X-ray diagnostic radiology and radiation therapy, as well as in some of industrial applications, but not on regular way. Since 1988, radiation protection training regulated by the Ministry of Health and required for all of the workers in radiation workplaces licensed by the authority the State Public Health and Medical Officers Service (SPHAMOS). Decree No. 16/2000. (VI. 8.) EuM of the Minister of Health on the enforcement of Clauses of the Nuclear Law 116/1996 regulates the radiation protection training of Radiation Workers (RW). Annex 4 of Decree sees radiation protection training and in-service training: Persons performing conducted work in the field of the use of the nuclear energy and any other work within legal relationship shall be educated in training and in-service training at an interval of 5 years. Three levels of the training introduced; basic, extended and comprehensive, based on radiation risk related to the given job. Several institutions are involved in performing radiation protection training, such universities, scientific institutions, Regional Radiological Health Centers (RRHC) of SPHAMOS, private enterprises etc. All training course material is subject to accreditation. Most of the faculties of the universities involved in training of natural sciences and engineering provide subjects on the fundamentals of dosimetry, radiobiology and radiation protection within the courses of physics, biophysics, chemistry, biology, ecology etc. These courses take 5-10 contact hours per week on average. The members of the Hungarian Committee of EUTERP Platform summarize their broad experience collected in the past 20 year. (author)

  20. Work of ICRP Committee 4 on the implementation of the new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    2010-01-01

    ICRP Mission was founded in 1928 by the international Society of Radiology to advance for the public benefit the science of radiological protection, in particular by providing recommendations and guidance on all aspects of protection against ionizing radiation. The commission has five committees, plus a scientific secretariat. It has task groups and working parties which are established either by the main commission or by the committees. It consists of 82 members from 24 countries and six continents. It has 7 approximately 100 external experts participating in task groups. It also has an international community of experts in radiological protection. Committee 4 is concerned with providing advice on the application of the recommended system of protection in all its facets for occupational and public exposure. It also acts as the major point of contact with other international organizations and professional societies concerned with protection against ionizing radiation. The priorities of Committee 4 (2009 -2013) are to: . Develop advice on the implementation of the new recommendations and contribute to their dissemination . Review the ethics and values (precautionary principles, tolerability of risk, equity, sustainable development¡¦) underlying the principles and concepts of the radiation protection system . Enhance the dialogue and cooperation with international organizations and professionals The programme of work for Committee 4 was outlined: a) Task Group N¡Æ 76 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to NORM b) Task Group N¡Æ 80 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations as applied to the geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste c) Task Group N¡Æ 81 : Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to radon exposure d) Committee 4 programme of work (4): Task Group (to be established): Application of the Commission.s Recommendations to the protection of aircraft crew to cosmic rays e) Committee 4 programme of work (5

  1. Application of radiation protection principles to the cleanup of contaminated areas. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    Recognizing that there was a general lack of guidance on protection from ionizing radiation in the case of protracted or chronic exposures and prompted by the clear need for such guidance for aiding decision making in the particular case of the rehabilitation of areas affected by residual deposits of radioactive materials from past activities, the IAEA started a project in 1993 to address the problem. A small working group was established and met on several occasions over a three year period. The working group used, as it starting point, the Recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) (Publication 60) and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. The approach emphasizes the use of risk to individuals from existing contamination and from the residual contamination after cleanup actions as a basis for decision making. Nevertheless, links are maintained with the basic ICRP radiation protection system by recognizing that, in many situations, cleanup actions may be influenced by more than only individual risk consideration; there will be radiological and non-radiological constraints which will differ depending on whether the situation is more 'intervention like' or 'practice like'. The framework for decision making being proposed by the working group is being published in this report to allow for a period of review and comment by experts and decision makers in Member States

  2. The use of detectors based on ionisation recombination in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Intitial recombination of ionisation in a gas depends on the ionisation density and hence on the linear energy transfer along the tracks of charged particles. This effect can be used as a basis for instruments that respond to different types of ionising radiation approximately in the way required by the quality factor-linear energy transfer relation recommended by the ICRP for use in radiation protection. Empirical instruments based on ionisation recombination that have been used for radiation protection measurements are reviewed, and relations are derived from recombination theory that show that the response of such detectors can be readily predicted. The usefulness of recombination instruments in radiation protection is discussed and their advantages and limitations assessed. It is shown that their main application will be as reference instruments against which other detectors can be calibrated. As an extension to using recombination detectors as reference instruments, the feasibility of specifying radiation quality in terms of ionisation recombination is investigated. (author)

  3. ICRP recommendations on 'managing patient dose in digital radiology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) approved the publication of a document on 'Managing patient dose in digital radiology' in 2003. The paper describes the content of the report and some of its key points, together with the formal recommendations of the Commission on this topic. With digital techniques exists not only the potential to improve the practice of radiology but also the risk to overuse radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging: wide dynamic range, post-processing, multiple viewing options, electronic transfer and archiving possibilities are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. It is expected that the ICRP report helps to profit from the benefits of this important technological advance in medical imaging with the best management of radiation doses to the patients. It is also expected to promote training actions before the digital techniques are introduced in the radiology departments and to foster the industry to offer enough technical and dosimetric information to radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists to help in the optimisation of the imaging. (authors)

  4. History of radiation protection agencies and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritenour, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    The history of radiation protection and standards has shown a decrease of recommended exposure limits over the years. There are two reasons for this decrease. First there has been an increased awareness of the biological effects of radiation. Second, advances in technology have made it possible to use radiation more efficiently while decreasing unnecessary dose to workers and the public. Thus it is now possible to maintain much smaller dose limits than in the early years. Current radiation protection philosophy is based on the assumption that there is no completely ''safe'' amount of radiation. In practical terms, however, there is certainly a level below which the measurement of biologic effects becomes meaningless. The important operational concept as put forth by the ICRP in 1977 is that exposure of an individual should be kept As Low as Reasonably Achievable (the ALARA principle) below recommended limits. In other words, recognizing that there are many situations in which it is impossible to reduce exposure to zero, one must weigh the cost of designing equipment and structures that reduce exposure below the recommended limits against the perceived benefits of doing so

  5. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, H.M.

    1969-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  6. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, H M [Environmental and Life Sciences Division, Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  7. Radiation protection in well logging: case studies in the Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    This study is performed to improve radiation protection level in well logging include tow case studies in Sudan (Lost or misplaced sources). General review of radiation and radiation protection basic concept is highlighted discussed. Also preview of well logging practice and source of radiation use in well logging, safety of radiation sources, storage and manage of not use sources (weak sources) and protection of worker and potential exposure for public and worker, investigations in cause of lost or misplaced sources in well. Assessment was made in well logging using checklist prepared in accordance with the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA basic safety standard, International Committee for Radiological Protection ICRP and safety in transport of radiation sources. The checklist includes all requirement of radiation protection. It is found that all requirement was present except the delay of calibration of radiation detectors, the movement of radiation sources form storage to base of manipulated area need adequate care for shielding and safe transport and personal monitoring service must be provide in Sudan. Investigation was made in cause of lose of nine radiation source in well it is found that all those sources were loss in different depth in the well and with deferent location and there was no risk because there was no contamination of fluids which caused by damage of loss sources. Some recommendations were stated that, if implemented could improve the status of radiation protection in well logging. (Author)

  8. Implementation of the ICRP-60 Recommendations by Swiss Pharmaceutical Companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, R. P.; Traub, K.; Berlepsch, P.; Reischmann, F. J.; Zoubek, N.

    2004-01-01

    Switzerland was among the first countries that adapted its national law to the recommendations of the ICRP-publication No. 60. Already in 1991, the Federal Parliament enacted a new Radiological Protection Act. In 1994, the Federal Government adopted the new Radiation Protection Ordinance. Federal Ministries followed with technical ordinances and guidelines, e.g., for radioactive waste in 1996, for handling open sources in 1997, for X-rays in 1998 and for the training and dosimetry of radiation workers in 1999. In 1996, the Council of the European Union (Switzerland is not a member of the EU) decreed the Directive for the Protection of the Health of Workers and the General Public against the Dangers Arising from Ionising Radiation. Based on this directive, Germany adopted a new Radiation Protection Ordinance in 2001 and a new X-Ray-Ordinance in 2002. To transform the ordinances into radiation protection in the workplace further technical ordinances and guidelines are under development. Almost ten years ago, users of ionising radiation in Switzerland had to deal with the problems of implementing the new radiation protection legislation into their local rules that Germany and other EU companies are facing now. Therefore it may be interesting and helpful for authorities and companies in the EU to learn from the experience of their Swiss colleagues. (Author) 4 refs

  9. Radiation protection for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Rodenas, J.; Campayo, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    It a a great number of medical installations in spain using particle accelerators for radiotherapy. It is obvious the importance of an accurate estimation of the doses produced in these installations that may be received by health workers, patients or public. The lower values of dose limits established in the new ICRP recommendations imply a recalculation of items concerning such installations. In our country, specific guidelines for radiation protection in particle accelerators facilities have not been yet developed, however two possible guides can be used, NCRP report number 51 and DIN Standard 6847. Both have been analyzed comparatively in the paper, and major remarks have been summarized. Interest has been focused on thickness estimation of shielding barriers in order to verify whether must be modified to comply with the new dose limits. Primary and secondary barriers for a Mevatron used in a Medical Center, have been calculated and the results have been compared with actual data obtained from the installation, to test the adequacy of shielding barriers and radioprotection policies. The results obtained are presented and analyzed in order to state the implications of the new ICRP recommendations. (author)

  10. Evaluation of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M. Y. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study an evaluation of radiation safety and protection in interventional orthopedic procedures for the staff in three theatres in Khartoum state was conducted. To evaluate radiation protection program and staff knowledge with regard to radiation protection a questionnaire was designed and distributed among the staff there. Integrity check was conducted on the available radiation tools ( lead aprons) to ensure that they provide optimal protection when positioned appropriately. Also dose rate was measured around the theatre to evaluate the level of leakage radiation. Finally the absorbed dose to orthopedic specialists was measured during several procedures. The study showed the absence of most of the radiation protection and safety procedures that ensure the protection of of workers and lack of radiation protection program. The integrity check conducted on lead aprons showed uncapable crack in about 24% of the checked aprons. And in spite of this, there was no action taken to withdraw those faulty aprons or to replace them due to the acute shortage of the aprons available in the three centers and this will cause unjustified radiation exposure to the staff. The level of radiation around the theatres was found to fall within the acceptable limit according to the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) recommendations that -if implemented -could improve the status of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures. The improve. The important recommendations are to establish a single regulatory authority in Sudan independent from any user or promotion of radiation as well as to conduct periodically training courses for orthopedic staff on radiation protection in orthopedic interventional procedures.(Author)

  11. The use of total detriment in radiation protection and its potential extension to other hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Stansbury, P.S.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    Before publication of the 1977 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), radiation protection standards were based on dose limits to single organs. These dose limits were only loosely linked to the expected effects in the first two generations from gonadal doses and to the risk of fatal cancer from doses to specific organs. In 1977, the ICRP recommended the use of the ''effective dose equivalent (EDE),'' which is a method of summing the doses (weighted with relative risk coefficients) to all organs and tissues, and recommended an annual limit for EDE. Since the 1977 recommendations were published, a ''total risk'' or total detriment approach has been extended to include nonfatal cancers and genetic effects for all subsequent generations, i.e., the total health detriment from low doses of ionizing radiation. This paper discusses the development of this total health detriment from ionizing radiation exposures, and explores potential methods for using it with other hazards (such as exposures to other physical agents, hazardous chemicals, and fatal and nonfatal accidents) in calculating the total detriment to a worker

  12. Fundamental ICRP recommendations at the start of the 21st century: status of the revision of ICRP publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2002-01-01

    The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, are either re-stated or revised at intervals of about 15 years, most recently in ICRP Publication 60, adopted in 1990. ICRP plan to issue its next recommendations around 2005. Through extensive consultation, the active participation of the radiological protection community was recruited already at the conceptual stage. Based on the vast input received, ICRP is currently preparing draft recommendations. These are likely to emphasise egalitarian values more than utilitarian ones, to be holistic rather than anthropocentric, and to be formatted as a relatively concise set of actual recommendations underpinned by separate publications with more detail. The draft will again be circulated worldwide and comments will be discussed in 2004 with a view to approval of the recommendations in 2005 and publication in 2005 or 2006. Thus, integration into legislation would be possible sometime between 2006 and 2010, say. (orig.) [de

  13. Role IAEA implementation of ICRP-60 on regulations the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshinawy, R.K.M.; Gomaa, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    In november 1990, the (ICRP) adopted its 1990 recommendations (ICRP-60) ( 1). These recommendations will significantly influence not only IAEA's basic safety standards (safety series 9) ( 2), but also the IAEA regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material ( 3) and its supporting documents ( 4-6). IAEA experts are currently engaged in the revision of the transport regulations. This revision process led to the publication of the revised transport regulations of 1966. The transport regulations are developed to ensure safety during movement of radioactive materials, and to provide reasonable assurance that the transport activities comply with the basic safety standards for radiation protection

  14. Legal aspects of radiation protection at the international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazian, J.

    1981-01-01

    A review is made of the respective activities of the various international organizations concerned with radiation protection at the legal level. These organizations are either non-governmental (I.C.R.P., I.C.R.U.) or governmental in which case they can act at the world (U.N., I.A.E.A., I.L.O., W.H.O.) or regional level (N.E.A., EURATOM, COMECOM). The legal impact of the recommendations or directives they issue is specified [fr

  15. New quantities in radiation protection and conversion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Four new quantities have been proposed by the ICRP for use in radiation protection from external sources, i.e. the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent (penetrating), and the individual dose equivalent (superficial). These quantities are briefly described together with two new concepts of expanded and aligned fields. The BCRU recommends that these quantities should be adopted for use in the UK together with conversion coefficients when re-calibrating existing instruments, reporting the results of measurements and designing instruments. (UK)

  16. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  17. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F.; Chang, I.

    1995-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny (∼ 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 μm. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar

  18. Protection of the patient from ionizing radiation in medical exposure in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Ben Shlomo, A.; Berlovitz, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRP issued in 1991 its recent recommendations related to the protection of the worker, the public and the patient from ionizing radiation. In 1996 the IAEA together with the WHO, the ILO and other major international bodies published the Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the BSS). The BSS are based on the core principles of Justification, Optimization and Dose Limitation. Many countries adopted the radiation protection philosophy and the administrative framework presented in the BSS as the basis for their legal radiation protection system. Following the publication of the BSS, the EC published in 1997 its Medical Exposure Directive 97/43 /Euratom. Article 14 of the ME Directive requires that EC member states bring into force the laws and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this directive before 13 May 2000. Most EC member states have complied with this requirement and issued the relevant laws and /or regulations. The Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations that came into force in the UK on 13 May 2000 are a good example

  19. The future policy for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the 1990's, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) launched a process for establishing new recommendations, which are expected to serve as guidelines for national systems of radiological protection. Currently the ICRP's proposed recommendations are being subjected to extensive stakeholder comment and modifications. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has been actively involved in this process. Part of the Committee's work has been to undertake collaborative efforts with the ICRP through, for example, the organisation of broad stakeholder fora. The first of these, held in Taormina, Italy in 2002, focused on the development of a policy basis for the radiological protection of the environment. The second forum, held in Lanzarote, Spain in April 2003, addressed the latest concepts and approaches in the ICRP proposed recommendations for a system of radiological protection. During this meeting, the ICRP listened to the views of various stakeholder groups, including radiological protection regulators, environmental protection ministries, the nuclear power industry and NGOs. As a result, the ICRP modified its proposals to better reflect stakeholder needs and wishes. This report presents the outcomes of the discussions, examining what the ICRP proposed and how its proposals have been affected and modified as a result of stakeholder input. (author)

  20. Protection against ionizing radiation by leaded glass googles during interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zett-Lobos, Claudio; Vera Munoz, Felipe; Arriola Alvarez, Katerina; Diaz Ramos, Oscar; Gamarra, Jorge; Fernandez Palomo, Cristian; Merello, Lorenzo; Mora D, Alex; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Catalan Reyes, Monica; Ramos Avasola, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is not known whether leaded glass goggles with 0.25 mm Pb equivalency, used in interventional cardiology procedures, attenuate radiation below the levels established by the latest recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Aim: To assess if the degree of attenuation of the secondary ionizing radiation achieved by the use of 0.25 mm Pb leaded glass goggles, in occupationally exposed workers in interventional cardiology procedures, meets the latest ICRP recommendations. Material and Methods : A prospective investigation was carried out to compare the eye exposure to secondary ionizing radiation received by occupationally exposed personnel in a 9 months period. A set of two thermo luminescent dosimeters was arranged in the front and back of leaded glass goggles in a cohort of seven members of an interventional cardiology service, exposed to 1057 consecutive procedures. Results:The monthly dose equivalent measurement performed in front of the goggles ranged between 1.1 and 6.5 mSv,for paramedics and interventional cardiologists. The radiation measured in the back of the glass varied between 0.66 and 2.75 mSv,respectively.The degree of attenuation of the dose at eye level ranged from 40% to 57.7%,respectively. The projected annual exposure would reach 33 mSv for the interventional cardiologist. Conclusions: With a similar load of work and wearing 0.25 mm Pb equivalent glass goggles, interventional cardiologists will exceed the crystalline equivalent dose limit recommended by the ICRP (20 mSv/year averaged over the past 5 years)

  1. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Jones, C.; Lochard, J.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been amassed in

  2. Radiation protection guidelines for the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    With the exception of the function of cells in the skin associated with immunocompetence nonstochastic effects have been well characterized and threshold doses are known with a precision appropriate for setting radiation protection standards. A dose limitation of 0.5 Sv per year and a working lifetime dose limit of 20 Sv should protect the worker population adequately and therefore, the current protection standards are quite adequate. The risk estimate for skin cancer is very dependent on the selection of the projection model and on the mortality rate assumed. Based on the relative risk model, a mortality rate of 0.2% and summing risks for both UVR exposed and shielded skin the risk is about twice (1.94/10 -4 Sv -1 ) that which ICRP derived in 1977. With the absolute model the risk is considerably less, about 0.5/10 -4 Sv -1 . 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Can radiation protection be further improved in underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.

