WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiation morbidity scoring

  1. Using perinatal morbidity scoring tools as a primary study outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Bodnar, Lisa M; Platt, Robert W

    2017-11-01

    Perinatal morbidity scores are tools that score or weight different adverse events according to their relative severity. Perinatal morbidity scores are appealing for maternal-infant health researchers because they provide a way to capture a broad range of adverse events to mother and newborn while recognising that some events are considered more serious than others. However, they have proved difficult to implement as a primary outcome in applied research studies because of challenges in testing if the scores are significantly different between two or more study groups. We outline these challenges and describe a solution, based on Poisson regression, that allows differences in perinatal morbidity scores to be formally evaluated. The approach is illustrated using an existing maternal-neonatal scoring tool, the Adverse Outcome Index, to evaluate the safety of labour and delivery before and after the closure of obstetrical services in small rural communities. Applying the proposed Poisson regression to the case study showed a protective risk ratio for adverse outcome following closures as compared with the original analysis, where no difference was found. This approach opens the door for considerably broader use of perinatal morbidity scoring tools as a primary outcome in applied population and clinical maternal-infant health research studies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Evaluation of the prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among radiation oncologist members of the Kyoto Radiation Oncology Study Group (KROSG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the self-reported prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among radiation oncologists members of the Kyoto Radiation Oncology Study Group (KROSG) and to identify factors contributing to burnout. We mailed an anonymous survey to 125 radiation oncologists members of the KROSG. The survey included; the demographic data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). There were 87 responses out of 125 eligible respondents (69.6% response rate). In terms of burnout, three participants (3.4%) fulfilled the MBI-HSS criteria of having simultaneously high emotional exhaustion (EE), high depersonalization (DP) and low sense of personal accomplishment (PA). Eighteen (20.6%) reported a high score for either EE or DP meeting the alternative criteria for burnout with three of these simultaneously having high EE and high DP. The prevalence of psychological morbidity estimated using GHQ-12 was 32%. A high level of EE and low level of PA significantly correlated with high level of psychological morbidity with P < 0.001 and <0.01 respectively. Having palliative care activities other than radiotherapy and number of patients treated per year were the only factors associated with burnout. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among radiation oncologists in Japan. Compared with other studies involving radiation oncologists, the prevalence of low personal accomplishment was particularly high in the present study. The prevalence of psychological morbidity was almost the double that of the Japanese general population and was significantly associated with low PA and high EE.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen - an effective tool to treat radiation morbidity in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Ramona; Klemen, Huberta; Quehenberger, Franz; Sankin, Oliver; Mayer, Elisabeth; Hackl, Arnulf; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja-Maria

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) used in the treatment of radiation cystitis and proctitis following irradiation of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Between June 1995 and March 2000, 18 men (median age 71 years) with radiation proctitis (n=7), cystitis (n=8), and combined proctitis/cystitis (n=3) underwent HBO therapy in a multiplace chamber for a median of 26 sessions (range 2-60). The treatment schedule (2.2-2.4 atmospheres absolute, 60 min bottom time, once-a-day, 7 days a week) was set at a lower limit of 20 sessions; the upper limit was left open to symptom-related adjustment. Prior to HBO treatment, RTOG/EORTC late genitourinal (GU) morbidity was Grade 2 (n=3), Grade 3 (n=6) or Grade 4 (n=2); modified RTOG/EORTC late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity was either Grade 2 (n=4) or Grade 3 (n=6). Results: Sixteen patients underwent an adequate number of sessions. RTOG/EORTC late GU as well as modified GI morbidity scores showed a significant improvement after HBO (GI, P=0.004; GU, P=0.004; exact Wilcoxon signed rank test); bleeding ceased in five out of five patients with proctitis and in six out of eight patients with cystitis; one of those two patients, in whom an ineffective treatment outcome was obtained, went on to have a cystectomy. Conclusions: HBO treatment seems to be an effective tool to treat those patients with late GI and GU morbidity when conventional treatment has led to unsatisfactory results. Particularly in patients with radiation cystitis, HBO should not be delayed too long, as in the case of extensive bladder shrinkage improvement is hard to achieve

  4. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Elisa K.; Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L.; Virani, Sean; Nichol, Alan; Speers, Caroline; Wai, Elaine S.; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  5. Adjuvant Hypofractionated Versus Conventional Whole Breast Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Long-Term Hospital-Related Morbidity From Cardiac Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Elisa K. [Department of Oncology, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John (Canada); Woods, Ryan; McBride, Mary L. [Cancer Control Research Department, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Virani, Sean [Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Speers, Caroline [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Wai, Elaine S. [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott, E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of cardiac injury with hypofractionated whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (HF-WBI) compared with conventional whole-breast/chest wall radiation therapy (CF-WBI) in women with left-sided breast cancer remains a concern. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increase in hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes with HF-WBI relative to CF-WBI. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 1998, 5334 women ≤80 years of age with early-stage breast cancer were treated with postoperative radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall alone. A population-based database recorded baseline patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Hospital administrative records identified baseline cardiac risk factors and other comorbidities. Factors between radiation therapy groups were balanced using a propensity-score model. The first event of a hospital admission for cardiac causes after radiation therapy was determined from hospitalization records. Ten- and 15-year cumulative hospital-related cardiac morbidity after radiation therapy was estimated for left- and right-sided cases using a competing risk approach. Results: The median follow-up was 13.2 years. For left-sided cases, 485 women were treated with CF-WBI, and 2221 women were treated with HF-WBI. Mastectomy was more common in the HF-WBI group, whereas boost was more common in the CF-WBI group. The CF-WBI group had a higher prevalence of diabetes. The 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes (95% confidence interval) was not different between the 2 radiation therapy regimens after propensity-score adjustment: 21% (19-22) with HF-WBI and 21% (17-25) with CF-WBI (P=.93). For right-sided cases, the 15-year cumulative hospital-related morbidity from cardiac causes was also similar between the radiation therapy groups (P=.76). Conclusions: There is no difference in morbidity leading to hospitalization from cardiac causes among women with left-sided early-stage breast

  6. Use of EuroSCORE as a predictor of morbidity after cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Isaac Newton Guimarães; de Moraes Neto, Fernando Ribeiro; Andrade, Tamirys Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of the EuroSCORE as a predictor of postoperative morbidity after cardiac surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 900 patients operated on and admitted to the intensive care unit postoperatively at the Royal Portuguese Hospital of Recife. We included all patients with complete medical records, excluding those who died during surgery, underwent transplantation or correction of congenital heart disease. We evaluated the development of respiratory infection, cerebrovascular accident, and dialysis-dependent renal failure, and the EuroSCORE was compared in terms of the three complications using the Mann-Whitney test. The calibration model for predicting the morbidities being studied was evaluated using the test set of Homer-Lemeshow goodness. The accuracy of the model was assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUROC). Results The model showed good calibration in predicting respiratory infection, acute renal failure and stroke (P=0.285, P=0.789, P=0.45, respectively), with good accuracy for respiratory infection (AUROC=0.710 and P<0.001) and dialysis-dependent renal failure (AUROC=0.834 and P<0.001), but no accuracy to predict stroke (AUROC=0.519). The high-risk patients were more likely to develop respiratory infection (OR=9.05, P<0.001) and dialysis-dependent renal failure (OR=39.6, P<0.001). The probability of developing respiratory infection and dialysis-dependent renal failure was less than 10% with EuroSCORE up to 7 and more than 70% with EuroSCORE greater than 15. Conclusion EuroSCORE proved to be a good predictor of major postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: respiratory and dialysis-dependent renal failure. PMID:24896157

  7. Portsmouth physiological and operative severity score for the Enumeration of Mortality and morbidity scoring system in general surgical practice and identifying risk factors for poor outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Nagpal, Nitin; Sidhu, D. S.; Singh, Amandeep; Tyagi, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Estimation of the outcome is paramount in disease stratification and subsequent management in severely ill surgical patients. Risk scoring helps us quantify the prospects of adverse outcome in a patient. Portsmouth-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (P-POSSUM) the world over has proved itself as a worthy scoring system and the present study was done to evaluate the feasibility of P-POSSUM as a risk scoring system as a tool in efficacious prediction of mortality and morbidity in our demographic profile. Materials and Methods: Validity of P-POSSUM was assessed prospectively in fifty major general surgeries performed at our hospital from May 2011 to October 2012. Data were collected to obtain P-POSSUM score, and statistical analysis was performed. Results: Majority (72%) of patients was male and mean age was 40.24 ± 18.6 years. Seventy-eight percentage procedures were emergency laparotomies commonly performed for perforation peritonitis. Mean physiological score was 17.56 ± 7.6, and operative score was 17.76 ± 4.5 (total score = 35.3 ± 10.4). The ratio of observed to expected mortality rate was 0.86 and morbidity rate was 0.78. Discussion: P-POSSUM accurately predicted both mortality and morbidity in patients who underwent major surgical procedures in our setup. Thus, it helped us in identifying patients who required preferential attention and aggressive management. Widespread application of this tool can result in better distribution of care among high-risk surgical patients. PMID:28250670

  8. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouwe, Merian van; Bree, Remco de; Kuik, Dirk J.; Goede, Cees J.T. de; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Doornaert, Patricia; Rene Leemans, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides were treated by surgery (n = 51) or (chemo)radiation (n = 123). Abduction, anteflexion, endorotation and exorotation were assessed. Subjective measurements were performed using the Visual Analogue Scale for pain, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) and stiffness reporting. Results: Predictive factors for SDQ-score > 0 (n = 54) were VAS pain score, stiffness, abduction, anteflexion, physiotherapy, low shoulder position and surgical treatment. The SDQ, stiffness and pain scores were significantly higher in the surgically treated group than in the non-surgical group (p < 0.01). Anteflexion, abduction and exorotation were less impaired in the non-surgically treated group than in the surgically treated group (p < 0.01). No differences between neck dissection and neck dissection with post-operative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy and chemoradiation were found for these movements. Conclusions: Shoulder morbidity is often present after non-surgical treatment of the neck, but to a lesser extent compared to surgical treatment. Radiotherapy adds no morbidity to neck dissection and chemotherapy does not add extra morbidity to primary radiation

  10. Clinical impact of predictive assays for acute and late radiation morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, W.; Classen, J.; Belka, C.; Bamberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Clinically reliable predictive assays for normal tissue radiation sensitivity would help to avoid severe radiation induced morbidity and result in individualized dose prescriptions. Profound differences of individual fibroblast and lymphocyte radiation sensitivity in vitro have been documented in patients with certain genetic syndromes but also in patients without known genetic disorders. The following review evaluates whether fibroblast or lymphocyte radiation sensitivity measured in vitro correlates with the degree of acute and late radiation induced morbidity. Results: Acute radiation side effects and lymphocyte sensitivity has been investigated in 2 studies. One of them reported an insecure correlation, the other no correlation at all. Fibroblast radiation sensitivity and the extent of acute radiation induced side effects on skin and mucosal sites has been compared in a total of 5 studies. None of these studies found a consistent significant correlation. Lymphocyte radiation sensitivity and late effects have been studied by 2 institutions. Late radiation induced skin and mucosal changes did not correlate with lymphocyte sensitivity in head and neck cancer patients, whereas in breast cancer patients a weak (R 2 =0.06) correlation between the degree of late skin reactions and lymphocyte sensitivity was observed. Late skin or mucosal radiation reactions and fibroblast sensitivity were examined by 5 research groups. Data analysis revealed significant correlations or at least a trend towards a significant correlation in all studies. The quality of the reported correlations expressed as R 2 ranged from 0.13 to 0.60, indicating a low predictive value. Conclusions: Lymphocyte radiation sensitivity as measured by currently available assays does not or only poorly correlate with acute and late effects of radiation in patients, precluding predictive tests based on lymphocyte sensitivity. Fibroblast radiation sensitivity does not correlate with acute but

  11. Mortality, morbidity and refractoriness prediction in status epilepticus: Comparison of STESS and EMSE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Giada; Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Leitinger, Markus; Trinka, Eugen; Meletti, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a neurological emergency, characterized by high short-term morbidity and mortality. We evaluated and compared two scores that have been developed to evaluate status epilepticus prognosis: STESS (Status Epilepticus Severity Score) and EMSE (Epidemiology based Mortality score in Status Epilepticus). A prospective observational study was performed on consecutive patients with SE admitted between September 2013 and August 2015. Demographics, clinical variables, STESS-3 and -4, and EMSE-64 scores were calculated for each patient at baseline. SE drug response, 30-day mortality and morbidity were the outcomes measure. 162 episodes of SE were observed: 69% had a STESS ≥3; 34% had a STESS ≥4; 51% patients had an EMSE ≥64. The 30-days mortality was 31.5%: EMSE-64 showed greater negative predictive value (NPV) (97.5%), positive predictive value (PPV) (59.8%) and accuracy in the prediction of death than STESS-3 and STESS-4 (pstatus epilepticus proved refractory to non-anaesthetic treatment. All three scales showed a high NPV (EMSE-64: 87.3%; STESS-4: 89.4%; STESS-3: 87.5%) but a low PPV (EMSE-64: 40.9%; STESS-4: 52.9%; STESS-3: 32%) for the prediction of refractoriness to first and second line drugs. This means that accuracy for the prediction of refractoriness was equally poor for all scales. EMSE-64 appears superior to STESS-3 and STESS-4 in the prediction of 30-days mortality and morbidity. All scales showed poor accuracy in the prediction of response to first and second line antiepileptic drugs. At present, there are no reliable scores capable of predicting treatment responsiveness. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for reporting morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Ellis, Rodney J.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Bahnson, Robert; Wallner, Kent; Stock, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To standardize the reporting of brachytherapy-related prostate morbidity to guide ongoing clinical practice and future investigations. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate brachytherapy performed a literature review and, guided by their clinical experience, formulated specific recommendations for reporting on morbidity related to prostate brachytherapy. Results: The ABS recommends using validated, patient-administered health-related quality-of-life instruments for the determination of baseline and follow-up data regarding bowel, urinary, and sexual function. Both actuarial and crude incidences should be reported, along with the temporal resolution of specific complications, and correlated with the doses to the normal tissues. The International Prostate Symptom Score is recommended to assess urinary morbidity, and any dysuria, gross hematuria, urinary retention, incontinence, or medication use should be quantified. Likewise, the ''Sexual Health Inventory for Men,'' which includes the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function, is the preferred instrument for reporting sexual function, and the loss of sexual desire, incidence of hematospermia, painful orgasm (orgasmalgia), altered orgasm intensity, decreased ejaculatory volume, use of erectile aids, and use of hormones for androgen deprivation should be quantified. The ABS recommends adoption of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer acute and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme for reporting rectal morbidity and noting the incidence of rectal steroid, laser, or antidiarrheal use. Conclusion: It is important to focus on health-related quality-of-life issues in the treatment of prostate cancer, because the control rates are very similar between appropriate treatment modalities. The ABS recommends using the International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of

  13. Assessment of morbidity in carcinoma of the cervix: a comparison of the LENT SOMA scales and the Franco-Italian glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Susan E.; Burns, Meriel P.; Routledge, Jacqueline A.; Swindell, Ric; Bentzen, Soeren M.; West, Catharine M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the correlation between the LENT (late effects on normal tissue) SOMA (subjective objective management analytic) system and the Franco-Italian glossary scores of late morbidity in cervical cancer patients treated with radiation, and to compare the ability of the scoring systems to detect differences between radiation treatment groups. Materials and methods: The study was retrospective. Patients, invited to take part in the study, had radiotherapy for cervical cancer and had a minimum of 3 years follow-up with no evidence of recurrence. One hundred patients agreed to take part. LENT subjective data were obtained using a patient questionnaire approach in order to complete the scales as published. The LENT objective, management and Franco-Italian glossary scores were obtained by a physician. Correlations between scores and differences between treatment groups were examined using non-parametric tests. Results: The average LENT SOMA scores had a greater resolution than the maximum scores, and using the maximum score alone underestimated treatment morbidity. The Franco-Italian glossary scores correlated strongly with the LENT objective scores (ρ=0.61, P<0.0005), and less strongly with the LENT subjective scores (ρ=0.45, P<0.0005). Significant differences in morbidity between the radiation treatment groups were measured using both the LENT SOMA system and the Franco-Italian glossary. Conclusions: The maximum and average LENT scores should be reported for each subsite. The LENT objective scores correlated well with the scores obtained using the established Franco-Italian glossary, but the LENT system provided additional information on subjective treatment effects. Both systems were able to measure significant differences in morbidity between radiation treatment groups. In conclusion, the LENT SOMA system is a valid and comprehensive approach for scoring the late normal tissue effects of radiotherapy

  14. Evaluation of the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) scoring system in elderly patients with pressure sores undergoing fasciocutaneous flap-reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Kazuo; Morita, Eishin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to predict operative morbidity in elderly patients with deep pressure sores by using the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) scoring system. Fifteen patients over 70 years old were retrospectively reviewed who had undergone gluteus maximus fasciocutaneous flap-reconstruction for pressure sores of the sacral region from 1 April 2005 to 31 March 2007. Complications were seen in six cases (40%) after operation. Four were wound infection, one was chest infection and another was septicemia. The subjects were divided into two groups by the presence (complicated group) or absence (non-complicated group) of postoperative complications. Each item of physiological scores, physiological score (PS), operative severity score (OS) and predicted morbidity rate (R) were calculated and compared between two groups. As a result, hemoglobin (P = 0.0276), PS (P = 0.0023) and R (P = 0.0078) differed significantly between the two groups. It is noteworthy that the PS were over 25 in all of the complicated group, but in only one of nine in the non-complicated group (P = 0.0014). Our study suggests that, for pressure sores in the sacral region in elderly patients, gluteus maximus fasciocutaneous flap-reconstruction can be employed in patients whose PS are under 24 in the POSSUM scoring system.

  15. Diabetes mellitus: a predictor for late radiation morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, David M.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Given the high frequency of diabetes, as well as prostate cancer in the elderly population, we sought to determine whether diabetic patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3DCRT) had an increased risk of late gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) complications. Methods and Materials: Nine-hundred forty-four prostate cancer patients were treated between April 1989 and October 1996 using 3DCRT. Median patient age was 69 years (range 48-89), median center of prostate dose was 7211 cGy (range 6211-8074) and median follow-up was 36 months (range 2-99). Patients were evaluated every 6 months with digital rectal examinations, serum PSAs and symptom questionnaires. Radiation morbidity was quantified using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and modified Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales. Patients with a preexisting history of either Type I or Type II diabetes mellitus were coded as diabetics. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients had diabetes (13% of total). Rates of acute morbidity did not differ between diabetics and nondiabetics; however, diabetics experienced significantly more late grade 2 GI toxicity (28% vs. 17%, p = 0.011) and late grade 2 GU toxicity (14% vs. 6%, p 0.001). There was a trend toward increased late grade 3 and 4 GI complications in diabetics, but not for late grade 3 and 4 GU complications; however, the total number of recorded events for these categories was small. Examining the onset of late toxicity, diabetics developed GU complications earlier than nondiabetics (median: 10 months vs. 24 months, p = 0.02). Considering age, dose, rectal blocking, field size, and history of diabetes in a stepwise multivariate regression model for late grade 2 GI toxicity, dose (p 0.0001), diabetes (p = 0.0110), and rectal blocking (p = 0.0163) emerged independently predictive for complications. For late grade 2 GU toxicity, only the presence of diabetes remained independently significant

  16. Studying morbidity and predicting mortality in patients with blunt chest trauma using a novel clinical score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Manay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A departmental audit in March 2015 revealed significant mortality rate of 40% in blunt chest trauma patients (much greater than the global 25%. A study was thus planned to study morbidity and predictors of mortality in blunt chest trauma patients admitted to our hospital. Methods: This study was a prospective observational study of 139 patients with a history of blunt chest trauma between June 2015 and November 2015 after the Institutional Ethics Committee approval in April 2015. The sample size was calculated from the prevalence rate in our institute from the past medical records. Results: The morbidity factors following blunt chest injuries apart from pain were need for Intensive Care Unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Significant predictors of mortality in our study were SpO2 16, and need for mechanical ventilation. By calculating the likelihood ratios of each respiratory sign, a clinical score was devised. Conclusion: The modifiable factors affecting morbidity and mortality were identified. Mild to moderate chest injury due to blunt trauma is difficult to diagnose. The restoration of respiratory physiology has not only significant implications on recovery from chest injury but also all other injuries. It is our sincere hope that the score we have formulated will help reduce mortality and morbidity after further trials.

  17. Analysis of anatomical factors controlling the morbidity of radiation-induced otitis media with effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shengzi; Wang Weifang; Zhang Haiyan; Guo Ming; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the anatomical factors controlling the morbidity of radiation-induced otitis media with effusion (OME) and determine how to best preserve middle ear function when treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Materials and methods: Forty patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma undergoing 3-D radiotherapy (RT) planning and curative RT were analyzed retrospectively. The difference in dosage over the middle ear cavity and the isthmus of the Eustachian tube (ET) was evaluated. Pure tone audiometry and impedance audiometry tests were performed before and after RT. Results: Mean dosages over the isthmus of the ET for acoustic impedance and pure tone audiometry were recorded. Differences in dosage among the three classifications of unchanged, improved, and worsened ears were statistically significant. Conclusion: There was a correlation between the morbidity of radiation-induced OME and the radiation dosage over the middle ear cavities. Decreased OME morbidity was observed when the dosage over the isthmus of the ET was below 52 Gy and the dosage over middle ear cavity was below 46 Gy

  18. Inhaled 239PuO2 and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.; Decker, J.R.; Lai, Y.L.

    1988-08-01

    Rats and beagle dogs were given doses of 60 Co gamma radiation and/or body burdens of 239 PuO 2 within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses of both species within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell concentrations and by long-term loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in animals of both species that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled plutonium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in both species, but its only effect on blood cell concentrations was lymphocytopenia in dogs. Combined gamma irradiation and plutonium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Plutonium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the long-term effect of plutonium lung burdens in both species. Rats were less sensitive to both kinds of radiation, whether administered alone or in combination. 71 refs., 105 figs., 48 tabs

  19. Using a composite morbidity score and cultural survey to explore characteristics of high proficiency neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempf, Joseph W; Wang, Lian; Dunn, Michael

    2018-01-03

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) collaboration has not eliminated the morbidity variability seen among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Factors other than inconstant application of potentially better practices (PBPs) might explain divergent proficiency. Measure a composite morbidity score and determine whether cultural, environmental and cognitive factors distinguish high proficiency from lower proficiency NICUs. Retrospective analysis using a risk-adjusted composite morbidity score (Benefit Metric) and cultural survey focusing on very low birth weight (VLBW) infants from 39 NICUs, years 2000-2014. The Benefit Metric and yearly variance from the group mean was rank-ordered by NICU. A comprehensive survey was completed by each NICU exploring whether morbidity variance correlated with CQI methodology, cultural, environmental and/or cognitive characteristics. 58 272 VLBW infants were included, mean (SD) age 28.2 (3.0) weeks, birth weight 1031 (301) g. The 39 NICU groups' Benefit Metric improved 40%, from 80 in 2000 to 112 in 2014 (Pexpectations of providers, enhanced learning opportunities, knowledge of CQI fundamentals and more generous staffing. Cultural, environmental and cognitive characteristics vary among NICUs perhaps more than traditional CQI methodology and PBPs, possibly explaining the inconstancy of VLBW infant morbidity reduction efforts. High proficiency NICUs foster spirited team work and camaraderie, sustained learning opportunities and support of favourable staffing that allows problem solving and widespread involvement in CQI activities. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Rectal and urinary morbidity in patients undergoing prostate I-125 implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Kenneth; Wallner, Kent

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the risk of urinary incontinence or severe rectal complications in patients who have TURP/TUIP or rectal bleeding after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred nine patients with T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma were treated with I-125 implantation from 1988 through 1994. Ten patients underwent TURP/TUIP after brachtherapy to relieve urinary obstruction refractory to non-surgical management. Twenty-two developed rectal morbidity and were subsequently followed with endoscopy and serial clinical evaluation. RESULTS: Permanent urinary incontinence following TURP/TUIP developed in seven of 10 patients. Urinary incontinence was mild in three patients (LENT score = 1) and severe in 4 additional patients (LENT score = 3). There was no relationship between the degree of incontinence and the use of TURP versus TUIP, mass of tissue resected, or time between brachytherapy and TURP/TUIP. Urethral doses were higher than we generally recommend (> 140 Gy) in the 5 patients for whom detailed urethral radiation dose information was available, Rectal morbidity developed in twenty-two patients. Twenty experienced radiation proctitis-related bright red blood per rectum (BRBPR), the majority of which ((15(20))) were mild (RTOG score = 1) and treated with medical management. The other 5 developed either a rectal ulcer ((3(5))) or fistula ((2(5))). The two patients without significant BRBPR developed a fistula and ulcer. Two of three patients with fistulas had predisposing conditions (pre-implant history of fistula and previous pelvic radiation for rectal cancer). All four rectal ulcers healed with conservative management. CONCLUSION: Permanent urinary incontinence is common in patients who require a TURP/TUIP after prostate brachytherapy. Its cause is multifactorial and may include surgically-related damage to the urinary sphincters and radiation dose to the uretha. Rectal morbidity after prostate brachtherapy is mild in the majority of cases and

  1. Inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats and dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Decker, J.R.; Lai, Y.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Hiastala, M.P.; McGee, D.R.; Park, J.F.; Kuffel, E.G.; Ragan, H.A.; Cannon, W.C.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1988-08-01

    Rats and beagle dogs were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or body burdens of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses of both species within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell concentrations and by long-term loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in animals of both species that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled plutonium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in both species, but its only effect on blood cell concentrations was lymphocytopenia in dogs. Combined gamma irradiation and plutonium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Plutonium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the long-term effect of plutonium lung burdens in both species. Rats were less sensitive to both kinds of radiation, whether administered alone or in combination. 71 refs., 105 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. Correlation of probability scores of placenta accreta on magnetic resonance imaging with hemorrhagic morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Grace; Horowitz, Jeanne M; Berggruen, Senta; Ernst, Linda M; Linn, Rebecca L; Hewlett, Bradley; Kim, Jennifer; Chalifoux, Laurie A; McCarthy, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that assigning grades to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of suspected placenta accreta will correlate with hemorrhagic outcomes. We chose a single-center, retrospective, observational design. Nulliparous or multiparous women who had antenatal placental MRI performed at a tertiary level academic hospital were included. Cases with antenatal placental MRI were included and compared with cases without MRI performed. Two radiologists assigned a probability score for accreta to each study. Estimated blood loss and transfusion requirements were compared among groups by the Kruskal-Wallis H test. Thirty-five cases had placental MRI performed. MRI performance was associated with higher blood loss compared with the non-MRI group (2600 [1400-4500]mL vs 900[600-1500]mL, Paccreta, probability scores for antenatal placental MRI may not be associated with increasing degrees of hemorrhage. Continued research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of assigning probability scores for antenatal accreta imaging studies, combined with clinical indices of suspicion, in assisting with antenatal multidisciplinary team planning for operative management of this morbid condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Does an Algorithmic Approach to Using Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiation Result in Good Function, Local Control Rates, and Low Morbidity in Patients With Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jason; Ghasem, Alex; Huntley, Samuel; Donaldson, Nathan; Keisch, Martin; Conway, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) are two modalities used in the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. Previous work at our institution showed early complications and outcomes for patients treated with HDR-BT, EBRT, or a combination of both radiation therapy modalities. As the general indications for each of these approaches to radiation therapy differ, it is important to evaluate the use of each in an algorithmic way, reflecting how they are used in contemporary practice at sites that use these treatments. QUESTION/PURPOSES: (1) To determine the proportions of intermediate- and long-term complications associated with the use of brachytherapy in the treatment of primary high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcomas; (2), to characterize the long-term morbidity of the three radiation treatment groups using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/ European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme; (3) to determine whether treatment with HDR-BT, EBRT, and HDR-BT+EBRT therapy, in combination with limb-salvage surgery, results in acceptable local control in this high-risk group of sarcomas. We retrospectively studied data from 171 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade extremity soft tissue sarcoma treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiation therapy between 1990 and 2012 at our institution, with a mean followup of 72 months. Of the 171 patients, 33 (20%) were treated with HDR-BT, 128 (75%) with EBRT, and 10 (6%) with HDR-BT+EBRT. We excluded 265 patients with soft tissue sarcomas owing to axial tumor location, previous radiation to the affected extremity, incomplete patient records, patients receiving primary amputation, recurrent tumors, pediatric patients, low- and intermediate-grade tumors, and rhabdoid histology. Fifteen patients (9%) were lost to followup for any reason including died of disease or other causes during the first 12 months postoperatively. This

  4. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry S

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis being tested in this project is that a greater proportion of patients who develop radiation-induced subcutaneous late tissue morbidity possess a variant allele in the ATM gene compared...

  5. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenstein, Barry S

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis being tested in this project is that a greater proportion of patients who develop radiation-induced subcutaneous late tissue morbidity possess a variant allele in the ATM gene compared...

  6. Prophylactic and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of the skin and mucosa. Part I. Results of a German multicenter questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J.S.; Wilhelm, R.; Niehoff, P.; Schneider, R.; Kovacs, G.; Kimmig, B.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, it was to evaluate the remedies, which are used for prevention and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of the skin and mucosa (mouth, pharynx, esophagus, small and large bowel, rectum and vagina). A questionnaire was sent to 130 radiotherapeutic departments in Germany in Juli 1995. The questionnaire had been designed with 22 open questions concerning the preventive and therapeutic management of acute radiation related morbidity of skin and mucosal sites. From 130 questionnaires, 89 (68.4%) were sent back till August 1995. All of them were evaluable. The recommendations showed a broad spectrum for each site. Especially the oral mucositis was treated in many different ways and combinations. The prevention and therapy of complicating superinfections seem to be the joint principle of most of the recommendations. The management of the acute radiation related morbidity has a wide clinical spectrum among different radiation therapy centers. Systematic prospectively designed investigations are necessary in order to achieve a further reduction in the radiation related acute morbidity. Therefore, a multicenter collaborative working group has been founded. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Temporal resolution of urinary morbidity following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Dorsey, Anthony T.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term urinary morbidity for prostate brachytherapy patients without a preimplant history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland and who received prophylactic and prolonged α-blockers. α-blockers may decrease radiation-induced urethritis and increase urinary flow. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated to identify factors associated with increased acute urinary morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland underwent transperineal ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. For all patients, an α-blocker was initiated prior to implantation and continued at least until the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) returned to baseline levels. Clinical parameters evaluated for short-term urinary morbidity included patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS (obtained within 3 weeks of implantation), and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, the utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy before implantation, the choice of isotope, the urethral dose, the total implant activity in millicuries, and a variety of dosimetric quality indicators (D 90 and V 100 /V 150 /V 200 ). Catheter dependency and the duration of α-blocker dependency was also evaluated. On average, 11.2 IPSS surveys were obtained for each patient. Results: One hundred fifty of the 170 patients (88.2%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on day 0. Only one patient required an urinary catheter for > 5 days. Two patients (1.2%) required a subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate gland because of prolonged obstructive/irritative symptoms. To date, no patient has developed an urinary stricture or urinary incontinence. The IPS score on average peaked at 2 weeks following implantation

  8. Impact of pre-implant lower urinary tract symptoms on postoperative urinary morbidity after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teishima, Jun; Iwamoto, Hideo; Miyamoto, Katsutoshi; Shoji, Koichi; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kanao; Kajiwara, Mitsuru; Matsubara, Akio

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to assess the impact of baseline lower urinary tract symptoms on postoperative urinary morbidity in patients being treated for prostate cancer with 125-I permanent prostate brachytherapy. A total of 104 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Their urinary morbidity was followed up using the International Prostate Symptom Score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for 12 months or more after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Patients were classified into two groups based on their baseline International Prostate Symptom Score: the low International Prostate Symptom Score group (score≤7) and the high International Prostate Symptom Score group (score≥8). Urinary morbidity was estimated in each group based on the results of the International Prostate Symptom Score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite measured before permanent prostate brachytherapy, and at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the end of all radiation therapy. The overall mean total International Prostate Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score quality of life score, and urinary-related scores for Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite were significantly worse at 1 month after the end of treatment, but they improved gradually after the treatment and recovered to the baseline level within 12 months. Even in the high-International Prostate Symptom Score group, the International Prostate Symptom Score and International Prostate Symptom Score Quality of Life score were significantly worse at 1-3 months after permanent prostate brachytherapy, and then recovered to the baseline level without prolongation. Although the urination-related Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite score in the high-International Prostate Symptom Score group was significantly worse at 1 month after permanent prostate brachytherapy in comparison with that in the low-International Prostate Symptom Score group, it recovered to the baseline level without

  9. Factors influencing incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in conformal and standard radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Epstein, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients treated with conformal technique are combined with and compared to 162 consecutive patients treated with standard techniques. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using the retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Univariate analysis compares differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade two acute morbidity by technique, T stage, age, irradiated volume, and dose. Multivariate logistic regression includes these same variables. Results: In nearly all categories, the conformal treatment group experienced significantly fewer acute grade 2 complications than the standard treatment group. Only volume (prostate ± whole pelvis) and technique (conformal vs. standard) were significantly related to incidence of morbidity on multivariate analysis. When dose is treated as a continuous variable (rather than being dichotomized into two levels), a trend is observed on multivariate analysis, but it does not reach significant levels. The incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients 65 years or older is significantly reduced by use of the conformal technique. Conclusion: The conformal technique is associated with fewer grade 2 acute toxicities for all patients. This

  10. Late effects of radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma: The patient's perspective of bladder, bowel and sexual morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, C.I.V.; Parker, C.A.; Morton, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    The patients' perceptions of the late effects of radiation therapy for carcinoma of the prostate on bladder, bowel and sexual function were determined by using a self-administered questionnaire (included as an appendix) which was posted in June 1996 to patients who had been treated for carcinoma of the prostate between February 1993 and April 1994 at the Herston centre of the Queensland Radium Institute. The questions were based on the SOMA-LENT subjective scales. Moderate bladder morbidity was reported by 15% of patients, with 2% reporting major morbidity. Moderate bowel morbidity was reported by 19% of patients with 2% reporting major morbidity, the major symptoms being bowel urgency and mucus discharge. Sexual function was a problem, with 72% of patients reporting dissatisfaction with their current level of sexual activity. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score for Evaluating Organ Failure and Outcome of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Obstetric Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Oliveira-Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the performance of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score in cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM. Design. Retrospective study of diagnostic validation. Setting. An obstetric intensive care unit (ICU in Brazil. Population. 673 women with SMM. Main Outcome Measures. mortality and SOFA score. Methods. Organ failure was evaluated according to maximum score for each one of its six components. The total maximum SOFA score was calculated using the poorest result of each component, reflecting the maximum degree of alteration in systemic organ function. Results. highest total maximum SOFA score was associated with mortality, 12.06 ± 5.47 for women who died and 1.87 ± 2.56 for survivors. There was also a significant correlation between the number of failing organs and maternal mortality, ranging from 0.2% (no failure to 85.7% (≥3 organs. Analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC confirmed the excellent performance of total maximum SOFA score for cases of SMM (AUC = 0.958. Conclusions. Total maximum SOFA score proved to be an effective tool for evaluating severity and estimating prognosis in cases of SMM. Maximum SOFA score may be used to conceptually define and stratify the degree of severity in cases of SMM.

  12. Morbidity follow-up feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.

    1988-02-01

    The report reviews the available sources of data within Canada for undertaking morbidity follow-up studies to both supplement and complement studies using Canadian mortality data. Such studies would permit earlier detection and more sensitive measures of differences in risk for exposures to radiation and allow timely measures to be taken to minimize any occupational and environmental health risk to radiation workers. The technical feasibility of using these sources was reviewed using the criteria of adequate personal identifying information, automation of data records, file size and the accuracy of the morbidity diagnosis information. At the present time certain of the provincial cancer registry files meet these criteria best. A work plan was prepared suggesting a morbidity pilot study to clarify the role of occupational factors in the incidence of cancer among radiation workers using the Alberta Cancer Registry file and the National Dose Registry (NDR) file of radiation workers. For the longer term a full cohort study using the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (NCIRS) and the NDR workers as the study population would provide information on all radiation workers on a national basis. A work plan was prepared and some initial format conversion of historical data was undertaken to begin developing the NCIRS into a data base suitable for long-term health studies

  13. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome.

  14. Impact of practice and of technical modifications on acute morbidity after prostate curie-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fur, E.; Malhaire, J.P.; Pradier, O.; Valeri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a cohort of 150 patients treated by curie-therapy for a prostate cancer, the authors report the analysis of the influence of some technical modifications (use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of a second period, and of a high frequency echographic probe during a third period) on the urinary toxicity. This toxicity has been assessed by using the urinary retention rate, and the difference between the maximum and initial International Prostate Symptom Score (IPPS). Rectal morbidity has been scaled according to a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. It appears that the occurrence of urinary retention after prostate radiotherapy decreases with practice and use of the automatic stepper. It seems that there is no impact on urinary morbidity (urinary retention excluded) nor on rectal morbidity. Short communication

  15. Late effects of radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma: The patient`s perspective of bladder, bowel and sexual morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, C.I.V.; Parker, C.A.; Morton, K.M. [Queensland Radium Institute, Herston, QLD (Australia)

    1998-02-01

    The patients` perceptions of the late effects of radiation therapy for carcinoma of the prostate on bladder, bowel and sexual function were determined by using a self-administered questionnaire (included as an appendix) which was posted in June 1996 to patients who had been treated for carcinoma of the prostate between February 1993 and April 1994 at the Herston centre of the Queensland Radium Institute. The questions were based on the SOMA-LENT subjective scales. Moderate bladder morbidity was reported by 15% of patients, with 2% reporting major morbidity. Moderate bowel morbidity was reported by 19% of patients with 2% reporting major morbidity, the major symptoms being bowel urgency and mucus discharge. Sexual function was a problem, with 72% of patients reporting dissatisfaction with their current level of sexual activity. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. New scoring system identifies kidney outcome with radiation therapy in acute renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Luci M.; Godinez, Juan; Thisted, Ronald A.; Woodle, E. Steve; Thistlewaite, J. Richard; Powers, Claire; Haraf, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Independent factors examined by Cox regression modeling were: gender (p 0.005), creatinine levels (p = 0.000), HLA-DR (p = 0.05), PRA-Maximum >70% (p = 0.014). Each factor was scored using integral coefficients to generate four different groups. The Kaplan-Meier survival analyzed by group produces an interpretable separation of the risk factors for graft loss. Conclusions: The outcome in patients treated with radiation therapy for acute renal graft rejection can be predicted by a novel scoring system. Patients with scores of three or less are able to achieve 100% renal graft salvage, while patients who have scores of 12 or higher are not able to be salvaged with the current radiation therapy regimen. Future studies should be directed toward identifying more effective treatment for patients who have a high score based on our criteria. The scoring system should be utilized to identify patients at risk who could benefit from radiation therapy. Further study with a randomized trial utilizing this scoring system is needed to confirm the validity of the scoring system in predicting graft survival and the efficacy of radiation in patients who receive radiation therapy for acute graft rejection

  17. Protective Lung Ventilation and Morbidity After Pulmonary Resection: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, David; Zhang, Hao; Pedoto, Alessia; Desiderio, Dawn P; Shi, Weiji; Tan, Kay See

    2017-07-01

    Protective lung ventilation (PLV) during one-lung ventilation (OLV) for thoracic surgery is frequently recommended to reduce pulmonary complications. However, limited outcome data exist on whether PLV use during OLV is associated with less clinically relevant pulmonary morbidity after lung resection. Intraoperative data were prospectively collected in 1080 patients undergoing pulmonary resection with OLV, intentional crystalloid restriction, and mechanical ventilation to maintain inspiratory peak airway pressure volume. The primary outcome was the occurrence of pneumonia and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Propensity score matching was used to generate PLV and non-PLV groups with comparable characteristics. Associations between outcomes and PLV status were analyzed by exact logistic regression, with matching as cluster in the anatomic and nonanatomic lung resection cohorts. In the propensity score-matched analysis, the incidence of pneumonia and/or ARDS among patients who had an anatomic lung resection was 9/172 (5.2%) in the non-PLV compared to the PLV group 7/172 (4.1%; odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-3.45, P= .62). The incidence of pneumonia and/or ARDS in patients who underwent nonanatomic resection was 3/118 (2.5%) in the non-PLV compared to the PLV group, 1/118 (0.9%; odds ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-28.84, P= .34). In this prospective observational study, we found no differences in the incidence of pneumonia and/or ARDS between patients undergoing lung resection with tidal volumes volume strategy during OLV on clinically important outcomes.

  18. Cancer morbidity as radiation protection efficiency indicator in uranium mining facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, T. A.; Operchuk, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reviews the efficiency of radiation protection in uranium mining industry. The officially provided data on individual doses for underground and surface mining professionals is analysed and cancer morbidity risk is assessed. The researchers defined the individual components of the total effective dose and separately assessed their contributions. The total of 114 cancer cases have been registered during the past 15 years. Accumulated equivalent doses for lungs are estimated from 20 to 430 mSv. The total working time in 56% of individual cancer cases diagnosed made over 20 years. The actual lung cancer mortality rate for miners is established 3 cases per 1000 individuals, which permits to question the authenticity of the dosimetric data and the efficiency of radiological protection applied.

  19. Mortality and morbidity risks vary with birth weight standard deviation score in growth restricted extremely preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Takuji; Itabashi, Kazuo; Kusuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    To assess whether the mortality and morbidity risks vary with birth weight standard deviation score (BWSDS) in growth restricted extremely preterm infants. This was a multicenter retrospective cohort study using the database of the Neonatal Research Network of Japan and including 9149 infants born between 2003 and 2010 at <28 weeks gestation. According to the BWSDSs, the infants were classified as: <-2.0, -2.0 to -1.5, -1.5 to -1.0, -1.0 to -0.5, and ≥-0.5. Infants with BWSDS≥-0.5 were defined as non-growth restricted group. After adjusting for covariates, the risks of mortality and some morbidities were different among the BWSDS groups. Compared with non-growth restricted group, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for mortality [aOR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.12] and chronic lung disease (CLD) (aOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.54) were higher among the infants with BWSDS -1.5 to <-1.0. The aOR for severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) (aOR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71) and sepsis (aOR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.32-2.24) were higher among the infants with BWSDS -2.0 to <-1.5. The aOR for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) (aOR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.64-3.55) was increased at a BWSDS<-2.0. Being growth restricted extremely preterm infants confer additional risks for mortality and morbidities such as CLD, ROP, sepsis and NEC, and these risks may vary with BWSDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Use of a Bayesian Hierarchy to Develop and Validate a Co-Morbidity Score to Predict Mortality for Linked Primary and Secondary Care Data from the NHS in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Colin J; Card, Tim R; West, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We have assessed whether the linkage between routine primary and secondary care records provided an opportunity to develop an improved population based co-morbidity score with the combined information on co-morbidities from both health care settings. We extracted all people older than 20 years at the start of 2005 within the linkage between the Hospital Episodes Statistics, Clinical Practice Research Datalink, and Office for National Statistics death register in England. A random 50% sample was used to identify relevant diagnostic codes using a Bayesian hierarchy to share information between similar Read and ICD 10 code groupings. Internal validation of the score was performed in the remaining 50% and discrimination was assessed using Harrell's C statistic. Comparisons were made over time, age, and consultation rate with the Charlson and Elixhauser indexes. 657,264 people were followed up from the 1st January 2005. 98 groupings of codes were derived from the Bayesian hierarchy, and 37 had an adjusted weighting of greater than zero in the Cox proportional hazards model. 11 of these groupings had a different weighting dependent on whether they were coded from hospital or primary care. The C statistic reduced from 0.88 (95% confidence interval 0.88-0.88) in the first year of follow up, to 0.85 (0.85-0.85) including all 5 years. When we stratified the linked score by consultation rate the association with mortality remained consistent, but there was a significant interaction with age, with improved discrimination and fit in those under 50 years old (C = 0.85, 0.83-0.87) compared to the Charlson (C = 0.79, 0.77-0.82) or Elixhauser index (C = 0.81, 0.79-0.83). The use of linked population based primary and secondary care data developed a co-morbidity score that had improved discrimination, particularly in younger age groups, and had a greater effect when adjusting for co-morbidity than existing scores.

  1. PSYCHOSOCIAL MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING MASTECTOMY FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Konnakkaparambil Ramakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast Cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and carries significant psychosocial morbidity. The diagnosis of the disease and the treatment modalities like surgery and chemotherapy contribute to the morbidity. The recognition of the psychosocial morbidity associated with mastectomy can help us formulate effective counselling strategies. The objectives of this study were- to assess the psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma breast, to identify the preoperative variables that predict the morbidity and to find out the correlation between degree of neuroticism of the individual and morbidity. MATERIALS AND METHODS 35 female patients who had mastectomy for breast cancer were evaluated at three time-points, preoperatively, immediately after surgery and 2 months after surgery. Anxiety and depression was assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, psychological distress was measured using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and neuroticism was assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism subscale (EPI-N. RESULTS There was a high level of anxiety, depression and GHQ scores preoperatively with a further worsening of these over the three interviews. Age, marital status and menopausal status were factors which had an influence on psychosocial morbidity. Preoperative EPI-N scores positively correlated with psychosocial morbidity. CONCLUSION There is a high level of psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer and mastectomy seems to worsen it in the first two months after surgery. Our study shows that psychosocial morbidity is affected by age, marital status, menopausal status and level of neuroticism.

  2. A Patient-Assessed Morbidity to Evaluate Outcome in Surgically Treated Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shudifat, Abdul Rahman; Kahlon, Babar; Höglund, Peter; Lindberg, Sven; Magnusson, Måns; Siesjo, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Outcome after treatment of vestibular schwannomas can be evaluated by health providers as mortality, recurrence, performance, and morbidity. Because mortality and recurrence are rare events, evaluation has to focus on performance and morbidity. The latter has mostly been reported by health providers. In the present study, we validate 2 new scales for patient-assessed performance and morbidity in comparison with different outcome tools, such as quality of life (QOL) (European Quality of Life-5 dimensions [EQ-5D]), facial nerve score, and work capacity. There were 167 total patients in a retrospective (n = 90) and prospective (n = 50) cohort of surgically treated vestibular schwannomas. A new patient-assessed morbidity score (paMS), a patient-assessed Karnofsky score (paKPS), the patient-assessed QOL (EQ-5D) score, work capacity, and the House-Brackmann facial nerve score were used as outcome measures. Analysis of paMS components and their relation to other outcomes was done as uni- and multivariate analysis. All outcome instruments, except EQ-5D and paKPS, showed a significant decrease postoperatively. Only the facial nerve score (House-Brackmann facial nerve score) differed significantly between the retrospective and prospective cohorts. Out of the 16 components of the paMS, hearing dysfunction, tear dysfunction, balance dysfunction, and eye irritation were most often reported. Both paMS and EQ-5D correlated significantly with work capacity. Standard QOL and performance instruments may not be sufficiently sensitive or specific to measure outcome at the cohort level after surgical treatment of vestibular schwannomas. A morbidity score may yield more detailed information on symptoms that can be relevant for rehabilitation and occupational training after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment outcome of schizophrenia co-morbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.N.S.; Arshad, N.; Naeem Ullah

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the pharmacological treatment outcome of schizophrenia, co-morbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder by comparing the effects of typical neuroleptic, atypical neuroleptic and a combination of typical with anti-obsessional drugs on positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and obsessional symptoms. Subjects and Methods: The sample consisted of 39 patients suffering from schizophrenia co-morbid with obsessive- compulsive disorder. They were divided in three groups according to the pharmacological treatment given by the treating psychiatrists. Sample was assessed at the start of treatment and twelve weeks later. Results: Patients receiving typical neuroleptics and anti-obsessional drugs showed better outcome (p < .05) both in psychotic (pre-intervention mean scores of positive scale of PANSS 26.90 as compared to postinterventional mean scores 19.00) and obsessional symptoms (pre-intervention mean scores on Padua Inventory 165.00 compared to 84.00 postinterventional mean scores) than those receiving typical and atypical neuroleptics alone. Conclusion: Treatment outcome of schizophrenia co-morbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder shows better results if anti-obsessional drugs are added to the neuroleptics. (author)

  4. Independent risk factors of morbidity in penetrating colon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Sadullah; Gedik, Ercan; Uysal, Ersin; Taçyildiz, Ibrahim Halil

    2009-05-01

    The present study explored the factors effective on colon-related morbidity in patients with penetrating injury of the colon. The medical records of 196 patients were reviewed for variables including age, gender, factor of trauma, time between injury and operation, shock, duration of operation, Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index (PATI), Injury Severity Score (ISS), site of colon injury, Colon Injury Score, fecal contamination, number of associated intra- and extraabdominal organ injuries, units of transfused blood within the first 24 hours, and type of surgery. In order to determine the independent risk factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Gunshot wounds, interval between injury and operation > or =6 hours, shock, duration of the operation > or =6 hours, PATI > or =25, ISS > or =20, Colon Injury Score > or = grade 3, major fecal contamination, number of associated intraabdominal organ injuries >2, number of associated extraabdominal organ injuries >2, multiple blood transfusions, and diversion were significantly associated with morbidity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed diversion and transfusion of > or =4 units in the first 24 hours as independent risk factors affecting colon-related morbidity. Diversion and transfusion of > or =4 units in the first 24 hours were determined to be independent risk factors for colon-related morbidity.

  5. Coronary calcium scoring with MDCT: The radiation dose to the breast and the effectiveness of bismuth breast shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet Halit; Yasar, Dogan; Albayram, Sait; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Ozer, Harun; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Mihmanli, Ismail; Akman, Canan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the breast radiation dose during coronary calcium scoring with multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT). We also evaluated the degree of dose reduction by using a bismuth breast shield when performing coronary calcium scoring with MDCT. Materials and methods: The dose reduction achievable by shielding the adult (35 years or older) female breasts was studied in 25 women who underwent coronary calcium scoring with MDCT. All examinations were performed with a 16-MDCT scanner. To compare the shielded versus unshielded breast dose, the examinations were performed with (right breast) and without (left breast) breast shielding in all patients. With this technique the superficial breast doses were calculated. To determine the average glandular breast radiation dose, we imaged an anthropomorphic dosimetric phantom into which calibrated dosimeters were placed to measure the dose to the breast. The phantom was imaged using the same protocol. Radiation doses to the breasts with and without the breast shielding were measured and compared using the Student's t-test. Results: The mean radiation doses with and without the breast shield were 5.71 ± 1.1 mGy versus 9.08 ± 1.5 mGy, respectively. The breast shield provided a 37.12% decrease in radiation dose to the breast with shielding. The difference between the dose received by the breasts with and without bismuth shielding was significant, with a p-value of less than 0.001. Conclusion: The high radiation during MDCT greatly exceeds the recommended doses and should not be underestimated. Bismuth in plane shielding for coronary calcium scoring with MDCT decreased the radiation dose to the breast. We recommend routine use of breast shields in female patients undergoing calcium scoring with MDCT

  6. Is Trabecular Bone Score Valuable in Bone Microstructure Assessment after Gastric Bypass in Women with Morbid Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Pia Marengo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of bariatric surgery on skeletal health raise many concerns. Trabecular bone score (TBS is obtained through the analysis of lumbar spine dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA images and allows an indirect assessment of skeletal microarchitecture (MA. The aim of our study was to evaluate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD and alterations in bone microarchitecture assessed by TBS in morbidly obese women undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB, over a three-year follow-up. Material/Methods: A prospective study of 38 morbidly obese white women, aged 46.3 ± 8.2 years, undergoing RYGB was conducted. Biochemical analyses and DXA scans with TBS evaluation were performed before and at one year and three years after surgery. Results: Patients showed normal calcium and phosphorus plasma concentrations throughout the study. However, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD3 decreased, and 71% of patients had a vitamin D deficiency at three years. BMD at femoral neck and lumbar spine (LSBMD significantly decreased 13.53 ± 5.42% and 6.03 ± 6.79%, respectively, during the three-year follow-up; however Z-score values remained above those for women of the same age. TBS was within normal ranges at one and three years (1.431 ± 106 and 1.413 ± 85, respectively, and at the end of the study, 73.7% of patients had normal bone MA. TBS at three years correlated inversely with age (r = −0.41, p = 0.010, body fat (r = −0.465, p = 0.004 and greater body fat deposited in trunk (r = −0.48, p = 0.004, and positively with LSBMD (r = 0.433, p = 0.007, fat mass loss (r = 0.438, p = 0.007 and lean mass loss (r = 0.432, p = 0.008. In the regression analysis, TBS remained associated with body fat (β = −0.625, p = 0.031; R2 = 0.47. The fracture risk, calculated by FRAX® (University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, with and without adjustment by TBS, was low. Conclusion: Women undergoing RYGB in the mid-term have a preserved bone MA, assessed by TBS.

  7. The PER (Preoperative Esophagectomy Risk) Score: A Simple Risk Score to Predict Short-Term and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Surgically Treated Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, Matthias; Metze, Johannes; Uzunoglu, Faik G; Nentwich, Michael; Ghadban, Tarik; Wellner, Ullrich; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Kluge, Stefan; Izbicki, Jakob R; Vashist, Yogesh K

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal resection in patients with esophageal cancer (EC) is still associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We aimed to develop a simple preoperative risk score for the prediction of short-term and long-term outcomes for patients with EC treated by esophageal resection. In total, 498 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma, who underwent esophageal resection, were included in this retrospective cohort study. Three preoperative esophagectomy risk (PER) groups were defined based on preoperative functional evaluation of different organ systems by validated tools (revised cardiac risk index, model for end-stage liver disease score, and pulmonary function test). Clinicopathological parameters, morbidity, and mortality as well as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to the PER score. The PER score significantly predicted the short-term outcome of patients with EC who underwent esophageal resection. PER 2 and PER 3 patients had at least double the risk of morbidity and mortality compared to PER 1 patients. Furthermore, a higher PER score was associated with shorter DFS (P PER score was identified as an independent predictor of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 2.1; P PER score allows preoperative objective allocation of patients with EC into different risk categories for morbidity, mortality, and long-term outcomes. Thus, multicenter studies are needed for independent validation of the PER score.

  8. An analysis of acute complications and perioperative morbidity from high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkaria, Jann N; Petereit, Daniel G; Kinsella, Timothy J; Buchler, Dolores A

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute morbidity and mortality for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy performed in an outpatient setting in the treatment of gynecological malignancies, and to identify possible risk factors for adverse outcomes. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with cervical (n=129) or uterine (n=42) carcinoma with an intact uterus were evaluated and treated from August 1989 through December 1994, with at least part of their therapy delivered with intracavitary HDR {sup 192}Ir radiation. A total of 830 ICR insertions were performed with greater than 95% done on an outpatient basis under heavy intravenous sedation using fentanyl and midazolam. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were recorded for any event occurring within 30 days of the completion of therapy. Anesthesia risk was evaluated retrospectively in all patients based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Class System. Results: The uterine patients, many treated with radiation alone because of morbid obesity or medical inoperability, had a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rate as compared to the cervix patient cohort. Thirteen of the 42 (31%) uterine patients and 8 of the 129 (6%) cervix patients required hospitalization within 30 days of treatment completion (p<0.001). Four of these uterine patients (10%) died of medical complications related to therapy or disease progression within 30 days, while 2 of the cervix patients (1.5%) died: one from disease progression and the other due to radiation enteritis (p=0.05). Preliminary analysis suggests that uterine patients with a high anesthesia risk score (ASA>2) experienced greater morbidity and mortality, while the best predictor of complications in the cervix patients was age greater than 70 years. For the entire cohort of patients, no correlation was found between the 30 day morbidity and mortality and the doses of fentanyl and midazolam used or the length of the procedure

  9. Urinary morbidity with a modified peripheral loading technique of transperineal 125i prostate implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Douglas; Colonias, Athanasios; Miller, Ralph; Benoit, Ronald; Cohen, Jeffrey; Arshoun, Youssef; Galloway, Michael; Karlovits, Stephen; Wu, Andrew; Johnson, Mark; Quinn, Annette; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of urinary morbidity within the first 12 months following a modified peripheral loading technique for permanent transperineal transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided 125 I prostate implantation and comparison of urinary morbidity with various clinical and implant parameters. Materials and Methods: Between October 1, 1996, and March 11, 1998, 87 patients with favorable, early stage prostate cancer were treated with permanent transperineal TRUS guided 125 I prostate implantation. A peripheral loading technique was utilized for source placement with 75-80% source distribution in the periphery and 20-25% source distribution centrally. A mean total activity of 38 mCi of 125 I was implanted (range, 19-66 mCi). The mean source activity was 0.43 mCi/source (range, 0.26-0.61 mCi/source) and the mean number of sources implanted was 88 (range, 56-134). The minimum prescribed dose to the prostate was 145 Gy. The median D 90 , V 100 , and V 150 were 152 Gy (range, 104-211 Gy), 92% (range, 71-99%), and 61% (range, 11-89%), respectively. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 12-29 months). Urinary morbidity was scored at 3 weeks and then at 3-month intervals for the first 2 years using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system (scale 0-5). Results: Most patients developed at least minor urinary symptoms with frequency or nocturia being the most common. Overall, 79% (69/87) of patients experienced urinary morbidity with 21% (18/87) reporting no symptoms. The incidence of overall Grade 1 urinary morbidity was 37% (32/87); Grade 2 morbidity was 37% (32/87); and Grade 3 morbidity was 6% (5/87). There was no Grade 4 or 5 morbidity. The incidence of Grade 0 frequency/nocturia was 36% (31/87); Grade 1 was 33% (29/87); Grade 2 was 30% (26/87); and Grade 3 was 1% (1/87). Grade 0 dysuria was seen in 56% (49/87) of patients; 32% (28/87) had Grade 1; 10% (9/87) Grade 2; and 1% (1/87) Grade 3 dysuria. Most urinary symptoms started a few weeks

  10. Comparing LCZ696 with enalapril according to baseline risk using the MAGGIC and EMPHASIS-HF risk scores: an analysis of mortality and morbidity in PARADIGM-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Joanne; Jhund, Pardeep S; Silva Cardoso, Jose; Martinez, Felipe; Mosterd, Arend; Ramires, Felix; Rizkala, Adel R; Senni, Michele; Squire, Iain; Gong, Jianjian; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Shi, Victor C; Desai, Akshay S; Rouleau, Jean L; Swedberg, Karl; Zile, Michael R; McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-11-10

    Although most patients in the PARADIGM-HF (Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial had mild symptoms, there is a poor correlation between reported functional limitation and prognosis in heart failure. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of risk in PARADIGM-HF and the effect of LCZ696 across that spectrum. This study analyzed rates of the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death or heart failure hospitalization, its components, and all-cause mortality using the MAGGIC (Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure) and EMPHASIS-HF (Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure) risk scores to categorize patients. The authors determined whether risk, on the basis of these scores, modified the treatment effect of LCZ696. The complete MAGGIC risk score was available for 8,375 of the 8,399 patients in PARADIGM-HF. The median MAGGIC score was 20 (IQR: 16 to 24). An increase of 1 point was associated with a 6% increased risk for the primary endpoint (p PARADIGM-HF patients had mild symptoms, many were at high risk for adverse outcomes and obtained a large absolute benefit from LCZ696, compared with enalapril, over a relatively short treatment period. LCZ696's benefit was consistent across the spectrum of risk. (PARADIGM-HF trial [Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure]; NCT01035255). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Age peculiarities of reproductive morbidity in female participants of the ChNPP accident consequences clean-up (according to the figures from SRU, 1988-2012 survey period)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majevs'ka, Yo.O.; Buzunov, V.O.

