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Sample records for radiation modulates hla

  1. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H;

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on ...

  2. Modulation of HLA Expression in Human Cytomegalovirus Immune Evasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aifen Lin; Huihui Xu; Weihua Yan

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) has evolved multiple mechanisms to escape the host immune recognition and innate or adaptive immune responses. Among them, hCMV has developed strategies to modulate the expression and/or function of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), including by encoding series of infection stage-dependent hCMV proteins to detain and destroy the expression of HLA molecules on the surface of infected cells. This disturbs the antigen presentation and processing, by encoding MHC class Ⅰ homologues or selective up-regulation of particular HLA class Ⅰ molecules binding to NK cell inhibitory receptors, and by encoding specific ligand antagonists to interfere with NK cell activating receptors. Here we discussed the molecular mechanisms utilized by the hCMV to alter the formation, transportation and expression of HLA antigens on the infected cell surface. The knowledge about hCMV modulating HLA expression could benefit us to further understand the pathogenesis of viral diseases and may eventually develop novel effective immunotherapies to counteract viral infections and viral associated diseases.

  3. Ionizing radiation modulates the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen-G in a human melanoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelin, S.; Gallegos, C.E.; Dubner, D. [Radiopathology Laboratory, Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Favier, B.; Carosella, E.D. [CEA, I2BM, Hopital Saint-Louis, IUH, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule involved in fetus protection from the maternal immune system, transplant tolerance, and viral and tumoral immune escape. Tumor-specific HLA-G expression has been described for a wide variety of malignancies, including melanomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ionizing radiation (IR) could modulate the surface expression of HLA-G1 in a human melanoma cell line that expresses endogenously membrane-bound HLA-G1. For this purpose, cells were exposed to increasing doses of {gamma}-irradiation (0-20 Gy) and HLA-G1 levels at the plasma membrane were analyzed at different times postirradiation by flow cytometry. HLA-G total expression and the presence of the soluble form of HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) in the culture medium of irradiated cells were also evaluated. IR was capable of down regulating cell surface and total HLA-G levels, with a concomitant increase of sHLA-G1 in the medium. These results could indicate that {gamma}-irradiation decreases HLA-G1 surface levels by enhancing the proteolytic cleavage of this molecule. (authors)

  4. HLA-B27-Homodimer-Specific Antibody Modulates the Expansion of Pro-Inflammatory T-Cells in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osiris Marroquin Belaunzaran

    Full Text Available HLA-B27 is a common genetic risk factor for the development of Spondyloarthritides (SpA. HLA-B27 can misfold to form cell-surface heavy chain homodimers (B272 and induce pro-inflammatory responses that may lead to SpA pathogenesis. The presence of B272 can be detected on leukocytes of HLA-B27+ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients and HLA-B27 transgenic rats. We characterized a novel B272-specific monoclonal antibody to study its therapeutic use in HLA-B27 associated disorders.The monoclonal HD5 antibody was selected from a phage library to target cell-surface B272 homodimers and characterized for affinity, specificity and ligand binding. The immune modulating effect of HD5 was tested in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Onset and progression of disease profiles were monitored during therapy. Cell-surface B272 and expansion of pro-inflammatory cells from blood, spleen and draining lymph nodes were assessed by flow cytometry.HD5 bound B272 with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 0.32 nM. HD5 blocked cell-surface interaction of B272 with immune regulatory receptors KIR3DL2, LILRB2 and Pirb. In addition, HD5 modulated the production of TNF from CD4+ T-cells by limiting B272 interactions in vitro. In an HLA-B27 transgenic rat model repetitive dosing of HD5 reduced the expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells, and decreased the levels of soluble TNF and number of cell-surface B272 molecules.HD5 predominantly inhibits early TNF production and expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Monoclonal antibodies targeting cell-surface B272 propose a new concept for the modulation of inflammatory responses in HLA-B27 related disorders.

  5. TCR clonotypes modulate the protective effect of HLA class I molecules in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huabiao; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Liu, Dongfang; Porter, Lindsay C; Fang, Justin W; Darko, Sam; Brockman, Mark A; Miura, Toshiyuki; Brumme, Zabrina L; Schneidewind, Arne; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cesa, Kevin T; Sela, Jennifer; Cung, Thai D; Toth, Ildiko; Pereyra, Florencia; Yu, Xu G; Douek, Daniel C; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D

    2012-06-10

    The human leukocyte antigens HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 are associated with protection against progression of disease that results from infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet most people with alleles encoding HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 are unable to control HIV-1. Here we found that HLA-B27-restricted CD8(+) T cells in people able to control infection with HIV-1 (controllers) and those who progress to disease after infection with HIV-1 (progressors) differed in their ability to inhibit viral replication through targeting of the immunodominant epitope of group-associated antigen (Gag) of HIV-1. This was associated with distinct T cell antigen receptor (TCR) clonotypes, characterized by superior control of HIV-1 replication in vitro, greater cross-reactivity to epitope variants and enhanced loading and delivery of perforin. We also observed clonotype-specific differences in antiviral efficacy for an immunodominant HLA-B57-restricted response in controllers and progressors. Thus, the efficacy of such so-called 'protective alleles' is modulated by specific TCR clonotypes selected during natural infection, which provides a functional explanation for divergent HIV-1 outcomes.

  6. Regulatory polymorphisms modulate the expression of HLA class II molecules and promote autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prithvi; Rai, Ekta; Song, Ran; Khan, Shaheen; Wakeland, Benjamin E; Viswanathan, Kasthuribai; Arana, Carlos; Liang, Chaoying; Zhang, Bo; Dozmorov, Igor; Carr-Johnson, Ferdicia; Mitrovic, Mitja; Wiley, Graham B; Kelly, Jennifer A; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Olsen, Nancy J; Cotsapas, Chris; Garcia, Christine K; Wise, Carol A; Harley, John B; Nath, Swapan K; James, Judith A; Jacob, Chaim O; Tsao, Betty P; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Karp, David R; Li, Quan Zhen; Gaffney, Patrick M; Wakeland, Edward K

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of sixteen SLE risk loci among 1349 Caucasian cases and controls produced a comprehensive dataset of the variations causing susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Two independent disease association signals in the HLA-D region identified two regulatory regions containing 3562 polymorphisms that modified thirty-seven transcription factor binding sites. These extensive functional variations are a new and potent facet of HLA polymorphism. Variations modifying the consensus binding motifs of IRF4 and CTCF in the XL9 regulatory complex modified the transcription of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in a chromosome-specific manner, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in the surface expression of HLA-DR and DQ molecules on dendritic cells with SLE risk genotypes, which increases to over 4-fold after stimulation. Similar analyses of fifteen other SLE risk loci identified 1206 functional variants tightly linked with disease-associated SNPs and demonstrated that common disease alleles contain multiple causal variants modulating multiple immune system genes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12089.001 PMID:26880555

  7. Regulatory T cells modulate granulomatous inflammation in an HLA-DP2 transgenic murine model of beryllium-induced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Douglas G; Falta, Michael T; McKee, Amy S; Martin, Allison K; Simonian, Philip L; Crawford, Frances; Gordon, Terry; Mercer, Robert R; Hoover, Mark D; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Tuder, Rubin M; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2014-06-10

    Susceptibility to chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is linked to certain HLA-DP molecules, including HLA-DP2. To elucidate the molecular basis of this association, we exposed mice transgenic (Tg) for HLA-DP2 to beryllium oxide (BeO) via oropharyngeal aspiration. As opposed to WT mice, BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice developed mononuclear infiltrates in a peribronchovascular distribution that were composed of CD4(+) T cells and included regulatory T (Treg) cells. Beryllium-responsive, HLA-DP2-restricted CD4(+) T cells expressing IFN-γ and IL-2 were present in BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice and not in WT mice. Using Be-loaded HLA-DP2-peptide tetramers, we identified Be-specific CD4(+) T cells in the mouse lung that recognize identical ligands as CD4(+) T cells derived from the human lung. Importantly, a subset of HLA-DP2 tetramer-binding CD4(+) T cells expressed forkhead box P3, consistent with the expansion of antigen-specific Treg cells. Depletion of Treg cells in BeO-exposed HLA-DP2 Tg mice exacerbated lung inflammation and enhanced granuloma formation. These findings document, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a Be-specific adaptive immune response in mice expressing HLA-DP2 and the ability of Treg cells to modulate the beryllium-induced granulomatous immune response.

  8. Dark Radiation from Modulated Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    We show that the modulated reheating mechanism can naturally account for dark radiation, which is favored by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the primordial Helium abundance. In this mechanism, the inflaton decay rate depends on a light modulus which acquires almost scale-invariant quantum fluctuations during inflation. We find that the light modulus is generically produced by the inflaton decay and therefore a prime candidate for the dark radiation. Interestingly, an almost scale-invariant power spectrum predicted in the modulated reheating mechanism gives a better fit to the observation in the presence of the extra radiation. We discuss the production mechanism of the light modulus in detail taking account of its associated isocurvature fluctuations. We also consider a case where the modulus becomes the dominant component of dark matter.

  9. HLA-G, immunocompetent cells and pregnancy outcome : a case of modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmer, Peter Martin

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we address the immunomodulatory role of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G). The placental trophoblast cells express HLA-G as membrane bound and soluble form (due to alternative splicing) at the fetomaternal interface. HLA-G putatively interacts with the maternal endometrial (decidual)

  10. Cooling of led module by various radiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumova A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Given article presents the results of an experimental comparison of three radiators which are: pressed radiator made of aluminum plate (basic variant, radiator made of copper wire, and copper/water pulsating heat pipe. The radiators are intended to take off heat from the LED module with the power capacity of 10,55 W. It is established that under natural convection all three radiators can keep temperature level of the circuit board module less than 64 C that lies within the operating range. In comparison with basic variant the use of the copper wire radiator allows lowering of the temperature in the LED module center on 3.9 C, and the same value for the pulsating heat pipe is 7.1 C.

  11. Modulation of synchrotron radiation by acoustic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Kocharyan, L A; Mirzoyan, V K

    1986-01-01

    By means of a quartz single crystal excited by piezoelectric oscillations, the modulation of synchrotron radiation reflected from the quartz planes (1011) is realized for frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 15 kHz when the Bragg condition is satisfied. The wavelength of synchrotron radiation ranged from 0.3 to 12A. The patterns of modulated beams taken from oscillograph and analyzer screens are shown.

  12. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, Tobias L; Deutsch, Aaron J; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W J; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P; Nöthen, Markus M; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E; Tsoi, Lam C; van Heel, David A; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T; Gregersen, Peter K; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the

  13. A novel mechanism of soluble HLA-G mediated immune modulation: downregulation of T cell chemokine receptor expression and impairment of chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years, many immunoregulatory functions have been ascribed to soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G. Since chemotaxis is crucial for an efficient immune response, we have investigated for the first time the effects of sHLA-G on chemokine receptor expression and function in different human T cell populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T cell populations isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated in the presence or absence of sHLA-G. Chemokine receptors expression was evaluated by flow cytometry. sHLA-G downregulated expression of i CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR5 in CD4(+ T cells, ii CXCR3 in CD8(+ T cells, iii CXCR3 in Th1 clones iv CXCR3 in TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells, and upregulated CXCR4 expression in TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells. sHLA-G inhibited in vitro chemotaxis of i CD4(+ T cells towards CCL2, CCL8, CXCL10 and CXCL11, ii CD8(+ T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11, iii Th1 clones towards CXCL10, and iv TCR Vdelta2gamma9 T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11. Downregulation of CXCR3 expression on CD4+ T cells by sHLA-G was partially reverted by adding a blocking antibody against ILT2/CD85j, a receptor for sHLA-G, suggesting that sHLA-G downregulated chemokine receptor expression mainly through the interaction with ILT2/CD85j. Follicular helper T cells (T(FH were isolated from human tonsils and stimulated as described above. sHLA-G impaired CXCR5 expression in T(FH and chemotaxis of the latter cells towards CXCL13. Moreover, sHLA-G expression was detected in tonsils by immunohistochemistry, suggesting a role of sHLA-G in local control of T(FH cell chemotaxis. Intracellular pathways were investigated by Western Blot analysis on total extracts from CD4+ T cells. Phosphorylation of Stat5, p70 s6k, beta-arrestin and SHP2 was modulated by sHLA-G treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrated that sHLA-G impairs expression and functionality of different chemokine receptors in T cells. These findings delineate a novel mechanism whereby sHLA

  14. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  15. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  16. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, Cæcilie Krogsgaard

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complicati......The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy...

  17. HLA-DR polymorphism modulates response to house dust mites in a transgenic mouse model of airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, G; Tilahun, A Y; Iijima, K; David, C S; Kita, H; Juhn, Y J

    2011-06-01

    We and others have reported that HLA-DRB1*03 is associated with childhood asthma. To extend this observation and to prove this association, we sensitized and challenged either HLA-DR2 (HLA-DRB1*1502) or HLA-DR3 (HLA-DRB1*0301) transgenic mice with house-dust mite extract. Inflammatory cell counts and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid between HLA-DR3 and DR2 mice were compared. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had significantly elevated eosinophil counts, Interleukin-4 and Interleukin-13 levels in the BAL fluid but not interferron gamma-γ. Thus, our study suggests that HLA-DRB1*0301 plays an important role in mounting a Th2-predominant immune response to house dust mite and Th2-type inflammation in the lung. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Immunological low-dose radiation modulates the pediatric medulloblastoma antigens and enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arabinda; McDonald, Daniel; Lowe, Stephen; Bredlau, Amy-Lee; Vanek, Kenneth; Patel, Sunil J; Cheshier, Samuel; Eskandari, Ramin

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapy can be an effective treatment for pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) patients. However, major subpopulations do not respond to immunotherapy, due to the lack of antigenic mutations or the immune-evasive properties of MB cells. Clinical observations suggest that radiation therapy (RT) may expand the therapeutic reach of immunotherapy. The aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of low-dose X-ray radiation (LDXR, 1 Gy) on the functional immunological responses of MB cells (DAOY, D283, and D341). Induction of MB cell death was examined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by fluorescent probes. Changes in the expression of  human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and caspase-3 activities during treatment were analyzed using Western blotting and caspase-3 assay. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LDXR upregulated the expression of HLA class I and HLA II molecules by more than 20% compared with control and high-dose (12 Gy) groups in vitro. Several of these HLA subtypes, such as MAGE C1, CD137, and ICAM-1, have demonstrated upregulation. In addition, LDXR increases ROS production in association with phosphorylation of NF-κB and cell surface expression of mAb target molecules (HER2 and VEGF). These data suggest that a combined LDXR and mAb therapy can create a synergistic effect in vitro. These results suggest that LDXR modulates HLA molecules, leading to alterations in T-cell/tumor-cell interaction and enhancement of T-cell-mediated MB cell death. Also, low-dose radiotherapy combined with monoclonal antibody therapy may one day augment the standard treatment for MB, but more investigation is needed to prove its utility as a new therapeutic combination for MB patients.

  19. Excitation of magnetization using a modulated radiation damping field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jamie D; Huang, Susie Y; Lin, Yung-Ya

    2006-10-12

    In this work, pulsed-field gradients are used to modulate the radiation damping field generated by the detection coil in an NMR experiment in order that spins with significantly different chemical shifts can affect one another via the radiation damping field. Experiments performed on solutions of acetone/water and acetone/DMSO/water demonstrate that spins with chemical shift differences much greater than the effective radiation damping field strength can still be coupled by modulating the radiation damping field. Implications for applications in high-field NMR and for developing sensitive magnetization detectors are discussed.

  20. HLA-Cw*0102-restricted HIV-1 p24 epitope variants can modulate the binding of the inhibitory KIR2DL2 receptor and primary NK cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Fadda

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for Natural Killer (NK cells in the control of HIV-1 infection. Recently, it was shown that NK cell-mediated immune pressure can result in the selection of HIV-1 escape mutations. A potential mechanism for this NK cell escape is the selection of HLA class I-presented HIV-1 epitopes that allow for the engagement of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, notably KIR2DL2. We therefore investigated the consequences of sequence variations within HLA-Cw*0102-restricted epitopes on the interaction of HLA-Cw*0102 with KIR2DL2 using a large panel of overlapping HIV-1 p24 Gag peptides. 217 decameric peptides spanning the HIV-1 p24 Gag consensus sequence were screened for HLA-Cw*0102 stabilization by co-incubation with Cw*0102⁺/TAP-deficient T2 cells using a flow cytometry-based assay. KIR2DL2 binding was assessed using a KIR2DL2-IgG fusion construct. Function of KIR2DL2⁺ NK cells was flow cytometrically analyzed by measuring degranulation of primary NK cells after co-incubation with peptide-pulsed T2 cells. We identified 11 peptides stabilizing HLA-Cw*0102 on the surface of T2 cells. However, only one peptide (p24 Gag₂₀₉₋₂₁₈ AAEWDRLHPV allowed for binding of KIR2DL2. Notably, functional analysis showed a significant inhibition of KIR2DL2⁺ NK cells in the presence of p24 Gag₂₀₉₋₂₁₈-pulsed T2 cells, while degranulation of KIR2DL2⁻ NK cells was not affected. Moreover, we demonstrated that sequence variations in position 7 of this epitope observed frequently in naturally occurring HIV-1 sequences can modulate binding to KIR2DL2. Our results show that the majority of HIV-1 p24 Gag peptides stabilizing HLA-Cw*0102 do not allow for binding of KIR2DL2, but identified one HLA-Cw*0102-presented peptide (p24 Gag₂₀₉₋₂₁₈ that was recognized by the inhibitory NK cell receptor KIR2DL2 leading to functional inhibition of KIR2DL2-expressing NK cells

  1. Discharge modulation noise in He---Ne laser radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolwijn, P.T.

    1967-01-01

    Discharge modulation noise in He---Ne laser radiation is considered theoretically, including explicitly the laser oscillator properties. Experiments reported previously by us and other authors are in agreement with our analysis.

  2. A dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sol Min; Song, Seong Chan; Hyun, Sung Eun; Park, Heung Deuk; Lee, Jaegi; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Gwi Eon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma For the lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma, volumetric modulated arc therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy were evaluated to compare these three treatment planning technique. The mean doses to the planning target volume and the femur were calculated to evaluate target coverage and the risk of bone fracture during radiation therapy. Volumetric modulated arc therapy can reduce the dose to the femur without compromising target coverage and reduce the treatment time compared with intensity modulated radiation therapy.

  3. Development of modulators against degenerative aging using radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, S. K.; Park, H. R.; Jang, B. S.; Roh, C. H.; Eom, H. S.; Choi, N. H.; Seol, M. A.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, H. M.; Park, M. K.; Shin, H. J.; Ryu, D. K.; Oh, W. J.; Kim, S. H; Yee, S. T.

    2012-04-15

    1. Objectives Establishment of modelling of degenerative aging using radiation technology Development of aging modulators using radiation degenerative aging model 2. Project results Establishment of the modeling of degenerative aging using radiation technology - The systematic study on the comparison of radiation-induced degeneration and natural aging process in animals and cells confirmed the biological similarity between these two degeneration models - The effective biomarkers were selected for the modelling of degenerative aging using radiation (10 biomarkers for immune/hematopoiesis, 1 for oxidative stress, 6 for molecular signaling, 3 for lipid metabolism) - The optimal irradiation condition was established for the modelling of degerative aging (total 5Gy with fractionation by over 10 times, lapse of over 4 months) - The molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced degeneration were studied including chronic inflammation (lung), inflammation-related lipid metabolism disturbance, mitochondria biogenesis and dynamics - The radiation degenerative model was evaluated with previously known natural substances (resveratrol, EGCG, etc) Development of aging modulators using radiation degenerative aging model - After the screening of about 800 natural herb extracts, 5 effective substances were selected for aging modulation. - 3 candidate compositions were selected from 20 compositions made from effective substances by in vitro evaluation (WAH2, WAH6, WAH7) - 1 composition (WAH6) was selected as the best aging modulator by in vivo evaluation in radiation-induced aging models and degenerative disease models. 3. Expected benefits and plan of application The modelling of degenerative aging using radiation can facilitate the aging research by providing the useful cell/animal models for aging research A large economic benefits are expected by the commercialization of developed aging modulators (over 10 billion KW in 2015.

  4. A high precision radiation-tolerant LVDT conditioning module

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, A; Losito, R; Peronnard, P; Secondo, R; Spiezia, G

    2014-01-01

    Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position sensors are widely used in particle accelerators and nuclear plants, thanks to their properties of contact-less sensing, radiation tolerance, infinite resolution, good linearity and cost efficiency. Many applications require high reading accuracy, even in environments with high radiation levels, where the conditioning electronics must be located several hundred meters away from the sensor. Sometimes even at long distances the conditioning module is still exposed to ionizing radiation. Standard off-the-shelf electronic conditioning modules offer limited performances in terms of reading accuracy and long term stability already with short cables. A radiation tolerant stand-alone LVDT conditioning module has been developed using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components. The reading of the sensor output voltages is based on a sine-fit algorithm digitally implemented on an FPGA ensuring few micrometers reading accuracy even with low signal-to-noise ratios. ...

  5. Radiation Hardened Turbo Coded OFDM Modulator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro Inc. proposes to develop an innovative Turbo-Coded Orthogonal Frequency Division Modulation (TC-OFDM) ASIC device. The proposed device provides data...

  6. Activation of ERα signaling differentially modulates IFN-γ induced HLA-class II expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Mostafa

    Full Text Available The coordinate regulation of HLA class II (HLA-II is controlled by the class II transactivator, CIITA, and is crucial for the development of anti-tumor immunity. HLA-II in breast carcinoma is associated with increased IFN-γ levels, reduced expression of the estrogen receptor (ER and reduced age at diagnosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol (E₂ and ERα signaling contribute to the regulation of IFN-γ inducible HLA-II in breast cancer cells. Using a panel of established ER⁻ and ER⁺ breast cancer cell lines, we showed that E₂ attenuated HLA-DR in two ER⁺ lines (MCF-7 and BT-474, but not in T47D, while it augmented expression in ER⁻ lines, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231. To further study the mechanism(s, we used paired transfectants: ERα⁺ MC2 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the wild type ERα gene and ERα⁻ VC5 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the empty vector, treated or not with E₂ and IFN-γ. HLA-II and CIITA were severely reduced in MC2 compared to VC5 and were further exacerbated by E₂ treatment. Reduced expression occurred at the level of the IFN-γ inducible CIITA promoter IV. The anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 and gene silencing with ESR1 siRNA reversed the E2 inhibitory effects, signifying an antagonistic role for activated ERα on CIITA pIV activity. Moreover, STAT1 signaling, necessary for CIITA pIV activation, and selected STAT1 regulated genes were variably downregulated by E₂ in transfected and endogenous ERα positive breast cancer cells, whereas STAT1 signaling was noticeably augmented in ERα⁻ breast cancer cells. Collectively, these results imply immune escape mechanisms in ERα⁺ breast cancer may be facilitated through an ERα suppressive mechanism on IFN-γ signaling.

  7. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  8. Radiation impairs perineural invasion by modulating the nerve microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Bakst

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Perineural invasion (PNI by cancer cells is an ominous clinical event that is associated with increased local recurrence and poor prognosis. Although radiation therapy (RT may be delivered along the course of an invaded nerve, the mechanisms through which radiation may potentially control PNI remain undefined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: An in vitro co-culture system of dorsal root ganglia (DRG and pancreatic cancer cells was used as a model of PNI. An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how RT to nerve or cancer affects nerve invasion by cancer. RESULTS: Cancer cell invasion of the DRG was partially dependent on DRG secretion of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. A single 4 Gy dose of radiation to the DRG alone, cultured with non-radiated cancer cells, significantly inhibited PNI and was associated with decreased GDNF secretion but intact DRG viability. Radiation of cancer cells alone, co-cultured with non-radiated nerves, inhibited PNI through predominantly compromised cancer cell viability. In a murine model of PNI, a single 8 Gy dose of radiation to the sciatic nerve prior to implantation of non-radiated cancer cells resulted in decreased GDNF expression, decreased PNI by imaging and histology, and preservation of sciatic nerve motor function. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation may impair PNI through not only direct effects on cancer cell viability, but also an independent interruption of paracrine mechanisms underlying PNI. RT modulation of the nerve microenvironment may decrease PNI, and hold significant therapeutic implications for RT dosing and field design for patients with cancers exhibiting PNI.

  9. Radiation-Induce Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Riverside, CA Invited Seminar: "The Proteasome as a Senor of Stress " 3/17/04 UCLA Department of Dentistry Monthly Seminar, Los Angeles, CA Invited...affects protective antitutnor imnmunity induced by Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured using 100 pM SucLLVY-7- AdVMARTI/DC vaccination amido -4...adjuvant activity was heightened if the cells were first stressed by radiation, indicating that injury can modulate this effect. In situ induction of

  10. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  12. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: radiation dosage constraint at the anterior mandible.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, H.W.; Jong, J.M. de; Granzier, M.E.; Nieman, F.H.; Baat, C. de; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Because the survival of endosseous implants in irradiated bone is lower than in non-irradiated bone, particularly if the irradiation dose exceeds 50Gy, a study was carried out to assess the irradiation dose in the anterior mandible, when intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used. The hypo

  13. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  14. PLA2R-associated membranous glomerulopathy is modulated by common variants in PLA2R1 and HLA-DQA1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M; Beggs, M L; Walker, P D; Larsen, C P

    2014-12-01

    Membranous glomerulopathy (MG) is most commonly caused by autoantibodies directed against the podocyte phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) and common variants in this gene are associated with MG. Here for the first time, we carried out a large case-control association study (n=1512) of PLA2R-positive and -negative MG to determine the extent of association in these pathologic subtypes. We performed four separate sets of analyses to determine significance of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their haplotypes followed by joint analysis and trans-ethnic mapping to increase power. The PLA2R1 SNP rs35771982 was most strongly associated with PLA2R-positive MG (P=1.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio (ORGG)=1.98). The associations of other SNPs in PLA2R1 could be explained because of linkage disequilibrium with the G-allele. Haplotypes in PLA2R1 did not exceed the significance of rs35771982 even after 10 000 permutations. PLA2R1 variants were only associated with PLA2R-positive MG and predominantly in Caucasians. PLA2R1 variants did not associate with MG in African Americans (AA). There was strong epistasis between HLA-DQA1 SNP rs2187668 and the PLA2R1 variant rs35771982. Thus, common variants in the PLA2R1, particularly rs35771982, modulate PLA2R-positive MG with HLA-DQA1 in Caucasians. PLA2R-negative MG especially in AA, may provide a novel opportunity to discover new genes underlying MG.

  15. Estimation of presampling modulation transfer function in synchrotron radiation microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The spatial resolution achieved by recent synchrotron radiation microtomographs should be estimated from the modulation transfer function (MTF) on the micrometer scale. Step response functions of a synchrotron radiation microtomograph were determined by the slanted edge method by using high-precision surfaces of diamond crystal and ion-milled aluminum wire. Tilted reconstruction was introduced to enable any edge to be used as the slanted edge by defining the reconstruction pixel matrix in an arbitrary orientation. MTFs were estimated from the step response functions of the slanted edges. The obtained MTFs coincided with MTF values estimated from square-wave patterns milled on the aluminum surface. Although x-ray refraction influences should be taken into account to evaluate MTFs, any flat surfaces with nanometer roughness can be used to determine the spatial resolutions of microtomographs.

  16. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  17. Energetic radiation belt electron precipitation showing ULF modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T. V.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2012-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere. This study considers the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of several minutes. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of these ˜MeV energetic particles. ACE satellite measurements of the MHD solar wind parameters are used as the upstream boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields, used to drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. The simulation results are compared with balloon observations obtained during the January 21, 2005 CME-shock event. Rapid loss of 20~keV to 1.5~MeV electrons was detected by balloon-borne measurements of Bremsstrahlung X-rays during the MINIS balloon campaign following the shock arrival at Earth. The global response of the radiation belts to this particular CME-shock driven storm was investigated focusing on precipitation mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations influence the radiation belt population. A primary cause for the precipitation modulation seen in both the simulation and the MINIS campaign is suggested based on the lowering of mirror points due to compressional magnetic field oscillations.

  18. Modulated Hawking radiation and a nonviolent channel for information release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Giddings

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Unitarization of black hole evaporation requires that quantum information escapes a black hole; an important question is to identify the mechanism or channel by which it does so. Accurate counting of black hole states via the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy would indicate this information should be encoded in radiation with average energy flux matching Hawking's. Information can be encoded with no change in net flux via fine-grained modulation of the Hawking radiation. In an approximate effective field theory description, couplings to the stress tensor of the black hole atmosphere that depend on the internal state of the black hole are a promising alternative for inducing such modulation. These can be picturesquely thought of as due to state-dependent metric fluctuations in the vicinity of the horizon. Such couplings offer the prospect of emitting information without extra energy flux, and can be shown to do so at linear order in the couplings, with motivation given for possible extension of this result to higher orders. The potential advantages of such couplings to the stress tensor thus extend beyond their universality, which is helpful in addressing constraints from black hole mining.

  19. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  20. Development of Modulators Against Degenerative Aging Using Radiation Fusion Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U.; Park, H. R.

    2010-04-15

    In this study, we selected final 20 biomarkers for the degenerative aging to develop radiation aging modeling, and validated a few of selected markers to utilize them in the screening of aging modulators. To select the biomarkers of the degenerative aging, 4 categories of aging-related markers (immune/hematopoiesis, oxidative damage, signaling molecule, lipid metabolism) were comparatively analyzed in irradiated and normally aged biosystems (cell lines or mice). In result, most of the biomarkers showed similar changes by irradiation and normal aging. Regarding the immune/hematopoiesis, the decline of immune cell functions (lymphocyte, NK cell) and Th1/Th2 imbalance, and decreased antigen-presenting of dendritic cells were observed and 10 biomarkers were selected in this category. mtDNA deletion was selected for the oxidative damage marker, 6 biomarkers including p21 and p-FOXO3a for signaling molecule biomarkers, and 3 biomarkers including the adipose tissue weight were selected for lipid metabolism. In addition, the various radiation application conditions by single/factionated irradiation and the periods after the irradiation were investigated for the optimal induction of changes of biomarker, which revealed that total 5Gy of 10 or more fractionated irradiations and 4 months or greather period were observed to be optimal. To found the basis for the screening of natural aging modulators, some selected aging biomarkers were validated by their inhibition by well-known natural agents (EGCG, HemoHIM, etc) in aged cell or mouse model. Additionally, by evaluating the reductive efficacy of 5 natural agents on the degeneration of skin and reproductive organs induced by radiation and chemicals (cyclophosphamide, etc), we established the base for the screening of degenerative diseases by various factors

  1. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  2. HLA-DPB1 and HLA Class I Confer Risk of and Protection from Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1∗01:02-DQB1∗06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38–0.67], p = 1.01 × 10−6) and HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47–0.80], p = 2.07 × 10−4) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1∗05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34–2.31], p = 4.71 × 10−05). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38–0.55] p = 8.99 × 10−17) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18–1.61], p = 7.11 × 10−5). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A∗11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13–1.54], p = 4.92 × 10−4), HLA-B∗35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41–2.70], p = 5.14 × 10−5), and HLA-B∗51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25–1.78], p = 1.09 × 10−5) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  3. Numerical method for angle-of-incidence correction factors for diffuse radiation incident photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill

    2017-05-01

    A numerical method is provided for solving the integral equation for the angle-of-incidence (AOI) correction factor for diffuse radiation incident photovoltaic (PV) modules. The types of diffuse radiation considered include sky, circumsolar, horizon, and ground-reflected. The method permits PV module AOI characteristics to be addressed when calculating AOI losses associated with diffuse radiation. Pseudo code is provided to aid users in the implementation, and results are shown for PV modules with tilt angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. Diffuse AOI losses are greatest for small PV module tilt angles. Including AOI losses associated with the diffuse irradiance will improve predictions of PV system performance.

  4. Visual assessment of the radiation distribution in the ISS Lab module: visualization in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saganti, P. B.; Zapp, E. N.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Lab module of the International Space Station (ISS) is a primary working area where the crewmembers are expected to spend majority of their time. Because of the directionality of radiation fields caused by the Earth shadow, trapped radiation pitch angle distribution, and inherent variations in the ISS shielding, a model is needed to account for these local variations in the radiation distribution. We present the calculated radiation dose (rem/yr) values for over 3,000 different points in the working area of the Lab module and estimated radiation dose values for over 25,000 different points in the human body for a given ambient radiation environment. These estimated radiation dose values are presented in a three dimensional animated interactive visualization format. Such interactive animated visualization of the radiation distribution can be generated in near real-time to track changes in the radiation environment during the orbit precession of the ISS.

  5. Overview of a HLA-Ig based "Lego-like system" for T cell monitoring, modulation and expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in molecular medicine have shown that soluble MHC-multimers can be valuable tools for both analysis and modulation of antigen-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we describe the use of dimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complexes, MHC-Ig, as part of an artificial Antigen-Presenting Cell (aAPC). MHC-Ig-based aAPC and its derivatives represent an exciting new platform technology for measuring and manipulating immune responses in vitro as well as in vivo. This new technology has the potential to help overcome many of the obstacles associated with limitations in current antigen-specific approaches of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmunity.

  6. Advances in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy physics with intensity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S

    2000-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a specific form of conformal radiation therapy, is currently attracting a lot of attention, and there are high expectations for this class of treatment techniques. Several new technologies are in development, but physicists are still working to improve the physical basis of radiation therapy.

  7. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Stewart, James [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Valerie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xie, Jason [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moseley, Joanne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael, E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  8. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  9. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  10. Modulating radiation cataractogenesis by hormonally manipulating lenticular growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsclaw, D.S. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Rothstein, H. (Fordham Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B.V. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States). Eye Radiation and Environmental Research Lab.)

    1994-09-01

    The cell cycle of the lens epithelium of northern leopard frogs was manipulated by hypophysectomy (to halt mitotic activity) and pituitary hormone administration (to stimulate baseline mitosis and reverse hypophysectomy-induced mitotic suppression). Animals were hypophysectomized, irradiated and injected with pituitary hormone replacement. Irradiated animals, irradiated animals + hormone replacement and irradiated hypophysectomized animals served as controls. It was found that irradiated-hypophysectomized (mitosis halted) frogs failed to develop opacities, while those with hormonal replacement (mitosis reinstated) developed cataracts. Furthermore, in all instances, the times of cataract onset and rates of progression directly correlated with the mitotic activity in the lens epithelia. Finally, we were able to titrate lens epithelial mitotic activity, and later cataractogenesis, by administering varying concentrations of replacement pituitary hormone, resulting in concentration-dependent correlation between mitotic index and the onset and rate of lens opacification. The ability to modulate cataractogenesis by way of altering cell proliferation is strong evidence that the post-radiation growth fraction plays a central role in the cytopathomechanism of radiocataracts. (Author).

  11. Radiation Hardened, Modulator ASIC for High Data Rate Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Ron; Putnam, Robert; Andro, Monty; Fujikawa, Gene

    2000-01-01

    Satellite-based telecommunication services are challenged by the need to generate down-link power levels adequate to support high quality (BER approx. equals 10(exp 12)) links required for modem broadband data services. Bandwidth-efficient Nyquist signaling, using low values of excess bandwidth (alpha), can exhibit large peak-to-average-power ratio (PAPR) values. High PAPR values necessitate high-power amplifier (HPA) backoff greater than the PAPR, resulting in unacceptably low HPA efficiency. Given the high cost of on-board prime power, this inefficiency represents both an economical burden, and a constraint on the rates and quality of data services supportable from satellite platforms. Constant-envelope signals offer improved power-efficiency, but only by imposing a severe bandwidth-efficiency penalty. This paper describes a radiation- hardened modulator which can improve satellite-based broadband data services by combining the bandwidth-efficiency of low-alpha Nyquist signals with high power-efficiency (negligible HPA backoff).

  12. Impact of machines on plan quality: volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, S; Cozzolino, M; Oliviero, C; Fiorentino, A; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of different machines on plan quality using both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were selected at random. Plans were computed for IMRT and VMAT Smart Arc, using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta (IMRT-E, VMAT-E) and Varian linac (IMRT-V, VMAT-V). A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70, 63 and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high- and low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units (MU), and delivery time. VMAT-E plans resulted slightly MU efficient (-24 % p delivery time (-19 % p < 0.05) compared to IMRT-E. All the delivery techniques resulted in equivalent target coverage in terms of D(98) % and D(2) %. For VMAT technique, a significant improvement of 7 % in homogeneity index (HI) for PTV58.1 was observed for Varian machine. A slight improvement in OARs sparing was observed with Elekta machine both for IMRT and VMAT techniques. Similar plan quality was observed for Elekta and Varian linacs, significant differences were observed in delivery efficiency, as MU number and delivery times, in favor of Elekta and Varian, respectively.

  13. Optimizing patient positioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy in hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siglin, Joshua; Champ, Colin E; Vakhnenko, Yelena; Witek, Matthew E; Peng, Cheng; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Harrison, Amy S; Shi, Wenyin

    2014-01-01

    Sparing the hippocampus during whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) offers potential neurocognitive benefits. However, previously reported intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans use multiple noncoplanar beams for treatment delivery. An optimized coplanar IMRT template for hippocampal-sparing WBRT would assist in clinical workflow and minimize resource utilization. In this study, we sought to determine the optimal patient position to facilitate coplanar treatment planning and delivery of hippocampal-sparing WBRT using IMRT. A variable angle, inclined board was utilized for patient positioning. An anthropomorphic phantom underwent computed tomography simulation at various head angles. The IMRT goals were designed to achieve target coverage of the brain while maintaining hippocampal dose-volume constraints designed to conform to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0933 protocol. Optimal head angle was then verified using data from 8 patients comparing coplanar and noncoplanar WBRT IMRT plans. Hippocampal, hippocampal avoidance region, and whole brain mean volumes were 1.1 cm(3), 12.5 cm(3), and 1185.1 cm(3), respectively. The hippocampal avoidance region occupied 1.1% of the whole brain planning volume. For the 30-degree head angle, a 7-field coplanar IMRT plan was generated, sparing the hippocampus to a maximum dose of 14.7 Gy; D100% of the hippocampus was 7.4 Gy and mean hippocampal dose was 9.3 Gy. In comparison, for flat head positioning the hippocampal Dmax was 22.9 Gy with a D100% of 9.2 Gy and mean dose of 11.7 Gy. Target coverage and dose homogeneity was comparable with previously published noncoplanar IMRT plans. Compared with conventional supine positioning, an inclined head board at 30 degrees optimizes coplanar whole brain IMRT treatment planning. Clinically acceptable hippocampal-sparing WBRT dosimetry can be obtained using a simplified coplanar plan at a 30-degree head angle, thus obviating the need for complex and time consuming noncoplanar

  14. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Research Society, Philadelphia, PA, 2006. McBride, William H. Invited Lecture: “Sense of Danger from Radiation,” Department of Radiation...Oncology, New York University, NY, April 2006. McBride, William H. Invited Speaker: “A Sense of Danger from Ionizing Radiation,” International...were treated with 0 or 10 Gy irradiation. Irradiation Mice were anesthetized with an i.p. injection of ketamine/ xylazine (80 mg/4 mg/kg of mouse

  15. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  16. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day. EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  17. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  18. Smith-Purcell terahertz radiation from laser modulated electron beam over a metallic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Bhasin, Lalita; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel scheme of terahertz (THz) radiation generation from the beat frequency modulation of an electron beam by two co-propagating lasers and the generation of terahertz radiation by the modulated beam passing over a periodic metallic grating. The lasers cause velocity modulation of the beam by exerting a longitudinal ponderomotive force on it. In the drift space between the modulator and metallic grating, the velocity modulation translates into density and current modulation. The modulated beam, propagating over the grating of specific wave number, induces space periodic image current in the conductor that emits beat frequency Smith-Purcell radiation. With 1 μm, 4 × 1016 W/cm2 lasers, beam current modulation of the order of 50% can be achieved at optimum lengths of the modulator and drift space. Employing 10 mA, 0.5 MeV short-period electron beam, propagating at a height of 50 μ m above the grating of period 150 μm, one may obtain THz radiated power of the order of 6 mW at 10 THz.