    1992-01-01

    The efforts of optimization made by mine operators to improve radiation protection are illustrated by results and comments. Routinely, uranium miners are the most exposed workers in the fuel cycle (average: 20-30 mSv.y -1 for underground mines). In uranium mines, especially for ten years, operators have been striving to lower collective doses and comply with the regulation in force based on ICRP recommendations. Since 1988, french uranium miners have registered no effective cumulated doses exceeding the basic limit of 50 mSv.y -1 , which does not occur in every country. In 1990, ICRP issued new recommendations lowering the basic limit so that the average should not exceed 20 mSv.y -1 . To comply with the limit, the operators should make a number of more or less restricting arrangements. Additional financial means would become important in present mines. New operating concepts should be sought for new mines. Independently of the financial aspects, should not the expenses made towards lowering a risk already very low (hypothetic and long-term risk) be better used to improve conventional safety. Furthermore, there appears a number of noxious effects running against the aim pursued. As a conclusion, more efficient radiation protection could be achieved by implementation of the principle of optimization of the collective dose instead of more severe limits of individual doses

  4. Comparison of the respiratory tract models of ICRP and US EPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao

    2000-01-01

    An index for the integral characterization of risk is necessary for improving risk management, comparing the effects of various practices on the environment and keeping risk as low as reasonably achievable while allowing economic development. Public health risk has been used as an index to compare and combine the risks from the presence of a variety of contaminants. In 1994, International Commission on Radiological Protection published the Publication 66 'Human Respiratory Tract Model for Radiological Protection'. Meanwhile US EPA published 'Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry'. Basically the concept of Reference Concentration (RfC) is similar to that of DAC used in radiation protection. Both of them are derived from the deposited amount of interested contaminants in the respiratory tract. In an attempt to assess the public health risk by combining the ICRP model and the deposited amount corresponding to values of RfC, the main application, especially the fractional deposition, of the respiratory tract model of US EPA is compared with the new respiratory tract model of ICRP. For normal nose breather, when the AMADs of monodisperse aerosol are 0.5 η m, 1 η m, 2 η m, 3 η m, 5 η m, 7 η m and 10 η m, minute volume is 1.2m 3 /h (20L/mim), the corresponding total fractional depositions calculated by the model of the US EPA are 0.33, 0.50, 0.72, 0.85, 0.95, 0.97 and 0.93. With the same condition, the total fractional deposition calculated by the ICRP model is 0.35, 0.51, 0.70, 0.78, 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77. For polydisperse aerosol with default values of ICRP for occupational and environmental exposures, the fractional depositions calculated by US EPA model are 0.82 and 0.50 while that by ICRP are 0.82 and 0.47. In conclusion, (1) The ICRP model is more accurate than the US EPA model and has a wider application. (2) For monodisperse aerosol, when the AMAD of aerosol is less than 3 η m there is no

  5. A comparison of radiological risk assessment models: Risk assessment models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and EPA (for NESHAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    Radiological risk assessments and resulting risk estimates have been developed by numerous national and international organizations, including the National Research Council's fifth Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR V), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). A fourth organization, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has also performed a risk assessment as a basis for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). This paper compares the EPA's model of risk assessment with the models used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, and ICRP. Comparison is made of the values chosen by each organization for several model parameters: populations used in studies and population transfer coefficients, dose-response curves and dose-rate effects, risk projection methods, and risk estimates. This comparison suggests that the EPA has based its risk assessment on outdated information and that the organization should consider adopting the method used by the BEIR V Committee, UNSCEAR, or ICRP

  6. Decision analysis and rational countermeasures in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    1991-09-01

    During the past few years several international organizations (ICRP, IAEA, OECD/NEA), in revising their radiation protection principles, have emphasized the importance of the rationalization and planning of intervention after a nuclear accident. An accident itself and the introduction of protective action entails risks to the people affected, monetary costs and social disruption. Thus protective actions, often including objectives which are difficult to control simultaneously, cannot be undertaken without careful contemplation and consideration of the essential consequences of decisions. Often during an accident there is not enough time for careful consideration. Decision analysis is an analyzing and thought guiding method for the definition of objectives and comparison of options. It is an appropriate methodology assisting in rendering explicit and apparent all factors involved and evaluating their relative importance. The planning of intervention with the help of decision analysis is portion of the preparation for accident situations. In this report one of the techniques of decision analysis, multi-attribute utility analysis, is presented, as concerns its application in planning protective actions in the event of radiation accidents. (orig.)

  7. Material and cultural assets. Part of radiation protection of the environment?; Sach- und Kulturgueter. Teil eines Strahlenschutzes der Umwelt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellermann, R.G. [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Loebner, W.

    2015-07-01

    Since several years the protection of the environment has been discussed at various international levels as part of radiation protection. ICRP has published a number of recommendations which relate primarily to the evaluation of radiation exposures to non-human species. Nevertheless, not least because of the declaratory mention of the environment in national legislative documents, the question arises how the environment can be integrated into the radiation protection or whether the radiation protection must be even expanded to new fields. A less discussed aspect here covers material and cultural assets that are classified in environmental law as objects worthy of protection. The paper describes some issues that arise in this context and outlines a framework for the consideration of material assets in radiation protection.

  8. Current status on preparation of dose conversion factors based on 1990 ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Michio

    1996-01-01

    The current status of arrangement of dose conversion factors for operational quantities are explained on the basis of 1995 ICRP-ICRU recommendations. The dose conversion factors of photon, neutron and electron were recommended by ICRP Publ. 74. It's contents are described. The relation between new dose conversion factors and the laws in connection with protecting radiation are explained. The dose conversion factors of 1 cm-, 3 mm- and 70 μm - dose equivalent which were introduced into the laws connected therewith in Japan are accepted the same values of ICRP Publ. 51 for photon and neutron. I mentioned the points of discussing about new dose conversion factors which are expected to be recommended. The laws have to show the dose conversion factors to be used by calculation and estimation of radiation shield, etc. The limit of energy of ICRU individual dose equivalent for photon is now until 1 MeV, but the value is insufficient and necessary to 10 MeV as same as the ambient dose equivalent in due consideration of atomic energy facilities. JAERI is preparing these dose conversion factors now. (S.Y.)

  9. Radiation protection education and training of radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsakkers, P.

    1995-01-01

    The International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technicians (ISRRT) is an international non-governmental organisation in official relationship with the World Health Organization. Over 50 countries are members of the ISRRT. The ISRRT encourages and facilitates communication between radiographers throughout the world. The ISRRT has produced several documents, e.g. ''The Role of the Radiographer in Europe''. The ISRRT has also done research and developed initiatives to analyse the quality of training of radiographers in the different member states of the EC. Research was done in the member states to analyse the efforts in the field of quality control. An extended study was performed on the current level of education in radiation protection in the European member states. The ICRP recommends in its publications the need of good training and continuing education for all radiographers. An important part of the basic training of radiographers should focus on the performance of radiation protection and quality control tests. Good daily practice can decrease patient dose in many ways. (Author)

  10. A study on the development of the radiation protection numerical guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M. S.; Kang, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper intends to develope the radiation protection numerical guideline for next generation nuclear power plants. For the determining a value for a societal life, medical costs method, wages and investments method, and GNP method are used. In assessing the risk factors due to radiation exposure, it is accepted that fatal cancer risk, nonfatal cancer risk, and genetic risk factors proposed by ICRP 60. It is calculated that the societal value of life with corresponding range of from $886,500 to $3,406,000 in 1996 U.S. dollars. The person-rem cost estimates can be found to range from $650 per person-rem to $2,500 per person-rem. The radiation protection numerical guideline for next generation nuclear power plants is proposed by $1,600 per person-rem

  11. A review of the fundamental principles of radiation protection when applied to the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. Michael

    2017-01-01

    A review of the role and relevance of the principles of radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology as specified by ICRP has been undertaken when diagnostic risks arising from an examination are taken into account. The increase in population doses arising from diagnostic radiology over the past 20 years has been due to the widespread application of higher dose CT examinations that provide significantly more clinical information. Consequently, diagnostic risks as well as radiation risks need to be considered within the patient radiation protection framework. Justification and optimisation are discussed and the limitations imposed on patient protection by employing only a radiation risk framework is highlighted. The example of radiation protection of the patient in breast screening programmes employing mammography is used to highlight the importance of defined diagnostic outcomes in any effective radiation protection strategy. (author)

  12. Directives and recommendations of the European Communities on health protection against ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The CNEN has published a third edition, with comments, of the Directives and Recommendations of the European Communities on health protection against ionizing radiations, following their revision in 1976. This revision takes account of recent developments in the ICRP recommendations which serve as guidelines in the legislation of many countries for establishing general radiation protection principles as well as basic criteria and technical standards. The new Directive, while keeping to the basic principles established in 1959, introduces new methods for improved medical surveillance of workers; also, the previous difference between occupationally exposed workers and those occasionally exposed is eliminated. Finally, a new concept of critical groups is introduced as regards protection of the population, as a basis for its protection. (NEA) [fr

  13. The Radioecological Aspects OF Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branica, G.; Franic, Z.; Marovic, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the links between radioecology and radiation protection. The traditional radiation protection framework of the International Commission Radiological Protection (ICRP), adopted by the legislation of most countries, is shifting from the paradigm that 'if man is adequately protected from ionizing radiation, then other living things are also likely to be sufficiently protected' towards more efficient protection of non-human biota. However, the estimation of radiation doses, especially low ones, to non-human organisms is very complex issue since they have been studied to a far lesser extent compared to human doses. The first step in dose calculations (i.e. risk assessment) is the measurement of real field data for various radionuclides in various compartments of the biosphere as well as dose rate measurements. Once we obtain relevant data, it is reasonable to argue that biota is adequately protected if the dose rates to the maximally exposed individual from this population are below a certain (safe) limit. The problem arises when one attempts to identify such an individual within a contaminated environment described by measured radioecological parameters. Computer simulation techniques, like Monte Carlo methods are used to generate a 'population' of doses with known distributional qualities. Then, using statistical methods, a part of this population is mathematically 'sampled' to compare the ability of the various statistics at estimating the representative sample of maximally exposed individuals. This exposure, depending on environmental conditions is subject to radioecological investigations. Radioecological investigations regarding fission products in Croatia are implemented as part of an extended and still ongoing radioactive contamination monitoring programme of the human environment that has been fully harmonized with European legislation, i.e. the European Commission's recommendation of June 2000 on the

  14. Two example applications of optimization techniques to US Department of Energy contractor radiation protection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Martin, J.B.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Six numerical examples of optimization of radiation protection are provided in the appendices of ICRP Publication 37. In each case, the calculations are based on fairly well defined parameters and assumptions that were well understood. In this paper, we have examined two numerical examples that are based on empirical data and less certain assumptions. These examples may represent typical applications of optimization principles to the evaluation of specific elements of a radiation protection program. In the first example, the optimum bioassay frequency for tritium workers was found to be once every 95 days, which compared well with ICRP Publication 10 recommendations. However, this result depended heavily on the assumption that the value of a potential undetected rem was US $1000. The second example showed that the optimum frequency for recalibrating Cutie Pie (CP) type ionization chamber survey instruments was once every 102 days, which compared well with the Hanford standard frequency of once every 90 days. This result depended largely on the assumption that an improperly operating CP instrument could lead to a serious overexposure. These examples have led us to conclude that optimization of radiation protection programs must be a very dynamic process. Examples must be recalculated as empirical data expand and improve and as the uncertainties surrounding assumptions are reduced

  15. Radiation safety consideration in uranium industry in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.T.; El-Assaly, F.M.; El-Naggar, A.M.; Gomaa, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation protection measures are essential in mining and milling of uranium and thorium. The basic concept of radiation protection is that all exposures should be kept as low as it is reasonably achievable (ALARA). Most potential hazards arise from exposures to radioactive gases of radon and thoron and their daughter products. Thus new limits were derived by the ICRP integrating both the internal and external exposures to radon daughters. The present study evaluates the radiation protection measures carried out at three Egyptian mines (Massikat, Aradia North and South). Different recommendations were presented complying with optimization of radiation protection in accordance with the ICRP system of dose limitation

  16. Bases for protection against radiation and conventional hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    The living and working environment of man is polluted by : (1) ionizing radiations, both natural and man-made, (2) man-made non-ionizing radiations e.g. microwaves, and (3) man-made chemicals. Many of these agents are carcinogenic and mutagenic. The basic radiation safety standards laid down by the ICRP have long-term objectives and take into account all aspects of radiation protection problem, but in the case of other agents the safety standards, whatever few are available, have short-term objectives and differ widely from country to country. If the paramountcy of man's health is accepted as the objective of all safety programmes i.e. either for radiation hazards or conventional hazards, the above disparity must be removed. In order to achieve this goal, just as assessment of damage to organs and tissues of man is available in the case of ionizing radiations, similar assessment in the case of conventional hazards must be made available by collecting relevant data. (M.G.B.)

  17. Current knowledge on radon risk. Implications for practical radiation protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Wolfgang-Ulrich [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie, Essen (Germany); Giussani, Augusto; Kreuzer, Michaela; Sobotzki, Christina [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Ruehm, Werner [German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Lecomte, Jean-Francois [International Affaires Directorate, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, P.O. Box 17, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Harrison, John [Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Breckow, Joachim [THM University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    ICRP suggested a strategy based on the distinction between a protection approach for dwellings and one for workplaces in the previous recommendations on radon. Now, the Commission recommends an integrated approach for the protection against radon exposure in all buildings irrespective of their purpose and the status of their occupants. The strategy of protection in buildings, implemented through a national action plan, is based on the application of the optimisation principle below a derived reference level in concentration (maximum 300 Bq m{sup -3}). A problem, however, arises that due to new epidemiological findings and application of dosimetric models, ICRP 115 (Ann ICRP 40, 2010) presents nominal probability coefficients for radon exposure that are approximately by a factor of 2 larger than in the former recommendations of ICRP 65 (Ann ICRP 23, 1993). On the basis of the so-called epidemiological approach and the dosimetric approach, the doubling of risk per unit exposure is represented by a doubling of the dose coefficients, while the risk coefficient of ICRP 103 (2007) remains unchanged. Thus, an identical given radon exposure situation with the new dose coefficients would result in a doubling of dose compared with the former values. This is of serious conceptual implications. A possible solution of this problem was presented during the workshop. (orig.)

  18. Current knowledge on radon risk. Implications for practical radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Wolfgang-Ulrich; Giussani, Augusto; Kreuzer, Michaela; Sobotzki, Christina; Ruehm, Werner; Lecomte, Jean-Francois; Harrison, John; Breckow, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    ICRP suggested a strategy based on the distinction between a protection approach for dwellings and one for workplaces in the previous recommendations on radon. Now, the Commission recommends an integrated approach for the protection against radon exposure in all buildings irrespective of their purpose and the status of their occupants. The strategy of protection in buildings, implemented through a national action plan, is based on the application of the optimisation principle below a derived reference level in concentration (maximum 300 Bq m -3 ). A problem, however, arises that due to new epidemiological findings and application of dosimetric models, ICRP 115 (Ann ICRP 40, 2010) presents nominal probability coefficients for radon exposure that are approximately by a factor of 2 larger than in the former recommendations of ICRP 65 (Ann ICRP 23, 1993). On the basis of the so-called epidemiological approach and the dosimetric approach, the doubling of risk per unit exposure is represented by a doubling of the dose coefficients, while the risk coefficient of ICRP 103 (2007) remains unchanged. Thus, an identical given radon exposure situation with the new dose coefficients would result in a doubling of dose compared with the former values. This is of serious conceptual implications. A possible solution of this problem was presented during the workshop. (orig.)

