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Sample records for radiation damaged lasers

  1. Laser annealing heals radiation damage in avalanche photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jin Gyu [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are a practical option for space-based quantum communications requiring single-photon detection. However, radiation damage to APDs significantly increases their dark count rates and thus reduces their useful lifetimes in orbit. We show that high-power laser annealing of irradiated APDs of three different models (Excelitas C30902SH, Excelitas SLiK, and Laser Components SAP500S2) heals the radiation damage and several APDs are restored to typical pre-radiation dark count rates. Of nine samples we test, six APDs were thermally annealed in a previous experiment as another solution to mitigate the radiation damage. Laser annealing reduces the dark count rates further in all samples with the maximum dark count rate reduction factor varying between 5.3 and 758 when operating at -80 C. This indicates that laser annealing is a more effective method than thermal annealing. The illumination power to reach these reduction factors ranges from 0.8 to 1.6 W. Other photon detection characteristics, such as photon detection efficiency, timing jitter, and afterpulsing probability, fluctuate but the overall performance of quantum communications should be largely unaffected by these variations. These results herald a promising method to extend the lifetime of a quantum satellite equipped with APDs. (orig.)

  2. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  3. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of corneal damage induced by 1573 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, D.; Chapel, C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRR/SRBF), 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie; Pothier, C. [DGA-DCE/CTA/LOT, 94 - Arcueil (France); Sales, N. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses (DSV/DRM/SNV), 92 (France)

    2006-07-01

    Recent developments in laser technology have originated a variety of infrared laser sources between 1500-1700 nm called as 'eye-safe' which are gaining widespread use in industry, medicine and military applications. This spectral region has been called 'eye safe' because the cornea and aqueous humor absorb sufficient radiation to prevent nearly all potentially damaging radiation from reaching the retina whereas the lens does not absorb this spectral range and remains undamaged. However, in providing protection for the deeper layers of the eye, the cornea itself is susceptible to thermal damage. Previous studies, performed at 1540 nm with exposures less than 1 s, are inconsistent in the quantity of energy required to cause corneal damage. The purpose of this study was first, to determine the threshold damage exposure (E.D.{sub 50}) on rabbit cornea induced by a 3 ns single pulse emitted at 1573 nm, using clinical observations and histology and to compare the results to the limit values recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or international standards. Secondly, it was suggested to investigate the cellular effects of infrared radiation with biochemical techniques on cell cultures in order to specify a cellular damage threshold and a better understanding of the laser - tissue interaction and the corneal injury. The minimal damage criterion was defined by a shallow, very small depression of the epithelial surface with a mild fluorescein staining. The E.D.{sub 50} obtained with corneal beam diameter of 400 mm is 26.6 J.cm{sup -2}. The corresponding radiant exposure, calculated with the 1 mm aperture diameter recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. guidelines or standards, is 4.3 J.cm{sup -2}. In vitro experiments have been carried out on primary keratocytes and H.T. 1080 epithelial cell line, using an expanded beam of 3.5 mm diameter on plates or Lab Tek holders. Cells were irradiated with 10 Hz pulse ratio frequency during 1, 2 or 3 s. The S A

  4. Accelerated aging tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The combined effects of radiation damage and accelerated ageing in COTS lasers and p-i-n photodiodes are presented. Large numbers of these devices are employed in future High Energy Physics experiments and it is vital that these devices are confirmed to be sufficiently robust in terms of both radiation resistance and reliability. Forty 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 InGaAs p- i-n photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C with periodic measurements made of laser threshold and efficiency, in addition to p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout- related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (13 refs).

  5. Report on the Study of Radiation Damage in Calcium Fluoride and Magnesium Fluoride Crystals for use in Excimer Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-10-04

    A study was performed to investigate the effects of radiation damage in calcium fluoride and magnesium fluoride crystals caused by gamma rays and UV photons from excimer lasers. The purpose was to study and correlate the damage caused by these two different mechanisms in various types of material used for fabricating optical elements in high power excimer lasers and lens systems of lithography tools. These optical systems are easily damaged by the laser itself, and it is necessary to use only the most radiation resistant materials for certain key elements. It was found that a clear correlation exists between the, radiation induced damage caused by high energy gamma rays and that produced by UV photons from the excimer laser. This correlation allows a simple procedure to be developed to select the most radiation resistant material at the ingot level, which would be later used to fabricate various components of the optical system. This avoids incurring the additional cost of fabricating actual optical elements with material that would later be damaged under prolonged use. The result of this screening procedure can result in a considerable savings in the overall cost of the lens and laser system.

  6. Investigation of damage to metals by pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1981-10-01

    A study was made of the physical mechanism involved in piercing holes in metallic plates, using CO2 laser radiation. It was established experimentally that the energy consumed in removing a unit volume of a metal has a minimum, depending on the duration and energy of the laser pulse. An explanation is proposed for the laws governing this behavior, based on ideas of the ejection of liquid from a crater by the vapor pressure of the material. The effect on the interaction efficiency of the absorption of laser radiation in the plasma jet is taken into account.

  7. [Mitigation of mice radiation damage after acute and prolonged γ-irradiation by a laser device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskanyan, K Sh; Vorozhtsova, S V; Abrosimova, A N; Mitsyn, G V; Gaevskiy, V N; Molokanov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Effects of 7 Gy 60Co γ-radiation (acute and prolonged exposure), and combined exposure to 650 nm laser and γ-radiation on survival, peripheral blood, karyocyte count and mitotic index of bone marrow cells were studied in young C57BL/6 mice. All mice died following acute γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 1.14 Gy/min for 5 days or combined exposure for 11 days. Thirty percent survival from prolonged exposure to the dose rate of 0.027 Gy/min was observed after 19-day γ- and 38-day combined irradiation. Peripheral blood parameters did not differ significantly after acute and prolonged exposure; however, hyperchromemia was observed in mice after 24 hours of acute γ-irradiation. The count of mitoses per 1000 nucleus-containing BM cells evidenced that BM was virtually collapsed after 72 hours since the acute γ-exposure. It was demonstrated that laser can manage protection from a broad range of ionizing radiation doses and mitigate the adverse effects of equally acute and prolonged radiation exposure.

  8. Retinal thermal damage threshold dependence on exposure duration for the transitional near-infrared laser radiation at 1319 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiarui; Jiao, Luguang; Jing, Xiaomin; Chen, Hongxia; Hu, Xiangjun; Yang, Zaifu

    2016-05-01

    The retinal damage effects induced by transitional near-infrared (NIR) lasers have been investigated for years. However, the damage threshold dependence on exposure duration has not been revealed. In this paper, the in-vivo retinal damage ED50 thresholds were determined in chinchilla grey rabbits for 1319 nm laser radiation for exposure durations from 0.1 s to 10 s. The incident corneal irradiance diameter was fixed at 5 mm. The ED50 thresholds given in terms of the total intraocular energy (TIE) for exposure durations of 0.1, 1 and 10 s were 1.36, 6.33 and 28.6 J respectively. The ED50 thresholds were correlated by a power law equation, ED50 = 6.31t (0.66) [J] where t is time [s], with correlation coefficient R = 0.9999. There exists a sufficient safety margin (factor of 28~60) between the human ED50 thresholds derived from the rabbit and the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values in the current laser safety standards.

  9. Laser radiation bracket debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Koranda, Petr; Nemec, Michal; Racek, Jaroslav; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2008-02-01

    Ceramic brackets are an aesthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths, which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during classical type of debonding. This study examined the possibility of laser radiation ceramic brackets removing as well as the possible damage of a surface structure of hard dental tissue after this procedure. Two types of lasers were used for the experiments - a laser diode LIMO HLU20F400 generating a wavelength of 808 nm with the maximum output power 20W at the end of the fiber (core diameter 400 μm, numerical aperture 0.22). As a second source, a diode-pumped Tm:YAP laser system generating a wavelength of 1.9 μm, with up to 3.8 W maximum output power was chosen. For the investigation, extracted incisors with ceramic brackets were used. In both cases, laser radiation was applied for 0.5 minute at a maximum power of 1 W. Temperature changes of the irradiated tissue was registered by camera Electrophysics PV320. After the interaction experiment, the photo-documentation was prepared by the stereomicroscope Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan. The surface tissue analysis was processed in "low vacuum" (30 Pa) regime without desiccation. This technique was used to record back-scattered electron images. Selecting the appropriate laser, resin, and bracket combination can minimize risks of enamel degradation and make debonding more safe.

  10. Physical investigations on the radiation damage of graphene oxide by IR pulsed laser

    OpenAIRE

    Silipigni Letteria; Torrisi Lorenzo; Cutroneo Mariapompea

    2018-01-01

    Graphene oxide foils were irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at the moderated intensities of the order of 108 W/cm2 in vacuum. Measurements of atomic emission during the laser irradiation were performed with ion collectors and mass spectrometry, demonstrating a strong emission of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Further investigations of the irradiated graphene oxide foils were carried out on pristine and laser irradiated samples by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray photoelectr...

  11. Physical investigations on the radiation damage of graphene oxide by IR pulsed laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silipigni Letteria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide foils were irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at the moderated intensities of the order of 108 W/cm2 in vacuum. Measurements of atomic emission during the laser irradiation were performed with ion collectors and mass spectrometry, demonstrating a strong emission of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Further investigations of the irradiated graphene oxide foils were carried out on pristine and laser irradiated samples by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that graphene oxide losses oxygen and hydrogen during the irradiation, changing its carbon content and its chemical and physical properties.

  12. Physical investigations on the radiation damage of graphene oxide by IR pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silipigni, Letteria; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Mariapompea

    2018-01-01

    Graphene oxide foils were irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at the moderated intensities of the order of 108 W/cm2 in vacuum. Measurements of atomic emission during the laser irradiation were performed with ion collectors and mass spectrometry, demonstrating a strong emission of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Further investigations of the irradiated graphene oxide foils were carried out on pristine and laser irradiated samples by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that graphene oxide losses oxygen and hydrogen during the irradiation, changing its carbon content and its chemical and physical properties.

  13. Experimental Validation of Thermal Retinal Models of Damage from Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    for measuring relative intensity profile with a thermocouple or fiber-optic sensor .............................................. 72 B-2 Calculated...relative intensity profiles meas- ured by 5- and 10-pm-radius sensors of a Gaussian beam, with standard deviation of 10 Pm...have been selected so that the combined temperatura -rate process model would correctly predict damage for data appearing in the open literature. When

  14. Combined radiation damage, annealing, and ageing studies of InGaAsP /InP 1310 nm lasers for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2002-01-01

    A summary is presented of the combined effects of radiation damage, accelerated annealing and accelerated ageing in 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP multi-quantum-well lasers, the type chosen for use in the CMS Tracker optical links. The radiation damage effects are compared for a variety of radiation sources: /sup 60/Co-gamma, 0.8 MeV (average energy) neutrons, 20 MeV (average energy) neutrons and 300 MeV/c pions that represent important parts of the spectrum of particles that will be encountered in the CMS Tracker. The relative damage factors of the various sources are calculated by comparing the laser threshold current increase due to radiation damage giving approximately=0 : 0.12 : 0.53 : 1 for /sup 60/Co-gamma, approximately =0.8 MeV neutrons, approximately=20 MeV neutrons with respect to 300 MeV/c pions. The effects of bias current and temperature on the annealing were measured and, in all cases, the annealing is proportional to log(annealing time). A bias current of 60 mA increases the annealing, in terms of the ti...

  15. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with qu...

  16. Radiation damage in biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, Martina Christina

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity, ionizing radiations have been widely applied in medicine both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The risks associated with radiation exposure and handling led to the parallel development of the field of radiation protection. Pioneering experiments done by Sanche and co-workers in 2000 showed that low-energy secondary electrons, which are abundantly generated along radiation tracks, are primarily responsible for radiation damage through successive interactions with the molecular constituents of the medium. Apart from ionizing processes, which are usually related to radiation damage, below the ionization level low-energy electrons can induce molecular fragmentation via dissociative processes such as internal excitation and electron attachment. This prompted collaborative projects between different research groups from European countries together with other specialists from Canada,  the USA and Australia. This book summarizes the advances achieved by these...

  17. DNA damages induced by Ar F laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapel, C.; Rose, S.; Chevrier, L.; Cordier, E.; Courant, D. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    2006-07-01

    The photo ablation process used in corneal refractive surgery by the Argon Fluoride (Ar F) laser emitting in ultraviolet C at 193 nm, exposes viable cells round the irradiated zone to sub ablative doses (< 400 joules.m -2). Despite that DNA absorption is higher at 193 nm than 254 nm, cytotoxicity of 193 nm laser radiation is lower than radiation emitted by 254 nm UV-C lamps. In situ, DNA could be protected of laser radiation by cellular components. Consequently, some authors consider that this radiation does not induce genotoxic effect whereas others suspect it to be mutagenic. These lasers are used for fifteen years but many questions remain concerning the long term effects on adjacent cells to irradiated area. The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of 193 nm laser radiation on DNA of stromal keratocytes which are responsible of the corneal structure. The 193 nm laser irradiation induces directly DNA breakage in keratocytes as it has been shown by the comet assay under alkaline conditions. Two hours post irradiation, damages caused by the highest exposure (150 J.m-2) are not repaired as it has been measured with the Olive Tail Moment (product of tail length and tail DNA content). They give partly evidence of induction of an apoptotic process in cells where DNA could be too damaged. In order to characterize specifically double strand breaks, a comparative analysis by immunofluorescence of the H2 Ax histone phosphorylation (H2 Ax) has been performed on irradiated keratocytes and unirradiated keratocytes. Results show a dose dependent increase of the number of H2 Ax positive cells. Consequences of unrepaired DNA lesions could be observed by the generation of micronuclei in cells. Results show again an increase of micronuclei in laser irradiated cells. Chromosomal aberrations have been pointed out by cytogenetic methods 30 mn after irradiation. These aberrations are dose dependent (from 10 to 150 J.m-2). The number of breakage decreases in the long run

  18. Laser undulator radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, Y; Ruschin, S; Tanabé, T; Toyoda, K

    2000-01-01

    Various characteristics such as the number of photons, the wavelength, and the solid angle of the laser undulator radiation have been measured quantitatively. It was performed in the visible wavelength region using the interaction between a high-power pulsed CO sub 2 laser and a high-quality electron beam having an energy of 0.65-0.85 MeV. The experimental results were in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. A criterion to determine the limitation to the number of periods of the laser undulator was also proposed.