  19. Patient Specification Quality Assurance for Glioblastoma Multiforme Brain Tumors Treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mohammed, H. I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of performing patient specification quality assurance for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. The study evaluated ten intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using 10 MV beams, a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, five fractions a week for a total of six weeks treatment). For the quality assurance protocol we used a two-dimensional ionization-chamber array (2D-...

  20. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  1. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  2. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2011-01-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is currently the most important facility used to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiation in the ionosphere. In order to produce this ELF radiation the HAARP transmitter radiates a strong beam of high-frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates the electrons' temperature in the D region ionosphere and leads to modulated conductivity and a time-varying current which then radiates at the modu...

  3. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2011-01-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is currently the most important facility used to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiation in the ionosphere. In order to produce this ELF radiation the HAARP transmitter radiates a strong beam of high-frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates the electrons' temperature in the D region ionosphere and leads to modulated conductivity and a time-varying current which then radiates at the modu...

  4. Head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy leads to an increase of opportunistic oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has led to new possibilities in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). Limited information is available on how this more advanced radiation technique affects the oral microflora. In a prospective study we assessed the

  5. Three-Phase Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Undergoing Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: Dosimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shan; Liu, Xu; Lu, Heming; Huang, Huixian; Shu, Liuyang; Jiang, Hailan; Cheng, Jinjian; Peng, Luxing; Pang, Qiang; Gu, Junzhao; Qin, Jian; Lu, Zhiping; Mo, Ying; Wu, Danling; Wei, Yinglin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy may experience significant anatomic changes throughout the entire treatment course, and adaptive radiation therapy may be necessary to maintain optimal dose delivered both to the targets and to the critical structures. The timing of adaptive radiation therapy, however, is largely unknown. This study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a 3-phase adaptive radiation therapy technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Twenty patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy were recruited prospectively. After fractions 5 and 15, each patient had repeat computed tomography scans, and adaptive replans with recontouring the targets and organs at risk on the new computed tomography images were generated and used for subsequent treatment (replan 1 and replan 2). Two hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans (plan 1 and plan 2) were generated by superimposing the initial plan (plan 0) to each repeated new computed tomography image, reflecting the actual dose delivered to the targets and organs at risk if no changes were made to the original plan. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the adaptive replans (adaptive radiation therapy plans: plan 0 + replan 1 + replan 2) and their corresponding nonadaptive radiation therapy plans (plan 0 + plan 1 + plan 2). Comparing with the nonadaptive radiation therapy plans, the adaptive radiation therapy plans resulted in a significant improvement in conformity index for planning target volumes for primary disease, involved lymph node, high-risk clinical target volume, and low-risk clinical target volume (PTVnx, PTVnd, PTV1, and PTV2, respectively). Median V95 for PTVnx; D95, D99, V100, V95, and V93 for PTVnd; D99 and V100 for PTV1; and D95, D99, V100, V95, and V93 for PTV2 were increased significantly. There were significant dose-volume reductions, including maximum doses to the brainstem and

  6. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  7. [The assessment of modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation on cognitive function in rats of different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priakhin, E A; Triapitsyna, G A; Andreev, S S; Kolomiets, I A; Polevik, N D; Akleev, A V

    2007-01-01

    The modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation influence on cognitive function of male uninbred Wister rat exposed at the age of sexual maturation (2 months) and at the age of morphofunctional maturity (3.5 months) was examined. Animals were subjected to pulse electromagnetic radiation (925 MHz) modulated as a GSM standard with the power density 1.2 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes every day for 12 days. At day 8 of exposure the cognitive function were examined with the Morris water maze. In the result of investigation it was determines that modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic radiation at the sexual maturation age did not affect the spatial learning and improve the visual orientation performance. Modulated radiofrequence electromagnetic exposure of animals at the sex maturity age did not affect the visual performance and improve the spatial performance of male rats.

  8. Performance And Radiation Hardness Of The Atlas/sct Detector Module

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose experiment being constructed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at FERN, Geneva. ATLAS is designed to exploit the full physics potential of LHC, in particular to study topics concerning the Higgs mechanism, Super-symmetry and CP violation. The cross sections for the processes under study are extremely small, requiring very high luminosity colliding beams. The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is an essential part of the Inner Detector tracking system of ATLAS. The active elements of the SCT is 4088 detector modules, tiled on four barrel cylinders and eighteen endcap disks. As a consequence of the high luminosity, the detector modules will operate in a harsh radiation environment. This thesis describes work concerning radiation hardness, beam test performance and methods for production testing of detector modules. The radiation hardness studies have been focused on the electrical performance of the front-end ASIC and the detector module. The results have identified features ...

  9. Kinomic profiling approach identifies Trk as a novel radiation modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, John S; Jaboin, Jerry J; Anderson, Joshua C; Nowsheen, Somaira; Stanley, Jennifer A; Naji, Faris; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Tu, Tianxiang; Hallahan, Dennis E; Yang, Eddy S; Bonner, James A; Willey, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Ionizing radiation treatment is used in over half of all cancer patients, thus determining the mechanisms of response or resistance is critical for the development of novel treatment approaches. In this report, we utilize a high-content peptide array platform that performs multiplex kinase assays with real-time kinetic readout to investigate the mechanism of radiation response in vascular endothelial cells. We applied this technology to irradiated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We identified 49 specific tyrosine phosphopeptides that were differentially affected by irradiation over a time course of 1h. In one example, the Tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) family members, TrkA and TrkB, showed transient activation between 2 and 15 min following irradiation. When we targeted TrkA and TrkB using small molecule inhibitors, HUVEC were protected from radiation damage. Conversely, stimulation of TrkA using gambogic amide promoted radiation enhancement. Thus, we show that our approach not only can identify rapid changes in kinase activity but also identify novel targets such as TrkA. TrkA inhibition resulted in radioprotection that correlated with enhanced repair of radiation-induced damage while TrkA stimulation by gambogic amide produced radiation sensitization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the operation of a diffraction-radiation generator with preliminary HF modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, A. G.

    1991-05-01

    The excitation conditions and output characteristics of a diffraction-radiation generator with preliminary HF modulation are determined. Attention is given to the effects of the modulation parameter, the phase shift, and the aiming distance on the displacement of the generation zone, variations of the minimum starting current, the frequency shift, the oscillation amplitude, and the efficiency of the generator. It is shown that the efficiency of a generator with preliminary HF modulation can be twice as high as that of a generator without modulation.

  11. Patient Specification Quality Assurance for Glioblastoma Multiforme Brain Tumors Treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. I. Al-Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of performing patient specification quality assurance for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. The study evaluated ten intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans using 10 MV beams, a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, five fractions a week for a total of six weeks treatment. For the quality assurance protocol we used a two-dimensional ionization-chamber array (2D-ARRAY. The results showed a very good agreement between the measured dose and the pretreatment planned dose. All the plans passed >95% gamma criterion with pixels within 5% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. We concluded that using the 2D-ARRAY ion chamber for intensity modulated radiation therapy is an important step for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans, and this study has shown that our treatment planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy is accurately done.

  12. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Ultrafast Radiation Detection by Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E

    2006-02-22

    We describe a new class of radiation sensor that utilizes optical interferometry to measure radiation-induced changes in the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium. Radiation absorption in the sensor material produces a transient, non-equilibrium, electron-hole pair distribution that locally modifies the complex, optical refractive index of the sensor medium. Changes in the real (imaginary) part of the local refractive index produce a differential phase shift (absorption) of an optical probe used to interrogate the sensor material. In contrast to conventional radiation detectors where signal levels are proportional to the incident energy, signal levels in these optical sensors are proportional to the incident radiation energy flux. This allows for reduction of the sensor form factor with no degradation in detection sensitivity. Furthermore, since the radiation induced, non-equilibrium electron-hole pair distribution is effectively measured ''in place'' there is no requirement to spatially separate and collect the generated charges; consequently, the sensor risetime is of the order of the hot-electron thermalization time {le} 10 fs and the duration of the index perturbation is determined by the carrier recombination time which is of order {approx} 600 fs in, direct-bandgap semiconductors, with a high density of recombination defects; consequently, the optical sensors can be engineered with sub-ps temporal response. A series of detectors were designed, and incorporated into Mach Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometer-based detection systems: proof of concept, lower detection sensitivity, Mach-Zehnder detectors were characterized at beamline 6.3 at SSRL; three generations of high sensitivity single element and imaging Fabry-Perot detectors were measured at the LLNL Europa facility. Our results indicate that this technology can be used to provide x-ray detectors and x-ray imaging systems with single x-ray sensitivity and S

  14. SU-E-J-274: Responses of Medulloblastoma Cells to Radiation Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J [Dept. of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Rogalla, S; Contag, C [Dept. of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Woo, D [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, H [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, T [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation responses of the medulloblastoma cell line Daoy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantitative variations to variable radiation dosimetic parameters were tracked by bioluminescent images (BLIs). Methods: The luciferase and green fluorescent protein positive Daoy cells were cultured on dishes. The medulloblastoma cells irradiated to different dose rate, interval of fractionated doses, field margin and misalignment, and dose uniformity in IMRT were monitored using bioluminescent images. The cultured cells were placed into a dedicated acrylic phantom to deliver intensity-modulated fluences and calculate accurate predicted dose distribution. The radiation with dose rate from 0.5 Gy/min to 15 Gy/min was irradiated by adjusting monitor unit per minute and source-to-surface distances. The intervals of fractionated dose delivery were changed considering the repair time of double strand breaks (DSB) revealed by straining of gamma-H2AX.The effect of non-uniform doses on the cells were visualized by registering dose distributions and BLIs. The viability according to dosimetric parameters was correlated with bioluminescent intensities for cross-check of radiation responses. Results: The DSB and cell responses due to the first fractionated dose delivery significantly affected final tumor control rather than other parameters. The missing tumor volumes due to the smaller field margin than the tumor periphery or field misalignment caused relapse of cell responses on BLIs. The dose rate and gradient had effect on initial responses but could not bring out the distinguishable killing effect on cancer cells. Conclusion: Visualized and quantified bioluminescent images were useful to correlate the dose distributions with spatial radiation effects on cells. This would derive the effective combination of dose delivery parameters and fractionation. Radiation responses in particular IMRT configuration could be reflected to image based-dose re-optimization.

  15. [Effect of the ISS Russian segment configuration on the service module radiation environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrikas, V G

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of variations in the Service module radiation environment as a function of ISS Russian segment configuration was carried out using models of the RS modules and a spherical humanoid phantom. ISS reconfiguration impacted significantly only the phantom brought into the transfer compartment (ExT). The Radiation Safety Service prohibition for cosmonauts to stay in this compartment during solar flare events remains valid. In all other instances, error of dose estimation is higher as compared to dose value estimation with consideration for ISS RS reconfiguration.

  16. [Change of cholinesterase relative activity under modulated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation in experiments in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashovkina, M S; Pashovkin, T N

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the activity of enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) have been experimentally investigated under the influence of amplitude-modulated super-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (carrier frequency of 2.375 MHz; power flux density of 8 mW/cm2, 20 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2; modulation frequency range 10 to 210 Hz; exposure time 5 min). The appearance of peaks of the cholinesterase increased relative activity, as well as the changes in the direction and intensity of the reaction associated with the modulation frequency and power flux are observed at equal power flux densities and exposure times.

  17. Optimisation of frequency-modulated characteristics of output radiation in a lidar with Raman amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorievsky, V I [V.A.Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Fryazino branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tezadov, Ya A [IRE-Polus Research and Technology Association, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    The reported study is aimed at increasing the power in the transmission path of a lidar with Raman amplification for longpath sensing of methane by optimising the frequency-modulated characteristics of the output radiation. The pump current of the used distributed-feedback master laser was modulated by a linearfrequency signal with simultaneous application of a non-synchronous high-frequency signal. For such a modulation regime, the Raman amplifier provided the mean output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 1650 nm. The spectral broadening did not significantly decrease the lidar sensitivity at long paths. (lidars)

  18. The conundrum of HLA-DRB1*14:01/*14:54 and HLA-DRB3*02:01/*02:02 mismatches in unrelated hematopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, A; Crocchiolo, R; Bontempelli, M; Carcassi, C; Carella, G; Crespiatico, L; Garbarino, L; Mascaretti, L; Mazzi, B; Mazzola, G; Miotti, V; Porfirio, B; Tagliaferri, C; Valentini, T; Vecchiato, C; Fleischhauer, K; Sacchi, N; Bosi, A; Martinetti, M

    2011-07-01

    Uncertainty still exists on the role of polymorphisms outside the HLA-DRB1 binding site or inside the HLA-DRB3 binding groove in unrelated hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). The ideal model to solve the conundrum consists of the transplants mismatched for HLA-DRB1*14:01/*14:54 and/or for HLA-DRB3*02:01/*02:02. A task force was set up in Italy to recruit transplanted pairs defined as HLA-DRB1*14:01 before 2006, the year crucial for the proper definition of the HLA-DRB1*14:54 allele in molecular biology. Out of 2723 unrelated pairs, 189 transplanted in Italy from 1995 to 2006 were HLA-DRB1*14:01 positive; 103/189 pairs with good historical DNA were retyped for HLA-DRB1*14 and HLA-DRB3 at-high resolution level; 31/103 pairs had HLA-DRB1*14 and/or HLA-DRB3 mismatched; 99/103, having complete clinical data, underwent statistical analysis for OS, TRM, disease-free survival and acute and chronic GvHD. No significant involvement of HLA-DRB1*14:01/*14:54 or HLA-DRB3*02:01/*02:02 mismatches was found, either alone or combined. Our findings suggest that disparities at exon 3 of the HLA-DRB1 gene seem unlikely to influence the outcome after HSCT. The same may be envisaged for HLA-DRB3(*)02:01 and (*)02:02 alleles which, although differing in the Ag binding site, seem unable to modulate an appreciable immune response in an HSCT setting.

  19. New Developments in HLA-G in Cardiac Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Tumiati, Laura C; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego H

    2016-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class 1b protein, whose gene is located on chromosome 6 (6p21.31). HLA-G inhibits the immune cells' cytotoxic activity by interacting with specific receptors on their membranes. Since it is a naturally occurring immune modulator, HLA-G has been investigated in transplantation. Indeed, a number of investigations reveal that HLA-G expression is influenced by genetic polymorphisms and in turn, those polymorphisms are associated with detrimental or beneficial outcomes in various pathological situations. The present review introduces the HLA-G molecule, the gene and its polymorphisms. It focuses on the expression of HLA-G and the role of polymorphisms primarily in heart transplant outcomes, secondarily in other transplant organs, as well as the role of the allograft and effect of medical therapy. We discuss the limitations in HLA-G transplant investigations and future directions. The immune inhibiting activity of HLA-G has a great deal of potential for its utilization in enhancing diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies against rejection in the setting of transplantation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Operating a Microwave Radiation Detection Monitor. Module 10. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on operating a microwave radiation detection monitor. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) testing the…

  1. Ultrasound modulated bioluminescence tomography and controllability of the radiative transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of an optical source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the radiative transport equation (RTE). A controllability result for the RTE plays an essential role in the analysis.

  2. Evaluation of a fast method of EPID-based dosimetry for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Rasmussen, Karl H.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could potentially be useful for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) QA. The data density, high resolution, large active area, and efficiency of the MV EPID make it an attractive option. However, EPIDs were designed to be effective imaging devices, but not dosimeters, and as a result they do not measure dose in tissue-equivalent materials.

  3. Modulation of the Southern Hemisphere climate by solar radiation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Steven; Lenton, Andrew; Rotstayn, Leon; Gupta, Alex Sen; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Tilmes, Simone

    2015-04-01

    Geoengineering is increasingly being considered as a means to lessen the climatic impacts of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, it is not without significant risks of its own. In this study, we investigate the response of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) climate to solar radiation management (SRM) using Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project experiments G3 and G3solar. We find that the response to SRM is characterized by a contraction of the Hadley Cell and subtropical dry zones. This is accompanied by a shift towards a less positive state of the Southern Annular Mode and a northward shift of the SH westerly winds, mitigating the trends under projected future anthropogenic forcing. These changes result in an increase in precipitation minus evaporation in the SH subtropics, suggesting that SRM may be effective at counteracting the anthropogenically-driven drying trend in this region. However, any beneficial impacts cease abruptly as soon as geoengineering is terminated.

  4. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  5. A Novel Approach to Thermal Design of Solar Modules: Selective-Spectral and Radiative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Dubey, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Shashwata; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Chavali, Raghu Vamsi; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kottantharayil, Anil; Vasi, Juzer; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-11-21

    For commercial solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 degrees C higher than the ambient. In the long run, extreme self-heating may erode efficiency and shorten lifetime, thereby, dramatically reducing the total energy output by almost ~10% Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical cooling methods to combat PV self-heating. In this paper, we explore two fundamental sources of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical and thermal properties of the solar module to eliminate the parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance the thermal emission to the cold cosmos (radiative cooling). The proposed technique should cool the module by ~10 degrees C, to be reflected in significant long-term energy gain (~ 3% to 8% over 25 years) for PV systems under different climatic conditions.

  6. Development and Impact Evaluation of an E-Learning Radiation Oncology Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfieri, Joanne, E-mail: Joanne.alfieri@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Portelance, Lorraine; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter [Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Gallant, Fleure [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Artho, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists are faced with the challenge of irradiating tumors to a curative dose while limiting toxicity to healthy surrounding tissues. This can be achieved only with superior knowledge of radiologic anatomy and treatment planning. Educational resources designed to meet these specific needs are lacking. A web-based interactive module designed to improve residents' knowledge and application of key anatomy concepts pertinent to radiotherapy treatment planning was developed, and its effectiveness was assessed. Methods and Materials: The module, based on gynecologic malignancies, was developed in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of subject matter experts. Subsequently, a multi-centre randomized controlled study was conducted to test the module's effectiveness. Thirty-six radiation oncology residents participated in the study; 1920 were granted access to the module (intervention group), and 17 in the control group relied on traditional methods to acquire their knowledge. Pretests and posttests were administered to all participants. Statistical analysis was carried out using paired t test, analysis of variance, and post hoc tests. Results: The randomized control study revealed that the intervention group's pretest and posttest mean scores were 35% and 52%, respectively, and those of the control group were 37% and 42%, respectively. The mean improvement in test scores was 17% (p < 0.05) for the intervention group and 5% (p = not significant) for the control group. Retrospective pretest and posttest surveys showed a statistically significant change on all measured module objectives. Conclusions: The use of an interactive e-learning teaching module for radiation oncology is an effective method to improve the radiologic anatomy knowledge and treatment planning skills of radiation oncology residents.

  7. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    % prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within......PURPOSE: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. METHODS AND MATERIALS...... plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses...

  8. A promising new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: modulation of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-11-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit for the coincidence time resolution of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of the optical properties of a material exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to for the first time study whether ionizing radiation can produce modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5× {{10}-6} is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the detected event rate and average photon energy of the radiation source.

  9. A new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: modulation of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-10-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) annihilation photon pair coincidence time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of a material's optical properties as exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to study whether ionizing radiation can also produce fast modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5x10-6 is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the radiation source flux rate and average photon energy.

  10. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  11. Interactive Learning Module Improves Resident Knowledge of Risks of Ionizing Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Alexander Y; Breaud, Alan H; Schneider, Jeffrey I; Kadom, Nadja; Mitchell, Patricia M; Linden, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Physician awareness of the risks of ionizing radiation exposure related to medical imaging is poor. Effective educational interventions informing physicians of such risk, especially in emergency medicine (EM), are lacking. The SIEVERT (Suboptimal Ionizing Radiation Exposure Education - A Void in Emergency Medicine Residency Training) learning module was designed to improve provider knowledge of the risks of radiation exposure from medical imaging and comfort in communicating these risks to patients. The 1-hour module consists of introductory lecture, interactive discussion, and role-playing scenarios. In this pilot study, we assessed the educational effect using unmatched, anonymous preintervention and postintervention questionnaires that assessed fund of knowledge, participant self-reported imaging ordering practices in several clinical scenarios, and trainee comfort level in discussing radiation risks with patients. All 25 EM resident participants completed the preintervention questionnaire, and 22 completed the postintervention questionnaire within 4 hours after participation. Correct responses on the 14-question learning assessment increased from 6.32 (standard deviation = 2.36) preintervention to 12.23 (standard deviation = 1.85) post-intervention. Overall, 24% of residents were comfortable with discussing the risks of ionizing radiation exposure with patients preintervention, whereas 41% felt comfortable postintervention. Participants ordered fewer computed tomography scans in 2 of the 4 clinical scenarios after attending the educational intervention. There was improvement in EM residents' knowledge regarding the risks of ionizing radiation exposure from medical imaging, and increased participant self-reported comfort levels in the discussion of these risks with patients after the 1-hour SIEVERT learning module. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation of ULF wave-modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B.; Paral, J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; Usanova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the millihertz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Losses balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible. Three-dimensional simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code, during a coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock event on 17 March 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation. The arrival of a strong CME-shock, such as the one simulated, disrupts the electric and magnetic fields in the magnetosphere and causes significant changes in both components of momentum, pitch angle, and L shell of radiation belt electrons, which may cause them to precipitate into the loss cone.

  13. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C., E-mail: ccpinnix@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  14. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer : a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, Andrea; Van Gestel, Dirk; Arends, Mark P.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Schuring, Danny; Kunze-Busch, Martina C.; Louwe, Rob J. W.; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-

  15. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Gestel, D. Van; Arends, M.P.; Korevaar, E.W.; Schuring, D.; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Louwe, R.J.W.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-

  16. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Gestel, D. Van; Arends, M.P.; Korevaar, E.W.; Schuring, D.; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Louwe, R.J.W.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment

  17. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer : a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, Andrea; Van Gestel, Dirk; Arends, Mark P.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Schuring, Danny; Kunze-Busch, Martina C.; Louwe, Rob J. W.; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment

  18. Full wave analysis of non-radiative dielectric waveguide modulator for the determination of electrical equivalent circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Pathak; A Basu; S K Koul

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the determination of electrical equivalent circuit of ON/OFF modulator in non-radiative dielectric (NRD) guide configurations at Ka-band. Schottky barrier mixer diode is used to realize this modulator and its characteristics are determined experimentally using vector network analyzer. Full wave FEM simulator HFSS is used to determine an equivalent circuit for the mounted diode and modulator in ON and OFF states. This equivalent circuit is used to qualitatively explain the experimental characteristics of modulator.

  19. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  20. Immunoregulatory Role of HLA-G in Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Murdaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases are sustained by a T-helper 2 polarization leading to interleukin-4 secretion, IgE-dependent inflammation, and mast cell and eosinophil activation. HLA-G molecules, both in membrane-bound and in soluble forms, play a central role in modulation of immune responses. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G molecules are detected in serum of patients with allergic rhinitis to seasonal and perennial allergens and correlate with allergen-specific IgE levels, clinical severity, drug consumption, and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy. sHLA-G molecules are also found in airway epithelium of patients with allergic asthma and high levels of sHLA-G molecules are detectable in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage of asthmatic patients correlating with allergen-specific IgE levels. Finally, HLA-G molecules are expressed by T cells, monocytes-macrophages, and Langerhans cells infiltrating the dermis of atopic dermatitis patients. Collectively, although at present it is difficult to completely define the role of HLA-G molecules in allergic diseases, it may be suggested that they are expressed and secreted by immune cells during the allergic reaction in an attempt to suppress allergic inflammation.

  1. [Radiation sterilization of units of a Mars descent module--a miniature meteorological station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, D V; Trofimov, V I; Aleksashkin, S N; Khamidullina, N M; Novikova, N D; Deshevaia, E A; Polikarpov, N A

    2010-01-01

    Subject of the test was a procedure of electron sterilization of Mars descent module units. As a result, data on distribution of absorbed dose field across the surface and by the entire volume of the mockup of a miniature meteorological station (MMS) were obtained In addition, electron sterilization technology was developed and the range of absorbed dose from electron radiation that will sterilize reliably packaged MMS hardware were defined in the interval from 30 to 40 kGy.

  2. Atomic orientation by a broadly frequency-modulated radiation: theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, G; Dancheva, Y

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic resonances driven in thermal vapour of alkali atoms by laser radiation broadly modulated at a frequency resonant with the Zeeman splitting. A model accounting for both hyperfine and Zeeman pumping is developed and its results are compared with experimental measurements performed at relatively weak pump irradiance. The interplay between the two pumping processes generates intriguing interaction conditions, often overlooked by simplified models.

  3. An HLA matched donor! An HLA matched donor? What do you mean by: HLA matched donor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rood, J J; Oudshoorn, M

    1998-07-01

    The term 'an HLA matched donor' is in general used without giving exact information on the level of resolution of the HLA typing. This can lead to misunderstandings. A proposal is formulated to agree on using six match categories according to the HLA typing technique used to indicate the level of confidence of the matching.

  4. A Two-moment Radiation Hydrodynamics Module in Athena Using a Time-explicit Godunov Method

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, M Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M1 closure relation and include all leading source terms. We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well-described by the M1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, i...

  5. Global-scale coherence modulation of radiation-belt electron loss from plasmaspheric hiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A W; Halford, A; Millan, R; McCarthy, M; Fennell, J; Sample, J; Woodger, L; Hospodarsky, G; Wygant, J R; Cattell, C A; Goldstein, J; Malaspina, D; Kletzing, C A

    2015-07-09

    Over 40 years ago it was suggested that electron loss in the region of the radiation belts that overlaps with the region of high plasma density called the plasmasphere, within four to five Earth radii, arises largely from interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction strongly influences the evolution of the radiation belts during a geomagnetic storm, and over the course of many hours to days helps to return the radiation-belt structure to its 'quiet' pre-storm configuration. Observations have shown that the long-term electron-loss rate is consistent with this theory but the temporal and spatial dynamics of the loss process remain to be directly verified. Here we report simultaneous measurements of structured radiation-belt electron losses and the hiss phenomenon that causes the losses. Losses were observed in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by hiss-scattered electrons colliding with the Earth's atmosphere after removal from the radiation belts. Our results show that changes of up to an order of magnitude in the dynamics of electron loss arising from hiss occur on timescales as short as one to twenty minutes, in association with modulations in plasma density and magnetic field. Furthermore, these loss dynamics are coherent with hiss dynamics on spatial scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere. This nearly global-scale coherence was not predicted and may affect the short-term evolution of the radiation belts during active times.

  6. Parameter optimization of solar modules based on lens concentrators of radiation and cascade photovoltaic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. M.; Davidyuk, N. Yu.; Ionova, E. A.; Pokrovskii, P. V.; Rumyantsev, V. D.; Sadchikov, N. A.

    2010-02-01

    Two main issues governing the design of a solar concentrator module with triple-junction nano-heterostructure photovoltaic converters (PVCs) are considered: the effective concentration of radiation using Fresnel lenses and effective heat removal from PVCs. By theoretically and experimentally simulating these processes, the design parameters of module’ s elements are determined. A test batch of full-size modules has been fabricated. Each module consists of a front panel of small-size Fresnel lenses (a total of 144 lenses arranged as a 12 × 12 array) and the corresponding number of multilayer InGaP/GaAs/Ge PVCs. The PVCs are mounted on heat-distributing plates and are also integrated into a panel. The efficiency of the concentrator module with a 0.5 × 0.5-m entrance aperture measured under outdoor conditions is 24.3%, which is more than twice as high as the efficiency of standard (concentrator-free) silicon modules. In smaller test modules, the efficiency corrected for the PVC standard temperature (25° C) reaches 26.5%.

  7. Echo-enabled tunable terahertz radiation generation with a laser-modulated relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme to generate narrow-band tunable terahertz (THz radiation using a variant of the echo-enabled harmonic generation is analyzed. We show that by using an energy chirped beam, THz density modulation in the beam phase space can be produced with two lasers having the same wavelength. This removes the need for an optical parametric amplifier system to provide a wavelength-tunable laser to vary the central frequency of the THz radiation. The practical feasibility and applications of this scheme are demonstrated numerically with a start-to-end simulation using the beam parameters at the Shanghai Deep Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser facility (SDUV. The central frequency of the density modulation can be continuously tuned by either varying the chirp of the beam or the momentum compactions of the chicanes. The influence of nonlinear rf chirp and longitudinal space charge effect have also been studied in our article. The methods to generate the THz radiation in SDUV with the new scheme and the estimation of the radiation power are also discussed briefly.

  8. Accommodating practical constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy by means of compensators

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, J

    2001-01-01

    intensity distribution, inverse modelling of the radiation attenuation within the compensator is required. Two novel and independent approaches, based on deconvolution and system identification, respectively, are proposed to accomplish this. To compare the approach with the 'rival' state of the art beam modulation technique, theoretical and experimental examination of the modulated fields generated by manufactured compensators and multileaf collimators is presented. This comparison focused on the achievable resolution of the intensity modulated beams in lateral and longitudinal directions. To take into account the characteristics of a clinical environment, a comprehensive study has been carried out to investigate the suitability of the most common commercially available treatment couch systems for their suitability for IMRT treatments. In this context, an original rule based advisory system has been developed to alert the operator of any potential collision of the beam with the moveable supporting structures ...

  9. Concentrator photovoltaic module architectures with capabilities for capture and conversion of full global solar radiation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Kyu Tae

    2016-12-06

    Emerging classes ofconcentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules reach efficiencies that are far greater than those of even the highest performance flat-plate PV technologies, with architectures that have the potential to provide the lowest cost of energy in locations with high direct normal irradiance (DNI). A disadvantage is their inability to effectively use diffuse sunlight, thereby constraining widespread geographic deployment and limiting performance even under the most favorable DNI conditions. This study introduces a module design that integrates capabilities in flat-plate PV directly with the most sophisticated CPV technologies, for capture of both direct and diffuse sunlight, thereby achieving efficiency in PV conversion of the global solar radiation. Specific examples of this scheme exploit commodity silicon (Si) cells integrated with two different CPV module designs, where they capture light that is not efficiently directed by the concentrator optics onto large-scale arrays of miniature multijunction (MJ) solar cells that use advanced III-V semiconductor technologies. In this CPV scheme (

  10. Concentrator photovoltaic module architectures with capabilities for capture and conversion of full global solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Yao, Yuan; He, Junwen; Fisher, Brent; Sheng, Xing; Lumb, Matthew; Xu, Lu; Anderson, Mikayla A.; Scheiman, David; Han, Seungyong; Kang, Yongseon; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Bahabry, Rabab R.; Lee, Jung Woo; Paik, Ungyu; Bronstein, Noah D.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Meitl, Matthew; Burroughs, Scott; Mustafa Hussain, Muhammad; Lee, Jeong Chul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.

    2016-12-01

    Emerging classes of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules reach efficiencies that are far greater than those of even the highest performance flat-plate PV technologies, with architectures that have the potential to provide the lowest cost of energy in locations with high direct normal irradiance (DNI). A disadvantage is their inability to effectively use diffuse sunlight, thereby constraining widespread geographic deployment and limiting performance even under the most favorable DNI conditions. This study introduces a module design that integrates capabilities in flat-plate PV directly with the most sophisticated CPV technologies, for capture of both direct and diffuse sunlight, thereby achieving efficiency in PV conversion of the global solar radiation. Specific examples of this scheme exploit commodity silicon (Si) cells integrated with two different CPV module designs, where they capture light that is not efficiently directed by the concentrator optics onto large-scale arrays of miniature multijunction (MJ) solar cells that use advanced III-V semiconductor technologies. In this CPV+ scheme (“+” denotes the addition of diffuse collector), the Si and MJ cells operate independently on indirect and direct solar radiation, respectively. On-sun experimental studies of CPV+ modules at latitudes of 35.9886° N (Durham, NC), 40.1125° N (Bondville, IL), and 38.9072° N (Washington, DC) show improvements in absolute module efficiencies of between 1.02% and 8.45% over values obtained using otherwise similar CPV modules, depending on weather conditions. These concepts have the potential to expand the geographic reach and improve the cost-effectiveness of the highest efficiency forms of PV power generation.

  11. Concentrator photovoltaic module architectures with capabilities for capture and conversion of full global solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Yao, Yuan; He, Junwen; Fisher, Brent; Sheng, Xing; Lumb, Matthew; Xu, Lu; Anderson, Mikayla A.; Scheiman, David; Han, Seungyong; Kang, Yongseon; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Bahabry, Rabab R.; Lee, Jung Woo; Paik, Ungyu; Bronstein, Noah D.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Meitl, Matthew; Burroughs, Scott; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Lee, Jeong Chul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging classes of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules reach efficiencies that are far greater than those of even the highest performance flat-plate PV technologies, with architectures that have the potential to provide the lowest cost of energy in locations with high direct normal irradiance (DNI). A disadvantage is their inability to effectively use diffuse sunlight, thereby constraining widespread geographic deployment and limiting performance even under the most favorable DNI conditions. This study introduces a module design that integrates capabilities in flat-plate PV directly with the most sophisticated CPV technologies, for capture of both direct and diffuse sunlight, thereby achieving efficiency in PV conversion of the global solar radiation. Specific examples of this scheme exploit commodity silicon (Si) cells integrated with two different CPV module designs, where they capture light that is not efficiently directed by the concentrator optics onto large-scale arrays of miniature multijunction (MJ) solar cells that use advanced III–V semiconductor technologies. In this CPV+ scheme (“+” denotes the addition of diffuse collector), the Si and MJ cells operate independently on indirect and direct solar radiation, respectively. On-sun experimental studies of CPV+ modules at latitudes of 35.9886° N (Durham, NC), 40.1125° N (Bondville, IL), and 38.9072° N (Washington, DC) show improvements in absolute module efficiencies of between 1.02% and 8.45% over values obtained using otherwise similar CPV modules, depending on weather conditions. These concepts have the potential to expand the geographic reach and improve the cost-effectiveness of the highest efficiency forms of PV power generation. PMID:27930331

  12. A Two-moment Radiation Hydrodynamics Module in Athena Using a Time-explicit Godunov Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M 1 closure relation and include all leading source terms to {O}(β τ). We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well described by the M 1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, in which the effect of the RSLA is minimal. We present an analysis of the dispersion relation of RHD linear waves highlighting the conditions of applicability for the RSLA. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we utilize a suite of radiation and RHD tests covering a broad range of regimes, including RHD waves, shocks, and equilibria, which show second-order convergence in most cases. As an application, we investigate radiation-driven ejection of a dusty, optically thick shell in the ISM. Finally, we compare the timing of our method with other well-known iterative schemes for the RHD equations. Our code implementation, Hyperion, is suitable for a wide variety of astrophysical applications and will be made freely available on the Web.

  13. Double modulation of X radiation diffracted in a quartz single crystal by high and low frequency acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kocharyan, L A; Bornazyan, H S

    1986-01-01

    The time dependence of X radiation diffracted in a quartz single crystal is experimentally investigated when surface acoustic waves modulated by low frequency oscillations of different frequencies and forms are excited in the crystal.

  14. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC.

  15. The reversal of the rotational modulation rates of the north and south components of Saturn kilometric radiation near equinox

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. A. Gurnett; J. B. Groene; A. M. Persoon; J. D. Menietti; S.-Y. Ye; W. S. Kurth; R. J. MacDowall; A. Lecacheux

    2010-01-01

      It has been known for many years that Saturn emits intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths and that this radiation is modulated by the rotation of the planet at a rate that varies slowly...

  16. Radiation Effects Investigations Based on Atmospheric Radiation Model (ATMORAD) Considering GEANT4 Simulations of Extensive Air Showers and Solar Modulation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Guillaume; Cheminet, Adrien

    2015-07-01

    The natural radiative atmospheric environment is composed of secondary cosmic rays produced when primary cosmic rays hit the atmosphere. Understanding atmospheric radiations and their dynamics is essential for evaluating single event effects, so that radiation risks in aviation and the space environment (space weather) can be assessed. In this article, we present an atmospheric radiation model, named ATMORAD (Atmospheric Radiation), which is based on GEANT4 simulations of extensive air showers according to primary spectra that depend only on the solar modulation potential (force-field approximation). Based on neutron spectrometry, solar modulation potential can be deduced using neutron spectrometer measurements and ATMORAD. Some comparisons between our methodology and standard approaches or measurements are also discussed. This work demonstrates the potential for using simulations of extensive air showers and neutron spectroscopy to monitor solar activity.

  17. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  18. Acoustic radiation force in tissue-like solids due to modulated sound field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, Egor V.; Guzina, Bojan B.

    2012-10-01

    The focus of this study is the sustained body force (the so-called acoustic radiation force) in homogeneous tissue-like solids generated by an elevated-intensity, focused ultrasound field (Mach number=O(10-3)) in situations when the latter is modulated by a low-frequency signal. This intermediate-asymptotics problem, which bears relevance to a number of emerging biomedical applications, is characterized by a number of small (but non-vanishing) parameters including the Mach number, the ratio between the modulation and ultrasound frequency, the ratio of the shear to bulk modulus, and the dimensionless attenuation coefficient. On approximating the response of soft tissues as that of a nonlinear viscoelastic solid with heat conduction, the featured second-order problem is tackled via a scaling paradigm wherein the transverse coordinates are scaled by the width of the focal region, while the axial and temporal coordinate are each split into a "fast" and "slow" component with the twin aim of: (i) canceling the linear terms from the field equations governing the propagation of elevated-intensity ultrasound, and (ii) accounting for the effect of ultrasound modulation. In the context of the focused ultrasound analyses, the key feature of the proposed study revolves around the dual-time-scale treatment of the temporal variable, which allows one to parse out the contribution of ultrasound and its modulation in the nonlinear solution. In this way the acoustic radiation force (ARF), giving rise to the mean tissue motion, is exacted by computing the "fast" time average of the germane field equations. A comparison with the existing theory reveals a number of key features that are brought to light by the new formulation, including the contributions to the ARF of ultrasound modulation and thermal expansion, as well as the precise role of constitutive nonlinearities in generating the sustained body force in tissue-like solids by a focused ultrasound beam.

  19. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  20. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.C.; Kusters, J.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Schieving, J.H.; Lindert, E.J. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Janssens, G.O.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3-21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were

  1. Experimental measurements of a prototype high concentration Fresnel lens CPV module for the harvesting of diffuse solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Noboru; Okamoto, Kazuya

    2014-01-13

    A prototype concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module with high solar concentration, an added low-cost solar cell, and an adjoining multi-junction solar cell is fabricated and experimentally demonstrated. In the present CPV module, the low cost solar cell captures diffuse solar radiation penetrating the concentrator lens and the multi-junction cell captures concentrated direct solar radiation. On-sun test results show that the electricity generated by a Fresnel lens-based CPV module with an additional crystalline silicon solar cell is greater than that for a conventional CPV module by a factor of 1.44 when the mean ratio of diffuse normal irradiation to global normal irradiation at the module aperture is 0.4. Several fundamental optical characteristics are presented for the present module.