  19. Human respiratory tract model for radiological protection: A revision of the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In 1984, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) appointed a task group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. The model was originally published in 1966, modified slightly in Publication No. 19, and again in Publication No. 30 (in 1979). The task group concluded that research during the past 20 y suggested certain deficiencies in the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. Research has also provided sufficient information for a revision of the model. The task group's approach has been to review, in depth, morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract; deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract; clearance of deposited materials; and the nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled radioactive substances. This review has led to a redefinition of the regions of the respiratory tract for dosimetric purposes. The redefinition has a morphologic and physiological basis and is consistent with observed deposition and clearance of particles and with resultant pathology. Regions, as revised, are the extrathoracic (E-T) region, comprising the nasal and oral regions, the pharynx, larynx, and upper part of the trachea; the fast-clearing thoracic region (T[f]), comprising the remainder of the trachea and bronchi; and the slow-clearing thoracic region (T[s]), comprising the bronchioles, alveoli, and thoracic lymph nodes. A task group report will include models for calculating radiation doses to these regions of the respiratory tract following inhalation of representative alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting particulate and gaseous radionuclides. The models may be implemented as a package of computer codes available to a wide range of users

  20. Evaluation of the use of ICRP 60 dose conversion factors in a postclosure assessment of a deep geological disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palattao, M.V.B.; Hajas, W.C.; Goodwin, B.W.

    1997-05-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste was completed in 1994 and is currently under review by an independent Review Panel. This EIS included a postclosure assessment case study to estimate the annual effective dose equivalent in sieverts per year to members of the public; these estimates were obtained using dose conversion factors (DCFS) based on the 1977 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). However, in 1990 the ICRP revised these recommendations based on additional biological information and developments in radiation protection. This report describes a study of how the more recent recommendations of the ICRP would affect the results of the postclosure assessment case study presented in the EIS. The report includes a theoretical description of how DCFs are used and a comparison of results from computer simulations using the 1977 and the 1990 ICRP recommendations. In the EIS case study, which was based on the 1977 ICRP recommendations, the total dose rate to a member of the critical group is more than six orders of magnitude below the dose rate associated with the regulatory criterion for individual radiological risk. The total dose rate to 10 4 years is dominated by 129 I, with smaller contributions from 36 C1 and 14 C. If the 1990 ICRP recommendations were implemented, the total dose rate would be mostly affected by the new DCF for 129 I, and would increase by about 67%. Even with this increase, the total dose rate would still remain many orders of magnitude lower than the dose rate associated with the regulatory risk criterion. (author)

  1. Mission and activities of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, C.H.

    2018-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), formed in 1928, develops the System of Radiological Protection for the public benefit. The objective of the recommendations is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection for people and the environment against the harmful effects of radiation exposure without unduly limiting the individual or societal benefits of activities involving radiation. In developing its recommendations, ICRP considers advances in scientific knowledge, evolving social values, and practical experience. These recommendations are the basis of radiological protection standards and practice worldwide

  2. The role of advisory organizations in ionizing radiation protection science and policy: A proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Funding for radiation protection science and policy has been in decline for more than a decade. Agencies that set policies and standards for radiation protection depend on external expert groups for advice, and unless the funding situation is stabilized, the ability of these advisory organizations to provide timely advice will be compromised. This paper examines the history of radiation protection policy in the United States, reviews the funding patterns of international and national radiation protection advisory bodies, and suggests recommendations for assuring that radiological and radiation protection science remains an important part of the nation's public health policy agenda. Five major advisory organizations are the focus of this paper--ICRP, ICRU, NCRP, National Research Council BEIR Committees, and UNSCEAR. The recommendations developed in this paper address the following issues: (1) the need to coordinate activities among national and international advisory bodies in order to minimize overlap of work scope and ensure comprehensive coverage of major radiation protection issues; (2) the need to reevaluate activities and operations of advisory groups in the context of an ever-changing radiation protection landscape; and (3) the need to establish the NCRP as the major federal advisory organization for radiation protection in the United States and to stabilize funding through Congressional appropriations

  3. Radiation protection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, L.; Langmueller, G.; Tuerschmann, G.

    1997-01-01

    The safety, the quality and efficiency of the radiological monitoring systems for block one and two of the NPP Mochovce, designed and delivered by the general designer, should be increased by EUCOM Siemens. Modern, accident resistant and/or more powerful monitoring systems have been designed by Siemens will be added to the existing systems. To achieve this radiation measuring units will be installed inside the hermetic zone, in the reactor hall, at the stack, at the release water system and in the environment in the vicinity of the NPP. The presentation, the storage distribution and the processing of all measuring results also will be optimised by installing a modern high-performance computer system, the so-called Central Radiological Computer System 'CRCS', featuring a high availability. The components will be installed in the relevant control rooms all over the plant. With this computer system it is easy to control the radiation level inside and outside the NPP during normal operation and during and after an accident. Special programs, developed by Siemens support the staff by interpreting the consequences of radioactive releases into the environment and by initiating protection procedures during and after an accident. All functions of the system are available for emergency protection drills and training the staff interruption of the normal control procedure. For the personal protection a digital personal dosimetry system completely considering with the requirements of ICRP 60 and several contamination monitors will be installed. (authors)

  4. ICRP publication 26. Its applicability in a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.; Donnelly, K.

    1980-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is a major Canadian provincial utility with more than 5 GW(e) installed nuclear electricity generating capacity and with a planned commitment to an additional 8.5 GW(e), all units being of the CANDU pressurized heavy-water type. The radiation protection programme, in addition to complying with Canadian Federal regulations, has been consistent with the philosophy and intent of ICRP recommendations and is frequently reviewed to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the most recent of which is ICRP-26. The application of the ALARA principle in this power reactor programme is described. A set of general guidelines has been established, the main features of which are: (a) achieving a dose consumption per unit of electricity generated which is low compared with reactors of a similar type; (b) ensuring that stations are operable with the dose equivalent of their labour-dictated manpower; (c) ensuring that the risk to atomic radiation workers is compatible with a corporate fatality rate standard of 8 man-hours worked. Achievement of these guidelines has necessitated implementing a continued dose-management programme. This programme is described generally. The cost applied to justify a dose reduction of 1 man.Sv is given, and a comparison is made with the equivalent life costs this implies and the costs used by safety agencies for other risk-reduction activities. Finally, some practical problems associated with some of the recommendations of ICRP-26 are discussed. (author)

  5. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  6. International basic safety standards for protecting against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation (hereinafter termed radiation) and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. The Standards have been developed from widely accepted radiation protection and safety principles, such as those published in the Annals of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Series. They are intended to ensure the safety of all types of radiation sources and, in doing so, to complement standards already developed for large and complex radiation sources, such as nuclear reactors and radioactive waste management facilities. For the sources, more specific standards, such as those issued by the IAEA, are typically needed to achieve acceptable levels of safety. As these more specific standards are generally consistent with the Standards, in complying with them, such more complex installations will also generally comply with the Standards. The Standards are limited to specifying basic requirements of radiation protection and safety, with some guidance on how to apply them. General guidance on applying some of the requirements is available in the publications of the Sponsoring Organizations and additional guidance will be developed as needed in the light of experience gained in the application of the Standards. Tabs

  7. International basic safety standards for protecting against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation (hereinafter termed radiation) and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. The Standards have been developed from widely accepted radiation protection and safety principles, such as those published in the Annals of the ICRP and the IAEA Safety Series. They are intended to ensure the safety of all types of radiation sources and, in doing so, to complement standards already developed for large and complex radiation sources, such as nuclear reactors and radioactive waste management facilities. For the sources, more specific standards, such as those issued by the IAEA, are typically needed to achieve acceptable levels of safety. As these more specific standards are generally consistent with the Standards, in complying with them, such more complex installations will also generally comply with the Standards. The Standards are limited to specifying basic requirements of radiation protection and safety, with some guidance on how to apply them. General guidance on applying some of the requirements is available in the publications of the Sponsoring Organizations and additional guidance will be developed as needed in the light of experience gained in the application of the Standards

  8. Implementations of new ICRP recommendations in the operation of the spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollet Sanudo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently reviewed its basic recommendations including a strong reduction in the annual dose limit for exposed workers to ionising radiation, New dose limits in occupational exposure will have a direct impact in all activities concerning radiation exposure. The likely effect on the nuclear industry of a major decrease in exposure limits is discussed and the approaches taken to minimize radiation exposures is presented. Changes to the philosophy of radiation protection that would allow accommodation of lower limits are suggested. Improvements to dose tracking and dose monitoring techniques are discussed. Methods for reducing existing radiation fields and for preventing future radiation field increases are briefly reviewed. Additionally, actions taken in the Spanish nuclear industry to identify collective groups and tasks potentially affected by the reduced new recommended limits are presented. (author)

  9. Regulatory aspects of radiation protection in Indian nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Vipin; Pawar, S.K.; Duraisamy, S.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Energy Act of 1962 covers the radiation safety aspects in the development, control and use of atomic energy. To carry out certain regulatory and safety functions under this act, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) was constituted in November 15, 1983. Operating Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) account for about 60% of occupational collective dose and about 65% of the number of radiation workers in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Therefore radiation protection aspects in NPPs are of prime importance. In 1970s and 1980s the high radiation exposures in NPPs was an issue with TAPS-1 and 2 reaching annual collective dose of 50 Person-Sv. In response to this, AERB constituted an expert committee to investigate the possibility of reducing collective doses in NPPs in 1988. Subsequently the recommendations of this committee were implemented in all NPPs. In 1990, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a downward revision of occupational dose limit to 20 mSv/yr from the earlier limit of 50 mSv/yr. Regulatory body endorsed these recommendations and gradually brought down the annual dose limits from 40 mSv in 1991 to 30 mSv in 1994 with the limit of 100 mSv averaged over a five year period in line with ICRP recommendations. Over the years, the regulatory body has put in place a sound regulatory frame work and mechanism to ensure adequate protection of occupational workers, members of public and environment due to operation of NPPs. Vast experiences in the field of radiation protection vis-à-vis stringent regulatory requirements such as review of exposure cases and special regulatory inspections during Biennial Shut Down (BSD) has helped in downward trends in occupational and public doses. This paper highlights the role of regulatory body in controlling the radiation doses to both occupational workers and members of public in the NPPs through a three-tier review system. The regulatory oversight, inspections and reviews has resulted in

  10. Approach to NORM/TENORM Problem based on Radiation Protection Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, T.; Sugiura, N.

    2004-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) and Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) are recent discussion issues in radiation protection. Relating materials are phosphate fertilizer, rare earth material, oil and gas, coal, metal ore, cement, ceramics, mineral sand, titanium pigment, building materials etc. These related industries, workers and public should be protected from radiations by including radioactive materials like uranium, thorium, radium etc. In this article, typical states of these materials and management are briefly reviewed and radiation protection principles how to consider NORM/TENORM based on ICRP recommendations and IAEA standards are discussed. Originally, the natural materials are excluded for its un-amenability of control. But under several conditions, an intervention concept should be applied and some consumer products are to be controlled based on a practice concept. The regulatory management is examined through a classification of NORM/TENORM and development of concepts; practice and intervention, exclusion and exemption, optimization of protection, etc. The optimization of protection is one of the most important discussion points. The origin of radioisotopes is natural. Therefore, the criteria or standard should be different from that of artificial source. Too strict regulation will cause much social and economical confusion. The harmonization of radiation protection system on NORM/TENORM in FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) countries was also tried by information exchange and intercomparison. (Author)

  11. Radiation protection - Performance criteria for radiobioassay. Part 1: General principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    radiobioassay results into dose are provided in publications of national and international regulations and guides, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU). Recommendations of the ICRP, NCRP, IAEA and ICRU, and experience with the practical application of these recommendations to the conduct of radiobioassay services and the interpretation and use of bioassay results in radiation protection programmes, have been considered in the development of this part of ISO 12790

  12. A REVIEW OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION PROTECTION WHEN APPLIED TO THE PATIENT IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, B Michael

    2017-06-01

    A review of the role and relevance of the principles of radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology as specified by ICRP has been undertaken when diagnostic risks arising from an examination are taken into account. The increase in population doses arising from diagnostic radiology over the past 20 years has been due to the widespread application of higher dose CT examinations that provide significantly more clinical information. Consequently, diagnostic risks as well as radiation risks need to be considered within the patient radiation protection framework. Justification and optimisation are discussed and the limitations imposed on patient protection by employing only a radiation risk framework is highlighted. The example of radiation protection of the patient in breast screening programmes employing mammography is used to highlight the importance of defined diagnostic outcomes in any effective radiation protection strategy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Radiation protection measures in the case of incidents and radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzberg, B.

    1976-01-01

    Measures to be taken in the case of radiation accidents connected with an unusually high radiation exposure to persons, the amounts of which exceed the limiting values, with depend on whether there has been an external or an internal exposure. In order to give further treatment in the case of whole-body or partial-body irradiation, it is necessary to estimate the exposure dose. In nuclear medicine the accident doses are generally low, i.e. acute radiation damage does not occur here, and immediate measures are not necessary. Therapeutic measures in the case of incorporation accidents are only necessary when the maximum amounts for the nuclide in question recommended by the ICRP has been reached or exceeded in the organism. However, decorporation measures ought to be carried out only by qualified radiation protection physicians. The type of radiation accident which occurs most frequently in nuclear medicine is radiation exposure as a result of contamination. If in the case of contamination of a person the measurement exceeds the radioactivity limit, the decontamination measures are necessary. In the present contribution, these measures for cases without injuries are described in detail. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Considerations on radiation protection of aircraft crew in Brazil; Consideracoes a respeito de protecao radiologica de tripulacoes de aeronaves no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, C.A.; Goncalez, O.L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.b [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Sordi, G.M.; Caldas, L.V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper discuss the guidelines existing in the ICRP documents related to radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew and it is presented a brief report on the evolution of these studies in this field, and also the regulations already adopted by the integrating of the European Union, Canada and USA. Also, are presented some peculiarities of Brazilian air space and the legislation applied to work with ionizing radiation, discussing the general aspects of radiation protection applied to the aircraft crew in Brazil

  15. Radiation protection principles as applied to the disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste and protection of the public. Commentary of ICRP publication 81 and publication 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso

    2001-01-01

    This commentary is for ICRP Publication 81 concerning the disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste to which the Publication 82 giving theoretical basis for protection of the public exposed for a long period. The primary object for prevention is the public in this disposal, which is quite different from the concept hitherto where the object is the facility. The essential points in the prevention are the definition and direction for the protection of future generations, critical group, potential exposures, protection optimization, principles in the technology and management, consistency of the principle, and evidence of observance to radiological standards. Dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/y or 10 -5 risk, reasonable measures taken for reduction of probable human invasion of its influence and observance to technological and control principles are recommended. Publication 82 principally describes and discusses the reference level for intervention and dose limits to the public due to action.(K.H.)