    2015-01-01

    Data on the Chernobyl disaster survivors received from the State Registry of Ukraine are out line in the paper. Review of the level and pattern of genital system morbidity was carried out for the 17,237 female participants of the ChNPP accident cleanup works in 1986-1987 depending on time under risk upon radiation expo sure and reproductive age at exposure. Survey period lasted since 1988 till 2012. Assessment of morbidity level, confidential intervals, and statistical significance was carried out using the trial version of OpenEpiversion 2.3.1. software. Statistical significance was also rated using the z-score and t- criterion. The results of this cohort epidemiological study showed that there are some peculiarities of natural course of the female genital system disease depending on reproductive age at exposure and time under risk upon radiation impact. Comparative statistical review of the level and pattern of genital system morbidity at different times within a survey period. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the childbearing age (18-45 years old) can be a risk factor of elevated incidence of uterine leiomyoma, benign mammary dysplasia (i.e. benign breast disease), and salpingooophoritis. It is far to assume that uterine and mammary tissues are more sensitive to impact of ionizing radiation in females of the childbearing age vs. in persons exposed in premenopause or menopause

  12. Resident-Specific Morbidity Reduced Following ACS NSQIP Data-Driven Quality Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrentine, Florence E; Hanks, John B; Tracci, Megan C; Jones, R Scott; Schirmer, Bruce D; Smith, Philip W

    2018-04-16

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestone Project for general surgery provided a more robust method for developing and tracking residents' competence. This framework enhanced systematic and progressive development of residents' competencies in surgical quality improvement. A 22-month interactive, educational program based on resident-specific surgical outcomes data culminated in a quality improvement project for postgraduate year 4 surgery residents. Self- assessment, quality knowledge test, and resident-specific American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Quality In-Training Initiative morbidity were compared before and after the intervention. Quality in-training initiative morbidity decreased from 25% (82/325) to 18% (93/517), p = 0.015 despite residents performing more complex cases. All participants achieved level 4 competency (4/4) within the general surgery milestones improvement of care, practice-based learning and improvement competency. Institutional American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program general surgery morbidity improved from the ninth to the sixth decile. Quality assessment and improvement self-assessment postintervention scores (M = 23.80, SD = 4.97) were not significantly higher than preintervention scores (M = 19.20, SD = 5.26), p = 0.061. Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool postintervention test scores (M = 17.4, SD = 4.88), were not significantly higher than pretest scores (M = 13.2, SD = 1.92), p = 0.12. Sharing validated resident-specific clinical data with participants was associated with improved surgical outcomes. Participating fourth year surgical residents achieved the highest score, a level 4, in the practice based learning and improvement competency of the improvement of care practice domain and observed significantly reduced surgical morbidity for cases in which they participated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Lateral rectal shielding reduces late rectal morbidity after high dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: further evidence for a dose effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W Robert; Hanks, Gerald E; Hanlon, Alexandra; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Using conventional treatment methods for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer central axis doses must be limited to 65-70 Gy to prevent significant damage to nearby normal tissues. A fundamental hypothesis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is that, by defining the target organ(s) accurately in three dimensions, it is possible to deliver higher doses to the target without a significant increase in normal tissue complications. This study examines whether this hypothesis holds true and whether a simple modification of treatment technique can reduce the incidence of late rectal morbidity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3DCRT to minimum planning target volume (PTV) doses of 71-75 Gy. Materials and Methods: 257 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer completed 3DCRT by December 31, 1993 and received a minimum PTV dose of 71-75 Gy. The median follow-up time was 22 months (range 4-67 months) and 98% of patients had followup of longer than 12 months. The calculated dose at the center of the prostate was <74 Gy in 19 patients, 74-76 Gy in 206 patients and >76 Gy in 32 patients. Late rectal morbidity was graded according to the LENT scoring system. Eighty-eight consecutive patients were treated with a rectal block added to the lateral fields. In these patients the posterior margin from the prostate to the block edge was reduced from the standard 15 mm to 7.5 mm for the final 10 Gy which reduced the dose to portions of the anterior rectal wall by approximately 4-5 Gy. Estimates of rates for rectal morbidity were determined by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses. Differences in morbidity percentages were evaluated by the Pearson chi square test. Results: Grade 2-3 rectal morbidity developed in 46 of 257 patients (18%) and in the majority of cases consisted of rectal bleeding. No patient has developed grade 4 or 5 rectal morbidity. The actuarial rate of grade 2-3 morbidity is 22% at 24 months and the median

  14. Epilepsy and quality of life: socio-demographic and clinical aspects, and psychiatric co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Maria de Almeida Souza Tedrus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study socio-demographic and clinical aspects, as well as psychiatric co-morbidity that influence the quality of life of adult epileptic patients. Methods One hundred and thirty-two individuals diagnosed with epilepsy were evaluated from neurological/clinical and psychiatric points of view and by the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31. Predictive factors for the QOLIE-31 scores were studied. Results The regression analyses indicated the existence of psychiatric co-morbidity (total score, seizure worry, emotional well-being, energy/fatigue, social function and cognitive function and a greater seizure frequency (total score, cognitive function and energy/fatigue as predictive factors for lower scores in the total QOLIE-31 score and in various dimensions. Abnormalities in the neurological exam and poly-therapy with anti-epileptic drugs were negative factors limited to one of the dimensions cognitive function and social function, respectively. Conclusion The presence of psychiatric co-morbidity and a greater seizure frequency were the main factors influencing the quality of life in epileptic patients as evaluated by QOLIE-31.

  15. Does the emergency surgery score accurately predict outcomes in emergent laparotomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peponis, Thomas; Bohnen, Jordan D; Sangji, Naveen F; Nandan, Anirudh R; Han, Kelsey; Lee, Jarone; Yeh, D Dante; de Moya, Marc A; Velmahos, George C; Chang, David C; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2017-08-01

    The emergency surgery score is a mortality-risk calculator for emergency general operation patients. We sought to examine whether the emergency surgery score predicts 30-day morbidity and mortality in a high-risk group of patients undergoing emergent laparotomy. Using the 2011-2012 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we identified all patients who underwent emergent laparotomy using (1) the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program definition of "emergent," and (2) all Current Procedural Terminology codes denoting a laparotomy, excluding aortic aneurysm rupture. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to measure the correlation (c-statistic) between the emergency surgery score and (1) 30-day mortality, and (2) 30-day morbidity after emergent laparotomy. As sensitivity analyses, the correlation between the emergency surgery score and 30-day mortality was also evaluated in prespecified subgroups based on Current Procedural Terminology codes. A total of 26,410 emergent laparotomy patients were included. Thirty-day mortality and morbidity were 10.2% and 43.8%, respectively. The emergency surgery score correlated well with mortality (c-statistic = 0.84); scores of 1, 11, and 22 correlated with mortalities of 0.4%, 39%, and 100%, respectively. Similarly, the emergency surgery score correlated well with morbidity (c-statistic = 0.74); scores of 0, 7, and 11 correlated with complication rates of 13%, 58%, and 79%, respectively. The morbidity rates plateaued for scores higher than 11. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the emergency surgery score effectively predicts mortality in patients undergoing emergent (1) splenic, (2) gastroduodenal, (3) intestinal, (4) hepatobiliary, or (5) incarcerated ventral hernia operation. The emergency surgery score accurately predicts outcomes in all types of emergent laparotomy patients and may prove valuable as a bedside decision

  16. Medical record weight (MRW): a new reliable predictor of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality in the hip fracture population?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Calpin, P

    2016-11-01

    We sought to compare the weight of patient’s medical records (MRW) to that of standardised surgical risk scoring systems in predicting postoperative hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality in patients with hip fracture. Patients admitted for surgical treatment of a newly diagnosed hip fracture over a 3-month period were enrolled. Patients with documented morbidity or mortality had significantly heavier medical records. The MRW was equivalent to the age-adjusted Charlson co-morbidity index and better than the American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status score (ASA), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM,) and Portsmouth-POSSUM score (P-POSSUM) in correlation with length of hospital admission, p = .003, 95% CI [.15 to .65]. Using logistic regression analysis MRW was as good as, if not better, than the other scoring systems at predicting postoperative morbidity and 90-day mortality. Medical record weight is as good as, or better than, validated surgical risk scoring methods. Larger, multicentre studies are required to validate its use as a surgical risk prediction tool, and it may in future be supplanted by a digital measure of electronic record size. Given its ease of use and low cost, it could easily be used in trauma units globally.

  17. Psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients is being studied all over the world. There is paucity of Indian literature particularly in asymptomatic HIV individuals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish the prevalence and the determinants of psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic HIV patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess psychiatric morbidity as per ICD-10 dacryocystorhinostomy criteria in 100 consecutive asymptomatic seropositive HIV patients and an equal number of age, sex, education, economic and marital status matched HIV seronegative control. All subjects were assessed with the general health questionnaire (GHQ, mini mental status examination, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and sensation seeking scale (SSS and the scores were analyzed statistically. Results: Asymptomatic HIV positive patients had significantly higher GHQ caseness and depression but not anxiety on HADS as compared to HIV seronegative controls. On SSS asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects showed significant higher scores in thrill and adventure seeking, experience seeking and boredom susceptibility as compared to controls. HIV seropositive patients had significantly higher incidence of total psychiatric morbidity. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity is higher in asymptomatic HIV patients when compared to HIV seronegative controls. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. High sensation seeking and substance abuse found in HIV seropositive patients may play a vital role in engaging in high-risk behavior resulting in this dreaded illness.

  18. Urinary morbidity following ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate seed implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Waldbaum, Robert; Wang Xiaohong; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the urinary morbidity experienced by patients undergoing ultrasound-guided, permanent transperineal seed implantation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and September 1997, 693 consecutive patients presented with a diagnosis of clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and were treated with ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (TPIPB). Ninety-three patients are excluded from this review, having received neoadjuvant antiandrogen therapy. TPIPB was performed with 125 I in 165 patients and with 103 Pd in 435 patients. Patients treated with implant alone received 160 Gy with 125 I (pre TG43) or 120 Gy with 103 Pd. One hundred two patients received preimplant, pelvic external beam radiation (XRT) to a dose of either 41.4 or 45 Gy because of high-risk features including PSA ≥ 10 and/or Gleason score ≥ 7. Combined modality patients received 120 Gy and 90 Gy, respectively for 125 I or 103 Pd. All patients underwent postimplant cystoscopy and placement of an indwelling Foley catheter for 24-48 h. Follow-up was at 5 weeks after implant, every 3 months for the first 2 years, and then every 6 months for subsequent years. Patients completed AUA urinary symptom scoring questionnaires at initial consultation and at each follow-up visit. Urinary toxicity was classified by the RTOG toxicity scale with the following adaptations; grade 1 urinary toxicity was symptomatic nocturia or frequency requiring none or minimal medical intervention such as phenazopyridine; grade 2 urinary toxicity was early obstructive symptomatology requiring alpha-blocker therapy; and grade 3 toxicity was considered that requiring indwelling catheters or posttreatment transurethral resection of the prostate for symptom relief. Log-rank analysis and Chi-square testing was performed to assess AUA score, prostate size, isotope selection, and the addition of XRT as possible prognosticators of

  19. Late rectal bleeding and genitourinary morbidity after high dose rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Takeshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate late rectal bleeding and genitourinary (GU) morbidity in patients consecutively treated with combined high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Data from 80 patients treated consecutively from October 2000 to May 2004 were analyzed. The median age was 69 years old, median follow-up 31 months, ranging from 17-59 months. All patients received endocrine therapy before radiation therapy. The patients were divided into low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups (4/24/52 patients) according to the risk factors defined by T-classification, prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score. Fractionation schedules for HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, and EBRT was fixed with 3 Gy fractions to 51 Gy. The distribution of fractionation was scheduled as follows; 5 Gy x 5 times in 14 patients, 7 Gy x 3 times in 19 patients, and 9 Gy x 2 times in 47 patients. The rectal bleeding was graded using the toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer while the genitourinary morbidities were graded using the toxicity criteria of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0. Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed in 9 patients (11.3%) with the 2-year actuarial probability at 11.2%. Grade 2 and 3 rectal bleeding was recognized in 8 and 1 patients, respectively. Grade 3 morbidity developed in the biopsied sites that were performed in the other hospital. No significant difference was observed in any HDR brachytherapy fractionation schedule. Grade 2 or worse GU morbidities were recognized in 30 patients (37.5%), consisting of 29 Grade 2 patients and 1 Grade 3 patient. Twenty-one patients in Grade 2 morbidity had an increase in the frequency of urination or nocturia, and urethral strictures developed in 3 patients. The 3-year actuarial probability of urethral stricture was 6.0%. One patient experienced Grade 3

  20. Impact of pre-existing co-morbidities on mortality in granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    of pre-existing co-morbidities among the patients was quantified according to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Each patient was matched with five age- and gender-matched population controls with no pre-existing co-morbidities captured by the CCI (CCI score = 0). The study subjects were followed...... throughout 2010. Cox regression analyses were used to calculate mortality rate ratios (MRRs). RESULTS: The median duration of follow-up in the GPA cohort was 5.8 years (interquartile range 2.3-10.0). Compared with their matched population controls, the MRR for patients presenting with a CCI score of 0 (n...

  1. Efficacy of tamsulosin hydrochloride in relieving "double-J ureteral stent-related morbidity": a randomized placebo controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Iqbal; Tripathy, Sambit; Agrawal, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of tamsulosin therapy in reducing ureteral double-J stent morbidity by evaluating USSQ, IPSS, QOL and VAS (primary objective) and to evaluate the morbidity and or complication(s) associated with indwelling double-J ureteral stent(s) and to evaluate the safety of tamsulosin therapy for "morbidity associated with double-J stents" by evaluating its tolerability, side effects and adverse events if any (secondary objective) as per protocol. After institutional review board approval, 60 consecutive patients with a double-J ureteral stent inserted after percutaneous nephrolithotomy or ureteroscopic stone treatment were randomly assigned to receive tamsulosin 0.4 mg, or a placebo for 4 weeks. The validated USSQ, VAS and IPSS were completed before stent insertion, at 3 days and 4 weeks after stent insertion and at 2 weeks after stent removal. Data were statistically analyzed for efficacy and tolerability of one drug over the other using Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Mann-Whitney test and Student's t test. Patients receiving tamsulosin compared with the placebo showed significant decrease in urinary index score, pain index score, work performance score, VAS score at loin area, VAS score at flank, VAS score at suprapubic area, average VAS score, need for antibiotics, number of hospital visits (P tamsulosin but, however, the decrease was not significant. No patients discontinued medication because of side effects. We conclude that ureteral stenting using double-J stents with concomitant tamsulosin therapy was generally well tolerated, safe, effective and significantly beneficial in reducing stent morbidity in the majority of our patients. We advocate the routine use of concomitant tamsulosin therapy in eligible patients undergoing ureteral stenting in order to minimize stent morbidity.

  2. Validation of the grown-ups with congenital heart disease score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörer, Jürgen; Roussin, Régine; LeBret, Emanuel; Ly, Mohamed; Abdullah, Jarrah; Marzullo, Rafaella; Pabst von Ohain, Jelena; Belli, Emre

    2018-06-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease in need of heart surgery frequently present with significant comorbidity. Furthermore, additional technical difficulties often related to redo operations increase the risk for postoperative mortality and morbidity. Hence, next to the type of the procedure, additional procedure-dependent and procedure-independent factors have to be considered for risk evaluation. The recently proposed grown-ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) mortality and morbidity scores account for these additional risk factors. We sought to validate their predictive power in a large population operated in a single centre. Data of all consecutive patients aged 18 years or more, who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease between 2005 and 2016, were collected. Mortality was defined as hospital mortality or mortality within 30 days following surgery. Morbidity was defined as occurrence of one or more of the following complications: renal failure requiring dialysis, neurologic deficit persisting at discharge, atrioventricular block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation, mechanical circulatory support, phrenic nerve injury and unplanned reoperation. The discriminatory power of the GUCH scores was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (c-index, including 95% CI). Eight hundred and twenty-four operations were evaluated. Additional procedure-dependent and procedure-independent factors, as defined in the GUCH scores, were present in 165 patients (20.0%) and 544 patients (66.0%), respectively. Hospital mortality and morbidity was 3.4% and 10.0%, respectively. C-index for GUCH mortality score was 0.809 (0.742-0.877). C-index for GUCH morbidity score was 0.676 (0.619-0.734). We could confirm the good predictive power of the GUCH mortality score for postoperative mortality in a large population of adults with congenital heart disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  3. Impact of practice and of technical modifications on acute morbidity after prostate curie-therapy; Impact de l'experience et des modifications techniques sur la morbidite aigue apres curietherapie de prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Malhaire, J.P.; Pradier, O. [CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Valeri, A. [CHU Cavale-Blanche, Brest (France)

    2011-10-15

    Based on a cohort of 150 patients treated by curie-therapy for a prostate cancer, the authors report the analysis of the influence of some technical modifications (use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of a second period, and of a high frequency echographic probe during a third period) on the urinary toxicity. This toxicity has been assessed by using the urinary retention rate, and the difference between the maximum and initial International Prostate Symptom Score (IPPS). Rectal morbidity has been scaled according to a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. It appears that the occurrence of urinary retention after prostate radiotherapy decreases with practice and use of the automatic stepper. It seems that there is no impact on urinary morbidity (urinary retention excluded) nor on rectal morbidity. Short communication

  4. The high-density lipoprotein-adjusted SCORE model worsens SCORE-based risk classification in a contemporary population of 30 824 Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    .8 years of follow-up, 339 individuals died of CVD. In the SCORE target population (age 40-65; n = 30,824), fewer individuals were at baseline categorized as high risk (≥5% 10-year risk of fatal CVD) using SCORE-HDL compared with SCORE (10 vs. 17% in men, 1 vs. 3% in women). SCORE-HDL did not improve...... with SCORE, but deteriorated risk classification based on NRI. Future guidelines should consider lower decision thresholds and prioritize CVD morbidity and people above age 65....

  5. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Improves Olfaction Sensitivity in Morbidly Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancı, Deniz; Altun, Huseyin; Altun, Hasan; Batman, Burcin; Karip, Aziz Bora; Serin, Kursat Rahmi

    2016-03-01

    Olfactory abilities of the patients are known to be altered by eating and metabolic disorders, including obesity. There are only a number of studies investigating the effect of obesity on olfaction, and there is limited data on the changes in olfactory abilities of morbidly obese patients after surgical treatment. Here we investigated the changes in olfactory abilities of 54 morbidly obese patients (M/F, 22/32; age range 19-57 years; body mass index (BMI) range 30.5-63.0 kg/m(2)) after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. A laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was performed by the same surgeon using five-port technique. Olfactory abilities were tested preoperatively and 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgery using a standardized Sniffin' Sticks Extended Test kit. Analyses of variance indicated statistically significant improvement in T, D, and I scores of morbidly obese patients within time factors (preoperative vs. 1, 3, and 6 months; 1 vs. 3 and 6 months; and 3 vs. 6 months; p < 0.001 for all). There was a statistically significant improvement in overall TDI scores with an increase from 25 to 41 during the 6 months follow-up period (p < 0.001 for all). Here, for the first time in literature, we were able to show the significant improvement in olfactory abilities of morbidly obese patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  6. [Is the socioeconomic deprivation EPICES score useful in obstetrics?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convers, M; Langeron, A; Sass, C; Moulin, J-J; Augier, A; Varlet, M-N; Seffert, P; Chêne, G

    2012-04-01

    To describe a validated and multifactorial deprivation score to study the relationship between socioeconomic deprivation and perinatal risks. The index of deprivation EPICES (Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers) was used to characterize the deprivation status of 234 women in post-partum in comparison with perinatal morbidity. The cutoff value of 30.7 was the threshold to define deprivation. Two hundred and eight patients were included in this retrospective study from whom 48 (23%) had a score of deprivation higher than 30.7. Maternofetal morbidity was more severe in deprived patients. The current results show that the EPICES score could be a useful obstetrical tool for the identification of deprived women during pregnancy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotine dependence, use of illegal drugs and psychiatric morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortega, José María; Jurado, Dolores; Martínez-González, Miguel Angel; Gurpegui, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of smoking and nicotine dependence with psychiatric morbidity, controlling for the potential confounding effect of smoking on the relationship between the use of other substances and psychiatric morbidity. A sample of 290 adults were interviewed at a primary health centre (patients, 58%; patients' relatives, 34%; staff, 8%) to inquire about their tobacco, caffeine, alcohol, and illegal drug consumption. Psychiatric morbidity, defined by a score >6 on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), showed a strong direct association with nicotine dependence. The use of illegal drugs, but not of alcohol, was also strongly associated with psychiatric morbidity, after controlling for smoking. Both smoking and high nicotine dependence were also associated with use of caffeine, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine. High nicotine dependence may be considered as an expression of individual psychopathologic vulnerability. Tobacco may have a central facilitating role in the use of caffeine, alcohol, and illegal drug.

  8. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rütten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Rooijakkers, Antoinette F.; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  9. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  10. Classification system for acute and chronic radiation treatment sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    A classification system in German language is proposed for scoring of acute and chronic treatment sequelae after radiotherapy. It includes all important organs and organ systems. The proposed grading corresponds to the four-scale-system of the WHO and UICC. The system is also compatible to the RTOG and EORTC acute and late radiation morbidity scoring criteria. This facilitates the data transfer for retrospective and prospective analysis of monomodal and multimodal radiotherapy treatment regimes. We recommend to use this scoring system in all German speaking countries for multicentric prospective studies. It is possible, that organ-specific sophistications of the toxicity grading will be developed in the future. These additions should conform with (inter)national standards and apply the same four-scale grading of this classification system. (orig.) [de

  11. Obsessive–compulsive disorder: subclassification based on co-morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestadt, G.; Di, C. Z.; Riddle, M. A.; Grados, M. A.; Greenberg, B. D.; Fyer, A. J.; McCracken, J. T.; Rauch, S. L.; Murphy, D. L.; Rasmussen, S. A.; Cullen, B.; Pinto, A.; Knowles, J. A.; Piacentini, J.; Pauls, D. L.; Bienvenu, O. J.; Wang, Y.; Liang, K. Y.; Samuels, J. F.; Roche, K. Bandeen

    2011-01-01

    Background Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is probably an etiologically heterogeneous condition. Many patients manifest other psychiatric syndromes. This study investigated the relationship between OCD and co-morbid conditions to identify subtypes. Method Seven hundred and six individuals with OCD were assessed in the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study (OCGS). Multi-level latent class analysis was conducted based on the presence of eight co-morbid psychiatric conditions [generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), major depression, panic disorder (PD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), tics, mania, somatization disorders (Som) and grooming disorders (GrD)]. The relationship of the derived classes to specific clinical characteristics was investigated. Results Two and three classes of OCD syndromes emerge from the analyses. The two-class solution describes lesser and greater co-morbidity classes and the more descriptive three-class solution is characterized by: (1) an OCD simplex class, in which major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most frequent additional disorder; (2) an OCD co-morbid tic-related class, in which tics are prominent and affective syndromes are considerably rarer; and (3) an OCD co-morbid affective-related class in which PD and affective syndromes are highly represented. The OCD co-morbid tic-related class is predominantly male and characterized by high conscientiousness. The OCD co-morbid affective-related class is predominantly female, has a young age at onset, obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) features, high scores on the ‘taboo’ factor of OCD symptoms, and low conscientiousness. Conclusions OCD can be classified into three classes based on co-morbidity. Membership within a class is differentially associated with other clinical characteristics. These classes, if replicated, should have important implications for research and clinical endeavors. PMID:19046474

  12. [Correlation between quality of life and morbidity of the caregivers of elderly stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nilce Maria de Freitas; Tavares, Darlene Mara Dos Santos

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the sociodemographic characteristics and the quality of life of the caregivers of elderly individuals with a stroke history, and correlate morbidity with the caregivers' quality of life scores. This is a cross-sectional household survey that interviewed the caregivers of elderly individuals using the following tools: a semi-structured instrument; the World Health Organization Quality of life-BREF; and the Brazilian Multidimensional Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Descriptive analysis and Pearson's correlation (psalary (34.8%). The highest quality of life score was in the social relations domain (67.57) and the lowest was in the environmental domain (54.82). The highest number of caregiver morbidities correlated with the lowest scores in all quality of life domains.

  13. Detection of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery: preliminary evaluation with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Aroca, F.; Reus, M.; Dios Berna-Serna, Juan de; Frutos-Bernal, M.D.; Lujan-Mompean, J.A.; Parrilla, P.; Bas, A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, with the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV), to differentiate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery. Thirty-two patients with morbid obesity were evaluated with ARFI and conventional ultrasound before bariatric surgery. The ARFI and ultrasound results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which is the reference standard. The patients were classed according to their histological findings into three groups: group A, simple steatosis; group B, inflammation; and group C, fibrosis. The median SWV was 1.57 ± 0.79 m/s. Hepatic alterations were observed in the histopathological findings for all the patients in the study (100 %), with the results of the laboratory tests proving normal. Differences in SWV were also observed between groups A, B and C: 1.34 ± 0.90 m/s, 1.55 ± 0.79 m/s and 1.86 ± 0.75 m/s (P < 0.001), respectively. The Az for differentiating NAFLD from NASH or fibrosis was 0.899 (optimal cut-off value 1.3 m/s; sensitivity 85 %; specificity 83.3 %). The ARFI technique is a useful diagnostic tool for differentiating NAFLD from NASH in asymptomatic patients with morbid obesity. (orig.)

  14. Detection of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery: preliminary evaluation with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Aroca, F.; Reus, M.; Dios Berna-Serna, Juan de [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of of Radiology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Frutos-Bernal, M.D.; Lujan-Mompean, J.A.; Parrilla, P. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Surgery, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Bas, A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Pathology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, with the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV), to differentiate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery. Thirty-two patients with morbid obesity were evaluated with ARFI and conventional ultrasound before bariatric surgery. The ARFI and ultrasound results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which is the reference standard. The patients were classed according to their histological findings into three groups: group A, simple steatosis; group B, inflammation; and group C, fibrosis. The median SWV was 1.57 {+-} 0.79 m/s. Hepatic alterations were observed in the histopathological findings for all the patients in the study (100 %), with the results of the laboratory tests proving normal. Differences in SWV were also observed between groups A, B and C: 1.34 {+-} 0.90 m/s, 1.55 {+-} 0.79 m/s and 1.86 {+-} 0.75 m/s (P < 0.001), respectively. The Az for differentiating NAFLD from NASH or fibrosis was 0.899 (optimal cut-off value 1.3 m/s; sensitivity 85 %; specificity 83.3 %). The ARFI technique is a useful diagnostic tool for differentiating NAFLD from NASH in asymptomatic patients with morbid obesity. (orig.)

  15. Models for pulmonary lethality and morbidity after irradiation from internal and external sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Filipy, R.E.; Hahn, E.F.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides a hazard-function model for estimating the risk of death from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis following a light-water nuclear power accident. A similar model is also provided for estimating the prevalence of respiratory functional morbidity among those that survive death from acute effects. Hazard-function models for lethality and for morbidity were constructed using the cumulative hazard estimator H, which is related to the risk estimator R through the equation R = 1-exp(-H). The estimator H can be calculated using information provided in the report. The method of calculation depends on the exposure scenario. In general, the total normalized dose X for lethality or for morbidity is calculated. For lethality, X = 1 corresponds to a median lethal dose (LD 50 ); for morbidity, X = 1 corresponds to a median effective dose (ED 50 ). H is related to X by the equation H = 1n(2)X/sup V/, where V depends on the type of radiation (or radiations) involved. Contributions to X can arise from each of two main modes of exposure: (1) brief exposure of the lung, at a relatively high dose rate, to mainly external gammas, followed by (2) chronic internal alpha, and/or beta, and/or gamma irradiation of the lung. Equations are provided for calculating the contributions to X from both modes of exposure. 73 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Use of autologous bone graft in anterior cervical decompression: morbidity & quality of life analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heneghan, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous iliac crest graft has long been the gold standard graft material used in cervical fusion. However its harvest has significant associated morbidity, including protracted postoperative pain scores at the harvest site. Thus its continued practice warrants scrutiny, particularly now that alternatives are available. Our aims were to assess incidence and nature of complications associated with iliac crest harvest when performed in the setting of Anterior Cervical Decompression (ACD). Also, to perform a comparative analysis of patient satisfaction and quality of life scores after ACD surgeries, when performed with and without iliac graft harvest. METHODS: All patients who underwent consecutive ACD procedures, with and without the use of autologous iliac crest graft, over a 48 month period were included (n = 53). Patients were assessed clinically at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively and administered 2 validated quality of life questionnaires: the SF-36 and Cervical Spine Outcomes Questionnaires (Response rate 96%). Primary composite endpoints included incidence of bone graft donor site morbidity, pain scores, operative duration, and quality of life scores. RESULTS: Patients who underwent iliac graft harvest experienced significant peri-operative donor site specific morbidity, including a high incidence of pain at the iliac crest (90%), iliac wound infection (7%), a jejunal perforation, and longer operative duration (285 minutes vs. 238 minutes, p = 0.026). Longer term follow-up demonstrated protracted postoperative pain at the harvest site and significantly lower mental health scores on both quality of life instruments, for those patients who underwent autologous graft harvest CONCLUSION: ACD with iliac crest graft harvest is associated with significant iliac crest donor site morbidity and lower quality of life at greater than 12 months post operatively. This is now avoidable by using alternatives to autologous bone without compromising clinical

  17. Critical combinations of radiation dose and volume predict intelligence quotient and academic achievement scores after craniospinal irradiation in children with medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Thomas E; Schreiber, Jane E; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm(2)). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate the value of newer methods of irradiation. Copyright © 2014

  18. Validation of risk assessment scoring systems for an audit of elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer in elderly patients: an audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hisao; Sano, Takanori; Yachida, Shinichi; Okano, Keiichi; Izuishi, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2007-10-01

    The goal of this study was to validate the usefulness of risk assessment scoring systems for a surgical audit in elective digestive surgery for elderly patients. The validated scoring systems used were the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) and the Portsmouth predictor equation for mortality (P-POSSUM). This study involved 153 consecutive patients aged 75 years and older who underwent elective gastric or colorectal surgery between July 2004 and June 2006. A retrospective analysis was performed on data collected prior to each surgery. The predicted mortality and morbidity risks were calculated using each of the scoring systems and were used to obtain the observed/predicted (O/E) mortality and morbidity ratios. New logistic regression equations for morbidity and mortality were then calculated using the scores from the POSSUM system and applied retrospectively. The O/E ratio for morbidity obtained from POSSUM score was 0.23. The O/E ratios for mortality from the POSSUM score and the P-POSSUM were 0.15 and 0.38, respectively. Utilizing the new equations using scores from the POSSUM, the O/E ratio increased to 0.88. Both the POSSUM and P-POSSUM over-predicted the morbidity and mortality in elective gastrointestinal surgery for malignant tumors in elderly patients. However, if a surgical unit makes appropriate calculations using its own patient series and updates these equations, the POSSUM system can be useful in the risk assessment for surgery in elderly patients.

  19. Leukaemia mortality and morbidity in Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche, B.; Hinz, G.; Tsavachidis, C.

    1987-01-01

    Two studies dealing with leukaemia in Bavaria/FRG are presented: a mortality study (1972-1978) and a morbidity study (1976-1981). Both were conducted as ecological studies, i.e. under inclusion of environmental factors. Major point of view is first the amount of natural background radiation and second the sites of nuclear reactors, which are six. Mortality and incidence is described. Calculations were made on the influence of migration on patterns of regional distribution. (author)

  20. Is fetal manipulation during shoulder dystocia management associated with severe maternal and neonatal morbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachon, Bertrand; Desseauve, David; Fritel, Xavier; Pierre, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    There is a lack of data regarding maternal morbidity and neonatal hypoxia associated with shoulder dystocia (SD), particularly with respect to whether SD is managed with our without fetal manipulation (FM). Our main objective was to compare severe maternal and neonatal morbidities associated with SD according to FM execution. We conducted a retrospective study based on a medical record analysis that included all SD cases from 2007 to 2012. SD was considered when additional maneuvers were required to complete a delivery. Severe maternal morbidity was defined as the occurrence of an obstetric anal sphincter injury. Severe neonatal morbidity was defined as the occurrence of one of these complications: permanent brachial plexus palsy, arterial cord pH < 7.1, Apgar score < 7 at 5 min. We compared severe maternal and neonatal morbidities in the FM and the no-FM group. We report an SD incidence of 2.4 % (n = 227) with 93.8 % of patients treated without FM. We identified two cases of permanent brachial plexus palsy, fifteen cases of arterial cord pH < 7.1 and six cases with an Apgar score < 7 at 5 min; all of them were from the no-FM group. There were more cases of OASI in the FM group (odd ratio = 9.2 [1.32-50.71]). No statistical differences between these groups were observed with respect to severe neonatal morbidity. Severe neonatal morbidity does not appear to be associated with FM during SD management, but severe maternal morbidity is associated with FM execution.

  1. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  2. Children With Morbid Obesity Benefit Equally as Children With Overweight and Obesity From an Ongoing Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijks, J M; Plat, J; Mensink, R P; Dorenbos, E; Buurman, W A; Vreugdenhil, A C E

    2015-09-01

    Despite stabilization of childhood overweight and obesity prevalence, there is a shift toward more severe degrees of obesity, which results in an increasing prevalence of children with morbid obesity. Prior studies demonstrated that lifestyle modification without ongoing treatment has only a modest and not sustainable effect in children with morbid obesity. This suggests that a chronic care model is necessary for long-term effects on weight management and health. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an ongoing lifestyle intervention in children with morbid obesity in comparison with children with overweight and obesity. This was a nonrandomized prospective intervention study with 12- and 24-month followup at the Centre for Overweight Adolescent and Children's Healthcare. Children and adolescents (n = 100 females and 72 males) with overweight, obesity, or morbid obesity were given long-term, outpatient, tailored lifestyle intervention. Body mass index (BMI) z score was measured. In children with morbid obesity, 12- and 24-month interventions resulted in a decrease of BMI z score of -0.13 ± 0.25 (P = .001) and -0.23 ± 0.32 (P = .01) respectively, whereas weight status category improved to obese in 21% and 25% of the children. Cardiovascular risk parameters including serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and diastolic blood pressure significantly improved after 1-year intervention in the complete group. Most important, BMI z score as well as cardiovascular risk parameters improved to a similar degree in children with overweight, obesity, and morbid obesity. Children with overweight, obesity, and morbid obesity benefit equally from an ongoing, outpatient, tailored lifestyle intervention, and demonstrate significant weight loss and improvement of cardiovascular risk parameters.

  3. Resistin expression correlates with steatohepatitis in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Claire R; Hindle, A Katharine; Latham, Patricia S; Fu, Sidney W; Brody, Fred J

    2013-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients are at risk for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) even in the absence of risk factors for liver disease. Unfortunately, NASH is usually not clinically evident, and a definitive, noninvasive test for NASH does not exist. Resistin, a cytokine originating from adipose tissue, is involved in insulin resistance and also initiates proinflammatory signaling from hepatic stellate cells. This study explores the relationship between resistin expression and liver pathology in bariatric surgery patients. Blood samples from 30 patients undergoing bariatric surgery were collected. Total RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to quantify relative gene expression using 18s rRNA gene as an internal control. Wedge liver biopsies from these patients were sectioned and stained. Based on a previously published scoring method, biopsies were assigned an overall NASH severity score and subscores for steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Results were analyzed by using Student's t test. Resistin mRNA levels ranged from 0.5 to 9.7. A group of five patients with very high resistin expression (>4) was identified. These patients had a significantly higher average NASH score compared with the rest of the group (7.9 vs. 4.48, p = 0.019). Steatosis and inflammation scores were significantly higher in the high-resistin group (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). There also was a trend toward higher fibrosis score in this group, which approached statistical significance (p = 0.051). In morbidly obese patients, high resistin expression in serum is associated with hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. The development of elevated resistin expression may represent a link between obesity and the onset of steatohepatitis.

  4. Non-cancer morbidity among Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers: a register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Kaja; Bromet, Evelyn J; Hakulinen, Timo; Auvinen, Anssi; Uusküla, Anneli; Rahu, Mati

    2014-05-14

    To examine non-cancer morbidity in the Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers cohort compared with the population sample with special attention to radiation-related diseases and mental health disorders. Register-based cohort study. Estonia. An exposed cohort of 3680 men (cleanup workers) and an unexposed cohort of 7631 men (population sample) were followed from 2004 to 2012 through the Population Registry and Health Insurance Fund database. Morbidity in the exposed cohort compared with the unexposed controls was estimated in terms of rate ratio (RR) with 95% CIs using Poisson regression models. Elevated morbidity in the exposed cohort was found for diseases of the nervous system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, ischaemic heart disease and for external causes. The most salient excess risk was observed for thyroid diseases (RR=1.69; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.07), intentional self-harm (RR=1.47; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.09) and selected alcohol-related diagnoses (RR=1.25; 95% CI 1.12 to 1.39). No increase in morbidity for stress reactions, depression, headaches or sleep disorders was detected. No obvious excess morbidity consistent with biological effects of radiation was seen in the exposed cohort, with the possible exception of benign thyroid diseases. Increased alcohol-induced morbidity may reflect alcohol abuse, and could underlie some of the higher morbidity rates. Mental disorders in the exposed cohort were probably under-reported. The future challenge will be to study mental and physical comorbidities in the Chernobyl cleanup workers cohort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Schreiber, Jane E. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm{sup 2}). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help

  6. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Schreiber, Jane E.; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm 2 ). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate

  7. The impact of co-morbidity on health-related quality of life in breast cancer survivors and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoormans, Dounya; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was: 1) to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores of breast cancer survivors to matched controls; and 2) to examine the relative impact (explained variance) of the type and number of co-morbidities on HRQoL. Data from the KARMA project was used in this cross-sectional study. For each woman diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 2552) there were two healthy age- and geographically matched females (n = 5104). Breast cancer survivors were categorized according to time since diagnosis: recently diagnosed (0-1 year), short- (2-5 years), mid- (6-10 years), and long-term survivors (> 10 years). Women completed a questionnaire addressing demographics (age, educational level, and geographical location), lifestyle factors (body mass index (BMI) and smoking), co-morbidities, and HRQoL. The difference in explained variance in six HRQoL-domains between demographics, lifestyle factors, and co-morbidity in women with breast cancer and matched controls was examined by hierarchical regression analyses. Women recently diagnosed (n = 63), reported the worst HRQoL followed by short-term survivors (2-5 years, n = 863). Thereafter, HRQoL scores further improved (6-10 years, n = 726), and were comparable to healthy females after 10 years (n = 893). Co-morbidity has a negative impact on HRQoL, which increased with time after diagnosis. Cardiovascular disease and depression were the strongest associates. Breast cancer survivors report clinically significant improvement in HRQoL scores six years after diagnosis. Co-morbidity has a negative impact on HRQoL, which increases with time after diagnosis, even though the number of co-morbidities remains stable. In long-term survivors there should be increasing awareness of co-morbidity and its impact on HRQoL.

  8. Application of dissociation curve analysis to radiation hybrid panel marker scoring: generation of a map of river buffalo (B. bubalis chromosome 20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffer Alejandro A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence of dyes bound to double-stranded PCR products has been utilized extensively in various real-time quantitative PCR applications, including post-amplification dissociation curve analysis, or differentiation of amplicon length or sequence composition. Despite the current era of whole-genome sequencing, mapping tools such as radiation hybrid DNA panels remain useful aids for sequence assembly, focused resequencing efforts, and for building physical maps of species that have not yet been sequenced. For placement of specific, individual genes or markers on a map, low-throughput methods remain commonplace. Typically, PCR amplification of DNA from each panel cell line is followed by gel electrophoresis and scoring of each clone for the presence or absence of PCR product. To improve sensitivity and efficiency of radiation hybrid panel analysis in comparison to gel-based methods, we adapted fluorescence-based real-time PCR and dissociation curve analysis for use as a novel scoring method. Results As proof of principle for this dissociation curve method, we generated new maps of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis chromosome 20 by both dissociation curve analysis and conventional marker scoring. We also obtained sequence data to augment dissociation curve results. Few genes have been previously mapped to buffalo chromosome 20, and sequence detail is limited, so 65 markers were screened from the orthologous chromosome of domestic cattle. Thirty bovine markers (46% were suitable as cross-species markers for dissociation curve analysis in the buffalo radiation hybrid panel under a standard protocol, compared to 25 markers suitable for conventional typing. Computational analysis placed 27 markers on a chromosome map generated by the new method, while the gel-based approach produced only 20 mapped markers. Among 19 markers common to both maps, the marker order on the map was maintained perfectly. Conclusion Dissociation curve

  9. Prognostic information in administrative co-morbidity data following coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Hvelplund, Anders; Rasmussen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic information obtainable from administrative data with respect to 30-day mortality following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and to compare it with the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) recorded ...... was equal to that of the EuroSCORE (c-statistic 0.79). Conclusions: A standard co-morbidity index based on administrative data as well as on clinical data has proven equally useful for prediction of mortality amongst CABG patients.......Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic information obtainable from administrative data with respect to 30-day mortality following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and to compare it with the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) recorded...... in a clinical database. Methods: We used a co-morbidity index calculated from administrative data in the Danish National Patient Register by means of all admissions 1 year prior to CABG. In addition, each CABG was categorised as being isolated or not, and acute or not. The prognostic power of the co...

  10. Morbidity And Quality Of Life Among Head And Neck Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the relative frequency of acute radiation morbidity and their perceived effect on quality of life among head and neck cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Subjects: Thirty eight patients comprising 28 males and ...

  11. Morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    Background. Studies on morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy are scarcely described. Methods. Patients who underwent surgery, including neck dissection, with and without radiation therapy at least 1 year before the study were asked to participate. We assessed neck pain, loss of

  12. Algorithm improvement program nuclide identification algorithm scoring criteria and scoring application.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  13. Morbidity and immunological tests in miners working in mines with low ionizing radiation level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, V.; Skokanova, V.; Skokanova, K.; Wagnerova, M.; Heribanova, A.; Riha, M.

    1984-01-01

    The total count of morbidity and prevalence of upper respiratory tract diseases (RTD) were studied in 210 miners working in shale mines with a low level of ionizing radiation with respect to their smoking habits. After one and a half years of observation tests of humoral immunity in the blood serum and saliva (immunoglobulins G, A, M and sIA) and tests of non-specific indices (alpha 2 macroglobulin (A 2M), transferrin, lysozyme) were performed. The number of healthy non-smokers reached 41.3% whereas the number of healthy smokers was only 26.5% (P<0.05). The greater was the number of diseases in single subjects, the greater was the difference between smokers and non-smokers (P<0.005). The difference between RTD morbidity of smokers and non-smokers was not significant in the subgroup of miners employed less than 10 years but the duration of employment raised the value significantly (P<0.002) in disfavour of smokers. The difference between smokers and non-smokers is emphasized in ageing. The mean levels of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM) were significantly higher in healthy non-smokers in comparison with other miners; this is also stressed by distribution analysis. The distribution of A 2M values also significantly differed in the subgroup of healthy non-smokers compared with other miners. Highly significant differences were found between healthy non-smokers and other miners using discrimination analysis of coupled tests. In contrast to that, the level of A 2M was in inverse relationship to the levels of Ig; in the subgroup of healthy non-smokers low levels of A 2M correlated with high levels of Ig of all three classes. The results are discussed from the point of view of the smokers' habits, the duration of employment in the mine, the age of the miners and the presumed genetical factors

  14. Children morbidity in two Bulgarian settlements near uranium mines for the period 1985 - 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusheva, R.; Yagova, A.; Kushev, K.

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective investigation of children morbidity is based on official statistical information. The comparison between the children from ecologically jeopardized settlements of Bukhovo and Jana and the control village of German includes the total morbidity as well as the morbidity of particular groups of diseases. It is found that both contaminated settlements have higher total morbidity which is due mainly to the respiratory system diseases as well as to the diseases of nervous, gastrointestinal and urinary systems, skin, traumas and poisonings. The groups of diseases which are possibly caused by radiation factors in the ecologically jeopardized settlements have characteristics lower than those of the country as a whole and the control village. 6 refs., 1 tab. (A.B.)

  15. The mortality and cancer morbidity experience of workers at the Springfields uranium production facility, 1946-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGeoghegan, D.; Binks, K.

    2000-01-01

    The results presented here are from the follow-up of the cohort of workers ever employed at the Springfields site of British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) between 1946 and 1995. The main activity of the site is uranium fuel fabrication and uranium hexafluoride production. The study cohort consists of 19 454 current and former employees, 13 960 of which were classified as radiation workers, and contains 479 146 person-years of follow-up. The mean follow-up period is 24.6 years. To the end of 1995 there have been 4832 deaths recorded for this cohort, 3476 of which were amongst radiation workers and 1356 were amongst non-radiation workers. The standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for all causes were 84 and 98 for radiation workers and non-radiation workers respectively. For all cancers the SMRs were 86 and 96 respectively. For cancer morbidity the standardised registration ratios (SRRs) for all cancers were 81 and 81 respectively. Significant associations were noted for both mortality and morbidity due to Hodgkin's disease and cumulative external dose. A strong association was also noted for morbidity, but not mortality, due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. These associations, however, are unlikely to be causal. The excess relative risk estimates for cancer other than leukaemia and for leukaemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukaemia are consistent with other occupationally exposed cohorts and estimates from the high-dose studies. (author)

  16. NEONATAL MORBIDITY AND EARLY OUTCOME OF VERY PRETERM INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heljić Suada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the mortality rate for preterm infants and the gestational age-specific mortality rate have dramatically improved over the last 3 to 4 decades, infants born preterm remain vulnerable to many complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, a compromised immune system, cardiovascular disorders, hearing and vision problems, and brain lesions.The aim is to determine mortality and morbidity rates and selected outcome variables for preterm infant’s < 30 weeks’ gestation, who were admitted to the NICU. Patients and methods: This study enrolled 102 infants with gestational age less than 30 weeks’ gestation, hospitalized in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Hospital, Clinical University Center Sarajevo, from Jan. 2010 to Dec. 2010. Parameters taken at admission were: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar score, excess base and CRIB score. Early outcome is considered as a survival at discharge or common preterm morbidities presented during hospitalizationResults: The mean BW of evaluated preterm infants was 1086 ± 250 g, the mean GA27.89 ± 1.97, Apgar score 5.41 ± 1.76, excess base at admission 6.39 ± 1.74 and mean CRIB score 3.72 ± 3.16. The overall survival rate was 70.5%. Selected outcomes at discharge were: RDS with 70.5% infants treated with natural surfactant, PDA treated with NSAIDS (23.5%, brain injury ( ≥ grade 3 IVH or PVL 16.6%, NEC Bell stages II or III 9.8%, BPD 25/72 (33.3% of infants who survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age. In 38 (37.2% infants, episodes of infections were noticed (one or more episodes in 25 infants, half of them were caused by Gram positive bacteria, most frequent coagulasa negative staphylococci. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the mostfrequent organism among Gram negative bacteria. One patient had invasive candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. In 5 infants (4.9% early onset of sepsis was documented. Conclusion: Very preterm

  17. Co-morbidity in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Clinical Study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, P; Srinath, S; Girimaji, S; Seshadri, S; Sagar, J V

    2016-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric co-morbidities in children and adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder at a tertiary care child and adolescent psychiatry centre. A total of 63 children and adolescents who were diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and fulfilled the inclusion criteria were comprehensively assessed for neurodevelopmental and psychiatric co-morbidities. The tools used included the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS), Children's Global Assessment Scale, Clinical Global Impression Scale, Vineland Social Maturity Scale, and Childhood Autism Rating Scale. All except 1 subject had neurodevelopmental and / or psychiatric disorder co-morbid with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; 66.7% had both neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Specific learning disability was the most common co-existing neurodevelopmental disorder and oppositional defiant disorder was the most common psychiatric co-morbidity. The mean baseline ADHD-RS scores were significantly higher in the group with psychiatric co-morbidities, especially in the group with oppositional defiant disorder. Co-morbidity is present at a very high frequency in clinic-referred children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Psychiatric co-morbidity, specifically oppositional defiant disorder, has an impact on the severity of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Co-morbidity needs to be explicitly looked for during evaluation and managed appropriately.

  18. Influence of various factors on oncology morbidity in Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    Increasing of quantity diseases of cancers caused only Chernobyl accident aren't revealed. Because increase of the oncology morbidity in Republic of Belarus is stimulated and of radiation and both of environmental contamination carcinogen factor and of factors acted on organism level

  19. Time to foster a rational approach to preventing cardiovascular morbid events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jay N; Duprez, Daniel A

    2008-07-29

    Efforts to prevent atherosclerotic morbid events have focused primarily on risk factor prevention and intervention. These approaches, based on the statistical association of risk factors with events, have dominated clinical practice in the last generation. Because the cardiovascular abnormalities eventuating in morbid events are detectable in the arteries and heart before the development of symptomatic disease, recent efforts have focused on identifying the presence of these abnormalities as a more sensitive and specific guide to the need for therapy. Advances in noninvasive techniques for studying the vasculature and the left ventricle now provide the opportunity to use early disease rather than risk factors as the tool for clinical decision making. A disease scoring system has been developed using 10 tests of vascular and cardiac function and structure. More extensive data to confirm the sensitivity and specificity of this scoring system and to demonstrate its utility in tracking the response to therapy are needed to justify widespread application in clinical practice.

  20. A phase I/II study of hypofractionated whole abdominal radiation therapy in patients with chemoresistant ovarian carcinoma: Karnofsky score determines treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Edwards, Robert; Land, Stephanie; D'Angelo, Gina M.S.; Kelley, Joseph; Price, Fredric

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy can provide useful palliation in chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to prospectively study the palliative effect of a hypofractionated radiation treatment regimen. Change in quality-of-life scores (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], Karnofsky scale), pain score, and tolerance to therapy were also assessed. Methods and Materials: A single-institution Phase I/II trial was initiated in patients with chemoresistant recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer. All patients had symptomatic and measurable intra-abdominal disease. Patients were treated with a single radiation fraction (700 cGy) or two fractions (300 cGy twice a day) to the whole abdomen over 1 day. Quality-of-life scale (FACT G version 2) was assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 months following treatment. Karnofsky scale and pain score were also evaluated in the same time frame. Results: Sixteen patients were prospectively entered into this protocol between February 1996 and September 1998. Twelve patients received a single 700 cGy fraction and four 300 cGy twice a day. All were heavily pretreated and 9 (56%) had a poor performance status prior to treatment. Symptoms needing palliation included pain (14), ascites (10), and bleeding (2). Symptomatic improvement occurred in all patients with pain (5 complete response [CR] and 7 partial response [PR], all patients with bleeding (CR 2), and two (20%) with ascites. Five patients (31%) had a reduction in lesion size documented radiologically in three. The mean duration of response was 22 weeks in patients with a Karnofsky score >70. Thirteen patients developed transient nausea and vomiting which resolved in 48 hours in all. All patients developed a transient lymphopenia. Thirteen patients completed a follow-up quality-of-life scale. There was an improvement in the physical and functional components of the scale in patients with Karnofsky score of 90-100. There was no improvement in quality of

  1. Scoring of radiation-induced micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes by automated image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Seuntjens, J.; Thierens, H.

    1994-01-01

    The micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes is, at present, frequently used to assess chromosomal damage caused by ionizing radiation or mutagens. Manual scoring of micronuclei (MN) by trained personnel is very time-consuming, tiring work, and the results depend on subjective interpretation of scoring criteria. More objective scoring can be accomplished only if the test can be automated. Furthermore, an automated system allows scoring of large numbers of cells, thereby increasing the statistical significance of the results. This is of special importance for screening programs for low doses of chromosome-damaging agents. In this paper, the first results of our effort to automate the micronucleus assay with an image-analysis system are represented. The method we used is described in detail, and the results are compared to those of other groups. Our system is able to detect 88% of the binucleated lymphocytes on the slides. The procedure consists of a fully automated localization of binucleated cells and counting of the MN within these cells, followed by a simple and fast manual operation in which the false positives are removed. Preliminary measurements for blood samples irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy X-rays indicate that the automated system can find 89% ± 12% of the micronuclei within the binucleated cells compared to a manual screening. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Jong, Pim A. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bleys, Ronald L.A.W. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Das, Marco; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buls, Nico; Mey, Johan de [UZ Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS). Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels using unenhanced prospectively ECG-triggered protocols. Tube voltage was 120 kV and tube current differed between protocols. CT data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and reduced dose CT data with IR. CCS was quantified with Agatston scores, calcification mass and calcification volume. Differences were analysed with the Friedman test. Fourteen hearts showed coronary calcifications. Dose reduction with FBP did not significantly change Agatston scores, calcification volumes and calcification masses (P > 0.05). Maximum differences in Agatston scores were 76, 26, 51 and 161 units, in calcification volume 97, 27, 42 and 162 mm{sup 3}, and in calcification mass 23, 23, 20 and 48 mg, respectively. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes with significant differences for one vendor (P < 0.05). Median relative differences between reference FBP and reduced dose IR for Agatston scores remained within 2.0-4.6 %, 1.0-5.3 %, 1.2-7.7 % and 2.6-4.5 %, for calcification volumes within 2.4-3.9 %, 1.0-5.6 %, 1.1-6.4 % and 3.7-4.7 %, for calcification masses within 1.9-4.1 %, 0.9-7.8 %, 2.9-4.7 % and 2.5-3.9 %, respectively. IR resulted in increased, decreased or similar calcification masses. CCS derived from standard FBP acquisitions was not affected by radiation dose reductions up to 80 %. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes. (orig.)

  3. Assessing the impact of a fistula after a pancreaticoduodenectomy using the Post-operative Morbidity Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin C; Christein, John D; Behrman, Stephen W; Callery, Mark P; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Kent, Tara S; Pratt, Wande B; Lewis, Russell S; Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-10-01

    The Post-operative Morbidity Index (PMI) is a quantitative utility measure of a complication burden created by severity weighting. The Fistula Risk Score (FRS) is a validated model that predicts whether a patient will develop a post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF). These novel tools might provide further discrimination of the ISGPF grading system. From 2001 to 2012, 1021 pancreaticoduodenectomies were performed at four institutions. POPFs were categorized by ISGPF standards. PMI scores were calculated based on the Modified Accordion Severity Grading System. FRS scores were assigned according to the relative influence of four recognized factors for developing a clinically relevant POPF (CR-POPF). In total, 231 patients (22.6%) developed a POPF, of which 54.1% were CR-POPFs. The PMI differed significantly between the ISGPF grades and patients with no or non-fistulous complications (P concept of clinical severity. CR-POPFs usually reflect the patient's highest Accordion score whereas biochemical POPFs are often superseded. The correlation between FRS and PMI indicates that risk factors for a fistula contribute to overall pancreaticoduodenectomy morbidity. © 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  4. Assessment of psychiatric morbidity among health-care students in a teaching hospital, Telangana state: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udai Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional education can be a stressful experience for health-care students and may impact negatively on emotional well-being and academic performance which leads to psychiatric morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among the professional health-care students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among professional health-care students in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Telangana state. The information regarding demographic data, academic achievements, and positive and negative events in the recent past was collected using semi-structured pro forma, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 is used to assess the psychiatric morbidity. Descriptive analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis were done to analyze the data. Results: A total of 836 students participated in the study, and the overall mean GHQ total score in the study population was 26.8, which is above the cutoff (24 score. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among study population is about 58.7%. Academic achievement and negative events in the recent past had effect on psychological morbidity and showed high GHQ scores among study population which was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The poor academic performance and negative events had a strong impact on psychological morbidity of students. The higher level of psychological morbidity warrants need for intervention such as social and psychological support to improve the quality of life for the health-care students. Further, a creation of positive academic environment as a teamwork of faculty, administration, educational experts, and students helps to develop psychological healthy dental and medical professionals who can perform better in a coming future.