  2. Modes of targets in water excited and identified using radiation pressure of modulated focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Timothy; Fortuner, Auberry; Abawi, Ahmad; Kirsteins, Ivars; Marston, Philip

    2016-11-01

    The modulated radiation pressure (MRP) of ultrasound has been widely used to selectively excite low frequency modes of fluid objects. We previously used MRP to excite less compliant metallic object in water including the low frequency modes of a circular metal plate in water. A larger focused ultrasonic transducer allows us to drive modes of larger more-realistic targets. In our experiments solid targets are suspended by strings or supported on sand and the modulated ultrasound is focused on the target's surface. Target sound emissions were recorded and a laser vibrometer was used to measure the surface velocity of the target to give the magnitude of the target response. The source transducer was driven with a doublesideband suppressed carrier voltage as in. By varying the modulation frequency and monitoring target response, resonant frequencies can be measured and compared to finite element models. We also demonstrate the radiation torque of a focused first-order acoustic vortex beam associated with power absorption in the Stokes layer adjacent to a sphere. Funded by ONR.

  3. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Weiliang, E-mail: wdu@mdanderson.org; Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  4. Residues Met76 and Gln79 in HLA-G α1 domain involved in KIR2DL4 recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua YAN; Li An FAN

    2005-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has long been speculated as a beneficial factor for a successful pregnancy for its restricted expression on fetal-maternal extravillous cytotrophoblasts and its capability of modulating uterine natural killer cell (uNK) function such as cytotoxicity and cytokine production through NK cell receptors. HLA class I α1domain is an important killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) recognition site and the Met76 and Gln79 are unique to HLA-G in this region. NK cell receptor KIR2DL4 is a specific receptor for HLA-G, yet the recognition site on HLA-G remains unknown. In this study, retroviral transduction was applied to express the wild type HLA-G (HLA-wtG), mutant HLA-G (HLA-mG) on the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 cells and KIR2DL4 molecule on NK-92 cells,respectively. KIR2DL4-IgG Fc fusion protein was generated to determine the binding specificity between KIR2DL4and HLA-G. Our results showed that residue Met76, Gln79 mutated to Ala76,79 in the α1 domain of HLA-G protein could affect the binding affinity between KIR2DL4 and HLA-G, meanwhile, the KIR2DL4 transfected NK-92 cells (NK-92-2DL4) showed a considerably different cytolysis ability against the HLA-wtG and HLA-mG transfected K562 targets.Taken together, our data indicated that residue Met76 and Gln79 in HLA-G α1 domain plays a critical role in the recognition of KIR2DL4, which could be an explanation for the isoforms of HLA-G, all containing the α1 domain, with the potential to regulate NK functions.

  5. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caocci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp deletion-insertion (del-ins polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.

  6. Simple tool for prediction of parotid gland sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensheimer, Michael F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M., E-mail: sharonhummel@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA (United States); Cain, David; Quang, Tony S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Sparing one or both parotid glands is a key goal when planning head and neck cancer radiation treatment. If the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps one or both parotid glands substantially, it may not be possible to achieve adequate gland sparing. This finding results in physicians revising their PTV contours after an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan has been run and reduces workflow efficiency. We devised a simple formula for predicting mean parotid gland dose from the overlap of the parotid gland and isotropically expanded PTV contours. We tested the tool using 44 patients from 2 institutions and found agreement between predicted and actual parotid gland doses (mean absolute error = 5.3 Gy). This simple method could increase treatment planning efficiency by improving the chance that the first plan presented to the physician will have optimal parotid gland sparing.

  7. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  8. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  9. Intensity Modulated Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer Guided by High Field MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    evolving voxel-dependent penalty scheme", Medical Physics 31, 2819-2825, 2004. 2. Lian J, Hunjan S, Daniel B, Lo A, Levin J, Cardenas C, Dumoulin C...November 2004 3094 Lian et al.: Registration of ER-based MRI/MRSI and CT 3094 Boyer, C. Cardenas , F. van den Haak, and Y Yang from modulated radiation...calculations. ative algorithms can be written as As an example, Figure 2-9 illustrates the flowchart of an algebraic iterative inverse planning technique (AIIPT

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  11. Efficiency gains for spinal radiosurgery using multicriteria optimization intensity modulated radiation therapy guided volumetric modulated arc therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huixiao; Winey, Brian A; Daartz, Juliane; Oh, Kevin S; Shin, John H; Gierga, David P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate plan quality and delivery efficiency gains of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a multicriteria optimization-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (MCO-IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery of spinal metastases. MCO-IMRT plans (RayStation V2.5; RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) of 10 spinal radiosurgery cases using 7-9 beams were developed for clinical delivery, and patients were replanned using VMAT with partial arcs. The prescribed dose was 18 Gy, and target coverage was maximized such that the maximum dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the spinal cord was 10 or 12 Gy. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints from the clinically acceptable MCO-IMRT plans were utilized for VMAT optimization. Plan quality and delivery efficiency with and without collimator rotation for MCO-IMRT and VMAT were compared and analyzed based upon DVH, planning target volume coverage, homogeneity index, conformity number, cord PRV sparing, total monitor units (MU), and delivery time. The VMAT plans were capable of matching most DVH constraints from the MCO-IMRT plans. The ranges of MU were 4808-7193 for MCO-IMRT without collimator rotation, 3509-5907 for MCO-IMRT with collimator rotation, 4444-7309 for VMAT without collimator rotation, and 3277-5643 for VMAT with collimator of 90 degrees. The MU for the VMAT plans were similar to their corresponding MCO-IMRT plans, depending upon the complexity of the target and PRV geometries, but had a larger range. The delivery times of the MCO-IMRT and VMAT plans, both with collimator rotation, were 18.3 ± 2.5 minutes and 14.2 ± 2.0 minutes, respectively (P < .05). The MCO-IMRT and VMAT can create clinically acceptable plans for spinal radiosurgery. The MU for MCO-IMRT and VMAT can be reduced significantly by utilizing a collimator rotation following the orientation of the spinal cord. Plan quality for VMAT is similar to MCO-IMRT, with similar MU for both modalities. Delivery times can be reduced

  12. Polymorphism of HLA-A and HLA-B in pre-eclampsia%HLA-A和HLA-B的多态性与先兆子痫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张展; 贾莉婷; 张琳琳

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between the polymorphism of HLA-A, HLA-B genes and pre-eclampsia. Methods: HLA-A, HLA-B genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) in 119 preeclampsia patients, 117 normal pregnant women and their neonates. Results: The study showed that 16 HLA-A and 39 HLA-B alleles were obtained in pre-eclamptic patients and normal pregnant women. 15 HLA-A and 37 HLA-B alleles were obtained in their neonates. No significant difference was found in maternal or neonatal HLA-A, HLA-B alleles be-tween pre-eclampsia group and control group (Pc>0. 05). The frequencies of HLA-A11, HLA-A24,HLA-B13, HLA-B14, HLA-B15, HLA-B52 maternal/fetus genetic assoications were significantly different between pre-eclampsia group and control group (P<0. 05). Conclusion: Some HLA-A, HLA-B maternal/fetus special bindings may be associated with the susceptibility or protective of pre-eclampsia.

  13. Treatment of folliculitis decalvans using intensity-modulated radiation via tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Plachouri, Kerasia-Maria; Jeskowiak, Antonia; Sunderkötter, Cord; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2015-11-01

    Folliculitis decalvans (FD) is a form of primary neutrophilic scarring alopecia that is characterized clinically by chronic suppurative folliculitis and often associated with pruritus or even pain. Treatment of FD is often difficult. Herein, we report a case of recalcitrant and painful folliculitis decalvans refractory to antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies, which was successfully treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in order to irreversibly eliminate hair follicles that prove to be one etiological trigger. A 45-year-old male patient with a refractory FD presented with a crusting suppurative folliculitis and atrophic scarring patches on the scalp associated with pain and pruritus. We attempted relief of symptoms by reducing scalp inflammation and eliminating hair follicles through radiation. We delivered 11.0 Gy in two radiation series using tomotherapy, 5.0 Gy in 5 equivalent fractions as a first radiation course. The symptoms markedly decreased but did not totally disappear. Therefore, we delivered a second radiation series 4 months later with an additional 6 Gy. This led to almost complete epilation on the scalp and abolished pain and pruritus on the capillitium. The patient was regularly followed up until 26 months after radiotherapy. Draining lesions or exudation did not recur. He only experienced discrete hair regrowth in the occipital region with folliculitis 12 months after radiotherapy. These residual lesions are currently treated with laser epilation therapy. A radical approach to eliminating hair follicles by repeated radiation therapy may induce lasting relief of symptoms in chronic suppurative FD associated with persistent trichodynia.

  14. Standard fractionation intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT of primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Clifton D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT affords unparalleled capacity to deliver conformal radiation doses to tumors in the central nervous system. However, to date, there are few reported outcomes from using IMRT, either alone or as a boost technique, for standard fractionation radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Methods Forty-two patients were treated with IMRT alone (72% or as a boost (28% after 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT. Thirty-three patients with primary disease and 9 patients with recurrent tumors were included. Thirty-four patients (81% had surgery, with gross tumor resection in 13 patients (36%; 22 patients (53% received chemo-radiotherapy. The median total radiation dose for all patients was 60 Gy with a range from 30.6 to 74 Gy. Standard fractions of 1.8 Gy/day to 2.0 Gy/day were utilized. Results Median survival was 8.7 months, with 37 patients (88% deceased at last contact. Nonparametric analysis showed no survival difference in IMRT-boost vs. IMRT-only groups. Conclusion While technically feasible, preliminary results suggest delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT did not improve survival outcomes in this series compared to historical controls. In light of this lack of a survival benefit and the costs associated with use of IMRT, future prospective trials are needed to evaluate non-survival endpoints such as quality of life and functional preservation. Short of such evidence, the use of IMRT for treatment of GBM needs to be carefully rationalized.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Joseph C., E-mail: joseph.hodges@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Beg, Muhammad S. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  16. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H. Omar, E-mail: hwooten@radonc.wustl.edu; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  17. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C M

    2003-12-21

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue.

  18. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter; Chan, Kit Chi; Cheng, Ka Wai; Chan, Ka Yiu; Chau, Ming Chun

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric comparisons between RapidArc (RA) and conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were performed to address differences in dose coverage of the target, sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs), delivery of monitor units (MUs) and time, to assess whether the RA technique was more beneficial for treatment of NPC. Eight NPC patients (Stages I–IV), who had completed RA treatment, were selected for this study. Computed tomography data sets were re-planned using 7-fields fixed beam IMRT. Quantitative measurements of dose-endpoint values on the dose-volume histograms were carried out for evaluation of: (i) dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%); (ii) degree of conformity (CI95%); (iii) tumor control probability (TCP); (iv) doses to OARs; (v) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP); (vi) treatment time; and (vii) MUs. RA plans achieved better dose conformity and TCP in planning target volumes (PTVs). Target dose homogeneity was not as high as for IMRT plans. Doses to tempero-mandibular joints, clavicles, parotid glands and posterior neck, and their NTCPs were significantly lower in RA plans (P delivery time for RA treatment technique was also noted. PMID:23188186

  19. Regeneration of spine disc and joint cartilages under temporal and space modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, E.; Shekhter, A.; Baskov, A.; Baskov, V.; Baum, O.; Borchshenko, I.; Golubev, V.; Guller, A.; Kolyshev, I.; Omeltchenko, A.; Sviridov, A.; Zakharkina, O.

    2009-02-01

    The effect of laser radiation on the generation of hyaline cartilage in spine disc and joints has been demonstrated. The paper considers physical processes and mechanisms of laser regeneration, presents results of investigations aimed to optimize laser settings and to develop feedback control system for laser reconstruction of spine discs. Possible mechanisms of laser-induced regeneration include: (1) Space and temporary modulated laser beam induces nonhomogeneous and pulse repetitive thermal expansion and stress in the irradiated zone of cartilage. Mechanical effect due to controllable thermal expansion of the tissue and micro and nano gas bubbles formation in the course of the moderate (up to 45-50 oC) heating of the NP activate biological cells (chondrocytes) and promote cartilage regeneration. (2) Nondestructive laser radiation leads to the formation of nano and micro-pores in cartilage matrix. That promotes water permeability and increases the feeding of biological cells. Results provide the scientific and engineering basis for the novel low-invasive laser procedures to be used in orthopedics for the treatment cartilages of spine and joints. The technology and equipment for laser reconstruction of spine discs have been tested first on animals, and then in a clinical trial. Since 2001 the laser reconstruction of intervertebral discs have been performed for 340 patients with chronic symptoms of low back or neck pain who failed to improve with non-operative care. Substantial relief of back pain was obtained in 90% of patients treated who returned to their daily activities. The experiments on reparation of the defects in articular cartilage of the porcine joints under temporal and spase modulated laser radiation have shown promising results.

  20. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairn, T. [Premion Cancer Care, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower Qld 4066, Australia and Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia); Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V. [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage.Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in

  1. Comparative outcomes for three-dimensional conformal versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, J; Hoffe, S E; Almhanna, K; Dinwoodie, W; Yue, B; Fulp, W; Meredith, K L; Shridhar, R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging data suggests a benefit for using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the management of esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated at our institution who received definitive or preoperative chemoradiation with either IMRT or 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) between October 2000 and January 2012. Kaplan Meier analysis and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to evaluate survival outcomes. We evaluated a total of 232 patients (138 IMRT, 94 3DCRT) who received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range, 44-64.8) to gross disease. Median follow up for all patients, IMRT patients alone, and 3DCRT patients alone was 18.5 (range, 2.5-124.2), 16.5 (range, 3-59), and 25.9 months (range, 2.5-124.2), respectively. We observed no significant difference based on radiation technique (3DCRT vs. IMRT) with respect to median overall survival (OS) (median 29 vs. 32 months; P = 0.74) or median relapse free survival (median 20 vs. 25 months; P = 0.66). On multivariable analysis (MVA), surgical resection resulted in improved OS (HR 0.444; P 20% weight loss (OR 0.51; P = 0.050). Our data suggest that while IMRT-based chemoradiation for esophageal cancer does not impact survival there was significantly less toxicity. In the IMRT group there was significant decrease in weight loss and grade ≥3 toxicity compared to 3DCRT.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) generates soluble HLA-G1 by cell surface proteolytic shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Trentini, Alessandro; Bortolotti, Daria; Manfrinato, Maria C; Rotola, Antonella; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Melchiorri, Loredana; Di Luca, Dario; Dallocchio, Franco; Fainardi, Enrico; Bellini, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules are non-classical HLA class I antigens with an important role in pregnancy immune regulation and inflammation control. Soluble HLA-G proteins can be generated through two mechanisms: alternative splicing and proteolytic release, which is known to be metalloprotease mediated. Among this class of enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) might be involved in the HLA-G1 membrane cleavage. Of particular interest are MMP-2 and MMP-9, which regulate the inflammatory process by cytokine and chemokine modulation. We evaluated the effect of MMP-9 and MMP-2 on HLA-G1 membrane shedding. In particular, we analyzed the in vitro effect of these two gelatinases on the secretion of HLA-G1 via proteolytic cleavage in 221-G1-transfected cell line, in JEG3 cell line, and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results obtained by both cell lines showed the role of MMP-2 in HLA-G1 shedding. On the contrary, MMP-9 was not involved in this process. In addition, we identified three possible highly specific cleavage sites for MMP-2, whereas none were detected for MMP-9. This study suggests an effective link between MMP-2 and HLA-G1 shedding, increasing our knowledge on the regulatory machinery beyond HLA-G regulation in physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  4. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of Forward Tangent Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (FT-IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for early stage whole breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri Sedeh, Nader

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a well-known type of external beam radiation therapy. The advancement in technology has had an inevitable influence in radiation oncology as well that has led to a newer and faster dose delivery technique called Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Since the presence of the VMAT modality in clinics in the late 2000, there have been many studies in order to compare the results of the VMAT modality with the current popular modality IMRT for various tumor sites in the body such as brain, prostate, head and neck, cervix and anal carcinoma. This is the first study to compare VMAT with IMRT for breast cancer. The results show that the RapidArc technique in Eclipse version 11 does not improve all aspects of the treatment plans for the breast cases automatically and easily, but it needs to be manipulated by extra techniques to create acceptable plans thus further research is needed.

  5. Intensity modulated radiation therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Results of feasibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Rui Bai; Guo-Hua Wu; Wei-Jian Guo; Xu-Dong Wu; Yuan Yao; Yin Chen; Ren-Hua Zhou; Dong-Qin Lu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in combination with chemotherapy could increase radiation dose to gross tumor volume without severe acute radiation related toxicity by decreasing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Twenty-one patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were evaluated in this clinical trial,Patients would receive the dose of IMRT from 21Gy to 30Gy in 7 to 10 fractions within two weeks after conventional radiotherapy of 30Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The total escalation tumor dose would be 51, 54,57, 60Gy, respectively. 5-fluororacil (5-FU) or gemcitabine was given concurrently with radiotherapy during the treatment course.RESULTS: Sixteen patients who had completed the radiotherapy plan with doses of 51Gy (3 cases), 54Gy (3 cases), 57Gy (3 cases) and 60Gy (7 cases) were included for evaluation. The median levels of CA19-9 prior to and after radiotherapy were 716 U/ml and 255 U/ml respectively (P<0.001) in 13 patients who demonstrated high levels of CA19-9 before radiotherapy. Fourteen patients who suffered from pain could reduce at least 1/3-1/2 amount of analgesic intake and 5 among these patients got complete relief of pain. Ten patients improved in Kamofsky performance status (KPS). The median follow-up period was 8 months and one-year survival rate was 35 %. No patient suffered more than grade Ⅲ acute toxicities induced by radiotherapy.CONCLUSION: Sixty Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks with late course IMRT technique combined with concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy can provide a definitely palliative benefit with tolerable acute radiation related toxicity for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. GSK3β and β-Catenin Modulate Radiation Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Watson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of factors and mechanisms contributing to the inherent radioresistance of pancreatic cancer may improve cancer treatment. Irradiation inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β by phosphorylation at serine 9. In turn, release of cytosolic membrane β-catenin with subsequent nuclear translocation promotes survival. Both GSK3β and β-catenin have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to death. METHODS: We investigated pancreatic cancer cell survival after radiation in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on the role of the function of the GSK3β/β-catenin axis. RESULTS: Lithium chloride, RNAi-medicated silencing of GSK3β, or the expression of a kinase dead mutant GSK3β resulted in radioresistance of Panc1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3β resulted in radiosensitization of Panc1 cells. GSK3β silencing increased radiation-induced β-catenin target gene expression asmeasured by studies of AXIN2 and LEF1 transcript levels. Western blot analysis of total and phosphorylated levels of GSK3β and β-catenin showed that GSK3β inhibition resulted in stabilization of β-catenin. Xenografts of both BxPC3 and Panc1 with targeted silencing of GSK3β exhibited radioresistance in vivo. Silencing of β-catenin resulted in radiosensitization, whereas a nondegradable β-catenin construct induced radioresistance. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the hypothesis that GSK3β modulates the cellular response to radiation in a β-catenin-dependent mechanism. Further understanding of this pathway may enhance the development of clinical trials combining drugs inhibiting β-catenin activation with radiation and chemotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  7. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede

  8. Approximated segmentation considering technical and dosimetric constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy with electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kiesel, Antje

    2010-01-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy, optimal intensity distributions of incoming beams are decomposed into linear combinations of leaf openings of a multileaf collimator (segments). In order to avoid inefficient dose delivery, the decomposition should satisfy a number of dosimetric constraints due to suboptimal dose characteristics of small segments. However, exact decomposition with dosimetric constraints is only in limited cases possible. The present work introduces new heuristic segmentation algorithms for the following optimization problem: Find a segmentation of an approximated matrix using only allowed fields and minimize the approximation error. Finally, the decomposition algorithms were implemented into an optimization programme in order to examine the assumptions of the algorithms for a clinical example. As a result, identical dose distributions with much fewer segments and a significantly smaller number of monitor units could be achieved using dosimetric constraints. Consequently, the dose deli...

  9. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Desouky, O [National center for radiation research and technology-Egyptian atomic energy, Cairo (Egypt); Eldib, A [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  10. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    cellular damge caused by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Deinococcus radiodurans; Lactobacillus plantarurn; cyanobacteria ; radiation...6 3. K. S. Makarova and MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria. Bacterial Stress Responses...In Press) Abstract | The prospect of comparative genomics resolving the seemingly paradoxical mechanism of extreme radiation resistance in

  11. [Nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a lung cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, C; Zhou, W; Song, C

    1996-06-01

    The HLA-DQA1 allele and nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a patient with IDDM complicated lung cancer have been identified by PCR/SSCP, PCR/SSCP and PCR/sequencing. The results showed that: (1) All of the lung cancer patient and his family members carried HLA-DQA1* 0301/0501 alleles. (2) a single base substitution G-->A at position -155 and deletion CAA at position -161 to -163 occurred in the patient. These results suggest that the mutation of HLA-DQA1 promoter region may modulate HLA-DQA1 gene expression by trans-acting factors binding to variant cis-acting elements and may be responsible for pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  12. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  13. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  14. Construction of an end-cap module prototype for the ATLAS transition radiation tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Danielsson, H

    2000-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested an 8-plane module prototype for the end-cap of the ATLAS TRT (Transition Radiation Tracker). The overall mechanics as well as the detailed design of individual components are presented. The prototype contains over 6000 straw tubes with a diameter of 4 mm, filled with an active gas mixture of 70% Xe, 20% CF4 and 10% CO//2. Very tight requirements on radiation hardness (10 Mrad and 2 multiplied by l0**1**4 neutrons per cm**2) straw straightness (sagitta less than 300 m), wire positions and leak tightness put great demands upon design and assembly. In order to verify the design, the stability of the wire tension, straw straightness, high-voltage performance and total leak rate have been measured and the results are presented. Some examples of dedicated assembly tooling and testing procedures are also given. Finally, the results of the calculations and measurements of both mechanical behaviour and wire offset are presented. 6 Refs.

  15. [Vestibular disorders and nausea during head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, É; Righini, C A; Chamorey, E; Villa, J; Atallah, I; Reyt, É; Coffre, A; Schmerber, S

    2016-06-01

    We studied whether there is a relationship between nausea and vestibular disorders in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. We performed a prospective single-centre study that enrolled 31 patients. A videonystagmography was carried out before and within 15 days after radiation therapy for each patient. Nausea was assessed at baseline, every week, and at the post-radiotherapy videonystagmography visit. Twenty-six patients had benefited from a complete interpretable videonystagmography. For 14 of these patients vestibular damage was diagnosed post-radiotherapy. During irradiation, six patients felt nauseous, but without dizziness. In univariate analysis, we found a relationship statistically significant between the average dose received by the vestibules and vestibular disorder videonystagmography (P=0.001, odds ratio [OR]: 1.08 [1.025-.138]), but there was no relationship between vestibular disorder videonystagmography and nausea (P=0.701). Irradiation of the vestibular system during IMRT does not seem to explain the nausea. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  17. Thermoelectric Oxide Modules (TOMs for the Direct Conversion of Simulated Solar Radiation into Electrical Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Tomeš

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The direct conversion of concentrated high temperature solar heat into electrical energy was demonstrated with a series of four–leg thermoelectric oxide modules (TOM. These temperature stable modules were not yet optimized for high efficiency conversion, but served as proof-of-principle for high temperature conversion. They were constructed by connecting two p- (La1.98Sr0.02CuO4 and two n-type (CaMn0.98Nb0.02O3 thermoelements electrically in series and thermally in parallel. The temperature gradient ΔT was applied by a High–Flux Solar Simulator source (HFSS which generates a spectrum similar to solar radiation. The influence of the graphite layer coated on the hot side of the Al2O3 substrate compared to the uncoated surface on ΔT, Pmax and η was studied in detail. The measurements show an almost linear temperature profile along the thermoelectric legs. The maximum output power of 88.8 mW was reached for a TOM with leg length of 5 mm at ΔT = 622 K. The highest conversion efficiency η was found for a heat flux of 4–8 W cm-2 and the dependence of η on the leg length was investigated.

  18. Investigating the influence of respiratory motion on the radiation induced bystander effect in modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Aidan J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory motion introduces complex spatio-temporal variations in the dosimetry of radiotherapy and may contribute towards uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. This study investigates the potential radiobiological implications occurring due to tumour motion in areas of geometric miss in lung cancer radiotherapy. A bespoke phantom and motor-driven platform to replicate respiratory motion and study the consequences on tumour cell survival in vitro was constructed. Human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and H1299 were irradiated in modulated radiotherapy configurations in the presence and absence of respiratory motion. Clonogenic survival was calculated for irradiated and shielded regions. Direction of motion, replication of dosimetry by multi-leaf collimator (MLC) manipulation and oscillating lead shielding were investigated to confirm differences in cell survival. Respiratory motion was shown to significantly increase survival for out-of-field regions for H460/H1299 cell lines when compared with static irradiation (p < 0.001). Significantly higher survival was found in the in-field region for the H460 cell line (p < 0.030). Oscillating lead shielding also produced these significant differences. Respiratory motion and oscillatory delivery of radiation dose to human tumour cells has a significant impact on in- and out-of-field survival in the presence of non-uniform irradiation in this in vitro set-up. This may have important radiobiological consequences for modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Sufang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lin Shaojun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Tham, Ivan W.K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Pan Jianji; Lu Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Lu, Jiade J., E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Radiation Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, National University Health System, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  1. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  2. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator’s intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the

  3. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Udroiu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays.Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis.ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF-MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying ELF-MF biological

  4. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Polymorphism in the regulatory region located more than 1.1 kilobases 5' to the start site of transcription, the promoter region, and exon 1 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Sørensen, Steen; Morling, N

    1999-01-01

    The non-classic Human Leucocyte Antigen class Ib molecule, HLA-G, is expressed on the invasive, extra-villous cytotrophoblast in human placenta. HLA-G protects against natural killer (NK)-cell-mediated lysis and may modulate the secretion of cytokines. Aberrant expression of HLA-G has been reported...

  6. Integrating Anatomy Training into Radiation Oncology Residency: Considerations for Developing a Multidisciplinary, Interactive Learning Module for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation…

  7. SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION X-RAY-DIFFRACTION OF MODULATED STRUCTURES IN CHARGE-DENSITY-WAVE MATERIALS - APPLICATION TO NBSE3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSMAALEN, S; DEBOER, JL; COPPENS, P

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction has been performed on niobium triselenide at 20K. The modulation parameters belonging to both Charge-Density-Waves (CDW's) have been determined. The high-temperature CDW is found to comprise of displacements on all atoms of column III, as well as on Se atoms o

  8. The modulation of radiation-induced cell death by genistein in K562 cells:Activation of thymidine kinase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Ho JEONG; Young Hee JIN; Eun Young KANG; Wol Soon JO; Hwan Tae PARK; Jae Dong LEE; Yeo Jin YOO; Soo Jin JEONG

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of the most effective tools in cancer therapy. In a previous study, we reported that protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors modulate the radiation responses in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)cell line K562. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, delayed radiation-induced cell death, while non-recepter tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A (HMA) enhances radiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we focused on the modulation of radiation-induced cell death by genistein and performed PCR-select suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH) to understand its molecular mechanism. We identified human thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), which is cell cycle regulatory gene and confirmed expression of TK1 mRNA by Northern blot analysis. Expression of TK1 mRNA and TK 1enzymatic activity were parallel in their increase and decrease. TK1 is involved in G1-S phase transition of cell cycle progression. In cell cycle analysis, we showed that radiation induced G2 arrest in K562 cells but it was not able to sustain. However, the addition of genistein to irradiated cells sustained a prolonged G2 arrest up to 120 h. In addition,the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, cyclin A and cyclin B 1, provided the evidences of G1/S progression and G2-arrest, and their relationship with TK1 in cells treated with radiation and genistein. These results suggest that the activation of TK1 may be critical to modulate the radiation-induced cell death and cell cycle progression in irradiated K562 cells.

  9. Parallelization of interpolation, solar radiation and water flow simulation modules in GRASS GIS using OpenMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofierka, Jaroslav; Lacko, Michal; Zubal, Stanislav

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the parallelization of three complex and computationally intensive modules of GRASS GIS using the OpenMP application programming interface for multi-core computers. These include the v.surf.rst module for spatial interpolation, the r.sun module for solar radiation modeling and the r.sim.water module for water flow simulation. We briefly describe the functionality of the modules and parallelization approaches used in the modules. Our approach includes the analysis of the module's functionality, identification of source code segments suitable for parallelization and proper application of OpenMP parallelization code to create efficient threads processing the subtasks. We document the efficiency of the solutions using the airborne laser scanning data representing land surface in the test area and derived high-resolution digital terrain model grids. We discuss the performance speed-up and parallelization efficiency depending on the number of processor threads. The study showed a substantial increase in computation speeds on a standard multi-core computer while maintaining the accuracy of results in comparison to the output from original modules. The presented parallelization approach showed the simplicity and efficiency of the parallelization of open-source GRASS GIS modules using OpenMP, leading to an increased performance of this geospatial software on standard multi-core computers.

  10. Differential expression of HLA-G and ILT-2 receptor in human tuberculosis: Localized versus disseminated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Abhinav; Thakral, Deepshi; Mourya, Manish K; Singh, Amar; Mohan, Anant; Bhatnagar, Anuj K; Mitra, Dipendra K; Kanga, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecule that can modulate immune cell activation. The role of HLA-G in tuberculosis, an immune-mediated and chronic bacterial disease remains to be elucidated. We investigated the expression profile of soluble and membrane bound HLA-G in pulmonary TB (PTB), TB pleural effusion (TB-PE, localized disease) and Miliary TB (disseminated form). The expression of HLA-G receptor, ILT-2 was also determined on the immune cells. We observed that the plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly increased in Miliary TB than in TB-PE patients. In contrast, immunophenotyping revealed that the percent frequency of CD3(+) T cells expressing HLA-G was significantly reduced in Miliary TB as compared to TB-PE, whereas frequency of CD14(+) monocytes expressing HLA-G was significantly higher in TB-PE patients. Strikingly in the TB-PE cases, comparison of disease site, i.e. pleural effusion with peripheral blood showed increased expression of both soluble and surface HLA-G, whereas ILT-2 expressing cells were reduced at the local disease site. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in TB-PE cases, HLA-G expression on CD3(+) T cells was influenced by broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. Thus, differential expression of HLA-G could potentially be a useful biomarker to distinguish different states of TB disease.

  11. Carfilzomib alters the HLA-presented peptidome of myeloma cells and impairs presentation of peptides with aromatic C-termini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, D J; Walz, S; Backert, L; Schuster, H; Kohlbacher, O; Weisel, K; Rittig, S M; Kanz, L; Salih, H R; Rammensee, H-G; Stevanović, S; Stickel, J S

    2016-04-08

    Recent studies suggest that multiple myeloma is an immunogenic disease, which might be effectively targeted by antigen-specific T-cell immunotherapy. As standard of care in myeloma includes proteasome inhibitor therapy, it is of great importance to characterize the effects of this treatment on HLA-restricted antigen presentation and implement only robustly presented targets for immunotherapeutic intervention. Here, we present a study that longitudinally and semi-quantitatively maps the effects of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib on HLA-restricted antigen presentation. The relative presentation levels of 4780 different HLA ligands were quantified in an in vitro model employing carfilzomib treatment of MM.1S and U266 myeloma cells, which revealed significant modulation of a substantial fraction of the HLA-presented peptidome. Strikingly, we detected selective down-modulation of HLA ligands with aromatic C-terminal anchor amino acids. This particularly manifested as a marked reduction in the presentation of HLA ligands through the HLA allotypes A*23:01 and A*24:02 on MM.1S cells. These findings implicate that carfilzomib mediates a direct, peptide motif-specific inhibitory effect on HLA ligand processing and presentation. As a substantial proportion of HLA allotypes present peptides with aromatic C-termini, our results may have broad implications for the implementation of antigen-specific treatment approaches in patients undergoing carfilzomib treatment.

  12. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  13. Dosimetric comparison of hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jia-Fu [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Dah-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Hui-Ling, E-mail: hlyeh@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen-Fa [Department of Radiation Physics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of 3 different treatment techniques: hybrid volumetric-modulated arc therapy (hybrid-VMAT), pure-VMAT, and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (F-IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer. The hybrid-VMAT treatment technique and 2 other treatment techniques—pure-VMAT and F-IMRT—were compared retrospectively in 10 patients with left-sided early breast cancer. The treatment plans of these patients were replanned using the same contours based on the original computed tomography (CT) data sets. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were also recorded and evaluated. The hybrid-VMAT plan generated the best results in dose coverage of the target and the dose uniformity inside the target (p < 0.0001 for conformal index [CI]; p = 0.0002 for homogeneity index [HI] of planning target volume [PTV]{sub 50.4} {sub Gy} and p < 0.0001 for HI of PTV{sub 62} {sub Gy}). Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to doses of 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}) and 5 Gy (V{sub 5} {sub Gy}) by the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those of the F-IMRT and the pure-VMAT plans. The volume of ipsilateral lung irradiated to a dose of 5 Gy was significantly less using the hybrid-VMAT plan than that using the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The total mean MUs for the hybrid-VMAT plan were significantly less than those for the F-IMRT or the pure-VMAT plan. The mean machine delivery time was 3.23 ± 0.29 minutes for the hybrid-VMAT plans, which is longer than that for the pure-VMAT plans but shorter than that for the F-IMRT plans. The hybrid-VMAT plan is feasible for whole-breast irradiation of left-sided early breast cancer.

  14. Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christian M.; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Glazer, Andrew M.; Steiner, Heidi E.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Roden, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations. PMID:28207879

  15. A polymorphism in HLA-G modifies statin benefit in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Naidoo, Devesh; Wu, Ann C.; Brilliant, Murray H; Denny, Joshua; Ingram, Christie; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Linneman, James G.; McGeachie, Michael J.; Dan M Roden; Shaffer, Christian M.; Shah, Anushi; Weeke, Peter; Weiss, Scott T; Xu, Hua; Medina, Marisa W.

    2014-01-01

    Several reports have shown that statin treatment benefits patients with asthma, however inconsistent effects have been observed. The mir-152 family (148a, 148b and 152) has been implicated in asthma. These microRNAs suppress HLA-G expression, and rs1063320, a common SNP in the HLA-G 3’UTR which is associated with asthma risk, modulates miRNA binding. We report that statins up-regulate mir-148b and 152, and affect HLA-G expression in an rs1063320 dependent fashion. In addition, we found that i...

  16. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  17. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  18. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  19. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  20. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwint, Margriet [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van den [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose, E-mail: j.belderbos@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  1. Yes-associated protein (YAP modulates oncogenic features and radiation sensitivity in endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tsujiura

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein (YAP is a transcriptional co-activator and regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. We investigated the clinical and biological significance of YAP in endometrial cancer (EMCA.YAP expression in 150 primary tumor tissues from patients with EMCA was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological data was assessed. The biological functions of YAP were determined in EMCA cell lines through knockdown/overexpression of YAP. The role of YAP in modulating radiation sensitivity was also investigated in EMCA cells.Increased nuclear YAP expression was significantly associated with higher grade, stage, lympho-vascular space invasion, postoperative recurrence/metastasis and overall survival in estrogen mediated EMCA, called type 1 cancer (p = 0.019,  = 0.028,  = 0.0008,  = 0.046 and  = 0.015, respectively. In multivariate analysis, nuclear YAP expression was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in type 1 EMCA. YAP knockdown by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.05, anchorage-dependent growth (p = 0.015 and migration/invasion (p<0.05, and a significant increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase (p = 0.002. Conversely, YAP overexpression promoted cell proliferation. Clonogenic assay demonstrated enhanced radiosensitivity by approximately 36% in YAP inhibited cells.Since YAP functions as a transcriptional co-activator, its differential localization in the nucleus of cancer cells and subsequent impact on cell proliferation could have important consequences with respect to its role as an oncogene in EMCA. Nuclear YAP expression could be useful as a prognostic indicator or therapeutic target and predict radiation sensitivity in patients with EMCA.

  2. Effect of Radiation on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Silicon Modulator for HL-LHC data Transmission Applications

    CERN Document Server

    El Nasr-Storey, Sarah Seif; Baudot, Charles; Detraz, Stephane; Fedeli, Jean Marc; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Olantera, Lauri; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Sigaud, Christophe; Soos, Csaba; Troska, Jan; Vasey, Francois; Vivien, Laurent; Zeiler, Marcel; Ziebell, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    High-speed Mach-Zehnder interferometer silicon modulators were irradiated with neutrons and X-rays in two separate radiation tests. The devices were exposed to a total fluence of 1.2 x 10$^{15}$ neutrons/cm$^2$ and a total ionizing dose of 1.3 MGy; levels comparable to the worst radiation levels for a tracking detector after 10 years of operation at the High- Luminosity LHC. Our measurements indicate that the devices performance does not significantly degrade after exposure to nonionizing radiation and begins to be affected by ionizing radiation after a dose of a few hundred kGy; the phase-shift for an applied reverse bias of 1 V is 10% of its pre-irradiated value after 600 kGy of received ionizing dose.