  16. The implementation of the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Kyu Lim

    1993-01-01

    Over the last three years, the new Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60) brought some controversies in radiation protection field. In the course of preparation for implementation of the new Recommendations in Korea, some main issues were critically reviewed including the reduction of dose limits for occupational exposures, the introduction of the concept of dose constraints for proposed practices, and the description of radiological protection system using the concept of practice and intervention. Not only scientific meaning of dose limits but also socio-political impact in different countries must be considered for implementation to the regulatory system. How-to-communicate with the general public on the radiation risk would be more difficult task for specialists than how-to-meet the lower limits. A considerable amount of costs and resources will be required for implementing the new Recommendations. The most dominant portion of the resources would be needed in the education program including the training of personnel in radiation protection field. Education of the general public on the underlying concept of the new system of radiological protection is also important to prevent any unfavorable disturbance on the public acceptance

  17. ALI and DAC for transuranic elements based on the metabolic data presented in ICRP Publication 48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Orihiko; Yamaguchi, Yukichi; Homma, Toshimitsu

    1987-07-01

    The recently published ICRP report, ICRP Publication 48, presents the new metabolic data of some transuranic elements, compared with those employed in the calculation of ALI and DAC in ICRP Publication 30. Values of ALI and DAC for 72 radionuclides were calculated using the metabolic data presented in the Publication 48. The calculation was performed by a computer code system DOSDAC, which can systematically calculate ALI and DAC by the same method as that described in the Publication 30. The calculated values of ALI and DAC were tabulated in the same format as that of the supplements to the Publication 30. For the convenience of using in the dose assessment, also given are values of committed effective dose equivalent per intake of unit activity. It is expected that these values will be applied to the radiation protection purposes. (author)

  18. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  19. Basic safety standards for radiation protection. 1982 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Health Organization, the International Labour Organisation and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have undertaken to provide jointly a world-wide basis for harmonized and up-to-date radiation protection standards. The new Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection are based upon the latest recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which are essentially contained in its Publication No.26. These new Basic Safety Standards have been elaborated by an Advisory Group of Experts which met in Vienna from 10-14 October 1977, from 23-27 October 1978 and from 1-12 December 1980 under the joint auspices of the IAEA, ILO, WHO and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD. Comments on the draft Basic Safety Standards received from Member States and relevant organizations were taken into account by the Advisory Group in the process of preparation of the revised Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection, which are published by the IAEA on behalf of the four sponsoring organizations. One of the main features of this revision is an increased emphasis on the recommendation to keep all exposures to ionizing radiation as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; consequently, radiation protection should not only apply the basic dose limits but also comply with this recommendation. Detailed guidance is given to assist those who have to decide on the implementation of this recommendation in particular cases. Another important feature is the recommendation of a more coherent method for achieving consistency in limiting risks to health, irrespective of whether the risk is of uniform or non-uniform exposure of the body.

  20. From 'Roentgen' to 'effective dose'. Cooperation of PTR/PTB with Standard Committee Radiology in the development of radiation protection dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Dietze, G.; Hohlfeld, K.

    1995-01-01

    The development of quantities and units in the field of radiation protection dosimetry is demonstrated by some examples. This development is strongly connected with work performed at the PTR/PTB and the work of the ''Normenausschuss Radiologie (NAR) im DIN''. In the following the new radiation protection operational quantities are described which have been recommended by the international commissions ICRU and ICRP for use in area and individual monitoring of external radiation. It is aimed to introduce these quantities in Germany in 1995 - also in legal metrology. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1997-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.

    1996-01-01

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author)

  3. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1996-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Dosimetric Significance of the ICRP's Updated Guidance and Models, 1989-2003, and Implications for U.S. Federal Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.

    2003-09-10

    Over the past two decades the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a series of Federal guidance documents for the purpose of providing the Federal and State agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs. Currently recommended dose conversion factors, annual limits on intake, and derived air concentrations for intake of radionuclides are tabulated in Federal Guidance Report No. 11 (FGR 11), published in 1988. The tabulations in FGR 11 were based on dosimetric quantities and biokinetic and dosimetric models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed for application to occupational exposures. Since the publication of FGR 11 the ICRP has revised some of its dosimetric quantities and its models for workers and has also developed age-specific models and dose conversion factors for intake of radionuclides by members of the public. This report examines the extent of the changes in the inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients of FGR 11 implied by the updated recommendations of the ICRP, both for workers and members of the public.

  5. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Jones, C. [Retired US DOE (United States); Lochard, J. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Lazo, T. [OECD/NEA - Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been

  6. Radiation protection and personnel safety in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Due to availability of a variety of radioisotopes from BRIT, a considerable number of industrial organizations have come up in India which employ radiation sources in one form or the other. More such organizations may come up in the near future due to the 'Make in India' policy of the Government. All ionizing radiations, whether electromagnetic (gamma- ã ) or corpuscular (particles of alpha-á, or beta-â-), and neutrons (0n1) are harmful to the human body. The damage done by radiations is sinister as human senses are not capable of detecting even lethal doses of radiation. The dose of radiations absorbed by human body which take into account the biological effectiveness of different types of radiations as noted above. The overall outcome of exposure to radiation is initiated by damage to the cells of the organism. The effects of radiation may be deterministic or stochastic, early or late, of somatic or genetic type. The somatic effects (physical) can either be immediate or delayed when the whole body is acutely irradiated with radiation doses. All countries including India have brought their national laws/standards on ionizing radiation in line with the ICRP codes. The conditions for registration, transport, storage, protection and use of radiation sources have been laid down in regulations. The purpose of practical protection against radiation is to prevent any individual receiving a harmful dose. Radiation measurement Instruments like dose meter, pocket dosimeter, NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and recording instruments such as film/TLD badge have been briefly described

  7. Preliminary radiation protection tests for the body height and body weight of the Chinese reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Z.Y.; Chang, Z.Y.; Lan, W.Z.; Yin, G.A.; Li, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation protection standard recommended by ICRP was evaluated in terms of its suitability for Chinese people. The body height and weight of 100,325 healthy Chinese were measured and anatomical data collected from usable corpses of persons who died by accident or sudden death. The data included the size and weight of certain organs. 18 refs

  8. International Commission On Radiological Protection: recommendations relevant to the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is an independent, international organization that advances for the public benefit the science of radiological protection, in particular by providing recommendations and guidance on all aspects of protection against ionizing radiation. This presentation touches on aspects of The 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP, a fundamental document that lays out the system of radiological protection for all exposure situations and types, and focuses on other recent publications relevant to the uranium industry. Of particular relevance are the 2009 ICRP Statement on Radon and the accompanying report on lung cancer risk from radon. (author)

  9. Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiations arising from Medical and Dental Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1972-01-01

    This Code is a revision of the 1964 Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use. This revised Code (which does not have the force of law) applies to the use of ionizing radiations arising from all forms of medical and dental practice and from allied research involving human subjects. It covers both workers, patients and members of the public. Although the arrangements recommended relate primarily to institutions they should be applied, as far as possible, by all medical and dental practitioners. The Code has been drawn up in the light of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and of the views of the Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations.

  10. New radiobiological findings bearing on the 1977 ICRP recommendations. [Sensitivity of mouse and monkey prenatal oocytes to chronic, low-dose, tritium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-02-14

    Recent experiments on low-level irradiation during development raise questions relevant to ICRP Publication 26. Mice and monkeys were studied; the measured endpoint was the radiation-induced loss of female germ cells. Three issues are examined. The first is the numerical value of Q (quality factor) appropriate for low-energy beta rays. Comparisons of tritium with gamma radiation were made under conditions of chronic, low-level exposure, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was found to approach 3. Its bearing on ICRP's recommendations concerning Q applicable to tritium is discussed. Second, female germ cells in squirrel monkeys before birth were discovered to be extraordinarily radiosensitive, more easily destroyed than those of mice. If this holds for other primates too, it has radiation-protection implications hitherto overlooked. Third, the contrast between massive germ-cell loss from chronic exposure in prenatal squirrel monkeys and reported radioresistance of oocytes to acute exposure in rhesus monkeys, unless due to species difference, suggests that during development protracted irradiation may be especially injurious. This also could have important radiation-protection implications and is under investigation. (ERB)

  11. The Involvement of IRPA in the Development of ICRP and Other International Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: One of the main items in the IRPA constitution is to encourage the establishment and continuous review of universally acceptable radiation protection standards or recommendations through the international bodies concerned. This matter was discussed in depth at the Associate Societies Forum during the IRPA-10 Congress in Hiroshima in May 2000. A clear consensus existed among societies present that IRPA must play a larger role in the standard setting process. The mechanisms to fulfil this role have still to be elaborated but two processes have been identified. One for collecting and transmitting societies views on proposals by standards-setting bodies and another for quickly informing societies about the developments within international bodies on which IRPA acts as an observer. An example of the first was when IRPA invited its Member Societies to comment on Professor Roger Clarke's Controllable Dose proposal. The IRPA 10 Congress in May 2000 in Hiroshima provided the obvious focus for discussing the responses from the various Societies. These have been brought together in a report entitled IRPA Member Societies' Contributions to the development of new ICRP Recommendations and transmitted to ICRP by the IRPA Secretariat. The second procedure is more established as IRPA has observer status with a number of organisations including ICRP, IAEA and NEA and on interagency committees such as the Interagency Committee on Radiation Safety Standards (IACRS). (author)

  12. Present situation and influence of new ICRP recommendations on radioactive material transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamard, J.; Ringot, C.

    1991-01-01

    The publication of new ICRP recommendations will involve the revision of IAEA standards and consequently the revision of transport regulations for radioactive materials. Transport regulations are briefly reviewed and application for radiation protection of workers and public is examined. Influence of new recommendations on transport regulations and eventual modifications on classification and transport of materials, packaging design and permissible exposure for workers and public in the prospect of regulation revision forecasted for 1995

  13. ICRP and radiological protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Standards in relation to radiological protection in medicine are well-documented, particularly with the recent update of the Basic Safety Standards. The principles of justification and optimisation remain key, as dose limitation is not applicable in medical practice. Appropriate justification relies on the knowledge, experience and discretion of the relevant medical practitioners and this may be overlooked in the race for diagnosis and treatment. One argument would be further regulation of medical exposures, although it is difficult to see how this could be imposed without denying patients essential investigations and treatments. Another contentious issue is individual patient dose management with the possible creation of a 'radiation passport'. Individual radiation susceptibility is a topic that has attracted much attention, but how to manage such persons, if identified, raises further questions. Communicating radiation risks and benefits to patients appropriately needs to be addressed, including who should be responsible for this, given accurate knowledge is a prerequisite. Ethics in radiological protection is also being widely discussed and this in relation to medical practice, which already involves numerous ethical issues, is likely to be open to debate in the near future. (authors)

  14. The Nea contribution to the evolution of the international system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Since the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) initiated a dialogue in 1999 on the evolution of the system of radiological protection, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has actively engaged in providing the ICRP with input and views. The Committee's work on this subject has included eight expert group reports, seven international conferences, and four detailed review and comment assessments of draft ICRP recommendations. This report presents a chronological summary of the issues, views and concerns raised by the CRPPH as the ICRP issued various draft versions of its new recommendations (ICRP Publication 103, published in December 2007), and of the response by the ICRP as seen in its subsequent draft recommendations. The interest of this summary report is that it will not only assist readers in understanding the main themes and concepts of the new ICRP recommendations, but also why and how the changes from the previous ICRP Publication 60 recommendations came about. (author)

  15. ICRP 60 - the next step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Thomson, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Following the publication in 1990 of the recommendations proposed by the International Commission on Radiological protection (ICRP 60), this editorial briefly highlights the advice given by the NRPB to UK government departments on how to implement those recommendations regarding occupational, medical and public exposure. (UK)

  16. Radiation and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation are summarized. The principles and practice of radiation protection, as applied to human populations, are described with reference to the ICRP recommendations for 'justification, optimization and dose limits'. (U.K.)

  17. The new ICRP recommendations on radiological protection in geological disposal of long-lived solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, Jacques; Schneider, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste management has been the subject of several recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) since 1985. The aim of the new Publication 122 (2013) is to describe how the 2007 general recommendations of the Commission (Publication 103) can be applied in the context of geological disposal. For this purpose, it is important to emphasise that the new approach developed by ICRP is based on three types of exposure situations: planned, emergency and existing: - Planned exposure situations correspond to situations where exposures result from the operation of deliberately introduced sources. Exposures can be planned and fully controlled. - Emergency exposure situations correspond to situations where exposures result from the loss of control of a source within a planned exposure, or from an unexpected situation (e.g. malevolent event). These situations require urgent actions to prevent or mitigate exposures. - Existing exposure situations correspond to situations where exposures result from sources that already exist when decisions are taken to control them. The characterisation of exposure is therefore a prerequisite for their control. The application of the three basic radiological protection principles - justification, optimisation of protection and limitation of individual doses - are therefore considered in this new framework with justification and optimisation applying to the three types of exposure situations and limitation only to planned exposure situations. The main points highlighted in Publication 122 for the application of the system of radiological protection to geological disposal of long-life solid radioactive waste are summarized

  18. Operational Radiological Protection and Aspects of Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Lindvall, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1992, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), along with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has sponsored the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE). ISOE collects and analyses occupational exposure data and experience from over 400 nuclear power plants around the world and is a forum for radiological protection experts from both nuclear power plants and regulatory authorities to share lessons learned and best practices in the management of worker radiation exposures. In connection to the ongoing work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop new recommendations, the ISOE programme has been interested in how the new recommendations would affect operational radiological protection application at nuclear power plants. Bearing in mind that the ICRP is developing, in addition to new general recommendations, a new recommendation specifically on optimisation, the ISOE programme created a working group to study the operational aspects of optimisation, and to identify the key factors in optimisation that could usefully be reflected in ICRP recommendations. In addition, the Group identified areas where further ICRP clarification and guidance would be of assistance to practitioners, both at the plant and the regulatory authority. The specific objective of this ISOE work was to provide operational radiological protection input, based on practical experience, to the development of new ICRP recommendations, particularly in the area of optimisation. This will help assure that new recommendations will best serve the needs of those implementing radiation protection standards, for the public and for workers, at both national and international levels. (author)

  19. Radiation protection requirements in the limitation of the release of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes the requirements of radiation protection, as presented in the new ICRP recommendation, in relation to the limitation of the release of radioactive effluents. The concepts of effective dose equivalent and collective dose equivalent are used in the presentation of the optimization procedures and the dose limitation to individuals. The dose commitment is used for the procedures applied to control future exposures. An appendix describes the basic concepts and quantities used in assessments of human exposures and risks. (author)

  20. Precautions against radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the characteristics of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations likely to cause hazards in a chemical laboratory are considered. Quantities and units of radiation are described. The general principles of radiation protection, precautions against radiation hazards, ICRP standards and recommendations and the legislation relating to the control of radiation hazards in the UK are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Comparison of old and new ICRP models for respiratory tract dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the historical development and application of respiratory tract dosimetry models by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, ICRP, for health protection from inhaled radioactive aerosols. Three different models are discussed, those that were included in ICRP recommendations published in 1960 and 1979, and the new ICRP Publication 66. Basic features of these models are compared and contrasted. These features include model structure, sites and frequencies of particle deposition, processes and rates of clearance of the deposited material from the respiratory tract, and consideration of the parameters involved in these processes and how various factors can influence these parameters. All three models lead to the calculation of absorbed radiation doses with differing degrees of regional and local specificity. These calculations are achieved using different tools ranging from quick hand calculations to sophisticated computerized modeling approaches. A side-by-side review of these models indicates several important trends in respiratory tract dosimetry models, the most obvious of which is the increased complexity of each new model over the past 30+ years. These increases reflect both the increasing size of the knowledge base derived from studies in laboratory animals and in human subjects and the need for models more broadly applicable for both occupational and environmental exposures. It is likely that future research will be directed to those key aspects of the new model having the largest uncertainties. The detailed design of the new model and its associated software provide excellent means of identifying useful research areas and using the resulting new information in organized and productive ways

  2. Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiations arising from Medical and Dental Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Code is a revision of the 1964 Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use. This revised Code (which does not have the force of law) applies to the use of ionizing radiations arising from all forms of medical and dental practice and from allied research involving human subjects. It covers both workers, patients and members of the public. Although the arrangements recommended relate primarily to institutions they should be applied, as far as possible, by all medical and dental practitioners. The Code has been drawn up in the light of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and of the views of the Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations. (NEA) [fr

  3. Radiological protection in medicine. ICRP Publication 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  4. ICRP Publication 105. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Bernard; Biau, Alain; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Etard, Cecile; Rannou, Alain; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Roch, Patrice Elle a ete validee par le Professeur Jean-Marc Cosset

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This

  5. The ICRP task group respiratory tract model - an age-dependent dosimetric model for general application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Human Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Protection has developed a revised dosimetric model for the respiratory tract. Papers outlining the model, and describing each aspect of it were presented at the Third International Workshop on Respiratory Tract Dosimetry (Albuquerque 1-3 July 1990), the Proceedings of which were recently published in Radiation Protection Dosimetry Volume 38 Nos 1-3 (1991). Since the model had not changed substantially since the Workshop at Albuquerque, only a summary of the paper presented at Schloss Elmau is included in these Proceedings. (author)

  6. Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident: experiences of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, T; Takahara, S; Kimura, M; Kinase, S

    2015-06-01

    Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident are discussed in this paper based on the experiences following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The criteria for use in nuclear emergencies in the Japanese emergency preparedness guide were based on the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 63. Although the decision-making process for implementing protective actions relied heavily on computer-based predictive models prior to the accident, urgent protective actions, such as evacuation and sheltering, were implemented effectively based on the plant conditions. As there were no recommendations and criteria for long-term protective actions in the emergency preparedness guide, the recommendations of ICRP Publications 103, 109, and 111 were taken into consideration in determining the temporary relocation of inhabitants of heavily contaminated areas. These recommendations were very useful in deciding the emergency protective actions to take in the early stages of the Fukushima accident. However, some suggestions have been made for improving emergency preparedness and response in the early stages of a severe nuclear accident. © The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers 2014.