  19. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, H. D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mao, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Levashov, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Santana, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Welch, J. N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wolf, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  20. Radiation damage in electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Rubinstein, John L

    2010-01-01

    In an electron microscope, the electron beam used to determine the structures of biological tissues, cells, and molecules destroys the specimen as the image is acquired. This destruction occurs before a statistically well-defined image can be obtained and is consequently the fundamental limit to resolution in biological electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Damage from the destructive interaction of electrons with frozen-hydrated specimens occurs in three stages: primary damage, as electrons ionize the sample, break bonds, and produce secondary electrons and free radicals; secondary damage, as the secondary electrons and free radicals migrate through the specimen and cause further chemical reactions; and tertiary damage, as hydrogen gas is evolved within the sample, causing gross morphological changes to the specimen. The deleterious effects of radiation are minimized in cryo-EM by limiting the exposure of the specimen to incident electrons and cooling the sample to reduce secondary damage. This review emphasizes practical considerations for minimizing radiation damage, including measurement of electron exposure, estimation of absorbed doses of energy, selection of microscope voltage and specimen temperature, and selection of electron exposure to optimize images. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  2. The early stages of silicon surface damage induced by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser radiation: an AFM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Sacher, E.; Meunier, M

    2004-01-30

    The early stages of the surface microstructural modification of silicon, induced by single pulses of CO{sub 2} laser irradiation ({lambda}=10.6 {mu}m), have been studied, in both vacuum and air, by contact mode AFM. The laser pulse was found to be absorbed at the front surface of the sample, facing the laser; this was shown to be due to the presence of native oxide, which absorbs at this wavelength. We found that this absorption of energy caused the stress-induced formation of vertically oriented, square-shaped fragments, 400-700 nm in length, often with short branches, that form a wall around the impact site; they oriented toward the plane of the sample with distance from the impact site, aligning more in the electric field direction of the pulse. In addition, electrically charged, branched fragments were redeposited at the outer extremities of the pulse site.

  3. Radiation damage of structural materials

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsky, Jaroslav

    1994-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of nuclear power plants is critical in the prevention or control of severe accidents. This monograph deals with both basic groups of structural materials used in the design of light-water nuclear reactors, making the primary safety barriers of NPPs. Emphasis is placed on materials used in VVER-type nuclear reactors: Cr-Mo-V and Cr-Ni-Mo-V steel for RPV and Zr-Nb alloys for fuel element cladding. The book is divided into 7 main chapters, with the exception of the opening one and the chapter providing a phenomenological background for the subject of radiation damage. Ch

  4. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage as determined by laser irradiation suggests that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the principal DNA lesions produced by terrestrial sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Yoon, Jae-in; Schroeder, Christi; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Cockburn, Myles; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2011-01-01

    suggest that CPDs are the principal lesion responsible for most DNA damage-dependent biological effects of sunlight.—Besaratinia, A., Yoon, J. -I., Schroeder, C., Bradforth, S. E., Cockburn, M., Pfeifer, G. P. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage as determined by laser irradiation suggests that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the principal DNA lesions produced by terrestrial sunlight. PMID:21613571

  5. Studies on the Neutron Radiation Damage Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU De-hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish a unified standard of the evaluation of different sources of radiation damage, the neutron radiation damage equivalent standard source was determined both at home and abroad, and a lot of equivalence research work was done for making weapons anti neutron radiation performance examination and acceptance basis. The theoretical research progress was combed according to the relationship between the displacement damage function and the radiation source spectra ,and the experimental research progress was combed from the basic experimental methods, the controlling trend of effect parameters and field parameters. The experiment method to reduce the uncertainty was discussed, and present the research directions of radiation damage equivalence.

  6. Simulation of radiation damage in zircon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J.; Maupin, G.D.

    1988-05-01

    Radiation damage in natural zircon minerals due to alpha decay over geologic time has been simulated in laboratory studies extending over 5.5 years using Pu-doped synthetic zircon. These studies confirm for the first time that laboratory testing of actinide-doped materials can accurately predict the radiation-damage behavior of radioactive waste forms over geologic time and also provide new insights into interpretation of radiation damage in natural minerals.

  7. Simulation of radiation damage in zircon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J.; Maupin, G.D.

    1987-06-01

    Radiation damage in natural zircon minerals due to alpha decay has been simulated in laboratory studies using Pu-doped synthetic zircon. These studies confirm that laboratory testing of actinide-doped materials can accurately predict the radiation-damage behavior of radioactive waste forms over geologic time, and also provide new insights into interpretation of radiation damage in natural minerals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon under combined millisecond and nanosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-03-01

    The laser-silicon interaction process was investigated with the superposed radiation of two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. A pulse duration of 1 millisecond (ms) was superposed by 7 nanosecond (ns) pulses, creating a combined pulse laser (CPL). The time-resolved surface temperature of silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The melting thresholds of silicon were attained for a single ms laser and a CPL by infrared radiometry and time-resolved reflectance. The concept of threshold boundary was proposed, and a fitted curve of threshold boundary was obtained. An axisymmetric model was established for laser heating of silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained for single ms laser and CPL irradiation using finite element analysis. The numerical results were validated experimentally, and an obvious decrease in melting threshold was found under CPL irradiation. That is attributed to pre-heating by the ms laser and the surface damage caused by the ns laser.

  9. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  10. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  11. Laser induced damage threshold on metallic surfaces during laser cleaning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available laser paint removal. Laser induced damage on 316L stainless steel was studied, with the target subjected to single and multiple pulse irradiations using a Q-switched Nd:YAG, with fluences between 0.15 and 11.8 J/cm2. Several different damage morphologies...

  12. Laser damage test bench for space optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Wolfgang; Allenspacher, Paul

    2017-11-01

    At the German Aerospace Center in Stuttgart a laser damage test bench is run to evaluate damage thresholds of various optical components. The system setup is based on the current ISO standards 11254 [1-3] for single shot and multiple pulse operation. The laser damage test bench contains two repetitively pulsed laser sources, a Ti:Sapphire and a Nd:YAG laser, operating at wavelengths of 775 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Harmonic wavelength converters to the visible spectral range are available. Both lasers are supplying the same damage testing rig. Online damage assessment techniques like sensitive scatter probe monitoring and video microscopy monitoring are used. The system is suited and has been tested extensively in the past for dielectric coated optics like beam turning mirrors, reflectors and windows, nonlinear optical components, semiconductors, and laser crystals. The damage test bench is located in a class 10,000 cleanroom environment under a laminar flowbox providing an additional isolation factor of >103. The tests can also be performed in sealed optical compartments in partial vacuum and under long term irradiation conditions. All experiments are supported by theoretical simulation of laser-material interactions, down to the sub-ps timescale [4].

  13. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors.

  14. Small Optics Laser Damage Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Justin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This specification defines the requirements and procedure for laser damage testing of coatings and bare surfaces designated for small optics in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  15. Ultrashort Laser Retinal Damage Threshold Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    pulses in the rabbit eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1995;36(9): 1910–7. [19] Laser Institute of America . American National Standard for Safe Use of...32] Lin CP, Kelly MW, Sibayan SAB, Latina MA, Anderson RR. Selective cell killing by microparticle absorption of pulsed laser radiation. IEEE J Sel Top

  16. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  17. The LHCb VELO: Performance and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, H.L., E-mail: hella.snoek@nikhef.nl

    2014-11-21

    LHCb is a forward spectrometer experiment dedicated to the search for New Physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons produced by the proton–proton interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The measurement of the flight distance of these hadrons is critical for the physics program. The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point and provides excellent resolution of charged tracks and vertex positions. The VELO has been run successfully since installation. The sensors have the first sensitive strips at a radius of 8.2 mm and are exposed to maximum radiation doses of ∼0.6×10{sup 14}1MeVn{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}perfb{sup −1} delivered integrated luminosity. The performance of the VELO during the first LHC run is described, together with methods to monitor radiation damage. Results from the radiation damage studies are presented showing interesting features, such as an unexpected charge coupling to the second metal layer routing lines after irradiation. The radiation damage has so far no impact on the track reconstruction performance. - Highlights: • We study the performance and radiation damage of the LHCb VELO detector. • The physics performance of the VELO detector is meeting its expectations. • Radiation damage is monitored through multiple developed methods. • An unexpected, radiation induced effect to the second metal layer has been observed.

  18. Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

    2009-11-14

    In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

  19. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  20. Animal Models of Ionizing Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    level, some epithelial damage was observed (3). Michaelson, et al. (19) demonstrated that dogs developed hypothyroidism two to four years after expos... Pathophysiologic Signs of the Responses of the Nervous System to Ionizing Radiation, In Response of the Nervous System to Ionizing Radiation, Academic Press...Immunol. Ther. Exp., 10:416-459, 1962. 138. Krochak, R.J., and D.G. Baker, Radiation Nephritis. Clinical Manifestations and Pathophysiologic Mechanisms

  1. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  2. Photothermal damage prediction of laser interstitial thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Fan, Shifu; Zhao, Youquan

    2006-11-01

    An improved scattering optical model was developed under cylindrical coordinate to simulate the thermal effect of diffusing applicator in laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). The thermal damage was calculated by finite element method (FEM) using Pennes bio-heat transfer equation and Arrhenius injury integral formula. The numerical results showed that the scattering can considerably influence the evaluation of the lesion area, and the relationship between application powers or time and resulting tissue thermal damage was nonlinear. Although usually applying relatively low power can avoid tissue charring, rather higher power is recommended because it is indispensable to achieve necessary damage threshold and the therapy time can be shortened.

  3. Laser-Induced Damage with Femtosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.

    The strong electric fields of focused femtosecond laser pulses lead to non-equilibrium dynamics in materials, which, beyond a threshold intensity, causes laser-induced damage (LID). Such a strongly non-linear and non-perturbative process renders important LID observables like fluence and intensity thresholds and damage morphology (crater) extremely difficult to predict quantitatively. However, femtosecond LID carries a high degree of precision, which has been exploited in various micro/nano-machining and surface engineering applications, such as human eye surgery and super-hydrophobic surfaces. This dissertation presents an array of experimental studies which have measured the damage behavior of various materials under femtosecond irradiation. Precision experiments were performed to produce extreme spatio-temporal confinement of the femtosecond laser-solid damage interaction on monocrystalline Cu, which made possible the first successful direct-benchmarking of LID simulation with realistic damage craters. A technique was developed to produce laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in a single pulse (typically a multi-pulse phenomenon), and was used to perform a pump-probe study which revealed asynchronous LIPSS formation on copper. Combined with 1-D calculations, this new experimental result suggests more drastic electron heating than expected. Few-cycle pulses were used to study the LID performance and morphology of commercial ultra-broadband optics, which had not been systematically studied before. With extensive surface analysis, various morphologies were observed, including LIPSS, swelling (blisters), simple craters, and even ring-shaped structures, which varied depending on the coating design, number of pulses, and air/vacuum test environment. Mechanisms leading to these morphologies are discussed, many of which are ultrafast in nature. The applied damage behavior of multi-layer dielectric mirrors was measured and compared between long pulse (150 ps

  4. Radiation damage of polymers in ultrasonic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbalagan, Poornnima

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has always been a topic of great interest in various fields of sciences. In this work, an attempt is made to probe into the effect of subthreshold ultrasonic waves on the radiation damage created by irradiation of deuterons in polymer samples wherein the polymer samples act as model systems. Two equal volumes of radiation damage were produced in a single polymer sample wherein a standing wave of ultrasound was introduced into one. Three polymers namely, Polycarbonate, Polymethylmethacrylate and Polyvinyl chloride were used in this work. Four independent techniques were used to analyze the irradiated samples and visualize the radiation damage. Interferometric measurements give a measure of the refractive index modulation in the irradiated sample. Polymers, being transparent, do not absorb in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy shows absorption peaks in the visible region in irradiated polymer samples. Ion irradiation causes coloration of polymers. The light microscope is used to measure the absorption of white light by the irradiated polymers. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to obtain a measure of the open volume created by irradiation in polymers. A comparison between the irradiated region and the region exposed to ultrasonic waves simultaneously with irradiation in a polymer sample shows the polymer specific influence of the ultrasonic standing wave. (orig.)

  5. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-11-20

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

  6. Radiation damage in the LHCb VELO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, D.

    2013-08-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon micro-strip detector which surrounds the LHCb interaction point and provides μm resolution of charged tracks and vertex positions. The tip of the VELO sensors is predicted to receive a dose of 0.5 ×1013 1-MeV neq /cm2 per fb of data. The highest fluence of any silicon tracker at the four major LHC experiments. Radiation damage studies have been carried out during the first two years of data taking at LHCb for all 88 sensors of the VELO. Radiation damage has been observed in all sensors, with those sensors in the highest fluence regions showing evidence of type inversion. Radiation induced charge loss due to the second metal layer on the sensors is also observed.

  7. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, S. L.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory models developed over the past decade provide unique information about the structure of nanoscale defects produced by irradiation and about the nature of short-range interaction between radiation defects, clustering of defects, and their migration pathways. These ab initio models, involving no experimental input parameters, appear to be as quantitatively accurate and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage phenomena. Density functional theory models have effectively created a new paradigm for the scientific investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature- and dose-dependent response of materials to irradiation, a problem of pivotal significance for applications.

  8. Thulium fiber laser damage to the ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Our laboratory is studying experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative lithotripter to the clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. Safety studies characterizing undesirable Holmium laser-induced damage to ureter tissue have been previously reported. Similarly, this study characterizes TFL induced ureter and stone basket damage. A TFL beam with pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rates of 150-500 Hz was delivered through a 100-μm-core, low-OH, silica optical fiber to the porcine ureter wall, in vitro. Ureter perforation times were measured and gross, histological, and optical coherence tomography images of the ablation zone were acquired. TFL operation at 150, 300, and 500 Hz produced mean ureter perforation times of 7.9, 3.8, and 1.8 s, respectively. Collateral damage averaged 510, 370, and 310 μm. TFL mean perforation time exceeded 1 s at each setting, which is a greater safety margin than previously reported during Holmium laser ureter perforation studies.