  5. Propensity Score Matched Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy vs Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Survival Analysis from the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PurposeNo direct comparisons between extreme hypofractionation and conventional fractionation have been reported in randomized trials for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The goal of this study is to use a propensity score matched (PSM analysis with the National Cancer Database (NCDB for the comparison of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for organ confined prostate cancer.MethodsMen with localized prostate cancer treated with radiation dose ≥72 Gy for IMRT and ≥35 Gy for SBRT to the prostate only were abstracted from the NCDB. Men treated with previous surgery, brachytherapy, or proton therapy were excluded. Matching was performed to eliminate confounding variables via PSM. Simple 1–1 nearest neighbor matching resulted in a matched sample of 5,430 (2,715 in each group. Subset analyses of men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA > 10, GS = 7, and GS > 7 yielded matched samples of 1,020, 2,194, and 247, respectively.ResultsNo difference in survival was noted between IMRT and SBRT at 8 years (p = 0.65. Subset analyses of higher risk men with PSA > 10 or GS = 7 histology or GS > 7 histology revealed no difference in survival between IMRT and SBRT (p = 0.58, p = 0.68, and p = 0.62, respectively. Variables significant for survival for the matched group included: age (p < 0.0001, primary payor (p = 0.0001, Charlson/Deyo Score (p = 0.0002, PSA (p = 0.0013, Gleason score (p < 0.0001, and use of hormone therapy (p = 0.02.ConclusionUtilizing the NCDB, there is no difference in survival at 8 years comparing IMRT to SBRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Subset analysis confirmed no difference in survival even for intermediate- and high-risk patients based on Gleason Score and PSA.

  6. Sources of stress and psychological morbidity among undergraduate physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J M; Feeney, C; Hussey, J; Donnellan, C

    2010-09-01

    Professional education can be a stressful experience for some individuals, and may impact negatively on emotional well-being and academic performance. Psychological morbidity and associated sources of stress have not been investigated extensively in physiotherapy students. This study explored sources of stress, psychological morbidity and possible associations between these variables in undergraduate physiotherapy students. A questionnaire-based survey. The Undergraduate Sources of Stress Questionnaire was used to identify sources of stress, and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) was used to rate the prevalence of psychological morbidity, using a conservative GHQ threshold of 3 to 4 to determine probable 'cases'. Uni- and multivariate tests of correlation were used to analyse the data. An Irish educational institution. One hundred and twenty-five physiotherapy undergraduate students. More than one-quarter of all students (27%) scored above the GHQ threshold, indicating probable psychological morbidity. This is higher than the level of psychological morbidity reported by the general population. Regression analysis showed that academic (beta=0.31, Pphysiotherapy students, with academic and personal issues being the greatest concern. While personal causes of stress such as stressful events and mood are more difficult to control, manipulation of curricular factors may have positive effects on academic sources of stress. Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation between International Prostate Symptom Score and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-23

    Jul 23, 2016 ... International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms-benign prostatic ... cause of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in the male geriatric population.[1] ... age and results in LUTS in about 10% of elderly men.[1]. BPH causes morbidity through the urinary ...

  8. Geographic Variation in Morbidity and Mortality of Cerebrovascular Diseases in Korea during 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyeon; Bahk, Jinwook; Kim, Ikhan; Kim, Yeon-Yong; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Jeehye; Park, Jong Heon; Shin, Soon-Ae; Khang, Young-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about within-country variation in morbidity and mortality of cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs). Geographic differences in CVD morbidity and mortality have yet to be properly examined. This study examined geographic variation in morbidity and mortality of CVD, neighborhood factors for CVD morbidity and mortality, and the association between CVD morbidity and mortality across the 245 local districts in Korea during 2011-2015. District-level health care utilization and mortality data were obtained to estimate age-standardized CVD morbidity and mortality. The bivariate Pearson correlation was used to examine the linear relationship between district-level CVD morbidity and mortality Z-scores. Simple linear regression and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate the associations of area characteristics with CVD morbidity, mortality, and discrepancies between morbidity and mortality. Substantial variation was found in CVD morbidity and mortality across the country, with 1074.9 excess CVD inpatients and 73.8 excess CVD deaths per 100,000 between the districts with the lowest and highest CVD morbidity and mortality, respectively. Higher rates of CVD admissions and deaths were clustered in the noncapital regions. A moderate geographic correlation between CVD morbidity and mortality was found (Pearson correlation coefficient = .62 for both genders). Neighborhood level indicators for socioeconomic disadvantages, undersupply of health care resources, and unhealthy behaviors were positively associated with CVD morbidity and mortality and the relative standing of CVD mortality vis-à-vis morbidity. Policy actions targeting life-course socioeconomic conditions, equitable distribution of health care resources, and behavioral risk factors may help reduce geographic differences in CVD morbidity and mortality in Korea. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychiatric morbidity and people's experience of and response to social problems involving rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Nigel J; Pleasence, Pascoe; Buck, Alexy

    2010-11-01

    Psychiatric morbidity has been shown to be associated with the increased reporting of a range of social problems involving legal rights ('rights problems'). Using a validated measure of psychiatric morbidity, this paper explores the relationship between psychiatric morbidity and rights problems and discusses the implications for the delivery of health and legal services. New representative national survey data from the English and Welsh Civil and Social Justice Survey (CSJS) surveyed 3040 adults in 2007 to explore the relationship between GHQ-12 scores and the self reported incidence of and behaviour surrounding, rights problems. It was found that the prevalence of rights problems increased with psychiatric morbidity, as did the experience of multiple problems. It was also found the likelihood of inaction in the face of problems increased with psychiatric morbidity, while the likelihood of choosing to resolve problems without help decreased. Where advice was obtained, psychiatric morbidity was associated with a greater tendency to obtain a combination of 'legal' and 'general' support, rather than 'legal' advice alone. The results suggest that integrated and 'outreach' services are of particular importance to the effective support of those facing mental illness. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Somatic and mental morbidity of young female physicians. Does emotional exhaustion constitute the missing link?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Zsuzsa; Adám, Szilvia

    2013-01-06

    The high prevalence of morbidity among female physicians in Hungary is well documented, however, little is known about the prevalence of that in certain age groups. To assess the prevalence of somatic and psychiatric morbidity in two age cohorts (Cohort 1: age 24-43 and Cohort 2: age 44-76) of female physicians and to explore the relationship between morbidity and potential risk factors including work-related stressors. Representative, cross-sectional, quantitative survey among representative samples of female physicians (N = 408). Physicians in Cohort 1 reported more frequent night shift rotation, less leisure time, and fewer days off compared to physicians in Cohort 2. Physicians in Cohort 1 were less satisfied with their work, workplace, reported less support from their colleagues, and received lower salary compared to physicians in Cohort 2. Physicians in Cohort 1 scored significantly higher on the emotional exhaustion and the personal accomplishment scales MBI as compared to Cohort 2 physicians. In Cohort 1 emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment were associated with high depression scores and frequent suicidal ideation. The role of emotional exhaustion is decisive of young physicians' well-being. Future research should focus on understanding the psycho-social, individual, organizational, and societal correlates of the high prevalence of morbidity among young female physicians in Hungary.

  12. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C. (Department of General Surgery, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting.

  13. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting

  14. Non-Life Threatening Maternal Morbidity: Cross Sectional Surveys from Malawi and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Shamsa; Jean-Baptiste, Rachel; Rahman, Atif; Neilson, James P; van den Broek, Nynke R

    2015-01-01

    For more accurate estimation of the global burden of pregnancy associated disease, clarity is needed on definition and assessment of non-severe maternal morbidity. Our study aimed to define maternal morbidity with clear criteria for identification at primary care level and estimate the distribution of and evaluate associations between physical (infective and non-infective) and psychological morbidities in two different low-income countries. Cross sectional study with assessment of morbidity in early pregnancy (34%), late pregnancy (35%) and the postnatal period (31%) among 3459 women from two rural communities in Pakistan (1727) and Malawi (1732). Trained health care providers at primary care level used semi-structured questionnaires documenting signs and symptoms, clinical examination and laboratory tests which were bundled to reflect infectious, non-infectious and psychological morbidity. One in 10 women in Malawi and 1 in 5 in Pakistan reported a previous pregnancy complication with 1 in 10 overall reporting a previous neonatal death or stillbirth. In the index pregnancy, 50.1% of women in Malawi and 53% in Pakistan were assessed to have at least one morbidity (infective or non-infective). Both infective (Pakistan) and non-infective morbidity (Pakistan and Malawi) was lower in the postnatal period than during pregnancy. Multiple morbidities were uncommon (Pakistan 2.6% in Malawi had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score (EPDS) > 9. Complications during a previous pregnancy, infective morbidity (p <0.001), intra or postpartum haemorrhage (p <0.02) were associated with psychological morbidity in both settings. Our findings highlight the need to strengthen the availability and quality of antenatal and postnatal care packages. We propose to adapt and improve the framework and criteria used in this study, ensuring a basic set of diagnostic tests is available, to ensure more robust assessment of non-severe maternal morbidity.

  15. Tale of Two Patent Ductus Arteriosus Severity Scores: Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Daniel; El-Khuffash, Afif; McNamara, Patrick J; Nitzan, Itamar; Hammerman, Cathy

    2018-01-01

     Several echocardiographic scoring systems have been developed to assess the severity of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) shunting in preterm infants.  The objective of this study was to compare the ability of two different scoring systems to evaluate the hemodynamic significance of the PDA and to predict long-term PDA-associated morbidities.  El-Khuffash cohort (previously described) was derived from a multicenter, prospective, observational study conducted in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Ireland, Canada, and Australia.  A total of 141 infants with a mean gestational age of 26 ± 1.4 weeks and a mean birth weight of 952 ± 235 g were evaluated on day 2 of life. The two scores were well correlated with each other and both scores positively predicted chronic lung disease/death in this population.  There appears to be an overall stepwise progression in the incidence of poor outcome parameters from "closed" to "borderline" to "hemodynamically significant" PDA. Both the El-Khuffash and Shaare Zedek scores are predictive of PDA-associated morbidities. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Postoperative outcome after oesophagectomy for cancer: Nutritional status is the missing ring in the current prognostic scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, B; Scarpa, M; Cavallin, F; Cagol, M; Alfieri, R; Saadeh, L; Ancona, E; Castoro, C

    2015-06-01

    Several prognostic scores were designed in order to estimate the risk of postoperative adverse events. None of them includes a component directly associated to the nutritional status. The aims of the study were the evaluation of performance of risk-adjusted models for early outcomes after oesophagectomy and to develop a score for severe complication prediction with special consideration regarding nutritional status. A comparison of POSSUM and Charlson score and their derivates, ASA, Lagarde score and nutritional index (PNI) was performed on 167 patients undergoing oesophagectomy for cancer. A logistic regression model was also estimated to obtain a new prognostic score for severe morbidity prediction. Overall morbidity was 35.3% (59 cases), severe complications (grade III-V of Clavien-Dindo classification) occurred in 20 cases. Discrimination was poor for all the scores. Multivariable analysis identified pulse, connective tissue disease, PNI and potassium as independent predictors of severe morbidity. This model showed good discrimination and calibration. Internal validation using standard bootstrapping techniques confirmed the good performance. Nutrition could be an independent risk factor for major complications and a nutritional status coefficient could be included in current prognostic scores to improve risk estimation of major postoperative complications after oesophagectomy for cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Stochastic effects of environmental radiation exposure in populations living near the Mayak Industrial Association: preliminary report on study of cancer morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossenko, M M; Hoffman, D A; Thomas, T L

    2000-07-01

    The Mayak Industrial Association, located in the South Ural Mountains, began operation in 1948 and was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. During the early days of operation, technological failures resulted in the release of large amounts of radioactive waste into the Techa River. Residents who lived in villages on the banks of the Techa and Iset Rivers were exposed to varying levels of radioactivity. The objective of this study is to assess stochastic (carcinogenic) effects in populations exposed to offsite releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak nuclear facility in Russia. Subjects of the present study are those individuals who lived during the period January 1950 through December 1960 in any of the exposed villages along the Techa River in Chelyabinsk Oblast. Death certificates and cancer incidence data have been routinely collected in the past from a five-rayon catchment area of Chelyabinsk Oblast. The registry of exposed residents along the Techa River assembled and maintained by the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine for the past 40 y is the basis for identifying study subjects for this project. Specific study objectives are to evaluate the incidence of cancer among current and former residents of Chelyabinsk Oblast who are in the exposed Techa River cohort; integrate results from the dose-reconstruction study to estimate doses for risk assessment; and develop a structure for maintaining continued follow-up of the cohort for cancer incidence. In the earlier part of our collaborative effort, the focus has been to enhance the cancer morbidity registry by updating it with cancer cases diagnosed through 1997, to conduct a series of validation procedures to ensure completeness and accuracy of the registry, and to reduce the numbers of subjects lost to follow-up. A feasibility study to determine cancer morbidity in migrants from the catchment area has been proposed. Our preliminary analyses of cancer morbidity

  18. Low doses of radiation: epidemiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikiy, N.P.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Medvedeva, E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Influence of small dozes of radiation was investigated with the help epidemiologic evidence. Correlation analysis, regression analysis and frequency analysis were used for investigating morbidity of various cancer illnesses. The pollution of the environment and the fallout of radionuclides in 1962 and 1986 years have an influence upon morbidity of cancer. Influence of small dozes of radiation on health of the population is multifactorial. Therefore depending on other adverse external conditions the influence of radiation in small dozes can be increased or is weakened. Such character of influence of radiation in small dozes proposes the differentiated approach at realization of preventive measures. Especially it concerns regions with favorable ecological conditions.

  19. Effect on intelligence test score of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, Masanori; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi.

    1988-10-01

    Analyses of intelligence test scores (Koga) at 10-11 years of age of individuals exposed prenatally to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki using estimates of the uterine absorbed dose based on the recently introduced system of dosimetry, the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86), reveal the following: 1) there is no evidence of a radiation-related effect on intelligence among those individuals exposed within 0-7 weeks after fertilization or in the 26th or subsequent weeks; 2) for individuals exposed at 8-15 weeks after fertilization, and to a lesser extent those exposed at 16-25 weeks, the mean tests scores but not the variances are significantly heterogeneous among exposure categories; 3) the cumulative distribution of test scores suggests a progressive shift downwards in individual scores with increasing exposure; and 4) within the group most sensitive to the occurrence of clinically recognizable severe mental retardation, individuals exposed 8 through 15 weeks after fertilization, the regression of intelligence score on estimated DS86 uterine absorbed dose is more linear than with T65DR fetal dose, the diminution in intelligence score under the linear model is 21-29 points at 1Gy. The effect is somewhat greater when the controls receiving less than 0.01 Gy are excluded, 24-33 points at 1 Gy. These findings are discussed in the light of the earlier analysis of the frequency of occurrence of mental retardation among the prenatally exposed survivors of the A-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It is suggested that both are the consequences of the same underlying biological process or processes. (author)

  20. The laval questionnaire: a new instrument to measure quality of life in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Fanny; Marceau, Picard; Turgeon, Nathalie; Biron, Simon; Richard, Denis; Lacasse, Yves

    2011-08-15

    Our recent review of the literature uncovered eleven obesity-specific quality of life questionnaires, all with incomplete demonstration of their measurement properties. Our objective was to validate a new self-administered questionnaire specific to morbid obesity to be used in clinical trials. The study was carried out at the bariatric surgery clinic of Laval Hospital, Quebec City, Canada. This study followed our description of health-related quality of life in morbid obesity from which we constructed the Laval Questionnaire. Its construct validity and responsiveness were tested by comparing the baseline and changes at 1-year follow-up in 6 domain scores (symptoms, activity/mobility, personal hygiene/clothing, emotions, social interactions, sexual life) with those of questionnaires measuring related constructs (SF-36, Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II). 112 patients (67 who got bariatric surgery, 45 who remained on the waiting list during the study period) participated in this study. The analysis of the discriminative function of the questionnaire showed moderate-to-high correlations between the scores in each domain of our instrument and the corresponding questionnaires. The analysis of its evaluative function showed (1) significant differences in score changes between patients with bariatric surgery and those without, and (2) moderate-to-high correlations between the changes in scores in the new instrument and the changes in the corresponding questionnaires. Most of these correlations met the a priori predictions we had made regarding their direction and magnitude. The Laval Questionnaire is a valid measure of health-related quality of life in patients with morbid obesity and is responsive to treatment-induced changes.

  1. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right-sided cancer. To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion abnormality in patients treated with CRT on the

  2. Sarcopenia is not associated with morbidity, mortality, or recurrence after esophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Steve R; Dolan, James P; Dewey, Elizabeth N; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Tieu, Brandon H; Schipper, Paul H; Hunter, John G

    2018-05-01

    Sarcopenia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in hepatic, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. We examined the effect of sarcopenia on morbidity, mortality, and recurrence after resection for esophageal cancer. Retrospective review of consecutive esophagectomies from 2010 to 2015. Computed tomography studies were analyzed for sarcopenia. Morbidity was analyzed using Fischer's test and survival data with Kaplan Meier curves. The sarcopenic group (n = 127) had lower BMI, later stage disease, and higher incidence of neoadjuvant radiation than those without sarcopenia (n = 46). There were no differences in morbidity or mortality between the groups (p = .75 and p = .31, respectively). Mean length of stay was similar (p = .70). Disease free and overall survival were similar (p = .20 and p = .39, respectively). There is no association between sarcopenia and increased morbidity, mortality and disease-free survival in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer. Sarcopenia in esophageal cancer may not portend worse outcomes that have been reported in other solid tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How is the injury severity scored? a brief review of scoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of injured patients is a critical issue in pre-hospital and emergency departments. Trauma victims are usually young and the injuries may lead to mortality or severe morbidities. The severity of injury can be estimated by observing the anatomic and physiologic evidences. Scoring systems are used to present a scale of describing the severity of the injuries in the victims.We reviewed the evidences of famous scoring systems, the history of their development, applications and their evolutions. We searched electronic database PubMed and Google scholar with keywords: (trauma OR injury AND (severity OR intensity AND (score OR scale.In this paper, we are going to present a definition of scoring systems and discuss the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS and Injury Severity Score (ISS, the most acceptable systems, their applications and their advantages and limitations.Several injury-scoring methods have been introduced. Each method has specific features, advantages and disadvantages. The AIS is an anatomical-based scoring system, which provides a standard numerical scale of ranking and comparing injuries. The ISS was established as a platform for trauma data registry. ISS is also an anatomically-based ordinal scale, with a range of 1-75. Several databases and studies are formed based on ISS and are available for trauma management research.Although the ISS is not perfect, it is established as the basic platform of health services and public health researches. The ISS registering system can provide many opportunities for the development of efficient data recording and statistical analyzing models.

  4. Morbidity ranking of U.S. workers employed in 206 occupations: the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 1986-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David J; Fleming, Lora E; Gómez-Marín, Orlando; LeBlanc, William G; Arheart, Kristopher L; Caban, Alberto J; Christ, Sharon L; Chung-Bridges, Katherine; Pitman, Terry

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to rank U.S. occupations by worker morbidity. From 1986 through 1994, morbidity information was collected on over 410,000 U.S. workers who participated in the National Health Interview Survey, an annual household survey representative of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. A multivariate adjusted logistic regression morbidity summary score was created for each worker group based on seven indicators: days of restricted activity, bedrest, and missed work in the previous 2 weeks; doctor visits and hospitalizations in the previous 12 months; reported health conditions; and health status. Worker groups reporting the greatest morbidity included social workers, inspectors, postal clerks, psychologists, and grinding machine operators; worker groups reporting the least morbidity included dentists, pilots, physicians, pharmacists, and dietitians. These findings aid in the identification of worker groups that require increased attention for morbidity research and prevention.

  5. Morbidity rate of nervous system among medical personnel occupationally exposed to chronic low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkova, A.

    1987-01-01

    The morbidity rate of the nervous system among 1190 subjects, medical personnel, working with sources and environment of ionizing radiation was studied by the personal analysis of the diseases, written down in the personal out-patient department cards as well as of a control group of 870 medical workers of various other specialities. The morbidity rate of the nervous system among the medical personnel, exposed to chronic occupational radiation effect, was established not to be higher than that of the other medical workers - 38.0 and 40.3% respectively. Neuroses and peripheral nervous diseases have the greatest relative share in the structure of morbidity rate of the nervous system in both groups examined, with no statistical significance in the differences of the indices. The significantly higher incidence of autonome dystonias, established among the personnel from the X-ray departments and consulting rooms could be discussed in connection with the great relative share of the subjects from that group with a length of service over 15 years and had received the possible maximum cumulative equivalent doses. 3 tabs., 21 refs

  6. Psychiatric co-morbidity in chronic pain disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqoob, N.; Sharif, A.; Shoaib, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with chronic pain disorder in hospital setting. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Okara from June 2011 to May 2012. Patients and Methods: A purposive sample of 400 patients (males=117; females=283) gathered from pain clinic and other outpatient departments of the hospital and were interviewed in detail and Present State Examination was carried out. Demographic variables were scored using descriptive statistics and results were analyzed using correlation methods. Results: It was revealed that psychiatric illness in overall sample prevailed among 266 participants (67%). Among which 164 participants (62%) were diagnosed with depression, 67 patients (25.2%) of chronic pain were diagnosed with anxiety disorders, 28 patients (11%) with adjustment disorder and 1.5% and 1.1% diagnosed with drug dependence and somatization disorder, respectively. Conclusion: Psychiatric co-morbidity especially the incidence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders were high amongst patients suffering from chronic pain disorder. (author)

  7. Psychological Morbidity in Students of Medical College and Science and Art College Students - A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Mahawar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of quality of life in medical students we have conducted a cross sectional & descriptive study on screening of mental illness of 60 medical students of prefinal year and comparing it with 60 students of third year of Science and Art College. Students were selected via random sampling. GHQ-12 was used as a screening tool and after obtaining scores students were graded in 3 categories - individuals screened positive for psychological morbidity were of Grades 2 and 3 and individuals screened negative for psychological morbidity were of Grade 1 and they were compared according to college, gender & residence. Students screened positive for psychological morbidity as per GHQ-12 were found higher in medical college (87% as compared to Science and Art College (45% and a statistically significant association was found between psychological morbidity and medical students. Psychological morbidity was not significantly associated with residence and gender.

  8. The laval questionnaire: a new instrument to measure quality of life in morbid obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therrien Fanny

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our recent review of the literature uncovered eleven obesity-specific quality of life questionnaires, all with incomplete demonstration of their measurement properties. Our objective was to validate a new self-administered questionnaire specific to morbid obesity to be used in clinical trials. The study was carried out at the bariatric surgery clinic of Laval Hospital, Quebec City, Canada. Methods This study followed our description of health-related quality of life in morbid obesity from which we constructed the Laval Questionnaire. Its construct validity and responsiveness were tested by comparing the baseline and changes at 1-year follow-up in 6 domain scores (symptoms, activity/mobility, personal hygiene/clothing, emotions, social interactions, sexual life with those of questionnaires measuring related constructs (SF-36, Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results 112 patients (67 who got bariatric surgery, 45 who remained on the waiting list during the study period participated in this study. The analysis of the discriminative function of the questionnaire showed moderate-to-high correlations between the scores in each domain of our instrument and the corresponding questionnaires. The analysis of its evaluative function showed (1 significant differences in score changes between patients with bariatric surgery and those without, and (2 moderate-to-high correlations between the changes in scores in the new instrument and the changes in the corresponding questionnaires. Most of these correlations met the a priori predictions we had made regarding their direction and magnitude. Conclusion The Laval Questionnaire is a valid measure of health-related quality of life in patients with morbid obesity and is responsive to treatment-induced changes.

  9. Health literacy, self-perceived health and self-reported chronic morbidity among older people in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Ervin; Burazeri, Genc; Jerliu, Naim; Sørensen, Kristine; Ramadani, Naser; Hysa, Bajram; Brand, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    The aim was to describe health literacy among the older population of Kosovo, an Albanian speaking post-war country in the Western Balkans, in the context of self-perceived health status and self-reported chronic morbidity. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Kosovo in 2011 including 1753 individuals aged ≥ 65 years (886 men, 867 women; mean age 73.4 ± 6.3 years; response rate: 77%). Participants were asked to assess, on a scale from 1 to 5, their level of difficulty with regard to access, understanding, appraisal and application of health information. Sub-scale scores and an overall health literacy score were calculated for each participant. Information on self-perceived health status, presence and number of chronic diseases and socioeconomic characteristics was also collected. Mean values of the overall health literacy score and all sub-scale scores (access, understanding, appraisal and application) were lower among older people who reported a poorer health status or at least one chronic condition compared with individuals who perceived their health status as good or had no chronic conditions (p association between health literacy levels and self-perceived health and chronic morbidity in this post-war European population. The putative link with chronic morbidity and lower adherence to health services is hard to establish through this cross-sectional study. Prospective population-based studies should be conducted in Kosovo and other transitional settings to replicate these findings and properly address the causal relationship between health literacy and health status. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Late morbidity profiles in prostate cancer patients treated to 79-84 Gy by a simple four-field coplanar beam arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chism, Derek B.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne H.; Mitra, Raj K.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the frequency and magnitude of late GI and GU morbidity in prostate cancer patients treated to high dose levels with a simple three-dimensional conformal technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 156 intermediate- and high-risk patients were treated between January 1, 1992 and February 28, 1999 with a simple four-field three-dimensional conformal technique to 79-84 Gy. All patients were treated with a four-field conformal technique; the prostate received 82 Gy and the seminal vesicles and periprostatic tissue 46 Gy. GI and GU toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Morbidity Grading Scale and compared using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: The late Grade 2 GI complication rate was 9% and 38% at 3 years for patients treated with and without rectal blocking, respectively (p=0.0004). No Grade 3 late GI complications developed. The rate of Grade 2 late GU complications was 5%, 8%, and 12% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. The Grade 3 late GU complication rate was 2% at 36 months. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The treatment method described is a simple four-field conformal technique that can be easily implemented in the general radiation community. A dose of 79-84 Gy can be safely delivered to the prostate, with a 9% rate of late Grade 2 GI, 12% rate of late Grade 2 GU, and 2% rate of late Grade 3 GU complications

  11. Study of morbidity in persons subjected to combined effect of low dose irradiation and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.; Zakharov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Materials related to study of morbidity in persons from one of the controled areas subjected to combined effect of low dose ionizing radiation and alcohol are presented. The group under control included persons living in the same area but not misusing alcohol. The morbidity analysis for the period of two years before the accident showed that the number of morbidity cases and days characterized by incapacity for work among 100 working persons was 1.2 and 1.35 times higher as compared to persons not misusing alcohol. Two years after the accident these values constitute 1.6 and 1.75 correspondingly. It is established on the basis of the dispensary examnations, that taking into account other equal conditions the number of morbidity cases related to cardiovasular deseases among the persons misusing alcohol increased (11 % against 6.8 % bycontrol). The number of other chronic morbidity cases does not differ from control values. 7 refs.; 2 tabs

  12. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A.; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  13. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  14. Comparison of Risk Scores for Prediction of Complications following Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tom Kai Ming; Choi, David Hyun-Min; Haydock, David; Gamble, Greg; Stewart, Ralph; Ruygrok, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Risk models play an important role in stratification of patients for cardiac surgery, but their prognostic utilities for post-operative complications are rarely studied. We compared the EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II, Society of Thoracic Surgeon's (STS) Score and an Australasian model (Aus-AVR Score) for predicting morbidities after aortic valve replacement (AVR), and also evaluated seven STS complications models in this context. We retrospectively calculated risk scores for 620 consecutive patients undergoing isolated AVR at Auckland City Hospital during 2005-2012, assessing their discrimination and calibration for post-operative complications. Amongst mortality scores, the EuroSCORE was the best at discriminating stroke (c-statistic 0.845); the EuroSCORE II at deep sternal wound infection (c=0.748); and the STS Score at composite morbidity or mortality (c=0.666), renal failure (c=0.634), ventilation>24 hours (c=0.732), return to theatre (c=0.577) and prolonged hospital stay >14 days post-operatively (c=0.707). The individual STS complications models had a marginally higher c-statistic (c=0.634-0.846) for all complications except mediastinitis, and had good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test P-value 0.123-0.915) for all complications. The STS Score was best overall at discriminating post-operative complications and their composite for AVR. All STS complications models except for deep sternal wound infection had good discrimination and calibration for post-operative complications. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk-adjusted scoring systems in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Edmund; McArdle, Kirsten; Wong, Ling S

    2011-01-01

    Consequent to recent advances in surgical techniques and management, survival rate has increased substantially over the last 25 years, particularly in colorectal cancer patients. However, post-operative morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer vary widely across the country. Therefore, standardised outcome measures are emphasised not only for professional accountability, but also for comparison between treatment units and regions. In a heterogeneous population, the use of crude mortality as an outcome measure for patients undergoing surgery is simply misleading. Meaningful comparisons, however, require accurate risk stratification of patients being analysed before conclusions can be reached regarding the outcomes recorded. Sub-specialised colorectal surgical units usually dedicated to more complex and high-risk operations. The need for accurate risk prediction is necessary in these units as both mortality and morbidity often are tools to justify the practice of high-risk surgery. The Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) is a system for classifying patients in the intensive care unit. However, APACHE score was considered too complex for general surgical use. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade has been considered useful as an adjunct to informed consent and for monitoring surgical performance through time. ASA grade is simple but too subjective. The Physiological & Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) and its variant Portsmouth POSSUM (P-POSSUM) were devised to predict outcomes in surgical patients in general, taking into account of the variables in the case-mix. POSSUM has two parts, which include assessment of physiological parameters and operative scores. There are 12 physiological parameters and 6 operative measures. The physiological parameters are taken at the time of surgery. Each physiological parameter or operative variable is sub-divided into three or four levels with

  16. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Kezik, Julie M.; Hill, Melissa E.; Tsai, Eling; Li, De-Wei; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g and Can f 1>1.2 μg/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 μg/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: ► Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. ► Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. ► Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma

  17. Approaches to ultra-low radiation dose coronary artery calcium scoring based on 3rd generation dual-source CT : A phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McQuiston, Andrew D.; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Meinel, Felix G.; Canstein, Christian; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Cannao, Paola M.; Wichmann, Julian L.; Allmendinger, Thomas; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; De Cecco, Carlo N.

    Objectives: To investigate to what extent 3rd generation dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) can reduce radiation dose in coronary artery calcium scoring. Methods: Image acquisition was performed using a stationary calcification phantom. Prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered 120 kV

  18. Chance of psychiatric morbidity amongst recently diagnosed cancer outpatients attending a chemotherapy unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Chaves

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalent rate of psychiatry morbidity amongst patients with cancer reported in various studies ranges from 5 to 50%, a variation that can be attributed to differences in sample size, the disease itself and treatment factors. The objectives of the present study were to determine the frequency of psychiatric morbidity amongst recently diagnosed cancer outpatients and try to identify which factors might be related to further psychological distress. Two hundred and eleven (70.9% female patients and 87 (29.1% male patients from the chemotherapy unit of the Cancer Hospital A.C. Camargo (São Paulo completed a questionnaire that featured data on demographic, medical and treatment details. The Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 was administered to the patients to determine their personal psychiatric morbidity. Seventy-two patients (25.8% scored > or = 8 in the SRQ-20, the cut-off point for a patient to be considered a psychiatric case. When the low and high scoring groups were compared no differences were detected regarding age, marital status, tumor site, sex, or previous treatment. Nonetheless, patients in the lowest social class and those who were bedridden less than 50% of the time had a significantly higher probability of being a psychiatric case. Regarding help-seeking behavior in situations in which they had doubts or were frightened, about 64% of the total sample did not seek any type of support and did not talk to anyone. This frequency of psychiatric morbidity agrees with data from the cancer literature. According to many investigators, the early detection of a comorbid psychiatric disorder is crucial to relieve a patient's suffering.

  19. Can the Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score predict postoperative complications other than mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Małczak, Piotr; Pisarska, Magdalena; Migaczewski, Marcin; Winiarski, Marek; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) are bariatric procedures with acceptable risk of postoperative morbidities and mortalities, but identification of high-risk patients is an ongoing issue. DeMaria et al. introduced the Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score (OS-MRS), which was designed for mortality risk assessment but not perioperative morbidity risk. To assess the possibility to use the OS-MRS to predict the risk of perioperative complications related to LSG and LRYGB. Retrospective analysis of patients operated on for morbid obesity was performed. Patients were evaluated before and after surgery. We included 408 patients (233 LSG, 175 LRYGB). Perioperative complications were defined as adverse effects in the 30-day period. The Clavien-Dindo scale was used for description of complications. Patients were assigned to five grades and three classes according to the OS-MRS results, then risk of morbidity was analyzed. Complications were observed in 30 (7.35%) patients. Similar morbidity was related to both procedures (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.53-2.44, p = 0.744). The reoperation and mortality rates were 1.23% and 0.49% respectively. There were no significant differences in median OS-MRS value between the group without and the group with perioperative complications. There were no significant differences in OS-MRS between groups (p = 0.091). Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score was not related to Clavien-Dindo grades (p = 0.800). It appears that OS-MRS is not useful in predicting risk of perioperative morbidity after bariatric procedures.

  20. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  1. Morbidity, including fatal morbidity, throughout life in men entering adult life as obese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Holst, Claus; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-01-01

    The association between obesity in adults and excess morbidity and mortality is well established, but the health impact throughout adult life of being obese in early adulthood needs elucidation. We investigated somatic morbidity, including fatal morbidity, throughout adulthood in men starting adult...... life as obese....

  2. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  3. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Gerber, Leah; Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stone, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy

  4. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  5. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Young; Park, Hoon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  6. Pain Catastrophizing in Borderline Morbidly Obese and Morbidly Obese Individuals with Osteoarthritic Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J Somers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is limited information about how morbidly obese osteoarthritis (OA patients cope with the pain they experience. Pain catastrophizing is an important predictor of pain and adjustment in persons with persistent pain. This may be particularly relevant in the morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI] of 40 kg/m2 or greater OA population at risk for increased pain. The present study first examined whether borderline morbidly obese and morbidly obese OA patients report higher levels of pain catastrophizing than a sample of OA patients in the overweight and obese category (BMI between 25 kg/m2 and 34 kg/m2. Next, it examined how pain catastrophizing is related to important indexes of pain and adjustment in borderline morbidly obese and morbidly obese OA patients.

  7. The Henri Mondor Procedure of Morbidity and Mortality Review Meetings: Prospective Registration of Clinical, Dosimetric, and Individual Radiosensitivity Data of Patients With Severe Radiation Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, Yazid, E-mail: yazid.belkacemi@aphp.fr [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); INSERM U955 Eq 07, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Colson-Durand, Laurianne [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Granzotto, Adeline [INSERM, UMR1052, Radiobiology Group, Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, Lyon (France); Husheng, Shan; To, Nhu Hanh; Majdoul, Soufya; Guet, Saada; Hervé, Marie-Laure; Fonteneau, Gloria; Diana, Christian; Le Bret, Cindy; Dominique, Claude [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Fayolle, Maryse [AP-HP, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); AP-HP, Henri Mondor Breast Center, University of Paris-Est, Créteil (France); Foray, Nicolas [INSERM, UMR1052, Radiobiology Group, Cancer Research Centre of Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT), various radiation-induced toxicities can develop in about one-fourth of patients. An international interest in using morbidity and mortality rates to monitor the quality of care and integrate morbidity and mortality review (MMR) meetings into organizations' governance processes has arisen. We report the first results of patients included in our MMR procedure that included biological assays for individual intrinsic radiosensitivity (IIRS). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients were prospectively included in the MMR database. Twenty-two were evaluable for IIRS. Prostate (n=10) and breast (n=8) cancers were the most frequent disease types. The total dose delivered, determined according to the type of disease, ranged from 30 to 74 Gy. Our MMR procedure requires strict criteria: patients with unresolved toxicity of grade 3 or higher with availability of clinical (photographic) data, IIRS results obtained from skin biopsy assays, treatment modalities, and follow-up data. The RT technique and dosimetry were reviewed. Results: Our prospective registration of toxicities showed mainly rectitis, occurring in 7 cases, and skin toxicities, occurring in 9. Of the 7 patients with rectitis, 5 received 66 Gy of post-prostatectomy RT with V50 (rectum volume receiving 50 Gy) ranging from 45% to 75% and a mean maximal dose of 66.5 Gy. For dermatitis and cystitis, the mean maximal doses were in the range of classical constraints without any overdosage or dose heterogeneity. No errors were found in the review of treatment planning and positioning. Conversely, all the patients were considered biologically as radiosensitive with genomic instability and ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair impairments. Conclusions: The MMR review of files allowed clear answers for patients on the relationship between clinical events and their IIRS. Our procedure has allowed education of all our staff to monitor

  8. The Henri Mondor Procedure of Morbidity and Mortality Review Meetings: Prospective Registration of Clinical, Dosimetric, and Individual Radiosensitivity Data of Patients With Severe Radiation Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Colson-Durand, Laurianne; Granzotto, Adeline; Husheng, Shan; To, Nhu Hanh; Majdoul, Soufya; Guet, Saada; Hervé, Marie-Laure; Fonteneau, Gloria; Diana, Christian; Le Bret, Cindy; Dominique, Claude; Fayolle, Maryse; Foray, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT), various radiation-induced toxicities can develop in about one-fourth of patients. An international interest in using morbidity and mortality rates to monitor the quality of care and integrate morbidity and mortality review (MMR) meetings into organizations' governance processes has arisen. We report the first results of patients included in our MMR procedure that included biological assays for individual intrinsic radiosensitivity (IIRS). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients were prospectively included in the MMR database. Twenty-two were evaluable for IIRS. Prostate (n=10) and breast (n=8) cancers were the most frequent disease types. The total dose delivered, determined according to the type of disease, ranged from 30 to 74 Gy. Our MMR procedure requires strict criteria: patients with unresolved toxicity of grade 3 or higher with availability of clinical (photographic) data, IIRS results obtained from skin biopsy assays, treatment modalities, and follow-up data. The RT technique and dosimetry were reviewed. Results: Our prospective registration of toxicities showed mainly rectitis, occurring in 7 cases, and skin toxicities, occurring in 9. Of the 7 patients with rectitis, 5 received 66 Gy of post-prostatectomy RT with V50 (rectum volume receiving 50 Gy) ranging from 45% to 75% and a mean maximal dose of 66.5 Gy. For dermatitis and cystitis, the mean maximal doses were in the range of classical constraints without any overdosage or dose heterogeneity. No errors were found in the review of treatment planning and positioning. Conversely, all the patients were considered biologically as radiosensitive with genomic instability and ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair impairments. Conclusions: The MMR review of files allowed clear answers for patients on the relationship between clinical events and their IIRS. Our procedure has allowed education of all our staff to monitor

  9. Morbidity rate among adults and children residing in the vicinity of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Shtereva, V.

    1994-01-01

    This retrospective study comprises the residents of the villages of Dolni Bogrov and Gorni Bogrov and is carried out on the base of official medical statistics for the period 1985-1989. The data obtained are compared with those on a nation-wide scale and the control village of German. A higher morbidity rate among children is established for the diseases of nervous, respiratory and digestive system, infections and parasitic diseases. The morbidity rate (general and by classes of diseases) is lower than the one on a nation-wide scale, and higher compared to the control village for: diseases of cardiovascular, nervous and digestive system, infections, neoplasms, injuries, poisonings, parasitic, skeletal and skin diseases. Morbidity rate by classes of diseases connected with radiation exposure is lower than the one for the country and comparable to that of the control village. 2 tabs., 6 refs. (orig.)

  10. Is it possible to reduce the surgical mortality and morbidity of peptic ulcer perforations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Adnan; Tatar, Cihad; Yıldırım, Doğan; Dönmez, Turgut; Ünal, Akın; Kocakuşak, Ahmet; Akıncı, Muzaffer

    2017-01-01

    Peptic ulcer perforation is a life-threatening situation requiring urgent surgical treatment. A novel vision in peptic ulcer perforation is necessary to fill the gaps created by antiulcer medication, aging of the patients, and presentation of resistant cases in our era. In this study, we aimed to share our findings regarding the effects of various risk factors and operative techniques on the mortality and morbidity of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Data from 112 patients presenting at our Training and Research Hospital Emergency Surgery Department between January 2010 and December 2015 who were diagnosed with PUP through physical examination and laboratory and radiological tests and operated at the hospital have been retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups based on morbidity (Group 1), mortality (Group 2), and no complication (Group 3). Of the 112 patients included in the study, morbidity was observed in 21 (18.8%), mortality in 11 (9.8%), and no complication was observed in 80 (71.4%), who were discharged with cure. The differences between group for the average values of the perforation diameter and American Society of Anesthesiologists, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, and Mannheim Peritonitis Index scores were statistically significant (p<0.001 for each). The average values for the group with mortality were significantly higher than those of the other groups. In this study where we investigated risk factors for increased morbidity and mortality in PUPs, there was statistically significant difference between the average values for age, body mass index, perforation diameter, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Mannheim Peritonitis Index scores among the three groups, whereas the amount of subdiaphragmatic free air did not differ.

  11. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens

  12. Gender Differences in Compulsive Buying Disorder: Assessment of Demographic and Psychiatric Co-Morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli de Mattos, Cristiana; Kim, Hyoun S; Requião, Marinalva G; Marasaldi, Renata F; Filomensky, Tatiana Z; Hodgins, David C; Tavares, Hermano

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying is a common disorder found worldwide. Although recent research has shed light into the prevalence, etiology and clinical correlates of compulsive buying disorder, less is known about gender differences. To address this empirical gap, we assessed potential gender differences in demographic and psychiatric co-morbidities in a sample of 171 compulsive buyers (20 men and 151 women) voluntarily seeking treatment in São Paulo, Brazil. A structured clinical interview confirmed the diagnosis of compulsive buying. Of the 171 participants, 95.9% (n = 164) met criteria for at least one co-morbid psychiatric disorder. The results found that male and female compulsive buyers did not differ in problem severity as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale. However, several significant demographic and psychiatric differences were found in a multivariate binary logistic regression. Specifically, male compulsive buyers were more likely to report being non-heterosexual, and reported fewer years of formal education. In regards to psychiatric co-morbidities, male compulsive buyers were more likely to be diagnosed with sexual addiction, and intermittent explosive disorder. Conversely, men had lower scores on the shopping subscale of the Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire. The results suggest that male compulsive buyers are more likely to present with co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Treatment planning for compulsive buying disorder would do well to take gender into account to address for potential psychiatric co-morbidities.

  13. Prediction of postoperative morbidity, mortality and rehabilitation in hip fracture patients: the cumulated ambulation score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    fracture patients with an independent walking function admitted from their own home. Rehabilitation followed a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation regimen and discharge criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Admission tests with a new mobility score to assess prefracture functional mobility and a short mental......OBJECTIVE: To validate the cumulated ambulation score as an early postoperative predictor of short-term outcome in hip fracture patients. DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive study. SETTING: An orthopaedic hip fracture unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS: Four hundred and twenty-six consecutive hip...... of short-term postoperative outcome after hip fracture surgery....

  14. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation

  15. Temperamental dimensions of the TEMPS-A in females with co-morbid bipolar disorder and bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakowski, Janusz K; Kaminska, Katarzyna; Charytonik, Jolanta; Akiskal, Kareen K; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the effect of co-morbid bipolar disorder and bulimia on temperamental dimensions measured by TEMPS-A, relative to "pure" bulimia and "pure" bipolar disorder, in female patients. The study was performed on 47 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) with a mean age of 36±10 years, 96 patients with bulimia or bulimic type of anorexia, mean age 26±9 years and 50 control healthy females (HC), mean age 29±6 years. Among bulimic patients, a group of 68 subjects with co-morbid bulimia with bipolarity (BD+B) was identified, based on positive score of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ). The TEMPS-A questionnaire, 110 questions version, has been used, evaluating five temperament domains: depressive, cyclothymic, hyperthymic, irritable and anxious. Parametric analysis was performed for 4 groups (BD, "pure" bulimia (PB), BD+B and HC), with 28 subjects randomly chosen from each group, using analysis of variance and cluster analysis. All clinical groups significantly differed from control group by having higher scores of depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and anxious temperaments and lower of hyperthymic one. Among patients, significantly higher scores of cyclothymic and irritable temperaments were found in BD+B compared to both PB and BD. These differences were also reflected in cluster analysis, where two clusters were identified. Bipolarity in bulimic patients assessed only by the MDQ. These results show that co-morbid bulimia and bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme dimensions of both cyclothymic and irritable temperaments, significantly higher than each single diagnosis. Possible clinical implications of such fact are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Micronucleus test for radiation biodosimetry in mass casualty events: Evaluation of visual and automated scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.bolognesi@istge.i [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Balia, Cristina; Roggieri, Paola [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Cardinale, Francesco [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bruzzi, Paolo [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Sorcinelli, Francesca [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Laboratory of Genetics, Histology and Molecular Biology Section, Army Medical and Veterinary, Research Center, Via Santo Stefano Rotondo 4, 00184 Roma (Italy); Lista, Florigio [Laboratory of Genetics, Histology and Molecular Biology Section, Army Medical and Veterinary, Research Center, Via Santo Stefano Rotondo 4, 00184 Roma (Italy); D' Amelio, Raffaele [Sapienza, Universita di Roma II Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia and Ministero della Difesa, Direzione Generale Sanita Militare (Italy); Righi, Enzo [Frascati National Laboratories, National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    In the case of a large-scale nuclear or radiological incidents a reliable estimate of dose is an essential tool for providing timely assessment of radiation exposure and for making life-saving medical decisions. Cytogenetics is considered as the 'gold standard' for biodosimetry. The dicentric analysis (DA) represents the most specific cytogenetic bioassay. The micronucleus test (MN) applied in interphase in peripheral lymphocytes is an alternative and simpler approach. A dose-effect calibration curve for the MN frequency in peripheral lymphocytes from 27 adult donors was established after in vitro irradiation at a dose range 0.15-8 Gy of {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (dose rate 6 Gy min{sup -1}). Dose prediction by visual scoring in a dose-blinded study (0.15-4.0 Gy) revealed a high level of accuracy (R = 0.89). The scoring of MN is time consuming and requires adequate skills and expertise. Automated image analysis is a feasible approach allowing to reduce the time and to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation decreasing the variability due to subjective evaluation. A good correlation (R = 0.705) between visual and automated scoring with visual correction was observed over the dose range 0-2 Gy. Almost perfect discrimination power for exposure to 1-2 Gy, and a satisfactory power for 0.6 Gy were detected. This threshold level can be considered sufficient for identification of sub lethally exposed individuals by automated CBMN assay.

  17. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  18. PREDICE score as a predictor of 90 days mortality in patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, D. P. S.; Hasan, R.

    2018-03-01

    Hospitalization in chronic heart failure patients associated with high mortality and morbidity rate. The 90 days post-discharge period following hospitalization in heart failure patients is known as the vulnerable phase, it carries the high risk of poor outcomes. Identification of high-risk individuals by using prognostic evaluation was intended to do a closer follow up and more intensive to decreasing the morbidity and mortality rate of heart failure.To determine whether PREDICE score could predict mortality within 90 days in patients with heart failure, an observational cohort study in patients with heart failure who were hospitalized due to worsening chronic heart failure. Patients were in following-up for up to 90 days after initial evaluation with the primary endpoint is death.We found a difference of the significantstatistical between PREDICE score in survival and mortality group (p=0.001) of 84% (95% CI: 60.9% - 97.4%).In conclusion, PREDICE score has a good ability to predict mortality within 90 days in patients with heart failure.

  19. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    for which they were eligible. Infants with low gestational age, growth restriction, low Apgar scores, and who were born on the day of maternal admission to hospital were less likely to receive evidence based care. After adjustment, evidence based care was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (risk...... ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.87) and in-hospital mortality or severe morbidity, or both (0.82, 0.73 to 0.92), corresponding to an estimated 18% decrease in all deaths without an increase in severe morbidity if these interventions had been provided to all infants. CONCLUSIONS: More......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective multinational...

  20. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Q. da Luz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional cognitions may be associated with unhealthy eating behaviors seen in individuals with obesity. However, dysfunctional cognitions commonly occur in individuals with poor mental health independently of weight. We examined whether individuals with morbid obesity differed with regard to dysfunctional cognitions when compared to individuals of normal weight, when mental health status was controlled for. 111 participants—53 with morbid obesity and 58 of normal weight—were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, Young Schema Questionnaire, Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and a Demographic and Clinical Questionnaire. Participants with morbid obesity showed higher scores in one (insufficient self-control/self-discipline of 15 early maladaptive schemas and in one (labeling of 15 cognitive distortions compared to participants of normal weight. The difference between groups for insufficient self-control/self-discipline was not significant when mental health status was controlled for. Participants with morbid obesity showed more severe anxiety than participants of normal weight. Our findings did not show clinically meaningful differences in dysfunctional cognitions between participants with morbid obesity or of normal weight. Dysfunctional cognitions presented by individuals with morbid obesity are likely related to their individual mental health and not to their weight.

  1. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Felipe Q.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Hay, Phillipa; Roekenes, Jessica A.; Swinbourne, Jessica; da Silva, Dhiordan C.; da S. Oliveira, Margareth

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctional cognitions may be associated with unhealthy eating behaviors seen in individuals with obesity. However, dysfunctional cognitions commonly occur in individuals with poor mental health independently of weight. We examined whether individuals with morbid obesity differed with regard to dysfunctional cognitions when compared to individuals of normal weight, when mental health status was controlled for. 111 participants—53 with morbid obesity and 58 of normal weight—were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, Young Schema Questionnaire, Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and a Demographic and Clinical Questionnaire. Participants with morbid obesity showed higher scores in one (insufficient self-control/self-discipline) of 15 early maladaptive schemas and in one (labeling) of 15 cognitive distortions compared to participants of normal weight. The difference between groups for insufficient self-control/self-discipline was not significant when mental health status was controlled for. Participants with morbid obesity showed more severe anxiety than participants of normal weight. Our findings did not show clinically meaningful differences in dysfunctional cognitions between participants with morbid obesity or of normal weight. Dysfunctional cognitions presented by individuals with morbid obesity are likely related to their individual mental health and not to their weight. PMID:28264484

  2. An analysis of acute complications and perioperative morbidity from high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute morbidity and mortality for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy performed in an outpatient setting in the treatment of gynecological malignancies, and to identify possible risk factors for adverse outcomes. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with cervical (n=129) or uterine (n=42) carcinoma with an intact uterus were evaluated and treated from August 1989 through December 1994, with at least part of their therapy delivered with intracavitary HDR 192 Ir radiation. A total of 830 ICR insertions were performed with greater than 95% done on an outpatient basis under heavy intravenous sedation using fentanyl and midazolam. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were recorded for any event occurring within 30 days of the completion of therapy. Anesthesia risk was evaluated retrospectively in all patients based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Class System. Results: The uterine patients, many treated with radiation alone because of morbid obesity or medical inoperability, had a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rate as compared to the cervix patient cohort. Thirteen of the 42 (31%) uterine patients and 8 of the 129 (6%) cervix patients required hospitalization within 30 days of treatment completion (p 2) experienced greater morbidity and mortality, while the best predictor of complications in the cervix patients was age greater than 70 years. For the entire cohort of patients, no correlation was found between the 30 day morbidity and mortality and the doses of fentanyl and midazolam used or the length of the procedure. Conclusions: The acute complication rate from HDR brachytherapy performed on an outpatient basis with heavy intravenous sedation is acceptable for the great majority of patients who present for treatment. However, the high morbidity and mortality experienced by certain patient cohorts suggests that careful assessment of the risk/benefit ratio for treatment

  3. Role of bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (bisap score in predicting outcome in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Bashir Bhat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of Bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (BISAP score in predicting the outcome of acute pancreatitis. Methods: This single hospital based prospective study included fifty patients of acute pancreatitis admitted within 48 hours of onset of symptoms, who were divided into two groups according to admission BISAP score. BISAP score 3 (severe acute pancreatitis. The ability of BISAP score to predict mortality, morbidity and hospital stay in acute pancreatitis patients was analyzed. Results: A BISAP score of >3 was associated with increased risk of development of transient organ failure, persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis (Statistically significant. Mortality in group with BISAP and #8805;3 was 23.5% (4 patients which was statistically higher than group with BISAP score and #706;3 (0 patients (p=0.019.The mean duration of hospital stay of patients in group with BISAP score < 3 was 7.58 +/- 4.04 days and in group with BISAP score and #8805;3 was 15.35 +/- 1.66.(p=0.02. Conclusion: Bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP score, at admission is an excellent score in predicting the mortality, morbidity and hospital stay and hence management protocol in patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(4.000: 215-220

  4. Assessment of morbidity pattern, quality of life and awareness of government facilities among elderly population in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was done to assess the determinants of morbidity pattern, quality of life (QoL and awareness of elderly about various government schemes and social security legislations. Materials and Methods: Data was collected by house to house survey among participants aged 60 years and above using a structured interview schedule. The QoL was assessed using Kannada version of WHOQOL-BREF instrument following language validation. Results: Mean age of 206 participants was 69.6±6.7 years. Half of them were males and majority were graduates 54 (26.2%. Morbidity was present among 194 (94.2% participants (95% CI 89.5-98.9%, most common being hypertension 96 (46.6%. Morbid conditions were seen more among less educated (P = 0.007. Only 68 (33% were under medical insurance coverage, 17 (8.3% were under old age government pension and 74 (35.9% were under retirement pension scheme. Social relationships, psychological health and environmental domain scores were associated with socio-economic status. Social relationship domain score was significantly better among well educated participants and those without morbidities. Level of ambulation was significantly associated with QoL scores in all domains (P < 0.001. Majority of the participants 132 (64.1% had moderate level of awareness about government facilities for senior citizens. Awareness level was significantly better among males (P < 0.001, well educated (P < 0.001, better socio-economic status respondents (P < 0.001 and those currently working (P = 0.026. Conclusion: Health status of elderly needs improvement which would also improve their QoL. Awareness about various government schemes needs to be enhanced to improve its utilization. The results of this study are expected to help policy makers in planning comprehensive services for elderly residing in this area.

  5. Do prostate cancer patients want to choose their own radiation treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol-Geerdink, Julia J. van; Stalmeier, Peep F.M.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Schimmel, Erik C.; Huizenga, Henk; Daal, Wim A.J. van; Leer, Jan-Willem

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate whether prostate cancer patients want to be involved in the choice of Radiation dose, and which patients want to be involved. Methods and Materials: This prospective study involved 150 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. A decision aid was used to explain the effects of two alternative radiation doses (70 and 74 Gy) in terms of cure and side effects. Patients were then asked whether they wanted to choose their treatment (accept choice), or leave the decision to the physician (decline choice). The treatment preference was carried out. Results: Even in this older population (mean age, 70 years), most patients (79%) accepted the option to choose. A lower score on the designations Pre-existent bowel morbidity, Anxiety, Depression, Hopelessness and a higher score on Autonomy and Numeracy were associated with an increase in choice acceptance, of which only Hopelessness held up in multiple regression (p < 0.03). The uninformed participation preference at baseline was not significantly related to choice acceptance (p = 0.10). Conclusion: Uninformed participation preference does not predict choice behavior. However, once the decision aid is provided, most patients want to choose their treatment. It should, therefore, be considered to inform patients first and ask participation preferences afterwards

  6. Likelihood Estimation of the Systemic Poison-Induced Morbidity in an Adult North Eastern Romanian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Lionte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acute exposure to a systemic poison represents an important segment of medical emergencies. We aimed to estimate the likelihood of systemic poison-induced morbidity in a population admitted in a tertiary referral center from North East Romania, based on the determinant factors. Methodology: This was a prospective observational cohort study on adult poisoned patients. Demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics were recorded in all patients. We analyzed three groups of patients, based on the associated morbidity during hospitalization. We identified significant differences between groups and predictors with significant effects on morbidity using multiple multinomial logistic regressions. ROC analysis proved that a combination of tests could improve diagnostic accuracy of poison-related morbidity. Main findings: Of the 180 patients included, aged 44.7 ± 17.2 years, 51.1% males, 49.4% had no poison-related morbidity, 28.9% developed a mild morbidity, and 21.7% had a severe morbidity, followed by death in 16 patients (8.9%. Multiple complications and deaths were recorded in patients aged 53.4 ± 17.6 years (p .001, with a lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score upon admission and a significantly higher heart rate (101 ± 32 beats/min, p .011. Routine laboratory tests were significantly higher in patients with a recorded morbidity. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a GCS < 8, a high white blood cells count (WBC, alanine aminotransferase (ALAT, myoglobin, glycemia and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP are strongly predictive for in-hospital severe morbidity. Originality: This is the first Romanian prospective study on adult poisoned patients, which identifies the factors responsible for in-hospital morbidity using logistic regression analyses, with resulting receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Conclusion: In acute intoxication with systemic poisons, we identified several clinical and laboratory variables

  7. Morbidity, including fatal morbidity, throughout life in men entering adult life as obese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between obesity in adults and excess morbidity and mortality is well established, but the health impact throughout adult life of being obese in early adulthood needs elucidation. We investigated somatic morbidity, including fatal morbidity, throughout adulthood in men starting adult life as obese. METHODS: Among 362,200 Danish young men, examined for military service between 1943 and 1977, all obese (defined as BMI≥31.0 kg/m(2, and, as controls, a random 1% sample of the others was identified. In the age range of 18-25 years, there were 1,862 obese, which encompass the men above the 99.5 percentile, and 3,476 controls. Information on morbidity was obtained via national registers. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative morbidity assessed as first incidence of disease, occurrence of disease in the year preceding death and prevalent disease at time of death. RESULTS: From age 18 through 80 years the obese had an increased risk of becoming diseased by or die from a broad range of diseases. Generally, the incidence of first event, occurrence in the year prior to death, and prevalence at time of death showed the same pattern. As an example, the relative hazard of type 2 diabetes was constant throughout life at 4.9 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 4.1-5.9, 5.2 (95% CI: 3.6-7.5, and 6.8 (95% CI: 4.6-10.1, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings strongly support the continued need to avoid beginning adult life as obese, as obese young men experience an increased morbidity, including fatal morbidity, from many diseases throughout life.