  7. Data file on retention and excretion of inhaled radionuclides calculated using ICRP dosimetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigure, Nobuhito; Nakano, Takashi; Enomoto, Hiroko; Shimo, Michikuni; Inaba, Jiro

    2000-01-01

    , the effective dose as well as the intake of radioactivity for the monitored worker can be evaluated from the measured monitoring result. This data file can help dosimetrists involved in radiation protection to assess intakes of radionuclides in work places where individual monitoring is introduced as a component of the radiation protection program. (author)

  8. The purpose of radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, K.Z.

    1979-01-01

    In the early period (1942-1960) of nuclear energy programmes with which I was associated, most radiation protection standards seem to have been formulated on the assumption that there is a threshold dose of ionizing radiation below which no radiation damage is expected to result in the lifetime of the exposed individual. It was in this climate of opinion that health physics began as a profession, and levels of maximum permissible exposure (MPE) to external sources of radiation, maximum permissible concentrations in air, water and food, and maximum permissible body burdens of radionuclides inside the human body were set and enforced. Some of the levels of MPE were quite high in comparison with present standards but, fortunately, the health physicists at the national laboratories in which most radiation workers were employed were very conservative; in most cases the average annual exposures were less than 10% of the MPE levels. However, there was not much concern with the man-rem concept, as exemplified by rather high levels of radioactive waste discharged from the plants or placed in temporary holding facilities - where there was a likely possibility of seepage into the environment. This situation was understandable and justifiable at a time when the purpose of radiation protection monitoring was simply to prevent individuals from exceeding a threshold dose. The period of the recent past up to the present time (1978) has been one in which there has been a gradual change from the concept of a threshold dose hypothesis to the linear hypothesis. In this period the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the national standards setting bodies have pointed out that the levels they have selected are based on the linear hypothesis, but in most respects they leave us with the impression that this is most probably a conservative assumption, subject to revision when better data become available. Also, during this period, the concept of exposure As Low As

  9. Information and training on radiation protection for trade union representatives from the nine Member States of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    As part of its training and information programme on radiation protection, the Directorate-General for Employment and Social Affairs (Health and Safety Directorate) organized for the third and fourth time (in October 1977 and 1978) seminars on radiation protection on behalf of trade union representatives from the nine Member States; the seminars served in particular as a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences. The present volume reproduces the papers read on those occasions, covering the following topics: the independence of radiaton protection units; training and information in radiation protection; analysis of the main innovations in radiological protection concepts emerging from ICRP Publication No 26; the protection of occasionally exposed workers; the work of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation; the concept of optimization; future developments in dosimetry. Although the publication is destined mainly for the participants in the two meetings, the information it contains may also be of use to anyone interested in the problems of radiation protection and the spreading of knowledge in this field

  10. Foetal dosimetry--is the ICRP dosimetric system for humans now complete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Steve [Westlakes Research Institute, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-01

    Internal dosimetry is possibly the most complex area of science associated with radiological protection, and has a long history. Primary control of internal exposure now relied on control of annual intakes rather than limitation of organ burdens. Although it took nearly a decade for regulations and hence the practice of occupational radiation protection to fully adopt the new recommendations, the new dosimetric concepts were quite rapidly adopted in the assessment of public exposure because the new methods provided a more natural means of assessing the significance of exposure to a combination of external and internal exposure involving a number of different radionuclides. As a result, following the ICRP's initial publication of dosimetric models for occupational exposure, adaptations became available to cover environmental exposure, including the exposure of infants and children. Increasingly sophisticated biokinetic and dosimetric models have now been developed which, together with the welcome availability of dose per unit intake factors in CD-ROM form make it easy for the radiation protection practitioner to assess committed effective doses, and committed equivalent doses to individual organs, to occupationally exposed adults and environmentally exposed infants, children and adults. The inability to readily assess doses to the developing foetus has, however, long been perceived as a significant gap in knowledge with implications for the study of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations and possibly also the control of occupational exposure for women of child-bearing age. The first systematic assessment of doses to the foetus was in connection with the study of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of Sellafield in the UK, for which preliminary models were developed. Since that time a few publications giving guidance on the calculation of foetal doses have emerged and more sophisticated assessments of foetal dose have been reported

  11. ICRP Publication 84 of the ICRP. Pregnancy and medical irradiation; ICRP publication 84 de la CIPR. Grossesse et irradiation medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In this volume, the ICRP answers questions relative to medical irradiation of pregnant women, that without responses could lead to unappropriated behaviours. It gives the circumstances for a women to be irradiated, the radiation doses delivered by the radiological procedures for a diagnosis and for a therapy. The risks for the fetus and the woman are tackled, their part in the general risks of the pregnancy and the information to give to the future mother. (N.C.)

  12. Radon dosimetry for workers: ICRP's approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, James W.; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently published two reports on radon exposure; Publication 115 on lung cancer risks from radon and radon progeny and Publication 126 on radiological protection against radon exposure. A specific graded approach for the control of radon in workplaces is recommended where a dose assessment is required in certain situations. In its forthcoming publication on Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) document, Part 3, effective dose coefficients for radon and thoron will be provided. These will be calculated using ICRP reference biokinetic and dosimetric models. Sufficient information and dosimetric data will be given so that site-specific dose coefficients can be calculated based on measured aerosol parameter values. However, ICRP will recommend a single dose coefficient of 12 mSv per working level month (WLM) for inhaled radon progeny to be used in most circumstances. This chosen reference value was based on both dosimetry and epidemiological data. In this paper, the application and use of dose coefficients for workplaces are discussed including the reasons for the choice of the reference value. Preliminary results of dose calculations for indoor workplaces and mines are presented. The paper also briefly describes the general approach for the management of radon exposure in workplaces based both on ICRP recommendations and the European directive (2013/59/EURATOM). (authors)

  13. Development of radiation protection and measurement technology -A study on the radiation and environmental safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Si Young; Seo, Kyeong Won; Yoon, Seok Cheol; Lee, Tae Yeong; Kim, Bong Hwan; Chung, Deok Yeon; Lee, Ki Chang; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang; Kim, Jang Ryeol; Lee, Sang Yoon

    1994-07-01

    Reference radiation fields which can meet the national and international standard and criteria such as the ANSI N13.11 have been designed, produced and evaluated to maintain the national traceability and reliability of the radiation measurement and to provide precise calibration of the various radiation measuring instruments as well as standard irradiation of the personal dosimeters for the performance evaluation. Existing dose calculation algorithm has been improved to correctly evaluate the shallow dose from the β(Ti-204) + γ(Cs-137) mixed radiation exposure by applying the TLD response correction function newly derived in this study. A mathematical algorithm to calculate the internal dose from inhalation of the uranium isotopes has been developed on the basis of the ICRP-30 respiratory tract model. Detailed performance analysis of the KAERI lung counter has been carried out to participate in the intercomparison of lung dosimetry. A preliminary and basic study on the quantitative method of optimal dose reduction based on the ALARA concept has been performed to technically support and strengthen the national radiation protection infrastructure. (Author)

  14. Workers and the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    In both the preparation and the application of the recommendations presented by the ICRP one important voice has been absent: that of the workers in the nuclear industry. A large number of specialists are studying their situation from all points of view, in their different capacities as workers, consumers and male or female members of the public, but this extensive study is being done without consulting them, without their opinion even being asked for. The paper discusses such deficiencies, in particular all those aspects which distinguish these recommendations from a legal text. The lack of conciseness in the definition of the limit which the average annual dose to a large group of workers must not exceed (500 mrad) is considered. The possibility of a large number of workers being exposed for a long period is not acceptable if the decision is left to the manager of a nuclear facility alone. Cost-benefit analysis, as it is described in the ICRP text, cannot be considered to provide credible protection from the point of view of workers. Moreover, the various ICRP recommendations fail to mention such important matters as allowance for low-dose effects, disparities in the social security coverage offered to various categories of workers in the event of occupational illness, and the increasing use of migrant workers for difficult decontamination and maitenance tasks. At a time when it is thought that nuclear technology can be standardized, the French Democratic Labour Confederation (CFDT) expresses its fears concerning the practical application of the ICRP recommendations; for example, the text of ICRP Publication 26 has not yet been translated into French, but Euratom has already proposed directives for its application in Member States

  15. Justification in radiation protection: a study on screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Law, J.

    2002-01-01

    Justification was defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in publication 26 as no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produces a positive net benefit. ICRP have subsequently refined this definition. In ICRP 60 justification is defined as no practice involving exposures to radiation should be adopted unless it produces sufficient benefit to the exposed individual or to society to offset the detriment it causes. (The justification of a practice). The European Commission have included justification in the recent medical exposures directive. This Directive distinguishes between individual medical exposures and medical practices. Justification is defined in the Medical Exposures Directive as showing a sufficient net benefit weighing the total potential diagnostic or therapeutic benefits it produces, including the direct health benefits to an individual and the benefits to society, against the individual detriment that the exposure might cause. Detriment is defined in the Medical Exposures Directive as clinically observable deleterious effects that are expressed in individuals or their descendants, the appearance of which is either immediate or delayed and, in the latter case, implies a probability, rather than a certainty, of appearance

  16. 21 century perspective in radiation protection of humans and human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2003-01-01

    In 21 century ionizing radiation is applied in all field of human activities. In parallel, the radiobiology and radiation medicine are developing as separate branches for the purposes of the radiation protection: for risk estimation and regulation of the human irradiation. Main features of radiation protection at the beginning of the century are: 1.Well developed conservative theoretical background, based on the linear non-threshold concept 'dose-effect' towards the carcinogenesis and genetic effects; 2. Developed international and national structures, including organizations as ICRP, UNSCEAR, ICRU, IAEA, WHO, FAO, BEIR, OECD/NEA, ILO, NCRP, NRPB etc. 3. Detailed regulative legislation for all cases of human irradiation, combines with effective control structures. Ionizing radiation is the most strictly regulated factor affecting humans among the all adverse impacts of the living environment. The expectations for the radiation protection in 21 century are: 1. A radical reassessment of the concept for low doses and the linear non-threshold concept since data for existing of a threshold on the human population level. 2. Taking into consideration of the the adaptation to the irradiation, comparable with the natural radiation background. 3. Taking into consideration of the radiation hormesis, which are now ignored by the risk theory. 4. Clarification of the questions of the genetic effects, which are not yet determined for the human population. 5. Radical solutions of the radioactive waste problem, which will be crucial for the future of the nuclear energy production. 6. Gradual overcoming of the fear from ionizing radiation, which is an important social factor

  17. The ICRP 60 and the agency's regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggio, A.L.; Novo, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has adopted its new '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection' in November 1990, they were published in 1991 as 'ICRP Publication 60.' Two main scenarios are considered by the new ICRP's recommendations: a) Protection in proposed and continuing practices (further subdivided as protection against actual exposures and protection against potential exposures); and b) Protection by intervention. Although intervention means any activity in order to decrease the overall exposure, removing existing sources, modifying pathways or reducing the number of exposed individuals, in relation to the transport of radioactive materials, protection by intervention is related mainly to emergency planning, while protection against actual and potential exposures can be considered as the subject of most of the requirements of the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material', of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The on-going revision of the IAEA Safety Series No. 9, which is aimed at putting this publication in line with the new ICRP recommendations will, for the first time, provide a convalidated radiological framework for the 1996 revision of the Agency Transport Regulations. However, to adapt to the transport area the radiological principles and criteria will require a significant effort and a carefully evaluation of the overall impact of each change proposed. (J.P.N.)

  18. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, John; Day, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  19. Principles of the International Commission on Radiological Protection system of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation of a quantitative system of dose limitation based on ICRP principles of 'stochastic' and 'non-stochastic' effects requires that judgements be made on several factors including: relationships between radiation dose and the induction of deleterious effects for a variety of endpoints and radiation types; acceptable levels of risk for radiation workers and members of the public; and methods of assessing whether the cost of introducing protective measures is justified by the reduction in radiation detriment which they will provide. In the case of patients deliberately exposed to ionising radiations, the objectives of radiation protection differ somewhat from those applying to radiation workers and members of the public. For patients, risks and benefits relate to the same person and upper limits on acceptable risks may differ grossly from those appropriate to normal individuals. For these reasons, and because of its historical relationship with the International Congress of Radiology, the ICRP has given special consideration to radiation protection in medicine and has published reports on protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology and in radiation therapy. (author)

  20. The evolution of the system of radiological protection: the justification for new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    ICRP has been encouraging discussion, during the past few years, on the best way of expressing radiological protection philosophy in its next Recommendations, which it plans to publish in 2005. The present Recommendations were initiated by Publication 60 in 1990 and have been complemented by additional publications over the last twelve years. It is now clear that there is a need for the Commission to summarize the totality of the number of numerical values that it has recommended in some ten reports. This has been done in this paper and from these, a way forward is indicated to produce a simplified and more coherent statement of protection philosophy for the start of the 21. century. A radical revision is not envisaged, rather a coherent statement of current policy and a simplification in its application. (author)

  1. DNA Repair Inhibition by Mercuric Chloride in Earthworms after Exposure to Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain); An, Kwang Guk [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    All organisms are being exposed to harmful factors present in the environment. Ionizing radiation can damage DNA through a series of molecular events depending on the radiation energy. The biological effects due to the combined action of ionizing radiation with the other factor are hard to estimate and predict in advance. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants to be used in environmental radiation protection. Particularly, the earthworm Eisenia fetida can be used as a bio-indicator of pollution in soil. This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of radiation and the synergistic effects between radiation and mercury in earthworm, E. fetida

  2. DNA Repair Inhibition by Mercuric Chloride in Earthworms after Exposure to Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Nili, Mohammad; An, Kwang Guk

    2011-01-01

    All organisms are being exposed to harmful factors present in the environment. Ionizing radiation can damage DNA through a series of molecular events depending on the radiation energy. The biological effects due to the combined action of ionizing radiation with the other factor are hard to estimate and predict in advance. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants to be used in environmental radiation protection. Particularly, the earthworm Eisenia fetida can be used as a bio-indicator of pollution in soil. This study was performed to investigate the acute genotoxic effects of radiation and the synergistic effects between radiation and mercury in earthworm, E. fetida

  3. Integration of the environment into the system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higley, K.

    2018-01-01

    In 2005 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) embarked on an effort to ensure that the system for environmental radiological protection would be reconcilable with that for radiological protection of man, and with the approaches used for protection of the environment from other potential hazards

  4. Control development of radiation protection and safety on personnel eye lens of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titik Kartika; Ishak

    2013-01-01

    The review on radiation protection and safety to the lens of personnel especially in interventional radiology activities has been carried out. The use of radiation in interventional radiology installations provide significant exposure to the lens of the eye, especially personnel. The results of the latest various surveys and researches on the effects of low dose radiation to the eye lens indicates that the eye lens dose threshold is less than the preconceived values. Based on these facts, recently, ICRP and IAEA provides recommendations regarding the reduction of the value of the eye lens dose limit for personnel. BAPETEN have adopted the value of the eye lens dose limit in the development of new regulations on radiation protection and safety. However, the application of this provision has various challenges that BAPETEN provide 3 (three) years transitional period. These challenges include the problem of monitoring the eye lens dose, the eye lens protective equipment which is not adequate, the lack of understanding of personnel related to the risk of low radiation to the eye lens, as well as the proper procedures to mitigate those risks. BAPETEN as a regulatory agency is expected to provide solutions to the problems faced by the stake holders. Therefore, to answer the challenge, it is necessary to develop better monitoring of radiation protection and safety. (author)

  5. Trends in radiation protection--a view from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of ionizing radiation protection in our society, with the exception of extraordinary events such as the Chernobyl accident, can be considered reasonably satisfactory. Occupationally, average exposures have risks no greater than accident rates in safe industries and show a downward trend in concert with results of safety practices in other occupations; higher exposures are being addressed specifically, and a new NCRP guideline may prove useful. An important concern relating to the quality factor for neutrons is at least partially accounted for by recent International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and NCRP recommendations. Among public exposures, the most important by far is exposure to indoor Rn. However, this problem is being addressed on all fronts, and its magnitude and the means to deal with it will soon be better known. For the near future, we should see a stabilizing of risk estimates, albeit at levels very probably higher than formerly. There may also be an increasing tendency to use incidence rather than mortality for calculating these estimates. These changes may require some adjustment in our perspective on limits. As the difference in risk between the sexes becomes more definite, we may wish to adopt a policy of equal risk rather than one of equal dose. Age data also emphasize, more and more, the decline of risk with age; consequently, using older workers when feasible in radiation-exposure circumstances becomes more desirable. For the longer-term future, various developments can be expected, including, possibly, a more suitable climate for a risk system, a more appropriate way to express differences in radiation quality, further knowledge of the role probabilities of causation may play in radiation control, the effect of mitigating and enhancing factors, and progress in fundamental oncology