  9. Laser-induced damage thresholds of starched PMMA waveplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Mikšys, D.; Maciulevičius, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Šlekys, G.; Samoylov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a versatile polymeric material that is well suited for fabrication of many commercial optical components: lenses, fibers, windows, phase waveplates and others. Our focus is achromatic zero-order waveplates made of anisotropic PMMA which can be used to modify the state of polarization of electromagnetic radiation. Such waveplates have a broad range of application in devices where polarized radiation is used. For example, when tunable lasers are used or when spectropolarimetric measurements are performed, one needs an achromatic waveplate providing a specific retardation in a wide wavelength range. Herewith anisotropic properties of PMMA subjected to one-axis stretching are analyzed and the technology for manufacturing such achromatic and super-achromatic, one-axis-stretched PMMA waveplates is described. This technology excludes any mechanical processing of waveplate component surfaces. Technical characteristics of achromatic and super-achromatic waveplates manufactured of PMMA including results of laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurements are discussed below.

  10. The LHCb VELO: Performance and radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, H. L.

    2014-11-01

    LHCb is a forward spectrometer experiment dedicated to the search for New Physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons produced by the proton-proton interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The measurement of the flight distance of these hadrons is critical for the physics program. The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point and provides excellent resolution of charged tracks and vertex positions. The VELO has been run successfully since installation. The sensors have the first sensitive strips at a radius of 8.2 mm and are exposed to maximum radiation doses of 0.6 ×1014 1 MeVneq /cm2 perfb-1 delivered integrated luminosity. The performance of the VELO during the first LHC run is described, together with methods to monitor radiation damage. Results from the radiation damage studies are presented showing interesting features, such as an unexpected charge coupling to the second metal layer routing lines after irradiation. The radiation damage has so far no impact on the track reconstruction performance.

  11. Radiation damage free ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Medvedev, Nikita; Chapman, Henry N.; Shih, Yanhua

    2018-01-01

    The x-ray free electron lasers can enable diffractive structural determination of protein nanocrystals and single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional x-ray diffraction. However the electronic form factor may be modified during the ultrashort x-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense x-ray pulse. For general x-ray imaging techniques, the minimization of the effects of radiation damage is of major concern to ensure reliable reconstruction of molecular structure. Here we show that radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with atomic spatial resolution by using x-ray parametric down-conversion and ghost diffraction with entangled photons of x-ray and optical frequencies. We show that the formation of the diffraction patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that can be as fine as the crystal lattice length scale of several Ångstrom. Since the samples are illuminated by low energy optical photons, they can be free of radiation damage.

  12. Radiation damage at LHCb, results and expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Faerber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb Detector is a single-arm spectrometer at the LHC designed to detect new physics through measuring CP violation and rare decays of heavy flavor mesons. The detector consists of vertex detector, tracking system, dipole magnet, 2 RICH detectors, em. calorimeter, hadron calorimeter, muon detector which all use different technologies and suffer differently from radiation damage. These radiation damage results and the investigation methods will be shown. The delivered luminosity till July 2011 was about 450 pb−1. The Vertex detector receives the highest particle flux at LHCb. The currents drawn by the silicon sensors are, as expected, increasing proportional to the integrated luminosity. The highest irradiaton regions of the n-bulk silicon sensors are observed to have recently undergone space charge sign inversion. The Silicon Trackers show increasing leakage currents comparable with earlier predictions. The electromagentic calorimeter and hadron calorimeter suffer under percent-level signal decrease whi...

  13. Radiation damage in the LHCb VELO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J.; Webber, A.; LHCb Collaboration1

    2013-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct particle tracks and vertices produced by proton-proton interactions near to the LHCb interaction point. The excellent track resolution and decay vertex separation provided by the VELO are essential to all LHCb analyses. For the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC up to the end of 2011 the VELO is exposed to higher particle fluences than any other silicon detector of the four major LHC experiments. These proceedings present results from radiation damage studies carried out during the first two years of data taking at the LHC. Radiation damage has been observed in all of the 88 VELO silicon strip sensors, with many sensors showing evidence of type-inversion in the highest fluence regions. Particular attention has been given to the two n+-on-p sensors as this type of sensor is one of the leading candidates for the LHC silicon detector upgrades.

  14. Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Harrison, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct particle tracks and vertices produced by proton-proton interactions near to the LHCb interaction point. The excellent track resolution and decay vertex separation provided by the VELO are essential to all LHCb analyses. For the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC up to the end of $2011$ the VELO is exposed to higher particle fluences than any other silicon detector of the four major LHC experiments. These proceedings present results from radiation damage studies carried out during the first two years of data taking at the LHC. Radiation damage has been observed in all of the $88$ VELO silicon strip sensors, with many sensors showing evidence of type-inversion in the highest fluence regions. Particular attention has been given to the two \

  15. Evaluation of radiation damage using nonlinear ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, K. H.; Wall, J. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Jacobs, L. J.; Viehrig, H.-W.

    2012-03-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound was used to monitor radiation damage in two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The microstructural changes associated with radiation damage include changes in dislocation density and the formation of precipitates, and nonlinear ultrasonic waves are known to be sensitive to such changes. Six samples each of two different RPV steels were previously irradiated in the Rheinsberg power reactor to two fluence levels, up to 1020 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). Longitudinal waves were used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity in these samples, and the results show a clear increase in the measured acoustic nonlinearity from the unirradiated state to the medium dose, and then a decrease from medium dose to high dose.

  16. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  17. INTERACTION OF FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION WITH SKIN: MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Yu. Rogov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of human skin response to the impact of femtosecond laser radiation were researched. The Monte–Carlo method was used for estimation of the radiation penetration depth into the skin cover. We used prevalent wavelength equal to 800 nm (for Ti: sapphire laser femtosecond systems. A mathematical model of heat transfer process was introduced based on the analytical solution of the system of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems. An experiment was carried out to determine the threshold energy of biological tissue injury (chicken skin was used as a test object. The value of electronic subsystem relaxation time was determined from the experiment and is in keeping with literature data. The results of this work can be used to assess the maximum permissible exposure of laser radiation of different lengths that cause the damage of biological tissues, as well as for the formation of safe operation standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  18. [Influence of microwave and laser radiation on survivability of organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, E Sh; Zakharov, S D; Aminova, E M; Ismailova, G E; Khachirov, D G

    2001-01-01

    Depending on energy, spatial-temporal, modulation and other characteristics of an electromagnetic field, properties of a subject, exposure settings and possible interaction of other attendant factors microwaves may have either stabilizing, wholesome and even therapeutic or negative (damaging) effects on biological and ecological objects and systems. Therefore, there are two interrelated problems to be addressed. One is electromagnetic safety of and health provisions for humans exposed to EMF and EMR and the other, effective utilization of microwave EMF and EMR for biomedical and other purposes associated with enhancement of viability of organisms. The light-oxygen effect of laser radiation is gaining footing in therapy where it is used to activate or destroy biological systems by optical radiation at a specified light dose. Thus, low-intensity laser radiation can be used to improve viability and high-intensity laser radiation, to treat cancers.

  19. ACE inhibition attenuates radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Sonja J.; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; de Boer, Rudolf A; Faber, Hette; Cannon, Megan V; Nagle, Peter W; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Luijk, Peter; Coppes, Robert P

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In thoracic irradiation, the maximum radiation dose is restricted by the risk of radiation-induced cardiopulmonary damage and dysfunction limiting tumor control. We showed that radiation-induced sub-clinical cardiac damage and lung damage in rats mutually interact and that

  20. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  1. Prevent Eye Damage: Protect Yourself from UV Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    PREVENT EYE DAMAGE Protect Yourself from UV Radiation M ost Americans understand the link between ultraviolet (UV) radiation and skin cancer. Many are less aware of the connection between UV radiation ...

  2. Non-destructive evaluation of UV pulse laser-induced damage performance of fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Wang, Fengrui; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Jiang, Xiaodong; Sun, Laixi; Ye, Xin; Li, Qingzhi; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Sun, Dunlu

    2017-11-24

    The surface laser damage performance of fused silica optics is related to the distribution of surface defects. In this study, we used chemical etching assisted by ultrasound and magnetorheological finishing to modify defect distribution in a fused silica surface, resulting in fused silica samples with different laser damage performance. Non-destructive test methods such as UV laser-induced fluorescence imaging and photo-thermal deflection were used to characterize the surface defects that contribute to the absorption of UV laser radiation. Our results indicate that the two methods can quantitatively distinguish differences in the distribution of absorptive defects in fused silica samples subjected to different post-processing steps. The percentage of fluorescence defects and the weak absorption coefficient were strongly related to the damage threshold and damage density of fused silica optics, as confirmed by the correlation curves built from statistical analysis of experimental data. The results show that non-destructive evaluation methods such as laser-induced fluorescence and photo-thermal absorption can be effectively applied to estimate the damage performance of fused silica optics at 351 nm pulse laser radiation. This indirect evaluation method is effective for laser damage performance assessment of fused silica optics prior to utilization.

  3. Laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Soms, L.; Marczak, J.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Perkowski, P.; Kedzierski, J.; Miszczyk, E.; Olifierczuk, M.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a problem in diagnostics of a dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose, the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. Such pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along an exactly the same optical path. In this case, the energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, several independent lasers have to be used. To form optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the energy of laser pulse through of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell (NLCC) of type LCNP2 with switching on time τON smaller than 5 μs might be applied. High laser damage resistance of NLCC and short τON can be fulfilled by preparation of liquid crystal cells with Liquid Crystal Mixture (LCM), well tuned to twisted nematic electro-optical effect, and well tuned all optical interfaces (Air - Antireflection - Quartz Plate - Electrode - Blocking Film - Aligning Layer - LCM - Aligning Layer - Blocking Film - Electrode - Quartz Plate - Antireflection - Air). In such LCNP2 cell, the transmission is higher than 97% at λ = 1.064 μm, as it is presented by Gooch and Tarry [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 8, 1575 (1975)]. The safe laser density energy is about 0.6 J/cm2 for a train of laser pulses (λ = 1.064 μm, pulse duration 10 ns FWHM, pulse repetition rate 100 pps, train duration 10 s), so the area of liquid crystal cell tolerating 3 J through it shall be as large as 5 cm2. Due to the presence of two blocking film layers between electrodes, LCNP2 can be driven by high voltages. Switching on time smaller than τON = 5 μs was obtained under 200 V switching voltage.

  4. Non-thermal electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-05-21

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat.

  5. Studies on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee Yong; Sohn, Young Sook

    1998-04-01

    We studied on the strategies of minimizing radiation damage in animal system. To this end we studied following areas of research (1) mechanisms involved in bone marrow damage after total body irradiation, (2) extraction of components that are useful in protecting hematopoietic system from radiation damage, (3) cell therapy approach in restoring the damaged tissue, (4) development of radioprotective chemical reagent, and (5) epidemiological study on the population that had been exposed to radiation.

  6. Electromagnetic radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a laser wakefield accelerator is calculated based on Lienard-Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically lies in the infrared

  7. Virtual Mie particle model of laser damage to optical elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Hirata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, devices being developed for application systems have used laser beams that have high average power, high peak power, short pulse width, and short wavelength. Therefore, optical elements using such application systems require a high laser damage threshold. The laser damage threshold is provided by International Organization for Standardization 11254 (ISO11254. One of the measurement methods of the laser damage threshold provided by ISO11254 is an online method to measure the intensity of light scattering due to a laser damage trace. In this paper, we propose a measurement method for the laser damage threshold that realizes high sensitivity and high accuracy by using polarized light and lock-in detection. Since the scattering light with laser damage is modeled on the asperity of the optical element-surface as Mie particles (virtual Mie particles, we consider the intensity change of scattering light as a change in the radius of a virtual Mie particle. To evaluate this model, the laser damage trace on the optical element-surface was observed by an atomic force microscopy (AFM. Based on the observed AFM image, we analyzed the frequency domain by the Fourier transform, and estimated the dominant virtual Mie particle radius in the AFM measurement area. In addition, we measured the laser damage threshold. The light source was the fifth generation of a Nd:YAG laser (λ =213nm. The specifications of the laser were: repetition frequency 10Hz, pulse width 4ns, linear type polarization, laser pulse energy 4mJ, and laser transverse mode TEM00. The laser specifications were a repetition frequency, pulse width, pulse energy and beam diameter of 10Hz, 4ns, 4mJ and 13mm, respectively. The laser damage thresholds of an aluminum coated mirror and a dielectric multi-layer mirror designed at a wavelength of 213nm as measured by this method were 0.684 J/cm2 and 0.998J/cm2, respectively. These laser damage thresholds were 1/4 the laser damage

  8. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Abrefah GS Klinger

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin

  9. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  10. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  11. Protection of DNA damage by radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, In Gyu; Lee, Kang Suk; Kim, Kug Chan; Oh, Tae Jung

    1998-12-01

    The SOS response of Escherichia coli is positively regulated by RecA. To examine the effects of polyamines on The SOS response of E. Coli, we investigated the expression of recA gene in polyamine-deficient mutant and wild type carrying recA'::lacZ fusion gene. As a result, recA expression by mitomycin C is higher in wild type than that of polyamine-deficient mutant, but recA expression by UV radiation is higher in wild type than of mutant. We also found that exogenous polyamines restored the recA expression in the polyamine-deficient mutant to the wild type level. These results proposed that polyamines play an important role in mechanism of intracellular DNA protection by DNA damaging agents.

  12. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

    2000-09-26

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

  13. Radiation damage limits to XPCS studies of protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodnala, Preeti, E-mail: preeti.vodnala@gmail.com; Karunaratne, Nuwan; Lurio, Laurence [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL, 60115 (United States); Bera, Sambhunath [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University UP, Sector 125, NOIDA 201313 (India); Thurston, George M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5603 (United States); Karonis, Nick [Department of Computer Science, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Mathematics and Computer Science, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60495 (United States); Winans, John [Department of Computer Science, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60495 (United States); Yasui, Linda [Department of Biology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Gaillard, Elizabeth; Karumanchi, Kalyan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb IL, 60115 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    The limitations to x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) imposed by radiation damage have been evaluated for suspensions of alpha crystallin. We find that the threshold for radiation damage to the measured protein diffusion rate is significantly lower than the threshold for damage to the protein structure. We provide damage thresholds beyond which the measured diffusion coeffcients have been modified using both XPCS and dynamic light scattering (DLS).

  14. The study of radiation damage of EPROM 2764 memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domanski Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple statistical theory of radiation damage of semiconductor memory has been constructed. The radiation damage of EPROM memory has been investigated. The measured number of damaged bytes is significantly lower than the expected number resulting from the purely random distribution of the damaged bits. In this way it has been proven that there is a correlation between the failures of individual memory bits which are located in the same byte.