  8. Adapting the Surgical Apgar Score for Perioperative Outcome Prediction in Liver Transplantation: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C. S. Pearson, MD

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions. The SAS-LT utilized simple intraoperative metrics to predict early morbidity and mortality after liver transplant with similar accuracy to other scoring systems at an earlier postoperative time point.

  9. Pilot validation of objective malnutrition—inflammation scores in pediatric and adolescent cohort on chronic maintenance dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca M Iorember

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recognition of the challenges inherent with the use of single-item indices for the diagnosis of malnutrition–inflammation morbidity in pediatric dialysis patients, to enhance accuracy, we validated a composite scoring system in a pilot study. The objective malnutrition—inflammation score seeks to validate the use of a composite scoring system as a tool for assessing malnutrition—inflammation burden in a pediatric dialysis population. Methods: We enrolled 20 patients on hemodialysis (n = 14 and peritoneal dialysis (n = 6 over a period of 12 months. We derived composite scores from selected indices of renal pathology, nutrition, dialysis adequacy, protein catabolism, and dialysis modality. We assessed reliability by a test–retest method and measured validity by defining the relationship of the indices with serum C-reactive protein in a multiple regression analysis. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision for the malnutrition—inflammation score. Results: The mean age was 12.8 years (standard deviation = 6.1, and male–female ratio was 12:8. Patients (n = 8 with elevated serum C-reactive protein (>0.3 mg/dL had higher composite score for malnutrition—inflammation morbidity. Similarly, the pediatric cohort on hemodialysis had higher score than those on peritoneal dialysis. Upon reliability testing, a low value of typical error (0.07 and high correlation coefficient (r = 0.95 supported validity of the instrument. Moreover, multiple regression analysis showed a strong predictive relationship (R2 = 0.9, p = 0.03 between the indices and serum C-reactive protein. Sensitivity of malnutrition—inflammation score was 62.5%, specificity was 83%, accuracy was 75%, and precision was 71%. Conclusion: Using criterion-validation method, we established the potential use of multi-diagnostic approach to quantify malnutrition—inflammation morbidity in a pediatric dialysis cohort

  10. Stroke scores and CT scan in ascertaining type of stroke. | Salawu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke, a major cause of morbidity and mortality is on the increase in Nigeria, routine Computerized Tomography (CT) for all Nigerians with stroke is not available to most doctors, and this poses management problems. We compared two available clinical scores with brain CT for the differential diagnosis of ...

  11. Morbidity and mortality of local failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Whitmore, R.B. III; Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Ladaga, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed our experience with morbidity and mortality associated with clinical local failure after definitive therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate by interstitial 125-iodine implantation, external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. Morbid complications included unilateral ureteral obstruction; bladder obstruction and/or incontinence requiring treatment by transurethral resection, or placement of a urethral or suprapubic catheter; hematuria requiring intervention for clot evacuation or fulguration, and perineal and/or pelvic pain. Lethal complications included bilateral ureteral obstruction or bowel obstruction. We treated 108 patients with 125-iodine, 178 with external beam radiotherapy and 67 with radical prostatectomy. Clinical local failure occurred in 26 per cent of the 125-iodine, 17 per cent of the external beam radiotherapy and 12 per cent of the radical prostatectomy groups. The total incidence of local failure with 125-iodine was statistically higher than for radical prostatectomy. Stage C and poorly differentiated tumors were associated with a statistically higher incidence of local failure compared to lower stage and grade tumors. However, within each stage and grade there was no significant difference in local failure between treatment modalities. There was negligible morbidity or mortality secondary to local failure associated with stage A2, stage B1 or well differentiated tumors regardless of treatment modality. There was no difference in the morbidity and mortality between treatment modalities for stage C or poorly differentiated tumors. However, for stage B2 or moderately differentiated tumors treated by 125-iodine implantation there was a statistically greater incidence of morbidity and mortality than that associated with external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy

  12. Radiation therapy for Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Takeshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Toshihide; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Kumiko; Masuda, Gota

    2000-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is frequently found in association with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report on radiotherapy for patients with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital. Between April 1991 and May 1997, radiotherapy was given to 11 lesions in eight men with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma to relieve their symptoms. The lesions involved the head and neck region, the legs, and the gastrointestinal tract. Radiotherapy was carried out with 4-MV photon through parallel opposed field or high energy electrons. Total doses ranged from 20 to 38 Gy, with a median of 30 Gy, delivered in 2- to 3-Gy fractions. Four patients were given other treatments prior to the radiotherapy. Acute reaction was evaluated according to the modified acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiotherapy had relieved the symptoms in all patients at completion of this therapy. Lesions that involved the hard palate and vocal cords had completely disappeared. The lesions that received radiotherapy were controlled without symptoms until the patients died. Patients who had the head and neck region treated exhibited severe acute mucosal reaction (at a dose of 30 Gy, there was grade 2 morbidity by modified RTOG criteria, in two patients, and grade 3 in three patients) although the radiation therapy was completed for these patients. Radiotherapy promises a favorable outcome for symptom relief in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. (author)

  13. Diagnosis trajectories of prior multi-morbidity predict sepsis mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Mette Kristina; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Nielsen, Annelaura Bach

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis affects millions of people every year, many of whom will die. In contrast to current survival prediction models for sepsis patients that primarily are based on data from within-admission clinical measurements (e.g. vital parameters and blood values), we aim for using the full disease histo...... of disease history to scoring based on within-admission clinical measurements emphasizing the value of long term data in novel patient scores that combine the two types of data.......Sepsis affects millions of people every year, many of whom will die. In contrast to current survival prediction models for sepsis patients that primarily are based on data from within-admission clinical measurements (e.g. vital parameters and blood values), we aim for using the full disease history...... recurrent trajectories of time-ordered co-morbidities had significantly increased sepsis mortality compared to those who did not follow a trajectory. We identified trajectories which significantly altered sepsis mortality, and found three major starting points in a combined temporal sepsis network: Alcohol...

  14. Relationship of personal hygiene with nutrition and morbidity profile: A study among primary school children in South Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deb Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Majority of the health problems affecting school children are preventable by promotion of hygienic practices through proper health education by the teachers, who are the first contacts. Objectives: The study was undertaken to find out the status of nutrition and personal hygiene among primary school children and their association with their varied morbidity profiles. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted in a primary school situated in the largest slum of Kolkata. Results: The participants included 103 boys and 81 girls, with a mean age of 6.2 years. The mean personal hygiene score of the girls (4.15 ± 0.98 was significantly higher than that of boys (3.2 ± 1.4 [P<0.05]. Most of the boys (54.37% and girls (74.07% were normally nourished as per the CDC growth chart. Over 70% of the children were suffering from one or more morbidities, the most common morbidity in both the sexes being pallor, followed by worm infestation. Personal hygiene scores were significantly higher (P<0.05 among those children who were normally nourished as well as those who did not suffer from any morbidity in the last 15 days. Conclusions: Care should be taken to improve the pitiable state of personal hygiene and poor sanitary practices of these school children through coordinated and concerted health education measures by teachers as well as parents.

  15. STUDY ON PSYCHIATRIC CO - MORBIDITY IN PSORIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is relatively common , chronic inflammatory and hyper - proliferative skin disease that affects 1.4% to 2.0% of the population. Presence of itching , chronic recurrent course of disease and incomplete cure may contribute to great deal of psychiatric co - morbidity in these patients. the most persuasive indications of a link between stress and psoriasis comes from patients themselves , with studies illustrating that the majority of patients believe that stress or psychological distress is a factor in the manifestations of their condition . Depression and anxiety are the most common disorders that are associated with psoriasis , but the proportion of patient also having other psychiatric co - morbid diseases which include social phobia , generalize anxiety disorder , panic disorder , psychotic diso rder , etc. Moreover , symptoms of psoriasis , especially pruritus , are related to depression. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate different psychiatric illnesses their prevalence and severity in psoriasis patients. METHODOLOGY : This was cross - sectional observational stu dy comprised of 70 consecutive patients of psoriasis attending the out - patient department of Dermatology. All the patients were subjected to detailed examinations including the elicitation of dermatological and psychiatric profile after getting written con sent for study . Data was collected using self - developed , pre tested , semi structured Pro format by interview method. RESULTS : The profile of psychiatric diagnoses obtained in the present study depressive disorder 31.4% {18.57% depression , 12.85% Depression with anxiety symptoms} , anxiety disorder 25.7% (7.14% GAD , 8.17% panic disorder , 5.71% social phobia , 4.28 specific phobia. Severity of major depressive disorder was determined with HAM - D score 53.8% had mild depression , 30.7% moderate depression and 15. 5% severe depression. Similarly when HAM - A scale was used to determined severity of generalized

  16. Measuring Biological Age via Metabonomics: The Metabolic Age Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Johannes; Friedrich, Nele; Wittfeld, Katharina; Pietzner, Maik; Budde, Kathrin; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Lohmann, Tobias; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Grabe, Hans Jörgen

    2016-02-05

    Chronological age is one of the most important risk factors for adverse clinical outcome. Still, two individuals at the same chronological age could have different biological aging states, leading to different individual risk profiles. Capturing this individual variance could constitute an even more powerful predictor enhancing prediction in age-related morbidity. Applying a nonlinear regression technique, we constructed a metabonomic measurement for biological age, the metabolic age score, based on urine data measured via (1)H NMR spectroscopy. We validated the score in two large independent population-based samples by revealing its significant associations with chronological age and age-related clinical phenotypes as well as its independent predictive value for survival over approximately 13 years of follow-up. Furthermore, the metabolic age score was prognostic for weight loss in a sample of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery. We conclude that the metabolic age score is an informative measurement of biological age with possible applications in personalized medicine.

  17. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of revised trauma score in poly- traumatized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H.N.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prognostic value and reliability of revised trauma score (RTS) in polytraumatized patients. Subjects and Methods: Thirty adult patients of road traffic accidents sustaining multisystem injuries due to high energy blunt trauma were managed according to the protocols of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) and from their first set of data RTS was calculated. Score of each patient was compared with his final outcome at the time of discharge from the hospital. Results: The revised trauma score was found to be a reliable predictor of prognosis of polytraumatized patients but a potentially weak predictor for those patients having severe injury involving a single anatomical region. The higher the RTS the better the prognosis of polytrauma patient and vice versa. Revised trauma score <8 turned out to be an indicator of severe injury with high mortality and morbidity and overall mortality in polytraumatized patients was 26.66%. However, RTS-6 was associated with 50% mortality. Conclusion: The revised trauma score is a reliable indicator of prognosis of polytraumatized patients. Therefore, it can be used for field and emergency room triage. (author)

  19. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis

  20. Scoring system predictive of survival for patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kress Marie-Adele S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment option for liver tumors. This study evaluated outcomes after SBRT to identify prognostic variables and to develop a novel scoring system predictive of survival. Methods The medical records of 52 patients with a total of 85 liver lesions treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-four patients had 1 lesion; 27 had 2 or more. Thirteen lesions were primary tumors; 72 were metastases. Fiducials were placed in all patients prior to SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 30 Gy (range, 16 – 50 Gy in a median of 3 fractions (range, 1–5. Results With median follow-up of 11.3 months, median overall survival (OS was 12.5 months, and 1 year OS was 50.8%. In 42 patients with radiographic follow up, 1 year local control was 74.8%. On univariate analysis, number of lesions (p = 0.0243 and active extralesional disease (p  Conclusions SBRT offers a safe and feasible treatment option for liver tumors. A prognostic scoring system based on the number of liver lesions, activity of extralesional disease, and KPS predicts survival following SBRT and can be used as a guide for prospective validation and ultimately for treatment decision-making.

  1. Heartburn during sleep: a clinical marker of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, F; Madalosso, C A S; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Gurski, R R

    2009-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and morbid obesity are entities with increasing prevalence. New clinical strategies are cornerstones for their management. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartburn during sleep (HDS) and whether this symptom predicts the presence of objective GORD parameters and increased heartburn perception in morbidly obese patients. Ninety-one consecutive morbidly obese patients underwent clinical evaluation, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and oesophageal pH monitoring. HDS was characterized when patients replied positively to the question, 'Does heartburn wake you from sleep?'. A General Score for Heartburn (GSH) ranging between 0 and 5 was assessed with the question 'How bad is your heartburn?'. HDS was reported by 33 patients (36%). More patients with HDS had abnormal acid contact time or reflux oesophagitis than patients without HDS (94%vs 57%, P heartburn preceded by acid reflux in diurnal (39%vs 9%; P heartburn. HDS occurs in a significant minority of patients with morbid obesity and has high positive predictive value for GORD. Symptomatic reflux during the sleep seems to be a marker of increased heartburn perception in this population.

  2. The importance of extreme weight percentile in postoperative morbidity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stey, Anne M; Moss, R Lawrence; Kraemer, Kari; Cohen, Mark E; Ko, Clifford Y; Lee Hall, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    Anthropometric data are important indicators of child health. This study sought to determine whether anthropometric data of extreme weight were significant predictors of perioperative morbidity in pediatric surgery. This was a cohort study of children 29 days up to 18 years of age undergoing surgical procedures at participating American College of Surgeons' NSQIP Pediatric hospitals in 2011 and 2012. The primary outcomes were composite morbidity and surgical site infection. The primary predictor of interest was weight percentile, which was divided into the following categories: ≤5(th) percentile, 6(th) to 94(th), or ≥95(th) percentile. A hierarchical multivariate logistic model, adjusting for procedure case mix, demographic, and clinical patient characteristic variables, was used to quantify the relationship between weight percentile category and outcomes. Children in the ≤5th weight percentile had 1.19-fold higher odds of overall postoperative morbidity developing than children in the nonextreme range (95% CI, 1.10-1.30) when controlling for clinical variables. Yet these children did not have higher odds of surgical site infection developing. Children in the ≥95(th) weight percentile did not have a significant increase in overall postoperative morbidity. However, they were at 1.35-fold increased odds of surgical site infection compared with those in the nonextreme range when controlling for clinical variables (95% CI, 1.16-1.57). Both extremely high and extremely low weight percentile scores can be associated with increased postoperative complications after controlling for clinical variables. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-morbid disorders in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette Marinette Monique

    2013-01-01

    in persons with TS. Both in clinical cohorts and in population-based cohorts the prevalence of co-morbidities is high. The presence of co-morbid ADHD and/or OCD has an impact on psychosocial, educational, and neuropsychological consequences of TS and it is associated with higher rates of other co......-morbid disorders, like rage, anxiety, and conduct disorders. The symptoms of a co-morbid disorder might appear prior to the time that tics reach clinical attention. The TS phenotype probably changes during the course of the disease. The exact aetiology of the co-occurrence of co-morbid disorders and TS...

  4. Pretreatment clinical findings predict outcome for patients receiving preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Singh, Anurag; Birnbaum, Elisa H.; Fry, Robert D.; Fleshman, James W.; Kodner, Ira J.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Picus, Joel; Walz, Bruce J.; Read, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Background: As a sole modality, preoperative radiation for rectal carcinoma achieves a local control comparable to that of postoperative radiation plus chemotherapy. Although the addition of chemotherapy to preoperative treatment improves the pathologic complete response rate, there is also a substantial increase in acute and perioperative morbidity. Identification of subsets of patients who are at low or high risk for recurrence can help to optimize treatment. Methods: During the period 1977-95, 384 patients received preoperative radiation therapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Ages ranged from 19 to 97 years (mean 64.4), and there were 171 females. Preoperative treatment consisted of conventionally fractionated radiation to 3600-5040 cGy (median 4500 cGy) 6-8 weeks before surgery in 293 cases or low doses of <3000 cGy (median 2000 cGy) immediately before surgery in 91 cases. Concurrent preoperative chemotherapy was given to only 14 cases in this study period. Postoperative chemotherapy was delivered to 55 cases. Results: Overall 93 patients have experienced recurrence (including 36 local failures). Local failures were scored if they occurred at any time, not just as first site of failure. For the group as a whole, the actuarial (Kaplan-Meier) freedom from relapse (FFR) and local control (LC) were 74% and 90% respectively at 5 years. Univariate analysis of clinical characteristics demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) adverse effect on both LC and FFR for the following four clinical factors: (1) location <5 cm from the verge, (2) circumferential lesion, (3) near obstruction, (4) tethered or fixed tumor. Size, grade, age, gender, ultrasound stage, CEA, radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy were not associated with outcome. Background of the surgeon was significantly associated with outcome, colorectal specialists achieving better results than nonspecialist surgeons. We assigned a clinical score of 0 to 2 on the basis of how many of the above four

  5. Co-morbidity in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    for the clinic to be able to recognize such co-morbidities. Areas covered: This is a review of studies investigating and discussing co-morbidities of psoriasis and screening. Literature was retrieved by searching on the PubMed database using individual and combined search terms related to relevant co...

  6. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  7. Risk score for first-screening of prevalent undiagnosed chronic kidney disease in Peru: the CRONICAS-CKD risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio A; Muñoz-Retamozo, Paola V; Smeeth, Liam; Checkley, William; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-11-29

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) represents a great burden for the patient and the health system, particularly if diagnosed at late stages. Consequently, tools to identify patients at high risk of having CKD are needed, particularly in limited-resources settings where laboratory facilities are scarce. This study aimed to develop a risk score for prevalent undiagnosed CKD using data from four settings in Peru: a complete risk score including all associated risk factors and another excluding laboratory-based variables. Cross-sectional study. We used two population-based studies: one for developing and internal validation (CRONICAS), and another (PREVENCION) for external validation. Risk factors included clinical- and laboratory-based variables, among others: sex, age, hypertension and obesity; and lipid profile, anemia and glucose metabolism. The outcome was undiagnosed CKD: eGFR anemia were strongly associated with undiagnosed CKD. In the external validation, at a cut-off point of 2, the complete and laboratory-free risk scores performed similarly well with a ROC area of 76.2% and 76.0%, respectively (P = 0.784). The best assessment parameter of these risk scores was their negative predictive value: 99.1% and 99.0% for the complete and laboratory-free, respectively. The developed risk scores showed a moderate performance as a screening test. People with a score of ≥ 2 points should undergo further testing to rule out CKD. Using the laboratory-free risk score is a practical approach in developing countries where laboratories are not readily available and undiagnosed CKD has significant morbidity and mortality.

  8. Immediate and long-term relationship between severe maternal morbidity and health-related quality of life: a prospective double cohort comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Noor Norhayati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the growing interest in severe maternal morbidity (SMM, the need to assess its effects on quality of life is pressing. The objective of this study was to compare the quality of life scores between women with and without SMM at 1-month and 6-month postpartum in Kelantan, Malaysia. Methods A prospective double cohort study design was applied at two tertiary referral hospitals over a 6-month period. The study population included all postpartum women who delivered in 2014. Postpartum women with and without SMM were selected as the exposed and non-exposed groups, respectively. For each exposed case identified, a non-exposed case with a similar mode of delivery was selected. The main outcome measures used were scores from the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12. Results The study measured 145 exposed and 187 non-exposed women. The group-time interaction of the repeated measure analysis of variance (RM ANOVA showed no significant difference in the mean overall SF-12 physical component summary score changes (P = 0.534 between women with and without SMM. Similarly, the group-time interaction of the RM ANOVA showed no significant difference in the mean overall SF-12 mental component summary score changes (P = 0.674 between women with and without SMM. However, women with SMM scored significantly lower on a general health perceptions subscale at 1-month (P = 0.031, role limitations due to physical health subscale at 6-month (P = 0.019, vitality subscale at 1-month (P = 0.007 and 6-month (P = 0.008, and role limitations due to emotional problems subscales at 6-month (P = 0.008. Conclusions Women with severe maternal morbidity demonstrated comparable quality of life during the 6-month postpartum period compared to women without severe maternal morbidity.

  9. Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Warninghoff, Jan C; Bayer, Otmar; Ferrari, Uta; Straube, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases have so far not been investigated systematically. Thus, it is still unclear whether the different vertigo syndromes (e.g. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease (MD), vestibular migraine and phobic vertigo (PPV)) have also different spectrums of co-morbidities. Methods All patients from a cohort of 131 participants were surveyed using a standardised questionnaire about the co-morbidities hypertension, diabetes ...

  10. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  11. Psychiatric morbidity in oral lichen planus: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Ranjan Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical types and association of psychological factors in patients with Oral Lichen Planus (OLP. Materials and Methods: An analytical age- and sex-matched study involved 30 patients with oral lichen planus (group 1 and 30 control subjects (group 2. We applied the following psychometric tests to both groups: General Health Questionnaire (GHQ and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Results: The patients with OLP were found to exhibit statistically significant higher anxiety, insomnia, and social dysfunction with the tests that were used (GHQ 24 and HADS than the control group (P > 0.05. The study group likewise exhibited greater depression and somatic symptoms. The mean total of the GHQ and HAD scores were found to be higher in the study group than in the controls (P > 0.05. Among the various types of OLP, patients with the erosive type had higher mean scores for anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and depression. Conclusion: In most patients psychiatric morbidity was strongly associated with OLP, which could support its role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. The higher scores of the General Health Questionnaire and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale gave an insight into the hypothesis that psychological factors are associated with the causation of OLP.

  12. Parthenium dermatitis severity score to assess clinical severity of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K Verma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parthenium dermatitis is the most common type of airborne contact dermatitis in India. It is a chronic disease of a remitting and relapsing course with significant morbidity and distress, but there is no scoring system to assess its severity. Aim: To design a scoring system for the assessment of clinical severity of disease in Parthenium dermatitis and to use this scoring system in various studies to determine its sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. Methods and Results: In our first few studies on Parthenium dermatitis, we designed and used a basic clinical severity scoring system based on itching, morphology of the lesions, and areas involved. However, in subsequent studies, we modified it to the present scoring system as Parthenium dermatitis severity score (PDSS. Our studies showed the high sensitivity of PDSS in characterization of the disease severity at the given point of time, as well as to determine the efficacy of a prescribed treatment modality which was reliable and reproducible. Conclusion: Thus, PDSS may be used by clinicians for appropriate scoring of the clinical severity of Parthenium dermatitis and in monitoring the disease response to therapy.

  13. Radiation therapy for Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebara, Takeshi [Municipal Kanbara General Hospital, Fujikawa, Shizuoka (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Toshihide; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Kumiko; Masuda, Gota

    2000-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is frequently found in association with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report on radiotherapy for patients with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital. Between April 1991 and May 1997, radiotherapy was given to 11 lesions in eight men with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma to relieve their symptoms. The lesions involved the head and neck region, the legs, and the gastrointestinal tract. Radiotherapy was carried out with 4-MV photon through parallel opposed field or high energy electrons. Total doses ranged from 20 to 38 Gy, with a median of 30 Gy, delivered in 2- to 3-Gy fractions. Four patients were given other treatments prior to the radiotherapy. Acute reaction was evaluated according to the modified acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiotherapy had relieved the symptoms in all patients at completion of this therapy. Lesions that involved the hard palate and vocal cords had completely disappeared. The lesions that received radiotherapy were controlled without symptoms until the patients died. Patients who had the head and neck region treated exhibited severe acute mucosal reaction (at a dose of 30 Gy, there was grade 2 morbidity by modified RTOG criteria, in two patients, and grade 3 in three patients) although the radiation therapy was completed for these patients. Radiotherapy promises a favorable outcome for symptom relief in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. (author)

  14. Maternal morbid obesity and obstetric outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to review pregnancy outcomes in morbidly obese women who delivered a baby weighing 500 g or more in a large tertiary referral university hospital in Europe. METHODS: Morbid obesity was defined as a BMI > or =40.0 kg\\/m2 (WHO). Only women whose BMI was calculated at their first antenatal visit were included. The obstetric out-comes were obtained from the hospital\\'s computerised database. RESULTS: The incidence of morbid obesity was 0.6% in 5,824 women. Morbidly obese women were older and were more likely to be multigravidas than women with a normal BMI. The pregnancy was complicated by hypertension in 35.8% and diabetes mellitus in 20.0% of women. Obstetric interventions were high, with an induction rate of 42.1% and a caesarean section rate of 45.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that maternal morbid obesity is associated with an alarmingly high incidence of medical complications and an increased level of obstetric interventions. Consideration should be given to developing specialised antenatal services for morbidly obese women. The results also highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of prepregnancy interventions in morbidly obese women.

  15. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J; Ravelli, Anita C J

    2015-08-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score score score matching analysis was performed with matching on multiple maternal baseline covariates (maternal age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, parity, year of birth, and preexistent diseases). Each MAR pregnancy was matched to three SC controls. Relative to SC, the MAR singletons had an increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes including Apgar score score matching, the risk of an Apgar score Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Morbidity related to axillary irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentzen, S.M.; Dische, S. [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood (United Kingdom). The Marie Curie Research Wing

    2000-07-01

    Some of the most debilitating morbidity after surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer is related to treatment of the axilla. This includes persistent arm lymphoedema, impaired shoulder mobility and brachial plexopathy. Considerable research efforts have been carried out on the radiation pathogenesis and the clinical radiobiology of these clinical endpoints, which has enabled their severity and incidence to be minimized. It is clear that the radiation dose-response relationships for these late endpoints are very steep. In other words, even small changes in the exact dose fractionation and physical dose distribution can cause major changes in toxicity. In particular, in many treatment schedules dose fractions larger than 2 Gy have been used without a sufficient reduction in total dose to avoid increased late effects. This is important, as much of the available literature reports side effects after suboptimal dose-fractionation schedules of side effects guaranteed and the locoregional lymphanot representative of what can be achieved using modern radiotherapy. An interesting parallelism to the problems encountered in reviewing historical experience is found in the British breast litigation, the current status of which is presented in this article. Furthermore, morbidity after radiotherapy is strongly influenced by concomitant surgery and/or chemotherapy, and this should be allowed for when designing the overall treatment. Apart from other therapeutic modalities, it has been suggested that other exogenous factors have an influence on the risk of radiotherapy-related morbidity. However, patients' age and, in the case of lymphoedema, also obesity are the only factors that have been established with some certainty. Routine adjustment of radiotherapy dose in these cases is not recommended. Two current developments may strengthen the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Sentinel node biopsy may allow nodal staging without major surgical excision of

  17. Mortality Risk from Co-Morbidities independent of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Status: NCI SEER-based Cohort Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Sarwar, Amna; Magge, Anil; Braithwaite, Dejana; Cook, Linda S.; Gregorio, David I.; Jones, Beth A; Hoag, Jessica; Gonsalves, Lou; Salner, Andrew; Zarfos, Kristen; Andemariam, Biree; Stevens, Richard G; Dugan, Alicia; Pensa, Mellisa; Brockmeyer, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A comparatively high prevalence of co-morbidities among African-American/Blacks (AA/B) has been implicated in disparate survival in breast cancer. There is a scarcity of data, however, if this effect persists when accounting for the adverse triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype which occurs at three-fold the rate in AA/B compared to white breast cancer patients. Methods We reviewed charts of 214 white and 202 AA/B breast cancer patients in the NCI-SEER Connecticut Tumor Registry who were diagnosed in 2000-07. We employed the Charlson Co-Morbidity Index (CCI), a weighted 17-item tool to predict risk of death in cancer populations. Cox Survival Analyses estimated hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality in relation to TNBC and CCI adjusting for clinicopathological factors. Results Among patients with SEER-Local Stage, TNBC increased the risk of death (HR=2.18, 95% CI 1.14-4.16), which was attenuated when the CCI score was added to the model (Adj. HR=1.50, 95% CI 0.74-3.01). Conversely, the adverse impact of the CCI score persisted when controlling for TNBC (Adj. HR=1.49, 95% CI 1.29-1.71; per one point increase). Similar patterns were observed in SEER-Regional Stage but estimated HRs were lower. AA/B patients with a CCI score of ≥3 had a significantly higher risk of death compared to AA/B patients without comorbidities (Adj. HR=5.65, 95% CI 2.90-11.02). A lower and non-significant effect was observed for whites with a CCI of ≥3 (Adj. HR=1.90, 95% CI 0.68-5.29). Conclusions Co-morbidities at diagnosis increase risk of death independent of TNBC, and AA/B patients may be disproportionately at risk. PMID:27000206

  18. Self-reported skin morbidity in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Zarchi, Kian; Ellervik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Skin diseases are thought to be common in the general population. In 2004, a cross-sectional study in Norway, using a validated questionnaire for 18,770 individuals, revealed a high prevalence of skin diseases in the general population. To describe the prevalence of self-reported skin morbidities...... questionnaire. In total, 17.2% self-reported skin complaints. The most prominent self-reported skin complaint was itch with an overall prevalence of 6.5%. The skin morbidity most influenced by age was pimples. There was a uniform pattern showing fewer skin complaints with increasing education. Women reported...... skin morbidities more frequently than men. Participants in employment reported fewer skin morbidities compared to unemployed participants. Skin morbidities in Denmark are common, and the distribution of prevalence estimates in the Danish population parallel those of the Norwegian population, although...

  19. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy ± hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a 25 (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) ≤ 25% vs. 60% for %V 25 > 25% (p 1 ≤ 40% vs. 44% for %V 1 > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V 25 > 25% and %V 1 > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively

  20. Morbidity of repeat transsphenoidal surgery assessed in more than 1000 operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Han, Sung Won; Zygourakis, Corinna C; Han, Seunggu J; Tran, Mai T; Miller, Liane M; Tom, Maxwell W; Kunwar, Sandeep; Blevins, Lewis S; Aghi, Manish K

    2014-07-01

    OBJECT.: While transsphenoidal surgery is associated with low morbidity, the degree to which morbidity increases after reoperation remains unclear. The authors determined the morbidity associated with repeat versus initial transsphenoidal surgery after 1015 consecutive operations. The authors conducted a 5-year retrospective review of the first 916 patients undergoing transsphenoidal surgery at their institution after a pituitary center of expertise was established, and they analyzed morbidities. The authors analyzed 907 initial and 108 repeat transsphenoidal surgeries performed in 916 patients (9 initial surgeries performed outside the authors' center were excluded). The most common diagnoses were endocrine inactive (30%) or active (36%) adenomas, Rathke's cleft cysts (10%), and craniopharyngioma (3%). Morbidity of initial surgery versus reoperation included diabetes insipidus ([DI] 16% vs 26%; p = 0.03), postoperative hyponatremia (20% vs 16%; p = 0.3), new postoperative hypopituitarism (5% vs 8%; p = 0.3), CSF leak requiring repair (1% vs 4%; p = 0.04), meningitis (0.4% vs 3%; p = 0.02), and length of stay ([LOS] 2.8 vs 4.5 days; p = 0.006). Of intraoperative parameters and postoperative morbidities, 1) some (use of lumbar drain and new postoperative hypopituitarism) did not increase with second or subsequent reoperations (p = 0.3-0.9); 2) some (DI and meningitis) increased upon second surgery (p = 0.02-0.04) but did not continue to increase for subsequent reoperations (p = 0.3-0.9); 3) some (LOS) increased upon second surgery and increased again for subsequent reoperations (p surgery (p = 0.3) but went on to increase upon subsequent reoperations (p = 0.001-0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that operation number, but not sex, age, pathology, radiation therapy, or lesion size, increased the risk of CSF leak, meningitis, and increased LOS. Separate analysis of initial versus repeat transsphenoidal surgery on the 2 most common benign pituitary lesions

  1. Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warninghoff, Jan C; Bayer, Otmar; Ferrari, Uta; Straube, Andreas

    2009-07-07

    Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases have so far not been investigated systematically. Thus, it is still unclear whether the different vertigo syndromes (e.g. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease (MD), vestibular migraine and phobic vertigo (PPV)) have also different spectrums of co-morbidities. All patients from a cohort of 131 participants were surveyed using a standardised questionnaire about the co-morbidities hypertension, diabetes mellitus, BMI (body mass index), migraine, other headache, and psychiatric diseases in general and the likelihood of a depression in particular. We noted hypertension in 29.0% of the cohort, diabetes mellitus in 6.1%, migraine in 8.4%, other headache in 32.1%, psychiatric diseases in 16.0%, overweight and obesity in 33.6% and 13.7% respectively, as well as a clinical indication for depression in 15.9%. In general, we did not detect an increased prevalence of the co-morbidities diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, migraine, other headache and obesity compared to the general population. There was an increased prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with PPV, and the prevalence of hypertension was elevated in patients with MD.

  2. Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Uta

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-morbidities of vertiginous diseases have so far not been investigated systematically. Thus, it is still unclear whether the different vertigo syndromes (e.g. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, Meniere's disease (MD, vestibular migraine and phobic vertigo (PPV have also different spectrums of co-morbidities. Methods All patients from a cohort of 131 participants were surveyed using a standardised questionnaire about the co-morbidities hypertension, diabetes mellitus, BMI (body mass index, migraine, other headache, and psychiatric diseases in general and the likelihood of a depression in particular. Results We noted hypertension in 29.0% of the cohort, diabetes mellitus in 6.1%, migraine in 8.4%, other headache in 32.1%, psychiatric diseases in 16.0%, overweight and obesity in 33.6% and 13.7% respectively, as well as a clinical indication for depression in 15.9%. Conclusion In general, we did not detect an increased prevalence of the co-morbidities diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, migraine, other headache and obesity compared to the general population. There was an increased prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with PPV, and the prevalence of hypertension was elevated in patients with MD.

  3. Quality of Life in Chronic Pancreatitis is Determined by Constant Pain, Disability/Unemployment, Current Smoking, and Associated Co-Morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Jorge D; Amann, Stephen T; Anderson, Michelle A; Abberbock, Judah; Sherman, Stuart; Conwell, Darwin L; Cote, Gregory A; Singh, Vikesh K; Lewis, Michele D; Alkaade, Samer; Sandhu, Bimaljit S; Guda, Nalini M; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Tang, Gong; Baillie, John; Brand, Randall E; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Forsmark, Christopher E; Banks, Peter A; Slivka, Adam; Wilcox, C Mel; Whitcomb, David C; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2017-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) has a profound independent effect on quality of life (QOL). Our aim was to identify factors that impact the QOL in CP patients. We used data on 1,024 CP patients enrolled in the three NAPS2 studies. Information on demographics, risk factors, co-morbidities, disease phenotype, and treatments was obtained from responses to structured questionnaires. Physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS, respectively) scores generated using responses to the Short Form-12 (SF-12) survey were used to assess QOL at enrollment. Multivariable linear regression models determined independent predictors of QOL. Mean PCS and MCS scores were 36.7±11.7 and 42.4±12.2, respectively. Significant (Ppancreatic morphology, diabetes, exocrine insufficiency, and prior endotherapy/pancreatic surgery had no significant independent effect on QOL. Constant pain, pain-related disability/unemployment, current smoking, and concurrent co-morbidities significantly affect the QOL in CP. Further research is needed to identify factors impacting QOL not explained by our analyses.

  4. Necrotizing soft-tissue infection: Laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing soft tissue infections score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI can be rapidly progressive and polymicrobial in etiology. Establishing the element of necrotizing infection poses a clinical challenge. A 64-year-old diabetic patient presented to our hospital with a gangrenous patch on anterior abdominal wall, which progressed to an extensive necrotizing lesion within 1 week. Successive laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing softtissue infections (LRINEC scores confirmed the necrotizing element. Cultures yielded Enterococci, Acinetobacter species and Apophysomyces elegans and the latter being considered as an emerging agent of Zygomycosis in immunocompromised hosts. Patient was managed with antibiotics, antifungal treatment and surgical debridement despite which he succumbed to the infection. NSTI′s require an early and aggressive management and LRINEC score can be applied to establish the element of necrotizing pathology. Isolation of multiple organisms becomes confusing to establish the etiological role. Apophysomyces elegans, which was isolated in our patient is being increasingly reported in cases of necrotizing infections and may be responsible for high morbidity and mortality. This scoring has been proposed as an adjunct tool to Microbiological diagnosis when NSTI′s need to be diagnosed early and managed promptly to decrease mortality and morbidity, which however may not come in handy in an immunocompromised host with polymicrobial aggressive infection.

  5. The role of marshall and rotterdam score in predicting 30-day outcome of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahaan, A. M. P.; Akbar, T. Y. M.; Nasution, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, especially in the young population. To predict the outcome of TBI, Marshall, and Rotterdam–CT Scan based scoring was mostly used. As many studies showed conflicting results regarding of the usage of both scoring, this study aims to determine the correlation between Rotterdam and Marshall scoring system with outcome in 30 days and found correlation among them. In 120 subjects with TBI that admitted to Adam Malik General Hospital, we found a significant association of both scorings with the 30-day Glasgow Outcome Score. Therefore, we recommend the use of Marshall and Rotterdam CT Score in initial assessment as a good predictor for patients with TBI.

  6. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cögen, Etem Emre; Tombul, Temel; Yildirim, Gökhan; Odabas, Faruk Omer; Sayin, Refah

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78 +/- 12.23 years compared to 61.01 +/- 15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity.

  7. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindley, Andrew; Zain, Zakiyah; Wood, Lisa; Whitehead, Anne; Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected

  8. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindley, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.hindley@lthtr.nhs.uk [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Zain, Zakiyah [College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Kedah (Malaysia); Wood, Lisa [Department of Social Sciences, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Whitehead, Anne [Medical and Pharmaceutical Statistics Research Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  9. The reliability of the McCabe score as a marker of co-morbidity in healthcare-associated infection point prevalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J S; Coignard, B; Price, L; Godwin, J; Cairns, S; Hopkins, S; Lyytikäinen, O; Hansen, S; Malcolm, W; Hughes, G J

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the reliability of the McCabe score in a healthcare-associated infection point prevalence survey.   A 10 European Union Member States survey in 20 hospitals (n = 1912) indicated that there was a moderate level of agreement (κ = 0.57) with the score. The reliability of the application of the score could be increased by training data collectors, particularly with reference to the ultimately fatal criteria. This is important if the score is to be used to risk adjust data to drive infection prevention and control interventions.

  10. Outcome prediction in gastroschisis - The gastroschisis prognostic score (GPS) revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligandla, Pramod S; Baird, Robert; Skarsgard, Eric D; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2017-05-01

    The GPS enables risk stratification for gastroschisis and helps discriminate low from high morbidity groups. The purpose of this study was to revalidate GPS's characterization of a high morbidity group and to quantify relationships between the GPS and outcomes. With REB approval, complete survivor data from a national gastroschisis registry was collected. GPS bowel injury scoring was revalidated excluding the initial inception/validation cohorts (>2011). Length of stay (LOS), 1st enteral feed days (dFPO), TPN days (dTPN), and aggregate complications (COMP) were compared between low and high morbidity risk groups. Mathematical relationships between outcomes and integer increases in GPS were explored using the entire cohort (2005-present). Median (range) LOS, dPO, and dTPN for the entire cohort (n=849) was 36 (26,62), 13 (9,18), and 27 (20,46) days, respectively. High-risk patients (GPS≥2; n=80) experienced significantly worse outcomes than low risk patients (n=263). Each integer increase in GPS was associated with increases in LOS and dTPN by 16.9 and 12.7days, respectively (pGPS effectively discriminates low from high morbidity risk groups. Within the high risk group, integer increases in GPS produce quantitatively differentiated outcomes which may guide initial counseling and resource allocation. IIb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Morbid obese adults increased their sense of coherence 1 year after a patient education course: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagermoen MS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available May Solveig Fagermoen,1 Glenys Hamilton,2 Anners Lerdal1,3 1Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2GAH Consulting, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Research, Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Oslo, Norway Background: Personal factors are key elements to understand peoples' health behavior. Studies of such factors are important to develop targeted interventions to improve health. The main purpose of this study is to explore sense of coherence (SOC in a sample of persons with morbid obesity before and after attending a patient education course and to explore the association between SOC and sociodemographic and other personal factors. Methods: In this longitudinal purposely sampled study, the participants completed questionnaires on the first day of the course and 12 months after course completion. Sixty-eight participants had valid scores on the selected variables at follow-up: SOC, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. Relationships were assessed with correlation analyses and paired and independent samples t-tests and predictors with linear regression analyses. Results: From baseline to follow-up, the total SOC score and the subdimension scores comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness all increased significantly. At both time points, the SOC scores were low compared to the general population but similar to scores in other chronically ill. At baseline, a multivariate analysis showed that older age, having paid work, and higher self-esteem were directly related to higher total SOC score after controlling for other sociodemographic factors and the participants' level of self-efficacy. Multivariate analyses of the relationship between baseline predictors of SOC at 12-month follow-up, controlling for baseline SOC scores or sociodemographic or personal factors, revealed that none of these variables independently predicted SOC scores at follow-up. Conclusion: The total SOC score and its

  12. Topical betamethasone for prevention of radiation dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidvari Shapour

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although acute radiation dermatitis (ARD is a common side-effect of radiotherapy (RT, currently there is no general consensus about its prevention or treatment of choice. Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether prophylactic use of topical betamethasone 0.1% can prevent ARD caused by chest wall irradiation. Methods: Fifty-one patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer and were going to receive RT, were randomly assigned to receive topical betamethasone 0.1%, petrolatum or none during RT. The frequency and severity of ARD (measured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria were recorded at the end of each week during RT and two weeks after its completion. Clinical outcomes were analyzed by relevant statistical methods. Results: All patients developed some degree of ARD, the frequency and severity of which increased with time and reached the maximum at the end of the seventh week for all groups. Patients receiving betamethasone had less severe ARD than the other two groups throughout the course of the study, but this difference was significant only at the end of the third week (p =0.027. No significant difference was observed between the petrolatum and control arms. Conclusion: Prophylactic and ongoing use of topical betamethasone 0.1% during chest wall RT for breast cancer delays occurrence of ARD but does not prevent it. Petrolatum has no effect on the prevention of ARD in these patients.

  13. Topical betamethasone for prevention of radiation dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Saboori, Hojjatollah; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Jowkar, Farideh; Namaz, Soha

    2007-01-01

    Although acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is a common side-effect of radiotherapy (RT), currently there is no general consensus about its prevention or treatment of choice. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether prophylactic use of topical betamethasone 0.1% can prevent ARD caused by chest wall irradiation. Fifty-one patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer and were going to receive RT, were randomly assigned to receive topical betamethasone 0.1%, petrolatum or none during RT. The frequency and severity of ARD (measured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria) were recorded at the end of each week during RT and two weeks after its completion. Clinical outcomes were analyzed by relevant statistical methods. All patients developed some degree of ARD, the frequency and severity of which increased with time and reached the maximum at the end of the seventh week for all groups. Patients receiving betamethasone had less severe ARD than the other two groups throughout the course of the study, but this difference was significant only at the end of the third week (p = 0.027). No significant difference was observed between the petrolatum and control arms. Prophylactic and ongoing use of topical betamethasone 0.1% during chest wall RT for breast cancer delays occurrence of ARD but does not prevent it. Petrolatum has no effect on the prevention of ARD in these patients.

  14. Chromosome painting in biological dosimetry: Semi-automatic system to score stable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sagredo, J.M.; Vallcorba, I.; Sanchez-Hombre, M.C.; Ferro, M.T.; San Roman Cos-Gayon, C.; Santos, A.; Malpica, N.; Ortiz, C.

    1997-01-01

    From the beginning of the description of the procedure of chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it was thought its possible application to score induced chromosomal aberrations in radiation exposition. With chromosome painting it is possible to detect changes between chromosomes that has been validated in radiation exposition. Translocation scoring by FISH, contrarily to the unstable dicentrics, mainly detect stable chromosome aberrations that do not disappear, it allows the capability of quantify delayed acute expositions or chronic cumulative expositions. The large number of cells that have to be analyzed for high accuracy, specially when dealing with low radiation doses, makes it almost imperative to use an automatic analysis system. After validate translocation scoring by FISH in our, we have evaluated the ability and sensitivity to detect chromosomal aberrations by chromosome using different paint probes used, showing that any combination of paint probes can be used to score induced chromosomal aberrations. Our group has developed a FISH analysis that is currently being adapted for translocation scoring analysis. It includes systematic error correction and internal control probes. The performance tests carried out show that 9,000 cells can be analyzed in 10 hr. using a Sparc 4/370. Although with a faster computer, a higher throughput is expected, for large population screening or very low radiation doses, this performance still has to be improved. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging versus Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation II score in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Wei; Zhang Xiaoming; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin; Pan Huashan; Feng Zhisong; Xu Xiaoxue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between established magnetic resonance (MR) imaging criteria of disease severity in acute pancreatitis and the Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, and to assess the utility of each prognostic indicators in acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: In this study there were 94 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), all had abdominal MR imaging. MR findings were categorized into edematous and necrotizing AP and graded according to the MR severity index (MRSI). The APACHE II score was calculated within 24 h of admission, and local complications, death, duration of hospitalization and ICU were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to determine their correlation. Results: In patients with pancreatitis, no significant correlation can be found between the APACHE II score and the MRSI score (P = 0.196). The MRSI score correlated well with morbidity (P = 0.006) but not with mortality (P = 0.137). The APACHE II score correlated well with mortality (P = 0.002) but not with the morbidity (P = 0.112). The MRSI score was superior to the APACHE II score as a predictor of the length of hospitalization (r = 0.52 vs. r = 0.35). A high MRSI and APACHE II score correlated with the need for being in the intensive care unit (ICU) (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: In patients with pancreatitis, MRSI is superior to APACHE II in assessing local complications from pancreatitis but has a limited role in determining systemic complications in which the APACHE II score excels.

  16. Early Contralateral Shoulder-Arm Morbidity in Breast Cancer Patients Enrolled in a Randomized Trial of Post-Surgery Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Adriaenssens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Shoulder/arm morbidity is a common complication of breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy (RT, but little is known about acute contralateral morbidity. Methods Patients were 118 women enrolled in a RT trial. Arm volume and shoulder mobility were assessed before and 1–3 months after RT. Correlations and linear regression were used to analyze changes affecting ipsilateral and contralateral arms, and changes affecting relative interlimb differences (RID. Results Changes affecting one limb correlated with changes affecting the other limb. Arm volume between the two limbs correlated (R = 0.57. Risk factors were weight increase and axillary dissection. Contralateral and ipsilateral loss of abduction strongly correlated (R = 0.78. Changes of combined RID exceeding 10% affected the ipsilateral limb in 25% of patients, and the contralateral limb in 18%. Aromatase inhibitor therapy was significantly associated with contralateral loss of abduction. Conclusions High incidence of early contralateral arm morbidity warrants further investigations.

  17. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.; Krieger, H.

    1978-01-01

    Data have been obtained by a genetic-epidemiological survey of a population living in the State of Espirito Santo (Brazil), and subjected to mean levels of natural radiation, per locality, ranging from 7 to 133 μrad/hr. Multiple regression models have been applied to the data, and the results showed no detectable effect of natural radiation on the sex ratio at birth, on the occurrence of congenital anomalies, and on the numbers of pregnancy terminations, stillbirths, livebirths, and post-infant mortality in the children, as well as fecundity and fertility of the couples (these observations contradict some data from the literature, based on official records and without analyses of the concomitant effects of other variables). However, nonsignificant results cannot be considered as disproving harmful effects of natural radiation on mortality and morbidity. These results may simply mean that other causes of mortality and morbidity are so important, under the conditions of the study, that the contribution of low-level, chronic natural radiation is made negligible. (author)

  18. Women's experience of maternal morbidity: a qualitative analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meaney, S

    2016-07-01

    Maternal morbidity refers to pregnancy-related complications, ranging in severity from acute to chronic. In Ireland one in 210 maternities will experience a severe morbidity. Yet, how women internalize their experience of morbidity has gone largely unexplored. This study aimed to explore women\\'s experiences of maternal morbidity.

  19. The association between gender and pediatric respiratory morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shmuel, Atar; Sheiner, Eyal; Wainstock, Tamar; Landau, Daniella; Vaknin, Flear; Walfisch, Asnat

    2018-06-26

    To evaluate the association between newborn gender and the risk for later pediatric respiratory morbidity. A population based cohort analysis was performed by comparing the risk of long-term respiratory morbidity (until 18 years of age) according to gender. Respiratory morbidity included hospitalizations involving pneumonia, asthma, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), influenza, and bronchiectasis. Deliveries occurred between the years 1991 and 2014 in a tertiary medical center. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed to compare cumulative respiratory morbidity. A Cox proportional hazards model controlled for confounders. During the study period 240 953 newborns met the inclusion criteria. Among them, 118 113 were females (49.0%) and 122 840 were males (51.0%). During the 18 years of follow-up, 13 719 (5.7%) different newborns were hospitalized with respiratory related morbidity. Males had significantly higher rates of respiratory morbidity as compared with females (6.4% vs 4.9% respectively, P respiratory morbidity (log rank P respiratory morbidity while adjusting for gestational age, birthweight, and other confounders (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.25-1.34, P respiratory morbidity, independent of obstetrical characteristics such as gestational age and birthweight. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Are ENT surgeons in the UK at risk of stress, psychological morbidities and burnout? A national questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijendren, Ananth; Yung, Matthew; Shiralkar, Uttam

    2018-02-01

    Work-related stress, psychological disorders and burnout are common occupational disorders affecting UK doctors. To date, there are no studies looking at these psychosocial morbidities amongst ENT surgeons worldwide. The General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory (aMBI) were incorporated into a questionnaire on occupational diseases amongst ENT surgeons and distributed to the entire membership of ENT-UK. The survey study also acquired demographic data on grade of respondent, years of experience in ENT and subspecialty interest. We received 108 (8.1% response rate) appropriately filled GHQ-12 and 121 (9.0% response rate) aMBI questionnaires. 61 respondents (56.5%) on the GHQ-12 were at high risk of developing stress and psychological morbidity and 35 (28.9%) had high enough aMBI scores to suggested burnout. When comparing scores of both GHQ-12 and aMBI with grade of respondent, years of experience in ENT and subspecialty, statistical difference was only found on the risk of stress and psychiatric disorders amongst paediatric ENT surgeons (7 high risk vs 0 low risk, p = 0.02), however the number of these respondents was small (7 in total). Both questionnaires had been validated for use within our population. We found high incidence rates of stress and psychological morbidity (56.5%) and a burnout prevalence rate of 28.9% amongst our responding cohort of UK Oto-rhino-laryngologists. No meaningful differences were found between stress, psychological morbidity and burnout with grade of ENT surgeon, years of experience in ENT and subspecialty within ENT. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tombul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Odabas, F.O.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+9-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  2. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tmbul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  3. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  4. Recipient characteristics and morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, Sumeet K; Saracino, Giovanna; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Gonzales, Stevan; Kim, Peter T; McKenna, Greg J; Klintmalm, Goran; Trotter, James

    2018-02-15

    Over the last decade, liver transplantation of sicker, older non-hepatitis C cirrhotics with multiple co-morbidities has increased in the United States. We sought to identify an easily applicable set of recipient factors among HCV negative adult transplant recipients associated with significant morbidity and mortality within five years after liver transplantation. We collected national (n = 31,829, 2002-2015) and center-specific data. Coefficients of relevant recipient factors were converted to weighted points and scaled from 0-5. Recipient factors associated with graft failure included: ventilator support (five patients; hazard ratio [HR] 1.59; 95% CI 1.48-1.72); recipient age >60 years (three patients; HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.23-1.36); hemodialysis (three patients; HR 1.26; 95% CI 1.16-1.37); diabetes (two patients; HR 1.20; 95% CI 1.14-1.27); or serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dl without hemodialysis (two patients; HR 1.15; 95% CI 1.09-1.22). Graft survival within five years based on points (any combination) was 77.2% (0-4), 69.1% (5-8) and 57.9% (>8). In recipients with >8 points, graft survival was 42% (model for end-stage liver disease [MELD] score recipients receiving grafts from donors with a donor risk index >1.7. In center-specific data within the first year, subjects with ≥5 points (vs. 0-4) had longer hospitalization (11 vs. 8 days, p need to be reassessed. The proposed clinical tool may be helpful for center-specific assessment of risk of graft failure in non-HCV patients and for discussion regarding relevant morbidity in selected subsets. Over the last decade, liver transplantation of sicker, older patient with multiple co-morbidities has increased. In this study, we show that a set of recipient factors (recipient age >60 years, ventilator status, diabetes, hemodialysis and creatinine >1.5 mg/dl) can help identify patients that may not do well after transplant. Transplanting sicker organs in patients with certain combinations of these

  5. The Influence of Co-Morbidity and Other Health Measures on Dental and Medical Care Use among Medicare beneficiaries 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John; Manski, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of co-morbidity and other health measures on the use of dental and medical care services among the community-based Medicare population with data from the 2002 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Methods A co-morbidity index is the main independent variable of our study. It includes oral cancer as a co-morbidity condition and was developed from Medicare claims data. The two outcome variables indicate whether a beneficiary had a dental visit during the year and whether the beneficiary had an inpatient hospital stay during the year. Logistic regressions estimated the relationship between the outcome variables and co-morbidity after controlling for other explanatory variables. Results High scores on the co-morbidity index, high numbers of self-reported physical limitations, and fair or poor self-reported health status were correlated with higher hospital use and lower dental care utilization. Similar results were found for other types of medical care including medical provider visits, outpatient care, and prescription drugs. A multiple imputation technique was used for the approximate 20% of the sample with missing claims, but the resulting co-morbidity index performed no differently than the index constructed without imputation. Conclusions Co-morbidities and other health status measures are theorized to play either a predisposing or need role in determining health care utilization. The study’s findings confirm the dominant role of these measures as predisposing factors limiting access to dental care for Medicare beneficiaries and as need factors producing higher levels of inpatient hospital and other medical care for Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:21972460

  6. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  7. Factors associated with IQ scores in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, L.L.; Nesbit, M.E. Jr.; Sather, H.N.; Meadows, A.T.; Ortega, J.A.; Hammond, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    To identify factors which might be associated with intellectual function following treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 50 long-term survivors were studied using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised. All patients were diagnosed between 1972 and 1974 and were treated on a single clinical trial protocol with identical induction and maintenance chemotherapy plus central nervous system prophylaxis that included cranial radiation. The mean full scale IQ score for the group was 95 (SEM 2.0), with mean verbal IQ of 94.4 and mean performance IQ of 96.9. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included female sex (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ), longer duration of chemotherapy (in performance IQ), and younger age at the time of radiation (in both verbal IQ and full-scale IQ). The age at the time of radiation was found to be significantly correlated with discrepancy between verbal and performance IQ, with younger age being associated with verbal IQ scores higher than performance IQ scores. When analyses were performed within specific subgroups of patients defined by sex and age at the time of radiation, dose of cranial radiation, concomitant intrathecal methotrexate therapy, and duration of therapy were all found to be correlated with a lower level of intellectual function. These preliminary findings provide direction for future studies to help identify high-risk patients

  8. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score

  9. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  10. Noise reduction technology reduces radiation dose in chronic total occlusions percutaneous coronary intervention: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccagni, Davide; Benincasa, Susanna; Bellini, Barbara; Candilio, Luciano; Poletti, Enrico; Carlino, Mauro; Colombo, Antonio; Azzalini, Lorenzo

    2018-03-23

    Chronic total occlusions (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with high radiation dose. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of the implementation of a noise reduction technology (NRT) on patient radiation dose during CTO PCI. A total of 187 CTO PCIs performed between February 2016 and May 2017 were analyzed according to the angiographic systems utilized: Standard (n = 60) versus NRT (n = 127). Propensity score matching (PSM) was performed to control for differences in baseline characteristics. Primary endpoints were Cumulative Air Kerma at Interventional Reference Point (AK at IRP), which correlates with patient's tissue reactions; and Kerma Area Product (KAP), a surrogate measure of patient's risk of stochastic radiation effects. An Efficiency Index (defined as fluoroscopy time/AK at IRP) was calculated for each procedure. Image quality was evaluated using a 5-grade Likert-like scale. After PSM, n = 55 pairs were identified. Baseline and angiographic characteristics were well matched between groups. Compared to the Standard system, NRT was associated with lower AK at IRP [2.38 (1.80-3.66) vs. 3.24 (2.04-5.09) Gy, p = 0.035], a trend towards reduction for KAP [161 (93-244) vs. 203 (136-363) Gycm 2 , p = 0.069], and a better Efficiency Index [16.75 (12.73-26.27) vs. 13.58 (9.92-17.63) min/Gy, p = 0.003]. Image quality was similar between the two groups (4.39 ± 0.53 Standard vs. 4.34 ± 0.47 NRT, p = 0.571). In conclusion, compared with a Standard system, the use of NRT in CTO PCI is associated with lower patient radiation dose and similar image quality.