  3. Long-term modulation of galactic cosmic radiation and its model for space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1994-10-01

    As the human exploration of space has received new attention in the United States, studies find that exposure to space radiation could adversely impact the mission design. Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), with its very wide range of charges and energies, is particularly important for a mission to Mars, because it imposes a stiff mass penalty for spacecraft shielding. Dose equivalent versus shielding thickness calculations, show a rapid initial drop on exposure with thickness, but an asymptotic behavior at a higher shielding thickness. Uncertainties in the radiobiology are largely unknown. For a fixed radiation risk, this leads to large uncertainties in shielding thickness for small uncertainties in estimated dose. In this paper we investigate the application of steady-state, spherically-symmetric diffusion-convection theory of solar modulation to individual measurements of differential energy spectra from 1954 to 1989 in order to estimate the diffusion coefficient, kappa(r,t), as a function of time. We have correlated the diffusion coefficient to the Climax neutron monitor rates and show that, if the diffusion coefficient can be separated into independent functions of space and time: kappa(r,t)=K(t) k0 beta Pk1 (r), where beta is the particle velocity and P the rigidity, then (i) The time dependent quantity 1/K(t), which is proportional to the deceleration potential, phi(r,t), is linearly related to the Climax neutron monitor counting rate. (ii) The coefficients obtained from hydrogen or helium intensity measurements are the same. (iii) There are different correlation functions for odd and even solar cycles. (iv) The correlation function for the Climax neutron monitor counting rate for given time, t, can be used to estimate mean deceleration parameter phi(t) to within +/- 15% with 90% confidence. We have shown that k(r,t) determined from hydrogen and/or helium data, can be used to fit the oxygen and iron differential energy spectra with a root mean square error of

  4. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible. Minimized risk profile following Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Huguenin, P.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Studer, S.P.; Zwahlen, R.A.; Graetz, K.W. [Dept. of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    Background and purpose: osteoradionecrosis (ON) of the mandible is a serious late complication of high-dose radiation therapy for tumors of the oropharynx and oral cavity. After doses between 60 and 72 Gy using standard fractionation, an incidence of ON between 5% and 15% is reported in a review from 1989, whereas in more recent publications using moderately accelerated or hyperfractionated irradiation and doses between 69 and 81 Gy, the incidence of ON is between < 1% and {proportional_to} 6%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is expected to translate into a further important reduction of ON. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess absolute and relative bone volumes exposed to high IMRT doses, related to observed bone tolerance. Patients and methods: between December 2001 and November 2004, 73 of 123 patients treated with IMRT were identified as subgroup ''at risk'' for ON (> 60 Gy for oropharyngeal or oral cavity cancer). 21/73 patients were treated in a postoperative setting, 52 patients underwent primary definitive irradiation. In 56 patients concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy was applied. Mean follow-up time was 22 months (12-46 months). Oral cavity including the mandible bone outside the planning target volume was contoured and dose-volume constraints were defined in order to spare bone tissue. Dose-volume histograms were obtained from contoured mandible in each patient and were analyzed and related to clinical mandible bone tolerance. Results: using IMRT with doses between 60 and 75 Gy (mean 67 Gy), on average 7.8, 4.8, 0.9, and 0.3 cm{sup 3} were exposed to doses > 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy, respectively. These values are substantially lower than when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The difference has been approximately quantified by comparison with a historic series. Additional ON risk factors of the patients were also analyzed. Only one grade 3 ON of the lingual horizontal branch, treated with

  5. Modulation of tenascin Genes expression in pig skin and muscular fibrosis after ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffrotin, C.; Tricaud, Y.; Castelli, M.; Crechet, F.; Lefaix, J.L.; Vaiman, M. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA-CEA-DSV-DRR) Laboratoire de Radiologie Appliquee, 78 - Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1997-03-01

    To study mechanisms leading to radiation-induced fibrosis, a complication which may occur after radiotherapy or radiation accidents, a model of local irradiation of skin in pig has been set up. It is characterized by the development of a cutaneous and muscular fibrosis within 5 months following a single dose of at least 140 Grays at the point of application of a collimated {sup 192}Ir source (2 cm in diameter). Accumulation of myo-fibroblasts, increased synthesis and deposition of components of the extra cellular matrix (ECM), such as collagens, fibronectin and hyaluronan were described in this model. We present here a study of the expression of the tenascin C and X (TN-C and TN-X) molecules which belong to a new family of glycoproteins of the ECM that has never been analysed in this context. A single dose of 160 Grays (0,6 Gy/mn) at the point of application of the {sup 192}Ir source was delivered on the right thigh of 4 Large While pigs. The animals were killed 9 to 11 months after irradiation and samples from unirradiated skin, repaired fibrotic skin and underlying muscular fibrotic tissue were recovered. TN-C and TN-X RNAs were analysed by the RNase protection and Northern blot methods using porcine cDNA probes. Analysis of TN-C protein was performed by Western blot technique using a polyclonal antibody raised against human TN-C. RNAs and proteins were quantified with the PhosphorImager SI and the Imaging Densitometer GS-700 from Biorad respectively. In conclusion, these data confirmed our previous observations about the independence of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the level of TN-X and TN-C mRNAs. As the TN-C gene is highly expressed both at the RNA and the protein levels, its products might play an important role both in the initiation and the chronic extension of radiation-induced fibrosis by modulating mechanism such as adhesion, migration or proliferation of cells. (authors)

  6. EBT GAFCHROMIC{sup TM} film dosimetry in compensator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaezzadeh, Seyedali [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Mahmoud, E-mail: alahverdi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedaie, Hasan A. [Department of Radiotherapy—Oncology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammadreza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza; Yarahmadi, Mehran [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The electron benefit transfer (EBT) GAFCHROMIC films possess a number of features making them appropriate for high-quality dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Compensators to deliver IMRT are known to change the beam-energy spectrum as well as to produce scattered photons and to contaminate electrons; therefore, the accuracy and validity of EBT-film dosimetry in compensator-based IMRT should be investigated. Percentage-depth doses and lateral-beam profiles were measured using EBT films in perpendicular orientation with respect to 6 and 18 MV photon beam energies for: (1) different thicknesses of cerrobend slab (open, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm), field sizes (5×5, 10×10, and 20×20 cm{sup 2}), and measurement depths (D{sub max}, 5.0 and 10.0 cm); and (2) step-wedged compensator in a solid phantom. To verify results, same measurements were implemented using a 0.125 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber in a water phantom and also in Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code. The mean energy of photons was increased due to beam hardening in comparison with open fields at both 6 and 18 MV energies. For a 20×20 cm{sup 2} field size of a 6 MV photon beam and a 6.0 cm thick block, the surface dose decreased by about 12% and percentage-depth doses increased up to 3% at 30.0 cm depth, due to the beam-hardening effect induced by the block. In contrast, at 18 MV, the surface dose increased by about 8% and depth dose reduced by 3% at 30.0 cm depth. The penumbral widths (80% to 20%) increase with block thickness, field size, and beam energy. The EBT film results were in good agreement with the ionization chamber dose profiles and Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code simulation behind the step-wedged compensator. Also, there was a good agreement between the EBT-film and the treatment-planning results on the anthropomorphic phantom. The EBT films can be accurately used as a 2D dosimeter for dose

  7. Treatment of folliculitis decalvans using intensity-modulated radiation via tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Plachouri, Kerasia-Maria; Jeskowiak, Antonia [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Dermatology, Muenster (Germany); Sunderkoetter, Cord [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Dermatology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Translational Dermatoninfectiology, Muenster (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Folliculitis decalvans (FD) is a form of primary neutrophilic scarring alopecia that is characterized clinically by chronic suppurative folliculitis and often associated with pruritus or even pain. Treatment of FD is often difficult. Herein, we report a case of recalcitrant and painful folliculitis decalvans refractory to antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies, which was successfully treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in order to irreversibly eliminate hair follicles that prove to be one etiological trigger. A 45-year-old male patient with a refractory FD presented with a crusting suppurative folliculitis and atrophic scarring patches on the scalp associated with pain and pruritus. We attempted relief of symptoms by reducing scalp inflammation and eliminating hair follicles through radiation. We delivered 11.0 Gy in two radiation series using tomotherapy, 5.0 Gy in 5 equivalent fractions as a first radiation course. The symptoms markedly decreased but did not totally disappear. Therefore, we delivered a second radiation series 4 months later with an additional 6 Gy. This led to almost complete epilation on the scalp and abolished pain and pruritus on the capillitium. The patient was regularly followed up until 26 months after radiotherapy. Draining lesions or exudation did not recur. He only experienced discrete hair regrowth in the occipital region with folliculitis 12 months after radiotherapy. These residual lesions are currently treated with laser epilation therapy. A radical approach to eliminating hair follicles by repeated radiation therapy may induce lasting relief of symptoms in chronic suppurative FD associated with persistent trichodynia. (orig.) [German] Die Folliculitis decalvans (FD) ist eine Form der primaer neutrophilen Alopezie, welche klinisch durch Schmerzen und eitrige Follikel gekennzeichnet ist. Da es bisher kein einheitliches Behandlungskonzept gibt, wird hier ueber eine FD berichtet, welche trotz mehrfacher antibiotischer

  8. Gamma-spectrometric module based on HPGe detector for radiation portal monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratjev Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of small-sized and powerful enough electric cryocoolers of various types on the market, has opened the perspective of HPGe detectors application, cooled by such coolers, in radiation portal monitors. The first results of a spectrometric module based on HPGe detector with relative efficiency of 45% cooled by a Stirling-cycle cryocooler, are presented. The spectrometer has provided energy resolutions of less than 0.95 keV and 1.95 keV at energies of 122 keV and 1332 keV, respectively. The deterioration of the energy resolution of HPGe detector cooled by electric cryocooler in comparison to the resolution with liquid nitrogen cooling was about 8% at the energy of 1332 keV. With the use of activated filters to suppress pulses produced by the mechanical vibrations, the energy resolution of the spectrometer was 0.8 keV and 1.8 keV, respectively, however, the detector relative efficiency at the energy of 1332 keV has dropped to 39 %.

  9. Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy: the importance of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) became a standard technique despite its drawbacks of volume delineation, planning, robustness of delivery, challenging quality assurance, and cost as compared with non-IMRT. The theoretic advantages of IMRT dose distributions are generally accepted, but the clinical advantages remain debatable because of the lack of clinical assessment of the effort that is required to overshadow the disadvantages. Rational IMRT use requires a positive advantage/drawback balance. Only 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 3 in the breast and 2 in the head and neck, which compare IMRT with non-IMRT (2-dimensional technique in four fifths of the trials), have been published (as of March 2011), and all had toxicity as the primary endpoint. More than 50 clinical trials compared results of IMRT-treated patients with a non-IMRT group, mostly historical controls. RCTs systematically showed a lower toxicity in IMRT-treated patients, and the non-RCTs confirmed these findings. Toxicity reduction, counterbalancing the drawbacks of IMRT, was convincing for breast and head and neck IMRT. For other tumor sites, the arguments favoring IMRT are weaker because of the inability to control bias outside the randomized setting. For anticancer efficacy endpoints, like survival, disease-specific survival, or locoregional control, the balance between advantages and drawbacks is fraught with uncertainties because of the absence of robust clinical data.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  12. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclean, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.maclean@uclh.nhs.uk [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Fersht, Naomi [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [Neuro-Ophthalmology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Short, Susan [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  13. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Warren D; Nazareth, Daryl P [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Hao H; Shi Leyuan [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Meyer, Robert R [Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: dsouzaw@ohsu.edu

    2008-06-21

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  14. A nested partitions framework for beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Zhang, Hao H.; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Shi, Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R.

    2008-06-01

    Coupling beam angle optimization with dose optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) increases the size and complexity of an already large-scale combinatorial optimization problem. We have developed a novel algorithm, nested partitions (NP), that is capable of finding suitable beam angle sets by guiding the dose optimization process. NP is a metaheuristic that is flexible enough to guide the search of a heuristic or deterministic dose optimization algorithm. The NP method adaptively samples from the entire feasible region, or search space, and coordinates the sampling effort with a systematic partitioning of the feasible region at successive iterations, concentrating the search in promising subsets. We used a 'warm-start' approach by initiating NP with beam angle samples derived from an integer programming (IP) model. In this study, we describe our implementation of the NP framework with a commercial optimization algorithm. We compared the NP framework with equi-spaced beam angle selection, the IP method, greedy heuristic and random sampling heuristic methods. The results of the NP approach were evaluated using two clinical cases (head and neck and whole pelvis) involving the primary tumor and nodal volumes. Our results show that NP produces better quality solutions than the alternative considered methods.

  15. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, J. L.; Webb, S.

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans.

  16. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. (Laboratoire de Biochimie de Tissu Conjonctif, Creteil (France))

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  17. Comparison of coplanar and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Hung-Chi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the differences in dose-volume data among coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, noncoplanar IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and portal vein thrombosis (PVT. Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC and PVT underwent step and shoot coplanar IMRT with intent to deliver 46 - 54 Gy to the tumor and portal vein. The volume of liver received 30Gy was set to keep less than 30% of whole normal liver (V30 Results HT provided better uniformity for the planning-target volume dose coverage than both IMRT techniques. The noncoplanar IMRT technique reduces the V10 to normal liver with a statistically significant level as compared to HT. The constraints for the liver in the V30 for coplanar IMRT vs. noncoplanar IMRT vs. HT could be reconsidered as 21% vs. 17% vs. 17%, respectively. When delivering 50 Gy and 60-66 Gy to the tumor bed, the constraints of mean dose to the normal liver could be less than 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Conclusion Noncoplanar IMRT and HT are potential techniques of radiation therapy for HCC patients with PVT. Constraints for the liver in IMRT and HT could be stricter than for 3DCRT.

  18. Organisational standards for the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, A; Warde, P; Sharpe, M; Oliver, T K; Bak, K; Leszczynski, K; Etheridge, S; Fleming, K; Gutierrez, E; Favell, L; Green, E

    2009-04-01

    By minimising the effect of irradiation on surrounding tissue, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher, more effective doses to the targeted tumour site, minimising treatment-related morbidity and possibly improving cancer control and cure. A multidisciplinary IMRT Expert Panel was convened to develop the organisational standards for the delivery of IMRT. The systematic literature search used MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database, the National Guidelines Clearing House and the Health Technology Assessment Database. An environmental scan of unpublished literature used the Google search engine to review the websites of key organisations, cancer agencies/centres and vendor sites in Canada, the USA, Australia and Europe. In total, 22 relevant guidance documents were identified; 12 from the published literature and 10 from the environmental scan. Professional and organisational standards for the provision of IMRT were developed through the analysis of this evidence and the consensus opinion of the IMRT Expert Panel. The resulting standards address the following domains: planning of new IMRT programmes, practice setting requirements, tools, devices and equipment requirements; professional training requirements; role of personnel; and requirements for quality assurance and safety. Here the IMRT Expert Panel offers organisational and professional standards for the delivery of IMRT, with the intent of promoting innovation, improving access and enhancing patient care.

  19. Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimetre telescopes (ARTIST). Dust polarisation module (DustPol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, M.; Brinch, C.; Girart, J. M.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Frau, P.; Hennebelle, P.; Kuiper, R.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Bertoldi, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Juhasz, A.; Schaaf, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a new publicly available tool (DustPol) aimed to model the polarised thermal dust emission. The module DustPol, which is publicly available, is part of the ARTIST (Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimetre Telescopes) package, which also offers tools for modelling the polarisation of line emission together with a model library and a Python-based user interface. DustPol can easily manage analytical as well as pre-gridded models to generate synthetic maps of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. These maps are stored in FITS format which is straightforwardly read by the data reduction software used, e.g., by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). This turns DustPol into a powerful engine for the prediction of the expected polarisation features of a source observed with ALMA or the Planck satellite as well as for the interpretation of existing submillimetre observations obtained with other telescopes. DustPol allows the parameterisation of the maximum degree of polarisation and we find that, in a prestellar core, if there is depolarisation, this effect should happen at densities of 106 cm-3 or larger. We compare a model generated by DustPol with the observational polarisation data of the low-mass Class 0 object NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, finding that the total and the polarised emission are consistent.

  20. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with field rotation--a time-varying fractionation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dink, Delal; Langer, Mark P; Rardin, Ronald L; Pekny, Joseph F; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Saka, Behlul

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical approach to the beam selection problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. The approach allows more beams to be used over the course of therapy while limiting the number of beams required in any one session. In the proposed field rotation method, several sets of beams are interchanged throughout the treatment to allow a wider selection of beam angles than would be possible with fixed beam orientations. The choice of beamlet intensities and the number of identical fractions for each set are determined by a mixed integer linear program that controls jointly for the distribution per fraction and the cumulative dose distribution delivered to targets and critical structures. Trials showed the method allowed substantial increases in the dose objective and/or sparing of normal tissues while maintaining cumulative and fraction size limits. Trials for a head and neck site showed gains of 25%-35% in the objective (average tumor dose) and for a thoracic site gains were 7%-13%, depending on how strict the fraction size limits were set. The objective did not rise for a prostate site significantly, but the tolerance limits on normal tissues could be strengthened with the use of multiple beam sets.

  1. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  2. Effects of acoustic radiation force and shear waves for absorption and stiffness sensing in ultrasound modulated optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Elson, Daniel S; Dunsby, Chris; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2011-04-11

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) combines optical contrast with ultrasound spatial resolution and has great potential for soft tissue functional imaging. One current problem with this technique is the weak optical modulation signal, primarily due to strong optical scattering in diffuse media and minimal acoustically induced modulation. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) can create large particle displacements in tissue and has been shown to be able to improve optical modulation signals. However, shear wave propagation induced by the ARF can be a significant source of nonlocal optical modulation which may reduce UOT spatial resolution and contrast. In this paper, the time evolution of shear waves was examined on tissue mimicking-phantoms exposed to 5 MHz ultrasound and 532 nm optical radiation and measured with a CCD camera. It has been demonstrated that by generating an ARF with an acoustic burst and adjusting both the timing and the exposure time of the CCD measurement, optical contrast and spatial resolution can be improved by ~110% and ~40% respectively when using the ARF rather than 5 MHz ultrasound alone. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that this technique simultaneously detects both optical and mechanical contrast in the medium and the optical and mechanical contrast can be distinguished by adjusting the CCD exposure time.

  3. Electrically-controlled near-field radiative thermal modulator made of graphene-coated silicon carbide plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid near-field radiative thermal modulator made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. The near-field photon tunneling between the emitter and receiver is modulated by changing graphene chemical potentials with symmetrically or asymmetrically applied voltage biases. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials due to tunable near-field coupling strength between graphene plasmons across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation and switching, which are the key functionalities required for a thermal modulator, are theoretically realized and analyzed. Newly introduced quantities of the modulation factor, the sensitivity factor and switching factor are studied quite extensively in a large parameter range for both graphene chemical potential and vacuum gap distance. This opto-electronic device with faster operating mode, which is in principle only limited by electronics and not by the thermal inertia, will facilitate the practical application of active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing with photon-based near-field thermal transport.

  4. A Method and an Apparatus for Generating a Phase-Modulated Wave Front of Electromagnetic Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a system for generating a phase-modulated wave front. According to the present invention, the spatial phase-modulation is not performed on the different parts of the wave front individually as in known POSLMs. Rather, the spatial phase-modulation of the......The present invention provides a method and a system for generating a phase-modulated wave front. According to the present invention, the spatial phase-modulation is not performed on the different parts of the wave front individually as in known POSLMs. Rather, the spatial phase......-modulation of the present invention is performed by generating an amplitude modulation in the wave front, Fourier or Fresnel transforming the amplitude modulated wave front, filtering Fourier or Fresnel components of the Fourier or Fresnel distribution with a spatial filter such as a phase contrast filter, and regenerating...... the wave front whereby the initial amplitude modulation has transformed into a phase-modulation....

  5. A review of in vitro experimental evidence for the effect of spatial and temporal modulation of radiation dose on response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, Natalka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)), E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)); Jackson, Michael (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    Background. Intensity modulated radiation therapy introduces strong spatial and temporal modulation of the dose delivery that may have therapeutic benefits, as yet unrealized. Material and methods. Experimental evidence for spatial and temporal modulation affecting the cell survival following in vitro irradiation has been derived using clonogenic assays. Results and discussion. The experimental results show that the survival status of a cell is strongly influenced by the spatial dose modulation. The classical bystander effect of decreased survival has now been supplemented by observations of increased survival, which may result from the same or different signaling mechanisms. Temporal dose modulation experiments show that dose protraction significantly increases cell survival. An appropriate choice of temporal dose modulation pattern enables cell death to be maximized or minimized for a constant dose and delivery time. Conclusion. Bystander effects challenge the assumption that outcome is solely dependent on local dose. Intra-fractional temporal modulation via protracted treatments and time varying dose delivery both affect the cell survival. The presence of bystander and temporal effects emphasize the need for a mathematical framework which incorporates their influence on cell survival

  6. HLA class I expression in bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, T; Pedrajas, G; Cozar, J M; Garrido, A; Vicente, J; Tallada, M; Garrido, F

    2003-10-01

    HLA class I molecules are frequently lost in a large variety of human carcinomas, possibly because of T-cell immune selection of major histocompatibility complex class I deficient tumor variants. We report that this phenomenon is also a frequent event in bladder carcinomas. Of a total of 72 bladder carcinomas, 72% of the tumors had at least one alteration in HLA class I expression. These altered HLA class I phenotypes were classified as total HLA class I loss (25%; phenotype I); HLA-A or/and HLA-B locus-specific loss (12%; phenotype III); and HLA class I allelic loss (35%; phenotype II or IV). Comparison of histopathological parameters with HLA class I expression showed a statistically significant relationship with the degree of differentiation and tumor recurrence.

  7. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Research about the disassociated cases between HLA-DRB1、HLA-DRB3、 HLA-DRB4、HLA-DRB5 locus and HLA-DQ locus%HLA-DRB1、HLA-DRB3、HLA-DRB4、HLA-DRB5与HLA-DQ位点不关联病例的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹丹; 孙敬芬; 朱海燕; 韩晓苹; 金荔; 刘楠; 奚永志; 高春纪; 于力

    2008-01-01

    目的:完善目前已知的HLA-DR与HLA-DQ关联表.方法:从2000~2006年间到我们实验室配型的供患者中选出与关联表不相符的16例标本并对这些标本进行高分辨鉴定.结果:发现在中国汉族人中的五条HLA-DR与HLA-DQ位点连锁遗传的单倍体.结论:为目前所用的HLA-DR与HLA-DQ位点关联表在中国人群中增加五个新的单倍体,使关联表更适合于中国人群.

  9. Study of material properties important for an optical property modulation-based radiation detection method for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M; Levin, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    We compare the performance of two detector materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and bismuth silicon oxide (BSO), for optical property modulation-based radiation detection method for positron emission tomography (PET), which is a potential new direction to dramatically improve the annihilation photon pair coincidence time resolution. We have shown that the induced current flow in the detector crystal resulting from ionizing radiation determines the strength of optical modulation signal. A larger resistivity is favorable for reducing the dark current (noise) in the detector crystal, and thus the higher resistivity BSO crystal has a lower (50% lower on average) noise level than CdTe. The CdTe and BSO crystals can achieve the same sensitivity under laser diode illumination at the same crystal bias voltage condition while the BSO crystal is not as sensitive to 511-keV photons as the CdTe crystal under the same crystal bias voltage. The amplitude of the modulation signal induced by 511-keV photons in BSO crystal is around 30% of that induced in CdTe crystal under the same bias condition. In addition, we have found that the optical modulation strength increases linearly with crystal bias voltage before saturation. The modulation signal with CdTe tends to saturate at bias voltages higher than 1500 V due to its lower resistivity (thus larger dark current) while the modulation signal strength with BSO still increases after 3500 V. Further increasing the bias voltage for BSO could potentially further enhance the modulation strength and thus, the sensitivity.

  10. Template Driven Code Generator for HLA Middleware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.; Huiskamp, W.

    2007-01-01

    HLA is the accepted standard for simulation interoperability. However, the HLA services and the API that is provided for these services are relatively complex from the user point of view. Since the early days of HLA, federate developers have attempted to simplify their task by using middleware that

  11. Template Driven Code Generator for HLA Middleware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.; Huiskamp, W.

    2007-01-01

    HLA is the accepted standard for simulation interoperability. However, the HLA services and the API that is provided for these services are relatively complex from the user point of view. Since the early days of HLA, federate developers have attempted to simplify their task by using middleware that

  12. Continuous-time method and its discretization to inverse problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving box-constrained inverse problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on the idea of continuous dynamical methods and split-feasibility algorithms. Our method can compute a feasible solution without the second derivative of an objective function, which is required for gradient-based optimization algorithms. We prove theoretically that a double Kullback-Leibler divergence can be used as the Lyapunov function for the IMRT planning system.

  13. Leakage-Penumbra effect in intensity modulated radiation therapy step-and-shoot dose delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigor N Grigorov; James CL Chow

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the leakage-penumbra(LP) effect with a proposed correction method for the step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT).METHODS: Leakage-penumbra dose profiles from 10 randomly selected prostate IMRT plans were studied. The IMRT plans were delivered by a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator equipped with a 120-leaf multileaf collimator(MLC). For each treatment plan created by the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system,a 3-dimensional LP dose distribution generated by 5 coplanar photon beams,starting from 0o with equal separation of 72 o,was investigated. For each photon beam used in the stepand-shoot IMRT plans,the first beam segment was set to have the largest area in the MLC leaf-sequencing,and was equal to the planning target volume(PTV). The overshoot effect(OSE) and the segment positional errors were measured using a solid water phantom with Kodak(TL and X-OMAT V) radiographic films. Film dosimetric analysis and calibration were carried out using a film scanner(Vidar VXR-16). The LP dose profiles were determined by eliminating the OSE and segment positional errors with specific individual irradiations. RESULTS: A non-uniformly distributed leaf LP dose ranging from 3% to 5% of the beam dose was measured in clinical IMRT beams. An overdose at the gap between neighboring segments,represented as dose peaks of up to 10% of the total BP,was measured. The LP effect increased the dose to the PTV and surrounding critical tissues. In addition,the effectdepends on the number of beams and segments for each beam. Segment positional error was less than the maximum tolerance of 1 mm under a dose rate of 600 monitor units per minute in the treatment plans. The OSE varying with the dose rate was observed in all photon beams,and the effect increased from 1 to 1.3 Gy per treatment of the rectal intersection. As the dosimetric impacts from the LP effect and OSE may increase the rectal post-radiation effects,a correction of LP was proposed and demonstrated for

  14. A feedback constraint optimization method for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, YONGWU; SUN, XIAONAN; WANG, QI; ZHOU, QINXUAN; GU, BENXING; SHI, GUOZHI; JIANG, DONGLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is able to achieve good target conformance with a limited dose to organs at risk (OARs); however, IMRT increases the irradiation volume and monitor units (MUs) required. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of an IMRT plan with fewer segments and MUs, while maintaining quality in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, two types of IMRT plan were therefore compared: The direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO)-RT method and the feedback constraint DMPO-RT (fc_DMPO-RT) method, which utilizes compensative feedback constraint in DMPO-RT and maintains optimization. Plans for 23 patients were developed with identical dose prescriptions. Each plan involved synchronous delivery to various targets, with identical OAR constraints, by means of 7 coplanar fields. The average dose, maximum dose, dose-volume histograms of targets and the OAR, MUs of the plan, the number of segments, delivery time and accuracy were subsequently compared. The fc_DMPO-RT exhibited superior dose distribution in terms of the average, maximum and minimum doses to the gross tumor volume compared with that of DMPO-RT (t=62.7, 20.5 and 22.0, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT also resulted in a smaller maximum dose to the spinal cord (t=7.3; P<0.05), as well as fewer MUs, fewer segments and decreased treatment times than that of the DMPO-RT (t=6.2, 393.4 and 244.3, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT maintained plan quality with fewer segments and MUs, and the treatment time was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in reduced radiation leakage and an enhanced curative effect. Therefore, introducing feedback constraint into DMPO may result in improved IMRT planning. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma specifically, feedback constraint resulted in the improved protection of OARs in proximity of targets (such as the brainstem and parotid) due to sharp dose distribution and reduced MUs. PMID:26622793

  15. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thotakura, Vijaya [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  16. Advanced Nongray Radiation Module in the LOCI Framework for Combustion CFD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR, an innovative, efficient and high fidelity computational tool to predict radiative heat transfer will be implemented in the LOCI framework. Radiative...

  17. Dosimetric effects of weight loss or gain during volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pair, Matthew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rojas, Hector D.; Kanke, James E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Weight loss or gain during the course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can alter the planned dose to the target volumes and critical organs. Typically, source-to-surface distance (SSD) measurements are documented by therapists on a weekly basis to ensure that patients' exterior surface and isocenter-to-skin surface distances remain stable. The radiation oncology team then determines whether the patient has undergone a physical change sufficient to require a new treatment plan. The effect of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetry is not well known, and it is unclear when rescanning or replanning is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of weight change (SSD increase or decrease) on IMRT or VMAT dose delivery in patients with prostate cancer and to determine the SSD change threshold for replanning. Whether IMRT or VMAT provides better dose stability under weight change conditions was also determined. We generated clinical IMRT and VMAT prostate and seminal vesicle treatment plans for varying SSDs for 10 randomly selected patients with prostate cancer. The differences due to SSD change were quantified by a specific dose change for a specified volume of interest. The target mean dose, decreased or increased by 2.9% per 1-cm SSD decrease or increase in IMRT and by 3.6% in VMAT. If the SSD deviation is more than 1 cm, the radiation oncology team should determine whether to continue treatment without modifications, to adjust monitor units, or to resimulate and replan.

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment results and locoregional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.L.Y.; Tsai, C.L.; Chen, W.Y.; Wang, C.W. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Huang, Y.S.; Chen, Y.F. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Kuo, S.H. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Hong, R.L. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Medical Oncology; Ko, J.Y.; Lou, P.J. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to examine outcomes in patients with T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 154 patients with nonmetastatic T4 NPC were treated with IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy in 33-35 fractions. In addition, 97 % of patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. Results: The rates of 5-year actuarial locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, progression free-survival, and overall survival (OS) were 81.2, 72.2, 61.9, and 78.1 %, respectively. A total of 27 patients had locoregional recurrence: 85.2 % in-field failures, 11.1 % marginal failures, and 3.7 % out-of-field failures. Fourteen patients with locoregional recurrence received aggressive treatments, including nasopharyngectomy, neck dissection, or re-irradiation, and the 5-year OS rate tended to be better (61.9 %) compared to those receiving conservative treatment (32.0 %, p = 0.051). In patients treated with 1 course of radiotherapy, grade {>=} 3 toxicities of ototoxicity, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, epistaxis, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis occurred in 18.2, 9.8, 6.3, 2.1, and 5.6 % of patients, respectively. Increased ototoxicity, osteonecrosis, severe nasal bleeding, and temporal necrosis were observed in patients treated by re-irradiation. Conclusion: IMRT offers good locoregional control in patients with T4 NPC. For patients with locoregional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy, aggressive local treatment may be considered for a better outcome. (orig.)

  19. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: Tom.Purdie@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  20. Gamma evaluation combined with isocenter optimal matching in intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Jino; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dose comparisons are widely performed by using a gamma evaluation with patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) or dose delivery quality assurance (DQA). In this way, a pass/fail determination is made for a particular treatment plan. When gamma evaluation results are close to the failure criterion, the pass/fail decision may change applying a small shift to the center of the 2D dose distribution. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the meaning of such a small relative shift in a 2D dose distribution comparison. In addition, we propose the use of a small shift for a pass/fail criterion in gamma analysis, where the concept of isocenter optimal matching (IOM) is applied to IMRT QA of 20 patients. Gamma evaluations were performed to compare two dose distributions, one with and the other without IOM. In-house software was developed in C++ in order to find IOM values including both translational and rotational shifts. Upon gamma evaluation failure, further investigation was initiated using IOM. In this way, three groups were categorized: group 1 for `pass' on gamma evaluation, group 21 for `fail' on the gamma evaluation and `pass' on the gamma the evaluation with IOM, and group 22 for `fail' on the both gamma evaluations and the IOM calculation. IOM results revealed that some failures could be considered as a `pass'. In group 21, 88.98% (fail) of the averaged gamma pass rate changed to 90.45% (pass) when IOM was applied. On average, a ratio of γ ≥ 1 was reduced by 11.06% in 20 patients. We propose that gamma evaluations that do not pass with a rate of 85% to 90% may be augmented with IOM to reveal a potential pass result.

  1. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D' Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  2. A general model for stray dose calculation of static and intensity-modulated photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauri, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.hauri2@uzh.ch; Schneider, Uwe [Faculty of Science, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057, Switzerland and Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen [Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing number of cancer survivors who are at risk of developing late effects caused by ionizing radiation such as induction of second tumors. Hence, the determination of out-of-field dose for a particular treatment plan in the patient’s anatomy is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to analytically model the stray dose according to its three major components. Methods: For patient scatter, a mechanistic model was developed. For collimator scatter and head leakage, an empirical approach was used. The models utilize a nominal beam energy of 6 MeV to describe two linear accelerator types of a single vendor. The parameters of the models were adjusted using ionization chamber measurements registering total absorbed dose in simple geometries. Whole-body dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters in an anthropomorphic phantom for static and intensity-modulated treatment plans were compared to the 3D out-of-field dose distributions calculated by a combined model. Results: The absolute mean difference between the whole-body predicted and the measured out-of-field dose of four different plans was 11% with a maximum difference below 44%. Computation time of 36 000 dose points for one field was around 30 s. By combining the model-calculated stray dose with the treatment planning system dose, the whole-body dose distribution can be viewed in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The results suggest that the model is accurate, fast and can be used for a wide range of treatment modalities to calculate the whole-body dose distribution for clinical analysis. For similar energy spectra, the mechanistic patient scatter model can be used independently of treatment machine or beam orientation.

  3. Application of influence diagrams to prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jürgen; Phillips, Mark H.; Cho, Paul S.; Kalet, Ira; Doctor, Jason N.

    2004-05-01

    The purpose is to incorporate clinically relevant factors such as patient-specific and dosimetric information as well as data from clinical trials in the decision-making process for the selection of prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. The approach is to incorporate the decision theoretic concept of an influence diagram into the solution of the multiobjective optimization inverse planning problem. A set of candidate IMRT plans was obtained by varying the importance factors for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ-at-risk (OAR) in combination with simulated annealing to explore a large part of the solution space. The Pareto set for the PTV and OAR was analysed to demonstrate how the selection of the weighting factors influenced which part of the solution space was explored. An influence diagram based on a Bayesian network with 18 nodes was designed to model the decision process for plan selection. The model possessed nodes for clinical laboratory results, tumour grading, staging information, patient-specific information, dosimetric information, complications and survival statistics from clinical studies. A utility node was utilized for the decision-making process. The influence diagram successfully ranked the plans based on the available information. Sensitivity analyses were used to judge the reasonableness of the diagram and the results. In conclusion, influence diagrams lend themselves well to modelling the decision processes for IMRT plan selection. They provide an excellent means to incorporate the probabilistic nature of data and beliefs into one model. They also provide a means for introducing evidence-based medicine, in the form of results of clinical trials, into the decision-making process.

  4. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abdul Haneefa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB and collapsed cone convolution (CCC algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3 are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV. Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters and constraints except the beam energy. For each patient’s plan of high energy photons, one set of photoneutron measurements using solid state neutron track detector (SSNTD was taken for this study. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in the rectum is 18.55±2.8, 14.58±2.1, and 16.77±4.7 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in bladder is 16.54±2.1, 17.42±2.1, and 16.94±41.9 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mixed fields neutron contribution at the beam entrance surface is 45.62% less than at 15 MV photon beam. Our result shows that, with negligible neutron contributions, mixed field IMRT has considerable dosimetric advantage.

  5. HybridArc: A novel radiation therapy technique combining optimized dynamic arcs and intensity modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robar, James L., E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada); Thomas, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    This investigation focuses on possible dosimetric and efficiency advantages of HybridArc-a novel treatment planning approach combining optimized dynamic arcs with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. Application of this technique to two disparate sites, complex cranial tumors, and prostate was examined. HybridArc plans were compared with either dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or IMRT plans to determine whether HybridArc offers a synergy through combination of these 2 techniques. Plans were compared with regard to target volume dose conformity, target volume dose homogeneity, sparing of proximal organs at risk, normal tissue sparing, and monitor unit (MU) efficiency. For cranial cases, HybridArc produced significantly improved dose conformity compared with both DCA and IMRT but did not improve sparing of the brainstem or optic chiasm. For prostate cases, conformity was improved compared with DCA but not IMRT. Compared with IMRT, the dose homogeneity in the planning target volume was improved, and the maximum doses received by the bladder and rectum were reduced. Both arc-based techniques distribute peripheral dose over larger volumes of normal tissue compared with IMRT, whereas HybridArc involved slightly greater volumes of normal tissues compared with DCA. Compared with IMRT, cranial cases required 38% more MUs, whereas for prostate cases, MUs were reduced by 7%. For cranial cases, HybridArc improves dose conformity to the target. For prostate cases, dose conformity and homogeneity are improved compared with DCA and IMRT, respectively. Compared with IMRT, whether required MUs increase or decrease with HybridArc was site-dependent.

  6. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stugis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, Gary B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Kies, Merill S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  7. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  8. The reversal of the rotational modulation rates of the north and south components of Saturn kilometric radiation near equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Groene, J. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Ye, S.-Y.; Kurth, W. S.; MacDowall, R. J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2010-12-01

    It has been known for many years that Saturn emits intense radio emissions at kilometer wavelengths and that this radiation is modulated by the rotation of the planet at a rate that varies slowly on time scales of years. Recently it has been shown that the radio emission consists of two components that have different rotational modulation rates, one emitted from the northern auroral region and the other emitted from the southern auroral region. In this paper we show using radio measurements from the Cassini spacecraft that the rotational modulation rates of the northern and southern components reversed near Saturn's recent equinox, which occurred on 11 August 2009. We show that a similar reversal was also observed by the Ulysses spacecraft near the previous equinox, which occurred on 19 November 1995. The solar control implied by these reversals has important implications on how Saturn's rotation is coupled into the magnetosphere.

  9. Electro-Optical Interference Laser Radiation Modulator (Elektroopticheskii Interfentsionnyi Modulyator Lazernogo Izlucheniya),

    Science.gov (United States)

    A modulator constructed on the basis of the Rozhdestvenskiy interferometer has been described. Characteristic static curves have been obtained in a... modulator working with one or two electro-optical crystals. A comparison of the interference and ordinary amplitude modulators has been given. (Author)

  10. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  11. Plan quality and delivery time comparisons between volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for scalp angiosarcoma: A planning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Yudai; Toya, Ryo; Saito, Tetsuo; Kuraoka, Akiko; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Maruyama, Masato; Murakami, Ryuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo

    2017-07-29

    Due to its spherical surface, scalp angiosarcoma requires careful consideration for radiation therapy planning and dose delivery. Herein, we investigated whether volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is superior to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of the plan quality and delivery time. Three different coplanar treatment plans were created for four patients, comprising a two-arc VMAT plan as well as 5-field and 9-field IMRT plans with 6 MV beams. The X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm was employed for dose calculation. A radiation therapy dose of 60 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. The homogeneity indexes (HIs) and conformity indexes (CIs) of the PTV, organs at risk (OARs) doses and delivery times were calculated and compared. For the VMAT, 5-field and 9-field IMRT plans, the mean HIs were 0.14, 0.16 and 0.15; CIs100% were 0.63, 0.61 and 0.64; CIs98% were 0.72, 0.66 and 0.70 and CIs95% were 0.74, 0.67 and 0.71 respectively. All mean dose parameters of the VMAT and 9-field IMRT plans for the brain were equal to or lower than those of the 5-field IMRT plan. For the 5-field IMRT plan, the dose constraints for the left lens were not satisfied in two patients. The mean delivery times were 3.3, 11.1 and 14.7 min for the VMAT, 5-field and 9-field IMRT plans respectively. The VMAT plan quality is comparable to that of 9-field IMRT, with a reduced delivery time. Therefore, VMAT represents a valuable, sophisticated irradiation technique for treating scalp angiosarcoma. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  12. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects.

  13. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  14. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Róisín M. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friis, Lone [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Siebold, Christian [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friese, Manuel A. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Falkenried 94, 20251 Hamburg (Germany); Fugger, Lars, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby Sygehus, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 N Aarhus (Denmark); Jones, E. Yvonne, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease.