  15. Influence of radiation damage on plasma facing material erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koidan, V.S. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' (RRC KI), Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: koidan@nfi.kiae.ru; Brukhanov, A.N.; Chugunov, O.K.; Gureev, V.M.; Khripunov, B.I.; Kornienko, S.N.; Kuteev, B.V.; Latushkin, S.T.; Muksunov, A.M.; Petrov, V.B.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Smirnov, V.P.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Unezhev, V.N. [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' (RRC KI), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    New experimental approach is developed to explore plasma facing materials accounting for neutron induced radiation damage on erosion of these materials in plasma. The radiation damage has been produced in carbon materials by 5 MeV {sup 12}C{sup +} ions accelerated on cyclotron of Kurchatov Institute. A high level of radiation damage (1-10 dpa) has been obtained on these materials. The erosion of irradiated materials including CFC under plasma impact was studied on the LENTA linear plasma simulator. Surface modification was analyzed and the erosion rate was evaluated. Enhancement of the erosion process was detected for the radiation-damaged materials.

  16. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  17. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J; Opalenik, Susan R; Beckham, Joshua T; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Jansen, E Duco

    2006-01-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (lambda=10.6 microm, 0.679 to 2.262 Wcm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, omegaL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 Wcm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 Wcm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin

  18. Investigations in silicate glasses. I. Radiation damage. II. Optical nonlinearity. [Gamma rays and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.J.

    1976-11-15

    The investigation of two poorly understood but technologically important physical properties of silicate glasses and related materials is described. The use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance to investigate the nature of radiation-induced damage in glasses exposed to a variety of high-energy radiation sources is discussed first. Second, the measurement of the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient in a variety of optical materials related to the design of high-power laser systems is described. The radiation damage investigations rely heavily on the comparison of experimental results for different experimental situations. The comparison of EPR lineshapes, absolute spin densities and power saturation behavior is used to probe a variety of microscopic and macroscopic aspects of radiation damage in glasses. Comparison of radiation damage associated with exposure to gamma rays and fast neutrons (and combinations thereof) are interpreted in terms of the microscopic damage mechanisms which are expected to be associated with the specific radiations. Comparison of radiation damage behavior in different types of glasses is also interpreted in terms of the behavior expected for the specific materials. The body of data which is generated is found to be internally self-consistent and is also generally consistent with the radiation damage behavior expected for specific situations. A new and versatile technique for measuring the nonlinear index of refraction coefficient, n/sub 2/, in optical materials is described. The technique utilizes a 1 ns pulsed neodymium-glass laser system and time-resolved interferometry to determine the ratio of the coefficient n/sub 2/ of sample materials to the n/sub 2/ of CS/sub 2/. This method avoids some of the complications associated with performing absolute measurements of n/sub 2/ and allows the use of a relatively simple experimental technique. The measurements determine the nonlinear index ratios of the samples with an accuracy of about

  19. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  20. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  1. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.F.; Milligan, J.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  2. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  3. Effect of laser radiation on rat radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprun, I.B.

    1979-03-01

    Quite a few experimental data have been obtained to date indicating that radioresistance of the organism is enhanced under the influence of electromagnetic emissions in the radiofrequency and optical ranges. But no studies were made of the possible radioprotective properties of coherent laser radiation. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the low-energy emission of optical quantum generators (lasers) in the red band stimulates the protective forces of the organism and accelerates regenerative processes; i.e., it induces effects that are the opposite of that of ionizing radiation. Moreover, it was recently demonstrated that there is activation of catalase, a radiosensitive enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of peroxide compounds, under the influence of lasers. For this reason, the effect of pre-exposure to laser beams on radiosensitivity of rats was tested.

  4. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  5. Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franks, L A; Olsen, R W; Walsh, D S; Vizkelethy, G; Trombka, J I; Doyle, B L; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI sub 2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 0 p/cm sup 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm sup 2. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5x10 sup 9 p/cm sup 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from a moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particles at fluences up to 1.5x10 sup 1 sup 0 alpha/cm sup 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5x10 sup 9 alpha/cm sup 2. CT detectors show resolution...

  6. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loch, R.A.; Sobierajski, R.; Louis, Eric; Bosgra, J.; Bosgra, J.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for highintensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly

  7. Interaction of laser radiation with urinary calculi

    OpenAIRE

    Mayo, M E

    2009-01-01

    Urolithias, calculus formation in the urinary system, affects 5 – 10% of the population and is a painful and recurrent medical condition. A common approach in the treatment of calculi is the use of laser radiation, a procedure known as laser lithotripsy, however, the technique has not yet been fully optimised. This research examines the experimental parameters relevant to the interactions of the variable microsecond pulsed holmium laser (λ = 2.12 μm, τp = 120 – 800 μs, I ~ 3 MW...

  8. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Microwave generation in an optical breakdown plasma created by modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z.; Losev, Leonid L.; Soskov, V. I.

    1990-06-01

    It was established that when laser radiation, intensity modulated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz, interacted with an optical breakdown plasma which it had created, a microwave component appeared in the thermal emf of the plasma. The amplitude of the microwave thermal emf reached 0.7 V for a laser radiation intensity of 6 GW/cm2. Laser radiation with λL = 1.06 μm was converted to the microwave range with λmω = 13 cm in the optical breakdown plasma. A microwave signal power of ~ 0.5 W was obtained from a laser power of ~ 5 MW.

  9. Use of 3-um laser radiation in middle ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1995-01-01

    An inner ear model was used to demonstrate thermal and mechanical effects occurring during Erbium laser stapedotomy. Results of inverse schlieren optical flash photography and time resolved pressure amplitude measurements indicate the existence of safe laser parameters for stapes foot plate perforation. Due to the high absorption of 3 micrometers radiation in water, efficient bone ablation and precise fenestration with small thermally damaged zones is achieved. Pressure transients caused by the explosive ablation process correlate with the spiking of the laser intensity. The energy of a laser pulse, directly applied into the perilymph through an already existing perforation, creates a vapor channel which afterwards collapses, sending out a strong pressure transient. The maximal amplitude of this pressure transient depends on the geometry and dynamics of the vapor channel and is several times stronger than the pressure amplitudes generated by the bone ablation process. This study shows that no permanent hearing loss or damage of inner ear structures is expected using an Erbium laser fluence of 10 J/cm2.

  10. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  11. Single Molecule Scanning of DNA Radiation Oxidative Damage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal will develop an assay to map genomic DNA, at the single molecule level and in a nanodevice, for oxidative DNA damage arising from radiation exposure;...

  12. Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

  13. Transient interference implications on the subpicosecond laser damage of multidielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Mangote, Benoît; Commandré, Mireille; Melninkaitis, Andrius; Mirauskas, Julius; Jeskevic, Maksim; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2010-08-01

    Laser-induced damage in optical thin films with subpicosecond pulses is investigated. A model dedicated to optical interference coatings and based on the rate equation for free electron generation is introduced. It takes into account the transient interference effects induced by changes in the dielectric function during the laser pulse and its feedback effect on the electron density distribution in the multilayer stack. Simulations are compared to experiments on HfO2 and Ta2O5 films with pulses ranging from 45 fs to 1 ps. It is shown that this approach can improve the interpretation of femtosecond and picosecond laser induced damage in thin films.

  14. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  15. Radiation damage of the ILC positron source target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushakov, A.; Riemann, S.

    2007-11-15

    The radiation damage of the positron source target for the International Linear Collider (ILC) has been studied. The displacement damage in target material due to multi-MeV photons has been calculated by combining FLUKA simulations for secondary particle production, SPECTER data for neutron displacement cross-sections and the Lindhard model for estimations of displacement damage by ions. The radiation damage of a stationary Ti6Al4V target in units of displacements per atom (dpa) has been estimated for photons from an undulator with strength 0.92 and period 1.15 cm. The calculated damage is 7 dpa. Approximately 12.5% of displacement damage result from neutrons. (orig.)

  16. BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J

    2010-10-26

    UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

  17. Mechanical impedance measurement and damage detection using noncontact laser ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Lim, Hyeong Uk; Hong, Jung-Wuk; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-06-01

    This Letter proposes a mechanical impedance (MI) measurement technique using noncontact laser ultrasound. The ultrasound is generated by shooting a pulse laser beam onto a target structure, and its response is measured using a laser vibrometer. Once ultrasound propagation converges to structural vibration, MI is formed over the entire structure. Because noncontact lasers are utilized, this technique is applicable in harsh environments, free of electromagnetic interference, and able to perform wide-range scanning. The formation of MI and its feasibility for damage detection are verified through thermo-mechanical finite element analysis and lab-scale experiments.

  18. Dose-rate effect of ultrashort electron beam radiation on DNA damage and repair in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayan, Nelly; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Grigoryan, Bagrat; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Sarkisyan, Natalia; Tsakanova, Gohar; Haroutiunian, Samvel; Aroutiounian, Rouben

    2017-11-01

    Laser-generated electron beams are distinguished from conventional accelerated particles by ultrashort beam pulses in the femtoseconds to picoseconds duration range, and their application may elucidate primary radiobiological effects. The aim of the present study was to determine the dose-rate effect of laser-generated ultrashort pulses of 4 MeV electron beam radiation on DNA damage and repair in human cells. The dose rate was increased via changing the pulse repetition frequency, without increasing the electron energy. The human chronic myeloid leukemia K-562 cell line was used to estimate the DNA damage and repair after irradiation, via the comet assay. A distribution analysis of the DNA damage was performed. The same mean level of initial DNA damages was observed at low (3.6 Gy/min) and high (36 Gy/min) dose-rate irradiation. In the case of low-dose-rate irradiation, the detected DNA damages were completely repairable, whereas the high-dose-rate irradiation demonstrated a lower level of reparability. The distribution analysis of initial DNA damages after high-dose-rate irradiation revealed a shift towards higher amounts of damage and a broadening in distribution. Thus, increasing the dose rate via changing the pulse frequency of ultrafast electrons leads to an increase in the complexity of DNA damages, with a consequent decrease in their reparability. Since the application of an ultrashort pulsed electron beam permits us to describe the primary radiobiological effects, it can be assumed that the observed dose-rate effect on DNA damage/repair is mainly caused by primary lesions appearing at the moment of irradiation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  19. Genomic damage in children accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fucic, A; Brunborg, G; Lasan, R

    2007-01-01

    of children to environmental genotoxicants. Environmental research on children predominantly investigates the health effects of air pollution while effects from radiation exposure deserve more attention. The main sources of knowledge on genome damage of children exposed to radiation are studies performed...

  20. Radiation damage limitations for the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanger, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    One important factor determining the lifetime of particle accelerators using superconducting magnets is the accumulated radiation damage of the magnet components. Using existing damage studies and a measured correlation between the radiation levels with the beam-off and the beam-on, a reasonable assessment of magnet lifetimes can be made. On the basis of this assessment it is expected that damage to the magnet conductor will not limit the magnet performance. The proper choice of polymeric materials used in the magnet is necessary to avoid frequent refurbishing of the magnets.

  1. Intraoperative arrhythmias and tissue damage during transmyocardial laser revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadipaşaoglu, K A; Sartori, M; Masai, T; Cihan, H B; Clubb, F J; Conger, J L; Frazier, O H

    1999-02-01

    Transmyocardial laser revascularization creates transmural channels to improve myocardial perfusion. Different laser sources and ablation modalities have been proposed for transmyocardial laser revascularization. We investigated the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and laser-tissue interactions during transmyocardial laser revascularization of normal porcine myocardium with three different lasers. We used a continuous-wave, chopped CO2 laser (20 J/pulse, 15 ms/pulse) synchronized with the R wave; a holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser (2 J/pulse, 250 micros/pulse, 5 Hz); and a xenon-chloride (excimer, Xe:Cl) laser (35 mJ/pulse, 20 ns/pulse, 30 Hz). Each laser was used 30 times as the sole modality in four consecutive pigs, yielding 120 channels. The average number of pulses needed to create a channel was 1, 11 +/- 4, and 37 +/- 8 for the CO2, Ho:YAG, and Xe:Cl lasers, respectively. All Ho:YAG and Xe:Cl channels had premature ventricular contractions. Ventricular tachycardia occurred in 70% of the Xe:Cl and 60% of the Ho:YAG channels. Only 36% of the CO2 channels had premature ventricular contractions, and only 3% of the CO2 channels had ventricular tachycardia (p CO2 channels were straight and well demarcated. The zone of structural and thermal damage extended over half the channel's diameter, measuring 0.52 +/- 0.25 mm. During transmyocardial laser revascularization, the CO2 laser synchronized with the R wave is significantly less arrhythmogenic than the Ho:YAG and Xe:Cl lasers not synchronized with the R wave. In addition, the interaction of the CO2 laser with porcine cardiac tissue is significantly less traumatic than that of the Ho:YAG and the Xe:Cl lasers.

  2. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  3. Morphological studies of laser-induced photoacoustic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Yashima, Yutaka; Watanabe, Shinichi; McAuliffe, Daniel J., Sr.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1990-06-01

    Argon-fluoride excimer laser ablation of stratum comeum causes deeper tissue damage than expected for thermal or photochemical mechanisms, suggesting thatphotoacoustic waves have arole in tissue damage. Laserirradiation (193 nm, 14 ns pulses, 1-2 Hz) attworadiantexposures, 60 and 160 mJ/cm2perpulse was usedto ablate the stratumcomeumofskin. Light and electron microscopy ofimmediate biopsies demonstrated damage to fibroblasts as deep as 88 and 220 jun, respectively, below the ablation site. Ablation throughwaterwas usedtoinertially confine the ablation zone. Partial ablationofs.c. through airproducedno damage, whereas partial ablation through water damaged skin to amean depth of 1 14.5 8.8( Full thickness ablation of s.c. through air and water produced damage zones measuring 192.2 16.2 and 293.0 71.6 rim, respectively (p mechanism ofdamage. The depths ofdamage for thelarge spot, line, and small spots were 43 1 164 urn, 269 96xni, andno damage. The spot size dependence ofthedepthofdamage is consistentwiththe geometric attenuation one would expect to be present from a pressure wave related phenomena. Sequential biopsies were taken over a 7 day period for light and transmission electron microscopy. At 24 hours, there was necrosis of the epidermis and papillary dermis subjacent to the ablation site, with neutrophils surrounding and demarcating the affected area. The necrotic zone sloughedby48 hours. Thereepithelializationwas completeby7 days. The sequenceofrepairis similartoknife wound healing which we have previously studied, and is analogous to other wound healing processes. We have used an experimental model of ArF excimer laser ablation of stratum corneum to investigate laser-induced photoacoustic damage. The evidence for the injury being due to pressure transients is indirectbutcompelling. Whether these pressuretransients are acoustic transients orshockwaves has notbeendetermined, although itis ourprejudicethatshockwaves are the predominant force under these

  4. Effect of laser pulse duration on damage to metal mirrors for laser IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, John E.; Tillack, Mark S.; Harilal, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Metal Mirror (GIMM) is a chief candidate for beam delivery for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). The goal for GIMM survival is greater than 3×10 8 laser pulses with 5 J/cm2 laser fluence normal to the incident beam. Laser-induced damage to metal mirrors is primarily a thermomechanical process. Long-term exposure leads to microstructural evolution analogous to fatigue. We have performed laser-induced damage experiments on high damage threshold aluminum mirrors using commercial KrF excimer (248 nm) lasers. We have studied mirror response to standard, 25 ns long-pulses as well as to IFE prototypic, 5 ns short-pulses achieved using a Pockels Cell. Short-pulse damage fluence was found to be better than predicted using simple thermal diffusion scaling from long-pulse results.