  11. Co-morbidities in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma represent a minority of the total asthma population, but carry a majority of the morbidity and healthcare costs. Achieving better asthma control in this group of patients is therefore of key importance. Systematic assessment of patients with possible severe asthma...... to identify treatment barriers and triggers of asthma symptoms, including co-morbidities, improves asthma control and reduces healthcare costs and is recommended by international guidelines on management of severe asthma. This review provides the clinician with an overview of the prevalence and clinical...... impact of the most common co-morbidities in severe asthma, including chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, dysfunctional breathing, vocal cord dysfunction, anxiety and depression, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD...

  12. Morbidity and GH deficiency: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, K.; Laursen, T.; Green, A.

    2008-01-01

    identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. Method: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO......Objective: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Design: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  13. Neuropsychological function in individuals with morbid obesity: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargénius, Hanna L; Lydersen, Stian; Hestad, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown cognitive dysfunction to be present in a significant number of individuals with obesity. The objective of this study was to assess the neuropsychological profile of morbidly obese patients referred to weight-loss treatment. An extensive battery of neuropsychological tests with well-known normative data covering various cognitive domains was administered to 96 patients. The test results were transformed to z-scores for comparisons with normative data. As a means of determining level of cognitive impairment within the group, deficit scores were applied. Group comparisons on the different cognitive domains were conducted between patients with depressive symptoms and patients reporting no such symptoms. As illustrated in mean z-scores, the patients demonstrated lower performance compared to normative data on visual memory (mean -.26, CI -.43 to -.09, p  = .003), speed of information processing (mean -.22, CI -.34 to -.09, p  = .001), executive functions (mean -.28, CI -.40 to -.16, p  ability, motor function, and working memory. The deficit scores, however, revealed working memory and motor function to be significantly impaired within the group as well. Patients with depressive symptoms differed from patients without such symptoms on visual memory (mean .43, CI .07 to .80, p  = .021). Some characteristic cognitive weaknesses and strengths were evident at the group level, although pronounced variation was observed. Deficits in executive functions, information processing, and attention should be taken into consideration in clinical practice.

  14. Effects of symptoms of co-morbid psychopathology on challenging behaviours among infants and toddlers with Autistic Disorder and PDD-NOS as assessed with the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L; Mahan, Sara; Fodstad, Jill C; Worley, Julie A; Neal, Daniene; Sipes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether level of symptoms of co-morbid psychopathology exacerbated challenging behaviours in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Using the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT)-Part 2 which measures co-morbid symptoms and the BISCUIT- Part 3 which examines challenging behaviours, 362 infants and toddlers with ASD were evaluated. Findings showed that participants scoring high on symptoms of Avoidance and Tantrum/Conduct problems had greater rates of aggressive/destructive behaviours, self-injurious behaviours (SIB) and stereotypies compared to those with low scores. Participants with high levels of Inattention/Impulsivity or Eat/Sleep concerns, compared to those with low levels, demonstrated greater aggressive/destructive behaviour and stereotypies. For symptoms of Anxiety/Repetitive Behaviours, participants with high scores displayed greater levels of stereotypies. Symptoms of co-morbid psychopathology are present at a very early age for children with ASD and elevated levels of these symptoms may exacerbate challenging behaviours.

  15. Serum cortisol values, superior vena cava flow and illness severity scores in very low birth weight infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Miletin, J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent evidence suggests that high cortisol concentrations are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Neonatal illness severity and mortality risk scores are reliable in predicting morbidity and mortality. The objectives were (i) to assess the correlation between serum cortisol levels and clinical assessment of multi-organ dysfunction\\/illness severity scores (CRIB II, SNAPPE-II and neonatal multiple organ dysfunction score (NEOMOD)) in first 24 h in VLBW infants and (ii) to assess the relationship between surrogates of end organ blood flow and serum cortisol levels. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective observational cohort study. Neonates with birth weight <1500 g were eligible for enrollment. Echocardiography evaluation of superior vena cava (SVC) flow was carried out in the first 24 h life. Cortisol levels were measured simultaneously and appropriate clinical scores were calculated. RESULT: A total of 54 VLBW neonates were enrolled following parental consent. Two patients were excluded because of congenital malformations. In 14 babies the cortisol value was not simultaneously obtained. The mean birth weight was 1.08 kg, mean gestational age was 27.8 weeks. There was a significant correlation between cortisol and NEOMOD score (P=0.006). There was no correlation between cortisol and CRIB II score (P=0.34), SVC flow (P=0.49) and mean arterial blood pressure respectively (P=0.35). CONCLUSION: There was no correlation between SVC flow and cortisol values or between cortisol and mean blood pressure values. There was a significant correlation between cortisol levels and neonatal organ dysfunction score evaluated suggesting that stressed VLBW infants do mount a cortisol response.

  16. Morbidity before and after the Diagnosis of Hyperthyroidism: A Nationwide Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Almind, Dorthe; Christensen, Kaare; Green, Anders; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism has been linked with different morbidities, like atrial fibrillation, stroke and diabetes mellitus. However, our knowledge regarding the extent and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and other diseases is fragmented. Here, we aimed at evaluating various morbidities before and after the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. Methods Observational cohort study. From nationwide Danish health registers 2631 hyperthyroid singletons and 375 twin pairs discordant for hyperthyroidism were identified and followed for an average of 6 years (range 0–13). Data on the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, diabetes mellitus, rheumatic diseases and malignant diseases was obtained by person-to-person record linkage with the National Danish Patient Register and/or the Danish National Prescription Registry (lung diseases and diabetes mellitus). Logistic and Cox regression models were used to assess the risk of morbidity before and after the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, respectively. All Cox regression analyses were adjusted for the degree of co-morbidity preceding the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, using the Charlson score. Results Hyperthyroid individuals had a significantly higher risk of being diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases (odds ratio (OR) 1.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.45–1.87), lung diseases (OR 1.53; 95% CI: 1.29–1.60), and diabetes mellitus (OR 1.43, 95% CI: 1.20–1.72), but not with malignant diseases (OR 1.16, 95% CI: 0.99–1.36) prior to the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. After the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, subjects had a significantly higher risk of being diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases (hazard ratio (HR) 1.34; 95% CI: 1.15–1.56), lung diseases (HR 1.28; 95% CI: 1.10–1.49), and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.46; 95% CI: 1.16–1.84), but not with rheumatic diseases (HR 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92–2.09) or malignant diseases (HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.97–1.42). Conclusions We demonstrate a significantly increased

  17. Thromboxane production in morbidly obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Francesca; Biasucci, Luigi M; Cialdella, Pio; Liuzzo, Giovanna; Giubilato, Simona; Della Bona, Roberta; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Iaconelli, Amerigo; Mingrone, Geltrude; Crea, Filippo

    2011-06-01

    Postmortem studies have demonstrated that morbidly obese subjects, surprisingly, have less coronary atherosclerosis than obese subjects. However, the reasons for this apparent protection from atherosclerosis are not yet clear. Thromboxane A2, a marker of platelet activation, is greater in obese subjects than in lean subjects, and this might be a clue to their increased cardiovascular risk. However, data on thromboxane A2 in morbidly obese subjects are lacking; therefore, we hypothesized that lower levels of thromboxane A2 in morbidly obese subjects might play a role in their lower atherothrombotic burden. We measured the serum levels of thromboxane B2 (TxB2), a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and leptin in 17 lean subjects (body mass index [BMI] 22.9 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)), 25 obese subjects (BMI 32.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)), and 23 morbidly obese subjects (BMI 48.6 ± 7.1 kg/m(2)), without insulin resistance, diabetes, or overt cardiovascular disease. The serum TxB2 levels were lower in the lean subjects than in the obese subjects (p = 0.046) and in the morbidly obese subjects than in the lean and obese subjects (p = 0.015 and p lean subjects (hs-CRP, p lean subjects (p lean subjects, suggesting that reduced platelet activation could play a role in the paradoxical protection of morbidly obese subjects from atherosclerosis, despite the greater levels of leptin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.A.; Czerski, P.A.; Stuchly, M.A.; Mild, K.H.; Sheppard, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    High-level radiofrequency radiation is a source of thermal energy that carries all of the known implications of heating for biological systems, including burns, temporary and permanent changes in reproduction, cataracts, and death. In general, no changes in chromosomes, DNA or the reproductive potential of animals exposed to RF radiation have been reported in the absence of significant rises in temperature, though there are limited data on DNA and chromosomal changes at non-thermal levels. Human data are currently limited and do not provide adequate information about the relationship between prolonged low-level RF radiation exposure and increased mortality or morbidity, including cancer incidence. In epidemiological studies and clinical reports of RF effects in man, the problems of quantification are numerous and include uncertainties about ''dose'', health effects, latent periods, dose-response relationships, and interactions with other physical or chemical agents. 228 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Quality of life in morbid obesity Calidad de vida en la obesidad mórbida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Poves Prim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: morbid obesity (MO is a chronic disease that is reaching epidemic proportions and becoming an increasing health problem in developed countries. Obesity-related comorbidities reduce both the quality and expectancy of life. Objectives: to validate the GIQLI (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index test as a reliable and effective tool for the evaluation of quality of life in morbidly obese patients. Patients and methods: the GIQLI test is made up of 36 individually scored items, the addition of which give up a final score. A higher score correlates with a better quality of life. Items can be separated into five groups or dimensions: digestive symptoms, emotional status, effects of treatment, and physical as well as social dysfunction. The GIQLI test was administered to a randomized sample of 1990 morbidly obese patients who fulfilled the indication criteria for bariatric surgery, and to a control group of 100 healthy individuals with no known medical, functional or psychiatric disease. Overall test and specific dimension scores were evaluated for each group. Results: overall test and specific dimension scores were significantly lower in patients with MO when compared to the control group. The overall GIQLI score decreased as age increased, as did the number of associated comorbidities. Conclusions: the GIQLI test proved to be a rather useful tool to evaluate quality of life in morbidly obese patients. These patients present a poorer quality of life not only because of the presence of digestive symptoms but also because of their emotional, physical, and social status.Introducción: la obesidad mórbida (OM es una enfermedad crónica que alcanza dimensiones epidémicas en los países desarrollados. La OM suele acompañarse de enfermedades graves asociadas que provocan una menor expectativa y peor calidad de vida. Objetivos: validar el cuestionario GIQLI (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index como herramienta fiable y eficaz en la

  20. Alvarado score: A valuable clinical tool for diagnosis of acute appendicitis –a retros-pective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Brahmachari1 and Ashwini B. Jajee2

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is a common surgical emergency and diagnosis is still a great challenge. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention re-duces morbidity and mortality. The present study was conducted to evaluate Alvarado scoring system for diagnosis of acute appen-dicitis in Indian set up. The study was carried out on 200 patients admitted in Surgery ward between January 2009 and December 2010 with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Alvarado score was calculated and all patients were divided in three groups. Mean age of presentation was 29.12 years and male to female ratio was 1.27:1. Higher the Alvarado score, more is the sensitivity. So pa-tients having score 7 or above had sensitivity of 66%. We con-clude that Alvarado score is unique since it incorporates signs, symptoms and laboratory findings of suspicious patients. Alvarado score can be utilized safely for diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  1. Etiology, clinical profile, severity and outcome of acute pancreatitis in relation to bed side index for severity of acute pancreatitis bisap and CT severity index [CTSI] scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezwada Srinivasa Rao, Matta SreeVani, V.Sarat Chandra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreas with involvement of regional tissues or remote organ systems and with potentially devastating consequences. Early prediction of outcome of acute pancreatitis within 24 hrs by clinically based bed Side Index of Severity of Acute Pancreatitis [BISAP] Score and radiological based CT Severity Index [CTSI] later on being useful in initiation of early treatment, assessing severity, to prevent morbidity and mortality. In those who survive, it can progress to chronic pancreatitis resulting in malabsorption and permanent diabetes. Aim: The aim was to study aetiology, clinical profile, severity, outcome of acute pancreatitis in relation to BISAP Score and CTSI. Materials and Methods: This was an observational and prospective study. The present study enrolled 55 patients who were diagnosed as acute pancreatitis and patients with chronic pancreatitis were excluded from the study. Vital data like pulse rate, blood Pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, conscious level using Glasgow coma scale, serum amylase, lipase, Chest x-ray, US abdomen and CT abdomen [both CECT & NCCT] were done. BISAP Score was obtained at the time of presentation or within 24 hours of presentation and radiological based CT Severity Index [CTSI] was calculated using the Balthazar grading system and Necrosis Scoring system to assess the severity, morbidity and mortality. The results: In this study, the most common aetiology being alcohol intake followed by gall stones. BISAP Score 3 had organ dysfunction and Score 4 had 100% mortality. The relation between CTSI score and Organ dysfunction showed increased organic dysfunction and higher mortality with higher CTSI Scores. p value < 0.0001 was calculated using Pearson Chi-square test and found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: Both BISAP and CTSI scores had positive correlation with morbidity and mortality.

  2. Maternal morbidities affect tens of millions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W R

    1994-02-01

    Various separate studies indicate maternal morbidity is more common than had been believed. A Safe Motherhood Survey was conducted in 1993 in the Philippines among 9000 women, as part of efforts to study women's language and perceptions about pregnancy and symptoms of morbidity. In El Salvador, interviews were conducted among 2000 women on morbidity issues. Preliminary results from a Family Health International (FHI) five-country survey of 16,000 women revealed that 7 out of every 10 women reported a health problem related to maternity or chronic conditions stemming from pregnancy or childbirth. Conditions ranged from obstructed labor, complications from unsafe abortions, and bacterial infections, to anemia, hemorrhage, and eclampsia. The quality of care determines whether the health problems are life threatening. Less serious morbidity cases involve fatigue or back pain, which is exacerbated by poor nutrition and hard physical labor. Other reproductive morbidities are sexually transmitted diseases, side effects from contraceptives, and general gynecological problems. The FHI results from Ghana, Indonesia, and Egypt showed 240-300 morbidities for every maternal death; maternal mortality worldwide is estimated at 500,000 annually. A study of fistula (an injury during labor to the vagina and bladder that results in urinary or fecal incontinence) found that Nigerian community norms and limited access to emergency health care were factors. The women reported costs, poor roads, and transportation problems. A study in Ethiopia found that, in an Addis Ababa hospital between 1983-88, 600 fistulas were repaired every year, of which almost 66% occurred at first delivery. A study in Cairo in 1988 found that nearly 6 out of every 10 women reported a prolapsed uterus. Women in the studies were able to talk openly and willingly about their problems, when concepts and language were appropriate and interviewers were trained. A small study in India confirmed the correlation between

  3. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  4. New morbidity of the young

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Biljana

    2002-01-01

    In the present phase of epidemiological transition, the most frequent causes of youth morbidity are disorders in reproductive health, mental disorders and injuries which are not life threatening. This, so-called new youth morbidity, is most often caused by their risky behavior, which in the field of sexuality often leads to unplanned pregnancies and abortions, as well as sexually transmitted infections. Misuse of tobacco, alcohol and narcotics, which is most commonly started in adolescence, h...

  5. Surgical apgar score in patients undergoing lumbar fusion for degenerative spine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Yuan; Huang, Jian-Hao; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar fusion is a procedure broadly performed for degenerative diseases of spines, but it is not without significant morbidities. Surgical Apgar Score (SAS), based on intraoperative blood loss, blood pressure, and heart rate, was developed for prognostic prediction in general and vascular operations. We aimed to examine whether the application of SAS in patients undergoing fusion procedures for degeneration of lumbar spines predicts in-hospital major complications. One hundred and ninety-nine patients that underwent lumbar fusion operation for spine degeneration were enrolled in this retrospective study. Based on whether major complications were present (N=16) or not (N=183), the patients were subdivided. We identified the intergroup differences in SAS and clinical parameters. The incidence of in-hospital major complications was 8%. The duration of hospital stay for the morbid patents was significantly prolonged (p=0.04). In the analysis of multivariable logistic regression, SAS was an independent predicting factor of the complications after lumbar fusion for degenerative spine diseases [p=0.001; odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=0.35 (0.19-0.64)]. Lower scores were accompanied with higher rates of major complications, and the area was 0.872 under the receiver operating characteristic curve. SAS is an independent predicting factor of major complications in patients after fusion surgery for degenerative diseases of lumbar spines, and provides good risk discrimination. Since the scoring system is relatively simple, objective, and practical, we suggest that SAS be included as an indicator in the guidance for level of care after lumbar fusion surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) to liver biopsy histologic scores in the evaluation of chronic liver disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mazhar; Robinson, Charlotte; Owen, David; Yoshida, Eric M; Harris, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) is a novel non invasive technique studying the localized mechanical properties of tissue by utilising short, high intensity acoustic pulses (shear wave pulses) to assess the mechanical response (tissue displacement), providing a measure of tissue elasticity. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of ARFI imaging as a non-invasive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis compared to liver biopsy scores. A prospective blind comparison study of ARFI elastography (Virtual Touch Imaging., ACUSON S2000 Ultrasound Unit, Siemens, Mountain View CA) in a consecutive series of patients who underwent liver biopsy for assessment of fibrosis in chronic liver disease. ARFI shear-wave propagation velocity was measured in meters per second. Mean ARFI velocities were compared with both Batts-Ludwig (F0 to F4) and Modified Ishak scores (F0 to F4) for fibrosis in liver biopsy findings. Twenty-one patients with chronic liver disease (Hepatitis C (HCV) =16, Hepatitis B (HBV) = 1, both HCV and HBV = 1 Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) = 1, others = 2) underwent ARFI and liver biopsy on the same day. The Spearman correlation coefficients between the median values of the ARFI measurements and the histological fibrosis stage of the Modified Ishak score and Batts-Lud- (3) wig score were both highly significant (p shak score in chronic liver disease. It.s accuracy in prediction of severe fibrosis and cirrhosis is maximal in comparison with earlier stages.

  7. Morbidity after neck dissection in head and neck cancer patients : a study describing shoulder and neck complaints, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilgen, Cornelis Paul van

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we are aiming at more insight in morbidity after head and neck cancer treatment (resection of the primary tumour, neck dissection and pre-or post-operative radiation therapy). We will study shoulder complaints and the role of the spinal accessory nerve, pain and the underlying pain

  8. Psychiatric morbidity develops after onset of pediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangsberg Boesen, Magnus; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) affects life at a stage vital for social and educational achievements and psychiatric co-morbidity is common after MS onset. Few studies have examined psychiatric morbidity before MS onset. METHODS: In this nationwide study, detailed case...... with psychiatric morbidity as exposure and MS as outcome, and a matched cohort study with MS as exposure and psychiatric co-morbidity as outcome. Hazard ratios (HR) including 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: We identified 212 children with MS and 1060 controls....... No association between psychiatric morbidity and the rate of MS was found before MS onset. After MS onset, children with MS had two times higher hazard for psychiatric co-morbidity compared with children without MS (HR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3-3.1; pPsychiatric morbidity seems to commence after MS...

  9. Impact of morbid obesity on medical expenditures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arterburn, D E; Maciejewski, M L; Tsevat, J

    2005-03-01

    Morbid obesity (body mass index (BMI) > or =40 kg/m2) is associated with substantially increased morbidity and mortality from chronic health conditions and with poorer health-related quality of life; however, less is known about the impact of morbid obesity on healthcare expenditures. To examine the impact of morbid obesity on healthcare expenditures using a nationally representative sample of US adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 16 262 adults from the 2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of the United States. Per capita healthcare expenditures were calculated for National Institutes of Health BMI categories, based on self-reported height and weight, using a two-part, multivariable model adjusted for age, gender, race, income, education level, type of health insurance, marital status, and smoking status. Odds of incurring any healthcare expenditure and per capita healthcare expenditures associated with morbid obesity in 2000. When compared with normal-weight adults, the odds of incurring any healthcare expenditure in 2000 were two-fold greater among adults with morbid obesity. Per capita healthcare expenditures for morbidly obese adults were 81% (95% confidence interval (CI): 48-121%) greater than normal-weight adults, 65% (95% CI: 37-110%) greater than overweight adults, and 47% (95% CI: 11-96%) greater than adults with class I obesity. Excess costs among morbidly obese adults resulted from greater expenditures for office-based visits, outpatient hospital care, in-patient care, and prescription drugs. Aggregate US healthcare expenditures associated with excess body weight among morbidly obese US adults exceeded $11 billion in 2000. The economic burden of morbid obesity among US adults is substantial. Further research is needed to identify interventions to reduce the incidence and prevalence of morbid obesity and improve the health and economic outcomes of morbidly

  10. Investigation on Down's syndrome in the children living in high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Yongru

    1989-01-01

    After the survey in 1975 and 1979 of Down's syndrome in the children living in high background radiation area, we made a follow-up investigation in 1985 and 1986. All the obtained data are analysed. 25258 children in high background radiation area were examined and 22 children with Down's syndrome were identified, the morbidity rate being 0.87%. 21837 children in control area were examined and four children with Down's syndrome were identified, the morbidity being 0.18%. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups. It was noted that the occurrence of Down's syndrome was related to the maternal age but there was no evidence suggesting a close relationship between high background radiation and the development of Down's syndrome

  11. Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Ding Zhe; Hogg, Annette; Herschtal, Alan; Binns, David; Ball, David L.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, 18 F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. 18 F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

  12. Maternal age and child morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Malene Meisner; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud

    2017-01-01

    the association between maternal age and overall child morbidity according to main diagnosis groups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a national cohort study including 352 027 live firstborn singleton children. The children were born between Jan 1994 and Dec 2009 and followed to Dec 2012. Children were divided...... into groups according to maternal age: 15-24, 25-29, 30-34, and 35+ years. Poisson regression analyses calculated adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of child morbidities according to main diagnoses groups A-Q of the International Classification of Disease 10 with adjustment for year of birth, body mass...... index, smoking, and mother's level of education. RESULTS: Average follow-up time was 11 years. Compared to children born to women 25-29 years, firstborn children to mothers aged 35+ had higher child morbidity in 8 of 19 main diagnosis groups and firstborn children to mothers 15-24 years had higher child...

  13. Evaluation of early postoperative morbidity in pediatric tonsillectomy with the use of sucralfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, André L L; Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Furtado, Paula Lobo; Araújo, Mercedes F S; Olivieira, Carlos A C P

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of sucralfate in alleviating posttonsilectomy morbidity in a pediatric group of patients. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled study comparing the irrigation of a solution containing either 1g of sucralfate (study group) or 1g of lactulose (control group) was performed on 69 children aged 3-12 years, who underwent tonsillectomy at the University Hospital of Brasilia Medical School. The children were randomly assigned and each one used a solution containing sucralfate or lactulose to swish and swallow four times daily during 7 days. Eleven patients were excluded. The anesthetic was standardized and no premedication was used. Pain magnitude using an "Oucher" scale, nausea, vomiting, bleeding, earache, analgesic drug intake, changes in the interincisor teeth distance, and changes in the weight and temperature were assessed by the surgeon 6, 24h, and 7 days after the surgery. Patients in the study group had significantly lower pain scores in the initial 6 postoperative hours (p<0.05). The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant for the other periods following the procedure or on the evaluation of the other indices. The use of the sucralfate in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy was not effective in reducing the postoperative morbidity according to the parameters used in this study. The surgical technique with careful mucosal dissection associated with postoperative caries could be more important in the reduction of posttonsilectomy morbidity.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Reduces Radiation-Induced Morbidity and Improves Health-Related Quality of Life: Results of a Nonrandomized Prospective Study Using a Standardized Follow-Up Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia A.H.; Rietveld, Derek H.F.; Leemans, C. Rene; Slotman, Ben J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with regard to patient-rated xerostomia, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute and late xerostomia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Included were 241 patients with HNSCC treated with bilateral irradiation ± chemotherapy. Since 2000, all patients treated with HNSCC were included in a program, which prospectively assessed acute and late morbidity according to the RTOG and HRQoL on a routine basis at regular intervals. Before October 2004, all patients were treated with 3D-CRT (N = 150). After clinical implementation in October 2004, 91 patients received IMRT. In this study, the differences regarding RTOG toxicity, xerostomia, and other items of HRQoL were analyzed. Results: The use of IMRT resulted in a significant reduction of the mean dose of the parotid glands (27 Gy vs. 43 Gy (p < 0.001). During radiation, Grade 2 RTOG xerostomia was significantly less with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. At 6 months, the prevalence of patient-rated moderate to severe xerostomia and Grade 2 or higher RTOG xerostomia was significantly lower after IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Treatment with IMRT also had a positive effect on several general and head and neck cancer-specific HRQoL dimensions. Conclusions: IMRT results in a significant reduction of patient- and observer-rated xerostomia, as well as other head and neck symptoms, compared with standard 3D-CRT. These differences translate into a significant improvement of the more general dimensions of HRQoL.

  15. Home radiator burns among inner-city children--Chicago, September 1991-April 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-27

    Contact with hot surfaces is a cause of substantial morbidity among children. In 1993, an estimated 1881 children visited emergency departments for treatment of burns related to nonvehicle radiators in the United States. This report summarizes the investigation of radiator burns among children aged 0-19 years living in a Chicago housing project and provides recommendations for preventing radiator burn injuries.

  16. Scoring of treatment-related late effects in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Routledge, Jacqueline; Burns, Meriel; Swindell, Rick; Davidson, Susan E.; Cowan, Richard A.; Logue, John P.; Wylie, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the correlation between different general and organ specific quality of life and morbidity scoring methods in a cohort of men treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Men who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (50 Gy in 16 fractions over 21 days) for localized prostate cancer more than 3 years previously and who had no evidence of recurrent disease were invited to take part in the study. A total of 101 of 135 invited patients agreed and completed LENT/SOMA, UCLA Prostate Cancer Index, and 36 item RAND Health survey questionnaires. Results: The patients had comparable results with other published series with respect to the UCLA and SF-36 indices. There was significant correlation between the corresponding parts of the UCLA and LENT/SOMA scales (P<0.0005). However, for the same symptoms, a patient tended to score lower (worse) on the UCLA scale in comparison to LENT/SOMA. The relationship between the average LENT/SOMA score and maximum score was also not straightforward with each set of data revealing different information. Conclusions: The LENT/SOMA questions were, in the main, more wide-ranging and informative than the UCLA index. It is helpful to give both the overall and maximum LENT/SOMA scores to most efficiently use all of the data. There may need to be a further LENT/SOMA question to allow both symptoms of tenesmus and faecal urgency to be fully addressed

  17. Acute morbidity reduction using 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma; a randomised phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, P.; Putten, W. van; Stroom, J.; Korevaar, G.; Heijmen, B.; Wijnmaalen, A.; Jansen, P.; Hanssens, P.; Griep, C.; Krol, A.; Samson, M.; Levendag, P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A randomised phase III toxicity study (conventional vs conformal radiotherapy) was performed for prostatic carcinoma to study the effects on the (acute) morbidity of intestinal/rectosigmoid and bladder. The observed toxicity was compared with Dose Volume Histograms to reveal possible volume (reduction) effects. Methods: In the phase III study 266 T1-4 N0M0 prostate cancer patients were entered. Patients were randomised for conventional and conformal radiotherapy (total dose 66 Gy, minimum PTV dose 95% ICRU and a CTV-PTV margin of 10 mm in both study arms). The GTV was limited to the prostate only in T1 tumors. In all other patients the GTV was defined to be prostate and seminal vesicles for the complete treatment course. The CTV-PTV margin (10mm) was created by a automated program to ensure the minimum prescribed margin. The rectosigmoid was defined to be the rectum including the sigmoid within the Treatment Volume (ICRU). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the EORTC/RTOG morbidity score and weekly quality of life questionnaires. The radiation technique comparison was done by Dose volume Histogram analysis using the Area Under The Curve (AUC) for different dose levels. In this preliminary DVH analysis we present the data for the first 100 patients. Results: Patient and tumor characteristics were evenly distributed between both study groups. The maximum toxicity is reached at 75% of the tumordose (TD) (rectal grade I 59% grade II 26%, bladder grade I 48%, grade II 16% and grade III 1% [catheter for urinary retention]). Comparing both study arms there seems to be a reduction in intestinal morbidity (grade II and higher resp. 32% vs 19% p=0.02). Further analysis revealed a marked reduction in medication for anal symptoms; this accounts for a large part of the significant difference in intestinal toxicity (grade II conventional vs conformal rectosigmoid 18% vs 14% and anal 16% vs 8%). For bladder morbidity no difference for mobidity higher than grade I is

  18. Morbid obesity increases risk of morbidity and reoperation in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Porter, Amanda; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel; Rayan, Tarek; Maloney, Patrick R; Carter, Bob S; Bydon, Mohamad; Gompel, Jamie J Van; Link, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased risk for postoperative CSF leak in patients with benign cranial nerve tumors. Other measures of postoperative morbidity associated with obesity have not been well characterized. Patients enrolled in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) from 2007 to 2013 with a diagnosis code of a benign neoplasm of a cranial nerve were included. The primary outcome of postoperative morbidity was analyzed as well as secondary outcomes of readmission and reoperation. The main covariate of interest was body mass index (BMI). A total of 561 patients underwent surgery for a benign cranial nerve neoplasm between 2007 and 2013. Readmission data, available for 2012-2013(n=353), revealed hydrocephalus, facial nerve injury, or CSF leak requiring readmission or reoperation occurred in 0.85%, 1.42%, and 3.12%, respectively. Composite morbidity included wound complications, infection, respiratory insufficiency, transfusion requirement, stroke, venous thromboembolism, coma and cardiac arrest. On multivariable analysis patients with class I (BMI 30-34.9) and II (BMI 35-39.9) obesity showed trends towards increasing return to operating room, though not significant, but there was no trend for composite complications in class I and II obesity patients. However, class III obesity, BMI≥40, was associated with increased odds of composite morbidity (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.24-15.88) and return to the operating room (OR 5.97, 95% CI 1.20-29.6) relative to patients with a normal BMI, 18.5-25. Obesity is an independent and important risk factor for composite morbidity in resection of benign cranial nerve neoplasms, and as such, merits discussion during preoperative counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Urethral dose and increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) in transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, N.; Itami, J.; Okuma, K.; Marino, H.; Ban, T.; Nakazato, M.; Kanai, K.; Naoi, K.; Fuse, M.; Nakagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to find the factors which influence the acute increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) after transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) using 125 I seeds. Patients and methods: from April 2004 through September 2006, 104 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer underwent TPI without external-beam irradiation. Median patient age was 70 years with a median follow-up of 13.0 months. 73 patients (70%) received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. The increment of IPSS was defined as the difference between pre- and postimplant maximal IPSS. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included age, initial prostate-specific antigen, Gleason Score, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, initial IPSS, post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, prostate V 100 , V 150 , D 90 , urethral D max , and urethral D 90 . In order to further evaluate detailed urethral doses, the base and apical urethra were defined and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. Results: the IPSS peaked 3 months after TPI and returned to baseline at 12-15 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, and the dosimetric parameters of the base urethra with IPSS increment. Conclusion: the base urethra appears to be susceptible to radiation and the increased dose to this region deteriorates IPSS. It remains unclear whether the base urethral dose relates to the incidence of late urinary morbidities. (orig.)

  20. Intubation of the morbidly obese patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydemann, Mogens; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Lindekaer, A L

    2012-01-01

    Several potential problems can arise from airway management in morbidly obese patients, including difficult mask ventilation and difficult intubation. We hypothesised that endotracheal intubation of morbidly obese patients would be more rapid using the GlideScope(®) (GS) (Verathon Inc Corporate H...... Headquarters, Bothell, WA, USA) than with the Fastrach™ (FT) (The Laryngeal Mask Company Ltd, Le Rocher, Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles)....

  1. External and internal radiation therapy: Past and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. Treatment modalities comprise radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy can be performed by using external or internal radiation therapy. However, each method has its unique properties which undertakes special role in cancer treatment, this question is brought up that: For cancer treatment, whether external radiation therapy is more efficient or internal radiation therapy one? To answer this question, we need to consider principles and structure of individual methods. In this review, principles and application of each method are considered and finally these two methods are compared with each other.

  2. Orthopedic trauma surgery in the morbidly obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzio, Anthony E; Gala, Raj J; Villasenor, Mario A; Hao, Jiandon; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    The treatment of morbidly obese patients in orthopedic trauma differs in many ways compared to injured patients with normal body mass indices. This paper highlights key differences and ways to overcome obstacles. We present specific tips, as well as considerations for initial planning, positioning for surgery, intra-operative strategies, and a discussion on both anesthesia and imaging. Several treatment strategies have been shown to have better results in morbidly obese patients. Pre-operative planning is necessary for minimizing risk to the patient. The prevalence of morbid obesity has increased in the USA in the past quarter century. Treatment for orthopedic injuries in morbidly obese patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that addresses not only their orthopedic injuries, but also medical co-morbidities. A team of medicine doctors, anesthesiologists, X-ray technicians, physical and occupational therapists, respiratory therapists, and social workers is needed in addition to the orthopedic surgeon. Modifications in both pre-operative planning and intra-operative strategies may be necessary in order to accommodate the patient. This paper presents numerous technical tips that can aid in providing stable fixation for fractures, as well as addressing peri-operative issues specific to the morbidly obese.

  3. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer: Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and Head and Neck Group (111 institutions) to evaluate the widespread use of cetuximab and radiotherapy in HNC and to estimate the frequency of grades III and IV skin reactions in the radiation portals associated with this protocol. Co-morbidities, RT schedules and co-medications were also recorded. Results: We received responses from 28 institutions in 11 countries. A total of 125 HNC patients from 15 institutions were treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. Information about the skin reactions was available from 71 patients. Of these 36 had no grade III/IV adverse effects in the RT field, 15 had a grade III and 20 had grade IV radiation dermatitis. No detectable relation of grades III and IV radiation dermatitis with co-morbidities such as liver insufficiency or renal dysfunction was found. Conclusion: According to the results of the questionnaire, grade III/IV radiation dermatitis is observed in 49% of HNC patients treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. A systematic clinical monitoring of cutaneous side effects during RT plus cetuximab is advised to ensure the safety of this protocol

  4. Morbidity in congenital heart surgery in a public hospital in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althabe, María; Rodríguez R, Ricardo; Balestrini, María; Charroqui, Alberto; Krynski, Mariela; Lenz, Ana M; Montonati, Mercedes; Moreno, Guillermo; Pilan, María L; Magliola, Ricardo; García Delucis, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    To describe the complications associated with heart surgery, compare them to a reference population, and identify mortality risk factors. Retrospective and descriptive study. All patients who underwent surgery at Hospital Garrahan in the 2013-2015 period were included. Age, weight, procedure, mechanical ventilation, length of stay in days, morbidity, and course were recorded. Renal failure requiring dialysis, neurological deficit, permanent pacemaker, circulatory support, phrenic nerve or vocal cord palsy, reoperation, wound infection, chylothorax, and tracheotomy were considered morbidities. A descriptive, statistical analysis by risk category was done using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) morbidity score. 1536 patients, median age: 12 months (interquartile range [IQR] 25-75: 3-60), weight: 8 kg (IQR 25-75: 4.4 to 17.5), mortality: 5%. A total of 361 events were recorded in 183 patients. An unplanned reoperation was the most common event (7.2%); the rest occurred in < 3% of patients. Compared to patients without complications, patients who had events required more days on mechanical ventilation: 9.95 (IQR 25-75: 7.6512.24) versus 1.8 (IQR 2575: 1.46-2.14), p< 0.00001; a longer length of stay: 28.8 (IQR 25-75: 25.1-32.5) versus 8.5 (IQR 25-75: 7.9-9.2), p< 0.0001; and had a higher mortality: 19.6% versus 3.1% (RR: 4.58, 95% CI: 3.4 to 6.0), p< 0.0001. Circulatory support and renal failure were associated with a higher mortality. An unplanned reoperation was the most common event. Patients with complications required more days on mechanical ventilation and a longer length of stay and had a higher mortality. Circulatory support and renal failure were associated with a higher mortality. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría

  5. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Apart from the optimal use of drugs, various supplementary methods have been tested to decrease asthma morbidity, usually in patients from reiatively affluent socio-economic backgrounds. A study of additional measures taken in a group of moderate to severe adult asthmatics from very poor socio- ...

  6. Secondary osteoporosis due to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Katsuyuki; Kihana, Toshimasa; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Yasunari; Matsuura, Shumpei; Kataoka, Masaaki; Hamamoto, Ken (Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of the 3rd lumber vertebra (L3) and the 5th lumber vertebra (L5) were measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). BMD of L3 and L5 in 139 normal control cases decreased linearly with age (L3: Y= 317.32 - 3.283X, L5: Y= 314.35 - 2.9056X). Ratio of the BMD of L5 to L3 (L5/L3 ratio, %) was constant in the value of 106.03{+-}12.84% before 50 years old and increased linearly after 50 years old (Y= 21.624 + 1.7187X). In 30 radiated cases, BMD of the radiated L5 ws decreased after 20 Gy of radiation and reached 47.44{+-}18.74% of the preradiated value after 50 Gy of radiation. L5/L3 ratio was also decreased after 20 Gy of radiation and reached 48.34{+-}19.33% of pre-radiated value after 50 Gy radiation. BMD of L5 and L5/L3 ratio after 50 Gy of radiation were decreased linearly with age (L5: Y= 107.44 - 0.9686X, L5/L3 ratio: Y= 106.98 - 0.9472X). Quality of life (performance status: PS, lumbago score) after radiation correlated significantly with age, body weight, BMD of L3 before radiation, BMD of L5 after radiation. PS and lumbago score were increased significantly in cases of more than 75 years old, less than 50 kg, less than 100 mg/cm{sup 3} of BMD of L3 before radiation and less than 40 mg/cm{sup 3} of BMD of L5 after radiation. Quality of life after radiation was improved by treatment of alfacalcidol (PS: 3.0{+-}0.61 to 1.2{+-}0.47, lumbago score: 15.4{+-}4.08 to 4.2{+-}1.17). In conclusion, it should be said that pelvic radiation for gynecologic malignancy may disturb the bone metabolism and quality of life in the early phase after radiation, especially in the aged patients and that quality of life could be improved by treatment of alfacalcidol. (author).

  7. Ability of radiation therapists to assess radiation-induced skin toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Urvi; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Gaur, Pankaj; Back, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy has seen enhancement of the radiation therapist (RT) role, with RTs and nurses performing duties that were traditionally in the radiation oncologist's (RO) domain. This study aimed to assess whether RTs can consistently grade radiation-induced skin toxicity and their concordance with the gradings given by ROs. Digital photographs of skin reactions were taken at weeks 1, 3 and 6 of radiotherapy on nine patients with breast cancer. The randomly ordered photographs were reviewed once by eight ROs and four RO registrars and on two occasions separated by 6 weeks by 17 RTs. All graded the skin toxicities using the revised Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. No significant difference was seen between the median scores of the RTs at the first scoring session and the RO/Registrar group. The RTs at both measurement times showed greater inter-rater reliability than the RO/Registrars (W=0.6866, time 1 and 0.6981 time 2, vs. 0.6517), with the experienced RTs the most consistent (W=0.7078). The RTs also showed high intra-rater reliability (rho=0.8461, P<0.0010). These results from RTs with no specific preparation indicate that experienced RTs could assess breast cancer skin toxicity as part of their role.

  8. Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) Performance of Greek Preterm Infants: Comparisons With Full-Term Infants of the Same Nationality and Impact of Prematurity-Related Morbidity Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrengelas, Dimitrios; Kalampoki, Vassiliki; Kleisiouni, Paraskevi; Manta, Vassiliki; Mellos, Stavros; Pons, Roser; Chrousos, George P; Siahanidou, Tania

    2016-07-01

    Only a few studies have been conducted with the objective of creating norms of the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) for the assessment of gross motor development of preterm infants. The AIMS performance of preterm infants has been compared with that of the Canadian norms of full-term infants, but not with that of full-term infants of the same nationality. Moreover, the possible impact of prematurity-related morbidity factors on AIMS performance is unknown. The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate AIMS trajectory in a large population of Greek preterm infants and create norms, (2) to compare it with the AIMS trajectory of Greek full-term infants, and (3) to examine the possible influence of neonatal morbidity on AIMS scores in the preterm sample. This was a cross-sectional study. Mean AIMS scores were compared, per month (1-19), between 403 preterm infants (≤32 weeks of age, corrected for prematurity) and 1,038 full-term infants. In preterm infants, the association of AIMS scores with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of grade ≤III, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and sepsis was assessed by hierarchical regression analysis. Alberta Infant Motor Scale scores were significantly lower in preterm infants than in full-term infants. Mean AIMS scores in preterm infants were significantly associated with RDS (b=-1.93; 95% CI=-2.70, -1.16), IVH (b=-0.97; 95% CI=-1.69, -0.25), and ROP (b=-1.12; 95% CI=-1.99, -0.24) but not with BPD or sepsis in hierarchical regression analysis. Alberta Infant Motor Scale norms were created for Greek preterm infants. This study confirms that AIMS trajectories of preterm infants are below those of full-term infants of the same nationality. The influence of morbidity factors, including RDS, IVH, and ROP, should be taken into account when administering the AIMS in preterm infants. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  9. Association of personal hygiene with common morbidities among upper primary school children in rural Odisha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kalyan Kumar; Panigrahi, Sandeep Kumar; Soodi Reddy, Arun Kiran; Sahu, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    In India, children of upper primary school receive less attention from health-care providers. The majority of their health problems are preventable through hygienic practices. The aim of this study was to find out the association of personal hygiene with common morbidities among upper primary school children. A cross-sectional study conducted in a rural upper primary school of Odisha. A semi-structured schedule based on the Global School Health Survey Questionnaire and necessary instruments for clinical examination were used. Data were entered in Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Of 90 participants, 58 (64.4%) were girls. The mean age was 11.8 (±1.01) years. The mean body mass index of females was significantly higher than males (16.95 vs. 14.72; P = 0.001). More than 90% of children maintained good personal hygiene such as clean tongue, clean hair, handwashing, and using footwear. The most common morbidities found were dental caries (38.9%), history of worms in stool and lethargy (20%). A mean score of 6.14 ± 0.11 (out of 8) was seen for personal hygiene and not associated with any particular morbidity or gender. Brushing daily was significantly associated with reduced dental caries (χ 2 = 8.7; P personal hygiene. School health services should also focus on upper primary school children for improvement of personal hygiene.

  10. Psychiatric morbidity and non-participation in breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Organised breast cancer screening is currently one of the best strategies for early-stage breast cancer detection. However, early detection has proven challenging for women with psychiatric disease. This study aims to investigate psychiatric morbidity and non-participation in breast cancer screening. We conducted an observational cohort study including women invited to the first organised screening round in the Central Denmark Region. Data on psychiatric diagnosis, psychoactive prescription medicine and consultation with private psychiatrists were obtained from Danish registries and assessed for a period of up to 10 years before the screening date. The cohort comprised 144,264 women whereof 33.0% were registered with an indication of psychiatric morbidity. We found elevated non-participation propensity among women with a psychiatric diagnosis especially for women with schizophrenia and substance abuse. Also milder psychiatric morbidity was associated with higher non-participation likelihood as women who had redeemed psychoactive prescription medicine or have had minimum one consultation with a private psychiatrist were more likely not to participate. Finally, we found that the chronicity of psychiatric morbidity was associated with non-participation and that woman who had a psychiatric morbidity defined as 'persistent' had higher likelihood of non-participation than women with recently active morbidity or inactive psychiatric morbidity. This study showed a strong association between psychiatric morbidity and an increased likelihood of non-participation in breast cancer screening in a health care system with universal and tax-funded health services. This knowledge may inform interventions targeting women with psychiatric morbidity as they have poorer breast cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer morbidity in alcohol abusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Møller, Henrik; Andersen, J R

    1994-01-01

    Data on the association between alcohol abuse and cancer morbidity are scarce in large cohorts of non-hospitalised alcoholic men and women. Of 18,368 alcohol abusers who entered an outpatient clinic in Copenhagen during 1954-87, 18,307 were followed and their cancer incidence was compared with th...... and the liver are confirmed. In addition, this study indicates an increased occurrence of cancer of the prostate gland, pleura and uterine cervix in alcohol abusers.......Data on the association between alcohol abuse and cancer morbidity are scarce in large cohorts of non-hospitalised alcoholic men and women. Of 18,368 alcohol abusers who entered an outpatient clinic in Copenhagen during 1954-87, 18,307 were followed and their cancer incidence was compared...... with that of the total Danish population. On average the 15,214 men were observed for 12.9 years and the 3,093 women for 9.4 years. The overall morbidity of cancer was increased significantly. Of the men, 1,441 developed cancer [relative risk (RR) = 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-1.7], while 182 women did (RR...

  12. Association of Sun Exposure, Skin Colour and Body Mass Index with Vitamin D Status in Individuals Who Are Morbidly Obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Clare F; Bauer, Judith D; Martin, Ian; Rochester, Sharon; Duarte Romero, Briony; Prins, Johannes B; Wright, Olivia R L

    2017-10-04

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common issue, particularly in obese populations, and is tested by assessing serum 25(OH)D concentrations. This study aimed to identify factors that contribute to the vitamin D status in fifty morbidly obese individuals recruited prior to bariatric surgery. Data collected included serum 25(OH)D concentrations, dietary and supplement intake of vitamin D, sun exposure measures, skin colour via spectrophotometry, and genotype analysis of several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the vitamin D metabolism pathway. Results showed a significant correlation between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and age, and serum 25(OH)D and ITAC score (natural skin colour). Natural skin colour accounted for 13.5% of variation in serum 25(OH)D, with every 10° increase in ITAC score (i.e., lighter skin) leading to a 9 nmol/L decrease in serum 25(OH)D. Multiple linear regression using age, ITAC score, and average UV index in the three months prior to testing, significantly predicted serum 25(OH)D concentrations ( R ² = 29.7%). Single nucleotide polymorphisms for all vitamin D genes tested, showed lower serum 25(OH)D for those with the rare genotype compared to the common genotype; this was most pronounced for fok1 and rs4588 , where those with the rare genotype were insufficient (vitamin D status in individuals with morbid obesity requires testing of 25(OH)D, but potential risk factors for this population include natural skin colour and age.

  13. A new prognostic scoring system for perforation peritonitis secondary to duodenal ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomani, A.Z.; Qureshi, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify prognostic factors for perforated duodenal ulcers and to devise and assess a new scoring system. Methods: The observational prospective study was conducted at the Mayo Hospital, Lahore in two phases: from March 2010 to September 2011; and from October 2011 to July 2012. It included patients with duodenal ulcer perforation who were observed for identifying factors predicting 30-day prognosis. Each of the predictive factor was given a score based on its severity to devise a new scoring system. Chi-square was used for univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis was done using forward stepwise regression. Accuracy of the new scoring system was calculated using receiver operating curve analysis and its validity was evaluated in the second phase of the study. Results: Predictors of poor prognosis included multiple gut perforations, size of largest perforation >0.5cm, amount of peritoneal fluid >1000ml, simple closure, development of complications, post-operative systemic septicaemia and winter/autumn season of presentation. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 32.3% (n=32) and morbidity rate was 21.2% (n=21). The mean score was higher in the ones with poor prognosis (p=0.001). Similarly, the mean score was greater in those with grave prognosis (p=0.001). The scoring system had an overall sensitivity of 85.12% and specificity of 80.67% and was favourably comparable to other scoring systems. Conclusion: The new scoring system is a useful tool in predicting 30-day prognosis for perforated duodenal ulcers in acid peptic disease. (author)

  14. Sexual Activity and Urological Morbidities Among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Menopause represents the end of women reproductive career and it is at this time they begin to manifest morbidities such as urinary incontinence. Aim: To document proximate determinants of sexual activity and urological morbidities of menopausal women. Subjects and Methods: This was a community survey ...

  15. Timely diagnosis of dairy calf respiratory disease using a standardized scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuirk, Sheila M; Peek, Simon F

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory disease of young dairy calves is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, economic loss, and animal welfare concern but there is no gold standard diagnostic test for antemortem diagnosis. Clinical signs typically used to make a diagnosis of respiratory disease of calves are fever, cough, ocular or nasal discharge, abnormal breathing, and auscultation of abnormal lung sounds. Unfortunately, routine screening of calves for respiratory disease on the farm is rarely performed and until more comprehensive, practical and affordable respiratory disease-screening tools such as accelerometers, pedometers, appetite monitors, feed consumption detection systems, remote temperature recording devices, radiant heat detectors, electronic stethoscopes, and thoracic ultrasound are validated, timely diagnosis of respiratory disease can be facilitated using a standardized scoring system. We have developed a scoring system that attributes severity scores to each of four clinical parameters; rectal temperature, cough, nasal discharge, ocular discharge or ear position. A total respiratory score of five points or higher (provided that at least two abnormal parameters are observed) can be used to distinguish affected from unaffected calves. This can be applied as a screening tool twice-weekly to identify pre-weaned calves with respiratory disease thereby facilitating early detection. Coupled with effective treatment protocols, this scoring system will reduce post-weaning pneumonia, chronic pneumonia, and otitis media.

  16. A point-based prediction model for cardiovascular risk in orthotopic liver transplantation: The CAR-OLT score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWagner, Lisa B; Ning, Hongyan; Whitsett, Maureen; Levitsky, Josh; Uttal, Sarah; Wilkins, John T; Abecassis, Michael M; Ladner, Daniela P; Skaro, Anton I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). There is currently no preoperative risk-assessment tool that allows physicians to estimate the risk for CVD events following OLT. We sought to develop a point-based prediction model (risk score) for CVD complications after OLT, the Cardiovascular Risk in Orthotopic Liver Transplantation risk score, among a cohort of 1,024 consecutive patients aged 18-75 years who underwent first OLT in a tertiary-care teaching hospital (2002-2011). The main outcome measures were major 1-year CVD complications, defined as death from a CVD cause or hospitalization for a major CVD event (myocardial infarction, revascularization, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, cardiac arrest, pulmonary embolism, and/or stroke). The bootstrap method yielded bias-corrected 95% confidence intervals for the regression coefficients of the final model. Among 1,024 first OLT recipients, major CVD complications occurred in 329 (32.1%). Variables selected for inclusion in the model (using model optimization strategies) included preoperative recipient age, sex, race, employment status, education status, history of hepatocellular carcinoma, diabetes, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary or systemic hypertension, and respiratory failure. The discriminative performance of the point-based score (C statistic = 0.78, bias-corrected C statistic = 0.77) was superior to other published risk models for postoperative CVD morbidity and mortality, and it had appropriate calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = 0.33). The point-based risk score can identify patients at risk for CVD complications after OLT surgery (available at www.carolt.us); this score may be useful for identification of candidates for further risk stratification or other management strategies to improve CVD outcomes after OLT. (Hepatology 2017;66:1968-1979). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver

  17. The role of interventional radiology in reducing haemorrhage and hysterectomy following caesarean section for morbidly adherent placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixidor Viñas, M.; Chandraharan, E.; Moneta, M.V.; Belli, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To report experience of prophylactic occlusion balloon catheters (POBCs) in both internal iliac arteries before caesarean section, with or without embolization, to preserve the uterus and reduce haemorrhage. Methods and materials: Twenty-seven women diagnosed with morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) and with suspected placenta percreta underwent POBC placement before caesarean section. The balloons were inflated immediately after delivery of the baby. The patients' case notes were reviewed retrospectively for histological grading of MAP, blood loss, transfusion, requirement of uterine artery embolization (UAE), or hysterectomy, radiation dose, and infant or maternal morbidity and mortality. Results: MAP was confirmed histologically as percreta in 17, accreta in eight, and increta in two women. Mean blood loss was 1.92 l (range 0.5–12 l). Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) occurred in nine patients. Eight were referred for UAE, which was successful in six. Immediate peri-partum hysterectomy was performed in one patient. Three women in total required hysterectomy, two after recurrent haemorrhage after UAE. No foetal morbidity or mortality occurred. No maternal mortality occurred. There was one case of iliac artery thrombosis, which resolved with conservative therapy. Conclusion: POBC, with or without UAE, contributes to reduction of blood loss and preservation of the uterus in women with MAP. - Highlights: • Management of morbidly adherent placenta requires a multidisciplinary team approach. • Prophylactic occlusion balloon catheters reduce blood loss and help avoid hysterectomy. • Protocols ensure correct management of placenta percreta patients and minimise risk

  18. Gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress and job satisfaction among Chinese neurologists: a national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juncai; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Dan; Zhong, Xiaoni; Yang, Lining; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yuqing; Fan, Songhua; Liu, Lanxiang; Xie, Peng

    2017-07-01

    Women are an important part of the medical workforce, yet little is known about gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress and job satisfaction among neurologists. This study assessed gender differences in a large national sample of Chinese neurologists. Multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations. A total of 5558 neurologists were included in the analysis. Compared with their male counterparts, female neurologists were generally younger; were less likely to be married or to have children; had higher levels of education; were in practice for a shorter period of time; were less likely to hold senior roles; and had lower incomes. Male and female neurologists worked similar hours and spent a similar number of nights on call. No gender differences were found in psychological morbidity, burnout, and high levels of job stress for female and male, respectively. Women had higher emotional exhaustion scores, while men were more likely to have low levels of job satisfaction. The multivariate analysis showed that factors independently associated with psychological morbidity, burnout, high levels of job stress and low levels of job satisfaction were generally similar for women and men. These findings increase our understanding of gender differences in psychological morbidity, burnout, job stress, and job satisfaction among neurologists. As more women join the medical profession, these differences may be useful in designing medical training and practice.

  19. [Frailty, disability and multi-morbidity: the relationship with quality of life and healthcare costs in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutomski, Jennifer E; Baars, Maria A E; Boter, Han; Buurman, Bianca M; den Elzen, Wendy P J; Jansen, Aaltje P D; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Steunenberg, Bas; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Melis, René J F

    2014-01-01

    To assess the independent and combined impact of frailty, multi-morbidity, and activities of daily living (ADL) limitations on self-reported quality of life and healthcare costs in elderly people. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Data came from The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Minimum DataSet (TOPICS-MDS), a pooled dataset with information from 41 projects across the Netherlands from the Dutch national care for the Elderly programme. Frailty, multi-morbidity and ADL limitations, and the interactions between these domains, were used as predictors in regression analyses with quality of life and healthcare costs as outcome measures. Analyses were stratified by living situation (independent or care home). Directionality and magnitude of associations were assessed using linear mixed models. A total of 11,093 elderly people were interviewed. A substantial proportion of elderly people living independently reported frailty, multi-morbidity, and/or ADL limitations (56.4%, 88.3% and 41.4%, respectively), as did elderly people living in a care home (88.7%, 89.2% and 77,3%, respectively). One-third of elderly people living at home (31.9%) reported all three conditions compared with two-thirds of elderly people living in a care home (68.3%). In the multivariable analysis, frailty had a strong impact on outcomes independently of multi-morbidity and ADL limitations. Elderly people experiencing problems across all three domains reported the poorest quality-of-life scores and the highest healthcare costs, irrespective of their living situation. Frailty, multi-morbidity and ADL limitations are complementary measurements, which together provide a more holistic understanding of health status in elderly people. A multi-dimensional approach is important in mapping the complex relationships between these measurements on the one hand and the quality of life and healthcare costs on the other.

  20. Psychiatric morbidity in school children who suffered a stampede

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet S Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stampede is described as a sudden movement of a mass of people in response to a particular circumstance or stimulus. Human stampedes are quite often reported from crowded places like places of worship, sporting events, political rallies, etc. There are reports of development of posttraumatic stress disorder, depressive and anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents subsequent to both natural and man-made disasters. The present tragedy struck in a Government Secondary School in Delhi on September 9, 2009. The study describes the long-term psychiatric morbidity in children following stampede. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted by the department of psychiatry of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 38 children (all adolescent girls were registered at the casualty of the hospital and 1 absconded, 5 were brought dead. A total of 32 children were included in the study. After first assessment in the casualty, subsequent assessments at 8 weeks and 6 months were done using semi-structured performa, GHQ and Child′s reaction to traumatic event scale (CRTES-Revised. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The age-group of the children were 12-20 years(mean 14.3, all girls, studying in grades - VII to X Eight weeks follow up GHQ score was high in 27 (87%. On CRTESQ-R scale, 22 children were in high distress group (71%. Twenty-two children had symptoms of PTSD and five were in moderate distress group. Eleven children also had a comorbid diagnosis of depressive disorder, six had phobic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. There were statistically significant differences in mean GHQ scores at baseline and at 6 months follow up. There was also significant decrease in CRTESQ-R scale scores between baseline and 6 months. Conclusion: The children who were victims of stampede warrant the need for long-term intervention.