  15. Insights into HLA-G genetics provided by worldwide haplotype diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick C Castelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human Leucocyte Antigen G (HLA-G belongs to the family of nonclassical HLA class I genes, located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. HLA-G has been the target of most recent research regarding the function of class I nonclassical genes. The main features that distinguish HLA-G from classical class I genes are: a limited protein variability; b alternative splicing generating several membrane bound and soluble isoforms; c short cytoplasmic tail; d modulation of immune response (immune tolerance; e restricted expression to certain tissues. In the present work, we describe the HLA-G gene structure and address the HLA-G variability and haplotype diversity among several populations around the world, considering each of its major segments (promoter, coding and 3’untranslated regions. For this purpose, we developed a pipeline to reevaluate the 1000Genomes data and recover miscalled or missing genotypes and haplotypes. It became clear that the overall structure of the HLA-G molecule has been maintained during the evolutionary process and that most of the variation sites found in the HLA-G coding region are either coding synonymous or intronic mutations. In addition, only a few frequent and divergent extended haplotypes are found when the promoter, coding and 3’ untranslated regions are evaluated together. The divergence is particularly evident for the regulatory regions. The population comparisons confirmed that most of the HLA-G variability has originated before human dispersion from Africa and that the allele and haplotype frequencies have probably been shaped by strong selective pressures.

  16. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extrempohile Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    cyanobacteria , lichens, alpine yeast, and tardigrades. 4.3 Knowns and Unknowns of Deinococcus Mn2+ Complexes It is worth reminding the reader...from radiation-induced damage and uncouple it from genome damage and organism killing. The Mn(2+) complex preserved antigenic structures in aqueous...PLoS ONE, 5(9), e12570. 10. K. S. Makarova, MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria

  17. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  18. Evaluation of parameters of oxidative stress after in vitro exposure to FMCW- and CDMA-modulated radiofrequency radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Graham J; Spitz, Douglas R; Sim, Julia E; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Baty, Jack D; Moros, Eduardo G; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency (RF) radiation is capable of inducing oxidative stress or affecting the response to oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells. The two types of RF radiation investigated were frequency-modulated continuous-wave with a carrier frequency of 835.62 MHz (FMCW) and code division multiple access centered on 847.74 MHz (CDMA). To evaluate the effect of RF radiation on oxidative stress, J774.16 mouse macrophage cells were stimulated with gamma-interferon (IFN) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to exposure. Cell cultures were exposed for 20-22 h to a specific absorption rate of 0.8 W/kg at a temperature of 37.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring oxidant levels, antioxidant levels, oxidative damage and nitric oxide production. Oxidation of thiols was measured by monitoring the accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Cellular antioxidant defenses were evaluated by measuring superoxide dismutase activity (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) as well as catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. The trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to measure any changes in viability. The results of these studies indicated that FMCW- and CDMA-modulated RF radiation did not alter parameters indicative of oxidative stress in J774.16 cells. FMCW- and CDMA-modulated fields did not alter the level of intracellular oxidants, accumulation of GSSG or induction of antioxidant defenses in IFN/LPS-stimulated cells. Consistent with the lack of an effect on oxidative stress parameters, no change in toxicity was observed in J774.16 cells after either optimal (with or without inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase) or suboptimal stimulation.

  19. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (pradio-frequency radiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  20. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey M; Handorf, Elizabeth A; Price, Robert A; Cherian, George; Buyyounouski, Mark K; Chen, David Y; Kutikov, Alexander; Johnson, Matthew E; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie; Horwitz, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  1. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  2. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in

  3. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  4. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

  5. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  6. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy reduces radiation-induced trismus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective study with >5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Jin; Ma, Hong-Lian; Lai, Shu-Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Han, Fei; Lu, Li-Xia; Bao, Yong; Chen, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) provides better temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sparing and, thus, may reduce the incidence of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate radiation-induced trismus in patients with NPC who had received IMRT and to assess the pretreatment factors, relevant treatment factors, and dosimetry parameters associated with trismus. A prospective, single-arm measurement study with more than 5 years of follow-up was designed. Patients with newly diagnosed stage I through IVB NPC who received treatment with IMRT were eligible. Patients received 66 to 70 grays (Gy) to the gross tumor volume. The maximal interincisal distance (MID) was measured at baseline and 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after they completed IMRT. The trial enrolled 211 consecutive patients from 2001 to 2004. The mean dose to the TMJ ranged from 6.18 Gy to 51.36 Gy (median dose, 29.88 Gy). Compared with baseline MID levels, normalized MID levels at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, and 5 years after IMRT were 94.6% ± 9.9%, 92.5% ± 10.5%, 92% ± 10.6%, 92.2% ± 10.5%, 92.1% ± 10.2%, and 90.3% ± 11.4%, respectively (P trismus was identified in 12 of 211 patients (5.7%), and no grade 3/4 trismus was observed. There was an increasing risk of trismus after IMRT when the MID was 40.5 mm (P = .007). No dosimetric parameter was associated with trismus. IMRT was able to reduce the radiation dose to the TMJ and likely reduced the incidence and severity of radiation-induced trismus after radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  7. HLA-G polymorphisms and HLA-G expression in sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, TVF; Milman, N; Hylenius, S;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The MHC class Ib molecule Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G may be important in induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance, and HLA-G expression may have a role in different cancers, in certain diseases with associations to HLA, and in organ transplantation. Sarcoidosis...... is a systemic granulomatous disease with unknown etiology but at the molecular level several studies have shown HLA associations. METHODS: In the present study, HLA-G alleles/polymorphisms were studied in sarcoidosis patients (n = 47) and controls (n = 129) by PCR techniques and HLA-G protein expression...

  8. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  9. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar Ad, Voichita, E-mail: voichita.bar-ad@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Haibo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dutta, Pinaki R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  10. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Lin, Haibo; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland; Dutta, Pinaki R; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  11. Failure Patterns After Hemithoracic Pleural Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Spratt, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zauderer, Marjorie G. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Adusumilli, Prasad; Rusch, Valerie W. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Krug, Lee M. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We previously reported our technique for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the entire pleura while attempting to spare the lung in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Herein, we report a detailed pattern-of-failure analysis in patients with MPM who were unresectable or underwent pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), uniformly treated with hemithoracic pleural IMRT. Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven patients with MPM were treated with definitive or adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT between November 2004 and May 2013. Pretreatment imaging, treatment plans, and posttreatment imaging were retrospectively reviewed to determine failure location(s). Failures were categorized as in-field (within the 90% isodose line), marginal (<90% and ≥50% isodose lines), out-of-field (outside the 50% isodose line), or distant. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months from diagnosis and the median time to in-field local failure from the end of RT was 10 months. Forty-three in-field local failures (64%) were found with a 1- and 2-year actuarial failure rate of 56% and 74%, respectively. For patients who underwent P/D versus those who received a partial pleurectomy or were deemed unresectable, the median time to in-field local failure was 14 months versus 6 months, respectively, with 1- and 2-year actuarial in-field local failure rates of 43% and 60% versus 66% and 83%, respectively (P=.03). There were 13 marginal failures (19%). Five of the marginal failures (38%) were located within the costomediastinal recess. Marginal failures decreased with increasing institutional experience (P=.04). Twenty-five patients (37%) had out-of-field failures. Distant failures occurred in 32 patients (48%). Conclusions: After hemithoracic pleural IMRT, local failure remains the dominant form of failure pattern. Patients treated with adjuvant hemithoracic pleural IMRT after P/D experience a significantly longer time to local and distant failure than

  12. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lee, Jeun-Shenn; Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV)63Gy as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV70Gy and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV70Gy coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Stage I seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas; Boudreau, Chantal; Doucet, Robert; Alizadeh, Moein; Lambert, Carole; Van Nguyen, Thu; Taussky, Daniel (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, CRCHUM - Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Hopital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada)), e-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

    2011-05-15

    Background. A direct association between radiotherapy dose, side-effects and secondary cancers has been described in patients with seminoma. A treatment planning study was performed in order to compare computed tomography-based traditional radiotherapy (CT-tRT) versus bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (BMS-IMRT) in patients with Stage I seminoma. Material and methods. We optimized in 10 patients a CT-tRT and a BMS-IMRT treatment plan to deliver 20 Gy to the para-aortic nodes. CT-tRT and IMRT consisted of anteroposterior-posterioranterior parallel-opposed and seven non-opposed coplanar fields using 16 and 6-MV photon energies, respectively. Dose-Volume Histograms for clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared for both techniques using Wilcoxon matched-pair signed rank-test. Results. Dmean to CTV and PTV were similar for both techniques, even if CT-tRT showed a slightly improved target coverage in terms of PTV-D95% (19.7 vs. 19.5 Gy, p 0.005) and PTV-V95% (100 vs. 99.7%, p = 0.011) compared to BMS-IMRT. BMS-IMRT resulted in a significant reduction (5.2 Gy, p = 0.005) in the Dmean to the active bone marrow (ABM). The V100% and V75% of the OARs were reduced with BMS-IMRT by: ABM-V100% = 51.7% and ABM-V75% = 42.3%; bowel-V100% = 15.7% and bowel-V75% = 16.8%; stomach-V100% = 22% and stomach-V75% = 27.7%; pancreas-V100% = 37.1% and pancreas-V75% = 35.9% (p = 0.005 for all variables). Conclusions. BMS-IMRT reduces markedly the dose to the OARs compared to CT-tRT. This should translate into a reduction in acute and long-term toxicity, as well as into the risk of secondary solid and hematological cancers

  14. Postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy in high risk prostate cancer: a dosimetric comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digesú, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D A; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  15. An immobilization system for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray R; Amdur, Robert J; Palta, Jatinder R

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization treatment system used for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Instead of the thermoplastic facemask, the Vac Fix (S & S Par Scientific, Odense, Denmark) mold is used for immobilization of claustrophobic patients at the University of Florida in head-and-neck IMRT. The immobilization procedure combines the use of commercial stereotactic infrared (IR) ExacTrac camera system (BrainLAB, Inc., Westchester, IL) for patient setup and monitoring. The Vac Fix mold is placed on the headrest and folded up as needed to provide support before the mold is hardened. For the camera system, a frame referred to as a "tattoo-free immobilization accessory" is fabricated, on which the IR markers can be placed. A patient-specific dental impression is made with the bite tray. The movement of the markers, connected through the dental impression of the patient, accurately represents the overall patient motion. Patient movement is continuously monitored and repositioning is performed whenever patient movement exceeds the predefined tolerance limit. Monitored patient movements are recorded at a certain frequency. Recorded data are analyzed and compared with those of patients immobilized with the thermoplastic facemask plus the camera system that is the standard immobilization system in our clinic. For three patients treated with the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system, on average, the histogram-based uncertainties, U(95)(5), U(95)(20), and mean displacement, R(mean) (mm) were 1.03, 1.08, and 0.60, respectively. These values are close to those obtained with the mask plus the camera system. The Vac Fix mold plus the camera system often requires more beam interruptions because of repositioning than the mask plus the camera system (on average, the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system required repositioning 7.7 times and the mask plus the camera system required repositioning 1.8 times during 20

  16. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mei-Chun [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jeun-Shenn [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Cheng-Ying, E-mail: cyshiau@vghtpe.gov.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV){sub 63} {sub Gy} as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC.

  17. Lateral loss and dose discrepancies of multileaf collimator segments in intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee W; Das, Indra J; Huq, M Saiful

    2003-11-01

    In the step-and-shoot technique delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), each static field consists of a number of beamlets, some of which may be very small. In this study, we measured the dose characteristics for a range of field sizes: 2 x 2 to 12 x 10 cm2 for 6 and 15 MV x rays. For a given field length, a number of treatment fields are set up by sequentially increasing the field width using a multi leaf collimator. A set of fields is delivered with the accelerator operated in the IMRT mode. Using an ion chamber, the output factors at 1 cm and 3 cm laterally from a field edge are measured at different depths in a solid water phantom. Our results show that with insufficient lateral distance in at least one direction, the absorbed dose never reaches the equilibrium values, and can be significantly lower for very small field sizes. For example, the output factor of the 2 x 2 cm2 field relative to 10 x 10 cm2 at d(max0 is 0.832 and 0.790 for 6 MV and 15 MV x rays, respectively. Multiple output factor curves are obtained for different field lengths and different buildup conditions. Thus under nonequilibrium conditions, output factors are critically dependent on the field size and the conventional method of determining the equivalent square does not apply. Comparison of output factors acquired in the commissioning of the accelerator with those measured in the present study under conditions of nonequilibrium shows large discrepancies between the two sets of measurements. Thus monitor units generated by a treatment planning system using beam data commissioned with symmetric fields may be underestimated by > 5%, depending on the size and shape of the segments. To facilitate manual MU calculation as an independent check in step-and-shoot IMRT, the concept of effective equivalent square (EES) is introduced. Using EES, output factors can be calculated using existing beam data for fields with asymmetric collimator settings and under conditions of lateral

  18. Factors influencing the incidence of sinusitis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan-xia; Liu, Lan-ping; Li, Lei; Li, Xu; Cao, Xiu-juan; Dong, Wei; Yang, Xin-hua; Xu, Jin; Yu, Shui; Hao, Jun-fang

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of sinusitis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients before and after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to analyze factors associated with the incidence of sinusitis following IMRT. We retrospectively analyzed 283 NPC patients who received IMRT in our hospital from March 2009 to May 2011. The diagnostic criteria for sinusitis are based on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. CT or MRI scans were performed before and after IMRT to evaluate the incidence of sinusitis. Factors influencing the incidence of sinusitis were analyzed by log-rank univariate and logistic multivariate analyses. Among the 283 NPC patients, 128 (45.2 %) suffered from sinusitis before radiotherapy. The incidence rates of sinusitis in patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 NPC before radiotherapy were 22.6, 37.5, 46.8, and 61.3 %, respectively (χ 2 = 14.548, p = 0.002). Among the 155 NPC patients without sinusitis before radiotherapy, the incidence rates of sinusitis at the end of radiotherapy and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy were 32.9, 43.2, 61.3, 68.4, 73.5, 69.7, and 61.3 %, respectively (χ 2 = 86.461, p sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT (p = 0.003, 0.006, 0.002, and 0.020). Multivariate analysis showed that T stage, invasion of the nasal cavity, and nasal irrigation were influential factors for the incidence of sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT (p = 0.002, 0.002, and 0.000). There was a higher incidence of sinusitis with higher T stage among NPC patients before radiotherapy, and the incidence of sinusitis in NPC patients after IMRT was high (45.2 %). The incidence of sinusitis increased rapidly within the first 3 months after IMRT, and the number of sinusitis cases peaked at 6-9 months after IMRT and showed a trend toward stabilization after 1 year. Advanced T stage, invasion of the nasal cavity, and nasal irrigation were positively associated with the incidence

  19. Particle swarm optimizer for weighting factor selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Liyuan; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Gui, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    In inverse treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the objective function is typically the sum of the weighted sub-scores, where the weights indicate the importance of the sub-scores. To obtain a high-quality treatment plan, the planner manually adjusts the objective weights using a trial-and-error procedure until an acceptable plan is reached. In this work, a new particle swarm optimization (PSO) method which can adjust the weighting factors automatically was investigated to overcome the requirement of manual adjustment, thereby reducing the workload of the human planner and contributing to the development of a fully automated planning process. The proposed optimization method consists of three steps. (i) First, a swarm of weighting factors (i.e., particles) is initialized randomly in the search space, where each particle corresponds to a global objective function. (ii) Then, a plan optimization solver is employed to obtain the optimal solution for each particle, and the values of the evaluation functions used to determine the particle's location and the population global location for the PSO are calculated based on these results. (iii) Next, the weighting factors are updated based on the particle's location and the population global location. Step (ii) is performed alternately with step (iii) until the termination condition is reached. In this method, the evaluation function is a combination of several key points on the dose volume histograms. Furthermore, a perturbation strategy - the crossover and mutation operator hybrid approach - is employed to enhance the population diversity, and two arguments are applied to the evaluation function to improve the flexibility of the algorithm. In this study, the proposed method was used to develop IMRT treatment plans involving five unequally spaced 6MV photon beams for 10 prostate cancer cases. The proposed optimization algorithm yielded high-quality plans for all of the cases, without human

  20. Three-dimensional conformal intensity-modulated radiation therapy of left femur foci does not damage the sciatic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanlong Xu; Xibin Zhao; Qing Wang; Jungang Sun; Jiangbo Xu; Wenzheng Zhou; Hao Wang; Shigui Yan; Hong Yuan

    2014-01-01

    During radiotherapy to kill femoral hydatid tapeworms, the sciatic nerve surrounding the focus can be easily damaged by the treatment. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the effects of ra-diotherapy on the surrounding nervous tissue. In the present study, we used three-dimensional, conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy to treat bilateral femoral hydatid disease in Meriones meridiani. The focus of the hydatid disease on the left femur was subjected to radio-therapy (40 Gy) for 14 days, and the right femur received sham irradiation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, electron microscopy, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling assays on the left femurs showed that the left sciatic nerve cell structure was normal, with no ob-vious apoptosis after radiation. Trypan blue staining demonstrated that the overall protoscolex structure in bone parasitized withEchinococcus granulosus disappeared in the left femur of the animals after treatment. The mortality of the protoscolex was higher in the left side than in the right side. The succinate dehydrogenase activity in the protoscolex in bone parasitized withEchi-nococcus granulosus was lower in the left femur than in the right femur. These results suggest that three-dimensional conformal intensity-modulated radiation therapy achieves good therapeutic effects on the secondary bone in hydatid disease inMeriones meridiani without damaging the morphology or function of the sciatic nerve.

  1. Differential modulation of a radiation-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma cells by pifithrin-α and wortmannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunlin; Zhang, Jianghong; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The implication of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) for both radiation protection and radiotherapy has attracted significant attention, but a key question is how to modulate the RIBE. The present study found that, when a fraction of glioblastoma cells in T98G population were individually targeted with precise helium particles through their nucleus, micronucleus (MN) were induced and its yield increased non-linearly with radiation dose. After co-culturing with irradiated cells, additional MN could be induced in the non-irradiated bystander cells and its yield was independent of irradiation dose, giving direct evidence of a RIBE. Further results showed that the RIBE could be eliminated by pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) but enhanced by wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor). Moreover, it was found that nitric oxide (NO) contributed to this RIBE, and the levels of NO of both irradiated cells and bystander cells could be extensively diminished by pifithrin-α but insignificantly reduced by wortmannin. Our results indicate that RIBE can be modulated by p53 and PI3K through a NO-dependent and NO-independent pathway, respectively.

  2. Variations in the Rotational Modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation and Their Relationship to Magnetic Periodicities Observed Before and Near Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Groene, J. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), which is an intense radio emission generated at high latitudes in Saturn's magnetosphere, displays a strong rotationally driven modulation at two rates, one characteristic of radiation from the northern auroral zone, and the other from the southern auroral zone. During the period from about 2007 to 2009, Cassini observations show that the rotation rates were about 816 and 780 deg/day, corresponding to rotational periods of about 10.6 and 10.8 hr. However, as Saturn approached equinox in August 2009, the two rotation rates began to converge, and have since crossed in early 2010. This interchange of the rotational modulation rates of SKR in the two hemispheres potentially provides an important clue as to how angular momentum is transferred from the interior of Saturn to the magnetosphere. Using these measurements a new longitude system has been developed, one for the northern hemisphere and one for the southern hemisphere (SLS4-N and SLS4-S). These longitude systems are used to investigate similar variations in the rotational modulation of Saturn's magnetic field and field-aligned currents.

  3. Multi-population classical HLA type imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dilthey

    Full Text Available Statistical imputation of classical HLA alleles in case-control studies has become established as a valuable tool for identifying and fine-mapping signals of disease association in the MHC. Imputation into diverse populations has, however, remained challenging, mainly because of the additional haplotypic heterogeneity introduced by combining reference panels of different sources. We present an HLA type imputation model, HLA*IMP:02, designed to operate on a multi-population reference panel. HLA*IMP:02 is based on a graphical representation of haplotype structure. We present a probabilistic algorithm to build such models for the HLA region, accommodating genotyping error, haplotypic heterogeneity and the need for maximum accuracy at the HLA loci, generalizing the work of Browning and Browning (2007 and Ron et al. (1998. HLA*IMP:02 achieves an average 4-digit imputation accuracy on diverse European panels of 97% (call rate 97%. On non-European samples, 2-digit performance is over 90% for most loci and ethnicities where data available. HLA*IMP:02 supports imputation of HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB3-5, is highly tolerant of missing data in the imputation panel and works on standard genotype data from popular genotyping chips. It is publicly available in source code and as a user-friendly web service framework.

  4. Comparison and evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for postoperative radiation therapy of prostate cancer patient using a rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae Youn; Seok, Jin Yong; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Choi, Byeong Don; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sangnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The dose distribution of organ at risk (OAR) and normal tissue is affected by treatment technique in postoperative radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to compare dose distribution characteristic and to evaluate treatment efficiency by devising VMAT plans according to applying differed number of arc and IMRT plan for postoperative patient of prostate cancer radiation therapy using a rectal balloon. Ten patients who received postoperative prostate radiation therapy in our hospital were compared. CT images of patients who inserted rectal balloon were acquired with 3 mm thickness and 10 MV energy of HD120MLC equipped Truebeam STx (Varian, Palo Alto, USA) was applied by using Eclipse (Version 11.0, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). 1 Arc, 2 Arc VMAT plans and 7-field IMRT plan were devised for each patient and same values were applied for dose volume constraint and plan normalization. To evaluate these plans, PTV coverage, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) were compared and R{sub 50%} was calculated to assess low dose spillage as per treatment plan. D{sub 50%} of rectum and bladder Dmean were compared on OAR. And to evaluate the treatment efficiency, total monitor units(MU) and delivery time were considered. Each assessed result was analyzed by average value of 10 patients. Additionally, portal dosimetry was carried out for accuracy verification of beam delivery. There was no significant difference on PTV coverage and HI among 3 plans. Especially CI and R{sub 50%} on 7F-IMRT were the highest as 1.230, 3.991 respectively(p=0.00). Rectum D{sub 50%} was similar between 1A-VMAT and 2A-VMAT. But approximately 7% higher value was observed on 7F-IMRT compare to the others(p=0.02) and bladder Dmean were similar among the all plan(P>0.05). Total MU were 494.7, 479.7, 757.9 respectively(P=0.00) for 1A-VMAT, 2A-VMAT, 7F-IMRT and at the most on 7F-IMRT. The delivery time were 65.2sec, 133.1sec, 145.5sec respectively(p=0.00). The obvious shortest

  5. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte [Carolinas Medical Center North East, Concord, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke' s Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Small, William [Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illionis (United States); Berk, Lawrence [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Gaffney, David [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  6. Completion of HLA protein sequences by automated homology-based nearest-neighbor extrapolation of HLA database sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K; Niemann, M; de Hoop, T; Spierings, E

    The IMGT/HLA database contains every publicly available HLA sequence. However, most of these HLA protein sequences are restricted to the alpha-1/alpha-2 domain for HLA class-I and alpha-1/beta-1 domain for HLA class-II. Nevertheless, also polymorphism outside these domains may play a role in

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. A feasibility study of advanced techniques with modulated photons and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Clerici, Elena; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano-Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland). Medical Physics Unit; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To compare advanced treatment techniques with photons and protons as a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal glands metastases. Materials and Methods: Planning computer tomographic (CT) scans of 10 patients were selected. A total dose of 45 Gy in 7.5 Gy fractions was prescribed. Organs at risk (OAR) were liver and kidneys. Dose-volume metrics were defined to quantify quality of plans assessing target coverage and sparing of organs at risk. Plans for RapidArc, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), dynamic conformal arcs, 3D conformal static fields, and intensity modulated protons were compared. The main planning objective for the clinical target volume (CTV) was to cover 100% of the volume with 95% (V{sub 95%} = 100%) and to keep the maximum dose below 107% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 107%} = 0%). Planning objective for planning target volume (PTV) was V{sub 95%} > 80%. For kidneys, the general planning objective was V{sub 15Gy} < 35% and for liver V{sub 15Gy} < (liver volume-700 cm{sup 3}). Results: All techniques achieved the minimum and maximum dose objective for CTV and PTV, D{sub 5-95%} ranged from 1 Gy (protons) to 1.6 Gy (conformal static fields) on CTV. Maximal organ at risk sparing was achieved by protons. RapidArc presented the second lowest dose bath (V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose) after protons and the best conformality together with IMRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to adrenal glands metastases is achievable with several advanced techniques with either photons or protons. The intensity modulated approaches using either static fields, dynamic arcs or protons are superior to the other conformal solutions. For their simplicity, IMRT or RapidArc should be considered as the first option radiation treatment for those patients not eligible for proton treatment. (orig.)

  8. A model-aided segmentation in urethra identification based on an atlas human autopsy image for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Muller, Boris; Burman, Chandra; Mychalczak, Borys; Song, Yulin

    2007-01-01

    In order to protect urethra in radiation therapy of prostate cancer, the urethra must be identified and localized as an organ at risk (OAR) for the inverse treatment planning in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Because the prostatic urethra and its surrounding prostate tissue have similar physical characteristics, such as linear attenuation coefficient and density, it is difficult to distinct the OAR from the target in CT images. To localize the urethra without using contrast agent or additional imaging modalities other than planning CT images, a different approach was developed using a standard atlas of human anatomy image. This paper reports an investigation, in which an adult urethra was modeled based on a human anatomic image. An elastic model was build to account for a uniform tissue deformation of the prostate. This model was then applied to patients to localize their urethras and preliminary results are presented.

  9. Comparison of a new noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique for craniospinal irradiation with 3 coplanar techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders T; Lukacova, Slavka; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.;

    2015-01-01

    patient using the noncoplanar IMRT-based technique, a coplanar IMRT-based technique, and a coplanar volumetric-modulated arch therapy (VMAT) technique. Dosimetry data for all patients were compared with the corresponding data from the conventional treatment plans. The new noncoplanar IMRT technique......When standard conformal x-ray technique for craniospinal irradiation is used, it is a challenge to achieve satisfactory dose coverage of the target including the area of the cribriform plate, while sparing organs at risk. We present a new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), noncoplanar...... technique, for delivering irradiation to the cranial part and compare it with 3 other techniques and previously published results. A total of 13 patients who had previously received craniospinal irradiation with standard conformal x-ray technique were reviewed. New treatment plans were generated for each...

  10. Recognition of HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 by KIR3DL2 is peptide-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansasuta, Pokrath; Dong, Tao; Thananchai, Hathairat; Weekes, Michael; Willberg, Christian; Aldemir, Hatice; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Braud, Veronique M

    2004-06-01

    The recognition of MHC class I molecules by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) is central to the control of NK cell function and can also modulate the CTL activation threshold. Among KIR receptors, KIR3DL2 is thought to interact with HLA-A3 and -A11, although direct evidence has been lacking. In this study, we show that HLA-A3 and -A11 tetramers specifically bind to KIR3DL2*001 transfectants and that this recognition is peptide-specific. Single amino acid substitutions in the nonamer peptide underline a critical role for residue 8 in recognition of KIR3DL2. However, the role of this interaction in vivo still remains to be established.

  11. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HLA-A, HLA-B AND HLA-DR COMPATIBILITY ON THE RENAL ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    OpenAIRE

    V. Y. Abramov; Y. G. Moysyuk; N. N. Kaluzhina; N. B. Bogdanova; V. V. Morozova; N. V. Apanasenko

    2012-01-01

    We studied the long-term results of 532 deceased donor kidney transplantations to investigate the impact of HLA match on the survival of renal allograft. All transplants were performed in our center in 1996–2009 and moni- tored prospectively for 1–14 years. We found, the survival of 58 kidneys grafted with 0–2 mismatch for HLA- ABDR to be significantly better (Plogrank = 0,016) than the survival of the kidneys grafted with 3–6 HLA-ABDR mismatch. The full compatibility for HLA-A (n = 75) did n...

  12. First Experiences in Intensity Modulated Radiation Surgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery: A Dosimetric Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.; Celis-López, Miguel A.

    2003-09-01

    The National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City has acquired a Novalis® shaped beam radiosurgery unit. The institute is pioneer in the use of new technologies for neuroscience. The Novalis® unit allows the use of conformal beam radiosurgery/therapy and the more advanced modality of conformal therapy: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). In the present work we present the first cases of treatments that use the IMRT technique and show its ability to protect organs at risk, such as brainstem and optical vias.

  13. The impact of pediatric-specific dose modulation curves on radiation dose and image quality in head computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joana; Paulo, Graciano [Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, ESTESC, DMIR, Coimbra (Portugal); Foley, Shane; Rainford, Louise [University College Dublin, School of Medicine and Medical Science, Health Science Centre, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEntee, Mark F. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumberland Campus, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    The volume of CT examinations has increased with resultant increases in collective dose values over the last decade. To analyze the impact of the tube current and voltage modulation for dose values and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations. Head CT examinations were performed on anthropomorphic phantoms and four pediatric age categories before and after the introduction of dedicated pediatric curves for tube voltage and current modulation. Local diagnostic reference levels were calculated. Visual grading characteristic image quality evaluation was performed by four pediatric neuroradiologists and image noise comparisons were performed. Pediatric-specific modulation curves demonstrated a 49% decrease in mean radiation dose for phantom examinations. The local diagnostic reference levels (CTDIvol) for clinical examinations decreased by 52%, 41%, 46% and 40% for newborn, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, respectively. Visual grading characteristic image quality was maintained for the majority of age categorizations (area under the curve = 0.5) and image noise measurements did not change (P = 0.693). Pediatric-specific dose modulation curves resulted in an overall mean dose reduction of 45% with no significant differences in subjective or objective image quality findings. (orig.)

  14. Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Evidence in magnetic field phase data for rotational modulation of Saturn kilometric radiation emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. J.; Cecconi, B.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lamy, L.; Provan, G.; Zarka, P.

    2011-09-01

    Initial Voyager observations of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) indicated that the modulations in emitted power near the ˜11 h planetary rotation period are “strobe like,” varying with a phase independent of observer position, while subsequent Cassini studies of related oscillations in the magnetospheric magnetic field and plasma parameters have shown that these rotate around the planet with a period close to the SKR period. However, analysis of magnetic oscillation data over the interval 2004-2010 reveals the presence of variable secular drifts between the phases of the dominant southern period magnetic oscillations and SKR modulations, which become very marked after Cassini apoapsis moved for the first time into the postdusk sector in mid-2009. Here we use a simple theoretical model to show that such phase drifts arise if the SKR modulation phase also rotates around the auroral oval, combined with a highly restricted view of the SKR sources by the spacecraft due to the conical beaming of the emissions. Strobe-like behavior then occurs in the predawn-to-noon sector where the spacecraft has a near-continuous view of the most intense midmorning SKR sources, in agreement with the Voyager findings, while elsewhere the SKR modulation phase depends strongly on spacecraft local time, being in approximate antiphase with the midmorning sources in the postdusk sector. Supporting evidence for this scenario is provided through an independent determination of the variable rotation period of the southern magnetic field perturbations throughout the 6 year interval.

  15. Intensity modulated radiation therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for the treatment of high grade glioma: a dosimetric comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon M; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Kachris, Stefanos; Vogds, Betty J; DeRouen, Melissa; Gittleman, Alicia E; DeWyngaert, Keith; Vlachaki, Maria T

    2007-04-19

    The present study compared the dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) techniques in patients treated for high-grade glioma. A total of 20 patients underwent computed tomography treatment planning in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Prescription dose and normal-tissue constraints were identical for the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. The prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy delivered at 1.8 Gy per fraction using 4-10 MV photons. Normal-tissue dose constraints were 50-54 Gy for the optic chiasm and nerves, and 55-60 Gy for the brainstem. The IMRT plan yielded superior target coverage as compared with the 3D-CRT plan. Specifically, minimum and mean planning target volume cone down doses were 54.52 Gy and 61.74 Gy for IMRT and 50.56 Gy and 60.06 Gy for 3D-CRT (p < or = 0.01). The IMRT plan reduced the percent volume of brainstem receiving a dose greater than 45 Gy by 31% (p = 0.004) and the percent volume of brain receiving a dose greater than 18 Gy, 24 Gy, and 45 Gy by 10% (p = 0.059), 14% (p = 0.015), and 40% (p < or = 0.0001) respectively. With IMRT, the percent volume of optic chiasm receiving more than 45 Gy was also reduced by 30.40% (p = 0.047). As compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT significantly increased the tumor control probability (p < or = 0.005) and lowered the normal-tissue complication probability for brain and brainstem (p < 0.033). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy improved target coverage and reduced radiation dose to the brain, brainstem, and optic chiasm. With the availability of new cancer imaging tools and more effective systemic agents, IMRT may be used to intensify tumor doses while minimizing toxicity, therefore potentially improving outcomes in patients with high-grade glioma.

  16. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva: Treatment technique and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan James Rao, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: IMRT for vulvar cancer is associated with high rates of LRC in the postoperative setting and limited radiation-related toxicity. Durable LRC of disease after definitive IMRT remains challenging, and several refinements to our treatment technique are suggested.

  17. Species ecological similarity modulates the importance of colonization history for adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiaqi; Yang, Xian; Jiang, Lin

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive radiation is an important evolutionary process, through which a single ancestral lineage rapidly gives rise to multiple newly formed lineages that specialize in different niches. In the first-arrival hypothesis, David Lack emphasized the importance of species colonization history for adaptive radiation, suggesting that the earlier arrival of a diversifying species would allow it to radiate to a greater extent. Here, we report on the first rigorous experimental test of this hypothesis, using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and six different bacterial competitors. We show that the earlier arrival of P. fluorescens facilitated its diversification. Nevertheless, significant effects of colonization history, which led to alternative diversification trajectories, were observed only when the competitors shared similar niche and competitive fitness with P. fluorescens. These results highlight the important role of species colonization history, modified by their ecological differences, for adaptive radiation. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Advanced Nongray Radiation Module in the LOCI Framework for Combustion CFD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiative heat fluxes are important in the design of launch vehicles for Project Constellation. In this Phase II STTR, CFDRC and its partner Mississippi State...

  19. Simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Chang-Min [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 53 patients with inoperable HCC underwent SIB-IMRT using two dose-fractionation schemes, depending on the proximity of gastrointestinal structures. The 41 patients in the low dose-fractionation (LD) group, with internal target volume (ITV) < 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 55 and 44 Gy in 22 fractions to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 2 (PTV2), respectively. The 12 patients in the high dose-fractionation (HD) group, with ITV ≥ 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 66 and 55 Gy in 22 fractions to the PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no grade > 3 toxicity. The LD group had larger sized tumors (median: 6 vs. 3.4 cm) and greater frequencies of vascular invasion (80.6 vs. 16.7 %) than patients in the HD group (p < 0.05 each). The median overall survival (OS) was 25.1 months and the actuarial 2-year local progression-free survival (LPFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and OS rates were 67.3, 14.7, and 54.7 %, respectively. The HD group tended to show better tumor response (100 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.039) and 2-year LPFS (85.7 vs. 59 %, p = 0.119), RFS (38.1 vs. 7.3 %, p = 0.063), and OS (83.3 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.037) rates than the LD group. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor response was significantly associated with OS. SIB-IMRT is feasible and safe for patients with inoperable HCC. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die klinische Wirksamkeit und die Sicherheit der intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie mit simultanem integriertem Boost (SIB-IMRT) fuer Patienten mit einem inoperablen hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC) zu evaluieren. Bei 53 Patienten mit inoperablem HCC wurden zwei unterschiedliche Dosierungskonzepte je nach Lagebeziehung des

  20. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  1. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV{sub P}), right pelvic (PTV{sub RtLN}) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV{sub LtLN}), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV{sub RtLN}, and PTV{sub LtLN} received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV{sub B} of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D{sub MEAN}) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D{sub MEAN} of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D{sub MEAN} in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  2. Modulation of apoptosis by the combinatiom gamma radiation with medicinal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kug Chan; Kim, In Gyu; Shim, Hye Won

    2005-02-15

    Our work has demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum plus Duchesnea chrysantha extracts (GDE), which have been used traditionally for the prevention and treatment of various diseases in Korea, induce the apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells. In the present study we examine the possibility to improve therapeutic radiosensitivity by the treatment of GDE. We found that GDE enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of ionizing radiation in HL-60 cells. This combination resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation, suggesting that the induction of apoptosis by this combination occurs through the mitochondrial pathway. Furthermore we show that GDE have multiple divergent effects on cell cycle dynamics. In particular, GDE functions not only as a CDK inhibitor causing G1 arrest, it can also abrogate the G2 checkpoint after irradiation. We also observed an increased expression of p21/WAF1 and senescence-associated-β-gal staining when treated with GDE and radiation, indicating that GDE-treated HL-60 cells in combination with radiation become senescent and concurrently lose their clonogenecity. Our data suggest that treatment with GDE and radiation in combination may be quite effective in radiation-induced apoptosis and overall radiation-induced cell killing. These findings are clinically relevant and represent a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing the efficacy and decreasing side effects of radiotherapy.

  3. A Markov decision process approach to temporal modulation of dose fractions in radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; Ghate, A; Phillips, M H

    2009-07-21

    The current state of the art in cancer treatment by radiation optimizes beam intensity spatially such that tumors receive high dose radiation whereas damage to nearby healthy tissues is minimized. It is common practice to deliver the radiation over several weeks, where the daily dose is a small constant fraction of the total planned. Such a 'fractionation schedule' is based on traditional models of radiobiological response where normal tissue cells possess the ability to repair sublethal damage done by radiation. This capability is significantly less prominent in tumors. Recent advances in quantitative functional imaging and biological markers are providing new opportunities to measure patient response to radiation over the treatment course. This opens the door for designing fractionation schedules that take into account the patient's cumulative response to radiation up to a particular treatment day in determining the fraction on that day. We propose a novel approach that, for the first time, mathematically explores the benefits of such fractionation schemes. This is achieved by building a stylistic Markov decision process (MDP) model, which incorporates some key features of the problem through intuitive choices of state and action spaces, as well as transition probability and reward functions. The structure of optimal policies for this MDP model is explored through several simple numerical examples.

  4. HLA Typing for the Next Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema P Mayor

    Full Text Available Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance.

  5. [The HLA system and habitual abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek-Rosenmayr, A

    1990-01-01

    HLA-antigens are extremely polymorphic. A calculation of the polymorphism shows a number of 398.476.343 possible HLA-phenotypes, if HLA-A, -B, -C and -DR antigens are taken into account. The compatibility of HLA-antigens of recipient and donor plays a crucial role in transplantation: HLA-antigens are the traits, which are recognized by the immune system of the recipient in the frame of a rejection of the transplant or by the donor in the frame of a graft-versus-host reaction. Large international statistics show that HLA-incompatibility between recipient and donor leads to short transplant function periods, while compatibility brings about good transplant function. Therefore, matching of HLA-antigens plays an important role in transplantation of solid organs, mainly kidneys (3, 4, 5), and is completely necessary in bone marrow transplantation. Also in pregnancy, HLA-antigens are important: If HLA compatibility between mother and child is high, the risk for habitual abortion is higher than in normal pregnancies (6, 7).

  6. Importance of contouring the cervical spine levels in initial intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiation for head and neck cancers: Implications for re-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar Bhupesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the maximum differential cervical spinal (C-spine cord dose in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans of patients undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: The C-spine of ten head and neck cancer patients that were planned using IMRT and each cervical vertebral body and the right and left sides was contoured by splitting the cord in the center. Dose-volume histograms (DVH and maximum point doses were obtained for each contour and compared. Results: The dose to the cord varied with the location of the primary tumor but such variation was not consistently seen. This report provides information that is critical for planning reirradiation treatments. We recommend that contouring of the C-spine cord with IMRT should include outlining of each cervical cord level and identification of the right and the left sides of the cord on each plan.