  5. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, J G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron-positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  6. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  7. Damage Detection by Laser Vibration Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Daniela Birdeanu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The technique based on the vibration analysis by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer is one of the most promising, allowing to extract also small defect and to directly correlate it to local dynamic stiffness and structural integrity. In fact, the measurement capabilities of vibrometers, such as sensitivity, accuracy and reduced intrusively, allow having a very powerful instrument in diagnostic.

  8. Time scales of radiation damage decay in four optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Frank; Geis, Norbert; Katterloher, Reinhard; Bender, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the qualification campaigns for the near infrared spectrometer and photometer instrument (NISP) on board the ESA/EUCLID satellite six optical materials where characterized with respect to their transmission losses after a radiation dose representing the mission exposure to high energy particles in the outer Lagrange point L2. Data was taken between 500 and 2000nm on six 25mm thick coated probes. Thickness and coating being representative for the NISP flight configuration. With this paper we present results owing up the radiation damage shown in [1]. We where able to follow up the decay of the radiation damage over almost one year under ambient conditions. This allows us to distinguish between curing effects that happen on different time-scales. As for some of the materials no radiation damage and thus no curing was detected, all materials that showed significant radiation damage in the measured passband showed two clearly distinguished time scales of curing. Up to 70% of the transmission losses cured on half decay time scales of several tens of days, while the rest of the damage cures on time scales of years.

  9. Laser ultrasonic absorption measurement in fatigue-damaged materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenburger, S; Arnold, W

    2002-05-01

    Changes in the materials microstructure caused by fatigue processes affect the ultrasonic absorption. Thus, quantitative measurement of the ultrasonic absorption should provide an indirect measure of fatigue damage. In this paper we present a study of the ultrasonic absorption in fatigue-damaged metals using the reverberation technique in combination with laser-based ultrasound. The reverberation technique allows one to measure absorption independently of scattering.

  10. Laser-Induced Thermal Damage of Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    in the experiments. Food and water were withheld from the animals the night before exposing them to the lasers. Three to four pigs were exposed each...LJ@ AND INTEGRAL OF FX(L) WITWd RESPECT TO c RADIAL AREA9FPCL)*FROM RmC TO VARIOUS RADIAL OISTAkC~S (LO*S)*RZNT 00 34 LPZ*Ll XI8CLaeS)* RINiT X20CL-1

  11. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  12. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of {gamma}-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  13. Interface characteristics of peeling-off damages of laser coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun; Yi, Kui; Guohang, Hu; Shao, Jianda

    2014-01-01

    Coating stacks of HfO2/SiO2 and Ta2O5/SiO2 were separately prepared by electron beam evaporation and dual ion beam sputtering. Damage characteristics at the interlayer interfaces were analyzed after irradiation of the coatings by a 1064 nm laser. The cross-sectional morphologies of damage spots indicated that peeling-off damages always occurred at the interface where the low refractive index material (SiO2) was deposited on the high refractive index material (HfO2 or Ta2O5). The effects of interface microstructure and components on peeling-off damages were also discussed. The microstructure of the interface was not a major factor that influenced peeling-off damages. Incomplete oxides (SiOx) and Na, K, Li ions accumulated near the interface and caused the formation of micro-defects layers with nano-sized thicknesses. Micro-defects layers maybe reduced adhesion of different interfaces and formed plasmas by absorbing laser energy. Finally stripping damages happened from micro-defects layers during irradiation by a 1064 nm laser.

  14. Non-contact damage monitoring by laser AE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, M.; Nishinoiri, S.

    2005-04-01

    AE method is a well-known technique for in-situ monitoring of fracture behavior by attaching piezoelectric transducer. However, conventional AE transducer cannot be used at elevated temperature or severe environment. Laser based ultrasonic (LBU) technique has been developed to characterize materials properties and detect flaws in materials. We developed the AE measurement system with laser interferometer to apply this technique to microfracture evaluation in various materials. AE during sintering of alumina ceramics and thermal spying of alumina powder on steel substrates were successfully measured by laser interferometers. The effect of processing parameters on AE behavior was clearly observed by analyzing AE waveforms. One of the most advantages of this laser AE technique is to estimate the temperature where microcracks are generated. These results could give a feed back to control processing conditions in order to avoid damage in materials. It was concluded that the laser AE method was very useful to detect microcracks in ceramics during fabrication.

  15. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  16. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    and 100 gm loads using a Knoop diamond indentor. Coefficient of Thermal Expansion A quartz tube dilatometer was employed for thermal expansion...which in turn results in an explosive heating with plasma formation and cracking, melting and vaporizing of the material. 2. Experimental Procedure 2.1... explosive eruption upward and outward from the substrate interface. At the edge of the irradiated area, where the beam fluence is low, the damaged site

  17. Radiation damage studies of silicon microstrip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, T; Hara, K; Shimojima, M; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Johansen, L G; Kobayashi, H; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Nakano, I; Ohsugi, T; Riedler, P; Roe, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stugu, B; Takashima, R; Tanizaki, K; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamura, K

    2000-01-01

    Various types of large area silicon microstrip detectors were fabricated for the development of radiation-tolerant detectors that will operate in the LHC ATLAS SCT. The detectors were irradiated with 12-GeV protons at KEK to fluences of 1.7*10/sup 14/ and 4.2*10/sup 14 / protons/cm/sup 2/. Irradiated samples included n-on-n detectors with 4 k Omega cm bulk resistivity and p-on-n detectors with 1 k Omega cm and 4 k Omega cm bulk resistivities. Four patterns of p-stop structures are configured in the n-on-n detectors. Although Hamamatsu fabricated most of the detectors, p-on-n detectors by SINTEF are also included, as well as those fabricated in a modified process by Hamamatsu. The detector performances after irradiation that are compared are the probability of creation of faulty coupling capacitors, C-V characteristics, charge curves, and total leakage current. The p-on-n are similar to the n-on-n detectors in these performances, and will remain operational in the ATLAS radiation environment. (12 refs).

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Investigation of the interaction of laser radiation with composite materials by infrared spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, V. I.; Kovalenko, I. P.; Levashenko, G. I.; Mazaev, N. V.; Sokol'nikov, A. S.; Shuralev, S. L.

    1990-10-01

    A description is given of the method and apparatus for determination of the effective temperature and composition of a jet of products of the interaction of laser radiation with a glass-fiber-reinforced plastic and an organic plastic. Measurements are also possible of the temperature and emissivity of a target when it is exposed in atmospheric air to cw CO2 laser radiation with a flux density of 3 × 102 — 103 W/cm2. The products of damage to the glass-fiber-reinforced plastic consisted of particles of metal oxides with a diameter d32 = 2.3-3.5 μm and a volume concentration Cv = (0.06-0.25) × 10 - 4, and of molecular gases CO2, H2O, and HCl; the damage products of the organic plastic were conglomerates of soot particles with the diameter d32 = 1-1.8 μm and a volume concentration Cv = (0.4-0.9) × 10 - 4, and the same molecular gases. The target emissivity increased with time and reached 0.8-0.9.

  19. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  20. Linear and Nonlinear Damage Detection Using a Scanning Laser Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Vanlanduit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV can perform vibration measurements with a high spatial resolution, it is an ideal instrument to accurately locate damage in a structure. Unfortunately, the use of linear damage detection features, as for instance FRFs or modal parameters, does not always lead to a successful identification of the damage location. Measurement noise and nonlinear distortions can make the damage detection procedure difficult. In this article, a combined linear-nonlinear strategy to detect and locate damage in a structure with the aid of a SLV, will be proposed. To minimize the effect of noise, the modal parameters will be estimated using a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE. Both noise and nonlinear distortion levels are extracted using the residuals of a two-dimensional spline fit. The validation of the technique will be performed on SLV measurements of a delaminated composite plate.

  1. Discharge modulation noise in He---Ne laser radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolwijn, P.T.

    1967-01-01

    Discharge modulation noise in He---Ne laser radiation is considered theoretically, including explicitly the laser oscillator properties. Experiments reported previously by us and other authors are in agreement with our analysis.

  2. Investigation of the laser-induced damage of dispersive coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Ivan B.; von Conta, Aaron; Trushin, Sergei A.; Major, Zsuzsanna; Karsch, Stefan; Krausz, Ferenc; Pervak, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    Different dispersive coatings were tested in terms of laser-induced damage threshold by using a Ti:Sapphire laser yielding 1 mJ, 30 fs pulses at 500 Hz repetition rate at 790 nm central wavelength. The beam was focused down to 140 μm. Single layer coatings of Au, Ag, Nb2O5, SiO2, Ta2O5 and mixtures of Ta2O5 and silica were examined as well as different dispersive coatings. We observed a direct dependence of the damage threshold on the band gap of the materials used to produce the different samples. The damage threshold values for the dispersive coatings employing the same high index material lay within a range of 30% of each other.

  3. LHCb: Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Rodriguez Perez, P

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and offline physics analyses. The 88 VELO sensors are all n-on-n type but one, which is made from n-on-p silicon, and is the only n-on-p module silicon sensor operated at the LHC. The sensors have an inner radius of only 7 mm from the LHC beam and an outer radius of 42 mm, consequently the sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose. The LHCb is planned to record an integrated luminosity up to 5 $fb^{-1}$ with collision energies between 7 and 14 TeV before 2018. The leakage current in the sensors has increased significantly following the delivered luminosity, and decreased during shutdown periods due to annealing. The effective depletion voltage of the sensors is measured from the charge collection effi...

  4. Radiation damage on the LHCb-VELO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, G.

    2013-12-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories and vertices produced at the LHCb interaction region. This is a silicon strip detector system operating at the closest distance from the interaction region among all the currently installed detectors at the CERN LHC. The geometry of the sensors implies that every detector region is exposed to a different dose of radiation depending mainly on the radial distance from the beam line. In the first 2 years of operation they have been exposed to a range of fluences up to a maximum value of about 4.5×1013 1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq) cm-2. At the end of 2012 a maximum of about 1.5×1014 neq has been reached; data analysis is ongoing. Sensor currents, full depletion voltage and charge collection efficiencies have been studied at various fluences. Observation of type inversion of the n-type silicon sensors has been made (about after 10-15×1012 neq). The n-type bulk sensors have been compared with the only p-type bulk detectors installed in the LHC. A reduction in the charge collection efficiency due to charge losses to a second metal layer (used for routing the signal to the readout electronics in LHCb-VELO sensors) has been measured. Possible solutions to this undesirable effect are planned to be studied in the framework of the LHCb-VELO upgrade.

  5. Radiation damage on the LHCb-VELO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casse, G., E-mail: gcasse@hep.ph.liv.ac.uk

    2013-12-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories and vertices produced at the LHCb interaction region. This is a silicon strip detector system operating at the closest distance from the interaction region among all the currently installed detectors at the CERN LHC. The geometry of the sensors implies that every detector region is exposed to a different dose of radiation depending mainly on the radial distance from the beam line. In the first 2 years of operation they have been exposed to a range of fluences up to a maximum value of about 4.5×10{sup 13} 1 MeV neutron equivalent (n{sub eq}) cm{sup −2}. At the end of 2012 a maximum of about 1.5×10{sup 14} n{sub eq} has been reached; data analysis is ongoing. Sensor currents, full depletion voltage and charge collection efficiencies have been studied at various fluences. Observation of type inversion of the n-type silicon sensors has been made (about after 10–15×10{sup 12} n{sub eq}). The n-type bulk sensors have been compared with the only p-type bulk detectors installed in the LHC. A reduction in the charge collection efficiency due to charge losses to a second metal layer (used for routing the signal to the readout electronics in LHCb-VELO sensors) has been measured. Possible solutions to this undesirable effect are planned to be studied in the framework of the LHCb-VELO upgrade.

  6. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Presence of structure modulating agents (e.g. cholesterol) or antioxidant molecules (e.g. tocopherol, ascorbic acid) in the membrane protected lipids against radiation, suggesting involvement of free radicals in the damage process. There seems to exist a relationship between generated ROS and permeability changes after.

  7. Radioprotective agents to prevent cellular damage due to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tyler A; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Smith, Sean; Smith, Trevor K; Pearson, Tate; Kailasam, Aparna; Herrmann, Kortney Z; Schubert, Johanna; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-11-09

    Medical imaging has become a central component of patient care to ensure early and accurate diagnosis. Unfortunately, many imaging modalities use ionizing radiation to generate images. Ionizing radiation even in low doses can cause direct DNA damage and generate reactive oxygen species and free radicals, leading to DNA, protein, and lipid membrane damage. This cell damage can lead to apoptosis, necrosis, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis. As many as 2% of cancers (and an associated 15,000 deaths annually) can be linked to computed tomography exposure alone. Radioprotective agents have been investigated using various models including cells, animals, and recently humans. The data suggest that radioprotective agents working through a variety of mechanisms have the potential to decrease free radical damage produced by ionizing radiation. Radioprotective agents may be useful as an adjunct to medical imaging to reduced patient morbidity and mortality due to ionizing radiation exposure. Some radioprotective agents can be found in high quantities in antioxidant rich foods, suggesting that a specific diet recommendation could be beneficial in radioprotection.

  8. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  9. Radiation damage to multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Radiation damage to multi-walled carbon ... In this work, the Raman spectroscopy investigation of nanotube defects created by irradiation of Ar+ ions with various energies and doses was presented. In order to obtain more informative data, scanning electron ...