  1. Psychiatric morbidity in psoriasis: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing and disfiguring dermatological disorder with a significant effect on occupational, social, and other areas of functioning. Psychological stress has been known to have a significant role in the onset and exacerbation of this illness. To study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in psoriasis and the influence of specified demographic, psychological, social and illness-related variables. Methods: The study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital in a large urban setup. In this case–control study, 100 cases of psoriasis were studied in comparison with healthy controls who were matched for sociodemographic profile. The participants were given a sociodemographic questionnaire, clinical profile sheet, and psoriasis area and severity index (PASI. General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12 was used to screen for psychological distress, and subsequently, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for screening for depression and anxiety and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF scale for assessing the quality of life (QOL were administered. The results obtained were analyzed for evaluating the psychiatric morbidity and its various correlates. Appropriate statistical analysis was done using SPSS 21. Results: Using GHQ-12 cutoff score (≥3 for psychological distress, the overall prevalence of psychological distress was significantly more in cases of in comparison to healthy controls with an odds ratio of 8.54 (95% confidence interval 3.16–23.07, P < 0.0001. Statistical analysis showed a statistically significant correlation of educational status with QOL and severity of skin lesions (PASI with anxiety level. Severe skin lesions, more so on visible body parts were associated more commonly with psychological distress. Conclusions: All patients of psoriasis should be educated about the nature of the illness and screened for psychological distress. Dermatologists and family members should be educated to

  2. Combined modality therapy for localized prostate carcinoma using Iridium-192 brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy: results, morbidity, and the lack of value of surgical lymph node staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Michael; Ordorica, Edward; Dawson, Anne

    1997-01-01

    therapy. Survival: The bNED survival for patients with T1/T2 disease was 65% at 5 yrs. and 46% at 10 yrs. In a multivariate analysis the most important factors to predict biological control were pre treatment PSA and Gleason Score. In 150 pts. having a PSA <20 and Gleason Score <7 the 5 and 10 yr. bNED survivals were 74% and 64%. In patients in whom these values were exceeded, the 5 and 10 yr. survivals were significantly worse (50% and 34%, p<.01 at 10 yrs.). Patients with clinically extra capsular disease (T3) or nodal disease on staging did poorly (34% at 10 yrs.) but the use of nonsurgical staging was equivalent to open nodal sampling in selecting those patients with high likelihood of biological control. Those few patients found to have positive nodes despite favorable PSA and Gleason scores, had a much higher survival at 6 yrs post treatment (71% vs 27%, p<.05) and therefore still warrant aggressive treatment. Conclusions: The technique of Ir-192 temporary implant combined with external beam irradiation yields results comparable to radical prostatectomy in properly selected patients, and does so with minimal morbidity and a high likelihood of preservation of potency. This approach seems competitive with permanent transperineal seed implant and conformal external beam therapy. The combination of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score can be used to predict those patients who have a high likelihood of biological control, thus eliminating the need for open nodal dissection

  3. Activity Behaviours in Lean and Morbidly Obese Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi, Caterina; Mohd-Shukri, Nor; Denison, Fiona C; Saunders, David H; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2018-05-17

    Interventions to increase physical activity in pregnancy are challenging for morbidly obese women. Targeting sedentary behaviours may be a suitable alternative to increase energy expenditure. We aimed to determine total energy expenditure, and energy expended in sedentary activities in morbidly obese and lean pregnant women. We administered the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire PPAQ (non-objective) and the Actical accelerometer (objective) to morbidly obese (BMI≥40kg/m²) and lean (BMI≤25Kg/M²) pregnant women recruited in early (lean pregnant women. No differences were observed in the proportion of energy expended sedentary between lean and morbidly obese pregnant women. The greater total energy expenditure in morbidly obese pregnant women was corroborated by Actical accelerometer in early (n=14 per group, obese 1167.7 (313.6) Kcal; lean 781.1 (210.1) Kcal, plean 893.7 (175.9) Kcal, plean pregnant. Further studies are needed to determine whether sedentary behaviours are a suitable target for intervention in morbidly obese pregnancy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiation-induced morphological changes in the vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, K.; Fidarova, E.; Schmid, M.P.; Sturdza, A.; Kranz, A.; Poetter, R.; Nout, R.A.; Wiebe, E.; Polterauer, S.; Doerr, W.; Medical Univ. of Vienna

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Treatment-induced chronic vaginal changes after definitive radio(chemo)therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer patients are reported as one of the most distressing consequences of treatment, with major impact on quality of life. Although these vaginal changes are regularly documented during gynecological follow-up examinations, the classic radiation morbidity grading scales are not concise in their reporting. The aim of the study was therefore to identify and qualitatively describe, on the basis of vaginoscopies, morphological changes in the vagina after definitive radio(chemo)therapy and to establish a classification system for their detailed and reproducible documentation. Patients and methods: Vaginoscopy with photodocumentation was performed prospectively in 22 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer after definitive radio(chemo)therapy at 3-24 months after end of treatment. All patients were in complete remission and without severe grade 3/4 morbidity outside the vagina. Results: Five morphological parameters, which occurred consistently after treatment, were identified: mucosal pallor, telangiectasia, fragility of the vaginal wall, ulceration, and adhesions/occlusion. The symptoms in general were observed at different time points in individual patients; their quality was independent of the time of assessment. Based on the morphological findings, a comprehensive descriptive and semiquantitative scoring system was developed, which allows for classification of vaginal changes. A photographic atlas to illustrate the morphology of the alterations is presented. Conclusion: Vaginoscopy is an easily applicable, informative, and well-tolerated procedure for the objective assessment of morphological vaginal changes after radio(chemo)therapy and provides comprehensive and detailed information. This allows for precise classification of the severity of individual changes. (orig.)

  5. Psychiatric morbidity in parents of twins born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, J M; Ironside, W; Smith, G C

    1990-12-01

    A matched comparison was made of 158 parents of preschool twins conceived under three conditions; spontaneously, after infertility workup including drug treatment, and after in vitro fertilization (IVF). Indications of probable psychiatric caseness were obtained using the 60-item General Health Questionnaire. IVF parents' mean scores were similar to those of parents who spontaneously conceived, and both were significantly greater than those who conceived after an infertility workup. Mothers and fathers overall had similar scores, contrary to previous community findings of higher rates of psychiatric disorder among females. The prevalence of probable psychiatric caseness was less for IVF and spontaneously conceiving mothers, but greater for the respective fathers, than in an English community sample and greater than in an Australian community sample. The extent to which the self-reports of current psychiatric disturbance can be ascribed to any preexisting psychopathology is unknown. Indications of increased psychiatric disturbance found in this investigation warrant further prospective investigations, especially of the difficulties of rearing twins when couples are vulnerable in having this degree of psychiatric morbidity.

  6. Mortality in Graves' orbitopathy is increased and influenced by gender, age and pre-existing morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Charlotte F; Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is unclear whether the excess mortality associated with Graves' disease differs between individuals with Graves' orbitopathy (GO) or without (GD). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A nationwide, register-based cohort study in which all adult Danes diagnosed with GD (n = 28 461) and GO (n......-existing morbidity using the Charlson score. RESULTS: Adjusted mortality in Graves' disease overall (GD + GO) was significantly increased compared to that in the background population (HR = 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.15-1.21)). In GD and GO separately, adjusted mortality was also significantly higher than...

  7. Radiation and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on radiation therapy which is an essential treatment in the management of many conditions. It is important to appreciate the high incidence of subsequent endocrine morbidity, however, if the hypothalamic pituitary region is within the radiation fields. This is very much more common with external radiation therapy than with other forms of radiation treatment. The dose and fractional of administered radiation are important determinants of the endocrine deficits, their time on onset, and severity. Irradiation of large volumes of brain and hypothalamus may increase the risk of hormonal abnormalities as may preceding surgery in the treatment of pituitary disease. The phenomena observed in children and adults illustrate that there may be damage to pituitary, hypothalamus, and higher centers. In patients who have received a significant radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region, regular follow-up is mandatory. In adults, surveillance will include pituitary function testing on an annual basis for at least 10 years. In children careful monitoring of growth and pubertal development and early treatment of radiation-induced GH deficiency are vital

  8. Profile of Co-morbidities in the Obese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati SA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the profile of co-morbidities in obese patients reporting for bariatric surgical procedures. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at the Bariatric Surgery Unit of Department of Surgery of the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia. The records of all the obese patients (with Body Mass Index greater than 30, evaluated in the department over the period of two years from Jan 2012 to Dec 2014, were studied and co-morbidities were sought in all subjects. Results: Of the 172 subjects, 76.2% (n=131 were female and 23.8% (n=41 male. The age ranged from 17–49 years (Mean 29.9 years; Mode 28 years. The weight ranged from 82 kg–146kg and BMI ranged from 33–54 (mean BMI 44.7 kg/m. Out of the total of 172 patients, 96 (56 % including 72 females and 24 males had one or more co-morbidities. Conclusion: A wide range of co-morbidities occur in obese patients that have the potential to decrease the quality of life and the life span.

  9. Endovascular Interventions for the Morbidly Adherent Placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kaufman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly adherent placentas are a spectrum of abnormalities ranging from placental invasion of the myometrium to invasion past the myometrium and muscular layers into adjacent structures. This entity is becoming more prevalent recently with increased number of cesarean deliveries. Given the high risk of morbidity and mortality, this was traditionally treated with pre-term planned cesarean hysterectomy. However, recently, uterine preservation techniques have been implemented for those women wishing to preserve future fertility or their uterus. Early identification is crucial as studies have shown better outcomes for women treated at tertiary care facilities by a dedicated multidisciplinary team. Interventional radiologists are frequently included in the care of these patients as there are several different endovascular techniques which can be implemented to decrease morbidity in these patients both in conjunction with cesarean hysterectomy and in the setting of uterine preservation. This article will review the spectrum of morbidly adherent placentas, imaging, as well as the surgical and endovascular interventions implemented in the care of these complex patients.

  10. Psychiatric morbidity among Egyptian breast cancer patients and their partners and its impact on surgical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Wahab KM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A El-Hadidy1, Waleed Elnahas2, Mohamed AF Hegazy2, Mohamed T Hafez2, Basel Refky2, Khaled M Abdel Wahab21Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Surgery, Mansoura Oncology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptIntroduction: Psychiatric morbidities, especially cases of anxiety and depression, are prevalent among breast cancer patients and their partners.Patients and methods: Fifty-four early diagnosed breast cancer patients and their partners were compared with 50 healthy couples to assess psychiatric morbidity and the impact of various factors upon patients' surgical choice.Results: It was found that 18.5%, 22.2%, and 3.7% of husbands had generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder, respectively. It was also found that 38.8%, 29.6%, and 9.2% of the patients had major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and panic disorder, respectively. Depression and anxiety scores were high in both partners in love-based, well-adjusted marriages, within the middle socioeconomic class, and among educated couples. Among the well-known factors related to surgical treatment choice (age, parity, tumor size, pathology, grade, lymph node status, only age and psychological morbidity (in the patients and their partners had a significant impact on treatment choice.Conclusion: Patients of middle socioeconomic class, the well educated, and those in love-based marriages had a higher likelihood of suffering different types of psychological morbidities and were more likely to choose breast conservation or reconstruction than mastectomy.Keywords: anxiety, Arab, conservative, depression, mastectomy, reconstruction

  11. Morbidity pattern and personal hygiene in children among private primary school in urban area: are the trends changing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaske, Mayavati S; Khismatrao, Deepak S; Kevin, Fernandez; Pandve, Harshal T; Kundap, Ritesh P

    2013-07-01

    School health is an important intervention as a great deal of research tells us that schools can have a major effect on children's health, by teaching them about health and promoting healthy behaviors. The aim of this study is to determine common health problems and assess personal hygiene status among primary school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted in academic years 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, with three health check-up camps organized in private primary school of Pune city. A total of 450 students were assessed for health problems and composite score of personal hygiene status was calculated ranging from 0 to 5 by examination of hairs, nails, skin and clothes. Proportions calculated with application of Chi-square test and Pearson co-efficient applied to observe the relation between two quantitative variables. Out of 450 students examined, 56.2% were boys and 43.8% were girls with age ranging from 5 to 10 years. The major morbidities observed were dental caries (65.1%), upper respiratory tract infections (38.2%), ear wax (29.9%) and myopia (10.0%). Mean hygiene score was significantly higher in girls (4.32) than boys (3.95) and poor hygiene observed in older boys. Increasing myopia and poor dental hygiene denotes a changing morbidity pattern in private primary school of the urban area. The hygiene status of the girls is significantly better than boys.

  12. Impact of Restricted Maternal Weight Gain on Fetal Growth and Perinatal Morbidity in Obese Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Rasmussen, S.S.; Kelstrup, Louise

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVESince January 2008, obese women with type 2 diabetes were advised to gain 0-5 kg during pregnancy. The aim with this study was to evaluate fetal growth and perinatal morbidity in relation to gestational weight gain in these women.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSA retrospective cohort comprised...... the records of 58 singleton pregnancies in obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) with type 2 diabetes giving birth between 2008 and 2011. Birth weight was evaluated by SD z score to adjust for gestational age and sex.RESULTSSeventeen women (29%) gained ≤5 kg, and the remaining 41 gained >5 kg. The median (range...... with pregnancies with maternal weight gain >5 kg.CONCLUSIONIn this pilot study in obese women with type 2 diabetes, maternal gestational weight gain ≤5 kg was associated with a more proportionate birth weight and less perinatal morbidity....

  13. Anaesthetic and Obstetric challenges of morbid obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic and Obstetric challenges of morbid obesity in caesarean ... in morbidly obese parturient that had caesarean delivery in a Nigerian tertiary care centre. ... This mirrors a World Health Organisation report published in the World Health ...

  14. The Importance of Rockall Scoring System for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Long-Term Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Mehmet Abdussamet; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Unsal, Mustafa Gökhan; Yırgın, Hakan; Kahraman, İzzettin; Alış, Halil

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the importance of Rockall scoring system in long-term setting to estimate re-bleeding and mortality rate due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A total of 321 patients who had been treated for upper gastrointestinal bleeding were recruited to the study. Patients' demographic and clinical data, the amount of blood transfusion, endoscopy results, and Rockall scores were retrieved from patients' charts. The re-bleeding, morbidity, and mortality rates were noted after 3 years of follow-up with telephone. Re-bleeding rate was statistically significantly higher in Rockall 4 group compared to Rockall 0 group. Mortality rate was also statistically significantly higher in Rockall 4 group. Rockall risk scoring system is a valuable tool to predict re-bleeding and mortality rates for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in long-term setting.

  15. Physiological benefits from low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive literature indicates that minute doses of ionizing radiation benefit animal growth and development, fecundity, health and longevity. Specific improvements appear in neurologic function, growth rate and survival of young, wound healing, immune competence, and resistance to infection, radiation morbidity, and tumor induction and growth. Decreased mortality from these debilitating factors results in increased average life span following exposure to minute doses of ionizing radiation. The above phenomena suggest the possibility that ionizing radiation may be essential for life. Limited data with protozoa suggest that reproduction rates decrease when they are maintained in subambient radiation environments. This may be interpreted to be a radiation deficiency. Evidence must now be obtained to determine whether or not ionizing radiation is essential for growth, development, nutrient utilization, fecundity, health and longevity of higher animals. Whether or not ionizing radiation is found to be essential for these physiologic functions, the evidence reviewed indicates that the optimal amount of this ubiquitous agent is imperceptibly above ambient levels. (author)

  16. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

  17. Association of Sun Exposure, Skin Colour and Body Mass Index with Vitamin D Status in Individuals Who Are Morbidly Obese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare F. Dix

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common issue, particularly in obese populations, and is tested by assessing serum 25(OHD concentrations. This study aimed to identify factors that contribute to the vitamin D status in fifty morbidly obese individuals recruited prior to bariatric surgery. Data collected included serum 25(OHD concentrations, dietary and supplement intake of vitamin D, sun exposure measures, skin colour via spectrophotometry, and genotype analysis of several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the vitamin D metabolism pathway. Results showed a significant correlation between serum 25(OHD concentrations and age, and serum 25(OHD and ITAC score (natural skin colour. Natural skin colour accounted for 13.5% of variation in serum 25(OHD, with every 10° increase in ITAC score (i.e., lighter skin leading to a 9 nmol/L decrease in serum 25(OHD. Multiple linear regression using age, ITAC score, and average UV index in the three months prior to testing, significantly predicted serum 25(OHD concentrations (R2 = 29.7%. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for all vitamin D genes tested, showed lower serum 25(OHD for those with the rare genotype compared to the common genotype; this was most pronounced for fok1 and rs4588, where those with the rare genotype were insufficient (<50 nmol/L, and those with the common genotype were sufficient (≥50 nmol/L. Assessing vitamin D status in individuals with morbid obesity requires testing of 25(OHD, but potential risk factors for this population include natural skin colour and age.

  18. Maternal and newborn morbidity by birth facility among selected United States 2006 low-risk births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Joseph R; Pinette, Michael G; Cartin, Angelina; Blackstone, Jacquelyn

    2010-02-01

    We sought to evaluate perinatal morbidity by delivery location (hospital, freestanding birth center, and home). Selected 2006 US birth certificate data were accessed online from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Low-risk maternal and newborn outcomes were tabulated and compared by birth facility. A total of 745,690 deliveries were included, of which 733,143 (97.0%) occurred in hospital, 4661 (0.6%) at birth centers, and 7427 (0.9%) at home. Compared with hospital deliveries, home and birthing center deliveries were associated with more frequent prolonged and precipitous labors. Home births experienced more frequent 5-minute Apgar scores home and birthing center deliveries were associated with less frequent chorioamnionitis, fetal intolerance of labor, meconium staining, assisted ventilation, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and birthweight Home births are associated with a number of less frequent adverse perinatal outcomes at the expense of more frequent abnormal labors and low 5-minute Apgar scores. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic value of biologic subtype and the 21-gene recurrence score relative to local recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiation for early stage breast carcinoma: results from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E2197 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solin, Lawrence J; Gray, Robert; Goldstein, Lori J; Recht, Abram; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven; Badve, Sunil; Perez, Edith A; Shulman, Lawrence N; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Sledge, George W; Sparano, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the significance of biologic subtype and 21-gene recurrence score relative to local recurrence and local-regional recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiation. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E2197 was a prospective randomized clinical trial that compared two adjuvant systemic chemotherapy regimens for patients with operable breast carcinoma with 1-3 positive lymph nodes or negative lymph nodes with tumor size >1.0 cm. The study population was a subset of 388 patients with known 21-gene recurrence score and treated with breast conservation surgery, systemic chemotherapy, and definitive radiation treatment. Median follow-up was 9.7 years (range = 3.7-11.6 years). The 10-year rates of local recurrence and local-regional recurrence were 5.4 % and 6.6 %, respectively. Neither biologic subtype nor 21-gene Recurrence Score was associated with local recurrence or local-regional recurrence on univariate or multivariate analyses (all P ≥ 0.12). The 10-year rates of local recurrence were 4.9 % for hormone receptor positive, HER2-negative tumors, 6.0 % for triple negative tumors, and 6.4 % for HER2-positive tumors (P = 0.76), and the 10-year rates of local-regional recurrence were 6.3, 6.9, and 7.2 %, respectively (P = 0.79). For hormone receptor-positive tumors, the 10-year rates of local recurrence were 3.2, 2.9, and 10.1 % for low, intermediate, and high 21-gene recurrence score, respectively (P = 0.17), and the 10-year rates of local-regional recurrence were 3.8, 5.1, and 12.0 %, respectively (P = 0.12). For hormone receptor-positive tumors, the 21-gene recurrence score evaluated as a continuous variable was significant for local-regional recurrence (hazard ratio 2.66; P = 0.03). The 10-year rates of local recurrence and local-regional recurrence were reasonably low in all subsets of patients. Neither biologic subtype nor 21-gene recurrence score should preclude breast conservation treatment with radiation.

  20. Brachytherapy Improves Biochemical Failure–Free Survival in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Compared With Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham D.; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Cury, Fabio L.; Morris, Jim; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu; Warner, Andrew; Yang, Ying; Rodrigues, George

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and overall survival (OS) in low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients who received brachytherapy (BT) (either low-dose-rate brachytherapy [LDR-BT] or high-dose-rate brachytherapy with external beam radiation therapy [HDR-BT+EBRT]) versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) alone. Methods and Materials: Patient data were obtained from the ProCaRS database, which contains 7974 prostate cancer patients treated with primary radiation therapy at four Canadian cancer institutions from 1994 to 2010. Propensity score matching was used to obtain the following 3 matched cohorts with balanced baseline prognostic factors: (1) low-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; (2) intermediate-risk LDR-BT versus EBRT; and (3) intermediate-risk HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare differences in bFFS (primary endpoint) and OS in the 3 matched groups. Results: Propensity score matching created acceptable balance in the baseline prognostic factors in all matches. Final matches included 2 1:1 matches in the intermediate-risk cohorts, LDR-BT versus EBRT (total n=254) and HDR-BT+EBRT versus EBRT (total n=388), and one 4:1 match in the low-risk cohort (LDR-BT:EBRT, total n=400). Median follow-up ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 years for the 3 matched cohorts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that all BT treatment options were associated with statistically significant improvements in bFFS when compared with EBRT in all cohorts (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT hazard ratio [HR] 4.58, P=.001; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 2.08, P=.007; low-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 2.90, P=.004). No significant difference in OS was found in all comparisons (intermediate-risk EBRT vs LDR-BT HR 1.27, P=.687; intermediate-risk EBRT vs HDR-BT+EBRT HR 1.55, P=.470; low-risk LDR-BT vs EBRT HR 1.41, P=.500). Conclusions: Propensity score matched analysis showed that BT options led

  1. Co-Morbidities in psoriatic versus non-psoriatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Omar Al Houssien

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients with psoriasis were found to have an increased risk of developing major co-morbid disorders including diabetes, liver and renal function profile abnormalities. This indicates the importance of checking if this group of patients have co-morbid disorders.

  2. Diabetes mellitus morbidity in Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstaya, E.V.; Ermakova, D.P.; Glinskaya, T.N.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and total diabetes mellitus morbidity in Chernobyl clean-up workers was examined during 1995-2014 period. During all the period of investigations levels of acute and total morbidity were higher in clean-up workers, than in total Belarusian population. (authors)

  3. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Heme Oxygenase-1, Inflammation, and Insulin Resistance in Morbid Obesity with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Raquel; Masdeu, Maria José; Vigil, Laura; Rigla, Mercedes; Luna, Alexis; Rebasa, Pere; Pareja, Rocío; Hurtado, Marta; Caixàs, Assumpta

    2017-09-01

    Morbid obesity and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) interact at an inflammatory level. Bariatric surgery reduces inflammatory responses associated with obesity. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme with anti-inflammatory properties, which might be increased in morbid obesity or OSA. We studied morbidly obese patients with OSA to determine: (a) HO-1 plasma concentrations according to OSA severity and their relationship with insulin resistance and inflammation and (b) the impact of bariatric surgery on HO-1 and parameters of insulin resistance and inflammation. We analyzed the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA) and plasma concentrations of HO-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, interleukin-1-beta, C reactive protein (CRP), and adiponectin according to polysomnography findings in 66 morbidly obese patients before bariatric surgery and 12 months after surgery. Before surgery, HO-1 plasma concentrations were similar in three groups of patients with mild, moderate, and severe OSA, and correlated with HOMA (r = 0.27, p = 0.02). Twelve months after surgery, low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance had decreased in all the groups, but HO-1 plasma concentration had decreased only in the severe OSA group (p = 0.02). In this group, the reduction in HO-1 correlated with a reduction in CRP concentrations (r = 0.43, p = 0.04) and with improved HOMA score (r = 0.37, p = 0.03). Bariatric surgery decreases HO-1 concentrations in morbid obesity with severe OSA, and this decrease is associated with decreases in insulin resistance and in inflammation.

  4. Radiation and platinum drug interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nias, A.H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The ideal platinum drug-radiation interaction would achieve radiosensitization of hypoxic tumour cells with the use of a dose of drug which is completely non-toxic to normal tissues. Electron-affinic agents are employed with this aim, but the commoner platinum drugs are only weakly electron-affinic. They do have a quasi-alkylating action however, and this DNA targeting may account for the radiosensitizing effect which occurs with both pre- and post-radiation treatments. Because toxic drug dosage is usually required for this, the evidence of the biological responses to the drug and to the radiation, as well as to the combination, requires critical analysis before any claim of true enhancement, rather than simple additivity, can be accepted. The amount of enhancement will vary with both the platinum drug dose and the time interval between drug administration and radiation. Clinical schedules may produce an increase in tumour response and/or morbidity, depending upon such dose and time relationships. (author)

  5. Hepatic chemerin mRNA in morbidly obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajor, Maciej; Kukla, Michał; Waluga, Marek; Liszka, Łukasz; Dyaczyński, Michał; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Żądło, Dominika; Berdowska, Agnieszka; Chapuła, Mateusz; Kostrząb-Zdebel, Anna; Bułdak, Rafał J; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Hartleb, Marek

    The aim of this study was to investigate hepatic chemerin mRNA, serum chemerin concentration, and immunohistochemical staining for chemerin and and chemokine receptor-like 1 (CMKLR1) in hepatic tissue in 56 morbidly obese women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to search for a relationship with metabolic and histopathological features. Chemerin mRNA was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, chemerin, and CMKLR1 immunohistochemical expression with specific antibodies, while serum chemerin concentration was assessed with commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Serum chemerin concentration reached 874.1 ±234.6 ng/ml. There was no difference in serum chemerin levels between patients with BMI steatosis, and definite nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver chemerin mRNA was observed in all included patients and was markedly, but insignificantly, higher in those with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2, hepatocyte ballooning, greater extent of steatosis, and definite NASH. Hepatic chemerin mRNA might be a predictor of hepatic steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning, and NAFLD activity score (NAS) but seemed not to be a primary driver regulating liver necroinflammatory activity and fibrosis. The lack of association between serum chemerin and hepatic chemerin mRNA may suggest that adipose tissue but not the liver is the main source of chemerin in morbidly obese women.

  6. IL-6 is a potential marker for radiation pneumonitis: a prospective clinical study of circulating cytokines in predicting radiation pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuhchyau; Rubin, Philip; McDonald, Sandra; Finkelstein, Jacob; Smudzin, Therese; Hernady, Eric; Williams, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of radiotherapy in eradicating thoracic malignancy is limited by the normal lung tissue tolerance to ionizing radiation. Subacute and late radiation pulmonary toxicity manifests as radiation pneumonitis and ultimately lung fibrosis. Recently, the addition of chemotherapy or a biologic response modifier to radiation has become the standard therapy for inoperable lung cancer. The radiosensitizing effect of these agents is associated with an increased risk of radiation pulmonary injury and treatment related mortality. The search for a serum marker for predicting radiation pulmonary injury will help us understand the mechanism leading to such events and find possible interventions to prevent the adverse outcome. Unpublished data from our laboratory suggested that following a single dose of radiation, there was a dose-related elevation in IL-6 protein levels in the lung of radiation fibrosis prone mice. Based on this information, a prospective clinical study of circulating cytokine levels and its application to predict radiation induced pulmonary injury was conducted at University of Rochester. Preliminary results revealed promising information in identifying a circulating cytokine as a predictor for radiation pneumonitis. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients receiving thoracic irradiation for primary thoracic malignancy were registered in the study. Radiation pneumonitis was determined by subjective respiratory symptoms assessed according to RTOG morbidity scoring criteria. Pretreatment and serial post-therapy chest X-ray, chest CT scan and pulmonary function tests were obtained. Radiation fibrosis was determined by radiographic changes in irradiated normal lung using a scoring system which quantified the extent of loss of air content, degree of opacification, anatomic extent of involvement, air bronchogram, pleural thickening, or effusion. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), transforming growth factor

  7. Psychological and physical co-morbidity among urban South African women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mendenhall

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence for the links between poverty and both physical and mental health; but limited research on the relationship of physical and mental health problems exists in low- and middle-income countries. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence and co-morbidity of psychological distress among women with common physical diseases in a socio-economically disadvantaged urban area of South Africa.Women enrolled in the Birth to twenty (Bt20 cohort study were evaluated for this paper. Bt20 was founded in 1990 and has followed more than 3,000 children and their caregivers since birth; this study evaluates the health of the caregivers (average age 44 of these children. Psychological distress was evaluated by administering the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and we evaluated the presence of physical disease by self-report.Forty percent of the sample presented with psychological distress using the GHQ scoring method. More than half of the women who reported a history of a physical disease, including diabetes, heart attack, asthma, arthritis, osteoporosis, epilepsy, and tuberculosis, reported psychological disorder. Presence of one physical disease was not associated with increased rates of psychological distress. However, women who reported two diseases had increased rates of psychological symptoms, and this upward trend continued with each additional physical disease reported (measured to five.These data indicate high prevalence rates of co-morbid psychological distress among women with physical disease. This argues for the need of greater mental health support for women living with physical diseases.

  8. Tourette syndrome, co-morbidities and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Snedden, Corina; Črnčec, Rudi; Pick, Anna; Sachdev, Perminder

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is often associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and other co-morbidities, the presence of which can reduce health-related quality of life. The relationship between the number and type of co-morbidities and tic severity upon health-related quality of life has been insufficiently examined in Tourette syndrome populations and not at all in the Australian context. We hypothesised that an increased number of co-morbid diagnoses would be inversely related to health-related quality of life and that the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder in particular would negatively impact health-related quality of life. In all, 83 people with a previously established diagnosis of Tourette syndrome, who responded to a letter of invitation sent to the Tourette Syndrome Association of Australia past-member database, formed the study sample. Participants completed the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome-Quality of Life Scale and a short form of the National Hospital Interview Schedule to assess tics and related behaviours. Participants with pure-Tourette syndrome had significantly better health-related quality of life than those with Tourette syndrome and three or more co-morbid diagnoses. Few differences were observed between the pure-Tourette syndrome and Tourette syndrome and one or two co-morbid diagnoses groups. Analysis of the impact of individual co-morbid disorders and Tourette syndrome symptoms on health-related quality of life indicated that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder exerted a significant negative effect, as did the presence of complex tics, especially coprolalia and copropraxia. When these variables were examined in multiple regression analysis, number of co-morbidities and the presence of coprophenomena emerged as significant predictors of health-related quality of life. While tics are the defining feature of Tourette syndrome, it appears to be the

  9. General morbidity prevalence in the Delhi slums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the sickness prevalence in the slums of a metropolitan city? Objectives: To estimate the morbidity prevalence with reference to a socio-economic and demographic perspective of the slum population of Delhi. Study Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted and data were collected by a two-stage random sampling method. In the first stage, slum locations were selected and in the second stage households were selected. Participants: Data were collected from 1049 households consisting of 5358 individuals′ information. Results: The overall morbidity prevalence is 15.4%. It is 14.7 and 16.3% for males and females, respectively but the differences are not statistically significant. The reported higher morbidity prevalence and the illiteracy status are significantly associated. Diseases of the respiratory system appear to be very high among slum dwellers. Conclusion: From this study, it can be concluded that the number of years of staying in the slum area, presence of a separate kitchen, type of house, it being Pucca or Kuccha, types of toilet pits or open defecation are the important environmental factors for the reports of higher morbidity patterns from the slum area.

  10. Ureaplasma-associated prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silwedel, Christine; Speer, Christian P; Glaser, Kirsten

    2017-11-01

    Ureaplasma species (spp.) have been acknowledged as major causative pathogens in chorioamnionitis and prematurity, but may also contribute to key morbidities in preterm infants. Several epidemiological and experimental data indicate an association of neonatal Ureaplasma colonization and/or infection with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Furthermore, a potential causal relation with other inflammation-induced morbidities, such as intraventricular hemorrhage, white matter injury, necrotizing enterocolitis, and retinopathy of prematurity, has been debated. Areas covered: This review will summarize current knowledge on the role of Ureaplasma spp. in prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidities, while furthermore examining mutual underlying mechanisms. We try to elaborate who is at particular risk of Ureaplasma-induced inflammation and subsequent secondary morbidities. Expert commentary: Most likely by complex interactions with immunological processes, Ureaplasma spp. can induce pro-inflammation, but may also downregulate the immune system. Tissue damage, possibly causing the above mentioned complications, is likely to result from both ways: either directly cytokine-associated, or due to a higher host vulnerability to secondary impact factors. These events are very likely to begin in prenatal stages, with the most immature preterm infants being most susceptible and at highest risk.

  11. [Remuneration distribution - should morbidity-dependent overall remuneration also be distributed after adjustments for morbidity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walendzik, A; Trottmann, M; Leonhardt, R; Wasem, J

    2013-04-01

    In the 2009 reform of the German collective remuneration system for outpatient medical care, on the level of overall remuneration, the morbidity risk was transferred to the health funds fulfilling a long-term demand of physicians. Nevertheless not transferring morbidity adjustment to the levels of physician groups and singular practices can lead to budgets not related to patient needs and to incentives for risk selection for individual doctors. The systematics of the distribution of overall remuneration in the German remuneration system for outpatient care are analysed focusing on the aspect of morbidity adjustment. Using diagnostic and pharmaceutical information of about half a million insured subjects, a risk adjustment model able to predict individual expenditures for outpatient care for different provider groups is presented. This model enables to additively split the individual care burden into several parts attributed to different physician groups. Conditions for the use of the model in the distribution of overall remuneration between physician groups are developed. A simulation of the use of diagnoses-based risk adjustment in standard service volumes then highlights the conditions for a successfull installation of standard service volumes representing a higher degree of risk adjustment. The presented estimation model is generally applicable for the distribution of overall remuneration to different physician groups. The simulation of standard service volumes using diagnosis-based risk adjustment does not provide a more accurate prediction of the expenditures on the level of physician practices than the age-related calculation currently used in the German remuneration system for outpatient medical care. Using elements of morbidity-based risk adjustment the current German collective system for outpatient medical care could be transformed towards a higher degree of distributional justice concerning medical care for patients and more appropriate incentives

  12. Impact of Toxicity Grade and Scoring System on the Relationship Between Mean Lung Dose and Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in a Large Cohort of Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Jin Hekun; Wei Xiong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compute the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with RP scored using three grading systems and analyzed at four threshold levels of toxicity in a large cohort of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: On the basis of medical records and radiographic images, RP was scored retrospectively in 442 patients with NSCLC who had ≥6 months of follow-up after the end of RT. The severity of RP was scored for each patient using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0 (CTC2.0); the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE3.0); and the grading system of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). For each grading system and for each of four levels of toxicity (Grade ≥1, ≥2, ≥3, ≥4), the Lyman, logistic, and log-logistic normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were fitted to the data as functions of MLD. The parameter estimates from the model fits are listed in table form, and the RP risk estimates are presented graphically for the Lyman and log-logistic NTCP models. Results: The results presented here illustrate the impact of scoring system and level of toxicity on the relationship between MLD and RP risk. Conclusions: These results facilitate quantitative comparisons between our data and studies of RP risk reported by others, and several examples of such comparisons are provided.

  13. Cancer morbidity in one of the regions of the ecological disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyb, A.F.; Bul'bulya, M.A.; Shevchenko, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of cancer morbidity (1989) of the population of the Chelyabinsk Region and on 5 territories, exposed to radioactive contamination. As compared to the whole of Russia, total cancer morbidity rates for Chelyabinsk are significantly high, including those of rectal, lung and skin cancer both in men and women. The rates of breast cancer and hemoblatosis morbidity in women were also high. Total cancer morbidity rates on the study territories were lower than the mean district indices. On the tentative territories lip cancer morbidity both in mean and women was higher than the mean district indices; esophageal cancer morbidity rates in women on the same territories was rather high

  14. A 7 gene expression score predicts for radiation response in cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Vijayalakshmi, Neelakantan; Sabitha, Kesavan; Shirley, Sundersingh; Selvaluxmy, Ganesharaja; Bose, Mayil Vahanan; Nambaru, Lavanya

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among Indian women. The current recommendations are to treat the stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB and IVA with radical radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin based chemotherapy. However, Radiotherapy alone can help cure more than 60% of stage IIB and up to 40% of stage IIIB patients. Archival RNA samples from 15 patients who had achieved complete remission and stayed disease free for more than 36 months (No Evidence of Disease or NED group) and 10 patients who had failed radical radiotherapy (Failed group) were included in the study. The RNA were amplified, labelled and hybridized to Stanford microarray chips and analyzed using BRB Array Tools software and Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) analysis. 20 genes were selected for further validation using Relative Quantitation (RQ) Taqman assay in a Taqman Low-Density Array (TLDA) format. The RQ value was calculated, using each of the NED sample once as a calibrator. A scoring system was developed based on the RQ value for the genes. Using a seven gene based scoring system, it was possible to distinguish between the tumours which were likely to respond to the radiotherapy and those likely to fail. The mean score ± 2 SE (standard error of mean) was used and at a cut-off score of greater than 5.60, the sensitivity, specificity, Positive predictive value (PPV) and Negative predictive value (NPV) were 0.64, 1.0, 1.0, 0.67, respectively, for the low risk group. We have identified a 7 gene signature which could help identify patients with cervical cancer who can be treated with radiotherapy alone. However, this needs to be validated in a larger patient population

  15. Morbidity before and after the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism has been linked with different morbidities, like atrial fibrillation, stroke and diabetes mellitus. However, our knowledge regarding the extent and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and other diseases is fragmented. Here, we aimed at evaluating various morbidities before...... and after the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism....

  16. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Yoshida, Emi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis.

  17. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Yoshida, Emi; Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis

  18. Analysis of the radiation related morbidity observed in a randomized trial of neutron therapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Williams, J.R.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.; Quilty, P.M.; Rodger, A.; MacDougall, R.H.; Jack, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the morbidity in the bladder and bowel observed in a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons versus megavoltage photons in the treatment of bladder cancer. Acute reactions in the bladder and bowel were significantly worse after photon therapy. Of the patients treated with photons 45.7% had severe reactions in the bladder compared with 10.6% after neutron therapy (p less than 0.001). Severe acute bowel reactions were observed in 8.5% of the patients after photon therapy compared with 3.8% after neutron therapy (p less than 0.05). Late reactions were significantly worse after neutrons. Severe late reactions in the bladder were seen in 58.5% of patients after neutron therapy and in 40.5% after photon therapy (p less than 0.05). In the bowel they were observed in 53.3% of patients after neutron therapy compared with 8% after photon therapy (p less than 0.0001). The disparity in the degree of early and late complications makes assessment of RBE values difficult. It is estimated that for bladder morbidity the RBE value, for photon dose fractions of 2.75 Gy, is less than 3.3 for early reactions and equal to 3.4 for late effects. The respective RBE values for early and late effects in the bowel are less than 3.4 and 3.8

  19. Radiation exposure and infant cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1974-12-01

    Medical exposures accompanied by an increase in radiation use in the field of pediatrics were described. Basic ideas and countermeasures to radiation injuries were outlined. In order to decrease the medical exposure, it is necessary for the doctor, x-ray technician and manufacturer to work together. The mechanism and characteristics of radio carcinogenesis were also mentioned. Particularly, the following two points were described: 1) How many years does it take before carcinogenesis appears as a result of radiation exposure in infancy 2) How and when does the effect of fetus exposure appear. Radiosensitivity in infants and fetuses is greater than that of an adult. The occurrence of leukemia caused by prenatal exposure was reviewed. The relation between irradiation for therapy and morbidity of thyroid cancer was mentioned. Finally, precautions necessary for infants, pregnant women and nursing mothers when using radioisotopes were mentioned.

  20. Personal factors associated with health-related quality of life in persons with morbid obesity on treatment waiting lists in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdal, Anners; Andenæs, Randi; Bjørnsborg, Eva; Bonsaksen, Tore; Borge, Lisbet; Christiansen, Bjørg; Eide, Hilde; Hvinden, Kari; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2011-10-01

    To explore relationships of socio-demographic variables, health behaviours, environmental characteristics and personal factors, with physical and mental health variables in persons with morbid obesity, and to compare their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores with scores from the general population. A cross-sectional correlation study design was used. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaire from adult patients within the first 2 days of commencement of a mandatory educational course. Of 185 course attendees, 142 (76.8%) volunteered to participate in the study. Valid responses on all items were recorded for 128 participants. HRQoL was measured with the Short Form 12v2 from which physical (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores were computed. Other standardized instruments measured regular physical activity, social support, self-esteem, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and coping style. Respondents scored lower on all the HRQoL sub-domains compared with norms. Linear regression analyses showed that personal factors that included self-esteem, self-efficacy, sense of coherence and coping style explained 3.6% of the variance in PCS scores and 41.6% in MCS scores. Personal factors such as self-esteem, sense of coherence and a high approaching coping style are strongly related to mental health in obese persons.

  1. Disordered gambling and co-morbidity of psychiatric disorders among college students: an examination of problem drinking, anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ryan J; Usdan, Stuart; Cremeens, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the occurrence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders (i.e., problem drinking, anxiety, and depression) among college students who met the threshold for disordered gambling. The participants included a large sample of undergraduate students (n = 1,430) who were enrolled in an introductory health course at a large, southeastern university in Spring 2011 and completed an online assessment that included scales to assess disordered gambling, problem drinking, anxiety, and depression. We calculated screening scores, computed prevalence rates for each disorder, and calculated Pearson correlations and Chi square tests to examine correlations and co-morbid relationships between the four disorders. Analyses indicated that all disorders were significantly associated (p students who experience disordered gambling (and other psychiatric disorders) are at increased risk of experiencing co-occurring disorders, it might be useful for college health professionals to concurrently screen and intervene for co-occurring disorders.

  2. Morbidity of curative cancer surgery and suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Sekigami, Yurie; Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2017-11-01

    Curative cancer operations lead to debility and loss of autonomy in a population vulnerable to suicide death. The extent to which operative intervention impacts suicide risk is not well studied. To examine the effects of morbidity of curative cancer surgeries and prognosis of disease on the risk of suicide in patients with solid tumors. Retrospective cohort study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data from 2004 to 2011; multilevel systematic review. General US population. Participants were 482 781 patients diagnosed with malignant neoplasm between 2004 and 2011 who underwent curative cancer surgeries. Death by suicide or self-inflicted injury. Among 482 781 patients that underwent curative cancer surgery, 231 committed suicide (16.58/100 000 person-years [95% confidence interval, CI, 14.54-18.82]). Factors significantly associated with suicide risk included male sex (incidence rate [IR], 27.62; 95% CI, 23.82-31.86) and age >65 years (IR, 22.54; 95% CI, 18.84-26.76). When stratified by 30-day overall postoperative morbidity, a significantly higher incidence of suicide was found for high-morbidity surgeries (IR, 33.30; 95% CI, 26.50-41.33) vs moderate morbidity (IR, 24.27; 95% CI, 18.92-30.69) and low morbidity (IR, 9.81; 95% CI, 7.90-12.04). Unit increase in morbidity was significantly associated with death by suicide (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P = .02) and decreased suicide-specific survival (hazards ratio, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03, P = .01) in prognosis-adjusted models. In this sample of cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, patients that undergo high-morbidity surgeries appear most vulnerable to death by suicide. The identification of this high-risk cohort should motivate health care providers and particularly surgeons to adopt screening measures during the postoperative follow-up period for these patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A study of phenomenology, psychiatric co-morbidities, social and adaptive functioning in children and adolescents with OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Yaduvanshi, Rakesh; Arya, Amit; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2016-08-01

    To study the phenomenology, social, adaptive and global functioning of children and adolescents with OCD. Studies have shown varying prevalence of paediatric OCD ranging from 1% to 4%. Childhood-onset OCD have some important differences in sex distribution, presentation, co-morbidities and insight. 25 subjects (6 to ≤18 years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of OCD were included in this study. Subjects were evaluated using K-SADS-PL, Children's Y-BOCS, HoNOSCA, C-GAS and VABS-II. The mean age of the sample was 14.9±2.2 years. Obsession of contamination was commonest (68%) followed by aggressive obsession (60%); commonest compulsions were washing and cleaning (72%) followed by checking (56%). Most distressing obsessions were obsession of doubt about their decision (28%), having horrible thoughts about their family being hurt (20%) and thought that something terrible is going to happen and it will be their fault (16%). Most subjects rate spending far too much time in washing hands (60%) as most distressing compulsion, followed by rewriting and checking compulsions (both 12%). 76% subjects have co-morbid psychiatric diagnosis. Anxiety disorders (24%), depression (16%), and dissociative disorder (16%) were common co-morbidities. Mean C-GAS score of the sample was 53.2±9.9. 44% of subjects had below average adaptive functioning. The study shows that, most frequent obsessions and compulsions may be different from most distressing ones and this finding might have clinical implication. Most of the children and adolescent with OCD have co-morbidities. Children also had problems in adaptive functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of radiation safety awareness among nuclear medicine nurses: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, N A; Abdullah, M H R O; Said, M A; Ch'ng, P E

    2014-01-01

    All nuclear medicine nurses need to have some knowledge and awareness on radiation safety. At present, there is no study to address this issue in Malaysia. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the level of knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among nuclear medicine nurses at Putrajaya Hospital in Malaysia and (2) to assess the effectiveness of a training program provided by the hospital to increase the knowledge and awareness of the nuclear medicine nurses. A total of 27 respondents attending a training program on radiation safety were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire consists 16 items and were categorized into two main areas, namely general radiation knowledge and radiation safety. Survey data were collected before and after the training and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Respondents were scored out of a total of 16 marks with 8 marks for each area. The findings showed that the range of total scores obtained by the nuclear medicine nurses before and after the training were 6-14 (with a mean score of 11.19) and 13-16 marks (with a mean score of 14.85), respectively. Findings also revealed that the mean score for the area of general radiation knowledge (7.59) was higher than that of the radiation safety (7.26). Currently, the knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among the nuclear medicine nurses are at the moderate level. It is recommended that a national study be conducted to assess and increase the level of knowledge and awareness among all nuclear medicine nurses in Malaysia

  5. Assessment of radiation safety awareness among nuclear medicine nurses: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, N. A.; Abdullah, M. H. R. O.; Said, M. A.; Ch'ng, P. E.

    2014-11-01

    All nuclear medicine nurses need to have some knowledge and awareness on radiation safety. At present, there is no study to address this issue in Malaysia. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the level of knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among nuclear medicine nurses at Putrajaya Hospital in Malaysia and (2) to assess the effectiveness of a training program provided by the hospital to increase the knowledge and awareness of the nuclear medicine nurses. A total of 27 respondents attending a training program on radiation safety were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire consists 16 items and were categorized into two main areas, namely general radiation knowledge and radiation safety. Survey data were collected before and after the training and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Respondents were scored out of a total of 16 marks with 8 marks for each area. The findings showed that the range of total scores obtained by the nuclear medicine nurses before and after the training were 6-14 (with a mean score of 11.19) and 13-16 marks (with a mean score of 14.85), respectively. Findings also revealed that the mean score for the area of general radiation knowledge (7.59) was higher than that of the radiation safety (7.26). Currently, the knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among the nuclear medicine nurses are at the moderate level. It is recommended that a national study be conducted to assess and increase the level of knowledge and awareness among all nuclear medicine nurses in Malaysia.

  6. Liver morphology in morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T; Gluud, C

    1984-01-01

    Literature on liver morphology in untreated obesity reveals varying prevalences of various pathological findings. The purpose of this literature study was to summarize and evaluate the published observations and to discuss discrepant findings. A complete search was aimed at utilizing bibliographic...... methods including a computerized survey. Forty-one original articles were included, comprising information on liver morphology in 1515 morbidly obese patients. Liver biopsy was considered normal in 12 per cent of the cases. The most frequent abnormality reported was fatty change, present in 80 per cent...... of obesity, age, sex, alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus) does not point towards a single causal factor. Co-influence of additional pathogenetic factors are likely in the development of liver changes in morbid obesity....

  7. Late effects of normal tissues (lent) scoring system: the soma scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Pavy, J.J.; Denekamp, J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation tolerance of normal tissues remains the limiting factor for delivering tumoricidal dose. The late toxicity of normal tissues is the most critical element of an irradiation: somatic, functional and structural alterations occur during the actual treatment itself, but late effects manifest months to years after acute effects heal, and may progress with time. The optimal therapeutic ratio ultimately requires not only complete tumor clearance, but also minimal residual injury to surrounding vital normal tissues. The disparity between the intensity of acute and late effects and the inability to predict the eventual manifestation of late normal tissue injury has made radiation oncologists recognize the importance of careful patient follow-up. There is so far no uniform toxicity scoring system to compare several clinical studies in the absence of a 'common toxicity language'. This justifies the need to establish a precise evaluation system for the analysis of late effects of radiation on normal tissues. The SOMA/LENT scoring system results from an international collaboration. European Organization Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) have created subcommittees with the aim of addressing the question of standardized toxic effects criteria. This effort appeared as a necessity to standardize and improve the data recording, to then describe and evaluate uniform toxicity at regular time intervals. The current proposed scale is not yet validated, and should be used cautiously. (authors)

  8. Severe radiation morbidity in carcinoma of the cervix: impact of pretherapy surgical staging and previous surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Bruce A.; Hempling, Ronald E.; Piver, M. Steven; Baker, Trudy R.; McAuley, Michael; Driscoll, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to delineate the factors which (a) contribute to an increase in the severe, radiation induced complication rate and (b) have a significant effect on survival in patients with International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) Stage I-IVA cervical cancer undergoing pretherapy surgical staging. Methods and Materials: From 1971-1991, 189 patients underwent pretherapy surgical staging via a retroperitoneal approach (67) or transperitoneal approach (122). Seventy-nine patients had previously experienced a laparotomy. Patients subsequently received a median of 85 Gy to point A. In patients receiving paraaortic radiation, a median of 45 Gy was administered. One hundred and thirty-two (69.8%) patients received hydroxyurea as a radiation sensitizer. Results: Pretherapy surgical evaluation revealed that 21 of 89 (23.6%) Stage II patients and 32 of 85 (37.6%) Stage III patients had paraaortic lymph node metastases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis detailed the significant factors favorably influencing the radiation-induced complication rate to be a retroperitoneal approach of pretherapy surgical staging and no previous laparotomy. Survival was significantly prolonged in patients receiving hydroxyurea, evaluated via a retroperitoneal incision, with negative paraaortic lymph nodes, and with an early stage of disease. Conclusion: A retroperitoneal approach to pretherapy surgical staging and absence of previous surgery reduced the incidence of subsequent radiation-induced complications. Despite improvements in the detection of occult disease, prolonged survival is impaired when the therapeutic measures currently available are used

  9. Late toxicities after conventional radiation therapy alone for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Jeffrey Kit Loong, E-mail: ntrtkl@nccs.com.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Ha, Tam Cam [Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Singapore); Ong, Whee Sze [Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Siow, Tian Rui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Tham, Ivan Weng Keong [National University Health System Singapore (Singapore); Yap, Swee Peng; Tan, Terence Wee Kiat; Chua, Eu Tiong; Fong, Kam Weng [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Wee, Joseph Tien Seng [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    Background and purpose: We sought to evaluate the nature and frequency of late toxicities in a cohort of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with conventional radiotherapy alone. Methods and materials: Seven-hundred and ninety-six consecutive NPC patients treated using conventional radiotherapy at a single center from 1992 to 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with histology proven, completely staged, Stage I-IVB World Health Organization Type I-III NPC and completed radical radiotherapy were included. Patients with incomplete staging investigations, distant metastases at diagnosis, previous treatment, and incomplete radiotherapy were excluded. Radiotherapy-related complications were categorized using the RTOG Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 7.2 years. The 5-year overall survival and disease free survival were 69% and 56%, respectively, and the corresponding 10-year rates were 52% and 44%. Among 771 patients with at least 3 months of follow-up post treatment, 565 (73%) developed RT-related complications. Diagnosed neurological complications were cranial nerve palsies (n = 70; 9%), temporal lobe necrosis (n = 37; 5%), Lhermitte's syndrome (n = 7; 1%), and brachial plexopathy (n = 2; 0.3%). Non-neurological complications included xerostomia (n = 353; 46%), neck fibrosis (n = 169; 22%), hypo-pituitarism (n = 48; 6%), hearing loss (n = 120; 16%), dysphagia (n = 116; 15%), otorrhea (n = 101; 13%), tinnitus (n = 94; 12%), permanent tube feeding (n = 61; 8%), trismus (n = 45; 6%), second malignancies within treatment field (n = 17; 2%), and osteo-radionecrosis (n = 13; 2%). Conclusions: While radiotherapy is curative in NPC, many patients suffer significant late treatment morbidities with conventional radiotherapy techniques.

  10. Late toxicities after conventional radiation therapy alone for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan, Jeffrey Kit Loong; Ha, Tam Cam; Ong, Whee Sze; Siow, Tian Rui; Tham, Ivan Weng Keong; Yap, Swee Peng; Tan, Terence Wee Kiat; Chua, Eu Tiong; Fong, Kam Weng; Wee, Joseph Tien Seng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: We sought to evaluate the nature and frequency of late toxicities in a cohort of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with conventional radiotherapy alone. Methods and materials: Seven-hundred and ninety-six consecutive NPC patients treated using conventional radiotherapy at a single center from 1992 to 1995 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with histology proven, completely staged, Stage I–IVB World Health Organization Type I–III NPC and completed radical radiotherapy were included. Patients with incomplete staging investigations, distant metastases at diagnosis, previous treatment, and incomplete radiotherapy were excluded. Radiotherapy-related complications were categorized using the RTOG Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 7.2 years. The 5-year overall survival and disease free survival were 69% and 56%, respectively, and the corresponding 10-year rates were 52% and 44%. Among 771 patients with at least 3 months of follow-up post treatment, 565 (73%) developed RT-related complications. Diagnosed neurological complications were cranial nerve palsies (n = 70; 9%), temporal lobe necrosis (n = 37; 5%), Lhermitte’s syndrome (n = 7; 1%), and brachial plexopathy (n = 2; 0.3%). Non-neurological complications included xerostomia (n = 353; 46%), neck fibrosis (n = 169; 22%), hypo-pituitarism (n = 48; 6%), hearing loss (n = 120; 16%), dysphagia (n = 116; 15%), otorrhea (n = 101; 13%), tinnitus (n = 94; 12%), permanent tube feeding (n = 61; 8%), trismus (n = 45; 6%), second malignancies within treatment field (n = 17; 2%), and osteo-radionecrosis (n = 13; 2%). Conclusions: While radiotherapy is curative in NPC, many patients suffer significant late treatment morbidities with conventional radiotherapy techniques.

  11. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia

  12. Predictive score of sarcopenia occurrence one year after bariatric surgery in severely obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voican, Cosmin Sebastian; Lebrun, Amandine; Maitre, Sophie; Lainas, Panagiotis; Lamouri, Karima; Njike-Nakseu, Micheline; Gaillard, Martin; Tranchart, Hadrien; Balian, Axel; Dagher, Ibrahim; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Naveau, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Sarcopenic obesity is a risk factor of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to generate a predictive score of sarcopenia occurrence one year after bariatric surgery. We conducted an observational prospective cohort study on a total of 184 severely obese patients admitted to our institution to undergo sleeve gastrectomy. Skeletal muscle cross-sectional area at the third lumbar vertebrae (SMA, cm2) was measured from the routinely performed computed tomography. The skeletal muscle index (SMI) was calculated as follows: SMA/height2 (cm2/m2). Sarcopenia was defined as an SMI predictive sarcopenia occurrence scores were constructed using SMA and gender (SS1 score) or SMI and gender (SS2 score). The area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve of the SS2 score was significantly greater than that of the SS1 score for the diagnosis of postoperative sarcopenia occurrence (0.95±0.02 versus 0.90±0.02; ppredictive value of 83%, and a negative predictive value of 95%. In the group of patients without baseline sarcopenia, the SS2 score had still an excellent AUROC of 0.92±0.02. A cut-off of 0.55 predicted development of sarcopenia one year after sleeve gastrectomy in these patients with a sensitivity of 87%, a specificity of 88%, and negative predictive value of 95%. The SS2 score has excellent predictive value for the occurrence of sarcopenia one year after sleeve gastrectomy. This score can be used to target early intensification of nutritional and dietetic follow-up to the predicted high-risk population.

  13. Impact of maternal diabetes mellitus on mortality and morbidity of very low birth weight infants: a multicenter Latin America study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Carlos; Tapia, Jose L; Cardoso, Viviane C

    2015-01-01

    To compare mortality and morbidity in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI) born to women with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). This was a cohort study with retrospective data collection (2001-2010, n=11.991) from the NEOCOSUR network. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the outcome of neonatal mortality and morbidity as a function of maternal DM. Women with no DM served as the reference group. The rate of maternal DM was 2.8% (95% CI: 2.5-3.1), but a significant (p=0.019) increase was observed between 2001-2005 (2.4%, 2.1-2.8) and 2006-2010 (3.2%, 2.8-3.6). Mothers with DM were more likely to have received a complete course of prenatal steroids than those without DM. Infants of diabetic mothers had a slightly higher gestational age and birth weight than infants of born to non-DM mothers. Distribution of mean birth weight Z-scores, small for gestational age status, and Apgar scores were similar. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus. Delivery room mortality, total mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, and early-onset sepsis rates were significantly lower in the diabetic group, whereas necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) was significantly higher in infants born to DM mothers. In the logistic regression analysis, NEC grades 2-3 was the only condition independently associated with DM (adjusted OR: 1.65 [95% CI: 1.2 -2.27]). VLBWI born to DM mothers do not appear to be at an excess risk of mortality or early morbidity, except for NEC. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of maternal diabetes mellitus on mortality and morbidity of very low birth weight infants: a multicenter Latin America study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Grandi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare mortality and morbidity in very low birth weight infants (VLBWI born to women with and without diabetes mellitus (DM. METHODS: This was a cohort study with retrospective data collection (2001-2010, n = 11.991 from the NEOCOSUR network. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the outcome of neonatal mortality and morbidity as a function of maternal DM. Women with no DM served as the reference group. RESULTS: The rate of maternal DM was 2.8% (95% CI: 2.5-3.1, but a significant (p = 0.019 increase was observed between 2001-2005 (2.4%, 2.1-2.8 and 2006-2010 (3.2%, 2.8-3.6. Mothers with DM were more likely to have received a complete course of prenatal steroids than those without DM. Infants of diabetic mothers had a slightly higher gestational age and birth weight than infants of born to non-DM mothers. Distribution of mean birth weight Z-scores, small for gestational age status, and Apgar scores were similar. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus. Delivery room mortality, total mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, and early-onset sepsis rates were significantly lower in the diabetic group, whereas necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC was significantly higher in infants born to DM mothers. In the logistic regression analysis, NEC grades 2-3 was the only condition independently associated with DM (adjusted OR: 1.65 [95% CI: 1.2 -2.27]. CONCLUSIONS: VLBWI born to DM mothers do not appear to be at an excess risk of mortality or early morbidity, except for NEC.