  6. Radiation protection of cyclotron vault with maze in PET Cyclotron Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, Marko

    2003-01-01

    The PET Cyclotron center (PCC) is a complex for production, research and application of positron radiopharmaceuticals for PET (Positron Emission Tomography), which was commissioned this year (2004) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Positron radionuclides are produced by 18/9 MeV proton/deuteron cyclotron CYCLONE 18/9. Radiation protection of personnel and inhabitants against ionizing radiation in the PCC is solved with regard to the ICRP recommendations and Slovak regulatory system, protection rules and criteria and optimization of radiation protection. In the article comparisons of calculated and measured neutron and gamma dose equivalent rates around the CYCLONE 18/9 and at various points behind the shielding of cyclotron vault with maze are presented. Description of the CYCLONE 18/9 as a source of angular distribution of neutron energy spectra (production of 18 F was considered) was simulated by Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Code MCNP4B was used for shielding calculation of cyclotron vault with maze. Neutron energy spectra behind the shielding were measured by Bonner spectrometer. The values of neutron dose equivalent, which were calculated and measured around the CYCLONE 18/9 and at various points behind the shielding of cyclotron vault with maze, are within the range of factor 2. (authors)

  7. The implications of ICRP publication 74 for the design of the LHC shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    A joint committee of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) have recently published a report recommending new factors for the conversion of the fluence of neutrons, photons and electrons into radiologically significant quantities. Both the quantities specified and the numerical values of the conversion coefficients are different from previously published values. This report investigates the effect of these changes on the predictions of shielding requirements for the LHC and suggests that only minor policy adjustments are necessary. (author)

  8. The ICRP working party on bioassay interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, F.A.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Birchall, A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there have been many developments in modelling the behaviour of radionuclides in the human body. The current generation of models are designed to be more 'realistic' than the previous generation of simple compartment models. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) uses these models to produce dose coefficients and recognises that there is a need to give more guidance on how these models can be used to interpret bioassay data. A working party has been set up to address the issue. This paper describes some of the problems, some approaches to solving the problems and the progress of the ICRP working party. (author)

  9. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Han Sung; Wang, Zhao Jun; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Beom Sun

    2015-11-21

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens.

  10. New ICRP human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The new ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract is based on the premise that the large differences in radiation sensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they receive argue for calculating specific tissue doses rather than average lung doses. The model is also directly applicable to the worldwide population of both workers and the public. The requirement to describe intake, and deposition, clearance and dosimetry in each respiratory tract region, for a wide range of subjects at various levels of exercise necessarily means that the model is more complex than that of ICRP Publication 30. The widespread use of powerful personal computers, and the availability of user-friendly software to implement the model, however, will make it widely and readily accessible when the report is published. (Author)

  11. Operational radiation protection and radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1989-01-01

    The radiation protection system in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) is reviewed. The competent authority (the SAAS) and its systems of licensing and supervision are described. Discussion covers the role of the Radiation Protection Officer, the types of radiation monitoring, medical surveillance programs and the classification of workers and work areas. Unusual occurrences in the GDR, 1963-1976, are presented and the occupational radiation protection problems at some specific types of workplaces are discussed. The GDR's system of training in radiation protection and nuclear safety is described. 5 figs., 18 tabs

  12. Implications of recent ICRP recommendations for risk assessments for radioactive waste disposal and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted a new set of recommendations in November 1990 which were issued at ICRP Publication No. 60 in March 1991. These recommendations incorporate new radiobiological information and outline a comprehensive system of radiological protection. This paper evaluates the implications of these new recommendations vis a vis risk assessments for radioactive waste disposal and remediation of radioactively contaminated sites

  13. Modern environmental ethics and the possible implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars

    1996-01-01

    Environmental ethics is concerned with the moral relations that hold between humans and the natural world. The ethical principles governing those relations determine our duties, obligations, and responsibilities with regard to the Earth's natural environment and the animals and plants that inhabit it. When a life-centered view is accepted as has been done by Taylor, the obligations and responsibilities we have with respect to the wild animals and plants of the Earth are seen to arise from certain moral relations between ourselves and the natural world itself. Considering the shift of ethical values that have occurred in the world, we may now be at a point in history when it is timely and when there also exist scientific reasons to set up a protection policy equivalent to the ICRP principles for protection of humans (justification, optimisation and dose limits) for the protection of environment (including animals) against the harmful effects of radiation

  14. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  15. The evolution of the system of radiological protection: the justification for new ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    ICRP has been encouraging discussion during the past few years on the best way of expressing radiological protection philosophy in its next recommendations, which it plans to publish in 2005. The present recommendations were initiated by Publication 60 in 1990 and have been complemented by additional publications over the last 12 years. It is now clear that there is a need for the Commission to summarise the totality of the number of numerical values that it has recommended in some ten reports. This has been done in this paper, and from these a way forward is indicated to produce a simplified and more coherent statement of protection philosophy for the start of the 21st century. A radical revision is not envisaged, rather a coherent statement of current policy and a simplification in its application. (memorandum)

  16. Uncertainties in fatal cancer risk estimates used in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki

    1999-01-01

    Although ICRP and NCRP had not described the details of uncertainties in cancer risk estimates in radiation protection, NCRP, in 1997, firstly reported the results of uncertainty analysis (NCRP No.126) and which is summarized in this paper. The NCRP report pointed out that there are following five factors which uncertainty possessing: uncertainty in epidemiological studies, in dose assessment, in transforming the estimates to risk assessment, in risk prediction and in extrapolation to the low dose/dose rate. These individual factors were analyzed statistically to obtain the relationship between the probability of cancer death in the US population and life time risk coefficient (% per Sv), which showed that, for the latter, the mean value was 3.99 x 10 -2 /Sv, median, 3.38 x 10 -2 /Sv, GSD (geometrical standard deviation), 1.83 x 10 -2 /Sv and 95% confidential limit, 1.2-8.84 x 10 -2 /Sv. The mean value was smaller than that of ICRP recommendation (5 x 10 -2 /Sv), indicating that the value has the uncertainty factor of 2.5-3. Moreover, the most important factor was shown to be the uncertainty in DDREF (dose/dose rate reduction factor). (K.H.)

  17. Protection against Natural Radiation at Home and at Work Exclusion, Practice, Intervention-Theory and Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Kock, J.

    2004-01-01

    The issues related to protection against natural radiation at home and at work are addressed in the last fifteen years by various international organizations, professional bodies and national laws and regulations. The ICRP and the IAEA outlined theoretical principles, basic recommendations and some practical instructions for the classification of exposure situations to natural radiation sources into those that are dealt in the framework of practices and interventions and those that are excluded from the framework because they are un-amenable to control. However, in many practical cases, this classification appears to be a complex task, which has to be tackled by the national competent authorities in each country. When trying to convert the principles and guidance outlined by the international bodies into national regulations and practical instructions, we discover that some issues are undecided upon and guidance is lacking relating to sources and practices that were not explicitly addressed. Furthermore, some ambiguities in the principles and guidelines can be detected and difficulties encountered in their implementation. The recommendations and instructions of the ICRP and the IAEA related to natural radiation sources and chronic exposure and their interpretation by the European Commission are reviewed and analyzed. Their implications on the possible ways to handle issues such as the protection against radon at home and at work, the limits to be set on natural radioactive substances in building materials and the radiation risks related to the phosphate and coal ash industries are discussed. Recent decisions of the competent authorities in Israel and Israeli regulations and standardization related to some of these issues are presented. (Author) 12 refs

  18. [Eye lens radiation exposure during ureteroscopy with and without a face protection shield: Investigations on a phantom model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, G; Figel, M; Denk, J; Schulz, K; Sabo, A

    2016-03-01

    Eye lens radiation exposure during radiologically-guided endoscopic procedures may result in radiation-induced cataracts; therefore, we investigated the ocular radiation exposure during ureteroscopy on a phantom model. Using an Alderson phantom model and eye lens dosimeters, we measured the ocular radiation exposure depending on the number of X-ray images and on the duration of fluoroscopic imaging. The measurements were done with and without using a face protection shield. We could demonstrate that a significant ocular radiation exposure can occur, depending on the number of X-ray images and on the duration time of fluoroscopy. Eye lens doses up to 0.025 mSv were recorded even using modern digital X-ray systems. Using face protection shields this ocular radiation exposure can be reduced to a minimum. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations of a mean eye lens dosage of 20 mSv/year may be exceeded during repeated ureteroscopy by a high volume surgeon. Using a face protection shield, the eye lens dose during ureteroscopy could be reduced to a minimum in a phantom model. Further investigations will show whether these results can be transferred to real life ureteroscopic procedures.

  19. Implications of tissue reactions for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer effects and risks at low doses from ionising radiation have been main issues within the field of radiological protection. In contrast, non-cancer effects and risks at low doses from ionising radiation are controversial topics within the field of radiation protection. These issues are discussed in ICRP Publication 118, 'ICRP Statement on Tissue Reactions.' Both non-cancer effects and risks are expected to become increasingly important to the system of radiation protection. Before this can happen, several factors must be considered: thorough characterization of the relationship between dose and risk; verification of the biological mechanisms for any noted excess risk; and adjustment of noted excess risks through the use of a detriment factor. It is difficult to differentiate the relatively small risks associated with radiation from other risk factors in the low-dose region of the dose response curve. Several recent papers also indicate the possibility of a non-linear dose response relationship for non-cancer effects. In addition, there are still many uncertainties associated with the biological mechanisms for non-cancer effects. Finally, it is essential to consider the incorporation of detriment into a well-defined system of radiological protection. Given the recent interest in non-cancer effects, it is essential to facilitate discussions in order to more clearly define dose limits within the existing system of radiation protection for both cancer and non-cancer effects. (author)

  20. Technology development for evaluation of operational quantities in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Si Young; Lee, T. Y.; Kim, B. H.

    2003-03-01

    Korean government recently published a national regulation on the internal exposure monitoring and dose evaluation (internal dosimetry) based on the most recent ICRP recommendation 60 and subsequent publications, which supercede the former ICRP recommendation 26 and publication 30, on which the internal dosimetry practice in Korea had been based so far. Consequently, this project, according to the demand from both government and nuclear industry, had been launched to develop a user-friendly computer code on internal dosimetry adopting the most up to date ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric model to resolve the difficulties and problems faced to nuclear industry and to develop related technology. The reliability of this code, named as BiDAS, as a result of several benchmark calculations for self assurance appeared to be excellent comparing with the foreign computer code. This computer code is expected to be successfully utilized in nuclear industry and related fields in complying with the national regulation on internal dosimetry program started from late 2003. Reference low level gamma(γ) radiation field for calibration of environmental radiation(γ) monitor and reference neutron field for calibration of n monitoring equipment have been established and characterized. International cross comparison of these reference radiation fields have been performed and radiation response of various radiation monitoring instrument has been tested by using these reference radiation fields. A technology which can directly measure the radiation quality factor and tissue absorbed dose has been established to evaluate the neutron dose in terms of operational quantity in the unknown mixed n-γ radiation field. Spherical and cylindrical TEPC systems have been designed and manufactured and a portable TEPC system to measure the neutron quality and dose in the real work field has been developed and tested in accelerator laboratory

  1. Comparative evaluation of different approaches to environmental protection against ionising radiation in view of practicability and consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Hornung, L.; Mundigl, S.; Kirchner, G.

    2006-01-01

    International organisations, including ICRP, IAEA and UNSCEAR, and the international scientific community are currently engaged in work on the protection of non-human species against ionising radiation as a complement to the existing framework centred on humans. The basic ideas and conceptual approaches developed during the last decade substantially agree with each other. The EC funded FASSET project (Framework for Assessment of Environmental Impact) summarizes and reviews the current knowledge of radiation effects on biota, provides basic dosimetric models for fauna and flora and suggests an assessment framework. Protection of the environment against ionising radiation, on the one hand, aims to close a conceptual gap in radiation protection. Therefore, current frameworks for environmental protection conceptually follow radiation protection of man. On the other hand, preservation of natural resources, habitats and the biological diversity are common objectives of environmental protection against radioactive as well as chemical pollutants, suggesting an integrated approach based on the fundamental ideas of conventional environmental protection. In essence, a conceptual framework encompassing protection of man as well as of fauna and flora against chemical and radioactive pollutants would be highly desirable in view of coherence, consistency and transparency. Such an umbrella concept communicates the positive message that similar issues are treated in a conceptually similar manner, thus facilitating scientific justification and public communication and increasing acceptance. This paper discusses different concepts and approaches to radiation protection of man, radiation protection of non-human biota and environmental protection against chemical pollutants, identifies common principles and differences, addresses conflicting requirements and evaluates the feasibility and limitations of such an encompassing framework. (authors)

  2. Control of ionising radiation - a UK viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The primary aim of radiological protection is to provide an appropriate standard of protection for mankind, both as individuals and collectively, without unduly limiting the beneficial practices giving rise to radiation exposure. Guidance on the fundamental principles for radiation protection is provided on a global scale by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Member states of the European Union, such as the UK, are bound by the Euratom Treaty that requires the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) to develop uniform standards for radiological protection. These standards are based on recommendations from ICRP and are laid down in Euratom Directives relating to the safety of workers and the public, and of patients undergoing medical exposures. Member states are required to introduce national legislation to comply with Directives. In addition to ICRP and CEC, other international bodies are involved in developing practical standards and guidelines for radiological protection. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides guidelines relating to the transport of radioactive material, and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides information on the biological effects of radiation. In the UK, the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) was established in 1970 as a statutory advisory body. It has no regulatory functions. NRPB advises Government on the acceptability and applicability of international recommendations. Principles are then applied in the UK by Acts of Parliament and subsidiary instruments such as regulations, licences, authorizations and approvals. Various government departments are involved in policing the control of radiation according to their particular role, for example the Department of the Environment in relation to pollution, and the Department of Employment for the health and safety of workers. (author)

  3. Consideration of the ICRP 2006 revised tissue weighting factors on age-dependent values of the effective dose for external photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Han, Eun Young; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    The effective dose recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is the sum of organ equivalent doses weighted by corresponding tissue weighting factors, wT. ICRP is in the process of revising its 1990 recommendations on the effective dose where new values of organs and tissue weighting factors have been proposed and published in draft form for consultation by the radiological protection community. In its 5 June 2006 draft recommendations, new organs and tissues have been introduced in the effective dose which do not exist within the 1987 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom series (e.g., salivary glands). Recently, the investigators at University of Florida have updated the series of ORNL phantoms by implementing new organ models and adopting organ-specific elemental composition and densities. In this study, the effective dose changes caused by the transition from the current recommendation of ICRP Publication 60 to the 2006 draft recommendations were investigated for external photon irradiation across the range of ICRP reference ages (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year and adult) and for six idealized irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), left-lateral (LLAT), right-lateral (RLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Organ-absorbed doses were calculated by implementing the revised ORNL phantoms in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX2.5, after which effective doses were calculated under the 1990 and draft 2006 evaluation schemes of the ICRP. Effective doses calculated under the 2006 draft scheme were slightly higher than estimated under ICRP Publication 60 methods for all irradiation geometries exclusive of the AP geometry where an opposite trend was observed. The effective doses of the adult phantom were more greatly affected by the change in tissue weighting factors than that seen within the paediatric members of the phantom series. Additionally, dose conversion

  4. Problems of the inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational radiation protection control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przyborowski, S.