  10. Empirical constraints on the effects of radiation damage on helium diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alyssa J.; Hodges, Kip V.; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we empirically evaluate the impact of radiation damage on zircon (U-Th)/He closure temperatures for a suite of zircon crystals from the slowly cooled McClure Mountain syenite of south-central Colorado, USA. We present new zircon, titanite, and apatite conventional (U-Th)/He dates, zircon laser ablation (U-Th)/He and U-Pb dates, and zircon Raman spectra for crystals from the syenite. Titanite and apatite (U-Th)/He dates range from 447 to 523 Ma and 88.0 to 138.9 Ma, respectively, and display no clear correlation between (U-Th)/He date and effective uranium concentration. Conventional zircon (U-Th)/He dates range from 230.3 to 474 Ma, while laser ablation zircon (U-Th)/He dates show even greater dispersion, ranging from 5.31 to 520 Ma. Dates from both zircon (U-Th)/He datasets decrease with increasing alpha dose, indicating that most of the dispersion can be attributed to radiation damage. Alpha dose values for the dated zircon crystals range from effectively zero to 2.15 × 1019 α /g, spanning the complete damage spectrum. We use an independently constrained thermal model to empirically assign a closure temperature to each dated zircon grain. If we assume that this thermal model is robust, the zircon radiation damage accumulation and annealing model of Guenthner et al. (2013) does not accurately predict closure temperatures for many of the analyzed zircon crystals. Raman maps of the zircons dated by laser ablation document complex radiation damage zoning, sometimes revealing crystalline zones in grains with alpha dose values suggestive of amorphous material. Such zoning likely resulted in heterogeneous intra-crystalline helium diffusion and may help explain some of the discrepancies between our empirical findings and the Guenthner et al. (2013) model predictions. Because U-Th zoning is a common feature in zircon, radiation damage zoning is likely to be a concern for most ancient, slowly cooled zircon (U-Th)/He datasets. Whenever possible, multiple

  11. Express method of estimating laser-induced surface damage threshold for optical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazetdinov, V. S.; Alekseev, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. I.; Charukhchev, A. V.; Chernov, V. N.; Kotilev, V. N.; Liber, V. I.; Rukavishnikov, N. N.

    2002-01-01

    The present measurements of the components' surface resistance to laser-induced damage has been completed to facilitate development and construction of the “Luch” laser system, a four-channel Nd-phosphate glass laser with a full output energy of E = 14 16 kJ. The study describes a method that, with a series of experimental data obtained from a single sample, allows us not only to estimate the threshold fluences, but to take into account the statistical nature of the surface damage. In a number of experimental situations this method makes it possible to estimate damaging fluences even from the result of a single exposure of the studied surface. Estimated threshold fluences for various optical elements are presented: K8 glass, experimental phosphate laser glass KGSS-0180, high-reflecting and antireflecting thin-film coating of elements. The 1.054-[mu]m radiation pulse with half-height duration of 4 ns and the irradiation spot of [similar]4 mm in diameter were used in the experiment.

  12. Influence of radiation damage on plasma-facing material erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koidan, V.S.; Bruchanov, A.N.; Chugunov, O.K.; Gureev, V.M.; Khripunov, B.I.; Kornienko, S.N.; Kuteev, B.Y.; Latushkin, S.T.; Muksunov, A.M.; Petrov, V.B.; Ryazanov, A.; Smirnov, V.P.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Unezhev, V.N. [Russian Science Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ploshchad' Akademika Kurchatova 46, 123181 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Selection of structural materials for a fusion reactor is a very actual problem. Plasma-facing materials (PFM's) of the first wall and divertor of the fusion reactor will be affected by high heat, fast particle fluxes and 14 MeV neutron irradiation. All these factors are crucial for the lifetime of the fusion reactor components. Fast neutrons produce a high-level of radiation damage (estimated value is up to hundred dpa) in materials during long operation of fusion reactor. At the same time, PFM's will suffer erosion induced by the plasma as well. While important data on the plasma erosion have been collected for non-irradiated materials, it is difficult to qualify PFM's at present taking into account radiation damage effects. In this paper, we present the first experimental results on radiation-damage effects on erosion of materials under plasma impact. To obtain high level of radiation damage we simulate neutron irradiation by fast ions on the Cyclotron at Kurchatov Institute providing energies of 1-30 MeV. Using this method we can obtain the radiation damage equivalent in a few days that corresponds to fast neutron dose of irradiation {approx} 10{sup 26} neutron/m{sup 2}. Carbon materials were taken for the study as the targets: pyrolytic graphite (reference), MPG-8 (Russian graphite) and CFC SEP NB (ITER PFM candidate). Irradiation of these materials on the cyclotron has been performed with 5 MeV carbon ions. Plasma erosion was studied on the linear plasma simulator LENTA. Irradiated samples were exposed to steady-state deuterium plasma at 100 eV (D{sup +}ions) to dose {approx} 10{sup 25} ion/m{sup 2}.The microstructure modification was observed and comparison was made on damaged and non-irradiated materials. The experiments have been performed with 1-10 dpa of radiation damage. The results of the work appear to be an important step in further detailed characterization of PFM's in fusion reactor. (authors)

  13. Recommendations concerning the prevention of radiation-induced health hazards through the application of soft and MID lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Health Office (BGA) recommends observation of the following practical hints: The application of soft lasers or MID lasers for cosmetic treatment or acupuncture represents a danger to the eye. Instructions for use of laser equipment have to indicate this danger. Appropriate use of the equipment will prevent damage. Any person applying soft lasers or MID lasers for treatment of customers or patients near the eye are required to give proof of a special training assuring appropriate handling, and of instructions in laser radiation protection.

  14. Investigation of mechanisms leading to laser damage morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaignère, L.; Chambonneau, M.; Diaz, R.; Grua, P.; Courchinoux, R.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Rullier, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The original damage ring pattern at the exit surface of fused silica induced by highly modulated nanosecond infrared laser pulses demonstrates the time dependence of damage morphology. Such a damage structure is used to study the dynamics of the plasma issued from open cracks. This pattern originates from electron avalanche in this plasma, which simultaneously leads to an ionization front displacement in air and a silica ablation process. Experiments have shown that the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theoretical hydrodynamics modeling. During this presentation, we present the different phases and the associated mechanisms leading to this peculiar morphology: • During an incubation phase, a precursor defect provides energy deposit that drives the near surface material into a plasma state. • Next the silica plasma provides free electrons in the surrounding air, under laser irradiation an electron avalanche is initiated and generates a breakdown wave. • Then this breakdown wave leads to an expansion of the air plasma. This latter is able to heat strongly the silica surface as well as generate free electrons in its conduction band. Hence, the silica becomes activated along the breakdown wave. • When the silica has become absorbent, an ablation mechanism of silica occurs, simultaneously with the air plasma expansion, resulting in the formation of the ring patterns in the case of these modulated laser pulses. These mechanisms are supported by experiments realized in vacuum environment. A model describing the expansion of the heated area by thermal conduction due to plasma free electrons is then presented. Next, the paper deals with the two damage formation phases that are distinguished. The first phase corresponds to the incubation of the laser flux by a subsurface defect until the damage occurrence: an incubation fluence corresponds to this phase. The

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology, Babes National Institute, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: lilianajradu@yahoo.fr; Mihailescu, I. [Department of Lasers, Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Radu, S. [Department of Computer Science, Polytechnics University, Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Department of Biophysics, Bucharest University (Romania)

    2007-09-21

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m{sup 2} was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  16. Ablation of oral mucosa by erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sailer, Hermann F.; Hering, Peter; Prettl, Wilhelm

    1997-05-01

    The in vitro tissue ablation characteristics of two pulsed mid-infrared lasers were studied, especially, with the intent to evaluate photomechanical and photothermal side effects. The Erbium:YAG laser emitted radiation at 2.94 micrometers in a spiking mode. The free-running beam from the laser was focused onto freshly-excised porcine samples via a 108-mm sapphire lens. The spot size was determined by a photosensitive metallic foil. The Holmium:YAG laser emitted radiation at 2.10 micrometers . The radiation was coupled to a 400- micrometers core quartz fiber. Both lasers were operated at 5 Hz, and 6 pulses were delivered to each porcine specimen using 'dry' and 'wet' ablation mode, respectively. After irradiation, the samples were investigated by means of light and scanning electron microscopy. The results of this survey indicate that both laser types ablate porcine oral mucosa efficiently. The Er:YAG laser produces less surrounding mechanical and thermal damage. In contrast to safe and suitable optical fibers available for the Ho:YAG laser, fiber optical delivery systems for the Er:YAG laser are still in the development phase. Nevertheless, current research work in this field seems promising and the near future may hold an adequate optical transmission systems for the delivery of both wavelengths, 2.10 micrometers and 2.94 micrometers , in order to provide on the one hand atraumatic ablation and on the other hand sufficient hemostasis.

  17. Thermal annealing of natural, radiation-damaged pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter; Mihailova, Boriana [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Beirau, Tobias [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; and others

    2017-03-01

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the α-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1000 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia [6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} α-decay events per gram (dpg)], Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28%, Blue River 85% and Miass 100% according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (M. T. Vandenborre, E. Husson, Comparison of the force field in various pyrochlore families. I. The A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides. J. Solid State Chem. 1983, 50, 362, S. Moll, G. Sattonnay, L. Thome, J. Jagielski, C. Decorse, P. Simon, I. Monnet, W. J. Weber, Irradiation damage in Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} single crystals: Ballistic versus ionization processes. Phys. Rev. 2011, 84, 64115.), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} divided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlore (Miass) shows an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K, while the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K

  18. Laser method for simulating the transient radiation effects of semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Sun, Peng; Tang, Ge; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the laser simulation adequacy both by theoretical analysis and experiments. We first explain the basic theory and physical mechanisms of laser simulation of transient radiation effect of semiconductor. Based on a simplified semiconductor structure, we describe the reflection, optical absorption and transmission of laser beam. Considering two cases of single-photon absorption when laser intensity is relatively low and two-photon absorption with higher laser intensity, we derive the laser simulation equivalent dose rate model. Then with 2 types of BJT transistors, laser simulation experiments and gamma ray radiation experiments are conducted. We found good linear relationship between laser simulation and gammy ray which depict the reliability of laser simulation.

  19. Laser damage helps the eavesdropper in quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Audun Nystad; Sauge, Sebastien; Ghazali, Aina Mardhiyah M; Skaar, Johannes; Lydersen, Lars; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-02-21

    We propose a class of attacks on quantum key distribution (QKD) systems where an eavesdropper actively engineers new loopholes by using damaging laser illumination to permanently change properties of system components. This can turn a perfect QKD system into a completely insecure system. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on an avalanche photodiode-based detector shows that laser damage can be used to create loopholes. After ∼1  W illumination, the detectors' dark count rate reduces 2-5 times, permanently improving single-photon counting performance. After ∼1.5  W, the detectors switch permanently into the linear photodetection mode and become completely insecure for QKD applications.

  20. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaugliardo, P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia (Australia); Farnan, I.; Zhang, M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vance, E.R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Australia); Mudie, S. [The Australian Synchrotron, Victoria (Australia); Buckman, S.J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sullivan, J.P., E-mail: james.sullivan@anu.edu.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼10{sup 19} α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter. - Highlights: • Study of a range of naturally occurring zircons damaged by alpha radiation. • Characterised using a range of techniques, including PALS spectroscopy. • Effects on hydrous material appear important, rather than direct radiation damage. • Annealing is shown to remove the observed voids.

  1. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  2. A Computational Study of Hadron Radiation Damage to DNA Nucleobases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai

    Radiation damage of biomolecules is a signicant contributor to both the onset and also possible curing of cancer. Such damage is largely the result of free radicals that can be created by the interaction of high-energetic photons or ions with water within cells. Understanding the details...... constants based on transition state theory. The investigations are performed with methods of increasing complexity ranging from pure gas-phase, through PCM solvation up to the very accurate and explicit QM/MM models of nucleobase water clusters through which also the importance of making conformational...

  3. Non-Thermal Electromagnetic Radiation Damage to Lens Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Bormusov, Elvira; P.Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Sch?chter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-01-01

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35?C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was us...

  4. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  5. Impact of two CO(2) laser heatings for damage repairing on fused silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormont, P; Gallais, L; Lamaignère, L; Rullier, J L; Combis, P; Hebert, D

    2010-12-06

    CO(2) laser is an interesting tool to repair defects on silica optics. We studied UV nanosecond laser-induced damage in fused silica after CO(2) laser heating. The localization of damage sites and the laser damage threshold are closely related to stress area in silica induced by heating. By applying a suitable second laser heating, we managed to eliminate the debris issued from redeposited silica and to modify the stress area. As a consequence, a significant increase of laser resistance has been observed. This process offers the possibility to improve damage repairing sufficiently to extend the lifetime of the silica components.

  6. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Coughlan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  7. Growth behavior of laser-induced damage on fused silica optics under UV, ns laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negres, Raluca A; Norton, Mary A; Cross, David A; Carr, Christopher W

    2010-09-13

    The growth behavior of laser-induced damage sites is affected by a large number of laser parameters as well as site morphology. Here we investigate the effects of pulse duration on the growth rate of damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Results demonstrate a significant dependence of the growth parameters on laser pulse duration at 351 nm from 1 ns to 15 ns, including the observation of a dominant exponential versus linear, multiple-shot growth behavior for long and short pulses, respectively. These salient behaviors are tied to the damage morphology and suggest a shift in the fundamental growth mechanisms for pulses in the 1-5 ns range.

  8. Radiation Damage in Si Diodes from Short, Intense Ion Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, S. J.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Berkeley Lab is an induction accelerator studying the effects that concentrated ion beams have on various materials. Charged particle radiation damage was the focus of this research - we have characterized a series of Si diodes using an electrometer and calibrated the diodes response using an 241Am alpha source, both before and after exposing the diodes to 1 MeV He ions in the accelerator. The key part here is that the high intensity pulses from NDCX-II (>1010 ions/cm2 per pulse in accelerators, fusion energy experiments and space applications and results from short pulses can inform models of radiation damage evolution. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0205CH11231.

  9. Ion-Induced Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlathölter, Thomas

    The interaction of keV ions with building blocks of DNA and proteins is of fundamental interest to proton and heavy ion therapy. During the last decade, ion-induced ionization and fragmentation was studied for isolated biomolecules, biomolecular clusters, nanosolvated isolated biomolecules and solid thin biomolecular films. This article gives a brief overview over the research on biomolecular mechanisms underlying ion-induced radiation damage with a focus on the different target systems.