  15. Impact of co-morbidities and patient characteristics on international normalized ratio control over time in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Winnie W; Choi, Jiyoon C; Vanderpoel, Julie; Damaraju, Chandrasekharra V; Wildgoose, Peter; Fields, Larry E; Schein, Jeffrey R

    2013-08-15

    This study determined the association between co-morbidities, including heart failure (HF) and time in therapeutic range (TTR), in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Longitudinal patient-level anticoagulation management records collected from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Adult patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who used warfarin for a 12-month period with no gap of >60 days between visits were identified. TTR <55% was defined as "lower" TTR. CHADS₂ score of ≥2 was defined as "higher" CHADS₂. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the association between co-morbidities and TTR. A total of 23,425 patients met the study criteria. The mean age ± SD was 74.8 ± 9.7 years, with 84.8% aged ≥65 years. The most common co-morbidities were hypertension (41.7%), diabetes (24.1%), HF (11.7%), and previous stroke (11.1%). The mean TTR ± SD was 67.3 ± 14.4%, with 18.6% of patients in the lower TTR range. In multivariate analyses using age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, stroke, and region as covariates, HF (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28 to 1.56; p <0.001), diabetes (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.38; p <0.001), and previous stroke (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.27; p <0.001) were associated with lower TTR. In a second set of multivariate analyses using gender and region as covariates, a higher CHADS₂ score was associated with lower TTR (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.18; p <0.001). In conclusion, HF was associated with the greatest likelihood of a lower TTR, followed by diabetes, then stroke. Anticoagulation control may be more challenging for patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Soluble TWEAK and Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney patients (CKD). The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) as a marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CKD patients.

  17. Explaining excess morbidity amongst homeless shelter users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Birkelund, Jesper Fels

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: This article analyses excess morbidity amongst homeless shelter users compared to the general Danish population. The study provides an extensive control for confounding and investigates to what extent excess morbidity is explained by homelessness or other risk factors. METHODS: Data set...... includes administrative micro-data for 4,068,926 Danes who were 23 years or older on 1 January 2007. Nationwide data on shelter use identified 14,730 individuals as shelter users from 2002 to 2006. Somatic diseases were measured from 2007 to 2011 through diagnosis data from hospital discharges. The risk...... of somatic diseases amongst shelter users was analysed through a multivariate model that decomposed the total effect into a direct effect and indirect effects mediated by other risk factors. RESULTS: The excess morbidity associated with shelter use is substantially lower than in studies that did not include...

  18. The epidemiology of vertigo, dizziness and unsteadiness and its links to co-morbidities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eBisdorff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo, dizziness and unsteadiness (VDU are common symptoms traditionally considered to result from different kinds of vestibular and non-vestibular dysfunctions. The epidemiology of each symptom and how they relate to each other and to migraine, agoraphobia, motion sickness susceptibility (MSS, vaso-vagal episodes (VVE and anxiety-depression (AD was the object of this population-based study in north-eastern France. A self-administered questionnaire was returned by 2987 adults (age span 18-86 years, 1471 women. The 1-year prevalence for vertigo was 48.3%, for unsteadiness 39.1% and for dizziness 35.6%. The three symptoms were correlated with each other, occurred mostly (69.4% in various combinations rather than in isolation, less than once per month, and 90% of episodes lasted ≤ 2 minutes. The three symptoms were similar in terms of female predominance, temporary profile of the episodes and their link to falls and nausea. Symptom episodes of >1 hour increase the risk of falls. VDU are much more common than the known prevalence of vestibular disorders. The number of drugs taken increase VDU even when controlling for age. Each VDU symptom was correlated with each co-morbidity in Chi2 tests. The data suggest that the three symptoms are more likely to represent a spectrum resulting from a range of similar — rather than from different, unrelated — mechanisms or disorders. Logistic regressions controlling for each vestibular symptom showed that vertigo correlated with each co-morbidity but dizziness and unsteadiness did not, suggesting that vertigo is certainly not a more specific symptom than the other two. A logistic regression using a composite score of VDU, controlling for each co-morbidity showed a correlation of VDU to migraine and VVE but not to MSS and not to agoraphobia in men, only in women.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as morbid jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, A.; Carney, M. W.; Denman, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    A patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus and presenting with morbid jealousy is described. There was evidence of cerebral lupus. Her physical and mental symptoms responded to a combination of chlorpromazine and steroids. The morbid mental process was probably caused by her physical condition while the content of her disordered thought and behaviour was determined by her introverted premorbid personality, religiosity, unhappy childhood experiences and frustrated desire for children. PMID:7413541

  20. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Harshit; Vigneshwaran, Balasubiramaniyan; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Ahuja, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS) questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80%) showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH) during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG.

  1. Relationship of personal hygiene with nutrition and morbidity profile: a study among primary school children in South kolkata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Soumya; Dutta, Sinjita; Dasgupta, Aparajita; Misra, Raghunath

    2010-04-01

    Majority of the health problems affecting school children are preventable by promotion of hygienic practices through proper health education by the teachers, who are the first contacts. The study was undertaken to find out the status of nutrition and personal hygiene among primary school children and their association with their varied morbidity profiles. A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted in a primary school situated in the largest slum of Kolkata. The participants included 103 boys and 81 girls, with a mean age of 6.2 years. The mean personal hygiene score of the girls (4.15 ± 0.98) was significantly higher than that of boys (3.2 ± 1.4) [PPersonal hygiene scores were significantly higher (Ppersonal hygiene and poor sanitary practices of these school children through coordinated and concerted health education measures by teachers as well as parents.

  2. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Milagros; Bottle, Alex; Long, Susannah; Aylin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting. To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity. Retrospective observational study using administrative data. English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13. All admitted patients aged 65 years and over. By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis) we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%. We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups) up to 67% (80-84yr age-group). The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD). Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2), associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5), associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6) and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction. By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  3. Multi-Morbidity in Hospitalised Older Patients: Who Are the Complex Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Ruiz

    Full Text Available No formal definition for the "complex elderly" exists; moreover, these older patients with high levels of multi-morbidity are not readily identified as such at point of hospitalisation, thus missing a valuable opportunity to manage the older patient appropriately within the hospital setting.To empirically identify the complex elderly patient based on degree of multi-morbidity.Retrospective observational study using administrative data.English hospitals during the financial year 2012-13.All admitted patients aged 65 years and over.By using exploratory analysis (correspondence analysis we identify multi-morbidity groups based on 20 target conditions whose hospital prevalence was ≥ 1%.We examined a total of 2788900 hospital admissions. Multi-morbidity was highly prevalent, 62.8% had 2 or more of the targeted conditions while 4.7% had six or more. Multi-morbidity increased with age from 56% (65-69yr age-groups up to 67% (80-84yr age-group. The average multi-morbidity was 3.2±1.2 (SD. Correspondence analysis revealed 3 distinct groups of older patients. Group 1 (multi-morbidity ≤2, associated with cancer and/or metastasis; Group 2 (multi-morbidity of 3, 4 or 5, associated with chronic pulmonary disease, lung disease, rheumatism and osteoporosis; finally Group 3 with the highest level of multi-morbidity (≥6 and associated with heart failure, cerebrovascular accident, diabetes, hypertension and myocardial infarction.By using widely available hospital administrative data, we propose patients in Groups 2 and 3 to be identified as the complex elderly. Identification of multi-morbidity patterns can help to predict the needs of the older patient and improve resource provision.

  4. A study of psychiatric morbidity in patients of peptic ulcer diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagpal Singh Klair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among patients of peptic ulcer disease and to study the patients of peptic ulcer disease with psychiatric morbidity in comparison to patients of peptic ulcer disease without psychiatric morbidity on following variables: sociodemographic variables and attributes/risk factors of peptic ulcer disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of clinically proven acid peptic diseases and 30 cases of the control group were screened in department of General Medicine, outdoor as well as indoor patients. Instruments applied for the purpose of the study were Personal Bio-data Performa (Appendix-I, (SCL- 80 (Appendix-II, Hamilton rating scale for anxiety and depression, (P.S.L.E.; clinical diagnosis of psychiatric disorders was made as per ICD- 10 criteria. Data collected shall be subjected to statistical analysis. Results and Findings: The psychiatric morbidity was significantly (P10 years, compared to 23.80% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Lastly, 48.27% of patients with psychiatric morbidity had significantly (P<0.01 stronger family history of acid peptic disease compared to 9.52% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions: There is a significant relationship between the peptic ulcer disease and the various psychiatric morbidity factors as illustrated from the findings of this study.

  5. Massive haemoptysis death and other morbidity associated with high dose rate intraluminal radiotherapy for carcinoma of the bronchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollins, S.W.; Ryder, W.D.J.; Burt, P.A.; Barber, P.V.; Stout, R.

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and six patients with primary non-small cell carcinoma of the bronchus causing symptoms due to endobronchial disease, were treated with intraluminal radiotherapy (ILT) using the microSelectron-HDR machine at the Christie Hospital, Manchester, between April 1988 and the end of 1992. An assessment of morbidity for this treatment is presented, particularly with regard to the risk factors and causes of massive haemoptysis death. The most common early side-effect was a mild transient exacerbation of cough which usually resolved within 2-3 weeks. At various times following ILT treatment 83 bronchoscopies were carried out randomly in 55 patients. In bronchoscopies carried out within the first 3 months following ILT, no tumour was visible in 80% of cases. A mucosal radiation reaction score (RRS) was used to grade bronchoscopic appearance after ILT treatment. Overall, 55% of bronchoscopic examinations showed some degree of mucosal radiation reaction. The majority of radiation reactions from 6 months onwards after ILT demonstrated a degree of fibrosis. A radiation reaction was seen more frequently after treatment with 2000 cGy as opposed to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the central axis of the radiation source. Thirty-two patients were identified who had died from massive haemoptysis (MH) as a terminal event. A Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that the treatment-related factors of increased dose at first ILT (P = 0.004), prior laser treatment at the site of ILT (P = 0.020) and second ILT treatment in the same location as the first ILT treatment (P 0.047), all significantly increased the relative risk of MH death compared with their effect on the relative risk of death from other causes (OC). (In addition a fourth treatment-related factor, namely the concurrent use of ILT and external beam radiotherapy (EB) had a P value of 0.08). Twenty out of 25 assessable MH-death patients (80%) had evidence of recurrent or residual tumour before death but 5 patients (20

  6. Alcohol abuse and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Patients who drink too much have more complications after surgery. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the evidence, possible mechanisms, and prevention of the increased postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, defined by a consumption of at least five drinks per day. The literature could...... be criticised for several methodological flaws. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement showing moderate to strong evidence of increased postoperative morbidity after surgical procedures on alcohol abusers. There is weak to moderate evidence of increased postoperative mortality, hospital stay, and re......-operation. The personal and economic consequences are tremendous. The incidence of alcohol abusers undergoing surgery was 7% to 49%, according to gender and diagnosis. They have been identified by a self-reported alcohol intake, which implies the possibility of underestimation. Alcohol markers could be used for a more...

  7. Depressive Symptoms, Co-Morbidities, and Glycemic Control in Hong Kong Chinese Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie C. H. Fung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectivesUndiagnosed depression is an important comorbidity in type 2 diabetes (T2D which can be detected using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 questionnaire. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the associations of depression using GDS score with control of cardiometabolic risk factors and health status in elderly patients with T2D.Setting and participantsBetween February and December 2013, patients aged ≥65 years who underwent structured comprehensive assessment as a quality improvement program at the Diabetes Center of a teaching hospital were invited to complete the GDS-15 questionnaire.Main outcome measuresDepression was defined as a GDS score ≥7. Demographic data, prior history of co-morbidities, frequency of self-reported hypoglycemia, and attainment of treatment targets defined as HbA1c, <7%, blood pressure <130/80 mmHg, and LDL-C <2.6 mmol/L were documented.ResultsAmong 325 participants (65% male, median [interquartile range] age: 69 [8] years, 42 (13% had depression. Patients with depression had longer disease durations (mean ± SD: 15.1 ± 9.1 vs. 11.6 ± 8.1 years, P = 0.02, more frequent self-reported hypoglycemic events (17 vs. 6%, P = 0.03 and were less likely to attain all three treatment targets (0 vs. 16%, P = 0.004 than those without depression. On multivariable analysis, patients with depression had an odds ratio of 2.84 (95% confidence intervals: 1.35–6.00, P = 0.006 of reporting prior history of co-morbidities.ConclusionIn elderly patients with T2D, depression was not uncommon especially in those with poor control of risk factors, hypoglycemia, and co-morbidities. Inclusion of GDS-15 questionnaire during structured assessment for complications and risk factors can identify these high-risk patients for more holistic management of their physical and mental health.

  8. [The scoring system for the risk-stratification in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Kenji

    2017-01-01

      Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the persistence of the pathogenic autoantibodies, the antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Recurernt thrombosis is often observed in patients with APS which requires persistent prophylaxis. However, an uniform prophylactic treatment for APS patients is inadequate and stratification of the thrombotic risks is important as aPL are prevalently observed in other various diseases or elderly population. It is previously known that the multiple positivity or high titre of aPL correlate to the thrombotic events. To progress the stratification of the thrombotic risks and to quantitatively analyze them, antiphospholipid score (aPL-S) and the Global Anti-Phospholipid Syndrome Score (GAPSS) were defined as the scoring-systems. Both of these scoring-systems were raised from the large patient cohort data and either aPL profile classified in detail (aPL-S) or simplified aPL profile with classical thrombotic risk factors (GAPSS) were put into scoring system. They have shown a degree of accuracy in identifying high-risk APS patients, especially those at a high risk of thrombosis. However, there are several areas requiring improvement, or at least that clinicians should be aware of, before these instruments are applied in clinical practice. One such issue is standardisation of the aPL tests, including general testing of phosphatidylserine dependent antiprothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT).

  9. Co-morbidity of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with focus on personality traits and related disorders in a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Christian P; Romanos, Jasmin; Dempfle, Astrid; Heine, Monika; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Kruse, Anja; Reif, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Romanos, Marcel; Strobel, Alexander; Brocke, Burkhard; Schäfer, Helmut; Schmidtke, Armin; Böning, Jobst; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence and consequences of co-morbid axis-I and axis-II disorders as well as personality traits were examined in a large cohort of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AADHD) at a tertiary referral center. In- and outpatients referred for diagnostic assessment of AADHD were screened. 372 affected probands were examined by means of the Structured Clinical Interview of DSM-IV axis-I/II disorders, the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ). Lifetime co-morbidity with mood disorders was 57.3%, with anxiety disorders 27.2%, and with substance use disorders 45.0%. The histrionic personality disorder (35.2%) was the most frequent personality disorder. AADHD patients exhibited significantly altered scores on most of the NEO-PI-R and TPQ personality dimensions. The extent of substance abuse and dependence, as well as the presence of antisocial personality disorder alone or the cumulative number of other specific personality disorders was associated with lower psychosocial status (pdisorders was remarkably prevalent. In AADHD co-morbid mood, anxiety, and personality disorders as well as substance abuse/dependence is likely to be predictive of poor outcome.

  10. Parental psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity in Puerto Rican twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Nancy E.; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Silberg, Judy L.; Canino, Glorisa; Rosner, Bernard A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about paternal psychosocial factors and childhood asthma. Objective To examine the link between maternal and paternal psychosocial stress and asthma outcomes in young children. Methods Parents of 339 pairs of Puerto Rican twins were interviewed individually about their own psychosocial stress and about asthma in their children at age 1 and again about their child’s asthma at age 3. Fathers were asked about symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anti-social behavior. Mothers were asked about depressive symptoms. Outcomes assessed in children included recent asthma symptoms, oral steroid use and hospitalizations for asthma in the prior year, and asthma diagnosis. Generalized estimated equation models were used for the multivariate analysis of parental psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity in childhood. Results After multivariable adjustment, paternal PTSD symptoms, depression, and anti-social behavior were each associated with increased asthma symptoms at age 1 (e.g., OR =1.08 for each 1-point increase in PTSD score, 95% CI=1.03–1.14). Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with an increased risk of asthma hospitalizations at age 1 year. At age 3 years, maternal depressive symptoms were associated with asthma diagnosis and hospitalizations for asthma (OR for each 1-point increase in symptoms=1.16, 95% CI=1.00–1.36]). In an analysis combining 1 and 3 year outcomes, paternal depression was associated with oral steroid use, maternal depressive symptoms were associated with asthma hospitalizations and asthma diagnosis, and parental depression was associated with hospitalizations for asthma. Conclusions Both paternal and maternal psychosocial factors may influence asthma morbidity in young Puerto Rican children. PMID:21194742

  11. Coronary artery calcification scores improve contrast-induced nephropathy risk assessment in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osugi, Naohiro; Suzuki, Susumu; Shibata, Yohei; Tatami, Yosuke; Harata, Shingo; Ota, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Ishii, Hideki; Shimizu, Atsuya; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-06-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictive value of CAC scores for the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after cardiac catheterization in non-dialyzed CKD patients. The present study evaluated a total of 140 CKD patients who underwent cardiac catheterization. Patients were stratified into two groups based on the optimal cut-off value of the CAC score, which was graded by a non-triggered, routine diagnostic chest computed tomography scan: CAC score ≥8 (high CAC group); and CAC score 10 % in the baseline serum cystatin C level at 24 h after contrast administration. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate levels were 41.1 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , and the mean contrast dose administered was 37.5 mL. Patients with high CAC scores exhibited a higher incidence of CIN than patients with low CAC scores (25.5 vs. 3.2 %, p < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment for confounders, the CAC score predicted CIN (odds ratio 1.68, 95 % confidence interval 1.28-2.21, p < 0.001). Moreover, the C-index for CIN prediction significantly increased when the CAC scores were added to the Mehran risk score (0.855 vs. 0.760, p = 0.023). CAC scores, as evaluated using semi-quantitative methods, are a simple and powerful predictor of CIN. Incorporating the CAC score in the Mehran risk score significantly improved the predictive ability to predict CIN incidence.

  12. Site of delivery contribution to black-white severe maternal morbidity disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Egorova, Natalia N; Balbierz, Amy; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Hebert, Paul L

    2016-08-01

    The black-white maternal mortality disparity is the largest disparity among all conventional population perinatal health measures, and the mortality gap between black and white women in New York City has nearly doubled in recent years. For every maternal death, 100 women experience severe maternal morbidity, a life-threatening diagnosis, or undergo a life-saving procedure during their delivery hospitalization. Like maternal mortality, severe maternal morbidity is more common among black than white women. A significant portion of maternal morbidity and mortality is preventable, making quality of care in hospitals a critical lever for improving outcomes. Hospital variation in risk-adjusted severe maternal morbidity rates exists. The extent to which variation in hospital performance on severe maternal morbidity rates contributes to black-white disparities in New York City hospitals has not been studied. We examined the extent to which black-white differences in severe maternal morbidity rates in New York City hospitals can be explained by differences in the hospitals in which black and white women deliver. We conducted a population-based study using linked 2011-2013 New York City discharge and birth certificate datasets (n = 353,773 deliveries) to examine black-white differences in severe maternal morbidity rates in New York City hospitals. A mixed-effects logistic regression with a random hospital-specific intercept was used to generate risk-standardized severe maternal morbidity rates for each hospital (n = 40). We then assessed differences in the distributions of black and white deliveries among these hospitals. Severe maternal morbidity occurred in 8882 deliveries (2.5%) and was higher among black than white women (4.2% vs 1.5%, P rates among New York City hospitals ranged from 0.8 to 5.7 per 100 deliveries. White deliveries were more likely to be delivered in low-morbidity hospitals: 65% of white vs 23% of black deliveries occurred in hospitals in the lowest

  13. High velocity missile-related colorectal injuries: In-theatre application of injury scores and their effects on ostomy rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymak, Şahin; Ünlü, Aytekin; Harlak, Ali; Ersöz, Nail; Şenocak, Rahman; Coşkun, Ali Kağan; Zeybek, Nazif; Lapsekili, Emin; Kozak, Orhan

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of colorectal injuries (CRIs) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study was to analyze treatment trends of Turkish surgeons and effects of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST), Injury Severity (ISS), and Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index (PATI) scoring systems on decision-making processes and clinical outcomes. Data regarding high velocity missile (HVM)-related CRIs were retrospectively gathered. Four patient groups were included: Group 1 (stoma), Group 2 (no stoma in primary surgery), Group 2a (conversion to stoma in secondary surgery), and Group 2b (remaining Group 2 patients). Groups 1, 2, 2a, and 2b included 39 (66%), 20 (34%), 6 (30%), and 14 (70%) casualties, respectively. Ostomies were performed in casualties with significantly higher AAST scores (pcolon/rectum injury scores.

  14. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Koo; Hwang, Chul Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions

  15. Prevalence of cardiovascular morbidities in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Ko Ko; Nwe, Nwe; Hlaing, Su Su

    2017-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are now in a rising trend in South East Asia including Myanmar due to increase in major cardiovascular risk factors in both urban and rural areas, such as smoking, obesity and diabetes mellitus. It is necessary to determine CVD morbidities in Myanmar for planning of prevention and control activities for CVDs. The cross-sectional household survey was conducted in 2012 with 600 people aged 40 years and above in four townships (Kyauk-Tan, Mawlamyaing, Pathein and Pyay) and used face-to-face interview with standard questionnaire [Rose Angina Questionnaire and Questionnaire by European Cardiovascular Indicators Surveillance Set (EUROCISS) Research Group] to determine the level of reported CVD morbidities in adult population. Age of the study population ranged from 40 to 99 years with the mean age of 56 years. Seventy-one percent of the study population was women. Nine percent of the study population have suffered from angina according to Rose Angina Questionnaire. Prevalence of possible heart attack, stroke and heart failure was 7.5, 1.5 and 2.8%. Prevalence of hypertension was 51%. The CVD morbidities are high. There is a need for strengthening prevention and control activities of CVDs.

  16. External Validity of a Risk Stratification Score Predicting Early Distant Brain Failure and Salvage Whole Brain Radiation Therapy After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Robert H; Boselli, Danielle M; Symanowski, James T; Lankford, Scott P; McCammon, Robert J; Moeller, Benjamin J; Heinzerling, John H; Fasola, Carolina E; Burri, Stuart H; Patel, Kirtesh R; Asher, Anthony L; Sumrall, Ashley L; Curran, Walter J; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Crocker, Ian R; Prabhu, Roshan S

    2017-07-01

    A scoring system using pretreatment factors was recently published for predicting the risk of early (≤6 months) distant brain failure (DBF) and salvage whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone. Four risk factors were identified: (1) lack of prior WBRT; (2) melanoma or breast histologic features; (3) multiple brain metastases; and (4) total volume of brain metastases external patient population. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with 388 brain metastases treated with SRS between 2010 at 2013 at Levine Cancer Institute. The Press (Emory) risk score was calculated and applied to the validation cohort population, and subsequent risk groups were analyzed using cumulative incidence. The low-risk (LR) group had a significantly lower risk of early DBF than did the high-risk (HR) group (22.6% vs 44%, P=.004), but there was no difference between the HR and intermediate-risk (IR) groups (41.2% vs 44%, P=.79). Total lesion volume externally valid, but the model was able to stratify between 2 levels (LR and not-LR [combined IR and HR]) for early (≤6 months) DBF. These results reinforce the importance of validating predictive models in independent cohorts. Further refinement of this scoring system with molecular information and in additional contemporary patient populations is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Survey of cognition on nuclear and radiation in Beijing high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; He Jianrong; Zhu Xiayang; Yang Guoliang; Cong Huiling; Hu Qinfang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore cognition level on nuclear and radiation in Beijing high school students, which may provide evidence for promoting science popularization on nuclear and radiation. Methods: Questionnaire-based survey was conducted in Beijing high school students, randomized cluster sampling was used to recruit study participants. Demographic information was collected, and cognition level on nuclear and radiation was evaluated by questionnaire. Results: A total of 1029 pieces of eligible questionnaires were collected. The correct rate for answering common sense about nuclear and radiation was 58%, with score of boys significantly higher than that of girls (t = 4.131, P < 0.05). About subjective cognition of nuclear and radiation knowledge, 87 (8.5%) indicated 'quite clear', 779 (75.7%) indicated 'know a little', 163 (15.8%) indicated 'know nothing'. There was significant difference in score of common sense about nuclear and radiation among people with various subjective cognition level of nuclear and radiation (J-T = 8.279, P < 0.05). There was a linear correlation between support degree for nuclear power and subjective cognition level of nuclear and radiation (r = 0.161, P < 0.05). There was significant difference in score of common sense about nuclear and radiation among people with various support degree for nuclear power (J-T = 7.508, P < 0.05), whereas those who had got high scores tended to support nuclear power to a higher degree. Conclutions: Students knew little about knowledge on nuclear and radiation. It is necessary to strengthen propaganda and education on nuclear and radiation, which may help enhance the students' comprehensive quality, and sustainable expansion of nuclear power more support in the long run. (authors)

  18. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  19. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1998-01-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  20. [Laparoscopic cystectomy and transileal ureterostomy for neurogenic vesicosphincteric disorders. Evaluation of morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillotreau, Julien; Gamé, Xavier; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Mallet, Richard; De Boissezon, Xavier; Malavaud, Bernard; Marque, Philippe; Rischmann, Pascal

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the morbidity and mortality of laparoscopic cystectomy combined with transileal ureterostomy to treat neurogenic vesicosphincteric disorders. Prospective study performed between february 2004 and april 2006 on 26 consecutive patients with a mean age of 55.0 +/- 12.7 years treated by laparoscopic cystectomy for neurogenic vesicosphincteric disorders. The underlying neurological disease was multiple sclerosis (MS) in 20 cases, spinal cord injury in 4 cases and transverse myelitis in 2 cases. The median preoperative ASA score was 3 (range: 2-3). No open conversion was necessary. One intraoperative complication was observed (vascular injury). No perioperative death was observed. The nasogastric tube was maintained postoperatively for an average of 8.69 +/- 5.9 hours. The mean time to resumption of oral fluids was 1.4 +/- 0.7 days and mean time to resumption of solids was 2.6 +/- 1.0 days. The mean time to resumption of bowel movements was 3.8 +/- 3.2 days. The mean intensive care stay was 3.9 +/- 1.1 days. Two postoperative complications were observed in the same patient (ileus and bronchial congestion). Postoperative narcotic analgesics were necessary in 60% of cases. The mean hospital stay was 10.3 +/- 4.1 days. Two late postoperative complications were observed in the same patient (two episodes of pyelonephritis). Laparoscopic cystectomy has a low morbidity in neurological patients, allowing early return of feeding and a moderate length of hospital stay.

  1. Environmental Pollution: Causing High Morbidity and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    , E. Laho; , G. Koduzi; , D. Osmanlli; , F. Aliu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental pollution which is increasing, it is a concerning issue for the community, and when it comes to big cities like Elbasan this is a hot spot. The relevant experience has shown that the more industrial and urban pollution an area has, the higher the pulmonary morbidity is and more cases of mortality from tumoral diseases are. To investigate and show the morbidity and mortality rate from respiratory diseases, cancer etc In our investigation which is a retrospective statistical r...

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in perimenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit L Jagtap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women in the perimenopausal period are reported to be vulnerable to psychiatric disorders. Aim: To assess the psychiatric morbidity in perimenopausal women aged 45–55 years. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational, hospital-based study was conducted at the Department of Psychiatry in a tertiary care hospital attached to a medical college. The study sample consisted of consecutive women in perimenopause as diagnosed by a gynecologist and written informed consent for inclusion in the study. Women with a previous history of psychiatric illnesses, with a major medical illness, or who had undergone surgical menopause were excluded from the study. All women were evaluated with a brief questionnaire for collecting demographic and clinical information and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for assessing psychiatric disorders. Results: Of the 108 women in perimenopause included in the study, 31% had depressive disorder, 7% had anxiety, while 5% had depressive disorder with anxiety features. Psychiatric morbidity was significantly more in women having lesser education, from rural background, with a history of psychiatric illness in the family, a later age of menarche, and in the late stage of perimenopause. Conclusions: Women in the perimenopause affected by psychiatric morbidity were most commonly diagnosed with depression. As perimenopause is a time of vulnerability in women, attention to signs and symptoms of depression may be required so that they may lead a more productive life.

  3. Psychological Profile and Quality of Life of Morbid Obese Patients Attending a Cognitive Behavioural Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Marzocchi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The results show that 27% of cases had a BES score ≥ 17, indicative of possible binge eating, and 13% had a BES ≥ 27, largely indicative of binge eating, with a higher prevalence in females. The BDI score was above normal in 30% of males and 45% of females, and 13% of females were in the range of moderate-severe depression. BES and BDI were significantly correlated with each other. Orwell-97 was much higher in females, and similarly the generic PGWB was indicative of a poorer HRQL in females. PGWB was positively associated with age, without any effect of BMI. The association with age was maintained in female, not in males. Both the Orwell-97 and the PGWB were associated with both BES and BDI in both genders. Psychological distress is common and largely variable in patients attending CBT for morbid obesity. This data should be considered for individual treatment protocols, and should be compared with similar series of patients enrolled for bariatric surgery.

  4. Radiation therapy of malignant melanoma: Experience with high individual treatment doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermalz, H.J.; Fischer, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Melanoma is a complex tumor, metastasizes early both by lymphatic and blood vessels, and which may invoke a significant host ''immune,'' response. One can imagine a number of potentially useful roles for an effective radiation therapy regimen: 1. Treatment of the primary lesion. For small lesions located on the extremities, surgery may be simpler and obviate the risk of radiation failure. In other areas, e.g., head and neck, which may require more cosmetically or functionally debilitating surgery, a trial of radiation therapy may be worthwhile. 2. Preoperative radiation to the primary lesion before surgical resection in the hope of preventing tumor dissemination. 3. Prophylactic, local and regional lymph node radiation therapy. It has been popular in the past to remove malignant melanoma with wide local excision and dissection of adjacent node areas. It is still an open question whether some or any additional patients will be cured by the more vigorous local and extended treatment. Generally, those procedures have fallen into disfavor because of the associated morbidity. Presumably subclinical amounts of malignant melanoma could be sterilized with doses of radiation smaller than those necessary for bulk tumor. Wide field irradiation to the areas surrounding the primary lesion and the adjacent lymph nodes, to doses causing little morbidity, may well be worth clinical trial. 4. In combination with other forms of therapy, e.g., chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, to reduce the number of malignant cells in localized areas known to contain diseases. This may be particularly important prior to initiation of immunotherapy which may be much more effective in the absence of gross disease

  5. Development and validation of a risk score for chronic kidney disease in HIV infection using prospective cohort data from the D:A:D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Ross, Michael; Law, Matthew; Reiss, Peter; Kirk, Ole; Smith, Colette; Wentworth, Deborah; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Fux, Christoph A.; Moranne, Olivier; Morlat, Phillipe; Johnson, Margaret A.; Ryom, Lene; Lundgren, J. D.; Powderly, B.; Shortman, N.; Moecklinghoff, C.; Reilly, G.; Franquet, X.; Sabin, C. A.; Phillips, A.; Kirk, O.; Weber, R.; Pradier, C.; Law, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Dabis, F.; El-Sadr, W. M.; de Wit, S.; Ryom, L.; Kamara, D.; Smith, C.; Mocroft, A.; Tverland, J.; Mansfeld, M.; Nielsen, J.; Raben, D.; Salbøl Brandt, R.; Rickenbach, M.; Fanti, I.; Krum, E.; Hillebregt, M.; Geffard, S.; Sundström, A.; Delforge, M.; Fontas, E.; Torres, F.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Kjær, J.; Sjøl, A.; Meidahl, P.; Helweg-Larsen, J.; Schmidt Iversen, J.; Ross, M.; Fux, C. A.; Morlat, P.; Moranne, O.; Kesselring, A. M.; Kamara, D. A.; Friis-Møller, N.; Kowalska, J.; Sabin, C.; Bruyand, M.; Bower, M.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Donald, A.; Grulich, A.; Prins, J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; Wiersinga, W. J.; van der Valk, M.; Goorhuis, A.; Hovius, J. W.; van Eden, J.; Henderiks, A.; van Hes, A. M. H.; Mutschelknauss, M.; Nobel, H. E.; Pijnappel, F. J. J.; Westerman, A. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Back, N. K. T.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Berkhout, B.; Cornelissen, M. T. E.; Schinkel, C. J.; Thomas, X. V.; de Ruyter Ziekenhuis, Admiraal; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Baas, S.; Hage de Looff, L.; Versteeg, D.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Korsten-Vorstermans, E. M. H. M.; de Munnik, E. S.; Jansz, A. R.; Tjhie, J.; Wegdam, M. C. A.; Deiman, B.; Scharnhorst, V.; van der Plas, A.; Weijsenfeld, A. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; Bax, H. I.; Hassing, R. J.; van der Feltz, M.; Bassant, N.; van Beek, J. E. A.; Vriesde, M.; van Zonneveld, L. M.; de Oude-Lubbers, A.; van den Berg-Cameron, H. J.; Bruinsma-Broekman, F. B.; de Groot, J.; de Zeeuw-de Man, M.; Broekhoven-Kruijne, M. J.; Schutten, M.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Boucher, C. A. B.; Driessen, G. J. A.; van Rossum, A. M. C.; van der Knaap, L. C.; Visser, E.; Branger, J.; Duijf-van de Ven, C. J. H. M.; Schippers, E. F.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; Brimicombe, R. W.; van Ijperen, J. M.; van der Hut, G.; Franck, P. F. H.; van Eeden, A.; Brokking, W.; Groot, M.; Damen, M.; Kwa, I. S.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; van den Berg, J. F.; van Hulzen, A. G. W.; van der Bliek, G. L.; Bor, P. C. J.; Bloembergen, P.; Wolfhagen, M. J. H. M.; Ruijs, G. J. H. M.; Gasthuis, Kennemer; van Lelyveld, S. F. L.; Soetekouw, R.; Hulshoff, N.; van der Prijt, L. M. M.; Schoemaker, M.; Bermon, N.; van der Reijden, W. A.; Jansen, R.; Herpers, B. L.; Veenendaal, D.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Bauer, M. P.; Jolink, H.; Vollaard, A. M.; Dorama, W.; Moons, C.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kroes, A. C. M.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Kastelijns, M.; Smit, J. V.; Smit, E.; Bezemer, M.; van Niekerk, T.; Pontesilli, O.; Lowe, S. H.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Ackens, R. P.; Schippers, J.; Vergoossen, R.; Weijenberg Maes, B.; Savelkoul, P. H. M.; Loo, I. H.; Weijer, S.; el Moussaoui, R.; Heitmuller, M.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; Diederen, B. M. W.; Pronk, D.; van Truijen-Oud, F. A.; Leyten, E. M. S.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; van Hartingsveld, A.; Meerkerk, C.; Wildenbeest, G. S.; Mutsaers, J. A. E. M.; Jansen, C. L.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Dijkstra, K.; Faber, S.; Weel, J.; Kootstra, G. J.; Delsing, C. E.; van der Burg-van de Plas, M.; Heins, H.; Lucas, E.; Brinkman, K.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Blok, W. L.; Schouten, W. E. M.; Bosma, A. S.; Brouwer, C. J.; Geerders, G. F.; Hoeksema, K.; Kleene, M. J.; van der Meché, I. B.; Toonen, A. J. M.; Wijnands, S.; van Ogtrop, M. L.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; van Crevel, R.; Albers, M.; Bosch, M. E. W.; Grintjes-Huisman, K. J. T.; Zomer, B. J.; Stelma, F. F.; Burger, D.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; ter Beest, G.; van Bentum, P. H. M.; Langebeek, N.; Tiemessen, R.; Swanink, C. M. A.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Spelbrink, M.; Sulman, H.; Witte, E.; Peerbooms, P. G. H.; Mulder, J. W.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Lauw, F. N.; van Broekhuizen, M. C.; Paap, H.; Vlasblom, D. J.; Oudmaijer Sanders, E.; Smits, P. H. M.; Rosingh, A. W.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Geilings, J.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; de Kruijf-van de Wiel, B. A. F. M.; Kuipers, M.; Santegoets, R. M. W. J.; van der Ven, B.; Marcelis, J. H.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Kabel, P. J.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Sprenger, H. G.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Wilting, K. R.; Stienstra, Y.; de Groot-de Jonge, H.; van der Meulen, P. A.; de Weerd, D. A.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Riezebos-Brilman, A.; van Leer-Buter, C. C.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Mudrikova, T.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Barth, R. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van Elst-Laurijssen, D. H. M.; Laan, L. M.; van Oers-Hazelzet, E. E. B.; Patist, J.; Vervoort, S.; Nieuwenhuis, H. E.; Frauenfelder, R.; Schuurman, R.; Verduyn-Lunel, F.; Wensing, A. M. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Perenboom, R. M.; Bomers, M.; de Vocht, J.; Elsenburg, L. J. M.; Pettersson, A. M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Ang, C. W.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Bont, L. J.; Nauta, N.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zaheri, S.; Kimmel, V.; Tong, Y.; Lascaris, B.; van den Boogaard, R.; Hoekstra, P.; de Lang, A.; Berkhout, M.; Grivell, S.; Jansen, A.; de Groot, L.; van den Akker, M.; Bergsma, D.; Lodewijk, C.; Meijering, R.; Peeck, B.; Raethke, M.; Ree, C.; Regtop, R.; Ruijs, Y.; Schoorl, M.; Tuijn, E.; Veenenberg, L.; Woudstra, T.; Bakker, Y.; de Jong, A.; Broekhoven, M.; Claessen, E.; Rademaker, M. J.; Munjishvili, L.; Kruijne, E.; Tuk, B.; Bonnet, F.; Dupon, M.; Chêne, G.; Breilh, D.; Fleury, H.; Malvy, D.; Mercié, P.; Pellegrin, I.; Neau, D.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Bouchet, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Lacoste, D.; Tchamgoué, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Wittkop, L.; Bernard, N.; Hessamfar, M.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Dauchy, F. A.; Dutronc, H.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Duffau, P.; Schmeltz, J. Roger; Pistone, T.; Receveur, M. C.; Cazanave, C.; Ochoa, A.; Vareil, M. O.; Viallard, J. F.; Greib, C.; Lazaro, E.; Lafon, M. E.; Reigadas, S.; Trimoulet, P.; Molimard, M.; Titier, K.; Moreau, J. F.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé, G.; Dupont, A.; Gerard, Y.; André, K.; Bonnal, F.; Farbos, S.; Gemain, M. C.; Ceccaldi, J.; de Witte, S.; Courtault, C.; Monlun, E.; Lataste, P.; Meraud, J. P.; Chossat, I.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Conte, V.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; Diarra, F.; D'Ivernois, C.; Frosch, A.; Hannapier, C.; Lenaud, E.; Leleux, O.; Le Marec, F.; Leray, J.; Louis, I.; Palmer, G.; Pougetoux, A.; Sicard, X.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, D. Touchard B.; Petoumenos, K.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.; Hoy, J.; Watson, K.; Roth, N.; Nicholson, J.; Bloch, M.; Franic, T.; Baker, D.; Vale, R.; Carr, A.; Cooper, D.; Chuah, J.; Ngieng, M.; Nolan, D.; Skett, J.; Calvo, G.; Mateu, S.; Domingo, P.; Sambeat, M. A.; Gatell, J.; del Cacho, E.; Cadafalch, J.; Fuster, M.; Codina, C.; Sirera, G.; Vaqué, A.; Clumeck, N.; Necsoi, C.; Gennotte, A. F.; Gerard, M.; Kabeya, K.; Konopnicki, D.; Libois, A.; Martin, C.; Payen, M. C.; Semaille, P.; van Laethem, Y.; Neaton, J.; Bartsch, G.; Thompson, G.; Wentworth, D.; Luskin-Hawk, R.; Telzak, E.; Abrams, D. I.; Cohn, D.; Markowitz, N.; Arduino, R.; Mushatt, D.; Friedland, G.; Perez, G.; Tedaldi, E.; Fisher, E.; Gordin, F.; Crane, L. R.; Sampson, J.; Baxter, J.; Lundgren, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Podlekareva, D.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Fischer, A. H.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, J.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J. P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Bickel, M.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Testa, A.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Castagna, A.; Gianotti, N.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; Rozentale, B.; Zeltina, I.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Parczewski, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Zakharova, N.; Petersburg, Saint; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokráš, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Medrano, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Karlsson, A.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Morfeldt, L.; Thulin, G.; Åkerlund, B.; Koppel, K.; Håkangård, C.; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, R.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; de Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cicconi, P.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Santoro, C.; Suardi, C.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Puzzolante, C.; Abrescia, N.; Guida, M. G.; Onofrio, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; d'Avino, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Dollet, K.; Caissotti, C.; Dellamonica, P.; Roger, P. M.; Bernard, E.; Cua, E.; de Salvador-Guillouet, F.; Durant, J.; Ferrando, S.; Dunais, B.; Mondain-Miton, V.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B.; Pugliese, P.; Naqvi, A.; Pillet, S.; Risso, K.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Egger, M.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, A.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Yerly, S.; Bhagani, S.; Burns, F.; Byrne, P.; Carroll, A.; Cropley, I.; Cuthbertson, Z.; Drinkwater, T.; Fernandez, T.; Garusu, E.; Gonzales, A.; Grover, D.; Hutchinson, S.; Killingley, B.; Murphy, G.; Ivens, D.; Johnson, M.; Kinloch de Loes, S.; Lipman, M.; Madge, S.; Marshall, N.; Montgomery, H.; Shah, R.; Swaden, L.; Tyrer, M.; Youle, M.; Webster, D.; Wright, A.; Chaloner, C.; Miah, M.; Tsintas, R.; Burch, L.; Cambiano, V.; Lampe, F.; Nakagawa, F.; O'Connor, J.; Speakman, A.; Connell, M.; Clewley, G.; Martin, S.; Thomas, M.; Aagaard, B.; Aragon, E.; Arnaiz, J.; Borup, L.; Dragsted, U.; Fau, A.; Gey, D.; Grarup, J.; Hengge, U.; Herrero, P.; Jansson, P.; Jensen, B.; Jensen, K.; Juncher, H.; Lopez, P.; Matthews, C.; Mollerup, D.; Pearson, M.; Reilev, S.; Tillmann, K.; Varea, S.; Angus, B.; Babiker, A.; Cordwell, B.; Darbyshire, J.; Dodds, W.; Fleck, S.; Horton, J.; Hudson, F.; Moraes, Y.; Pacciarini, F.; Palfreeman, A.; Paton, N.; Smith, N.; van Hooff, F.; Bebchuk, J.; Collins, G.; Denning, E.; DuChene, A.; Fosdick, L.; Harrison, M.; Herman-Lamin, K.; Larson, G.; Nelson, R.; Quan, K.; Quan, S.; Schultz, T.; Wyman, N.; Carey, C.; Chan, F.; Courtney-Rodgers, D.; Drummond, F.; Emery, S.; Harrod, M.; Jacoby, S.; Kearney, L.; Lin, E.; Pett, S.; Robson, R.; Seneviratne, N.; Stewart, M.; Watts, E.; Finley, E.; Sánchez, A.; Standridge, B.; Vjecha, M.; Belloso, W.; Davey, R.; Duprez, D.; Lifson, A.; Pederson, C.; Price, R.; Prineas, R.; Rhame, F.; Worley, J.; Modlin, J.; Beral, V.; Chaisson, R.; Fleming, T.; Hill, C.; Kim, K.; Murray, B.; Pick, B.; Seligmann, M.; Weller, I.; Cahill, K.; Fox, L.; Luzar, M.; Martinez, A.; McNay, L.; Pierson, J.; Tierney, J.; Vogel, S.; Costas, V.; Eckstrand, J.; Brown, S.; Abusamra, L.; Angel, E.; Aquilia, S.; Benetucci, J.; Bittar, V.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Cahn, P.; Casiro, A.; Contarelli, J.; Corral, J.; Daciuk, L.; David, D.; Dobrzanski, W.; Duran, A.; Ebenrstejin, J.; Ferrari, I.; Fridman, D.; Galache, V.; Guaragna, G.; Ivalo, S.; Krolewiecki, A.; Lanusse, I.; Laplume, H.; Lasala, M.; Lattes, R.; Lazovski, J.; Lopardo, G.; Lourtau, L.; Lupo, S.; Maranzana, A.; Marson, C.; Massera, L.; Moscatello, G.; Olivia, S.; Otegui, I.; Palacios, L.; Parlante, A.; Salomon, H.; Sanchez, M.; Somenzini, C.; Suarez, C.; Tocci, M.; Toibaro, J.; Zala, C.; Agrawal, S.; Ambrose, P.; Anderson, C.; Anderson, J.; Beileiter, K.; Blavius, K.; Boyle, M.; Bradford, D.; Britton, P.; Brown, P.; Busic, T.; Cain, A.; Carrall, L.; Carson, S.; Chenoweth, I.; Clark, F.; Clemons, J.; Clezy, K.; Cortissos, P.; Cunningham, N.; Curry, M.; Daly, L.; D'Arcy-Evans, C.; del Rosario, R.; Dinning, S.; Dobson, P.; Donohue, W.; Doong, N.; Downs, C.; Edwards, E.; Egan, C.; Ferguson, W.; Finlayson, R.; Forsdyke, C.; Foy, L.; Frater, A.; French, M.; Gleeson, D.; Gold, J.; Habel, P.; Haig, K.; Hardy, S.; Holland, R.; Hudson, J.; Hutchison, R.; Hyland, N.; James, R.; Johnston, C.; Kelly, M.; King, M.; Kunkel, K.; Lau, H.; Leamy, J.; Lester, D.; Leung, J.; Lohmeyer, A.; Lowe, K.; MacRae, K.; Magness, C.; Martinez, O.; Maruszak, H.; Medland, N.; Miller, S.; Murray, J.; Negus, P.; Newman, R.; Nowlan, C.; Oddy, J.; Orford, N.; Orth, D.; Patching, J.; Plummer, M.; Price, S.; Primrose, R.; Prone, I.; Ree, H.; Remington, C.; Richardson, R.; Robinson, S.; Rogers, G.; Roney, J.; Russell, D.; Ryan, S.; Sarangapany, J.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, K.; Shields, C.; Silberberg, C.; Shaw, D.; Smith, D.; Meng Soo, T.; Sowden, D.; Street, A.; Kiem tee, B.; Thomson, J. L.; Topaz, S.; Villella, C.; Walker, A.; Watson, A.; Wendt, N.; Williams, L.; Youds, D.; Aichelburg, A.; Cichon, P.; Gemeinhart, B.; Rieger, A.; Schmied, B.; Touzeau-Romer, V.; DeRoo, A.; O'Doherty, E.; de Salles Amorim, C.; Basso, C.; Flint, S.; Kallas, E.; Levi, G.; Lewi, D.; Pereira, L.; da Silva, M.; Souza, T.; Toscano, A.; Angel, J.; Arsenault, M.; Bast, M.; Beckthold, B.; Bouchard, P.; Chabot, I.; Clarke, R.; Cohen, J.; Coté, P.; Ellis, M.; Gagne, C.; Gill, J.; Houde, M.; Johnston, B.; Jubinville, N.; Kato, C.; Lamoureux, N.; Latendre- Paquette, J.; Lindemulder, A.; McNeil, A.; McFarland, N.; Montaner, J.; Morrisseau, C.; O'Neill, R.; Page, G.; Piche, A.; Pongracz, B.; Preziosi, H.; Puri, L.; Rachlis, A.; Ralph, E.; Raymond, I.; Rouleau, D.; Routy, J. P.; Sandre, R.; Seddon, T.; Shafran, S.; Sikora, C.; Smaill, F.; Stromberg, D.; Trottier, S.; Walmsley, S.; Weiss, K.; Williams, K.; Zarowny, D.; Baadegaard, B.; Bengaard Andersen, Á; Boedker, K.; Collins, P.; Jensen, L.; Moller, H.; Lehm Andersen, P.; Loftheim, I.; Mathiesen, L.; Nielsen, H.; Obel, N.; Petersen, D.; Pors Jensen, L.; Trunk Black, F.; Aboulker, J. P.; Aouba, A.; Bensalem, M.; Berthe, H.; Blanc, C.; Bornarel, D.; Bouchaud, O.; Boue, F.; Bouvet, E.; Brancon, C.; Breaud, S.; Brosseau, D.; Brunet, A.; Capitant, C.; Ceppi, C.; Chakvetadze, C.; Cheneau, C.; Chennebault, J. M.; de Truchis, P.; Delavalle, A. M.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Dumont, C.; Edeb, N.; Fabre, G.; Foltzer, A.; Foubert, V.; Gastaut, J. A.; Gerbe, J.; Girard, P. M.; Goujard, C.; Hoen, B.; Honore, P.; Hue, H.; Hynh, T.; Jung, C.; Kahi, S.; Lang, J. M.; Le Baut, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Leturque, N.; Lévy, Y.; Loison, J.; Maddi, G.; Maignan, A.; Majerholc, C.; de Boever, C.; Meynard, J. L.; Michelet, C.; Michon, C.; Mole, M.; Netzer, E.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Raffi, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Ravaux, I.; Reynes, J.; Salmon-Ceron, D.; Sebire, M.; Simon, A.; Tegna, L.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Tramoni, C.; Vidal, M.; Viet-Peaucelle, C.; Weiss, L.; Zeng, A.; Zucman, D.; Adam, A.; Arastéh, K.; Behrens, G.; Bergmann, F.; Bittner, D.; Bogner, J.; Brockmeyer, N.; Darrelmann, N.; Deja, M.; Doerler, M.; Esser, S.; Faetkenheuer, G.; Fenske, S.; Gajetzki, S.; Goebel, F.; Gorriahn, D.; Harrer, E.; Harrer, T.; Hartl, H.; Hartmann, M.; Heesch, S.; Jakob, W.; Jäger, H.; Klinker, H.; Kremer, G.; Ludwig, C.; Mantzsch, K.; Mauss, S.; Meurer, A.; Niedermeier, A.; Pittack, N.; Plettenberg, A.; Potthoff, A.; Probst, M.; Rittweger, M.; Ross, B.; Rotty, J.; Rund, E.; Ruzicka, T.; Schmidt, R. T.; Schmutz, G.; Schnaitmann, E.; Schuster, D.; Sehr, T.; Spaeth, B.; Stephan, C.; Stockey, T.; Stoehr, A.; Trein, A.; Vaeth, T.; Vogel, M.; Wasmuth, J.; Wengenroth, C.; Winzer, R.; Wolf, E.; Reidy, D. L.; Cohen, Y.; Drora, G.; Eliezer, I.; Godo, O.; Kedem, E.; Magen, E.; Mamorsky, M.; Sthoeger, Z.; Vered, H.; Aiuti, F.; Bechi, M.; Bergamasco, A.; Bertelli, D.; Bruno, R.; Butini, L.; Cagliuso, M.; Carosi, G.; Casari, S.; Chrysoula, V.; Cologni, G.; Conti, V.; Corpolongo, A.; D'Offizi, G.; Gaiottino, F.; Di Pietro, M.; Filice, G.; Francesco, M.; Gianelli, E.; Graziella, C.; Magenta, L.; Martellotta, F.; Maserati, R.; Murdaca, G.; Nardini, G.; Nozza, S.; Puppo, F.; Pogliaghi, M.; Ripamonti, D.; Ronchetti, C.; Rusconi, V.; Sacchi, P.; Silvia, N.; Suter, F.; Tambussi, G.; Uglietti, A.; Vechi, M.; Vergani, B.; Vichi, F.; Vitiello, P.; Iwamoto, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Mori, M.; Nakamura, T.; Odawara, T.; Oka, S.; Shirasaka, T.; Tabata, M.; Takano, M.; Ueta, C.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Erradey, I.; Himmich, H.; Marhoum El Filali, K.; Blok, W.; van Boxtel, R.; Brinkman H Doevelaar, K.; Grijsen, M.; Juttmann, J.; Ligthart, S.; van der Meulen, P.; Lange, J.; Schrijnders-Gudde, L.; Septer-Bijleveld, E.; Sprenger, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Kvale, D.; Inglot, M.; Rymer, W.; Szymczak, A.; Aldir, M.; Baptista, C.; da Conceicao Vera, J.; dos Santos, C. Raquel A.; Valadas, E.; Vaz Pinto, I.; Chia, E.; Foo, E.; Karim, F.; Lim, P. L.; Panchalingam, A.; Quek, A.; Alcázar-Caballero, R.; Arribas, J.; Arrizabalaga, J.; de Barron, X.; Blanco, F.; Bouza, E.; Calvo, S.; Carbonero, L.; Carpena, I.; Castro, M.; Cortes, L.; del Toro, M.; Elias, M.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, V.; Fernandez-Cruz, E.; Fernández, P.; Freud, H.; Garcia, A.; Garcia, G.; Garrido, R.; Gijón, P.; Gonzalez-García, J.; Gil, I.; González, A.; López Grosso, P.; Guzmán, E.; Iribarren, J.; Jiménez, M.; Juega, J.; Lopez, J.; Lozano, F.; Martín-Carbonero, L.; Mata, R.; Menasalvas, A.; Mirelles, C.; de Miguel Prieto, J.; Montes, M.; Moreno, A.; Moreno, J.; Moreno, V.; Muñoz, R.; Ocampo, A.; Ortega, E.; Ortiz, L.; Padilla, B.; Parras, A.; Paster, A.; Pedreira, J.; Peña, J.; Perea, R.; Portas, B.; Pulido, F.; Rebollar, M.; de Rivera, J.; Roca, V.; Rodríguez-Arrondo, F.; Rubio, R.; Santos, J.; Sanz, J.; Sebastian, G.; Segovia, M.; Tamargo, L.; Viciana, P.; von Wichmann, M.; Bratt, G.; Hollander, A.; Olov Pehrson, P.; Petz, I.; Sandstrom, E.; Sönnerborg, A.; Gurtner, V.; Ampunpong, U.; Auchieng, C.; Bowonwatanuwong, C.; Chanchai, P.; Chetchotisakd, P.; Chuenyan, T.; Duncombe, C.; Horsakulthai, M.; Kantipong, P.; Laohajinda, K.; Phanuphak, P.; Pongsurachet, V.; Pradapmook, S.; Ruxruntham, K.; Seekaew, S.; Sonjai, A.; Suwanagool, S.; Techasathit, W.; Ubolyam, S.; Wankoon, J.; Alexander, I.; Dockrell, D.; Easterbrook, P.; Edwards, B.; Evans, E.; Fox, R.; Gazzard, B.; Gilleran, G.; Hand, J.; Heald, L.; Higgs, C.; Jebakumar, S.; Jendrulek, I.; Johnson, S.; Kinghorn, G.; Kuldanek, K.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; McLean, L.; Morris, S.; O'Farrell, S.; Ong, E.; Peters, B.; Stroud, C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; White, D.; Williams, I.; Wiselka, M.; Yee, T.; Adams, S.; Allegra, D.; Andrews, L.; Aneja, B.; Anstead, G.; Artz, R.; Bailowitz, J.; Banks, S.; Baum, J.; Benator, D.; Black, D.; Boh, D.; Bonam, T.; Brito, M.; Brockelman, J.; Bruzzese, V.; Burnside, A.; Cafaro, V.; Casey, K.; Cason, L.; Childress, G.; Clark, C. L.; Clifford, D.; Climo, M.; Couey, P.; Cuervo, H.; Deeks, S.; Dennis, M.; Diaz-Linares, M.; Dickerson, D.; Diez, M.; Di Puppo, J.; Dodson, P.; Dupre, D.; Elion, R.; Elliott, K.; El-Sadr, W.; Estes, M.; Fabre, J.; Farrough, M.; Flamm, J.; Follansbee, S.; Foster, C.; Frank, C.; Franz, J.; Frechette, G.; Freidland, G.; Frische, J.; Fuentes, L.; Funk, C.; Geisler, C.; Genther, K.; Giles, M.; Goetz, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Graeber, C.; Graziano, F.; Grice, D.; Hahn, B.; Hamilton, C.; Hassler, S.; Henson, A.; Hopper, S.; John, M.; Johnson, L.; Johnson, R.; Jones, R.; Kahn, J.; Klimas, N.; Kolber, M.; Koletar, S.; Labriola, A.; Larsen, R.; Lasseter, F.; Lederman, M.; Ling, T.; Lusch, T.; MacArthur, R.; Machado, C.; Makohon, L.; Mandelke, J.; Mannheimer, S.; Martínez, M.; Martinez, N.; Mass, M.; Masur, H.; McGregor, D.; McIntyre, D.; McKee, J.; McMullen, D.; Mettinger, M.; Middleton, S.; Mieras, J.; Mildvan, D.; Miller, P.; Miller, T.; Mitchell, V.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Moanna, A.; Mogridge, C.; Moran, F.; Murphy, R.; Nahass, R.; Nixon, D.; O'Brien, S.; Ojeda, J.; Okhuysen, P.; Olson, M.; Osterberger, J.; Owen, W.; Pablovich, S.; Patel, S.; Pierone, G.; Poblete, R.; Potter, A.; Preston, E.; Rappoport, C.; Regevik, N.; Reyelt, M.; Riney, L.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Roland, R.; Rosmarin-DeStefano, C.; Rossen, W.; Rouff, J.; Saag, M.; Santiago, S.; Sarria, J.; Wirtz, S.; Schmidt, U.; Scott, C.; Sheridan, A.; Shin, A.; Shrader, S.; Simon, G.; Slowinski, D.; Smith, K.; Spotkov, J.; Sprague, C.; States, D.; Suh, C.; Sullivan, J.; Summers, K.; Sweeton, B.; Tan, V.; Tanner, T.; Temesgen, Z.; Thomas, D.; Thompson, M.; Tobin, C.; Toro, N.; Towner, W.; Upton, K.; Uy, J.; Valenti, S.; van der Horst, C.; Vita, J.; Voell, J.; Walker, J.; Walton, T.; Wason, K.; Watson, V.; Wellons, A.; Weise, J.; White, M.; Whitman, T.; Williams, B.; Williams, N.; Windham, J.; Witt, M.; Workowski, K.; Wortmann, G.; Wright, T.; Zelasky, C.; Zwickl, B.; Dietz, D.; Chesson, C.; Schmetter, B.; Grue, L.; Willoughby, M.; Demers, A.; Dragsted, U. B.; Jensen, K. B.; Jansson, P. O.; Jensen, B. G.; Benfield, T. L.; Darbyshire, J. H.; Babiker, A. G.; Palfreeman, A. J.; Fleck, S. L.; Collaco-Moraes, Y.; Wyzydrag, L.; Cooper, D. A.; Drummond, F. M.; Connor, S. A.; Satchell, C. S.; Gunn, S.; Delfino, M. A.; Merlin, K.; McGinley, C.; Neaton, J. D.; George, M.; Grund, B.; Hogan, C.; Miller, C.; Neuhaus, J.; Roediger, M. P.; Thackeray, L.; Campbell, C.; Lahart, C.; Perlman, D.; Rein, M.; DerSimonian, R.; Brody, B. A.; Daar, E. S.; Dubler, N. N.; Fleming, T. R.; Freeman, D. J.; Kahn, J. P.; Kim, K. M.; Medoff, G.; Modlin, J. F.; Moellering, R.; Murray, B. E.; Robb, M. L.; Scharfstein, D. O.; Sugarman, J.; Tsiatis, A.; Tuazon, C.; Zoloth, L.; Klingman, K.; Lehrman, S.; Belloso, W. H.; Losso, M. H.; Benetucci, J. A.; Bogdanowicz, E. P.; Cahn, P. E.; Casiró, A. D.; Cassetti, I.; Contarelli, J. M.; Corral, J. A.; Crinejo, A.; David, D. O.; Ishida, M. T.; Laplume, H. E.; Lasala, M. B.; Lupo, S. H.; Masciottra, F.; Michaan, M.; Ruggieri, L.; Salazar, E.; Sánchez, M.; Hoy, J. F.; Rogers, G. D.; Allworth, A. M.; Anderson, J. S. C.; Armishaw, J.; Barnes, K.; Chiam, A.; Chuah, J. C. P.; Curry, M. C.; Dever, R. L.; Donohue, W. A.; Doong, N. C.; Dwyer, D. E.; Dyer, J.; Eu, B.; Ferguson, V. W.; French, M. A. H.; Garsia, R. J.; Hudson, J. H.; Jeganathan, S.; Konecny, P.; McCormack, C. L.; McMurchie, M.; Moore, R. J.; Moussa, M. B.; Piper, M.; Read, T.; Roney, J. J.; Shaw, D. R.; Silvers, J.; Smith, D. J.; Street, A. C.; Vale, R. J.; Wendt, N. A.; Wood, H.; Youds, D. W.; Zillman, J.; Tozeau, V.; DeWit, S.; de Roo, A.; Leonard, P.; Lynen, L.; Moutschen, M.; Pereira, L. C.; Souza, T. N. L.; Schechter, M.; Zajdenverg, R.; Almeida, M. M. T. B.; Araujo, F.; Bahia, F.; Brites, C.; Caseiro, M. M.; Casseb, J.; Etzel, A.; Falco, G. G.; Filho, E. C. J.; Flint, S. R.; Gonzales, C. R.; Madruga, J. V. R.; Passos, L. N.; Reuter, T.; Sidi, L. C.; Toscano, A. L. C.; Cherban, E.; Conway, B.; Dufour, C.; Foster, A.; Haase, D.; Haldane, H.; Klein, M.; Lessard, B.; Martel, A.; Martel, C.; Paradis, E.; Schlech, W.; Schmidt, S.; Thompson, B.; Vezina, S.; Wolff Reyes, M. J.; Northland, R.; Hergens, L.; Loftheim, I. R.; Raukas, M.; Justinen, J.; Landman, R.; Abel, S.; Abgrall, S.; Amat, K.; Auperin, L.; Barruet, R.; Benalycherif, A.; Benammar, N.; Bentata, M.; Besnier, J. M.; Blanc, M.; Cabié, A.; Chavannet, P.; Dargere, S.; de la Tribonniere, X.; Debord, T.; Decaux, N.; Delgado, J.; Frixon-Marin, V.; Genet, C.; Gérard, L.; Gilquin, J.; Jeantils, V.; Kouadio, H.; Leclercq, P.; Lelièvre, J.-D.; Levy, Y.; Michon, C. P.; Nau, P.; Pacanowski, J.; Piketty, C.; Salmon, D.; Schmit, J. L.; Serini, M. A.; Tassi, S.; Touam, F.; Verdon, R.; Weinbreck, P.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Yeni, P.; Bitsch, S.; Bogner, J. R.; Goebel, F. D.; Lehmann, C.; Lennemann, T.; Potthof, A.; Wasmuth, J. C.; Wiedemeyer, K.; Hatzakis, A.; Touloumi, G.; Antoniadou, A.; Daikos, G. L.; Dimitrakaki, A.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Giannaris, M.; Karafoulidou, A.; Katsambas, A.; Katsarou, O.; Kontos, A. N.; Kordossis, T.; Lazanas, M. K.; Panagopoulos, P.; Paparizos, V.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Petrikkos, G.; Skoutelis, A.; Tsogas, N.; Bergin, C. J.; Mooka, B.; Mamorksy, M. G.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Karplus, R.; Shahar, E.; Biglino, A.; de Gioanni, M.; Montroni, M.; Raise, E.; Honda, M.; Ishisaka, M.; Caplinskas, S.; Uzdaviniene, V.; Schmit, J. C.; Mills, G. D.; Blackmore, T.; Masters, J. A.; Morgan, J.; Pithie, A.; Brunn, J.; Ormasssen, V.; La Rosa, A.; Guerra, O.; Espichan, M.; Gutierrez, L.; Mendo, F.; Salazar, R.; Knytz, B.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Castro, R. S.; Horta, A.; Miranda, A. C.; Pinto, I. V.; Vera, J.; Vinogradova, E.; Yakovlev, A.; Wood, R.; Orrel, C.; Arnaiz, J. A.; Carrillo, R.; Dalmau, D.; Jordano, Q.; Knobel, H.; Larrousse, M.; Moreno, J. S.; Oretaga, E.; Pena, J. N.; Spycher, R.; Bottone, S.; Christen, A.; Franc, C.; Furrer, H. J.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Genné, D.; Hochstrasser, S.; Moens, C.; Nüesch, R.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Pumpradit, W.; Dangthongdee, S.; Kiertiburanakul, S.; Klinbuayaem, V.; Mootsikapun, P.; Nonenoy, S.; Piyavong, B.; Prasithsirikul, W.; Raksakulkarn, P.; Gazzard, B. G.; Ainsworth, J. G.; Angus, B. J.; Barber, T. J.; Brook, M. G.; Care, C. D.; Chadwick, D. R.; Chikohora, M.; Churchill, D. R.; Cornforth, D.; Dockrell, D. H.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Fox, P. A.; Gomez, P. A.; Gompels, M. M.; Harris, G. M.; Herman, S.; Jackson, A. G. A.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Kinghorn, G. R.; Kuldanek, K. A.; Larbalestier, N.; Lumsden, M.; Maher, T.; Mantell, J.; Muromba, L.; Orkin, C. M.; Peters, B. S.; Peto, T. E. A.; Portsmouth, S. D.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Ronan, A.; Schwenk, A.; Slinn, M. A.; Stroud, C. J.; Thomas, R. C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M. H.; Whiles, H. J.; White, D. J.; Williams, E.; Williams, I. G.; Acosta, E. A.; Adamski, A.; Antoniskis, D.; Aragon, D. R.; Barnett, B. J.; Baroni, C.; Barron, M.; Baxter, J. D.; Beers, D.; Beilke, M.; Bemenderfer, D.; Bernard, A.; Besch, C. L.; Bessesen, M. T.; Bethel, J. T.; Blue, S.; Blum, J. D.; Boarden, S.; Bolan, R. K.; Borgman, J. B.; Brar, I.; Braxton, B. K.; Bredeek, U. F.; Brennan, R.; Britt, D. E.; Bulgin-Coleman, D.; Bullock, D. E.; Campbell, B.; Caras, S.; Carroll, J.; Casey, K. K.; Chiang, F.; Cindrich, R. B.; Clark, C.; Cohen, C.; Coley, J.; Condoluci, D. V.; Contreras, R.; Corser, J.; Cozzolino, J.; Daley, L.; Dandridge, D.; D'Antuono, V.; Darcourt Rizo, J. G.; DeHovitz, J. A.; Dejesus, E.; DesJardin, J.; Dietrich, C.; Dolce, E.; Erickson, D.; Faber, L. L.; Falbo, J.; Farrough, M. J.; Farthing, C. F.; Ferrell-Gonzalez, P.; Flynn, H.; Frank, M.; Freeman, K. F.; French, N.; Fujita, N.; Gahagan, L.; Gilson, I.; Goetz, M. B.; Goodwin, E.; Guity, C. K.; Gulick, P.; Gunderson, E. R.; Hale, C. M.; Hannah, K.; Henderson, H.; Hennessey, K.; Henry, W. K.; Higgins, D. T.; Hodder, S. L.; Horowitz, H. W.; Howe-Pittman, M.; Hubbard, J.; Hudson, R.; Hunter, H.; Hutelmyer, C.; Insignares, M. T.; Jackson, L.; Jenny, L.; Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, G.; Johnson, J.; Kaatz, J.; Kaczmarski, J.; Kagan, S.; Kantor, C.; Kempner, T.; Kieckhaus, K.; Kimmel, N.; Klaus, B. M.; Koeppe, J. R.; Koirala, J.; Kopka, J.; Kostman, J. R.; Kozal, M. J.; Kumar, A.; Lampiris, H.; Lamprecht, C.; Lattanzi, K. M.; Lee, J.; Leggett, J.; Long, C.; Loquere, A.; Loveless, K.; Lucasti, C. J.; MacVeigh, M.; Makohon, L. H.; Markowitz, N. P.; Marks, C.; Martorell, C.; McFeaters, E.; McGee, B.; McIntyre, D. M.; McManus, E.; Melecio, L. G.; Melton, D.; Mercado, S.; Merrifield, E.; Mieras, J. A.; Mogyoros, M.; Moran, F. M.; Murphy, K.; Mutic, S.; Nadeem, I.; Nadler, J. P.; Ognjan, A.; O'Hearn, M.; O'Keefe, K.; Okhuysen, P. C.; Oldfield, E.; Olson, D.; Orenstein, R.; Ortiz, R.; Parpart, F.; Pastore-Lange, V.; Paul, S.; Pavlatos, A.; Pearce, D. D.; Pelz, R.; Peterson, S.; Pitrak, D.; Powers, S. L.; Pujet, H. C.; Raaum, J. W.; Ravishankar, J.; Reeder, J.; Reilly, N. A.; Reyelt, C.; Riddell, J.; Rimland, D.; Robinson, M. L.; Rodriguez, A. E.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M. C.; Rodriguez Derouen, V.; Rosmarin, C.; Rossen, W. L.; Rouff, J. R.; Sampson, J. H.; Sands, M.; Savini, C.; Schrader, S.; Schulte, M. M.; Scott, R.; Seedhom, H.; Sension, M.; Sheble-Hall, A.; Shuter, J.; Slater, L. N.; Slotten, R.; Smith, M.; Snap, S.; States, D. M.; Stringer, G.; Summers, K. K.; Swanson, K.; Sweeton, I. B.; Szabo, S.; Tedaldi, E. M.; Telzak, E. E.; Thompson, M. A.; Thompson, S.; Ting Hong Bong, C.; Vaccaro, A.; Vasco, L. M.; Vecino, I.; Verlinghieri, G. K.; Visnegarwala, F.; Wade, B. H.; Weis, S. E.; Weise, J. A.; Weissman, S.; Wilkin, A. M.; Witter, J. H.; Wojtusic, L.; Wright, T. J.; Yeh, V.; Young, B.; Zeana, C.; Zeh, J.; Savio, E.; Vacarezza, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health issue for HIV-positive individuals, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Development and implementation of a risk score model for CKD would allow comparison of the risks and benefits of adding potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals to a