    1993-01-01

    New international recommendations (ICRP-60) on inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational control are expected. Based on present regulations in Germany the problems of their implementation into radiation protection practice will be discussed. For underground workplaces and workplaces in radon spas and waterworks problems may be exist in particular points, whereas inclusion of workplaces in buildings seems to be problematicly in general. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Radiological protection system in the era of nuclear renaissance expectation for development of radiological protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyomatsu, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The current radiological protection system, which was established mainly by the ICRP and UNSCEAR, has contributed to the prevention of potential radiological health hazards, and has been a fundamental concept during the development of nuclear energy. Through a detailed discussion regarding the new ICRP recommendations, the world nuclear industry has reached a consensus that the current radiological protection system keeps its integrity in principle although it involves some remaining issues, such as the disposal of radioactive waste. In order to maximize the advantages of nuclear energy while keeping the integrity of radiological protection system, it is essential to address the characteristics of radiation, which is specific to nuclear energy, so that nuclear energy can coexist with other energy sources. The three basic principles of radiological protection (i.e., justification, optimization and dose limits), which were completed in the 1990 recommendations of ICRP, should be retained as the basic concepts for the future radiological protection system in order to maintain the continuity and consistency of the radiological protection system. The radiological protection system can be furthermore developed only by combining the above three principles with best practices extracted from utilities' field experience. The significant reduction of radiation exposures received by members of the public and radiation workers in the field has resulted from the efforts by the world utilities to achieve the optimization. In order to correctly apply the theory to the work practices, it is essential to see how the theory is practically used in the field. Such a process should be also emphasized in the revision work of the IAEA Basic Safety Standards (BSS), which is currently under progress. Integrating the theory in the work practices is the key to the true development of nuclear renaissance, which could lead to the establishment of the nuclear safety regime. (author)

  6. Relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of U: Implications for radiation standards for the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic models for U in adults recommended by Wrenn et al. (1985) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1979a) were used to study the relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U and whether current radiation standards for the public provide adequate protection against chemical toxicity from U in the kidney. We assumed that the threshold concentration for chemical toxicity is 1 microgram of U g-1 of kidney and that a safety factor of 10 should be applied in limiting kidney burdens for maximally exposed individuals in the general public. We found that a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 1 mSv (0.1 rem) for chronic exposures of the public from all sources, as recommended by the ICRP (1985) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP 1987), corresponds to concentrations of U in the kidney from chronic ingestion that exceed the assumed threshold for chemical toxicity of 1 microgram g-1 only for 238U using the metabolic model of the ICRP (1979a). However, using either metabolic model (ICRP 1979a; Wrenn et al. 1985), the predicted concentrations of U in the kidney exceeded the limit of 0.1 microgram g-1, based on the assumed safety factor for protection of the public, for both 238U and natural U. From these results, we concluded that chemical toxicity should be considered in developing health protection standards for the public for ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U. Environmental radiation standards for certain practices established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (EPA 1987a, 1987b, 1987c, 1987d; NRC 1988a) are consistent with a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice. If the metabolic model of Wrenn et al. 27 references

  7. FASSET - An European project for environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchertseifer, F.

    2003-01-01

    The European research project ''FASSET'' (Framework ASSessment of Enviromental ImpacT) will provide a framework of the environmental impact of the effects of ionising radiation and will identify protection aims for the environmental protection. This project represent a collaboration of different organisations from the European community: Sweden, Norway, Finland, Great Britain, Spain, France and Germany. The German participants are the GSF-research centre for environment and health and the German radiation protection office. The project is founded by the 5 th EC research programme. The existing national and international radiation protection regulations are focused to the humans. Other species, like plants and animals, are protected indirectly, if their habitat are close to urban areas or they represent a part of the food chain. The ICRP position ''if the man is protected, nature is protected as well'' is now under reconsideration by a ICRP-Taskgroup. The identification of perilled real reference organism by the FASSET-project is an working tool for the definition of the protection aims. For that purpose the project is divided into three working packages: dosimetry, exposure pathways and effects. Another working package is responsible for the developing of the concept using the results provided by the other working packages. (orig.)

  8. Comparison between the Brazilian regulation of radioprotection and the recommendation of International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007; Comparacao entre a norma brasileira de radioprotecao e a recomendacao da International Commission on Radiological Protection publicadas em 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Py Junior, Delcy A.; Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Oliveira, Sergio Q. de, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b, E-mail: marcelino@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Mortagua, Valter Jose, E-mail: Valter@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (USIN/INB), SP (Brazil). Usina de Interlagos

    2011-10-26

    This paper intends to compare the Brasilian basic regulation on radiological protection with the new recommendations of ICRP through existent differences. The main difference between the publication 60 and the publication 103 of the ICRP is the changing of concept of protection based on the process by use of practice and intervention concepts, to the protection based on the exposure situation, through the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existent situation. For adequacy to the Brazilian regulation it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation weighing and tissues, up dating of radiation detriments, besides to make clear the concept of environmental radioprotection

  9. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignoni, K.

    1986-01-01

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP) [de

  10. The evolution of thoughts from ICRP 46 concept of potential exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since issuing its latest basic recommendations in 1991 as ICRP Publication 60, the Commission has reviewed these recommendations regularly and, from time to time, has issued supplementary reports in the Annals of the ICRP. The extent of these supplementary reports has indicated a need for consolidation and rationalization. New scientific data have also been published since Publication 60, and while the biological and physical assumptions and concepts remain robust, some updating is required. In addition, there have been societal developments in that more emphasis is now given on the protection of individuals and stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological risk. Finally, it has also become apparent that the radiological protection of non-human species should receive more emphasis than in the past. It is against this background that the Commission has now decided to adopt a revised set of Recommendations while at the same time maintaining stability with the previous recommendations. Following several years of an open and worldwide discussion process, mainly through web consultation, ICRP intends to publish its new recommendations in 2007. In the context of AEN/NEA seminar on safety case for the deep disposal of radioactive waste, it appeared necessary first of all to examine the above mentioned evolution of ICRP system, as well as to recall the main ICRP publications on potential exposure and waste disposal and finally to focus on the main recommendations on solid waste disposal which are still valid. (author)

  11. Recommendations of ICRP-60 for occupationally exposed pregnant women. Compliance evaluation in six health centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, M.L.; Prieto, C.; Perez, L.; Tomasi, L.; Lopez Franco, P.

    1997-01-01

    The decrease in the limits of dose equivalent at the entry of the abdomen of occupationally exposed pregnant women, as recommended by ICRP-60, necessitates to evaluate with dosimeter the various professional positions in different services existing in a health care centre, to guarantee that such limits cannot be exceeded, and thus ensure the protection of the foetus. The results obtained in this work, related exclusively to external radiation dose, show that the radiation protection system currently in force is in compliance with the regulation in the majority of the professional positions evaluated, though stricter criteria for pregnant women workers must be established with the aim of obtaining a better dose optimization. The fact that pregnant operators are working in Nuclear Medicine requires an additional effort to ensure that doses in excess of the limits stated are prevented

  12. Radon - from knowledge to action: an all-around cleared issue of radiation protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maringer, F.J. [Vienna Univ. of Natural Resources and Applied Life Science, BEV - Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying (Austria); Vienna Univ. of Technology, Low-Level Counting Laboratory Arsenal, Wien (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    The knowledge about radon is well established in the radiation protection world. After many decades of research work done worldwide by many radiation protection scientists and research teams, the sources and origin, the transport through the soil and into the buildings, and the radiobiological effects of radon progenies in the human respiratory tract are well known. When typing 'radon' in web search engines e.g. www.google.at about 5.1 Million hits are appearing. A countless number of papers have been published in the field of radon research and the ICRP has established radiation protection principles for radon exposure at home and at workplaces. So far, the radon issue seemed well ticked off in the scientific world of radiation protection and the scientists could give more attention to other and more newsworthy problems and questions. But this is only half the truth. The implementation of radon mitigation and precaution standards needs continuously scientific attendance and research networking on an international level. Otherwise the radon issue could degrade easily to a simplified technical and economical exercise without sustainable results in public health. In this paper the radon investigations in Austria which have been carried out in the last 20 years and the applied methods and derived standards for mitigation and precaution in the home and workplace sectors are given. The future strategy and scientific and social necessities in the radon issue are outlined comprehensively. The agreed and proposed research objectives and cooperation which seems necessary are discussed in consideration of the medium-term European radiation protection context. (authors)

  13. Radon - from knowledge to action: an all-around cleared issue of radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about radon is well established in the radiation protection world. After many decades of research work done worldwide by many radiation protection scientists and research teams, the sources and origin, the transport through the soil and into the buildings, and the radiobiological effects of radon progenies in the human respiratory tract are well known. When typing 'radon' in web search engines e.g. www.google.at about 5.1 Million hits are appearing. A countless number of papers have been published in the field of radon research and the ICRP has established radiation protection principles for radon exposure at home and at workplaces. So far, the radon issue seemed well ticked off in the scientific world of radiation protection and the scientists could give more attention to other and more newsworthy problems and questions. But this is only half the truth. The implementation of radon mitigation and precaution standards needs continuously scientific attendance and research networking on an international level. Otherwise the radon issue could degrade easily to a simplified technical and economical exercise without sustainable results in public health. In this paper the radon investigations in Austria which have been carried out in the last 20 years and the applied methods and derived standards for mitigation and precaution in the home and workplace sectors are given. The future strategy and scientific and social necessities in the radon issue are outlined comprehensively. The agreed and proposed research objectives and cooperation which seems necessary are discussed in consideration of the medium-term European radiation protection context. (authors)

  14. Some aspects of radiological protection in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.; Napolitano, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic principles of radiation protection recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP are presented and the main radiological risks for the uranium mining workers are discussed. Finally some criteria for planning the radioactive waste management in uranium mines are given [pt

  15. Application of the ICRP approach for radiological protection of the marine environment in generic impact assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliaus, Viktoryia [Republican Scientific-Practical Centre of Hygiene, Laboratory of Radiation Safety, Akademicheskaya str. 8, 220012, Minsk (Belarus); Telleria, Diego M. [IAEA-Assessment and Management of Environmental Releases Unit, Wagramer Strasse 5 - PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria); Cabianca, Tiberio [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, PHE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a way to use the ICRP approach for protection of the environment in generic assessments of the radiological impact of radioactive releases to the marine environment. Generic assessments of radiological impact to the environment are needed in certain circumstances, for example, when input data are limited or when the likely radiological consequences are expected to be not significant. Under these circumstances the effort in performing the assessment must be commensurate with the potential radiological consequences. The generic assessment described in this paper is a simple tool which provides reasonable and cautious results and is applicable to multiple exposure scenarios associated with the assessment of the radiological impact of releases to the marine the environment. This generic assessment can be also used to provide preliminary results which, when compared to radiological criteria, may determine the need of further specific assessments. The ICRP based its approach to protect the environment in the definition of a set of reference animals and plants and the use of related radiological criteria, in the form of derived consideration reference levels. The paper discusses selection and exposure conditions of the reference animals and plants, methods to estimate their doses and the use of the radiological criteria, for the purpose of a generic assessment. The IAEA is elaborating applications of these generic impact assessments presented in the paper to be included in international guidance under development. (authors)

  16. Naturally occuring radiation in the Nordic countries - recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the publication ''Report on the Applicability of International Radiation Protection Recommendations in the Nordic Countries'', published in 1976, the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden expessed their agreement on the main principles of radiation protection. The general aspects of radiation protection were covered in the recommendations with the exception of exposure of the public from natural sources of radiation. In 1983 a working group published the report ''Naturally Occurring radiation in the Nordic Countries, - Levels'' in the Radiation Protection Information-Series from the Nordic countries. In that report the present knowledge of the population exposure from natural sources of external gamma-radiation and from radon and thoron daughters in air was reviewed as a basis for the development of the radiation protection recommendations for natural radiation. During preparation of these recommendations due account has also been taken of ICRP publication no. 39: ''Principles for Limiting Exposure of the Public to Natural Sources of Radiation'', which was published in 1984 and in which ICRP for the first time has issued more specific recommendations for natural sources. The recommendations may serve as a basis for more formal rules and regulations within each country, if this is seemed necessary. However, no attempt has been made to formulate identical rules for all the five countries since the exposure levels from natural sources, methods of application and the legal frameworks differ between the countries. (EG)

  17. Implications of the new ICRP recommendations for the management of post-accidental situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, R.; Kelly, N.

    1992-01-01

    From an analysis of the new ICRP recommendations in relation with the management of post-accidental situations, there appears that no significant changes in comparison with the present situation will result. The consequences are rather an attempt to further clarify and justify the way in which the system of radiation protection applies to such situations, corresponding clearly to 'intervention situation', especially: - the use of the justification and optimization principles for the decision of implementing a protective measure. - the use of 'intervention levels' instead of individual 'dose limits'. In addition, and although there is no link at all between the dose limits applying in 'practices situations' and the intervention levels, the increase of risk factors could also result in a change of intervention levels. (author)

  18. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.; Janssens, A.; Mrabit, K.; Ahier, B.

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  19. Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, Abel J; Akashi, Makoto; Sakai, Kazuo; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Boice Jr, John D; Chino, Masamichi; Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Kai, Michiaki; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Lee, Jai-Ki; Menzel, Hans-Georg; Niwa, Ohtsura; Yamashita, Shunichi; Weiss, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP. While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with ‘contamination’ of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information. Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled. It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of

  20. Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Abel J; Akashi, Makoto; Boice, John D; Chino, Masamichi; Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Kai, Michiaki; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Lee, Jai-Ki; Menzel, Hans-Georg; Niwa, Ohtsura; Sakai, Kazuo; Weiss, Wolfgang; Yamashita, Shunichi; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2013-09-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP. While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information. Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled. It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of potential

  1. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  2. Optimisation and decisions in radiological protection - A report of the work of an ICRP task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    In 1984 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a Task Group of Committee 4 to produce a report on methods for optimisation of protection other than cost-benefit analysis. As the work of the task group progressed it became clear that it would be more useful to produce a report on the entire field of application of optimisation, mainly to show how the various techniques including cost-benefit analysis could be applied appropriately to problems at different levels of complexity. This paper reports on the main ideas that have been developed by the task group. It must be emphasised that these ideas have not been endorsed by Committee 4 nor approved by the Commission so they can not yet be considered as recommendations

  3. Impact of ICRP publication 68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.; Woods, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    ICRP Publication 61 was a temporary replacement for ICRP Publication 30. It gave ALIs but not the underlying dose conversion factors. ICRP Publication 68 has now been issued to replace Publication 61; it contains the dose conversion factors but not the ALIs, so comparison is impossible without carrying out calculations. This paper presents comparisons between the two publications and calculates the ICRP Publication 68 ALIs for some of the more common radionuclides. (author)

  4. Proceedings of the 10. national radiation protection congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, Claire; Ducou Le Pointe, Hubert; Lochard, Jacques; Vaillant, L.; Masse, Roland; Stricker, Laurent; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Bernier, M.O.; Biau, A.; Bordy, J.M.; Laurier, D.; Guipaud, Olivier; Leuraud, Klervi; Rage, Estelle; Villeneuve, Sara; Clero, Enora; Samson, E.; Scanff, P.; Rannou, A.; Caldeira Ideias, P.; Paradis, H.; Boussetta, B.; Boyer, C.; Gontier, G.; Hemidy, P.Y.; Carreau Gaschereau, E.; Hartemann, P.; Menechal, P.; Mougniot, S.; Le Coz, E.; Le Goff, Pierre; Abela, G.; Chirent, T.; De Vita, A.; Drouet, F.; Hillaireau, B.; Marcillet, C.; Michoux, X.; Yadani, Fatima; Blanc, Pauline; Canal, E.; Perier, A.; Lahaye, T.; Andresz, Sylvain; Barbey, P.; Gagna, Gerald; Guetat, Ph.; Schneider, Thierry; Vaillant, Ludovic; Cherin, Herve; Roy, Catherine; Desbiolles, Alice; Roudier, Candice; Goria, Sarah; Stempfelet, Morgane; Monnereau, Alain; Lefranc, Agnes; Vacquier, Blandine; Baysson, H.; Etard, C.; Maurice, Jean-Baptiste; Milliat, Fabien; Moan, Gwennael; Petitguillaume, Alice; Roch, Patrice; Marie, Laurent; Dufay, Emilie; Magne, Isabelle; Mathieu, Peggy; Perrin, Anne; Veyret, Bernard; Clauss, Nicolas; Dabli, D.; Guillot, Sebastien; Kamoun, Hager; Mackowiak, Julien; Bensimon, Julie; Bez, Jeremy; Petitfrere, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) celebrated its 50 anniversary at the occasion of the 10. national radiation protection (RP) congress. This document brings together the abstracts of the different talks given at the congress. A - Invited talks: A1 - Forward through the rearview mirror: Reflections on ICRP Past and Future (C. COUSINS); A3 - Origin and evolution of the intervening parties involvement approach in RP (J. LOCHARD); A4 - Knowledge influence and biological uncertainties on RP evolution (R. MASSE); A5 - RP history in nuclear industry: EDF an anticipation example (L. STRICKER); B - Tutorial presentations: B1 - Environment RP: towards its explicit integration in French law? (K. BEAUGELIN-SEILLER, J. GARNIER-LAPLACE); B2 - Scanner exposure in child and radio-induced risk: recent epidemiological results (M.O. BERNIER); B3 - Ionizing radiations professional exposure dose measurement: goals and evolutions (A. BIAU, J.M. BORDY); B4 - Workers RP at dismantling sites (B. BOUSSETTA, L. VAILLANT); B5 - Environment RP (part 2): EDF's methodology and experience feedback (C. BOYER, G. GONTIER, P.Y. HEMIDY); B6 - Revision of SCENIHR's 2009 opinion about the potential health impact of electromagnetic fields, from the 2011 European inaugural meeting to its 2015 publication (P. HARTEMANN); B8 - Advances in low dose epidemiological knowledge (D. LAURIER); B9 - Use of ionizing radiations at the operating theatre: what RP issues? (P. MENECHAL, S. MOUGNIOT); Session 1: RP regulations and standards, RP and society (6 presentations); Session 2: effects of Ionizing radiations on men and ecosystems (6 presentations); Session 3: patients RP (7 presentations); Session 4: Populations and ecosystems RP (4 presentations); Session 5: Occupational RP - Industry (8 presentations); Session 6: non-ionizing radiations (5 presentations); Session 7: Occupational RP - Medical (6 presentations); Session 8: Advances in dosimetry and metrology (4 presentations)

  5. The normative power of the international commission of radiation protection on the approval of the international and communal jurisprudence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajoinie, O.