  10. The effect of radiation damage on the vertex detector efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, O

    1997-01-01

    97-023 This note describes a brief study into the effects of the radiation damage on the vertex detectorperformance. The noise increases as the detector is irradiated. Fixing the fraction of noise clusters to 0.1% by adjusting the thresholds brings about a loss in efficiency with increased irradiation. This loss in efficiency is parameterized, and some effects on the B->pi+pi- channel are shown.

  11. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  12. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, 1978-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    Special work during the year concentrated on induced repair of cellular radiation damage in a number of strains of Escherchia coli. Ultraviolet and x-radiation are considered for induction of cell damage. (PCS)

  13. Synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry of laser ablated species

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Casu, A.; Coreno, M.; De Simone, M.; Hoyos Campos, L.M.; Juarez-Reyes, A.M.; Kivimäki, A.; Orlando, S.; Sanz, M.; Spezzani, C.; Stankiewicz, M; Trucchi, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper describes an experimental apparatus suitable to create and study free clusters by combining laser ablation and synchrotron radiation. First tests on sulfur samples, S, showed the production, through laser ablation, of neutral Sn clusters (n = 1–8). These clusters were ionized using synchrotron radiation at photon energies from 160 eV to 175 eV, across the S 2p core edge. The feasibility of such combined ablation–synchrotron radiation experiments is demonstrated, opening new ...

  14. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  15. Scalable process for mitigation of laser-damaged potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystal optic surfaces with removal of damaged antireflective coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, S; Steele, W A; VanBlarcom, D S; Hawley, R A; Schaffers, K I; Geraghty, P

    2017-03-10

    We investigate an approach for the recycling of laser-damaged large-aperture deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals used for optical switching (KDP) and for frequency conversion (DKDP) in megajoule-class high-power laser systems. The approach consists of micromachining the surface laser damage sites (mitigation), combined with multiple soaks and ultrasonication steps in a coating solvent to remove, synergistically, both the highly adherent machining debris and the laser-damage-affected antireflection coating. We identify features of the laser-damage-affected coating, such as the "solvent-persistent" coating and the "burned-in" coating, that are difficult to remove by conventional approaches without damaging the surface. We also provide a solution to the erosion problem identified in this work when colloidal coatings are processed during ultrasonication. Finally, we provide a proof of principle of the approach by testing the full process that includes laser damage mitigation of DKDP test parts, coat stripping, reapplication of a new antireflective coat, and a laser damage test demonstrating performance up to at least 12  J/cm2 at UV wavelengths, which is well above current requirements. This approach ultimately provides a potential path to a scalable recycling loop for the management of optics in large, high-power laser systems that can reduce cost and extend lifetime of highly valuable and difficult to grow large DKDP crystals.

  16. Studying laser radiation effect on steel structure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Gazaliyev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the effect of laser radiation on the structure and properties of annealed and tempered steel with different content of carbon. For surface hardening there was used a laser complex equipped with Nd: YAG pulse laser with power density up to 30 kW/сm2. As a result of the carried-out studies there were calculated characteristics of laser, steel microstructure and properties.

  17. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  18. Radiation track, DNA damage and response—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Liamsuwan, T.; Taleei, R.; Liljequist, D.; Uehara, S.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper has been to review the current status and progress of the field of radiation biophysics, and draw attention to the fact that physics, in general, and radiation physics in particular, with the aid of mathematical modeling, can help elucidate biological mechanisms and cancer therapies. We hypothesize that concepts of condensed-matter physics along with the new genomic knowledge and technologies and mechanistic mathematical modeling in conjunction with advances in experimental DNA (Deoxyrinonucleic acid molecule) repair and cell signaling have now provided us with unprecedented opportunities in radiation biophysics to address problems in targeted cancer therapy, and genetic risk estimation in humans. Obviously, one is not dealing with ‘low-hanging fruit’, but it will be a major scientific achievement if it becomes possible to state, in another decade or so, that we can link mechanistically the stages between the initial radiation-induced DNA damage; in particular, at doses of radiation less than 2 Gy and with structural changes in genomic DNA as a precursor to cell inactivation and/or mutations leading to genetic diseases. The paper presents recent development in the physics of radiation track structure contained in the computer code system KURBUC, in particular for low-energy electrons in the condensed phase of water for which we provide a comprehensive discussion of the dielectric response function approach. The state-of-the-art in the simulation of proton and carbon ion tracks in the Bragg peak region is also presented. The paper presents a critical discussion of the models used for elastic scattering, and the validity of the trajectory approach in low-electron transport. Brief discussions of mechanistic and quantitative aspects of microdosimetry, DNA damage and DNA repair are also included as developed by the authors’ work.

  19. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for U-238(50+) and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  20. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating α-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  1. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for 238U50+ and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  2. Influence of standing-wave electric field pattern on the laser damage resistance of HfO sub 2 thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Protopapa, M L; De Tomasi, F; Di Giulio, M; Perrone, M R; Scaglione, S

    2002-01-01

    The standing-wave electric field pattern that forms inside an optical coating as a consequence of laser irradiation is one of the factors influencing the coating laser-induced damage threshold. The influence of the standing-wave electric field profile on the damage resistance to ultraviolet radiation of hafnium dioxide (HfO sub 2) thin films was investigated in this work. To this end, HfO sub 2 thin films of different thicknesses deposited by the electron beam evaporation technique at the same deposition conditions were analyzed. Laser damage thresholds of the samples were measured at 308 nm (XeCl laser) by the photoacoustic beam deflection technique and microscopic inspections. The dependence of the laser damage threshold on the standing-wave electric field pattern was analyzed.

  3. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratisto, H; Frenz, M; Ith, M; Altermatt, H J; Jansen, E D; Weber, H P

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 µm, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF(4)) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400-µm ZrF(4) fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200-µs, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 µs) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 µm as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50-µm collateral tissue damage.

  4. Interaction of CO2 laser radiation with dense plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Raoof, Wasfi Sharkawy

    1980-01-01

    The instabilities which occur in the interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a dense plasma have been studied. A TEA CO2 laser provided pulses of up to 30 joules of energy with a duration of 50 nanoseconds. By focussing the radiation on to a plane target a focal spot of about 180 micrometers diameter was formed with a irradiance of 10 to 10 W cm. The scattered radiation was collected by a laser focussing lens and analysed with a grating spectrometer. Linear relationships have been found betwe...

  5. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  6. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  7. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  8. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  9. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, Mike [Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-07

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions ({approx}2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 {mu}m h{sup -1} for large lesions (>15 000 cells)

  10. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  11. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  12. Investigation of stress induced by CO2 laser processing of fused silica optics for laser damage growth mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Cormont, Philippe; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-21

    Laser damage mitigation' is a process developed to prevent the growth of nanosecond laser-initiated damage sites under successive irradiation. It consists of re-fusing the damage area with a CO2 laser. In this paper we investigate the stress field created around mitigated sites which could have an influence on the efficiency of the process. A numerical model of CO2 laser interaction with fused silica is developed. It takes into account laser energy absorption, heat transfer, thermally induced stress and birefringence. Residual stress near mitigated sites in fused silica samples is characterized with specific photoelastic methods and theoretical data are compared to experiments. The stress distribution and quantitative values of stress levels are obtained for sites treated with the CO2 laser in various conditions of energy deposition (beam size, pulse duration, incident power). The results provided evidence that the presence of birefringence/residual stress around the mitigated sites has an effect on their laser damage resistance.

  13. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  14. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchan, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Robinson, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  16. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  17. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  18. Covariances for the 56Fe radiation damage cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Stanislav P.; Koning, Arjan; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The energy-energy and reaction-reaction covariance matrices were calculated for the n + 56Fe damage cross-sections by Total Monte Carlo method using the TENDL-2013 random files. They were represented in the ENDF-6 format and added to the unperturbed evaluation file. The uncertainties for the spectrum averaged radiation quantities in the representative fission, fusion and spallation facilities were first time assessed as 5-25%. Additional 5 to 20% have to be added to the atom displacement rate uncertainties to account for accuracy of the primary defects simulation in materials. The reaction-reaction correlation were shown to be 1% or less.

  19. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  20. Damages by radiation in glasses; Danos por radiacion en vidrios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, F.; Gutierrez, C.; Cisniega, G.; Flores, J.H.; Golzarri, J.I.; Espinoza, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    As a part of the works carried out to characterize the electrons beam from the Pelletron accelerator of the Mexican Nuclear Center aluminium-silicate glass samples were irradiated. The purpose of these irradiations is to cause alterations in the amorphous microstructure of the material by means of the creation of color centers. The population density of these defects, consequence to the irradiation, is function of the exposure time which varied from 1 to 30 minutes, with an electronic beam energy of 400 keV, doing the irradiations at free atmosphere. the obtained spectra are correlated by damage which the radiation produced. (Author)

  1. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Express method for estimating surface resistance of optical components to laser-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazetdinov, Vladmir S.; Alekseev, V. N.; Bessarab, A. V.; Charukchev, Alexander V.; Chernov, Victor N.; Kotilev, V. N.; Liber, V. I.; Rukavishnikov, Nikolai N.

    2001-04-01

    The study describes a method that, with a series of experimental data obtained from a single sample, allows not only to estimate the threshold fluences but to take into account statistical nature of surface-damage. In a number of experimental situations this method makes it possible to estimate damaging fluences even from the result of a singular exposure of the studied surface. Estimated threshold. Fluences for various optical elements are presented: K8-glass, experimental phosphate laser glass KGSS-0180, high-reflecting and anti-reflecting thin-film coating of elements. Half-height duration of 1.06 micrometers - radiation pulse of 4 ns and irradiation spot of approximately 4 mm in diameter were used in the experiment.

  3. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Frank R., E-mail: frank.wagner@fresnel.fr; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Campus de St Jérôme, 13013 Marseille (France); Duchateau, Guillaume [CELIA, UMR 5107 Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  4. A 5 Gb/s Radiation Tolerant Laser Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Amaral, L; Da Silva, S; Mazza, G; Meroli, S; Moreira, P; Rivetti, A; Troska, J; Wyllie, K

    2009-01-01

    A laser driver for data transmission at 5 Gb/s has been developed as a part of the Giga Bit Transceiver (GBT) project. The Giga Bit Laser Driver (GBLD) targets High Energy Physics (HEP) applications for which radiation tolerance is mandatory. The GBLD ASIC can drive both VCSELs and some types of edge emitting lasers. It is essentially composed of two drivers capable of sinking up to 12 mA each from the load at a maximum data rate of 5 Gb/s, and of a current sink for the laser bias current. The laser driver include also pre-emphasis and duty cycle control capabilities.

  5. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  6. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  7. Investigation of nanodefect properties in optical coatings by coupling measured and simulated laser damage statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Capoulade, Jérémie; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandré, Mireille

    2008-09-01

    We propose a model to link laser damage initiator properties (such as nature, size distribution, and density) to measured laser damage probabilities in optical materials. The model is based on the calculation of light absorption in nanoabsorbers and subsequent heating, coupled to laser damage statistics, and allows to obtain the laser damage probability as a function of laser fluence. Applications to the case of optical coatings irradiated in the nanosecond regime are presented. Laser damage probability curves are measured in hafnia single layer coatings made under different conditions: electron beam deposition and reactive low voltage ion plating. By studying the influence of the laser irradiation parameters (wavelength and beam size) and coating properties on the simulations, we show with our methodology that initiating defects (hafnium inclusions) can be identified. The implications of this approach for physical understanding and metrology applications are discussed.

  8. Clinical and experimental studies on effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadasaki, Kouichi

    1988-12-01

    Clinical and experimental studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on radiation-induced pulmonary damage. In a clinical study, one hundred patients with lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the development of radiation pneumonitis. In the patients treated with radiation and chemotherapy except for cisplatinum, radiation pneumonitis occurred more frequently and severely than patients with radiation alone. In an experimental study, male SD rats received 15 Gy radiation to the right lungs with or without injection of chemotherapeutic agents including cisplatinum, adriamycin or peplomycin. Histological changes and hydroxyproline contents of the lungs were evaluated at 2 or 5 months after treatment. Pulmonary damage was severer in rats with radiation and drugs than those with radiation alone. However, rats with cisplatinum had less damage than those with other drugs. In conclusion, radiation-induced pulmonary damage was enhanced by administration of several chemotherapeutic agents. However, cisplatinum seemed to enhance pulmonary damage less than other drugs. (author) 77 refs.

  9. Properties and recrystallization of radiation damaged pyrochlore and titanite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zietlow, Peter

    2016-11-02

    Radiation damage in minerals is caused by the alpha-decay of incorporated radionuclides, such as U and Th and their decay products. The effect of thermal annealing (400-1400 K) on radiation-damaged pyrochlores has been investigated by Raman scattering, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and combined differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG) (Zietlow et al., in print). The analysis of three natural radiation-damaged pyrochlore samples from Miass/Russia (6.4 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} a-decay events per gram (dpg)), Zlatoust/Russia (6.3 wt% Th, 23.1.10{sup 18} dpg), Panda Hill/Tanzania (1.6 wt% Th, 1.6.10{sup 18} dpg), and Blue River/Canada (10.5 wt% U, 115.4.10{sup 18} dpg), are compared with a crystalline reference pyrochlore from Schelingen (Germany). The type of structural recovery depends on the initial degree of radiation damage (Panda Hill 28 %, Blue River 85 %, Zlatoust and Miass 100 % according to XRD), as the recrystallization temperature increases with increasing degree of amorphization. Raman spectra indicate reordering on the local scale during annealing-induced recrystallization. As Raman modes around 800 cm{sup -1} are sensitive to radiation damage (Vandenborre and Husson 1983, Moll et al. 2011), the degree of local order was deduced from the ratio of the integrated intensities of the sum of the Raman bands between 605 and 680 cm{sup -1} devided by the sum of the integrated intensities of the bands between 810 and 860 cm{sup -1}. The most radiation damaged pyrochlores (Miass and Zlatoust) show an abrupt recovery of both, its short- (Raman) and long-range order (X-ray) between 800 and 850 K. The volume decrease upon recrystallization in Zlatoust pyrochlore was large enough to crack the sample repeatedly. In contrast, the weakly damaged pyrochlore (Panda Hill) begins to recover at considerably lower temperatures (near 500 K), extending over a temperature range of ca. 300 K, up to 800 K (Raman). The pyrochlore from Blue River shows in its

  10. Detection of DNA damage by space radiation in human fibroblasts flown on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-02-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37 °C in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damage with the γ-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional γ-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate γ rays at 37 °C. Cells exposed to chronic γ rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  11. Detection of DNA Damage by Space Radiation in Human Fibroblasts Flown on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; hide

    2017-01-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37 degrees Centigrade in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damages with the gamma-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional gamma-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate gamma rays at 37 degrees Centigrade. Cells exposed to chronic gamma rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  12. Coherent Cherenkov radiation and laser oscillation in a photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Denis, T; Lee, J H H; van der Meer, R; Strooisma, A; van der Slot, P J M; Vos, W L; Boller, K J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that photonic crystals can be used to generate powerful and highly coherent laser radiation when injecting a beam of free electrons. Using theoretical investigations we present the startup dynamics and coherence properties of such laser, in which gain is provided by matching the optical phase velocity in the photonic crystal to the velocity of the electron beam.