  7. HLA-DRB genotype and specific IgE responses in patients with allergies to penicillins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Because of the pivotal role of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules in regulating the immune response and their extensive polymorphism, it is not surprising that particular HLA class II alleles have been implicated in susceptibility to allergic diseases and in restriction of the IgE responses to a variety of allergens. We investigated the relationship between HLA-DRB genotype and allergies to various penicillins and explored HLA-DRB restriction of IgE responses to these derivatives of penicillin.Methods Radioallergosorbent test was used to examine 8 kinds of specific IgE antibodies (4 major and 4 minor antigenic determinants) in the sera of 248 patients with an allergy to penicillins and 101 healthy subjects without any allergic reaction. Some (113 patients and 87 healthy control subjects) were chosen from all subjects to type for HLA-DRB alleles by sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction.Results Compared with control subjects, a significantly increased frequency of DR9 was present in 77 patients with allergic reactions, with immediate hypersensitive reaction and with urticaria (P = 0.011; P = 0.019; P = 0.005 respectively). Conversely, a significantly decreased frequency of DR14.1 was found in 80 patients with positive IgE antibodies, with immediate reaction and with urticaria compared with control group (P = 0.024; P = 0.038; P = 0.038). A possible excess of HLA-DR17 was found in subjects who were responsive to benzylpenicilloyl compared with those were not (χ2 = 5.134, P = 0.023), and of HLA-DR4 was found in subjects responsive to phenoxomethylpenicillanyl (PVA, χ2 = 4.057, P = 0.044).Conclusion HLA-DRB gene may be involved in allergy to penicillins through modulating specific serum IgE to penicillins.

  8. Which T Category of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma May Benefit Most from Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared with Step and Shoot Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-Jing; Tang, Ling-Long; Yu, Xiao-Li; Chen, Mo; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with conventional step and shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (s-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients, and identify which T category patient gains the maximum benefit from VMAT. Methods Fifty-two patients that randomly selected from 205 patients received VMAT at a single center were retrospectively replanned with s-IMRT. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV) coverage of the 2 plans was normalized to the same level. A standard planning constraint set was used; the constraints for the organs at risk (OARs) were individually adapted. The calculated doses to the PTV and OARs were compared for s-IMRT and VMAT plans generated using the Monaco treatment planning system. Results VMAT and s-IMRT plans had similar PTV coverage and OAR sparing within all T categories. However, in stratified analysis, VMAT plans lead to better or similar sparing of the OARs in early T category patients; and lead to poorer sparing of the OARs in advanced T category patients (Pdelivery time per fraction for VMAT (424±64 s) was shorter than s-IMRT (778 ± 126 s, pdelivery time. PMID:24086503

  9. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within 20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HLA-G allelic variants are associated with differences in the HLA-G mRNA isoform profile and HLA-G mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Hylenius, Sine; Rørbye, Christina

    2003-01-01

    between mother and fetus in several ways. Finally, the expression of membrane-bound HLA-G and soluble HLA-G has been proposed to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and an aberrant HLA-G expression in pre-eclamptic placentas and spontaneous abortions has been reported. Here, an association between certain...... HLA-G polymorphisms and the mRNA levels of the different alternatively spliced HLA-G isoforms in first trimester trophoblast cell populations is reported. Several alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA isoforms, including a 14-bp polymorphism in the 3'UTR end (exon 8) of the HLA-G gene, are expressed...

  11. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 allele diversity and its extended haplotypes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A

    2017-02-01

    This study shows, for the first time, high-resolution allele frequencies of HLA-DQA1 loci in Madeira Island (Portugal) and allows us to better understand and refine present knowledge on DQB1 variation, with the identification of several alleles not previously reported in this population. Estimates on haplotype profile, involving HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1, are also reported. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HLA-A, HLA-B AND HLA-DR COMPATIBILITY ON THE RENAL ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Abramov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the long-term results of 532 deceased donor kidney transplantations to investigate the impact of HLA match on the survival of renal allograft. All transplants were performed in our center in 1996–2009 and moni- tored prospectively for 1–14 years. We found, the survival of 58 kidneys grafted with 0–2 mismatch for HLA- ABDR to be significantly better (Plogrank = 0,016 than the survival of the kidneys grafted with 3–6 HLA-ABDR mismatch. The full compatibility for HLA-A (n = 75 did not influence the long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,48. The absence of HLA-DR mismatch had a beneficial effect for survival of 68 kidneys (Plogrank = 0,07. Eighteen cases with the full HLA-B compatibility between graft and recipient demonstrated excellent long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,007. HLA-B compatibility influenced significantly (P = 0,042 the survival of transplanted kidney in the Cox regression model adjusted for donor and recipient age, panel-reactive antibody level, re-transplant, and immunosuppression protocol. The data obtained support the conclusion, that HLA compatibility should be one of the criteria of deceased donor kidney allocation. 

  13. Lab-on-a-chip enabled HLA diagnostic: combined sample preparation and real time PCR for HLA-B57 diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The diverse human HLA (human leukocyte antigen) system is responsible for antigen presentation and recognition. It is essential for the immune system to maintain a stable defense line, but also is also involved in autoimmunity as well as metabolic disease. HLA-haplotype (HLA-B27), for instance, is associated with inflammatory diseases such as Bechterew's disease. The administration of the HIV drug Abacavir in combination with another HLA-haplotype (HLAB57) is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. Accordingly, the HLA status has to be monitored for diagnosis or prior to start of therapy. Along this line, a miniaturized microfluidic platform has been developed allowing performing the complete analytical process from "sample-in" to "answer-out" in a point-of-care environment. The main steps of the analytical cascade inside the integrated system are blood cell lysis and DNA isolation, DNA purification, real-time PCR and quantitative monitoring of the rise of a fluorescent signal appearing during the PCR based sequence amplification. All bio-analytical steps were intended to be performed inside one chip and will be actuated, controlled and monitored by a matching device. This report will show that all required processes are established and tested and all device components work well and interact with the functional modules on the chips in a harmonized fashion.

  14. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Racquel E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheets, Nathan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wheeler, Stephanie B. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nutting, Chris [Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kindom (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Division of Clinical Studies, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  15. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  16. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  17. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced biochemical changes in cerebrum of Swiss albino mice by Grewia Asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Ahaskar, Muktika; Sharma, K V; Singh, Smita

    2008-01-01

    The present study evaluates the possible radioprotective effect of Grewia asiatica fruit (rich in anthocyanin, carotenes, vitamin C, etc.) pulp extract (GAE) on cerebrum of Swiss albino mice exposed to 5 Gy gamma radiation. For this, healthy mice from an inbred colony were divided into four groups: (1) Control (vehicle treated) (2) GAE treated - mice in this group were orally supplemented with GAE (700 m/kg. b.w./day) once daily for fifteen consecutive days, (3) Vehicle treated irradiated mice, and (4) GAE + Irradiated - Mice in this group received distilled water orally equivalent to GAE (700 m/kg. b.w/day) for fifteen days consecutively. Mice were sacrificed at various intervals viz. 1-30 days. Radiation-induced augmentation in the levels of lipid peroxidation of mice cerebrum was significantly ameliorated by GAE pretreatment. Radiation-induced depletion in the level of glutathione and protein was prevented significantly by GAE administration.

  19. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States); Rao, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Heguy, Adriana [Department of Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shen, Ronglai [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Haque, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katabi, Nora [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  20. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII.Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  1. Effect of intensiti modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fu Zhou; Qian Sun; Ya-Jun Zhang; Geng-Ming Wang; Bin He; Tao Qi; An Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of the intensity modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer.Methods:A total of 82 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were divided into observation group and control group according to the random number table method. Patients in the control group received conventional radiotherapy while observation group received intensity modulated radiotherapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimization method. The treatment effects, survival times, blood vessel-related factors, blood coagulation function and the levels of inflammatory factors and so on were compared between the two groups of patients.Results:The effective rate of the observation group after treatment was higher than that of the control group. Progression free survival and median overall survival times were longer than those of patients in the control group (P<0.05). The serum VEGF and HIF-αα levels as well as D-D, TT, PT, APTT and FIB levels were lower in observation group patients after treatment than those in the control group(P<0.05). At the same time point, serum TNF-αα, CRP and PCT levels in the observation group after treatment were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Serum M2-PK, CA125, CEA and SCC values of patients in the observation group after treatment were all significantly lower than those in the control group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:Intensity modulated radiation therapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimized method can improve the treatment effect, prolong the survival time, optimize micro inflammatory environment and inhibit tumor biological behavior at the same time.

  2. Modulation of Mortality by Tissue Trauma and Sepsis in Mice after Radiation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    States, and Chernobyl, U.S.S.R.) and from abandoned medical radiation devices (Juarez, Mexico, and Goiania , Brazil). Th ;nceased risk to human health as...well as the loss of life in Chernobyl and Goiania have had sobering influences upon the world. 202 92-19333 92 o J1 I l ~l ,,TIIII,1 .\\hodtatlon Of...exposed to radiation in the accident at Goiania (Brandao-Mello et al. 1991, Butturini et al. 1988). Several patients responded to GM-CSF with

  3. State of dose prescription and compliance to international standard (ICRU-83) in intensity modulated radiation therapy among academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra J; Andersen, Aaron; Chen, Zhe Jay; Dimofte, Andrea; Glatstein, Eli; Hoisak, Jeremy; Huang, Long; Langer, Mark P; Lee, Choonik; Pacella, Matthew; Popple, Richard A; Rice, Roger; Smilowitz, Jennifer; Sponseller, Patricia; Zhu, Timothy

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose prescription and recording compliance to international standard (International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements [ICRU]-83) in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) among academic institutions. Ten institutions participated in this study to collect IMRT data to evaluate compliance to ICRU-83. Under institutional review board clearance, data from 5094 patients-including treatment site, technique, planner, physician, prescribed dose, target volume, monitor units, planning system, and dose calculation algorithm-were collected anonymously. The dose-volume histogram of each patient, as well as dose points, doses delivered to 100% (D100), 98% (D98), 95% (D95), 50% (D50), and 2% (D2), of sites was collected and sent to a central location for analysis. Homogeneity index (HI) as a measure of the steepness of target and is a measure of the shape of the dose-volume histogram was calculated for every patient and analyzed. In general, ICRU recommendations for naming the target, reporting dose prescription, and achieving desired levels of dose to target were relatively poor. The nomenclature for the target in the dose prescription had large variations, having every permutation of name and number contrary to ICRU recommendations. There was statistically significant variability in D95, D50, and HI among institutions, tumor site, and technique with P values < .01. Nearly 95% of patients had D50 higher than 100% (103.5 ± 6.9) of prescribed dose and varied among institutions. On the other hand, D95 was close to 100% (97.1 ± 9.4) of prescribed dose. Liver and lung sites had a higher D50 compared with other sites. Pelvic sites had a lower variability indicated by HI (0.13 ± 1.21). Variability in D50 is 101.2 ± 8.5, 103.4 ± 6.8, 103.4 ± 8.2, and 109.5 ± 11.5 for IMRT, tomotherapy, volume modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiation therapy with IMRT, respectively. Nearly 95% of

  4. Intensity modulated radiation therapy: Analysis of patient specific quality control results, experience of Rene-Gauducheau Centre; Radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite: analyse des resultats des controles precliniques, experience du centre Rene-Gauducheau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavassa, S.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire, S.; Munos-Llagostera, C.; Delpon, G.; Lisbona, A. [Service de physique medicale, centre Rene-Gauducheau, CLCC Nantes Atlantique, site hospitalier Nord, boulevard Jacques-Monod, 44805 Nantes Saint-Herblain cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose. - Systematic verifications of patient's specific intensity-modulated radiation treatments are usually performed with absolute and relative measurements. The results constitute a database which allows the identification of potential systematic errors. Material and methods. - We analyzed 1270 beams distributed in 232 treatment plans. Step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation treatments were performed with a Clinac (6 and 23 MV) and sliding window intensity-modulated radiation treatments with a Novalis (6 MV). Results. - The distributions obtained do not show systematic error and all the control meet specified tolerances. Conclusion. - These results allow us to reduce controls specific patients for treatments performed under identical conditions (location, optimization and segmentation parameters of treatment planning system, etc.). (authors)

  5. Long-term results of forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients with early-stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Boram; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Ji Hae; Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Rena; Moon, Byung In [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To observe long-term clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), including local control and clinical toxicities. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 214 patients with stage I-II breast cancer who were treated with breast conserving surgery followed by adjuvant breast radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. All patients were treated using forward IMRT. The whole breast was irradiated to a dose of 50 to 50.4 Gy followed by an 8 to 12 Gy electron boost to the surgical bed. The median age was 46 years (range, 21 to 82 years) and the medial follow-up time was 7.3 years (range, 2.4 to 11.7 years). Stage T1 was 139 (65%) and T2 was 75 (35%), respectively. Ipsilateral breast recurrence was observed in 3 patients. The 5- and 10-year local control rates were 99.1% and 97.8%, respectively. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated according to the Harvard scale and 89.4% of patients were scored as excellent or good. The whole breast radiation therapy as an adjuvant treatment using a forward IMRT technique showed excellent long-term local control as well as favorable outcomes of toxicity and cosmesis.

  6. Ototoxicity evaluation in medulloblastoma patients treated with involved field boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): a retrospective review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Ototoxicity is a known side effect of combined radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The delivery of an involved field boost by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may reduce the dose to the inner ear when compared with conventional radiotherapy. The dose of cisplatin may also affect the risk of ototoxicity. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the impact of involved field boost using IMRT and cisplatin dose on the rate of ototoxicity. Methods Data from 41 medulloblastoma patients treated with IMRT were collected. Overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method Hearing function was graded according to toxicity criteria of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG). Doses to inner ear and total cisplatin dose were correlated with hearing function by univariate and multivariate data analysis. Results After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range: 14 to 72 months), 37 patients remained alive, with two recurrences, both in spine with CSF involvement, resulting in a disease free-survival and overall survival of 85.2% and 90.2%, respectively. Seven patients (17%) experienced POG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Cisplatin dose was a significant factor for hearing loss in univariate analysis (p ototoxicity. Median radiation dose to auditory apparatus should be kept below 42 Gy. Cisplatin doses should not exceed 375 mg/m2. PMID:25041714

  7. Studies for the LHCb SciFi tracker. Development of modules from scintillating fibres and tests of their radiation hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelhof, Robert Jan

    2016-05-18

    The LHCb detector will see a major upgrade in the LHC long shutdown 2, which is planned for 2019/20. Among others, the tracking stations, currently realised as silicon strip and drift tube detectors, will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker is based on scintillating fibres with a diameter of 250 μm, read out by multichannel silicon photomultipliers. The two major challenges related to the fibres are the radiation damage of the light guidance and the production of precise multi-layer fibre mats. This thesis presents radiation hardness studies performed with protons at the tandem accelerator at Forschungszentrum Garching and in situ in the LHCb cavern. The obtained results are combined with additional data of the LHCb SciFi group and two different wavelength dependent models of the radiation induced attenuation are determined. These are used to simulate the relative light yield, for both models it drops to 83% on average at the end of the nominal lifetime of the SciFi Tracker. A machine and techniques to produce multi-layer fibre mats were developed and optimised. Procedures for the production and alignment are described. These are implemented in the serial production of the SciFi modules which will start in the second quarter 2016.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer: is it ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tabitha Y; Tan, Poh Wee; Tang, Johann I

    2017-01-01

    Whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBEBRT) is commonly used as an essential arm in the treatment management of women with early-stage breast cancer. Dosimetry planning for conventional WBEBRT typically involves a pair of tangential fields. Advancement in radiation technology and techniques has the potential to improve treatment outcomes with clinically meaningful long-term benefits. However, this advancement must be balanced with safety and improved efficacy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced technique that shows promise in improving the planning process and radiation delivery. Early data on utilizing IMRT for WBEBRT demonstrate more homogenous dose distribution with reduction in organs at risk doses. This translates to toxicities reduction. The two common descriptors for IMRT are forward-planning “fields in field” and inverse planning. Unlike IMRT for other organs, the aim of IMRT for breast planning is to achieve dose homogeneity and not organ conformality. The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether IMRT is ready for prime time based on these three points: 1) workload impact, 2) the clinical impact on the patient’s quality of life, and 3) the appropriateness and applicability to clinical practice.

  9. Induction of HLA-G expression in a melanoma cell line OCM-1A following the treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua YAN; Ai Fen LIN; Chien Chung CHANG; Soldano FERRONE

    2005-01-01

    The non-classical HLA class I antigen HLA-G is an immune modulator which inhibits the functions of T cells,NK cells,and the Dendritic cells (DC).As a result,HLA-G expression in malignant cells may provide them with a mechanism to escape the immune surveillance.In melanoma,HLA-G antigen expression has been found in 30% of surgically removed lesions but in less than 1% of established cell lines.One possible mechanism underlying the differential HLAG expression in vivo and in vitro is that the HLA-G gene is epigenetically repressed in melanoma cells in vitro.To test this hypothesis,we treated the HLA-G negative melanoma cell line OCM-1A with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AC) and analyzed whether HLA-G expression can be restored.Our data strongly suggest that HLA-G is silenced as a result of CpG hypermethylation within a 5' regulatory region encompassing 220 bp upstream of the start codon.After treatment,HLA-G mRNA expression was dramatically increased.Western blot and flow cytometry showed that HLA-G protein was induced.Interestingly,HLA-G cell surface expression on the 5-AC treated OCM-1A cells is much less than that on the HLA-G positive JEG-3 cells while a similar amount of total HLA-G was observed.Possible mechanisms for the difference were analyzed in the study such as cell cold-treatment,peptide loading and antigen processing machinery components (APM) as well as β2 microglobulin (β2-m) expression.Data revealed that the APM component calreticulin might be involved in the lower HLA-G surface expression on OCM-1A cells.Taken together,our results indicated that DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism by which HLA-G antigen expression is modulated in melanoma cells in vitro. Furthermore,to the first time, we hypothesized that the deficiency of calreticulin might be involved in the low HLA-G surface expression on the 5-AC treated OCM-lA cells.

  10. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation; Caracterisation et modulation pharmacologique de l'inflammation intestinale induite par les rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremy, O

    2006-12-15

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  11. FMC-based Neutron and Gamma Radiation Monitoring Module for xTCA Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kozak, T; Napieralski, A

    2012-01-01

    The machines used in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, such as accelerators or tokamaks, are sources of gamma and neutron radiation fields. The radiation has a negative influence on electronics and can lead to the incorrect functioning of complex control and diagnostic system designed for HEP machines. Therefore, in most cases the electronic equipments is installed in radiation-safe areas, but in some cases this rule is omitted to decrease costs of the project. The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL), being under construction at DESY research center, is a good example. The E-XFEL uses single tunnel and part of the electronic system will be installed next to main beam pipe and exposed to radiation. The modern Advanced/Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA/μTCA) standards are foreseen as a base for control and diagnostic system for this new project. These flexible standards provide high reliability, availability and usability for the system which can be decreased by negative influe...

  12. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  13. [HLA and myasthenia. Subdivision in 3 categories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchidiac, A; Lepage, V; Berrih, S; Colombani, J; Degos, L

    1985-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility (HLA types), clinical and pathological findings, amount of acetylcholine receptor antibodies and T lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 63 patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG). The frequency of HLA-DR5 was increased among patients (0.50 versus 0.23 in controls, pc less than 0.01, relative risk 3.3) and that of HLA-DR3 previously described as associated with MG was slightly increased (0.31 versus 0.20 in controls). The relative frequencies of two T cell subpopulations (T4 helper and T8 suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes) were normal in HLA-DR5 positive patients while the ratio T4/T8 was increased in other MG patients, who were HLA-DR3 (p less than 0.005). The high rate was due to an increase in the absolute number of T4 lymphocytes (p less than 0.001). HLA-DR3 patients were mostly women with early onset of a severe form of the disease, marked by the presence of thymic follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. A third genetic susceptibility to this disease was recently described in patients treated with D-penicillamine, the antigenic frequency of HLA-Bw35, DR1 is significantly increased. These 3 types of association between HLA and myasthenia gravis can be related to three different physiopathological mechanisms: the first two are probably linked to individual immunity (inductor/suppressor disequilibrium), in the third association, the mechanism is immunopharmacological.

  14. Soluble HLA-G expression and renal graft acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, J; Terasaki, P I; Miller, J; Mizutani, K; Cai, J; Carosella, E D

    2006-09-01

    HLA-G is a potentially interesting molecule associated with immunosuppressive function. We survey here the presence of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in serial serum samples of renal transplants. A total of 330 sera of from 65 patients were tested for sHLA-G with ELISA. IgG/IgM antibodies to HLA, and MICA antibodies were also previously tested. After serial analysis of the 65 patients' 330 sera, 50% of 26 patients in functioning group had consistent sHLA-G expression or became positive, in comparison to 20.5% among 39 patients who rejected their transplants (p=0.013). Thus sHLA-G was associated with functioning transplants. Eighty percent (77 of 96) of the HLA IgG positive sera had no sHLA-G expression, while 81.4% (83 of 102) of the HLA-G(+) sera had no HLA IgG (p=0.005), which showed a negative association between sHLA-G and the presence of HLA IgG antibodies (which was previously been shown to be associated with failure). In this preliminary survey, sHLA-G was found in the serum of about 30% of renal transplant patients. sHLA-G had a negative association with allograft failure from chronic rejection, and a negative relationship with the production of HLA IgG antibodies. The significance of sHLA-G in renal transplants remains to be determined.

  15. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted.

  16. The modulating impact of illumination and background radiation on 8 Hz-induced infrasound effect on physicochemical properties of physiolagical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Naira; Mikayelyan, Yerazik; Barseghyan, Sedrak; Dadasyan, Erna; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2012-12-01

    At present, when the level of background ionizing radiation is increasing in a number of world locations, the problem of the study of biological effect of high background radiation becomes one of the extremely important global problems in modern life sciences. The modern research in biophysics proved that water is a most essential target, through which the biological effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations are realized. Therefore, there is no doubt about the strong dependency of non-ionizing radiation-induced effect on the level of background radiation. Findings have shown that illumination and background radiation have a strong modulation effect on infrasound-induced impacts on water physicochemical properties, which could also have appropriate effect on living organisms.

  17. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves

  18. The clinical potential of high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron beams optimized by simulated annealing for conformal radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Bill Jean, Jr.

    Purpose. The advent of new, so called IVth Generation, external beam radiation therapy treatment machines (e.g. Scanditronix' MM50 Racetrack Microtron) has raised the question of how the capabilities of these new machines might be exploited to produce extremely conformal dose distributions. Such machines possess the ability to produce electron energies as high as 50 MeV and, due to their scanned beam delivery of electron treatments, to modulate intensity and even energy, within a broad field. Materials and methods. Two patients with 'challenging' tumor geometries were selected from the patient archives of the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC), in San Antonio Texas. The treatment scheme that was tested allowed for twelve, energy and intensity modulated beams, equi-spaced about the patient-only intensity was modulated for the photon treatment. The elementary beams, incident from any of the twelve allowed directions, were assumed parallel, and the elementary electron beams were modeled by elementary beam data. The optimal arrangement of elementary beam energies and/or intensities was optimized by Szu-Hartley Fast Simulated Annealing Optimization. Optimized treatment plans were determined for each patient using both the high energy, intensity and energy modulated electron (HIEME) modality, and the 6 MV photon modality. The 'quality' of rival plans were scored using three different, popular objective functions which included Root Mean Square (RMS), Maximize Dose Subject to Dose and Volume Limitations (MDVL - Morrill et. al.), and Probability of Uncomplicated Tumor Control (PUTC) methods. The scores of the two optimized treatments (i.e. HIEME and intensity modulated photons) were compared to the score of the conventional plan with which the patient was actually treated. Results. The first patient evaluated presented a deeply located target volume, partially surrounding the spinal cord. A healthy right kidney was immediately adjacent to the tumor volume, separated

  19. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  20. Further considerations of cosmic ray modulation of infra-red radiation in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding effects of ionisation in the lower atmosphere is a new interdisciplinary area, crossing traditionally distinct scientific boundaries. Following the paper of Erlykin et al. (Astropart. Phys. 57--58 (2014) 26--29) we develop the interpretation of observed changes in long-wave (LW) radiation (Aplin and Lockwood, Env. Res. Letts. 8, 015026 (2013)), by taking account of cosmic ray ionisation yields and atmospheric radiative transfer. To demonstrate this, we show that the thermal structure of the whole atmosphere needs to be considered along with the vertical profile of ionisation. Allowing for ionisation by all components of a cosmic ray shower and not just by the muons, reveals that the effect we have detected is certainly not inconsistent with laboratory observations of the LW absorption cross section. The analysis presented here, although very different from that of Erlykin et al., does come to the same conclusion that the events detected were not caused by individual cosmic ray primaries -- not b...

  1. The Quality Control of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for ONCOR Siemens Linear Accelerators Using Film Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Jabbari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT has made a significant progress in radiation therapy centers in recent years. In this method, each radiation beam is divided into many subfields that create a field with a modulated intensity. Considering the complexity of this method, the quality control for IMRT is a topic of interest for researchers. This article is about the various steps of planning and quality control of Siemens linear accelerators for IMRT, using film dosimetry. This article in addition to review of the techniques, discusses the details of experiments and possible sources of errors which are not mentioned in the protocols and other references. Materials and Methods This project was carried out in Isfahan Milad hospital which has two Siemens ONCOR linear accelerators. Both accelerators are equipped with Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC which enables us to perform IMRT delivery in the step-and-shoot method. The quality control consists of various experiments related to the sections of radiation therapy. In these experiments, the accuracy of some components such as treatment planning system, imaging device (CT, MLC, control system of accelerator, and stability of the output are evaluated. The dose verification is performed using film dosimetry method. The films were KODAK-EDR2, which were calibrated before the experiments. One of the important steps is the comparison of the calculated dose with planning system and the measured dose in experiments. Results The results of the experiments in various steps have been acceptable according to the standard protocols. The calibration of MLC and evaluation of the leakage through the leaves of MLC was performed by using the film dosimetry and visual check. In comparison with calculated and measured dose, more that 80% of the points have to be in agreement within 3% of the value. In our experiments, between 85 and 90% of the points had such an agreement with IMRT delivery. Conclusion

  2. Annexin A2 Modulates Radiation-Sensitive Transcriptional Programming and Cell Fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Stenoien, David L.; Sowa, Marianne B.; von Neubeck, Claere; Chrisler, William B.; Tan, Ruimin; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable public interest in the health effects of low doses of radiation (LDR) that fall below the doses that can be plausibly investigated in epidemiological studies. At these low doses, experimental models can detect perturbations in signaling pathways and use this information to define functional consequences of LDR exposures prospectively. In this study, we show increased nuclear annexin A2 (AnxA2) levels in human skin organotypic culture and murine progenitor cell model systems following exposure to X-radiation (10-200 cGy). LDR (2-20 cGy) inhibits cell transformation responses following epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) exposures, indicating LDR may have a protective component mediated in part by nuclear localization of AnxA2. Oncogenic protein kinase C epsilon (PKC) levels are increased in nuclear extracts from AnxA2 silenced [shRNA] cells, suggesting that AnxA2 may contribute to PKC nuclear export, perhaps reducing oncogenic potential. Coordinately, silencing AnxA2 results in a sensitive phenotype and cells grow constitutively in soft agar. Using global microarray analysis, we show that silencing AnxA2 fundamentally alters transcriptional programming, changing the radioresponsive transcriptome and revealing biological processes that are induced in the absence of AnxA2. These observations suggest that AnxA2 plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of cellular and tissue response to ionizing radiation, and deficiency of AnxA2 could result in a permissive environment for radiation-induced health effects.

  3. Acousto-optic modulation and deflection of terahertz electromagnetic radiation in nonpolar liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P. A.; Voloshinov, V. B.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Knyazev, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The results of a series of experiments on controlled deflection of electromagnetic radiation of a free-electron laser upon diffraction by an acoustic wave in nonpolar liquids are presented. Acoustic and optical properties of liquids that are transparent in the terahertz range are discussed. It is demonstrated that nonpolar liquids may turn out to be a more efficient acousto-optic interaction medium than dielectric crystals or semiconductors.

  4. Comparative dosimetry of volumetric modulated arc therapy and limited-angle static intensity-modulated radiation therapy for early-stage larynx cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegel, Adam C.; Antone, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore–LIJ Health System, New Hyde, Park, NY (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore–LIJ Health System, New Hyde, Park, NY (United States); Hofstra–NSLIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY (United States)

    2013-04-01

    To compare relative carotid and normal tissue sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage larynx cancer. Seven treatment plans were retrospectively created on 2 commercial treatment planning systems for 11 consecutive patients with T1-2N0 larynx cancer. Conventional plans consisted of opposed-wedged fields. IMRT planning used an anterior 3-field beam arrangement. Two VMAT plans were created, a full 360° arc and an anterior 180° arc. Given planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% total volume at 95% of 6300 cGy and maximum spinal cord dose below 2500 cGy, mean carotid artery dose was pushed as low as possible for each plan. Deliverability was assessed by comparing measured and planned planar dose with the gamma (γ) index. Full-arc planning provided the most effective carotid sparing but yielded the highest mean normal tissue dose (where normal tissue was defined as all soft tissue minus PTV). Static IMRT produced next-best carotid sparing with lower normal tissue dose. The anterior half-arc produced the highest carotid artery dose, in some cases comparable with conventional opposed fields. On the whole, carotid sparing was inversely related to normal tissue dose sparing. Mean γ indexes were much less than 1, consistent with accurate delivery of planned treatment. Full-arc VMAT yields greater carotid sparing than half-arc VMAT. Limited-angle IMRT remains a reasonable alternative to full-arc VMAT, given its ability to mediate the competing demands of carotid and normal tissue dose constraints. The respective clinical significance of carotid and normal tissue sparing will require prospective evaluation.

  5. Which T category of nasopharyngeal carcinoma may benefit most from volumetric modulated arc therapy compared with step and shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT with conventional step and shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (s-IMRT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients, and identify which T category patient gains the maximum benefit from VMAT. METHODS: Fifty-two patients that randomly selected from 205 patients received VMAT at a single center were retrospectively replanned with s-IMRT. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV coverage of the 2 plans was normalized to the same level. A standard planning constraint set was used; the constraints for the organs at risk (OARs were individually adapted. The calculated doses to the PTV and OARs were compared for s-IMRT and VMAT plans generated using the Monaco treatment planning system. RESULTS: VMAT and s-IMRT plans had similar PTV coverage and OAR sparing within all T categories. However, in stratified analysis, VMAT plans lead to better or similar sparing of the OARs in early T category patients; and lead to poorer sparing of the OARs in advanced T category patients (P<0.05. VMAT shows significant advantages for low dose burden (P<0.05 compared with s-IMRT. The delivery time per fraction for VMAT (424±64 s was shorter than s-IMRT (778 ± 126 s, p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: VMAT provides similar dose coverage of the PTVs and similar/better normal tissue sparing in early T category NPC, and poorer OARs sparing in advanced T category NPC. And VMAT shows significant advantages for low dose burden and delivery time.

  6. SmartArc-based volumetric modulated arc therapy for endometrial cancer: a dosimetric comparison with helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S) to achieve radiation delivery efficiency higher than that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) when treating endometrial cancer, while maintaining plan quality. Methods Nine patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively studied. Three plans per patient were generated for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT. The dose distributions for the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Results The average homogeneity index was 1.06, 1.10 and 1.07 for the VMAT-S, IMRT and HT plans, respectively. The V40 for the rectum, bladder and pelvis bone decreased by 9.0%, 3.0% and 3.0%, respectively, in the VMAT-S plan relative to the IMRT plan. The target coverage and sparing of OARs were comparable between the VMAT-S and HT plans. The average MU was 823, 1105 and 8403 for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT, respectively; the average delivery time was 2.6, 8.6 and 9.5 minutes, respectively. Conclusions For endometrial cancer, the VMAT-S plan provided comparable quality with significantly shorter delivery time and fewer MUs than with the IMRT and HT plans. In addition, more homogeneous PTV coverage and superior sparing of OARs in the medium to high dose region were observed in the VMAT-S relative to the IMRT plan. PMID:24175929

  7. A comparison of treatment plan quality between Tri-Co-60 intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Choi, Chang Heon

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the plan quality of tri-Co-60 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for cervical cancer. A total of 20 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy for cervical cancer were selected. For each patient, a tri-Co-60 IMRT plan for which the target volume was the planning target volume (PTV) generated by adding 1mm isotropic margins from the clinical target volume (CTV) and a VMAT plan for which the target volume was the PTV generated by adding 7mm and 10mm margins from the CTV were generated. The tri-Co-60 IMRT plans were generated with the ViewRay™ system while the VMAT plans were generated with 15-MV photon beams from a linear accelerator (prescription dose=50.4Gy in 28 fractions). The average volumes of the PTVs and CTVs were 704.9cc±87.8cc and 271.6cc±51.6cc, respectively. No noticeable differences in the dose-volumetric parameters for the target volumes were observed between the tri-Co-60 IMRT and VMAT plans. The values of V40Gy for the small bowel and rectal wall, V45Gy of the bladder, and V35Gy of the femoral heads for the VMAT plans were 14.6%±7.8%, 54.4%±4.2%, 30.0%±4.7%, and 8.9%±3.3%, respectively. Those of the tri-Co-60 IMRT plans were 2.8%±2.1%, 23.0%±8.9%, 17.1%±6.1%, and 0.3%±0.4%, respectively. Owing to the target margin reduction capability, the tri-Co-60 IMRT plans were more favorable than the VMAT plans for cervical cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Embryotoxic effect of gamma radiation in mice and their modulation by vitamins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, P.K.; Singh, N.; Gajawat, S.; Pareek, T.K.; Dev, P.K. [Rajasthan Univ., Jaipur (India). Dept. of Zoology

    1999-07-01

    Ionizing radiations severely interfere with normal embryonic or fetal development, although period of late fetal development in mammals is considered to be the somewhat radioresistant. Here, an attempt is made to check the radiation induced developmental anomalies by vitamins during fetal development period. For this purpose, pregnant Swiss albino mice were exposed to 0.50 Gy gamma radiation during fetal growth period (day 14.25 post-coitus) in the presence (experimental) or absence (control) of vitamin B complex (20 mg/kg b.w.) till term. All dams were sacrificed on day 18 post-coitus and their uteri were examined to study reproductive status and anatomical abnormalities of each conceptus. About 48% pregnant females of the control group showed a complete embryonic resorption while in the experimental group the number of females showing resorption was only 33%. Resorption of embryos, fetal mortality and reduction in placental weight were significantly increased in mice irradiated in the absence of vitamin B complex. Various gross malformations including skeletal anomalies were significantly reduced in 18 days old fetuses given vitamin B complex therapy. Further, such fetuses had better ossification of skull and vertebrae. Sex-ratio of the fetuses, however, remained unaltered in both groups as compared to normal. (orig.)

  9. Study on the Optimization Algorithms for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Radiotherapy, together with the surgery and chemotherapy, are the three main means for tumor treatment. It is a historic advancement for tumor treatment that the classical three-dimensional (3D)conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) evolved into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Whereas,the advantages of IMRT have not yet been fully utilized, because of the complicated clinical conditions.The IMRT planning, one of the key issues of IMRT application, still has many problems open to be further studied.

  10. HLA expression and HLA type associations in relation to EBV status in Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Luke B; Veenstra, Rianne N; Loo, Eric Y; Hwang, Amie E; Siddiqi, Imran N; Visser, Lydia; Hepkema, Bouke G; Nolte, Ilja M; van den Berg, Anke; Cozen, Wendy; Diepstra, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    A proportion of classical Hodgkin lymphomas harbor the Epstein Barr virus (EBV). We previously demonstrated that associations between Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to EBV+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma differ between European and Chinese populations. Data on Hispanic populations is missing. Here we examined the association between HLA type, tumor cell HLA expression and other characteristics in Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Hispanic Hodgkin lymphoma patients diagnosed at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center from 2000-2012 were included (n = 65). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was analyzed for EBV by in situ hybridization and for HLA class I and class II expression by immunohistochemistry. HLA typing was performed by HLA-A specific quantitative PCR of genomic DNA from tissue. Thirty patients (46%) had EBV+ tumors. Expression of HLA class I (p = 0.0006) was significantly associated with EBV+ tumor status in Hispanic patients, similar to Europeans and Chinese. A positive association between HLA class II expression and EBV+ tumor status, as present in large studies in Europeans, was not found (p = 0.06). The prevalences of the specific European HLA-A*01 risk and European HLA-A*02 protective types were not significantly associated with EBV+ tumors among these Hispanic patients, however numbers were too low to draw firm conclusions. The HLA-A*02:07 allele, that is associated with EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma in Chinese, was absent. In conclusion, the association between EBV positivity in tumor cells and HLA class I expression appears to be consistent across different populations. Larger studies in Hispanics are needed to evaluate HLA allele susceptibility associations.

  11. A fast algorithm for solving a linear feasibility problem with application to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Gabor T; Chen, Wei

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is to deliver sufficient doses to tumors to kill them, but without causing irreparable damage to critical organs. This requirement can be formulated as a linear feasibility problem. The sequential (i.e., iteratively treating the constraints one after another in a cyclic fashion) algorithm ART3 is known to find a solution to such problems in a finite number of steps, provided that the feasible region is full dimensional. We present a faster algorithm called ART3+. The idea of ART3+ is to avoid unnecessary checks on constraints that are likely to be satisfied. The superior performance of the new algorithm is demonstrated by mathematical experiments inspired by the IMRT application.

  12. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  13. A novel schedule of accelerated partial breast radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in elderly patients: survival and toxicity analysis of a prospective clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayan, Mutlay; Nelson, Carl; Gagne, Havaleh; Rubin, Deborah; Heimann, Ruth [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington (United States); Wilson, Karen [University of Vermont Cancer Center, Burlington (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Several accelerated partial breast radiation (APBR) techniques have been investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer (BC); however, the optimal treatment delivery techniques remain unclear. We evaluated the feasibility and toxicity of APBR delivered using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in elderly patients with stage I BC, using a novel fractionation schedule. Forty-two patients aged ≥65 years, with stage I BC who underwent breast conserving surgery were enrolled in a phase I/II study evaluating APBR using IMRT. Forty eligible patients received 40 Gy in 4 Gy daily fractions. Patients were assessed for treatment related toxicities, and cosmesis, before APBR, during, and after completion of the treatment. The median age was 73 years, median tumor size 0.8 cm and the median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year locoregional control was 97.5% and overall survival 90%. Erythema and skin pigmentation was the most common acute adverse event, reported by 27 patients (69%). Twenty-six patients (65%) reported mild pain, rated 1-4/10. This improved at last follow-up to only 2 (15%). Overall the patient and physician reported worst late toxicities were lower than the baseline and at last follow-up, patients and physicians rated cosmesis as excellent/good in 93% and 86 %, respectively. In this prospective trial, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control with daily APBR. The acceptable toxicity profile and cosmetic results of this study support the use of IMRT planned APBR with daily schedule in elderly patients with early stage BC.

  14. [HL-A antigens in dust allergy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seignalet, J; Levallois, C; Lapinski, H; Jean, R

    1976-12-01

    The distribution of 29 HLA antigens has been compared in 60 unrelated children presenting a dust allergy and in 300 healthy controls. We observed an increased frequency for HLA-Aw19 and HLA-B5 in patients. Yet, the differences are not very significant and there is probably no association between one HLA gene and the dust allergy.