    2006-01-01

    From an original synthesis of the jurisprudence given by the regular control agency of the international work organization concerning the Convention OIT 115 relative to the protection of workers against the ionizing radiations, as well as an alternative analysis of a communal jurisprudence (CJCE, C-376/90, 25 November 1992: Commission of the European Communities against the Belgium kingdom), this work aims to bring a new way to see the power that exerts a non governmental organization with a scientific character: the International Commission for Radiologic Protection (ICRP) when it gives its 'recommendations'. (O.M.)

  6. Measurement methods and optimization of radiation protection: the case of internal exposure by inhalation to natural uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.; Gibert, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to discuss the ability of different measurement methods (air sampling and biological examinations) to answer to demands in the particular case of internal exposure by inhalation to natural uranium compounds. The realism and the sensitivity of each method are studied, on the base of new dosimetric models of the ICRP. The ability of analysis of these methods in order to optimize radiation protection are then discussed. (N.C.)

  7. Calculation of skin dose due to beta contamination using the new quantity of the ICRP 116: the local skin dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.; Menard, S.; Comte, N.

    2017-01-01

    Values of the new protection quantity Local Skin Dose 'LSD', introduced by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116, were calculated for 134 β - or β + emitting radionuclides, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. Two types of source geometry are considered: a point source and disc-type surface contamination (the source is placed in contact with the skin). This new protection quantity is compared with the operational quantity H2 (0.07, 0 deg.), leading us to conclude that, in accordance with the rules of the ICRP, the operational quantity over-estimates the protection quantity to a reasonable extent, except in very rare cases for very low average beta energies. Thus, with the new skin model described in ICRP 116, there are no longer any major differences between the operational quantities and protection quantities estimated with the skin model described in ICRP 74. (authors)

  8. ICRP Publication 125: Radiological Protection in Security Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, D A; Lazo, E; Tattersall, P; Simeonov, G; Niu, S

    2014-07-01

    The use of technologies to provide security screening for individuals and objects has been increasing rapidly, in keeping with the significant increase in security concerns worldwide. Within the spectrum of technologies, the use of ionizing radiation to provide backscatter and transmission screening capabilities has also increased. The Commission has previously made a number of statements related to the general topic of deliberate exposures of individuals in non-medical settings. This report provides advice on how the radiological protection principles recommended by the Commission should be applied within the context of security screening. More specifically, the principles of justification, optimisation of protection, and dose limitation for planned exposure situations are directly applicable to the use of ionising radiation in security screening. In addition, several specific topics are considered in this report, including the situation in which individuals may be exposed because they are concealed (‘stowaways’) in a cargo container or conveyance that may be subject to screening. The Commission continues to recommend that careful justification of screening should be considered before decisions are made to employ the technology. If a decision is made that its use is justified, the framework for protection as a planned exposure situation should be employed, including optimization of protection with the use of dose constraints and the appropriate provisions for authorisation and inspection.

  9. Addendum report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (3). Recent related overseas activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    Following the Statement on Tissue Reaction issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), revisions and discussions are underway in various international organizations about the standards, guidelines and methods for the eye dosimetry. We have previously discussed these issues in six interim reports, followed by two addendum reports on lens dosimetry. This addendum report reviews ongoing overseas discussion and work in relation to research on radiogenic cataracts and implementation of the new eye lens dose limit, such as those in the European Commission, Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi), Open Project for European Radiation Research Area (OPERRA), and the Unite Sates National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). This report serves as the last part of a series of reports by the Japan Health Physics Society Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye. (author)

  10. Comparison between the Brazilian regulation of radioprotection and the recommendation of International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Py Junior, Delcy A.; Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Oliveira, Sergio Q. de; Kelecom, Alphonse; Mortagua, Valter Jose

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to compare the Brasilian basic regulation on radiological protection with the new recommendations of ICRP through existent differences. The main difference between the publication 60 and the publication 103 of the ICRP is the changing of concept of protection based on the process by use of practice and intervention concepts, to the protection based on the exposure situation, through the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existent situation. For adequacy to the Brazilian regulation it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation weighing and tissues, up dating of radiation detriments, besides to make clear the concept of environmental radioprotection

  11. Transposition of ICRP-60 recommendations into French uranium mining regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.

    2001-01-01

    Directive 96/29/Euratom, drawn up from recommendations of the ICRP 60, must be transposed into French legislation before 13 May 2000. For the French uranium mining sector, two ministerial decrees, one for workers, the other for the environment, must be modified to take account of the new European rules. These modifications entail new statutory limits either for the workers, or to characterise the radiological impact on the environment. For the workers, the implementation since 1980 of a policy of optimising radiation protection in French mines enables us to envisage that these limits will be respected. For the environment, the application of new limits involves a new approach for the assessment of public doses, with the precise definition of critical groups and their realistic exposure scenario. (author)

  12. A conception of practical application of the ICRP Publ. 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao

    1999-01-01

    The report of view for practical application of ICRP Publ. 60 in Japanese regulations and its technical guideline proposal were published by the Advisory Committee of radiation protection in June, 1998 and April, 1999, respectively. This paper described the summary of the above reports and essential conception for the actual application. Following items were summarized: the change of technical terms such as the use of ''dose'' in place of dose equivalent, dose limits in occupational exposure (the effective dose limit not to exceed 100 mSv/5 y and 50 mSv/y), dose limits in women's occupational exposure (not to exceed 5 mSv/3 mth), the working area (the controlled area), public dose limits with consideration for medical exposure, exposure by natural sources of radiation, exposure in volunteers and nursing persons, occupational health service for radiation workers, emergency exposure (100 mSv; 300 mSv for lens and 1 Sv for skin), intervention in the public at emergency exposure, document, and the system for radiation control. It was expected for suitable institutions and groups to develop and make the guideline through the examination of the reports. (K.H.)

  13. A conception of practical application of the ICRP Publ. 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numakunai, Takao [Inst. of Radiation Measurements, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The report of view for practical application of ICRP Publ. 60 in Japanese regulations and its technical guideline proposal were published by the Advisory Committee of radiation protection in June, 1998 and April, 1999, respectively. This paper described the summary of the above reports and essential conception for the actual application. Following items were summarized: the change of technical terms such as the use of ''dose'' in place of dose equivalent, dose limits in occupational exposure (the effective dose limit not to exceed 100 mSv/5 y and 50 mSv/y), dose limits in women's occupational exposure (not to exceed 5 mSv/3 mth), the working area (the controlled area), public dose limits with consideration for medical exposure, exposure by natural sources of radiation, exposure in volunteers and nursing persons, occupational health service for radiation workers, emergency exposure (100 mSv; 300 mSv for lens and 1 Sv for skin), intervention in the public at emergency exposure, document, and the system for radiation control. It was expected for suitable institutions and groups to develop and make the guideline through the examination of the reports. (K.H.)

  14. Practical applications of the new ICRP recommendation to external dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1992-01-01

    Focussing on external dosimetry for occupational exposure the consequences of the new quantities equivalent dose (radiation weighting factor), effective dose (tissue weighting factor) and the ICRU operational quantities for individual and area dosimetry are discussed. Despite some arguments against the new quantities they should be introduced as rapidly as possible to keep international uniformity in radiation protection monitoring. It is shown that they provide a conservative estimate of the effective dose for photons and neutrons. In photon dosimetry only minor changes of the conversion factors relating operational quantities to effective dose is observed. In neutron dosimetry the conversion factors change by a factor of up to 2. It is pointed out that there is a urgent need to calculate standardized conversion factors for field quantities -operational quantities- organ and effective dose in a joint effort of ICRP and ICRU. This includes standardization of calibration methods for individual dosimetry using suitable phantoms instead of the sphere. (author)

  15. Relevance of protection quantities in medical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) continues to classify the exposures to radiation in three categories; namely 1- occupational exposure, 2- public exposure, and 3- medical exposure. Protection quantities are primarily meant for the regulatory purpose in radiological protection for controlling and limiting stochastic risks in occupational and public exposures. These are based on two basic assumptions of 1- linear no-threshold dose-effect relationship (LNT) at low doses and 2- long-term additivity of low doses. Medical exposure are predominantly delivered to individuals (patients) undergoing diagnostic examinations, interventional procedures and radiation therapy but also include individual caring for or comforting patients incurring exposure and the volunteers of biomedical medical research programmes. Radiation protection is as relevant to occupational and public exposure as to medical exposures except that the dose limits set for the formers are not applicable to medical exposure but reference levels and dose constrains are recommended for diagnostic and interventional medical procedures. In medical institutions, both the occupational and medical exposure takes place. Since the doses in diagnostic examinations are low, it has been observed that not only the protection quantities are often used in such cases but these are extended to estimate the number of cancer deaths due to such practices. One of the striking features of the new ICRP recommendations has been to elaborate the concepts of the dosimetric quantities. The limitation of protection quantities ((Effective dose, E=Σ RT D TR .W T .W R and Equivalent Dose H T =Σ RT D TR .W R ) have been brought out and this has raised a great concern and initiated debates on the use of these quantities in medical exposures. Consequently, ICRP has set a task group to provide more details and the recommendations. It has, therefore, became important to draw the attention of medical physics community

  16. The direction of ICRP - new recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    ICRP has been stimulating discussion, during the past three years, on the best way of expressing protection philosophy for the next publication of its Recommendations, which it hopes will be by 2005. The present recommendations were initiated by Publication 60 in 1990 and have subsequently been complemented by additional publications over the last twelve years. In this paper the totality of those recommendations is summarised and used to indicate a way forward to produce a simplified and more coherent statement of protection philosophy for the start of the 21. century. (author)

  17. Radiation protection - Revision of French radiation protection regulations (1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoux, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This article analyses the recent amendments to the 1966 and 1975 Decrees on general radiation protection principles and radiation protection of workers in large nuclear installations respectively and also describes national radiation protection law. In particular, the amendments incorporate the revised EURATOM basic radiation protection standards and the new international units (sievert and becquerel replace rem and curie) in the Decrees. (NEA) [fr

  18. ICRP recommendations in the present and in the short term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The recommendations of ICRP are either re-stated or revised at intervals of about 15 years, most recently in 1990. The protection philosophy in Publication 60 comprises justification of the practice or intervention considered; optimisation of protection; dose and risk limits and constraints to restrict the options in optimisation. For medical exposures, dose and risk limits and formal constraints are irrelevant, but Diagnostic Reference Levels serve a similar purpose. Building on this foundation, ICRP plans to issue its next recommendations around 2005. The 2005 Recommendations are likely to emphasise protection of the individual more than protection of society; to aim at protection of non-human species as well as man; to summarise and simplify advice given in various reports after Publication 60, and to be formatted as concise recommendations underpinned by separate publications with more detail. The draft will be circulated and comments will be discussed in 2004 with a view approval of the recommendations in 2005 and publication in 2005 or 2006. Thus, integration into legislation may be possible sometime between 2006 and 2010. (author)

  19. Nuclear decay data for dosimetry calculation. Revised data of ICRP Publication 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 1034 radionuclides, which are significant in medical, environmental and occupational exposures. The decay data were assembled from decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version as of 2003. Basic nuclear properties in the ENSDF that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of radiations were examined and updated by referring to UNBASE2003/AME2003, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. In addition, modification of incomplete ENSDF was done for their format errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The energies and intensities of emitted radiations by the nuclear decay and the subsequent atomic process were computed from the ENSDF using the computer code EDISTR04. EDISTR04 is an enhanced version of EDISTR used for assembling ICRP Publication 38 (ICRP38), and incorporates updates of atomic data and computation methods for calculating atomic radiations and spontaneous fission radiations. Quality assurance of the compiled data has been made by comparisons with various experimental data and decay databases prepared from different computer codes and data libraries. A package of the data files, called DECDC2 (Nuclear DECay Data for Dosimetry Calculation, Version 2), will succeed ICRP38 that has been used extensively in dose calculation and will be utilized in various fields. (author)

  20. Development of polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Preliminary study for posture change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tat Thang; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2013-01-01

    Even though International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) officially adopted a set of adult male and female voxel phantoms as the ICRP reference phantoms, there are several critical limitations due to the nature of voxel geometry and their low voxel resolutions. In order to overcome these limitations of the ICRP phantoms, we are currently developing polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP voxel phantoms to polygonal surface geometries. Among the many advantages of the ICRP polygonal surface phantom, especially, it is flexible and deformable. In principle, it is, therefore, possible to make the posture-changed ICRP phantoms which can provide more accurate dose values for exposure situations strongly relevant to worker's postures. As a preliminary study for developing the posture-changed ICRP phantoms, in this work we changed the posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom constructed in the previous study. Organ doses were then compared between original and posture-changed phantoms. In the present study, we successfully changed a posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom to the walking posture. From this results, it was explicitly shown that the polygon-surface version of the ICRP phantoms can be sufficiently modified to be various postures with the posture-changing method used in this study. In addition, it was demonstrated that phantom's posture must be considered in certain exposure situations, which can differ dose values from the conventional standing-posture phantom

  1. Use of TANDEM methodology for quality control in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, O.A.; Oliveira, I.R.; Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M.S.; Borges, F.L.S.; Joana, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the increase of the incidence of lens opacities for low radiation doses. Considering epidemiological data, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued a statement that changed the absorbed dose threshold for the eye lens. The statement also recommends a reduction in the dose limits to the eye lens for occupationally exposed persons; now it is considered to be 20 mSv in a year averaged over five years. For this research two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters TL were used in the construction of the curve tandem. (LiF-100H e LiF-200). For system calibration three monitors were irradiated for each radiation beam. The monitors were irradiated with 4 mGy kerma at 1.5 m from the focal point. The Tandem curve was obtained by the ratio between the values of the energy dependence curves of each dosimeter. Data obtained for the corresponding x-ray beams to radiation reference N60 to N120 are more accurate for determining the energy - steepest part of the curve. The results are shown similar to similar studies and confirm the possibility of using the method for determining the unknown energy radiation fields. (author)

  2. Introduction of radiological protection; Pengenalan kepada perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: basic principles of radiological protection , dose limit which was suggested, stochastic and nonstochastic effects, equivalent dose and alternative of it`s calculation, limit for the publics, ICRP (International Commission for Radiological Protection) recommendations, and the principles of radiological protection. Dangerous radiation sources also briefly summarized i.e. x-ray generators, reactor nucleus.

  3. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: IV. Basis of the human alimentary tract model and uncertainties in model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.; Harrison, J.; Phipps, A.

    2007-01-01

    The biokinetic and dosimetric model of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract applied in current documents of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was developed in the mid-1960's. The model was based on features of a reference adult male and was first used by the ICRP in Publication 30, Limits for Intakes of Radionuclides by Workers (Part 1, 1979). In the late 1990's an ICRP task group was appointed to develop a biokinetic and dosimetric model of the alimentary tract that reflects updated information and addresses current needs in radiation protection. The new age-specific and gender-specific model, called the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), has been completed and will replace the GI model of Publication 30 in upcoming ICRP documents. This paper discusses the basis for the structure and parameter values of the HATM, summarises the uncertainties associated with selected features and types of predictions of the HATM and examines the sensitivity of dose estimates to these uncertainties for selected radionuclides. Emphasis is on generic biokinetic features of the HATM, particularly transit times through the lumen of the alimentary tract, but key dosimetric features of the model are outlined, and the sensitivity of tissue dose estimates to uncertainties in dosimetric as well as biokinetic features of the HATM are examined for selected radionuclides. (authors)