  6. Tobacco use and self-reported morbidity among rural Indian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Anamitra; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Chowdhury, Abhijit

    2016-09-01

    Aim To measure the prevalence of self-reported morbidity and its associated factors among adults (aged ⩾15 years) in a select rural Indian population. Self-reporting of smoking has been validated as population-based surveys using self-reported data provide reasonably consistent estimates of smoking prevalence, and are generally considered to be sufficiently accurate for tracking the general pattern of morbidity associated with tobacco use in populations. However, to gauge the true disease burden using self-reported morbidity data requires cautious interpretation. During 2010-2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted under the banner of the Health and Demographic Surveillance System, Birbhum, an initiative of the Department of Health and Family Welfare, Government of West Bengal, India. With over 93.6% response rate from the population living in 12 300 households, this study uses the responses from 16 354 individuals: 8012 smokers, and 8333 smokeless tobacco users. Smokers and smokeless tobacco users were asked whether they have developed any morbidity symptoms due to smoking, or smokeless tobacco use. Bivariate, as well as multivariate logistic regression analyses were deployed to attain the study objective. Findings Over 20% of smokers and over 9% of smokeless tobacco users reported any morbidity. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) estimated using logistic regression shows that women are less likely to report any morbidity attributable to smoking (OR: 0.69; CI: 0.54-0.87), and more likely to report any morbidity due to smokeless tobacco use (OR: 1.68; CI: 1.36-2.09). Non-Hindus have higher odds, whereas the wealthiest respondents have lower odds of reporting any morbidity. With a culturally appropriate intervention to change behaviour, youth (both men and women) could be targeted with comprehensive tobacco cessation assistance programmes. A focussed intervention could be designed for unprocessed tobacco users to curb hazardous effects of

  7. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  8. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J., E-mail: rmyerson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gao, Feng [Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hall, Lannis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kodner, Ira [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lockhart, A. Craig [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mutch, Matthew [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Safar, Bashar [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  9. Colonoscopia: morbidade negligenciada Colonoscopy: neglected morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bellotti Formiga

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar fatores de risco que determinam morbidade ao exame de colonoscopia. MÉTODOS: No período de março a junho de 2009 foram analisados prospectivamente 170 pacientes submetidos a exame colonoscópico. Fatores de risco como idade, sexo, indicação, exame ambulatorial/internado, efeitos adversos e qualidade do preparo intestinal, procedimento endoscópico, diagnóstico e intercorrência peri-procedimento foram relacionados. RESULTADOS: A média de idade da amostra foi 60,16 ± 14,69 anos, com predominância do sexo feminino. A indicação mais prevalente do exame foi seguimento pós-operatório. Três exames foram inconclusivos por mau preparo. Do restante, 36,53% foram normais e a maioria dos alterados apresentou pólipos, adenomatosos predominantemente. Quanto as comorbidades, 48,82% dos pacientes possuíam alguma comorbidade, sendo Hipertensão Arterial Sistêmica a mais prevalente. Apenas 22,94% dos pacientes apresentaram algum efeito adverso ao preparo. O preparo foi limpo em 65,88% dos exames, mostrando significância quando comparado a morbidade. Outro fator de significância estatística foi a realização de procedimentos (44,7% dos exames, sendo a maioria polipectomias. A morbidade chegou a 16,47%, sendo a desidratação a mais prevalente. Não houve mortalidade. CONCLUSÃO: A qualidade do preparo intestinal e a realização de procedimento endoscópico são fatores diretamente relacionados a morbidade do exame de colonoscopia.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to analyze risks factors of morbidity on colonoscopy. METHOD: From March to June of 2009, 170 patients were examined and analyzed prospectively. Risks factors as age, sex, indication of exam, ambulatory or hospital exam, adverse events and quality of intestinal preparation, endoscopic procedure, diagnoses and incident before, during or after procedure were analyzed. RESULTS: The average age was 60,16±14,69 years old, with majority of female. The prevalent

  10. Caffeine ameliorates radiation-induced skin reactions in mice but does not influence tumour radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebbar, S.A.; Mitra, A.K.; George, K.C.; Verma, N.C. [Radiation Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: ncverma@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2002-03-01

    Intramuscular administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight to the gastrocnemius muscles of Swiss mice 5 min prior to local irradiation (35 Gy) of the leg delayed the progression of radiation-induced skin reactions in such animals. While 90% epilation with reddening of the skin was noted in animals treated with radiation alone, animals pretreated with caffeine suffered only partial hair loss with slight reddening of the skin on the 16th and 20th days post-irradiation. Beyond the 28th day, damage scores in irradiated feet for both the groups were similar (score 3) and remained unchanged until the 32nd day and then decreased and disappeared completely in both treatment groups by the 40th day after irradiation. In addition, the effect of caffeine on the radiation response of a mouse fibrosarcoma was investigated. Results showed that intratumoral administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg{sup -1} body weight 5 min prior to local exposure of tumours to 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays did not influence the response of tumours to radiation. The present study thus showed that although caffeine ameliorated radiation-induced skin reactions in the mouse leg, it did not affect the tumour radiation response, indicating its potential application in cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famiglietti, Robin M.; Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P 2 =0.4219), followed by wait times (R 2 =0.4000), access/environment (R 2 =0.3837), and patient education (R 2 =0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care

  12. Five fractions of radiation therapy followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Robert J; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females: mortality and morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.B.; Tonascia, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental studies and long-term studies of humans exposed to ionizing radiation in utero and after birth show that these exposures increase the risk of cancer in childhood and in later life. A possible life-shortening effect has also been reported. This study followed to their mid-twenties 1458 women exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays and 1458 matched, unexposed controls in Baltimore, Maryland, and obtained responses from over 100 women in each group. Information about general health and specific diseases was obtained from questionnaires. Deaths were ascertained through family members and death certificates. Mortality rates were slightly higher among exposure. Exposed women reported poor general health significantly more often than controls. Specific diseases occurred similarly in the two groups, although exposed women reported more epilepsy or fits, more ovarian tumors, and more high blood pressure. These strong correlation between weight and high blood pressure and the heavier weights of exposed women seemed to account for this difference. In summary, these matched exposed and control women, followed to their mid-twenties, experienced similar rates of morbidity and mortality. Radiation-induced cancers and life-shortening effects, if any, might not become evident until older ages

  15. Independent predictors of morbidity and mortality in blunt colon trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, R; Paterson, C A; Islam, S; Sweeney, W B; Baker, S P; Counihan, T C

    2004-01-01

    We sought to determine the impact of (1) grade of the colon injury, (2) the formation of an ostomy, and (3) associated injuries on outcomes such as morbidity and mortality after blunt colon injuries. We retrospectively reviewed 16,814 cases of blunt abdominal trauma. Patients with colonic injuries were selected and charts reviewed for demographic, clinical, and outcomes data. Injuries were grouped by the Colon Injury Scale (grades I-V). Independent risk factors of morbidity included spine and lung injuries, as well as increased age. A higher grade of colon injury trended toward a significant association with intra-abdominal complications. Independent risk factors of mortality included liver, heart, and lung injuries, as well as intracerebral blood and female gender. The grade of colon injury, the formation of an ostomy, and management of the colon trauma did not independently predict increased intra-abdominal complications, morbidity, or mortality. These results indicate that patients afflicted with blunt colon trauma experience a high rate of morbidity and mortality from associated injuries and or increased age. Treatment regimens directed at these factors will be most helpful in reducing the high morbidity and mortality after blunt colon trauma. Factors such as ostomy formation and management strategy are not associated with increased morbidity or mortality after blunt colon trauma.

  16. Superior metastasis-free survival for patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy compared to radical prostatectomy: A propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Markovina, MD, PhD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For high-risk prostate cancer (HR-PCa in men with a life expectancy of at least 10 years, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends radiation therapy (RT plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with category 1 evidence or radical prostatectomy (RP as an acceptable initial therapy. Randomized evidence regarding which therapy is optimal for disease control is lacking for men with HR-PCa. We performed a propensity-score-matched comparison of outcomes for men with localized HR-PCa treated with primary RT or RP. Methods and materials: The medical records of patients with localized HR-PCa who were treated at our institution between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. Patient and disease characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were collected. A combination of nearest-neighbor propensity score matching on age, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 comorbidity index, prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage as well as exact matching on prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason scores, and clinical T-stage was performed. Outcomes were measured from diagnosis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare metastasis-free and overall survival. Results: A total of 246 patients were identified with 62 propensity-score-matched pairs. ADT was administered to 6.5% and 80.6% of patients receiving RP and RT, respectively. Five-year rates of metastasis for RP and RT were 33% and 8.9%, respectively (P = .003. Overall survival was not different. Delay of salvage therapy was longer for patients undergoing primary RT (P < .001. Findings were similar when only those patients who did not receive ADT were compared. Conclusions: At our institution, treatment with primary RT resulted in superior metastasis-free survival over RP. This was not accompanied by an improvement in OS.

  17. Morbidity and mortality in patients with craniopharyngioma after surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowley, R K

    2010-10-01

    Craniopharyngioma (CP) is a benign tumour of the suprasellar region that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in comparison with other causes of hypopituitarism. We aimed to establish the rate and causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with CP who attended our centre.

  18. Conventional external beam radiation therapy and high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy as a boost for patients older than 70 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Salvajoli, Joao Vitor; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Ferrigno, Robson

    2005-01-01

    The treatment options for patients with non metastatic prostate cancer range from observation, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy to various combination of some to all of them. Objective: we evaluated the impact on biochemical control of disease (bNED), acute and late intestinal (GI) and urological (GU) morbidity for a group of patients older than 70 years presenting initial or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) as a boost to conventional external beam radiation therapy (RT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology from Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods: a total of 56 patients older than 70 were treated from March, 1997 to June, 2002. All patients had prior to HDRB a course of RT to a median dose of 45 Gy. HDRB doses ranged from 16 Gy to 20 Gy, given in 4 fractions. Results: the median age of the patients was 74.4 years (range 70-83) and the median follow-up 33 months (range 24 to 60). The 5-year actuarial bNED rate was 77%. Acute GU and GI morbidity G1-2 were seen in 17.8% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Late G1 or G2 GU morbidity was seen in 10.7% of the patients, while late G3 morbidity was observed in 7.1% of the patients, represented by urethral strictures. Conclusion: this group of patients had similar bNED rates when compared to literature, with acceptable morbidity rates. (author)

  19. Clinical analysis and study on the life quality of patients with radiation encephalopathy after radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer in Guangdong province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yamei; Zhang Yinyin; Xing Yigang; Liu Yimin; Li Yi; Guo Ling

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical manifestations and image features (MRI) of radiation encephalopathy (RE) in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients of Guangdong Province after radiotherapy and to evaluate the life quality of the patients as well as influencing factors in RE. Methods: The clinical data of 89 patients of RE were retrospectively reviewed. The life quality was evaluated using the LENT/SOMA scoring system in 33 RE and 34 NPC patients received radiotherapy but without RE, who served as the controls. Results: There is significant difference in morbidity in six months between the re-radiotherapy group and the first course radiotherapy group (P<0.05). The initial symptom was varied but mainly showed bulbar palsy. The most common symptoms consisted of bulbar palsy, limb paralysis, sensory abnormality and headache. The magnetic resonance (MR) image showed long T1 and long T2. Patients of the RE group had lower QOL score in the social domain, health and life level (P<0.05) compared with the controls. The results of bivariate correlation statistics shows that there are high correlations between some domain of QOL and headache/nervous system defect/bulbar palsy (P<0.05), indicating the influence of QOL after the onset of illness. Conclusions: The latency of RE is shorter after re-radiotherapy. Radiation encephalopathy negatively affecting some domain of life quality of the patient. The negative effect of bulbar palsy should be taken into account. (authors)

  20. Radiation therapy in the treatment of irresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, J.B.; Cavanaugh, P.J.; Stroup, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma is rising in the United States, but the problems of diagnosis and treatment are largely unsolved. However, in the classic article selected for this paper, a study at Duke University demonstrated in 1973 that radiation therapy given in moderately high doses can be given without substantial morbidity, can be locally effective in achieving good palliation, and can occasionally be curative. The authors' goals as physicians and surgeons caring for patients with pancreatic carcinoma should be to assess the potential for cure and attempt to achieve it in the fortunate very few, to palliate or delay symptoms with a minimum of inflicted morbidity in the unfortunate many, and to attempt to extend comfort and useful survival in all. To accomplish these goals is not easy and requires artful selective application of the available therapies. Many of these, including total pancreatectomy, specialized methods of radiation, and multidrug chemotherapy, are relatively new and their ultimate roles are neither fully developed nor adequately assessed. This paper tries to highlight the present state of the art in radiation therapy to assist clinicians who must now make decisions for the management of their patients with pancreatic carcinoma

  1. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY AND PERSONALITY PROFILE IN DIVORCE SEEKING COUPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Lalit; Gautam, Shiv

    1995-01-01

    To what extent psychiatric morbidity and personality factors contribute to marital disharmony and decision to divorce is still an unanswered question in Indian setting. This study was undertaken with aims to find out (1) the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in persons seeking divorce; (2) the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in persons who had good marital adjustment; (3) the nature of psychiatric morbidity observed in these subjects, and (4) the personality profile of these subjects. Fifty randomly selected divorce seeking couples (n=100) from the matrimonial court of Jaipur City and thirty couples with good marital adjustment (n=60) selected from the community were studied. Probable psychiatric cases identified by administering GHQ (Hindi version) were diagnosed according to ICD-10 and personality profile of all cases was studied by using 16 PF. High psychiatric morbidity (50%) was found among divorce seeking couples in comparison to control group (13%). There was a high prevalence of neurone disorders (22%) and mood disorders (16%) in experimental group. Schizophrenia and related disorders (10%) and substance abuse disorder (2%) were seen only in the experimental group. Specific personality factors related to divorce seeking individuals and persons with stable marriage have been identified. The implications of this study are highlighted. PMID:21743746

  2. Preoperative factors influencing mortality and morbidity in peptic ulcer perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaram, P; Sreekumar, A

    2018-04-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer is one of the most common surgical emergencies worldwide. With the improvement in medical therapy for peptic ulcers, the number of elective surgical procedures has come down. However, the incidence of perforated peptic ulcer is still increasing and remains as a substantial health problem with significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to find out the association between various preoperative and intraoperative factors with the postoperative mortality and morbidity in patients operated for peptic ulcer perforation. This prospective observational study had a time based sample of 101 perforation peritonitis cases admitted to the surgical wards of a tertiary care center from February 2015 to January 2016 who underwent laparotomy, diagnosed to have peptic ulcer perforation and underwent simple closure with an omental patch. Data regarding age, gender, presenting complaints, time elapsed from the onset of symptoms to surgery, physical examination findings, comorbid diseases, laboratory and imaging findings, intraoperative findings, length of hospital stay, postoperative morbidity, and mortality were recorded and analyzed. Female gender, older age group, perforation surgery interval more than 36 h, and size of perforation more than 1 cm 2 were found to be significant factors influencing postoperative mortality and morbidity. Postoperative morbidity was also associated with comorbid diseases. Abnormal renal function on presentation was identified as an additional risk factor for postoperative morbidity and longer hospital stay. An understanding of these factors, identification of patients at risk and early intervention can help in reducing the postoperative morbidity and mortality in peptic ulcer perforation.

  3. Severe maternal morbidity for 2004-2005 in the three Dublin maternity hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Cliona M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and causes of severe maternal morbidity in Dublin over a two year period from 2004 to 2005. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2005 was undertaken in the three large maternity hospitals in Dublin, which serve a population of 1.5 million people. All are tertiary referral centres for obstetrics and neonatology and have an annual combined delivery rate of circa 23,000 births. Cases of severe maternal morbidity were identified. A systems based classification was used. The primary cause of maternal morbidity and the number of events experienced per patient was recorded. RESULTS: We identified 158 women who fulfilled the definition for severe maternal morbidity, giving a rate of 3.2 per 1000 maternities. There were two maternal deaths during the time period giving mortality to morbidity ratio of 1:79. The commonest cause of severe morbidity was vascular dysfunction related to obstetric haemorrhage. Eclampsia comprised 15.4% of cases. Intensive care or coronary care admission occurred in 12% of cases. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of severe maternal morbidity in this population is 3.2\\/1000 maternities. Obstetric haemorrhage was the main cause of severe maternal morbidity.

  4. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychiatric Morbidity in HIV-infected Male Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Lee, Ming-Been; Morisky, Donald Edward; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Farabee, David; Lan, Yu-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Lyu, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Background/Purpose The seroincidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Taiwan has drastically increased since 2004, particularly among injection drug users and prisoners. The major purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of psychiatric morbidity among HIV-infected male prisoners. Methods In 2006, data were collected from all of HIV-infected male prisoners (n = 535) in seven prisons in Taiwan. This collection was performed using a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire in group settings directed by our interviewers. Psychiatric morbidity was measured using the five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale in 535 participants, which represented an 85% response rate. After excluding incomplete data, 479 participants were included in the analysis. Results Psychiatric morbidity was present in 46% of participants. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that correlates of the five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale defined cases included the following: being a recidivist, having poor self-rated health status, and having experienced psychiatric symptoms in one’s lifetime (e.g. significant physical pain or discomfort, depression for 2 weeks or longer, serious anxiety or tension, trouble understanding, concentrating, or remembering, and serious thoughts of suicide), with a Nagelkerke R2 equal to 0.365. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity is prevalent among HIV-infected male prisoners. Tailored HIV/AIDS education related to mental health is therefore suggested for inclusion as part of a comprehensive HIV/AIDS training program among incarcerated populations. PMID:20434025

  6. Radiation in the treatment of meningeal leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    At the present time, a successful regimen for the eradication of occult meningeal leukemia is the combination of cranial radiotherapy in a dose of 1800 rads in 10 fractions in 12 to 14 days with six doses of intrathecal methotrexate. This regimen, when given with prednisone and vincristine can be expected to give a relapse rate for isolated meningeal leukemia of approximately 5% during the first 2 years of follow-up. A modification of this regimen utilizing craniospinal radiation with prior and concurrent intrathecal methotrexate is given for the treatment of overt meningeal leukemia at diagnosis or for an isolated first relapse with meningeal leukemia. Radiation technique and morbidity are discussed

  7. Chronic rectal bleeding after high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients based on existing late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity scales. None of the existing morbidity scales include our most frequently observed late GI complication, which is chronic rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations. This communication documents the frequency of rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations and illustrates the variation in reported late serious GI complication rates by the selection of morbidity scale. Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and December 1993, 352 patients with T1-T3 nonmetastatic prostate cancers were treated with our four-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1-cm margin from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 36 months (range 2-76), and the median center of prostate dose was 74 Gy (range 63-81). Three morbidity scales are assessed: the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring at least one blood transfusion and/or more than two coagulations as a Grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Latency is measured from the end of radiotherapy to surgery, first blood transfusion, or third coagulation procedure. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy or sigmoid resection), three required multiple blood transfusions, two required one or two blood transfusions, and nine required at least three

  8. Morbidity and Mortality Patterns among Neurological Patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: The morbidity and mortality of neurological patients managed in the intensive care unit reflect the causes of neurological disorders and the effectiveness of management. Method: The morbidity and mortality patterns of neurological patients admitted into the intensive care unit of the University of Benin ...

  9. Non-Life Threatening Maternal Morbidity: Cross Sectional Surveys from Malawi and Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa Zafar

    Full Text Available For more accurate estimation of the global burden of pregnancy associated disease, clarity is needed on definition and assessment of non-severe maternal morbidity. Our study aimed to define maternal morbidity with clear criteria for identification at primary care level and estimate the distribution of and evaluate associations between physical (infective and non-infective and psychological morbidities in two different low-income countries.Cross sectional study with assessment of morbidity in early pregnancy (34%, late pregnancy (35% and the postnatal period (31% among 3459 women from two rural communities in Pakistan (1727 and Malawi (1732. Trained health care providers at primary care level used semi-structured questionnaires documenting signs and symptoms, clinical examination and laboratory tests which were bundled to reflect infectious, non-infectious and psychological morbidity.One in 10 women in Malawi and 1 in 5 in Pakistan reported a previous pregnancy complication with 1 in 10 overall reporting a previous neonatal death or stillbirth. In the index pregnancy, 50.1% of women in Malawi and 53% in Pakistan were assessed to have at least one morbidity (infective or non-infective. Both infective (Pakistan and non-infective morbidity (Pakistan and Malawi was lower in the postnatal period than during pregnancy. Multiple morbidities were uncommon ( 9. Complications during a previous pregnancy, infective morbidity (p <0.001, intra or postpartum haemorrhage (p <0.02 were associated with psychological morbidity in both settings.Our findings highlight the need to strengthen the availability and quality of antenatal and postnatal care packages. We propose to adapt and improve the framework and criteria used in this study, ensuring a basic set of diagnostic tests is available, to ensure more robust assessment of non-severe maternal morbidity.

  10. A proposed methodology for performing risk analysis of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dornsife, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is comprised of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. Topics discussed include barriers to effective risk assessment and management, and real versus perceived risk for various radiation programs in the state of Pennsylvania. Calculation results for Pennsylvania are provided for low-level radioactive waste transportation risks, indoor radon risk, and cancer morbidity risk from x-rays. A methodology for prioritizing radiation regulatory programs based on risk is presented with calculations for various Pennsylvania programs

  11. Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0681 TITLE: Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0681Genetic Modeling of Radiation Injury in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated...effects, urinary morbidity, rectal injury, sexual dysfunction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  12. Association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Score and Mortality in Patients with Isolated Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-03

    Background: The purpose of this study was to use a propensity score-matched analysis to investigate the association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) scores and clinical outcomes of patients with isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The study population comprised 7855 patients aged ≥40 years who were hospitalized for treatment of isolated moderate and severe TBI (an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) ≥3 points only in the head and not in other regions of the body) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Patients were categorized as high-risk (OSTA score -1; n = 5359). Two-sided Pearson's chi-squared, or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare categorical data. Unpaired Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Propensity score-matching in a 1:1 ratio was performed using NCSS software, with adjustment for covariates. Results: Compared to low-risk patients, high- and medium-risk patients were significantly older and injured more severely. The high- and medium-risk patients had significantly higher mortality rates, longer hospital length of stay, and a higher proportion of admission to the intensive care unit than low-risk patients. Analysis of propensity score-matched patients with adjusted covariates, including gender, co-morbidity, blood alcohol concentration level, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score revealed that high- and medium-risk patients still had a 2.4-fold (odds ratio (OR), 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.39-4.15; p = 0.001) and 1.8-fold (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.19-2.86; p = 0.005) higher mortality, respectively, than low-risk patients. However, further addition of age as a covariate for the propensity score-matching demonstrated that there was no significant difference between high-risk and low-risk patients or between medium-risk and low-risk patients, implying that older age

  13. Martial arts intervention decreases pain scores in children with malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Martin H; Thomas, Ronald; Cohen, Cindy; Bluth, Amanda C; Goldberg, Elimelech

    2016-01-01

    childhood cancer, with greater effect achieved with higher baseline pain scores and patient age. Martial arts intervention may improve patient compliance with respect to medical and surgical management, thus reducing disease morbidity and health care costs.

  14. Laryngeal morbidity after tracheal intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M K; Rasmussen, N; Kristensen, M S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tracheal intubation may cause vocal fold damage. The trial was designed to assess laryngeal morbidity comparing the Endoflex(®) tube with a conventional endotracheal tube with stylet. We hypothesised that laryngeal morbidity within the first 24 h after extubation would be lower...... with the Endoflex tube than with the conventional endotracheal tube with stylet because of less rigidity. METHODS: This randomised trial included 130 elective surgical patients scheduled for general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Pre- and post-operative assessment of hoarseness, vocal fold pathology......% with the Endoflex tube and 55% with the endotracheal tube with stylet at 24 h after extubation (P = 0.44). Post-operative vocal fold injury was present in 23% in the Endoflex tube group and in 36% in the endotracheal tube with stylet group (P = 0.13). The increase in shimmer, the voice analysis variable reflecting...

  15. Global Morbidity and Mortality of Leptospirosis: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Costa

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonosis, occurs in diverse epidemiological settings and affects vulnerable populations, such as rural subsistence farmers and urban slum dwellers. Although leptospirosis is a life-threatening disease and recognized as an important cause of pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome, the lack of global estimates for morbidity and mortality has contributed to its neglected disease status.We conducted a systematic review of published morbidity and mortality studies and databases to extract information on disease incidence and case fatality ratios. Linear regression and Monte Carlo modelling were used to obtain age and gender-adjusted estimates of disease morbidity for countries and Global Burden of Disease (GBD and WHO regions. We estimated mortality using models that incorporated age and gender-adjusted disease morbidity and case fatality ratios. The review identified 80 studies on disease incidence from 34 countries that met quality criteria. In certain regions, such as Africa, few quality assured studies were identified. The regression model, which incorporated country-specific variables of population structure, life expectancy at birth, distance from the equator, tropical island, and urbanization, accounted for a significant proportion (R(2 = 0.60 of the variation in observed disease incidence. We estimate that there were annually 1.03 million cases (95% CI 434,000-1,750,000 and 58,900 deaths (95% CI 23,800-95,900 due to leptospirosis worldwide. A large proportion of cases (48%, 95% CI 40-61% and deaths (42%, 95% CI 34-53% were estimated to occur in adult males with age of 20-49 years. Highest estimates of disease morbidity and mortality were observed in GBD regions of South and Southeast Asia, Oceania, Caribbean, Andean, Central, and Tropical Latin America, and East Sub-Saharan Africa.Leptospirosis is among the leading zoonotic causes of morbidity worldwide and accounts for numbers of deaths, which approach or exceed those

  16. Differences of wells scores accuracy, caprini scores and padua scores in deep vein thrombosis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatot, D.; Mardia, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is the venous thrombus in lower limbs. Diagnosis is by using venography or ultrasound compression. However, these examinations are not available yet in some health facilities. Therefore many scoring systems are developed for the diagnosis of DVT. The scoring method is practical and safe to use in addition to efficacy, and effectiveness in terms of treatment and costs. The existing scoring systems are wells, caprini and padua score. There have been many studies comparing the accuracy of this score but not in Medan. Therefore, we are interested in comparative research of wells, capriniand padua score in Medan.An observational, analytical, case-control study was conducted to perform diagnostic tests on the wells, caprini and padua score to predict the risk of DVT. The study was at H. Adam Malik Hospital in Medan.From a total of 72 subjects, 39 people (54.2%) are men and the mean age are 53.14 years. Wells score, caprini score and padua score has a sensitivity of 80.6%; 61.1%, 50% respectively; specificity of 80.65; 66.7%; 75% respectively, and accuracy of 87.5%; 64.3%; 65.7% respectively.Wells score has better sensitivity, specificity and accuracy than caprini and padua score in diagnosing DVT.

  17. [Analysis of the pediatric trauma score in patients wounded with shrapnel; the effect of explosives with high kinetic energy: results of the first intervention center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Hüseyin; Mesci, Ayhan; Demirbağ, Suzi; Eryılmaz, Mehmet; Yiğit, Taner; Peker, Yusuf

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to assess the pediatric trauma score analysis in pediatric trauma cases due to shrapnel effect of explosives material with high kinetic energy. The data of 17 pediatric injuries were reviewed retrospectively between February 2002 and August 2005. The information about age, gender, trauma-hospital interval, trauma mechanism, the injured organs, pediatric Glasgow coma score (PGCS), pediatric trauma score (PTS), hemodynamic parameters, blood transfusion, interventions and length of hospital stay (LHS) were investigated. While all patients suffered from trauma to the extremities, only four patients had traumatic lower-limb amputation. Transportation time was 1 hour in 65% of cases. While PTS was found as 8 (p=0.007). Morbidity rates of PTS 8 cases were 29.4% and 5.9%, respectively (p=0.026). While LHS was 22.8 days in PTS LHS was found to be only 4 days in PTS >8 cases. This difference was found to be statistically significant (p=0.001). PTS is very efficient and a time-saving procedure to assess the severity of trauma caused by the shrapnel effect. The median heart rate, morbidity, and LHS increased significantly in patients with PTS <=8.

  18. Tocolysis after preterm premature rupture of membranes and neonatal outcome: a propensity-score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthe, Elsa; Goffinet, François; Marret, Stéphane; Vayssiere, Christophe; Flamant, Cyril; Quere, Mathilde; Benhammou, Valérie; Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Kayem, Gilles

    2017-08-01

    There are conflicting results regarding tocolysis in cases of preterm premature rupture of membranes. Delaying delivery may reduce neonatal morbidity because of prematurity and allow for prenatal corticosteroids and, if necessary, in utero transfer. However, that may increase the risks of maternofetal infection and its adverse consequences. The objective of the study was to investigate whether tocolytic therapy in cases of preterm premature rupture of membranes is associated with improved neonatal or obstetric outcomes. Etude Epidémiologique sur les Petits Ages Gestationnels 2 is a French national prospective, population-based cohort study of preterm births that occurred in 546 maternity units in 2011. Inclusion criteria in this analysis were women with preterm premature rupture of membranes at 24-32 weeks' gestation and singleton gestations. Outcomes were survival to discharge without severe morbidity, latency prolonged by ≥48 hours and histological chorioamnionitis. Uterine contractions at admission, individual and obstetric characteristics, and neonatal outcomes were compared by tocolytic treatment or not. Propensity scores and inverse probability of treatment weighting for each woman were used to minimize indication bias in estimating the association of tocolytic therapy with outcomes. The study population consisted of 803 women; 596 (73.4%) received tocolysis. Women with and without tocolysis did not differ in neonatal survival without severe morbidity (86.7% vs 83.9%, P = .39), latency prolonged by ≥48 hours (75.1% vs 77.4%, P = .59), or histological chorioamnionitis (50.0% vs 47.6%, P = .73). After applying propensity scores and assigning inverse probability of treatment weighting, tocolysis was not associated with improved survival without severe morbidity as compared with no tocolysis (odds ratio, 1.01 [95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.09], latency prolonged by ≥48 hours (1.03 [95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.11]), or histological chorioamnionitis

  19. Impact of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia repair on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshit Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of hiatal hernia repair (HHR on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD in morbidly obese patients with hiatus hernia undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective study involving ten morbidly obese patients with large hiatus hernia diagnosed on pre-operative endoscopy who underwent LSG and simultaneous HHR. The patients were assessed for symptoms of GERD using a Severity symptom score (SS questionnaire and anti-reflux medications. Results: Of the ten patients, five patients had GERD preoperatively. At the mean follow-up of 11.70 ± 6.07 months after surgery, four patients (80% showed complete resolution while one patient complained of persistence of symptoms. Endoscopy in this patient revealed resolution of esophagitis indicating that the persistent symptoms were not attributable to reflux. The other five patients without GERD remained free of any symptom attributable to GERD. Thus, in all ten patients, repair of hiatal hernia (HH during LSG led to either resolution of GERD or prevented any new onset symptom related to GER. Conclusion: In morbidly obese patients with HH with or without GERD undergoing LSG, repair of the hiatus hernia helps in amelioration of GERD and prevents any new onset GER. Thus, the presence of HH should not be considered as a contraindication for LSG.

  20. Description and validation of a scoring system for tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vult von Steyern, Kristina; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella M; Höglund, Peter; Bozovic, Gracijela; Wiklund, Marie; Geijer, Mats

    2012-12-01

    To design and validate a scoring system for tomosynthesis (digital tomography) in pulmonary cystic fibrosis. A scoring system dedicated to tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis was designed. Three radiologists independently scored 88 pairs of radiographs and tomosynthesis examinations of the chest in 60 patients with cystic fibrosis and 7 oncology patients. Radiographs were scored according to the Brasfield scoring system and tomosynthesis examinations were scored using the new scoring system. Observer agreements for the tomosynthesis score were almost perfect for the total score with square-weighted kappa >0.90, and generally substantial to almost perfect for subscores. Correlation between the tomosynthesis score and the Brasfield score was good for the three observers (Kendall's rank correlation tau 0.68, 0.77 and 0.78). Tomosynthesis was generally scored higher as a percentage of the maximum score. Observer agreements for the total score for Brasfield score were almost perfect (square-weighted kappa 0.80, 0.81 and 0.85). The tomosynthesis scoring system seems robust and correlates well with the Brasfield score. Compared with radiography, tomosynthesis is more sensitive to cystic fibrosis changes, especially bronchiectasis and mucus plugging, and the new tomosynthesis scoring system offers the possibility of more detailed and accurate scoring of disease severity. Tomosynthesis is more sensitive than conventional radiography for pulmonary cystic fibrosis changes. The radiation dose from chest tomosynthesis is low compared with computed tomography. Tomosynthesis may become useful in the regular follow-up of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  1. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and severe maternal morbidity: is there an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Carina R; Pacagnella, Rodolfo C; Parpinelli, Mary A; Silveira, Carla; Andreucci, Carla B; Ferreira, Elton C; Santos, Juliana P; Zanardi, Dulce M; Souza, Renato T; Cecatti, Jose G

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among women experiencing a severe maternal morbidity event and associated factors in comparison with those without maternal morbidity. In a retrospective cohort study, 803 women with or without severe maternal morbidity were evaluated at 6 months to 5 years postpartum for the presence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Interviews were conducted by telephone and electronic data was stored. Data analysis was carried out by using χ2, Fisher's Exact test, and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant change in the prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder related to a previous severe maternal morbidity experience. There were also no differences in diagnostic criteria for severe maternal morbidity (hypertensive syndromes, hemorrhage, surgical intervention or intensive care unit admission required, among other management criteria). Low parity (2.5-fold risk) and increasing age were factors associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. A severe maternal morbidity episode is not associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms within five years of the severe maternal morbidity event and birth. However, a more advanced maternal age and primiparity increased the risk of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. This does not imply that women who had experienced a severe maternal morbidity event did not suffer or need differentiated care.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of topical application of natural honey and benzydamine hydrochloride in the management of radiation mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaksharam Jayachandran

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Pure natural honey can be an effective agent in managing radiation induced oral mucositis. Honey could be a simple, potent and inexpensive agent, which is easily available, and it can be a better therapeutic agent in managing radiation mucositis in developing countries like India for the management of this morbidity.

  3. The prediction of the in-hospital mortality of acutely ill medical patients by electrocardiogram (ECG) dispersion mapping compared with established risk factors and predictive scores--a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2011-08-01

    ECG dispersion mapping (ECG-DM) is a novel technique that analyzes low amplitude ECG oscillations and reports them as the myocardial micro-alternation index (MMI). This study compared the ability of ECG-DM to predict in-hospital mortality with traditional risk factors such as age, vital signs and co-morbid diagnoses, as well as three predictive scores: the Simple Clinical Score (SCS)--based on clinical and ECG findings, and two Medical Admission Risk System scores--one based on vital signs and laboratory data (MARS), and one only on laboratory data (LD).

  4. [Tuberculosis and diabetes co-morbidity: an unresolved problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Gil, César; Moore, David A J

    2014-01-01

    Co-morbidity between tuberculosis and diabetes has been described since the early 20th century. In developed countries, where there has been a decrease of infectious diseases with an increase of non-communicable diseases, as well as those countries who still have a high prevalence of infectious diseases but an increase of non-communicable diseases, it is observed that the prevalence of co-morbidity between tuberculosis and diabetes is increasing, making clinical management and control at the public health level a new challenge for health systems. This review aims to show the current available evidence that can inform research lines being developed to understand the problem. In countries like Peru, where there is an epidemiological transition, further research could allow us to understand and describe in a better way the characteristics and impact of this co-morbidity.

  5. The morbidity and mortality outcomes of indigenous Australian peoples after isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery: the influence of geographic remoteness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Anil; Tully, Phillip J; Bennetts, Jayme S; Tuble, Sigrid C; Baker, Robert A

    2013-08-01

    Though Indigenous Australian peoples reportedly have poorer survival outcome after cardiac surgery, few studies have jointly documented the experience of major morbidity, and considered the influence of patient geographic remoteness. From January 1998 to September 2008, major morbidity events and survival were recorded for 2748 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Morbidity and survival analyses adjusted for propensity deciles based on patient ethnicity and age, sex, left ventricular ejection fraction, recent myocardial infarction, tobacco smoking, diabetes, renal disease and history of stroke. Sensitivity analyses controlled for the patient accessibility/remoteness index of Australia (ARIA). The 297 Indigenous Australian patients (10.8% of total) had greater odds for total morbidity (adjusted odds ratio = 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-2.30) and prolonged ventilation (adjusted odds ratio = 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-3.44) in analyses adjusted for propensity deciles and geographic remoteness. With a median follow-up of 7.5 years (interquartile range 5.2-10.2), Indigenous Australian patients were found to experience 30% greater mortality risk (unadjusted hazard ratio = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.03-1.64, p = 0.03). The effect size strengthened after adjustment for propensity score (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.49; 95% CI: 1.13-1.96, p = .004). Adjustment for ARIA categorisation strengthened the effect size (adjusted HR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.11-2.13, p = .009). Indigenous Australian peoples were at greater risk for prolonged ventilation and combined morbidity outcome, and experienced poorer survival in the longer term. Higher mortality risk among Indigenous Australians was evident even after controlling for remoteness and accessibility to services. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Famiglietti, Robin M., E-mail: rfamigli@mdanderson.org; Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P<.0001). Satisfaction with patient–provider relationships had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction (R{sup 2}=0.4219), followed by wait times (R{sup 2}=0.4000), access/environment (R{sup 2}=0.3837), and patient education (R{sup 2}=0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care.

  7. Space radiation protection: Destination Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2014-04-01

    National space agencies are planning a human mission to Mars in the XXI century. Space radiation is generally acknowledged as a potential showstopper for this mission for two reasons: a) high uncertainty on the risk of radiation-induced morbidity, and b) lack of simple countermeasures to reduce the exposure. The need for radiation exposure mitigation tools in a mission to Mars is supported by the recent measurements of the radiation field on the Mars Science Laboratory. Shielding is the simplest physical countermeasure, but the current materials provide poor reduction of the dose deposited by high-energy cosmic rays. Accelerator-based tests of new materials can be used to assess additional protection in the spacecraft. Active shielding is very promising, but as yet not applicable in practical cases. Several studies are developing technologies based on superconducting magnetic fields in space. Reducing the transit time to Mars is arguably the best solution but novel nuclear thermal-electric propulsion systems also seem to be far from practical realization. It is likely that the first mission to Mars will employ a combination of these options to reduce radiation exposure. Copyright © 2014 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hippocampal dose volume histogram predicts Hopkins Verbal Learning Test scores after brain irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Okoukoni, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Radiation-induced cognitive decline is relatively common after treatment for primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, identifying dosimetric parameters that are predictive of radiation-induced cognitive decline is difficult due to the heterogeneity of patient characteristics. The memory function is especially susceptible to radiation effects after treatment. The objective of this study is to correlate volumetric radiation doses received by critical neuroanatomic structures to post–radiation therapy (RT memory impairment. Methods and materials: Between 2008 and 2011, 53 patients with primary brain malignancies were treated with conventionally fractionated RT in prospectively accrued clinical trials performed at our institution. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for the hippocampus, parahippocampus, amygdala, and fusiform gyrus. Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised scores were obtained at least 6 months after RT. Impairment was defined as an immediate recall score ≤15. For each anatomic region, serial regression was performed to correlate volume receiving a given dose (VD(Gy with memory impairment. Results: Hippocampal V53.4Gy to V60.9Gy significantly predicted post-RT memory impairment (P < .05. Within this range, the hippocampal V55Gy was the most significant predictor (P = .004. Hippocampal V55Gy of 0%, 25%, and 50% was associated with tumor-induced impairment rates of 14.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2%-28.7%, 45.9% (95% CI, 24.7%-68.6%, and 80.6% (95% CI, 39.2%-96.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The hippocampal V55Gy is a significant predictor for impairment, and a limiting dose below 55 Gy may minimize radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

  9. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy.

  10. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki

    2004-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

  11. Child Morbidity and Mortality in Slum Environments along Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem that guided this study was that child mortality and morbidity disparities continue to be observed in the era of improved expansion of the provision of health care services. Some areas have low mortality and morbidity while others such as the slums of Nairobi have high. Various factors may account for this ...

  12. The Avalanche Hypothesis and Compression of Morbidity: Testing Assumptions through Cohort-Sequential Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Silberman

    Full Text Available The compression of morbidity model posits a breakpoint in the adult lifespan that separates an initial period of relative health from a subsequent period of ever increasing morbidity. Researchers often assume that such a breakpoint exists; however, this assumption is hitherto untested.To test the assumption that a breakpoint exists--which we term a morbidity tipping point--separating a period of relative health from a subsequent deterioration in health status. An analogous tipping point for healthcare costs was also investigated.Four years of adults' (N = 55,550 morbidity and costs data were retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected in Pittsburgh, PA between 2006 and 2009; analyses were performed in Rochester, NY and Ann Arbor, MI in 2012 and 2013. Cohort-sequential and hockey stick regression models were used to characterize long-term trajectories and tipping points, respectively, for both morbidity and costs.Morbidity increased exponentially with age (P<.001. A morbidity tipping point was observed at age 45.5 (95% CI, 41.3-49.7. An exponential trajectory was also observed for costs (P<.001, with a costs tipping point occurring at age 39.5 (95% CI, 32.4-46.6. Following their respective tipping points, both morbidity and costs increased substantially (Ps<.001.Findings support the existence of a morbidity tipping point, confirming an important but untested assumption. This tipping point, however, may occur earlier in the lifespan than is widely assumed. An "avalanche of morbidity" occurred after the morbidity tipping point-an ever increasing rate of morbidity progression. For costs, an analogous tipping point and "avalanche" were observed. The time point at which costs began to increase substantially occurred approximately 6 years before health status began to deteriorate.

  13. Nutritional risk in major abdominal surgery: NURIMAS Liver (DRKS00010923 – protocol of a prospective observational trial to evaluate the prognostic value of different nutritional scores in hepatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Probst

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is commonly known as a risk factor in surgical procedures. The nutritional status seems particularly relevant to the clinical outcome of patients undergoing hepatic resection. Thus, identifying affected individuals and taking preventive therapeutic actions before surgery is an important task. However, there are only very few studies, that investigate which existing nutritional assessment score (NAS is suited best to predict the postoperative outcome in liver surgery. Objective: Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery (NURIMAS Liver is a prospective observational trial that analyses the predictive value of 12 different NAS for postoperative morbidity and mortality after liver resection. Methods: After admission to the surgical department of the University Hospital in Heidelberg or the municipal hospital of Karlsruhe, all patients scheduled for elective liver resection will be screened for eligibility. Participants will fill in a questionnaire and undergo a physical examination in order to evaluate nutritional status according to Nutritional Risk Index, Nutritional Risk Screening Score, Subjective Global Assessment, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire, Imperial Nutritional Screening System, Imperial Nutritional Screening System II, Nutritional Risk Classification and the ESPEN malnutrition criteria. Postoperative morbidity and mortality will be tracked prospectively throughout the postoperative course. The association of malnutrition according to each score and occurrence of at least one major complication will be analysed using both chi-squared tests and a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Already established risk factors in liver surgery will be added as covariates. Discussion: NURIMAS Liver is a bicentric, prospective observational trial. The aim of this study is to investigate the predictive value of clinical nutritional assessment

  14. Ocular Morbidity among Children Attending Government and Private Schools of Kathmandu Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Shrestha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children from the developing world are more prone to going blind from avoidable and preventable causes. In Nepal, children in private schools are reported to have a higher ocular morbidity than those in government schools, with myopia being the major cause of the morbidity. This study was designed to evaluate ocular morbidity in students from both types of school. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, comparative study among students from government and private schools of Kathmandu. Eye examination was carried out evaluating visual acuity, color vision, refractive status, binocular vision status, and anterior and posterior segment findings. Results: A total of 4,228 students from government and private schools were evaluated. The prevalence of ocular morbidity was 19.56 % with refractive error (11.9 % being the major cause of the morbidity, followed by strabismus and infective disorders. No signifi cant difference in the prevalence of ocular morbidity and refractive status was found in the students from government and private schools. Conclusions: A signifi cant number of children of school-going age have ocular morbidity with no signifi cant difference in the prevalence in the students from government and private schools. Research exploring the effect of various risk factors in the progression of myopia would be helpful to investigate the refractive status in children from these different types of schools. Keywords: Myopia, ocular morbidity, school Students