  15. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  16. Complementarity of binding motifs is a general property of HLA-A and HLA-B molecules and does not seem to effect HLA haplotype composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu eRao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Different HLA haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP. We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and –B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favouring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  17. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for anal carcinoma; Radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite des cancers de l'anus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffert, D.; Moreau-Claeys, M.V.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Alexis-Vautrin, 6, avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Anal canal carcinoma are highly curable by irradiation, combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced disease, with preservation of sphincter function. The clinical target volume for the nodes is extended, often including the inguinal nodes, which is not usual for other pelvic tumours. Acute and late effects are correlated with the volume and dose delivered to organs at risk, i. e. small bowel, bladder and increased by concomitant chemotherapy. Intensity modulated irradiation (IMRT) makes it possible to optimize the dose distribution in this 'complex U shaped' volume, while maintaining the dose distribution for the target volumes. The conversion from conformal irradiation to IMRT necessitates good knowledge of the definition and skills to delineate target volumes and organs at risk, including new volumes needed to optimize the dose distribution. Dosimetric and clinical benefits of IMRT are described, based on early descriptions and evidence-based publication. The growing development of IMRT in anal canal radiotherapy must be encouraged, and long-term benefits should be soon published. Radiation oncologists should precisely learn IMRT recommendations before starting the technique, and evaluate its early and late results for adverse effects, but also for long-term tumour control. (authors)

  19. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ling-ling; FENG Lin-chun; WANG Yun-lai; DAI Xiang-kun; XIE Chuan-bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique.It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT.Methods There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd),and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs <30%,V50 to the heart <50%, and V55 to the esophagus <50%. Both plans were evaluated by means of the dose coverage of the targets, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and other dosimetric indices.Results The dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the targets' volumes were found to be satisfactory in both plans, but the homogeneity of the HT plan was better than that of IMRT. The high-dose radiation volume (V20-V30) to the lung and the mean lung dose (MLD) decreased (P<0.05), but the low-dose radiation volume (V5-V10) increased slightly in the HT plan (P>0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant.Conclusions The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protectiqn for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  20. Intensity Modulated Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer Guided by High Field MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    for radiation treatment planning. Med Phys 2003;30:88–97. 9. Vedam SS, Keall PJ, Kini VR, Mostafavi H, Shukla HP, Mohan R. Acquiring a four-dimensional...G.; Shukla , H.; et al. Acquiring 4D thoracic CT scans using a multislice helical method. Phys. Med. Biol. 49:2053–67; 2004. 66. Low. D.A.; Nystrom...Phys 1983;10:410–5. 18. Schultheiss TE, Orton CG. Models in radiotherapy : definition of decision criteria. Med Phys 1985;12:183–7. 19. Martel MK

  1. SU-F-P-26: Study of Radiation Dose Evaluation for Organs at Risk Using MRI in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the contour and dosimetric feature of organs at risk (OARs) applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: 35 NPC patients was selected into this trail. CT simulation with non-contrast and contrast enhanced scan, MRI simulation with non-contrast and contrast enhanced T1, T2 and diffusion weighted imaging were achieved sequentially. And the OARs were contoured on the CT and MRI images after rigid registration respectively. 9 beams IMRT plan with equal division angle were designed for every patients, and the prescription dose for tumor target was set as 72Gy (2.4Gy/ fration). The boundary display, volume and dose-volume indices of each organ were compared between on MRI and CT images. Results: Compared to CT, MRI showed clearer boundary of brainstem, spinal cord, the deep lobe of Parotid gland and the optical nerve in canal. MRI images increase the volume of lens, optical nerve, while reducing the volume of eye slightly, and the maximum dose of lens, the mean dose of eyes and optical raised in different percentage, while there was no statistical differences were found. The left and right parotid volume on MRI increased by 7.07%, 8.13%, and the mean dose raised by 14.95% (4.01Gy), 18.76% (4.95Gy) with statistical significant difference (p<0.05). The brainstem volume reduced by 9.33% (p<0.05), and the dose of 0.1cm3 volume (D0.1cm3) reduced by mean 8.46% (4.32Gy), and D0.1cm3 of spinal cord increased by 1.5Gy on MRI. Conclusion: It is credible to evaluate the radiation dose of lens, eye and the spinal cord, while it should be necessary to evaluate the dose of brainstem, parotid and the optical nerve applying MRI images sometime, it will be more meaningful for these organs with high risk of radiation injury.

  2. Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Madden, Jennifer R. [Department of Neuro-Oncology, The Children' s Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Wilkening, Greta N. [Department of Pediatrics, The Children' s Hospital, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Liu, Arthur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

  3. Potential for improved intelligence quotient using volumetric modulated arc therapy compared with conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation for whole-ventricular radiation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X Sharon; Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion; Madden, Jennifer R; Wilkening, Greta N; Liu, Arthur K

    2012-12-01

    To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and evaluation of a phantom for multi-purpose dosimetry in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joo Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Yih [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kum, O Yeon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    A LEGO-type multi-purpose dosimetry phantom was developed for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), which requires various types of challenging dosimetry. Polystyrene, polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and polyurethane foam (PU-F) were selected to represent muscle, fat, bone, and lung tissue, respectively, after considering the relevant mass densities, elemental compositions, effective atomic numbers, and photon interaction coefficients. The phantom, which is composed of numerous small pieces that are similar to LEGO blocks, provides dose and dose distribution measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous media. The phantom includes dosimeter holders for several types of dosimeters that are frequently used in IMRT dosimetry. An ion chamber and a diode detector were used to test dosimetry in heterogeneous media under radiation fields of various sizes. The data that were measured using these dosimeters were in disagreement when the field sizes were smaller than 1.5 x 1.5 cm{sup 2} for polystyrene and PTFE, or smaller than 3 x 3 cm{sup 2} for an air cavity. The discrepancy was as large as 41% for the air cavity when the field size was 0.7 x 0.7 cm{sup 2}, highlighting one of the challenges of IMRT small field dosimetry. The LEGO-type phantom is also very useful for two-dimensional dosimetry analysis, which elucidates the electronic dis-equilibrium phenomena on or near the heterogeneity boundaries

  5. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy use for the localized treatment of thyroid cancer: Nationwide practice patterns and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Paolo; Robinson, Timothy J; Youngwirth, Linda M; Roman, Sanziana A; Sosa, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of randomized data, the optimal approach to adjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced thyroid cancer remains unclear. We employed a large retrospective analysis to assess the best available evidence of a potential beneficial impact of intensity-modulated versus 3D-conformal radiotherapy (IMRT vs. 3D-CT). Retrospective analysis of adult thyroid cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2011 within the National Cancer Database. Among patients treated with radiation therapy (N = 855), the use of IMRT (N = 437) increased among both comprehensive and academic centers (both p HR, 0.67; 95 % CI, 0.40-1.10; p = 0.115). This study presents the largest cohort to date examining receipt of IMRT in patients with locally advanced thyroid cancer and demonstrates an association between IMRT, treatment at a tertiary care center, higher total dose, and comparable or superior outcomes compared to patients treated with 3D conformal techniques despite more adverse disease features. In the absence of adequately powered prospective randomized trials, our retrospective analysis provides empirical evidence to support the use in these patients of dose escalation and IMRT, particularly at tertiary care centers.

  6. Rapid modulation of ultraviolet shielding in plants is influenced by solar ultraviolet radiation and linked to alterations in flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul W; Tobler, Mark A; Keefover-Ring, Ken; Flint, Stephan D; Barkley, Anne E; Ryel, Ronald J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) and the resultant decrease in epidermal UV transmittance (TUV ) are primary protective mechanisms employed by plants against potentially damaging solar UV radiation and are critical components of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing solar UV environments. Whether plants can adjust this UV sunscreen protection in response to rapid changes in UV, as occurs on a diurnal basis, is largely unexplored. Here, we use a combination of approaches to demonstrate that plants can modulate their UV-screening properties within minutes to hours, and these changes are driven, in part, by UV radiation. For the cultivated species Abelmoschus esculentus, large (30-50%) and reversible changes in TUV occurred on a diurnal basis, and these adjustments were associated with changes in the concentrations of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds and several quercetin glycosides. Similar results were found for two other species (Vicia faba and Solanum lycopersicum), but no such changes were detected in Zea mays. These findings reveal a much more dynamic UV-protection mechanism than previously recognized, raise important questions concerning the costs and benefits of UV-protection strategies in plants and have practical implications for employing UV to enhance crop vigor and quality in controlled environments.

  7. Optimal matching of 3D film-measured and planned doses for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is one of the most complex applications of radiotherapy that requires patient-specific quality assurance (QA). Here, we describe a novel method of 3-dimensional (3D) dose-verification using 12 acrylic slabs in a 3D phantom (30 x 30 x 12 cm(3)) with extended dose rate (EDR2) films, which is both faster than conventionally used methods, and clinically useful. With custom-written software modules written in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Application, the measured and planned dose distributions for the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were superimposed by matching their origins, and the point doses were compared at all matched positions. Then, an optimization algorithm was used to correct the detected setup errors. The results show that this optimization method significantly reduces the average maximum dose difference by 7.73% and the number of points showing dose differences of more than 5% by 8.82% relative to the dose differences without an optimization. Our results indicate that the dose difference was significantly decreased with optimization and this optimization method is statistically reliable and effective. The results of 3D optimization are discussed in terms of various patient-specific QA data obtained from statistical analyses.

  8. Low-frequency modulations in the solar microwave radiation as a possible indicator of inductive interaction of coronal magnetic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Kislyakov, A. G.; Rucker, H. O.; Urpo, S.

    2005-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) modulations of 37GHz microwave radiation during solar flares, recorded at the Metsähovi Radio Observatory, are considered. A fast Fourier transformation with a sliding window is used to obtain the dynamic spectra of the LF pulsations. We pay attention to the LFdynamic spectra having a specific multi-track structure, which is supposed to be an indication of a complex multi-loop composition of a flaring region. Application of the equivalent electric circuit models of the loops including the effects of electromagnetic inductive interaction in groups of slowly growing current-carrying magnetic loops allows us to explain and reproduce the main dynamical features of the observed LF modulation dynamic spectra. Each loop is considered as an equivalent electric circuit with variable parameters (resistance, capacitance and inductive coefficients) which depend on shape, scale, position of the loop with respect to other loops, as well as on the plasma parameters and value of the total longitudinal current in the magnetic tube.

  9. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqing; Nie, Lili; Yu, K N; Wu, Lijun; Kong, Peizhong; Bao, Lingzhi; Chen, Guodong; Yang, Haoran; Han, Wei

    2016-12-08

    During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2), at a relatively low concentration (20 µM), effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and micronucleus (MN). In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2) of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2) with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1), MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  10. Low Concentration of Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Modulates Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Mammalian Cell Cluster Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During radiotherapy procedures, radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE can potentially lead to genetic hazards to normal tissues surrounding the targeted regions. Previous studies showed that RIBE intensities in cell cluster models were much higher than those in monolayer cultured cell models. On the other hand, low-concentration carbon monoxide (CO was previously shown to exert biological functions via binding to the heme domain of proteins and then modulating various signaling pathways. In relation, our previous studies showed that exogenous CO generated by the CO releasing molecule, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (CORM-2, at a relatively low concentration (20 µM, effectively attenuated the formation of RIBE-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB and micronucleus (MN. In the present work, we further investigated the capability of a low concentration of exogenous CO (CORM-2 of attenuating or inhibiting RIBE in a mixed-cell cluster model. Our results showed that CO (CORM-2 with a low concentration of 30 µM could effectively suppress RIBE-induced DSB (p53 binding protein 1, p53BP1, MN formation and cell proliferation in bystander cells but not irradiated cells via modulating the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS andcyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. The results can help mitigate RIBE-induced hazards during radiotherapy procedures.

  11. A polymorphism in HLA-G modifies statin benefit in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naidoo, D; Wu, A C; Brilliant, M H;

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have shown that statin treatment benefits patients with asthma; however, inconsistent effects have been observed. The mir-152 family (148a, 148b and 152) has been implicated in asthma. These microRNAs suppress HLA-G expression, and rs1063320, a common SNP in the HLA-G 3'UTR...... that is associated with asthma risk, modulates miRNA binding. We report that statins upregulate mir-148b and 152, and affect HLA-G expression in an rs1063320-dependent fashion. In addition, we found that individuals who carried the G minor allele of rs1063320 had reduced asthma-related exacerbations (emergency...... department visits, hospitalizations or oral steroid use) compared with non-carriers (P=0.03) in statin users ascertained in the Personalized Medicine Research Project at the Marshfield Clinic (n=421). These findings support the hypothesis that rs1063320 modifies the effect of statin benefit in asthma...

  12. HLA diversity in the 1000 genomes dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Gourraud

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation by sequencing at a level that should allow the genome-wide detection of most variants with frequencies as low as 1%. However, in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, only the top 10 most frequent haplotypes are in the 1% frequency range whereas thousands of haplotypes are present at lower frequencies. Given the limitation of both the coverage and the read length of the sequences generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, the highly variable positions that define HLA alleles may be difficult to identify. We used classical Sanger sequencing techniques to type the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes in the available 1000 Genomes samples and combined the results with the 103,310 variants in the MHC region genotyped by the 1000 Genomes Project. Using pairwise identity-by-descent distances between individuals and principal component analysis, we established the relationship between ancestry and genetic diversity in the MHC region. As expected, both the MHC variants and the HLA phenotype can identify the major ancestry lineage, informed mainly by the most frequent HLA haplotypes. To some extent, regions of the genome with similar genetic or similar recombination rate have similar properties. An MHC-centric analysis underlines departures between the ancestral background of the MHC and the genome-wide picture. Our analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD decay in these samples suggests that overestimation of pairwise LD occurs due to a limited sampling of the MHC diversity. This collection of HLA-specific MHC variants, available on the dbMHC portal, is a valuable resource for future analyses of the role of MHC in population and disease studies.

  13. HLA-A*7401-mediated control of HIV viremia is independent of its linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*5703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Adland, Emily; Listgarten, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    disease, highlighting improved viremic control in subjects with HLA-A*7401 combined with HLA-B*57. In common with HLA-B alleles that are associated with effective control of viremia, HLA-A*7401 presents highly targeted epitopes in several proteins, including Gag, Pol, Rev, and Nef, of which the Gag...

  14. Radiation dose reduction sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction and automatic tube voltage modulation(CARE kV) in abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Joo; Chung, Yong Eun; Lee, Young Han; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and automated kV modulation (CARE kV) in reducing radiation dose without increasing image noise for abdominal CT examination. This retrospective study included 77 patients who received CT imaging with an application of CARE kV with or without SAFIRE and who had comparable previous CT images obtained without CARE kV or SAFIRE, using the standard dose (i.e., reference mAs of 240) on an identical CT scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) within 1 year. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (33 patients, CT scanned with CARE kV); and group B (44 patients, scanned after reducing the reference mAs from 240 to 170 and applying both CARE kV and SAFIRE). CT number, image noise for four organs and radiation dose were compared among the two groups. Image noise increased after CARE kV application (p < 0.001) and significantly decreased as SAFIRE strength increased (p < 0.001). Image noise with reduced-mAs scan (170 mAs) in group B became similar to that of standard-dose FBP images after applying CARE kV and SAFIRE strengths of 3 or 4 when measured in the aorta, liver or muscle (p ≥ 0.108). Effective doses decreased by 19.4% and 41.3% for groups A and B, respectively (all, p < 0.001) after application of CARE kV with or without SAFIRE. Combining CARE kV, reduction of mAs from 240 to 170 mAs and noise reduction by applying SAFIRE strength 3 or 4 reduced the radiation dose by 41.3% without increasing image noise compared with the standard-dose FBP images.

  15. Preoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Vulvar Carcinoma: Analysis of Pattern of Relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Shukla, Gaurav; Shinde, Ashwin; Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Richards, Scott; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Krivak, Thomas C. [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To examine clinical outcomes and relapse patterns in locally advanced vulvar carcinoma treated using preoperative chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with stage I-IV{sub A} (stage I, n=3; stage II, n=13; stage III, n=23; stage IV{sub A}, n=3) vulvar cancer were treated with chemotherapy and IMRT via a modified Gynecological Oncology Group schema using 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with twice-daily IMRT during the first and last weeks of treatment or weekly cisplatin with daily radiation therapy. Median dose of radiation was 46.4 Gy. Results: Thirty-three patients (78.6%) had surgery for resection of vulva; 13 of these patients also had inguinal lymph node dissection. Complete pathologic response was seen in 48.5% (n=16) of these patients. Of these, 15 had no recurrence at a median time of 26.5 months. Of the 17 patients with partial pathological response, 8 (47.1%) developed recurrence in the vulvar surgical site within a median of 8 (range, 5-34) months. No patient had grade ≥3 chronic gastrointestinal/genitourinary toxicity. Of those having surgery, 8 (24.2%) developed wound infections requiring debridement. Conclusions: Preoperative chemotherapy/IMRT was well tolerated, with good pathologic response and clinical outcome. The most common pattern of recurrence was local in patients with partial response, and strategies to increase pathologic response rate with increasing dose or adding different chemotherapy need to be explored to help further improve outcomes.

  16. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili, E-mail: commasll@163.com; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  17. A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlDuhaiby Eman Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Methods Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. Results IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for "virtually all" head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. Conclusions The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process.

  18. The impact of IL10 polymorphisms and sHLA-G levels on the risk of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ashwini; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Kalmady, Sunil V; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Subbana, Manjula; Venugopal, Deepthi; Amaresha, Anekal C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Debnath, Monojit

    2016-10-01

    Early life immune aberrations have strongly been associated with the risk of schizophrenia. Amongst them, inflammation induced neurodevelopmental origin has emerged as one of the widely recognized underlying mechanisms. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an important anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine. It modulates the expression of another immuno-inhibitory molecule, Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G), predominantly expressed at the feto-maternal interface. Under physiological conditions, IL-10 and HLA-G molecules regulate the feto-maternal immune homeostasis by limiting the inflammatory states and influence the outcome of pregnancy. The aberrant expression of these molecules can cause pregnancy complications, which are known to confer strong risk to schizophrenia in the offspring. However, there is a considerable lack of information on the effect of the functional interactions between IL-10 and HLA-G on the risk of schizophrenia. We therefore examined the impact of possible correlation between IL-10 genetic variations and the plasma levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) on schizophrenia risk. Genotyping of IL10 (-592 C>A, -1082 A>G) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by PCR-RFLP method in 219 schizophrenia patients and 197 healthy subjects and levels of sHLA-G were estimated by ELISA in 46 patients and 44 healthy subjects. There was no significant difference in the genotype and allele frequencies between the groups for both the IL10 SNPs analyzed. However, we observed a correlation between IL10 genetic variation and plasma levels of sHLA-G in schizophrenia patients. Patients carrying CC genotype of IL10 -592C>A polymorphism had significantly lower sHLA-G levels compared to CA and AA genotypes. Our findings suggest the impact of possible correlation between IL-10 and HLA-G on schizophrenia risk.

  19. Treatment with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, G.N.; Hanna, S.A.; Gadia, R.

    2014-11-15

    Through the development of four relevant clinical questions related with the proposed subject, we tried to present the main evidence for safety, toxicity and effectiveness using different radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of female patients of all ages with primary breast cancer treated with radiation therapy to the whole breast, regardless of histological type, staging, context of treatment (radical, adjuvant or palliative) and whether comorbidities were present or not. For this, a systematic review of the literature was performed in primary scientific research databases (Medline - Pubmed; Embase - Elsevier; Lilacs - Bireme; Cochrane Library - Central Register of Controlled Trials). All articles available until July 22, 2013, were included. The search strategy used for Medline research is described in Appendix. Articles were selected based on critical evaluation in search of the best available evidence. Recommendations were prepared based on discussion with the writing group, composed of three members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group specializing in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was made available for public consultation for 15 days and the suggestions forwarded to the writers for evaluation and consideration into the final text. Objective: to assess the most appropriate method of radiation therapy for treating patients with primary breast tumors. (author)

  20. Response of the AMOC to reduced solar radiation - the modulating role of atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthers, Stefan; Raible, Christoph C.; Rozanov, Eugene; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of reduced solar forcing (grand solar minimum or geoengineering scenarios like solar radiation management) on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is assessed in an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model simulations. Ensemble sensitivity simulations are performed with and without interactive chemistry. In both experiments the AMOC is intensified in the course of the solar radiation reduction, which is attributed to the thermal effect of the solar forcing: reduced sea surface temperatures and enhanced sea ice formation increase the density of the upper ocean in the North Atlantic and intensify the deepwater formation. Furthermore, a second, dynamical effect on the AMOC is identified driven by the stratospheric cooling in response to the reduced solar forcing. The cooling is strongest in the tropics and leads to a weakening of the northern polar vortex. By stratosphere-troposphere interactions, the stratospheric circulation anomalies induce a negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation in the troposphere which is found to weaken the AMOC through wind stress and heat flux anomalies in the North Atlantic. The dynamic mechanism is present in both ensemble experiments. In the experiment with interactive chemistry, however, it is strongly amplified by stratospheric ozone changes. In the coupled system, both effects counteract and weaken the response of the AMOC to the solar forcing reduction. Neglecting chemistry-climate interactions in model simulations may therefore lead to an overestimation of the AMOC response to solar forcing.

  1. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Lacoste-Collin MD, PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response.

  2. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  3. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary.

  4. Modulation of radiative heating by the Madden-Julian Oscillation and convectively coupled Kelvin waves as observed by CloudSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ding; Kuang, Zhiming

    2011-11-01

    The vertical distribution of radiative heating affects the moist static energy budget and potentially the maintenance and propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). This paper uses CloudSat data to examine the radiative heating climatology in the tropics and the vertical structure of its modulation by the MJO and convectively coupled Kelvin Waves (KWs). Composites of active regions of the MJO and KW both show positive radiative heating anomaly in the middle and lower troposphere and slightly negative radiative heating anomaly in upper troposphere. Such bottom-heavy profiles can help to strengthen the MJO while weaken the KWs. Another finding is that cloud condensate anomalies associated with the MJO are significantly more bottom-heavy than those of the KWs, while the radiative heating anomalies associated with the MJO are only very slightly more bottom-heavy.

  5. Low HLA polymorphism in Colombian mestizos

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila-Portillo, Luz Mabel; Instituto de Referencia Andino S.A.; Hospital Militar Central; Carmona, Alejandra; Universidad Católica de Manizales; Franco, Leidy; Instituto de Referencia Andino S.A.; Briceño, Ignacio; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Casas, María Consuelo; Instituto de Referencia Andino S.A.; Gómez, Alverto; Instituto de Referencia Andino S.A.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims to describe the allele frequency and haplotype of HLA class I and II molecules in a Colombian mestizo population.Methodology: HLA class I and II molecules on 197 unrelated Colombian individuals and 157 unrelated individuals making up 53 families fromdifferent regions of the country were studied at the Immunology Laboratory at the Military Hospital Central of Bogotá and at the Instituto de ReferenciaAndino by the PCR-SSP method.Results: The haplotype HLA-A * 24 B*35 ...

  6. HLA: The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    at glomerular basement membrane mediate Goodpasture syndrome , EF = (-I a which is associated with HLA-DR2. HLA-DR2 and RR a + b HLA-DR3 as well as...hemochromatosis A3 8.2 0.67 B14 4.7 0.13 Goodpasture syndrome D/DR2 15.9 0.82 Idiopathic membranous nephropathy D/DR3 12.0 0.69 aXd *RR = relative risk...distinct syndromes based on the mode of onset. Three main groups are (1) systemic Characler Positive Character Negatike with daily intermittent fever

  7. Ionizing radiation modulates cell surface integrin expression and adhesion of COLO-320 cells to collagen and fibronectin in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meineke, V.; Gilbertz, K.P.; Schilperoort, K.; Cordes, N.; Beuningen, D. van [Inst. of Radiobiology, Federal Armed Forces, Muenchen (Germany); Sendler, A. [Surgical Clinic, TU Muenchen (Germany); Moede, T. [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Purpose: Adhesion of tumor cells to endothelial cells and to the extracellular matrix is a key step in the initial phase of metastasis. Since radiotherapy of tumors can induce alterations of the cell surface, we investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on the expression of integrins in the colorectal tumor cell line COLO-320 and the modulation of adhesion capacity of irradiated cells to collagen and fibronectin. Material and Methods: The cells surface expression of a broad range of integrins on COLO-320 cells was determined by flow cytometry during 144 hours after X-irradiation. The functional significance of increased adhesion molecule expression was assessed by cell-matrix adhesion and receptor blocking experiments. Results: Cell surface expression of the following integrin {alpha} and {beta} subunits was quantified: {beta}1 (CD29), {alpha}2 (CD49b), {alpha}5 (CD49e) and {alpha}6 (CD49f). The expression of {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}5, and {alpha}6 changed as a function of time after irradiation (5 Gy). For {beta}1 even a function of dose (1-5 Gy) could be shown. Adhesion experiments confirmed a time dependent increase in adhesion to both collagen and fibronectin. Radiation-induced increase in adhesion was inhibited significantly by using a CD29 antibody. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation modulates cell surface expression of integrins and cell-matrix interactions. The {beta}1-integrin subunit plays an important role in radiation-induced adhesion to both collagen and fibronectin. Possible consequences of these invitro results for radiotherapy of colorectal tumors in vivo are discussed. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Adhaesion zwischen Tumorzellen und Endothelzellen sowie der extrazellulaeren Matrix ist ein entscheidender Schritt in der Initialphase einer Metastasierung. Da eine Bestrahlung von Tumoren mittels Radiotherapie Aenderungen der Zelloberflaeche bewirken kann, wurde der Effekt von ionisierender Strahlung auf die Expression von Integrinen in der

  8. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  9. Explicit and convex optimization of plan quality measures in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Engberg, Lovisa; Forsgren, Anders; Hårdemark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Given the widespread agreement that doses-at-volume play important roles in quality assessment of radiation therapy treatment plans, planning objectives that correlate well with explicit dose-at-volume optimization are likely to correlate well with plan quality. In this study, planning objectives are formulated to explicitly either minimize or maximize convex approximations of dose-at-volume, namely, mean-tail-doses. This is in contrast to the conventionally used planning objectives, which are used to maximize clinical goal fulfilment by relating to deviations from dose-at-volume thresholds. Advantages of the proposed planning objectives are investigated through juxtaposition with conventional objectives in a computational study of two patient cases, each with three doses-at-volume to be minimized subject to PTV coverage. With proposed planning objectives, this is translated into minimizing three mean-tail-doses. Comparison with conventional objectives is carried out in the dose-at-volume domain and in the no...

  10. A unified approach for inversion problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Yair; Bortfeld, Thomas; Martin, Benjamin; Trofimov, Alexei

    2006-05-01

    We propose and study a unified model for handling dose constraints (physical dose, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), etc) and radiation source constraints in a single mathematical framework based on the split feasibility problem. The model does not impose on the constraints an exogenous objective (merit) function. The optimization algorithm minimizes a weighted proximity function that measures the sum of the squares of the distances to the constraint sets. This guarantees convergence to a feasible solution point if the split feasibility problem is consistent (i.e., has a solution), or, otherwise, convergence to a solution that minimally violates the physical dose constraints and EUD constraints. We present computational results that demonstrate the validity of the model and the power of the proposed algorithmic scheme.

  11. Free electromagnetic radiation from the graphene monolayer with spatially modulated conductivity in THz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasik, Vladimir; Wartak, Marek S.; Zhukov, Alexander V.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2016-03-01

    An infinite graphene layer is known to support graphene surface plasmon polariton (GSP) confined at the interface between the two dielectric half-spaces. In the case of finite width graphene stripe, the termination of the graphene layer acts both as a scattering source and as a “mirror”, thus producing Fabry-Perot (FP)-type resonance. These resonant wavelengths in the presence of free-standing graphene stripe are investigated using the homogeneous convolution-type integral equation approach. The capabilities of the suggested numerical method are illustrated with the results for the transmission spectrum of TM electromagnetic waves travelling in the direction perpendicular to the graphene stripe. Special attention is paid to the case of spatially modulated conductivity of the graphene monolayer, and thus the feasibility of controlling the GSP response.

  12. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza...... of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza....

  13. High level of soluble HLA-G in the female genital tract of Beninese commercial sex workers is associated with HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Thibodeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most HIV infections are transmitted across mucosal epithelium. Understanding the role of innate and specific mucosal immunity in susceptibility or protection against HIV infection, as well as the effect of HIV infection on mucosal immunity, are of fundamental importance. HLA-G is a powerful modulator of the immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G expression in the female genital tract is associated with HIV-1 infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genital levels of sHLA-G were determined in 52 HIV-1-uninfected and 44 antiretroviral naïve HIV-1-infected female commercial sex workers (CSWs, as well as 71 HIV-1-uninfected non-CSW women at low risk of exposure, recruited in Cotonou, Benin. HIV-1-infected CSWs had higher genital levels of sHLA-G compared with those in both the HIV-1-uninfected CSW (P = 0.009 and non-CSW groups (P = 0.0006. The presence of bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.008, and HLA-G*01:01:02 genotype (P = 0.002 were associated with higher genital levels of sHLA-G in the HIV-1-infected CSWs, whereas the HLA-G*01:04:04 genotype was also associated with higher genital level of sHLA-G in the overall population (P = 0.038. When adjustment was made for all significant variables, the increased expression of sHLA-G in the genital mucosa remained significantly associated with both HIV-1 infection (P = 0.02 and bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.03. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that high level of sHLA-G in the genital mucosa is independently associated with both HIV-1 infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  14. SU-E-T-618: Plan Robustness Study of Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Patel, S; Shen, J; Harrington, D; Stoker, J; Ding, X; Hu, Y; Wong, W; Halyard, M; Schild, S; Ezzell, G; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Lack of plan robustness may contribute to local failure in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to treat head and neck (H&N) cancer. Thus we compared plan robustness of VMAT with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: VMAT and IMRT plans were created for 9 H&N cancer patients. For each plan, six new perturbed dose distributions were computed — one each for ± 3mm setup deviations along the S-I, A-P and L-R directions. We used three robustness quantification tools: (1) worst-case analysis (WCA); (2) dose-volume histograms (DVHs) band (DVHB); and (3) root-mean-square-dose deviation (RMSD) volume histogram (DDVH). DDVH represents the relative volume (y) on the vertical axis and the RMSD (x) on the horizontal axis. Similar to DVH, this means that y% of the volume of the indicated structure has the RMSD at least x Gy[RBE].The width from the first two methods at different target DVH indices (such as D95 and D5) and the area under the DDVH curves (AUC) for the target were used to indicate plan robustness. In these robustness quantification tools, the smaller the value, the more robust the plan is. Plan robustness evaluation metrics were compared using Wilcoxon test. Results: DVHB showed the width at D95 from IMRT to be larger than from VMAT (unit Gy) [1.59 vs 1.18 (p=0.49)], while the width at D5 from IMRT was found to be slightly larger than from VMAT [0.59 vs 0.54 (p=0.84)]. WCA showed similar results [D95: 3.28 vs 3.00 (p=0.56); D5: 1.68 vs 1.95 (p=0.23)]. DDVH showed the AUC from IMRT to be slightly smaller than from VMAT [1.13 vs 1.15 (p=0.43)]. Conclusion: VMAT plan robustness is comparable to IMRT plan robustness. The plan robustness conclusions from WCA and DVHB are DVH parameter dependent. On the other hand DDVH captures the overall effect of uncertainties on the dose to a volume of interest. NIH/NCI K25CA168984; Eagles Cancer Research Career Development; The Lawrence W. and Marilyn W. Matteson Fund for Cancer Research Mayo ASU Seed

  15. Statistical resolution of ambiguous HLA typing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Listgarten

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution HLA typing plays a central role in many areas of immunology, such as in identifying immunogenetic risk factors for disease, in studying how the genomes of pathogens evolve in response to immune selection pressures, and also in vaccine design, where identification of HLA-restricted epitopes may be used to guide the selection of vaccine immunogens. Perhaps one of the most immediate applications is in direct medical decisions concerning the matching of stem cell transplant donors to unrelated recipients. However, high-resolution HLA typing is frequently unavailable due to its high cost or the inability to re-type historical data. In this paper, we introduce and evaluate a method for statistical, in silico refinement of ambiguous and/or low-resolution HLA data. Our method, which requires an independent, high-resolution training data set drawn from the same population as the data to be refined, uses linkage disequilibrium in HLA haplotypes as well as four-digit allele frequency data to probabilistically refine HLA typings. Central to our approach is the use of haplotype inference. We introduce new methodology to this area, improving upon the Expectation-Maximization (EM-based approaches currently used within the HLA community. Our improvements are achieved by using a parsimonious parameterization for haplotype distributions and by smoothing the maximum likelihood (ML solution. These improvements make it possible to scale the refinement to a larger number of alleles and loci in a more computationally efficient and stable manner. We also show how to augment our method in order to incorporate ethnicity information (as HLA allele distributions vary widely according to race/ethnicity as well as geographic area, and demonstrate the potential utility of this experimentally. A tool based on our approach is freely available for research purposes at http://microsoft.com/science.

  16. Low-dose spiruchostatin-B, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor enhances radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells via modulation of redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Zhao, Qing Li; Li, Peng; Narita, Koichi; Katoh, Tadashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Spiruchostatin B (SP-B), is a potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in addition to HDAC inhibition, the pharmacological effects of SP-B are also attributed to its ability to produce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2. In this study, we investigated the effects of low dose (non-toxic) SP-B on radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoma U937 cells in vitro. The treatment of cells with low-dose SP-B induced the acetylation of histones, however, does not induce apoptosis. Whereas, the combined treatment with SP-B and radiation significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, suggesting the potential role of this combined treatment for future radiation therapy. Interestingly, the enhancement of apoptosis was accompanied by significant increased in the ROS generation. Pre-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited the enhancement of apoptosis induced by combined treatment, indicating that ROS play an essential role. It was also found that SP-B combined with radiation caused the activation of death receptor and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, via modulation of ROS-mediated signaling. Moreover, SP-B also significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis in other lymphoma cell lines such as Molt-4 and HL-60. Taken together, our findings suggest that the low-dose SP-B enhances radiation-induced apoptosis via modulation of redox signaling because of its ability to serve as an intracellular ROS generating agent, mainly (H2O2 or [Formula: see text]). This study provides further insights into the mechanism of action of SP-B with radiation and demonstrates that SP-B can be used as a future novel sensitizer for radiation therapy.

  17. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  18. Combination of KIR 2DL2 and HLA-C1 (Asn 80) confers susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Latvians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, A; Sedimbi, S K; Rajalingam, R; Nikitina-Zake, L; Rumba, I; Wigzell, H; Sanjeevi, C B

    2008-12-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are known to modulate natural killer (NK) and NK T-cell function by interacting with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on target cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of KIR2D genes with their HLA-C ligands in susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. A total of 98 type 1 diabetes patients and 70 healthy subjects from Latvia were typed for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. The HLA C1+/C2+ combination was positively, and C1-/C2+ combination was negatively, associated with type 1 diabetes. Stratification analysis of KIR/HLA-C ligand combinations showed 2DL2+/C1+, 2DL3+/C1+, and 2DS2+ /C1+ to be positively, and 2DL2-/C1- and 2DS2-/ C1- to be negatively, associated. The presence of 2DL2-HLA-C1 in the absence of 2DS1, 2DS2 confers maximum susceptibility. Absence of 2DL2 and HLA-C1 along with absence of 2DS1 and 2DS2 confer maximum protection. A hypothetical model of KIR/ligand combinations on immune responses and type 1 diabetes susceptibility is proposed. Our results suggest that a combination KIR2DL2- HLA-C1 plays a critical role in susceptibility or protection in Latvians against type 1 diabetes.

  19. HLA-G promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive activity during human pregnancy through engagement of the receptor ILT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstlin, Natascha; Ostermeir, Anna-Lena; Spring, Bärbel; Schwarz, Julian; Marmé, Alexander; Walter, Christina B; Poets, Christian F; Gille, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Establishing and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance is essential for a successful pregnancy; failure of immunological adaptation to pregnancy leads to severe complications such as abortion or preterm delivery. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that suppress T-cell responses, expand during pregnancy and thus may play a role in tolerance induction. Human leucocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I molecule with immune-modulatory properties, which is expressed during pregnancy. Here, we investigated the impact of HLA-G on MDSCs accumulation and activation in pregnant women. We demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs (GR-MDSCs) express receptors for HLA-G, namely immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 2 and 4, and that ILT4-expression by GR-MDSCs is regulated during pregnancy. Stimulation with soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) increased suppressive activity of GR-MDSCs, induced MDSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and led to phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in myeloid cells. Effects of sHLA-G on MDSC accumulation were mediated through ILT4. These results suggest an interaction between MDSCs and HLA-G in humans as a potential mechanism for maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance. Modulating MDSC function during pregnancy via HLA-G might provide new opportunities for a therapeutic manipulation of immunological pregnancy complications.

  20. Modulation in Ocean Primary Production due to Variability of Photosynthetically Available Radiation under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Tripathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of photosynthesis primarily depends on nutrients and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR at sea surface. Several ship cruises were carried out to measure optical, biological, and atmospheric parameters in the Arabian Sea and their variability were studied. An analytical nonspectral photosynthesis-irradiance model was used to estimate euphotic primary production (EuPP to study its variability during cruise periods. PAR was estimated using COART model using in situ measured aerosol optical depth (AOD to compare with in situ measured PAR. In order to understand the variability of PAR under different types of aerosol and different aerosol loading, a simulation study was carried out using COART model. EuPP was estimated for various PAR values under different aerosol loading and cloud coverage conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that for maritime, maritime polluted, and desert aerosols, the ratio PAR/PAR0AOD has attenuated to about 11–25%, whereas it has attenuated to 44% for urban aerosol type. PAR/PARclear  sky was reduced by ~57% for high aerosol loading and for overcast sky. The decrease in EuPP under various aerosol loading and cloud coverage was observed to depend on the photoadaptation parameter. EuPP/EuPPclear  sky was reduced by 38% for maximum maritime aerosol loading and for overcast sky.

  1. NOTE: Conceptual formulation on four-dimensional inverse planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Louis; Ma, Yunzhi; Ye, Yinyu; Xing, Lei

    2009-07-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) offers an extra dimension of 'time' on the three-dimensional patient model with which we can incorporate target motion in radiation treatment (RT) planning and delivery in various ways such as in the concept of internal target volume, in gated treatment or in target tracking. However, for all these methodologies, different phases are essentially considered as non-interconnected independent phases for the purpose of optimization, in other words, the 'time' dimension has yet to be incorporated explicitly in the optimization algorithm and fully exploited. In this note, we have formulated a new 4D inverse planning technique that treats all the phases in the 4DCT as one single entity in the optimization. The optimization is formulated as a quadratic problem for disciplined convex programming that enables the problem to be analyzed and solved efficiently. In the proof-of-principle examples illustrated, we show that the temporal information of the spatial relation of the target and organs at risk could be 'exchanged' amongst different phases so that an appropriate weighting of dose deposition could be allocated to each phase, thus enabling a treatment with a tight target margin and a full duty cycle otherwise not achievable by either of the aforementioned methodologies. Yet there are practical issues to be solved in the 4D RT planning and delivery. The 4D concept in the optimization we have formulated here does provide insight on how the 'time' dimension can be exploited in the 4D optimization process.

  2. SU-E-T-358: Empirical Beam Angle Optimization for Lung Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doozan, B [Florida Atlantic University (United States); Pella, S [South Florida Radiation Oncology, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Creating an improved BAO can decrease the amount of time a dosimetrist spends on making a treatment plan, improve the treatment quality and enhance the tools an inexperienced dosimetrist can use to develop planning techniques. Methods: Using empirical data created by experienced dosimetrists from 69 patients treated for lung cancer, the most frequently used gantry angles were applied to four different regions in each lung to gather an optimal set of fields that could be used to treat future lung cancer patients. This method, given the moniker FAU BAO, is compared in 7 plans created with the Eclipse BAO choosing 5 fields and 9 fields. Results: The results show that the conformality index improved by 30% or 3% when using the 5 and 9 fields. The conformation number was better by 12% from the 5 fields and 9% from the 9 fields. The organs at risk (OAR) were overall more protected to produce fewer nonstochastic effects from the radiation treatment with the FAU BAO. Conclusion: Empirical methods for beam angle optimization is a viable method for IMRT treatment planning techniques.

  3. Spin modulation periods detected in Saturnian kilometric radiation and inner magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, P. H. M.

    2012-09-01

    A few years ago, observations performed by the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the Cassini spacecraft revealed two distinct and variable rotation periods, at 10.6 hours and 10.8 hours, in Saturn's radio emissions. These two periods correspond to SKR produced in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The main time modulation of planetary radio emissions has always been attributed to the effect on the inner magnetosphere of the internal magnetic field which rigidly rotates with the deep interior of the planet. As a consequence, the magnetospheric plasma, which is supposed to be frozen in the magnetic field, should rotate (or sub-rotate) with a unique spin period and such a north/south asymmetry in the radio period should never be observed. However, contrary to the other magnetized planets, Saturn presents a very particular magnetic field since its dipolar moment is nearly aligned with the rotation axis of the planet. This alignment could bring out some phenomena developing in the internal structure which are probably masked in the case of the planets the magnetic dipole of which is significantly tilted. We propose to interpret the existence of the two separated and slowly varying periods in the saturnian magnetic field as the signature of the inner dynamo.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Reply to 'Comments on "Cellular response to modulated radiation fields"'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claridge Mackonis, E.; Suchowerska, N.; McKenzie, D. R.; Ebert, M.; Jackson, M.; Morrell, S.; Bewes, J.

    2009-03-01

    We have reported two new bystander effects derived from experimental data on the survival fraction following spatially modulated irradiation of a melanoma cell line, using a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam (Claridge Mackonis et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 5469). The validity of survival fractions exceeding unity and statistical evidence for the new effects have been challenged (Ross and Klassen 2008). Survival fractions exceeding unity have been reported and are expected in the presence of conditions favouring colony formation. After a reanalysis using a comparison with a proportional hazards approach (Cox 1975 Biometrika 62 269) and separately modelling the different exposure types using a linear quadratic model, we are able to reconfirm our original conclusions for the melanoma cell line. We present new data for non-small cell lung cancer, which provide further support for the presence of new bystander effects. The usefulness of plots of average survival as a function of average dose to the cell culture is further discussed. From these plots we find significant evidence for a higher mean survival than would be expected in the absence of bystander effects. With the evidence provided by the additional data and further statistical analysis of all data, we conclude that there is strong evidence for bystander effects that promote cell survival.

  5. HLA-E polymorphism and soluble HLA-E plasma levels in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, I; Laaribi, A B; Bortolotti, D; Belhadj, M; Mehri, A; Yahia, H B; Babay, W; Chaouch, H; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boukadida, J; Di Luca, D; Hannachi, N; Rizzo, R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurs in association to a deregulation of immune system. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) is an immune-tolerant nonclassical HLA class I molecule that could be involved in HBV progression. To measure soluble (s) HLA-E in patients with chronic HBV hepatitis (CHB). We tested the potential association of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G gene polymorphism to CHB. Our cohort consisted of 93 Tunisian CHB patients (stratified in CHB with high HBV DNA levels and CHB with low HBV DNA levels) and 245 healthy donors. Plasma sHLA-E was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer. No association between HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and HBV DNA levels in CHB patients was found. G/G genotype is less frequent in CHB patients without significance. sHLA-E is significantly enhanced in CHB patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.0017). Stratification according to HBV DNA levels showed that CHB patients with low HBV DNA levels have higher sHLA-E levels compared with CHB patients with high HBV DNA levels. CHB patients with G/G genotype have enhanced sHLA-E levels compared with other genotypes (P = 0.037). This significant difference is maintained only for CHB women concerning G/G genotypes (P = 0.042). Finally, we reported enhanced sHLA-E in CHB patients with advanced stages of fibrosis (P = 0.032). We demonstrate, for the first time, the association of sHLA-E to CHB. Owing to the positive correlation of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and the association of sHLA-E to advanced fibrosis stages, HLA-E could be a powerful predictor for CHB progression. Further investigations will be required to substantiate HLA-E role as a putative clinical biomarker of CHB.

  6. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  7. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these assoc...

  8. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I. [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Revmatizma; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter`s syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Definitive class I human leukocyte antigen expression in gestational placentation: HLA-F, HLA-E, HLA-C, and HLA-G in extravillous trophoblast invasion on placentation, pregnancy, and parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmon, Rinat; Pinnaduwage, Lakmini; Zhang, Jianhong; Lye, Stephen J; Geraghty, Daniel E; Dunk, Caroline E

    2017-06-01

    The extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) express HLA-C and HLA-G, but HLA-E and HLA-F are the subject of conflicting reports. In this study, we define the HLA expression profile during active EVT placental implantation, pregnancy development, and parturition. Immunohistochemistry, q-PCR, and Western blot were used to investigate HLA-C, HLA-E, and HLA-F placental expression across gestation from the early first trimester, late first trimester, second trimester (n=10 in each), preterm gestation (n=6) to elective term cesarean section and term vaginal deliveries (n=12, 38-41 weeks). EVT explants and Swan71 cells were used to assess HLA-C and HLA-F during active EVT migration. HLA-G, HLA-C, and HLA-F were expressed by 1st-trimester EVT and became intracellular and weaker as gestation progressed. HLA-E was only expressed in 1st-trimester placenta. HLA-F and HLA-C mRNA and protein expression levels showed a significant increase in the fetal villous mesenchyme across gestation. HLA-C levels increased with labor. We detected a 100-kDa HLA-F band in early pregnancy suggesting dimer formation on the EVT surface. These results were confirmed in EVT outgrowths and Swan71 trophoblast which showed that HLA-F and HLA-G are increased on the cell surface of migrating EVT, while HLA-C was internalized. Expression of HLA-F and HLA-G on the cell surface of actively migrating EVT supports their specific role in early EVT invasion and interactions with uterine natural killer cells. HLA-C's limited expression to the proliferative EVT suggests a protective role in the earliest events of implantation but not in active EVT invasion. We also show for the first time that HLA-C may be involved in parturition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashmi Singh; Rashmi Kaul; Anil Kaul; Khalid Khan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance ofchronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  11. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  12. An investigation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus conventional two-dimensional and 3D-conformal radiation therapy for early stage larynx cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has been incorporated at several institutions for early stage laryngeal cancer (T1/T2N0M0, but its utility is controversial. Methods In three representative patients, multiple plans were generated: 1 Conventional 2D planning, with the posterior border placed at either the anterior aspect ("tight" plan or the mid-vertebral body ("loose" plan, 2 3D planning, utilizing both 1.0 and 0.5 cm margins for the planning target volume (PTV, and 3 IMRT planning, utilizing the same margins as the 3D plans. A dosimetric comparison was performed for the target volume, spinal cord, arytenoids, and carotid arteries. The prescription dose was 6300 cGy (225 cGy fractions, and the 3D and IMRT plans were normalized to this dose. Results For PTV margins of 1.0 cm and 0.5 cm, the D95 of the 2D tight/loose plans were 3781/5437 cGy and 5372/5869 cGy, respectively (IMRT/3D plans both 6300 cGy. With a PTV margin of 1.0 cm, the mean carotid artery dose was 2483/5671/5777/4049 cGy in the 2D tight, 2D loose, 3D, and IMRT plans, respectively. When the PTV was reduced to 0.5 cm, the the mean carotid artery dose was 2483/5671/6466/2577 cGy to the above four plans, respectively. The arytenoid doses were similar between the four plans, and spinal cord doses were well below tolerance. Conclusions IMRT provides a more ideal dose distribution compared to 2D treatment and 3D planning in regards to mean carotid dose. We therefore recommend IMRT in select cases when the treating physician is confident with the GTV.

  13. Helical tomotherapy provides efficacy similar to that of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dosimetric benefits for endometrial carcinoma

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    Hsieh CH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1,4–6 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,2 Ming-Chow Wei,2 Wen-Yih Wu,2 Hsu-Dong Sun,2 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Li-Ying Wang,7 Yen-Ping Hsieh81Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, 4Department of Medicine, 5Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 6Oriental Institute of Technology, New Taipei City, 7School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 8Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan, ChinaBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and helical tomotherapy for endometrial cancer.Methods: Between November 1, 2006 and November 31, 2010, 31 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer were enrolled. All enrolled patients received total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant whole pelvic IMRT or helical tomotherapy.Results: The actuarial 3-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates for the IMRT and helical tomotherapy groups were 87.5% versus 100%, 91.7% versus 51.7%, 91.7% versus 83.3%, and 91.7% versus 51.7%, respectively. The conformal index and uniformity index for IMRT versus helical tomotherapy was 1.25 versus 1.17 (P = 0.04 and 1.08 versus 1.05 (P < 0.01, respectively. Two of 31 patients with cervical stump failure were noted, one in the IMRT group and the other in the helical tomotherapy group. No acute or late grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted, including proctitis, or genitourinary or gastrointestinal disturbances.Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy is as effective as IMRT and has better uniformity and

  14. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

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    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden; Wolfram, Kathrin; Haagen, Julia; Habelt, Bettina; Puttrich, Martin [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.) [German] Die orale Mukositis ist eine haeufige fruehe Nebenwirkung der Radio(chemo)therapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Die epitheliale Strahlenreaktion wird von Entzuendungserscheinungen begleitet; deren Interaktion mit epithelialen Prozessen ist derzeit unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung war die quantitative Erfassung des Effekts einer Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin (PTX) auf die Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut

  15. Resveratrol and its methoxy-derivatives as modulators of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

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    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Leone, Stefano; Basso, Emiliano; Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-07-01

    Various naturally occurring stilbene-like compounds that are related to resveratrol (RSV) possess some of the beneficial effects of the parent molecule and provide even further benefits. Therefore, a series of methoxylated analogues of RSV were prepared with the aim of increasing antitumour and proapoptotic activity. In a previous article, we studied two methoxy-derivatives, pterostilbene (PTERO) and trimethoxystilbene (TRIMETHOXY), in which the first was formed by the substitution of two hydroxyl groups with two methoxy groups (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene) and the second was formed by the replacement of all three OH groups with methoxy groups (trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene). Both methoxy-derivatives showed stronger antioxidant activity when compared with RSV. In the present article, we focused on the analysis of the ability of RSV and its two methoxylated derivatives to protect proliferating non-tumoural cells from the damage induced by ionising radiation (IR). First we showed that the methoxy derivatives, contrary to their parental compound, are unable to affect topoisomerase enzyme and consequently are not clastogenic per se Second we showed that both PTERO and TRIMETHOXY more efficiently reduce the chromosome damage induced by IR. Furthermore, TRIMETHOXY, but not PTERO, causes a delay in cell proliferation, particularly in mitosis progression increasing the number of cells in metaphase at the expense of prophases and ana/telophases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Lian Wang; Zhongxing Liao; Helen Liu; Jaffer Ajani; Stephen Swisher; James D Cox; Ritsuko Komaki

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the dosimetry, efficacy and toxicity of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer.METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on 7 patients who were definitively treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Patients who did not receive IMRT radiation and concurrent chemotherapy were not included in this analysis. IMRT plans were evaluated to assess the tumor coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment response was evaluated and toxicities were assessed.RESULTS: Five- to nine-beam IMRT were used to deliver a total dose of 59.4-66 Gy (median: 64.8 Gy) to the primary tumor with 6-MV photons. The minimum dose received by the planning tumor volume (PTV) of the gross tumor volume boost was 91.2%-98.2% of the prescription dose (standard deviation [SD]: 3.7%-5.7%).tumor volume was 93.8%-104.8% (SD: 4.3%-11.1%)of the prescribed dose. With a median follow-up of 15 mo (range: 3-21 mo), all 6 evaluable patients achieved complete response. Of them, 2 developed local recurrences and 2 had distant metastases, 3 survived with no evidence of disease. After treatment, 2 patients developed esophageal stricture requiring frequent dilation and 1 patient developed tracheal-esophageal fistula.CONCLUSION: Concurrent IMRT and chemotherapy resulted in an excellent early response in patients with locally advanced cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer. However, local and distant recurrence and toxicity remain to be a problem. Innovative approaches are needed to improve the outcome.

  17. Dosimetric and radiobiological consequences of computed tomography-guided adaptive strategies for intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate.

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    Battista, Jerry J; Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn

    2013-12-01

    To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dose-volume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D95, tumor control probability, V70Gy, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. The CTV D95 for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D95 values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D95 values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V(70Gy) and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

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    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle(3), Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  19. Impact of multileaf collimator configuration parameters on the dosimetric accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2 and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being −0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  20. Survival benefit of adding chemotherapy to intensity modulated radiation in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

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    Xuemei Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the contribution of chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC treated by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and to identify the optimal combination treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2006 and 2010, 276 patients with stage II-IVb NPC were treated by IMRT alone or IMRT plus chemotherapy. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy included neoadjuvant or concurrent, or neoadjuvant plus concurrent protocols. The IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy groups were well-matched for prognostic factors, except N stage, with more advanced NPC in the chemoradiotherapy arm. RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 33.8 months, the 3-year actuarial rates of overall survival (OS, metastasis-free survival (MFS, relapse-free survival (RFS, and disease-free survival (DFS were 90.3%, 84.2%, 80.3%, and 69.2% for all of the patients, respectively. Compared with the IMRT alone arm, patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significantly better DFS (HR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.12-6.22; P = 0.03, patients with neoadjuvant-concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significant improvement in RFS and DFS (HR = 4.03; 95% CI, 1.35-12.05; P = 0.01 and HR = 2.43; 95% CI, 1.09-5.44; P = 0.03, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy provided no significant benefit in OS, MFS, RFS, and DFS. Stage group and alcohol consumption were prognostic factors for OS and N stage was a significant predictor for DFS. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of concurrent or neoadjuvant-concurrent chemotherapy to IMRT is available to prolong RFS or DFS for locoregionally advanced NPC. Such work could be helpful to guide effective individualized therapy.

  1. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  2. Dose-volume-related dysphagia after constrictor muscles definition in head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, R; Ricchetti, F; Fiorentino, A; Fersino, S; Giaj Levra, N; Naccarato, S; Sicignano, G; Albanese, S; Di Paola, G; Alterio, D; Ruggieri, R; Alongi, F

    2014-12-01

    Dysphagia remains a side effect influencing the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) after radiotherapy. We evaluated the relationship between planned dose involvement and acute and late dysphagia in patients with HNC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), after a recontouring of constrictor muscles (PCs) and the cricopharyngeal muscle (CM). Between December 2011 and December 2013, 56 patients with histologically proven HNC were treated with IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy. The PCs and CM were recontoured. Correlations between acute and late toxicity and dosimetric parameters were evaluated. End points were analysed using univariate logistic regression. An increasing risk to develop acute dysphagia was observed when constraints to the middle PCs were not respected [mean dose (Dmean) ≥50 Gy, maximum dose (Dmax) >60 Gy, V50 >70% with a p = 0.05]. The superior PC was not correlated with acute toxicity but only with late dysphagia. The inferior PC was not correlated with dysphagia; for the CM only, Dmax >60 Gy was correlated with acute dysphagia ≥ grade 2. According to our analysis, the superior PC has a major role, being correlated with dysphagia at 3 and 6 months after treatments; the middle PC maintains this correlation only at 3 months from the beginning of radiotherapy, but it does not have influence on late dysphagia. The inferior PC and CM have a minimum impact on swallowing symptoms. We used recent guidelines to define dose constraints of the PCs and CM. Two results emerge in the present analysis: the superior PC influences late dysphagia, while the middle PC influences acute dysphagia.

  3. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

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    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants.Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA.Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package.Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%.Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  4. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

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    Yamín Rocío Arias-Murillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Colombia, who were attended in 8 centers of the clinical laboratory of the Clinica Colsanitas in different cities of the country from January 2004 to August 2008, were included in this study. All were HLA-A,-B, and -DRB1 typified via SSP PCR. Allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies were estimated with STATA Software Version 9.0 and the GENEPOP genetic analysis package. Results: 19, 28, and 15 different alleles were identified for loci HLA-A,-B and -DRB1, respectively. Alleles found most frequently were A*24 (26.2%, A*02 (26%, B*35(22.7%, and DRB1*04 (24%. The most frequent genotypes were A*02,24 (14.2%, B*07,35 (5.5%, DRB1*01,04, and DRB1*04,04 (6.9%; while most the frequent haplotypes were HLA A*24, B*35 (9.2%, A*24, DRB1*04 (8.1%; B*35, DRB1*04 (7.8%, A*2 DRB1*04 (7.4%. Conclusion: The results obtained provide a useful reference framework for the population studied, allowing compatibility probability calculations to be performed for organ transplants.

  5. Intermediate steroid withdrawal after renal transplantation and anti-HLA antibodies (HLA-Abs development

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    Elena Monfá

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Steroid withdrawal at 7 months of renal transplantation does not entail a higher risk in terms of HLA-Abs development in patients without pretransplant HLA-Abs and treatment with tacrolimus and MMF, although larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Louise J. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian [Department of Medical Physics, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh [Department of Medical Physics, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Sykes, Jonathan [Department of Medical Physics, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Franks, Kevin [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Sebag-Montefiore, David [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Henry, Ann M., E-mail: Ann.Henry@leedsth.nhs.uk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leeds Cancer Centre, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription, and PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV{sub DIL} prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription. Median PTV{sub DIL} D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions and similar PTV{sub DIL} median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm{sup 3} of rectum (Dmax{sub 0.5cc}), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal

  7. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

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    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Gavarotti, Paolo [Hematology, University of Torino and Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Vitolo, Umberto [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  8. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

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    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  9. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  10. Cell activation state influences the modulation of HLA-DR surface expression on human monocytes/macrophages by parenteral fish oil lipid emulsion El estado de activación celular influye en la modulación de la expresión del HLA-DR sobre la superficie de monocitos/macrófagos humanos por una emulsión lipídica parenteral de aceite de pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Torrinhas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal surface expression of HLA-DR by leukocytes is associated with a poor prognosis in critical care patients. Critical care patients often receive total parenteral nutrition with lipid emulsion (LE. In this study we evaluated the influence of fish oil LE (FO on human monocyte/macrophage (Mφ expression of surface HLA-DR under distinct activation states. Mononuclear leukocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers (n=18 were cultured for 24 hours without LE (control or with 3 different concentrations (0.1, 0.25, and 0.5% of the follow LE: a pure FO b FO in association (1:1-v/v with LE composed of 50% medium-chain trygliceride and 50% soybean oil (MCTSO, and c pure MCTSO. The leukocytes were also submitted to different cell activation states, as determinate by addition time: no INF-γ addition, 18 hours before, or at the time of LE addition. HLA-DR expression on Mφ surface was evaluated by flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies. In relation to controls (for 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.5%: 100 FO decreased the expression of HLA-DR when added alone [in simultaneously-activated Mφ, for 0.1%: 70 (59 ± 73; for 0.25%: 51 (48 ± 56; and for 0.5%: 52.5 (50 ± 58] or in association with MCTSO [in simultaneously-activated Mφ, for 0.1%: 50.5 (47 ± 61; for 25%: 49 (45 ± 52; and for 0.5%: 51 (44 ± 54 and in previously-activated Mf, for 1.0%: 63 (44 ± 88; for 0.25%: 70 (41 ± 88; and for 0.5%: 59.5 (39 ± 79] in culture medium (Friedman p La expresión anómala del HLA-DR sobre la superficie de los leucocitos se asocia con un pronóstico sombrío en pacientes críticos. A menudo, estos pacientes reciben nutrición parenteral total con una emulsión lipídica (EL. En este estudio, evaluamos la influencia de una EL de aceite de pescado (AP en la expresión del HLA-DR en la superficie de monocitos/macrófagos humanos (MΦ bajo diferentes estados de activación. Se cultivaron leucocitos mononucleares de sangre periférica de voluntarios

  11. Cell activation state influences the modulation of HLA-DR surface expression on human monocytes/macrophages by parenteral fish oil lipid emulsion El estado de activación celular influye en la modulación de la expresión del HLA-DR en la superficie de los monocitos/macrófagos humanos mediante una emulsión lipídica parenteral de aceite de pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Torrinhas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal surface expression of HLA-DR by leukocytes is associated with a poor prognosis in critical care patients. Critical care patients often receive total parenteral nutrition with lipid emulsion (LE. In this study we evaluated the influence of fish oil LE (FO on human monocyte/macrophage (Mphi expression of surface HLA-DR under distinct activation states. Mononuclear leukocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers (n = 18 were cultured for 24 hours without LE (control or with 3 different concentrations (0.1, 0.25, and 0.5% of the follow LE: a pure FO b FO in association (1:1 - v/v with LE composed of 50% mediumchain trygliceride and 50% soybean oil (MCTSO, and c pure MCTSO. The leukocytes were also submitted to different cell activation states, as determinate by INF-γ addition time: no INF-γ addition, 18 hours before, or at the time of LE addition. HLA-DR expression on Mphi surface was evaluated by flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies. In relation to controls (for 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.5%: 100 FO decreased the expression of HLA-DR when added alone [in simultaneously-activated Mphi, for 0.1%: 70 (59 ± 73; for 0.25%: 51 (48 ± 56; and for 0.5%: 52.5 (50 ± 58] or in association with MCTSO [in simultaneously-activated Mphi, for 0.1%: 50.5 (47 ± 61; for 25%: 49 (45 ± 52; and for 0.5%: 51 (44 ± 54 and in previously-activated Mphi, for 1.0%: 63 (44 ± 88; for 0.25%: 70 (41 ± 88; and for 0.5%: 59.5 (39 ± 79] in culture medium (Friedman p La expresión anormal del HLA-DR en la superficie de los leucocitos se asocia con un pronóstico peor en los enfermos críticos. Estos enfermos a menudo reciben nutrición parenteral total con una emulsión lipídica (EL. En este estudio evaluamos la influencia de la EL de aceite de pescado (AP sobre la expresión del HLA-DR de superficie por los monocitos /macrófagos humanos (Mfi en distintos estados de activación. Se cultivaron leucocitos mononucleares de sangre periférica de

  12. 3D radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer: the Shanghai Cancer Hospital experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6-51 months. Salvage surgery was performed before irradiation in 5 patients, and 38 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent 3D-RT, and 34 patients received IMRT. Median follow-up for all the patients was 18.3 months. Three-year overall survival and locoregional control were 56.1% and 59.7%, respectively. Three-year progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 65.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Nine patients developed grade 3 leukopenia. Grade 5 acute toxicity was not observed in any of the patients; however, 2 patients developed Grade 3 late toxicity. 3D-RT or IMRT is effective for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer, with the 3-year overall survival of 56.1%, and its complications are acceptable. Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to confirm the role of 3D-RT or IMRT in the multimodality management of the disease.

  13. A set cover approach to fast beam orientation optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy for total marrow irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chieh-Hsiu Jason; Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B, E-mail: chjlee@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.ca, E-mail: michael.sharpe@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    The beam orientation optimization (BOO) problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is a nonlinear problem, and existing methods to obtain solutions to the BOO problem are time consuming due to the complex nature of the objective function and size of the solution space. These issues become even more difficult in total marrow irradiation (TMI), where many more beams must be used to cover a vastly larger treatment area than typical site-specific treatments (e.g., head-and-neck, prostate, etc). These complications result in excessively long computation times to develop IMRT treatment plans for TMI, so we attempt to develop methods that drastically reduce treatment planning time. We transform the BOO problem into the classical set cover problem (SCP) and use existing methods to solve SCP to obtain beam solutions. Although SCP is NP-Hard, our methods obtain beam solutions that result in quality treatments in minutes. We compare our approach to an integer programming solver for the SCP to illustrate the speed advantage of our approach.

  14. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  15. The application of distance transformation on parameter optimization of inverse planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-04-16

    In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the dose specification and related weighting factor of an objective function for involved organs is usually predefined by a single value and then iteratively optimized, subject to a set of dose-volume constraints. Because the actual dose distribution is essentially non-uniform and considerably affected by the geometric shape and distribution of the anatomic structures involved, the spatial information regarding those structures should be incorporated such that the predefined parameter distribution is made to approach the clinically expected distribution. Ideally, these parameter distributions should be predefined on a voxel basis in a manual method. However, such an approach is too time-consuming to be feasible in routine use. In the present study, we developed a computer-aided method to achieve the goal described above, producing a non-uniform parameter distribution based on spatial information about the anatomic structures involved. The method consists of two steps: Use distance transformation technique to calculate the distance distribution of the structures. Based on the distance distribution, produce the parameter distribution via a function guided by prior knowledge. We use two simulated cases to examine the effectiveness of the method. The results indicate that application of a non-uniform parameter distribution produced by distance transformation clearly improves dose-sparing of critical organs without compromising dose coverage of the planning target.

  16. Acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy and organ tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrensmeier Frank

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute and late toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated by dose escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and organ tracking. Methods From 06/2004 to 12/2005 39 men were treated by 80 Gy IMRT along with organ tracking. Median age was 69 years, risk of recurrence was low 18%, intermediate 21% and high in 61% patients. Hormone therapy (HT was received by 74% of patients. Toxicity was scored according to the CTC scale version 3.0. Median follow-up (FU was 29 months. Results Acute and maximal late grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI toxicity was 3% and 8%, late grade 2 GI toxicity dropped to 0% at the end of FU. No acute or late grade 3 GI toxicity was observed. Grade 2 and 3 pre-treatment genitourinary (GU morbidity (PGUM was 20% and 5%. Acute and maximal late grade 2 GU toxicity was 56% and 28% and late grade 2 GU toxicity decreased to 15% of patients at the end of FU. Acute and maximal late grade 3 GU toxicity was 8% and 3%, respectively. Decreased late ≥ grade 2 GU toxicity free survival was associated with higher age (P = .025, absence of HT (P = .016 and higher PGUM (P Discussion GI toxicity rates after IMRT and organ tracking are excellent, GU toxicity rates are strongly related to PGUM.

  17. A system-level model for high-speed, radiation-hard optical links in HEP experiments based on silicon Mach-Zehnder modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, M.; Detraz, S.; Olantera, L.; Sigaud, C.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.

    2016-12-01

    Silicon Mach-Zehnder modulators have been shown to be relatively insensitive to displacement damage beyond a 1-MeV-equivalent neutron fluence of 3ṡ1016n/cm2. Recent investigations on optimized device designs have also led to a high resistance against total ionizing dose levels of above 1 MGy. Such devices could potentially replace electrical and/or optical links close to the particle interaction points in future high energy physics experiments. Since they require an external continuous-wave light source, radiation-hard optical links based on silicon Mach-Zehnder modulators need to have a different system design when compared to existing directly modulated laser-based optical links. 10 Gb/s eye diagrams of irradiated Mach-Zehnder modulators were measured. The outcomes demonstrate the suitability for using these components in harsh radiation environments. A proposal for the implementation of silicon Mach-Zehnder modulators in CERN's particle detectors was developed and a model to calculate the system performance is presented. The optical power budget and the electrical power dissipation of the proposed link is compared to that of the upcoming Versatile Link system that will be installed in 2018.

  18. Efficiency of the monocrystalline photovoltaic modules in conversion solar radiation into electrical energy; Eficiencia de modulos fotovoltaicos monocristalinos na conversao de radiacao solar em energia eletrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carliane Diniz e [Universidade Estadual do Maranhao (UEMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola], Email: carlianeds@yahoo.com.br; Seraphim, Odivaldo Jose [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCA/UNESP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], Email: seraphim@fca.unesp.br

    2006-07-01

    With the scarcity of the conventional sources of energy production, other options must be considered, as the use of energy resources you renewed, that they offer to multiple advantages. One of the options to the supply of energy of the agricultural users is the photovoltaic solar systems for the local promotion of the quality of life. The objective of this study was to evaluate two marks of monocrystalline photovoltaic modules in different angles of inclination. The modules had presented low efficiency of conversion in conditions of field for incident solar radiation. (author)

  19. An assessment of the feasibility and effectiveness of an e-learning module in delivering a curriculum in radiation protection to undergraduate medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2012-03-01

    Integrating radiation protection (RP) education in the undergraduate medical curriculum is gaining importance and is mandatory in certain jurisdictions. An e-learning module for RP was developed at the authors\\' medical school and was integrated into year 4 of the 5-year undergraduate medical program. The aim of this study was to investigate its impact on RP knowledge, student preferences for various teaching methods, self-assessment of RP knowledge, and perceptions of career prospects in radiology. Likert-type 5-point scale evaluations and general comments about the RP module and various methods of teaching were also obtained.

  20. Which technique for radiation is most beneficial for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer? Intensity modulated proton therapy versus intensity modulated photon treatment, helical tomotherapy and volumetric arc therapy for primary radiation - an intraindividual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnitz, Simone; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Neumann, Oliver; Koehler, Christhardt; Weihrauch, Mirko; Budach, Volker; Cozzi, Luca

    2015-04-17

    To compare highly sophisticated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by either helical tomotherapy (HT), RapidArc (RA), IMRT with protons (IMPT) in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Twenty cervical cancer patients were irradiated using either conventional IMRT, VMAT or HT; ten received pelvic (PEL) and ten extended field irradiation (EFRT). The dose to the planning-target volume A (PTV_A: cervix, uterus, pelvic ± para-aortic lymph nodes) was 1.8/50.4 Gy. The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV_B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. MRI-guided brachytherapy was administered with 5 fractions up to 25 Gy. For EBRT, the lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume. The irradiated small bowel (SB) volumes were kept as low as possible. For every patient, target parameters as well as doses to the organs at risk (SB, bladder, rectum) were evaluated intra-individually for IMRT, HT, VMAT and IMPT. All techniques provided excellent target volume coverage, homogeneity, conformity. With IMPT, there was a significant reduction of the mean dose (Dmean) of the SB from 30.2 ± 4.0 Gy (IMRT); 27.6 ± 5.6 Gy (HT); 34.1 ± 7.0 (RA) to 18.6 ± 5.9 Gy (IMPT) for pelvic radiation and 26.3 ± 3.2 Gy (IMRT); 24.0 ± 4.1 (HT); 25.3 ± 3.7 (RA) to 13.8 ± 2.8 Gy (IMPT) for patients with EFRT, which corresponds to a reduction of 38-52% for the Dmean (SB). Futhermore, the low dose bath (V10Gy) to the small bowel was reduced by 50% with IMPT in comparison to all photon techniques. Furthermore, Dmean to the bladder and rectum was decresed by 7-9 Gy with IMPT in patents with pelvic radiation and EFRT. All modern techniques (were proved to be dosimetrically adequate regarding coverage, conformity and homogeneity of the target. Protons offered the best sparing of small bowel and rectum and therefore could contribute to a significant reduction of acute and late toxicity in cervical cancer treatment.

  1. SU-E-T-338: Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Early Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I; Quinn, K; Seebach, A; Wang, H [OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center, Rockford, IL (United States); Yah, R [University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected for the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.

  2. Altered regulation of ELAVL1/HuR in HLA-B27-expressing U937 monocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S Sahlberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of HLA-B27 expression in the regulation of RNA binding protein (RBP Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision (ELAV L1/Human antigen R (HuR expression in Salmonella-infected or LPS-stimulated human monocytic cells, since HuR is a critical regulator of the post-transcriptional fate of many genes (e.g. TNFα important in inflammatory response. METHODS: U937 monocytic cells were stably transfected with pSV2neo resistant vector (mock, wild type HLA-B27, or mutated HLA-B27 with amino acid substitutions in the B pocket. Cells were differentiated, infected with Salmonella enteritidis or stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The expression levels of HuR protein and cleavage products (CP1 and CP2 were detected by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Specific inhibitors were used to study the role of PKR and p38 in HuR expression and generation of CPs. TNFα and IL-10 secretion after p38 and PKR inhibition were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Full length HuR is overexpressed and HuR cleavage is disturbed in U937 monocytic cells expressing HLA-B27 heavy chains (HC. Increased full length HuR expression, disturbed cleavage and reduced dependence on PKR after infection correlate with the expression of glutamic acid 45 in the B pocket that is linked to the misfolding of HLA-B27. CONCLUSION: Results show that the expression of HLA-B27 HCs modulates the intracellular environment of U937 monocyte/macrophages by altering HuR regulation. This phenomenon is at least partly dependent on the misfolding feature of the B27 molecule. Since HuR is an important regulator of multiple genes involved in inflammatory response observations offer an explanation how HLA-B27 may modulate inflammatory response.

  3. Recent Advances in Our Understanding of HLA-G Biology: Lessons from a Wide Spectrum of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA-G is a HLA-class Ib molecule with potent immunomodulatory activities, which is expressed in physiological conditions, where modulation of the immune response is required to avoid allograft recognition (i.e., maternal-fetal interface or transplanted patients. However, HLA-G can be expressed de novo at high levels in several pathological conditions, including solid and hematological tumors and during microbial or viral infections, leading to the impairment of the immune response against tumor cells or pathogens, respectively. On the other hand, the loss of HLA-G mediated control of the immune responses may lead to the onset of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, caused by an uncontrolled activation of the immune effector cells. Here, we have reviewed novel findings on HLA-G functions in different physiological and pathological settings, which have been published in the last two years. These studies further confirmed the important role of this molecule in the modulation of the immune system.

  4. Low-cost, simultaneous, single-sequence genotyping of the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, W G H; Tukuitonga, C F; Ofanoa, M; Munn, S R; Gane, E J

    2006-07-01

    New automated DNA sequencing technology has enabled the development of an assay for genotyping the three major HLA class 1 loci from a single sequence of each gene containing exon 3, intron 2 and exon 2. The assay allows 31 subjects (with 3 negative controls) to be genotyped at all three loci simultaneously, using a 96-well plate format. Genotypes were assigned by comparing each sequence to a database of 307 HLA-A, 563 HLA-B and 166 HLA-C alleles. Unequivocal, 4-digit allele assignments were made for 40 of 130 HLA-A genes, 82 of 130 HLA-B genes and 97 of 130 HLA-C genes from 21 European, 20 Tongan and 24 Niuean subjects. Ambiguity in interpretation of the sequence contributed to 66 of the 170 equivocal allele assignments, and 105 equivocal assignments were due to polymorphisms outside exons 2 and 3. All known alternative interpretations of ambiguous genotypes were identified, and seven HLA-B and two HLA-C ambiguities were resolved by reading the out-of-phase exon 2 sequence that followed an indel in intron 2. The genotypes of a subgroup of 27 heterozygous subjects, whose genotypes contained all of the alleles identified in this study, were confirmed with commercial, generic PCR-SSP typing. In European subjects, the repertoire of HLA-B/HLA-C haplotypes was almost identical to previously published data. We identified five new HLA-B/HLA-C haplotypes in the Polynesian subjects, and the remaining haplotypes were of Asian origin. In summary, we are describing a low-cost, sequencing assay for the three major HLA class I loci that provides a level of resolution that is comparable with a commercial PCR-SSP assay.

  5. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes in two Brazilian Indian tribes: evidence of conservative evolution of HLA-DQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomaior, V S; Faucz, F R; Schafhauser, C; Janzen-Dück, M; Boldt, A B; Petzl-Erler, M L

    1998-08-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphism of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 class II genes was analyzed in the Kaingang and Guarani Amerindians from southern Brazil using PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide typing methods. Four different DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes were found: DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402 (associated with DRB1*0802, DRB1*08041, and DRB1*0807), DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301 (associated with DRB1*1602, DRB1*1413, and DRB1*1402), DQA1*03-DQB1*0302 (associated with DRB1*0404 and DRB1*0411), and DQA1*03-DQB1*03032 (associated with DRB1*09012). These HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and haplotypes are common in many other populations of all major ethnic groups. Alleles and haplotypes introduced into the populations by post-Columbian admixture were seen at low frequency both in the Kaingang (3.2%) and in the Guarani (3.8%). No novel HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles have thus far been identified in Amerindians. This differs from previous results for HLA-DRB1, another class II locus presenting novel alleles (i.e., alleles not found in other ethnic groups and probably generated after migration of paleo-Indians to the Americas) in the Guarani and in other South American Indian populations. The distribution of the HLA-DQ alleles and haplotypes in Amerindians indicates a weaker diversifying selective pressure on the HLA-DQ genes compared with HLA-DRB1 and HLA-B. The more conservative evolution of HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 compared with HLA-DRB1 is strong evidence of (still not well-defined) functional differences of these class II genes.

  6. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc ...

  7. A fully electronic intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) process implemented in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify, and delivery systems:

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to implement an electronic method to perform and analyze intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) using an aSi megavoltage electronic portal imaging device in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify (R&V), and delivery systems. Methods A verification plan was generated in the treatment planning system using the actual treatment plan of a patient. After exporting the treatment fields to the R&V sy...

  8. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    OpenAIRE

    Karunakaran Kaviarasu; N Arunai Nambi Raj; K Krishna Murthy; A Ananda Giri Babu; Bhaskar Laxman Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was...

  9. Intermediate steroid withdrawal after renal transplantation and anti-HLA antibodies (HLA-Abs) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfá, Elena; San Segundo, David; San Millán, Juan Carlos Ruiz; Sanabria, Judith; Albines, Zoila; Rodrigo, Emilio; Romón, Iñigo; Asensio, Esther; Arias, Manuel; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    Steroid withdrawal in renal transplantation is desirable to avoid their adverse effects. However, by decreasing the immunosuppression, could lead to an increased risk for the development of HLA-Abs. Evaluate the relationship between steroid withdrawal and development of HLA-Abs in renal transplantation. We analyzed sera by Luminex from 182 kidney transplants performed from 1998 to 2011, before and two years after transplantation. All the patients had a pretransplant PRA (panel reactive of antibodies) 20%, we detected HLA-Abs pretransplant by Luminex in 11.5% of patients in both groups, of which, 66.6%, versus 53% (p 0.058), developed new specificities, with a similar percentage of donor specific antibodies (DSA) in both groups (33.33% vs 36.36%), pNS. In the subgroup without pretransplant HLA-Abs (group-I; n=115, group-II; n=45), 6.08% developed de novo HLA-Abs, being DSA 3.4% (Group-I) versus 7.69% in group II with 3.84% DSA (pNS). Steroid withdrawal at 7 months of renal transplantation does not entail a higher risk in terms of HLA-Abs development in patients without pretransplant HLA-Abs and treatment with tacrolimus and