  13. Numerical simulation of damage detection using laser-generated ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Nazirah, Ab Wahab; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques have been widely investigated due to its high spatial resolution and capacity for remote and noncontact measurement. In this study, the laser induced ultrasonic wave on an aluminum plate is simulated, and a nonlinear feature is used to detect a micro crack introduced in the plate model. A multi-physics simulation is conducted and optimized considering the effect of thermal diffusion. A nonlinear feature, called Bhattacharyya Distance (BD), is calculated to show the crack-induced geometric difference among the state space attractors obtained from closely spaced measurement points near the crack. First, a 3D model is built, and its simulation result is compared with an experiment performed using a noncontact laser ultrasonic measurement system. Then, by creating a micro crack in the model, BD is extracted and the crack is successfully detected and visualized. Finally, the effects of BD parameters, such as embedding dimension and frequency band, on damage visualization are investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies of new media radiation induced laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K. S.; Shiu, Y. J.; Raju, S. R.; Hwang, I. H.; Tabibi, B.

    1984-01-01

    Various lasants were investigated especially, 2-iodohepafluoropropane (i-C3F7I) for the direct solar pumped lasers. Optical pumping of iodine laser was achieved using a small flashlamp. Using i-C3F7I as a laser gain medium, threshold inversion density, small signal gain, and laser performance at the elevated temperature were measured. The experimental results and analysis are presented. The iodine laser kinetics of the C3F7I and IBr system were numerically simulated. The concept of a direct solar-pumped laser amplifier using (i-C3F7I) as the laser material was evaluated and several kinetic coefficients for i-C3F7I laser system were reexamined. The results are discussed.

  15. UV and IR laser radiation's interaction with metal film and teflon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Alekseev, S. B.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Lipatov, E. I.; Orlovskii, V. M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) and XeCl (0.308 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of metal and TiN-ceramic coatings on glass and steel substrates has been studied. Correlation between parameters of surface erosion versus laser-specific energy was investigated. Monitoring of laser-induced erosion on smooth polished surfaces was performed using optical microscopy. The correlation has been revealed between characteristic zones of thin coatings damaged by irradiation and energy distribution over the laser beam cross section allowing evaluation of defects and adhesion of coatings. The interaction of pulsed periodical CO2 ([lambda] [similar] 10.6 [mu]m), and Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene—PTFE) has been studied. Monitoring of erosion track on surfaces was performed through optical microscopy. It has been shown that at pulsed periodical CO2-radiation interaction with teflon the sputtering of polymer with formation of submicron-size particles occurs. Dependencies of particle sizes, form, and sputtering velocity on laser pulse duration and target temperature have been obtained.

  16. DNA Damage by Radiation in Tradescantia Leaf Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min; Hyun, Kyung Man; Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    The comet assay is currently used in different areas of biological sciences to detect DNA damage. The comet assay, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and need of a few cells, is ideal as a short-term genotoxicity test. The comet assay can theoretically be applied to every type of eukaryotic cell, including plant cells. Plants are very useful as monitors of genetic effects caused by pollution in the atmosphere, water and soil. Tradescantia tests are very useful tools for screening the mutagenic potential in the environment. Experiments were conducted to study the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiations on the genome integrity, particularly of Tradescantia. The increasingly frequent use of Tradescantia as a sensitive environmental bioindicator of genotoxic effects. This study was designed to assess the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation using Tradescnatia-comet assay. The development of comet assay has enabled investigators to detect DNA damage at the levels of cells. To adapt this assay to plant cells, nuclei were directly obtained from Tradescantia leaf samples. A significant dose-dependent increase in the average tail moment values over the negative control was observed. Recently the adaptation of this technique to plant cells opens new possibilities for studies in variety area. The future applications of the comet assay could impact some other important areas, certainly, one of the limiting factors to its utility is the imagination of the investigator.

  17. Grad-Level Radiation Damage of SIO2 Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.; Atoian, G.; Ludewig, H; White, S; O' Conor, J; Mokhov, N.V.

    2009-05-04

    Radiation effects and levels to detectors. SiO{sub 2} quartz fibers of the LHC ATLAS Zero-degree Calorimeter (ZDC) anticipated to experience integrated doses of a few Grad at their closest position were exposed to 200 MeV protons and neutrons at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Linac. Specifically, 1 mm- and 2mm-diameter quartz (GE 124) rods were exposed to direct 200 MeV protons during the first phase of exposure leading to peak integrated dose of {approx}28 Grad. Exposure to a primarily neutron flux of 1mm-diameter SiO{sub 2} fibers was also achieved with a special neutron source arrangement. In a post-irradiation analysis the quartz fiber transmittance was evaluated as a function of the absorbed dose. Dramatic degradation of the transmittance property was observed with increased radiation damage. In addition, detailed evaluation of the fibers under the microscope revealed interesting micro-structural damage features and irradiation-induced defects.

  18. Self-radiation damage in plutonium and uranium mixed dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masato, E-mail: kato.masato@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Komeno, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Uno, Hiroki; Sugata, Hiromasa [Inspection Development Company, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Nakae, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, TOKYU REIT Toranomon Bldg, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji [Tohoku University, 2145-2, Narita, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kashimura, Motoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    In plutonium compounds, the lattice parameter increases due to self-radiation damage by alpha-decay of plutonium isotopes. The lattice parameter change and its thermal recovery in plutonium and uranium mixed dioxide (MOX) were studied. The lattice parameter for samples of MOX powders and pellets that had been left in the air for up to 32 years was measured. The lattice parameter increased and was saturated at about 0.29%. The change in lattice parameter was formulated as a function of self-radiation dose. Three stages in the thermal recovery of the damage were observed in temperature ranges of below 673 K, 673-1073 K and above 1073 K. The activation energies in each recovery stage were estimated to be 0.12, 0.73 and 1.2 eV, respectively, and the corresponding mechanism for each stage was considered to be the recovery of the anion Frenkel defect, the cation Frenkel defect and a defect connected with helium, respectively.

  19. Subsurface defects of fused silica optics and laser induced damage at 351 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongjie, Liu; Jin, Huang; Fengrui, Wang; Xinda, Zhou; Xin, Ye; Xiaoyan, Zhou; Laixi, Sun; Xiaodong, Jiang; Zhan, Sui; Wanguo, Zheng

    2013-05-20

    Many kinds of subsurface defects are always present together in the subsurface of fused silica optics. It is imperfect that only one kind of defects is isolated to investigate its impact on laser damage. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the impact of subsurface defects on laser induced damage of fused silica optics with a comprehensive vision. In this work, we choose the fused silica samples manufactured by different vendors to characterize subsurface defects and measure laser induced damage. Contamination defects, subsurface damage (SSD), optical-thermal absorption and hardness of fused silica surface are characterized with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), fluorescence microscopy, photo-thermal common-path interferometer and fully automatic micro-hardness tester respectively. Laser induced damage threshold and damage density are measured by 351 nm nanosecond pulse laser. The correlations existing between defects and laser induced damage are analyzed. The results show that Cerium element and SSD both have a good correlation with laser-induced damage thresholds and damage density. Research results evaluate process technology of fused silica optics in China at present. Furthermore, the results can provide technique support for improving laser induced damage performance of fused silica.

  20. Facilities for studying radiation damage in nonmetals during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, P.W.

    1984-08-01

    Two facilities have been developed for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements on a single sample before, during and after irradiation. One facility uses /sup 60/Co gamma rays and the other 0.5 to 3 MeV electrons from an accelerator. Optical relays function as spectrophotometers, luminescenc detectors, etc. All radiation sensitive components are outside of walk-in irradiation chambers; all measurement control and data recording is computerized. Irradiations are made at controlled temperatures between 5K and 900/sup 0/C. The materials studied include glasses, quartz, alkali halides (especially natural rock salt), organic crystals, etc. As determined from color center measurements the damage formation rate in all materials studied at 25/sup 0/C or above is strongly temperature dependent. The defect concentration during irradiation is usually much greater than that measured after irradiation. The fraction of defects annealing after irradiation and the annealing rate usually increases as the irradiation temperature increases. The completed studies demonstrate that, in most cases, the extent of maximum damage and the damage formation and annealing kinetics can be determined only by making measurements during irradiation.

  1. Radiation damage of hollandite in multiphase ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Braeden M.; Tumurgoti, Priyatham; Sundaram, S. K.; Amoroso, Jake W.; Marra, James C.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Tang, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Radiation damage was simulated in multiphase titanate-based ceramic waste forms using an ion accelerator to generate high energy alpha particles (He+) and an ion implanter to generate 7 MeV gold (Au3+) particles. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the damaged surfaces and nearby regions. Simulated multiphase ceramic waste forms were prepared using two processing methods: spark plasma sintering and melt-processing. Both processing methods produced ceramics with similar phase assemblages consisting of hollandite-, zirconolite/pyrochlore-, and perovskite-type phases. The measured heavy ion (Au3+) penetration depth was less in spark plasma sintered samples than in melt-processed samples. Structural breakdown of the hollandite phase occurred under He+ irradiation indicated by the presence of x-ray diffraction peaks belonging to TiO2, BaTiO5, and other hollandite related phases (Ba2Ti9O20). The composition of the constituent hollandite phase affected the extent of damage induced by Au3+ ions.

  2. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, Colin, E-mail: colin.nave@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sutton, Geoff [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian [University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Stuart, David Ian [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage.

  3. An assessment of techniques for dehydrating root canals using infrared laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyra, T; Walsh, L T; Walsh, L J

    2000-08-01

    Infrared lasers have been used for debridement and sterilisation of both soft and hard tissues, but there have been few studies of such laser applications in endodontics. The present laboratory study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of using pulsed infrared laser radiation to remove moisture from root canals (with an adjunctive sterilising effect). Canals were prepared in extracted teeth and a standardised technique used to fill the apical half of the root canal with saline. Pulses of CO2 or Nd:YAG laser energy were delivered into the root canal system via miniature applicators and residual fluid determined, as well as temperature changes on the root surface. With the CO2 laser, long pulse durations were effective at dehydrating the canals, but elicited deleterious thermal changes both locally within the canal as well as on the root surface. With Nd:YAG laser treatment, large temperature increases on the root surface occurred even with low powers and low pulse frequencies, and extended times were necessary for dehydration. With higher powers and pulse frequencies, complete dehydration could be achieved in less than 60 seconds, however root surface temperatures increased approximately 25 degrees, and the radicular dentine was damaged by the production of plasma. Dehydration of root canals could not be achieved safely with these two infrared lasers, and damage to both radicular dentine and the periodontal ligament would occur if these techniques were to be applied clinically. Alternative methods which do not exert significant thermal effects should be investigated.

  4. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-optoelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Koerber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    The continuous development of laser systems toward more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices. These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, micro-optoelectromechanical systems, such as a digital micromirror device (DMD), are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources, both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW)-lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructive device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects, such as persistent dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  5. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  6. The repair mechanism for radiation damages by inorganic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Izumo, Yoshiro [Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiological Health

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies of the authors showed that the death rate for mice after radiation exposure at a sub-lethal dose was significantly decreased by administration of a large amount of inorganic element such as Zn, Co, Mn, Mg, etc. Here, the cellular metabolism of Co element was investigated to elucidate the mechanism of such repair of radiation damages. The incorporation of {sup 57}-Co into the mouse spleen and bone marrow cells in vitro exposed to X-ray was compared to that into both cells from the mouse in vivo exposed to X-ray. The administration of Co carrier into the cells from unexposed mice increased the incorporation of Co into these cells and there were no differences in Co-incorporation between the cells exposed to radiation in vitro and in vivo. The Co-incorporation into the bone marrow cells was dose-dependently increased by either of in vitro and in vivo exposure, suggesting that there exists some cellular defense mechanism. For in vivo exposure, the amount of Co incorporation and also DNA synthesizing activity in spleen and bone marrow cells both decreased as increasing the amount of Co subcutaneously injected, but not given to the culture medium. To clarify cellular distribution of Co incorporated, the cells suspension was homogenized and centrifuged for cell fractionation. About 80% of incorporated Co was found in the cytoplasmic fraction and the other was in the membrane fraction, suggesting that Co element might be incorporated into some cellular components. (M.N.)

  7. Mitigating radiation damage of single photon detectors for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cranmer, Miles [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Choi, Eric [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Magellan Aerospace, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hudson, Danya; Piche, Louis P.; Scott, Alan [Honeywell Aerospace (formerly COM DEV Ltd.), Ottawa, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Single-photon detectors in space must retain useful performance characteristics despite being bombarded with sub-atomic particles. Mitigating the effects of this space radiation is vital to enabling new space applications which require high-fidelity single-photon detection. To this end, we conducted proton radiation tests of various models of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one model of photomultiplier tube potentially suitable for satellite-based quantum communications. The samples were irradiated with 106 MeV protons at doses approximately equivalent to lifetimes of 0.6, 6, 12 and 24 months in a low-Earth polar orbit. Although most detection properties were preserved, including efficiency, timing jitter and afterpulsing probability, all APD samples demonstrated significant increases in dark count rate (DCR) due to radiation-induced damage, many orders of magnitude higher than the 200 counts per second (cps) required for ground-to-satellite quantum communications. We then successfully demonstrated the mitigation of this DCR degradation through the use of deep cooling, to as low as -86 C. This achieved DCR below the required 200 cps over the 24 months orbit duration. DCR was further reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures of +50 to +100 C. (orig.)

  8. Laser interferometry of radiation driven gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kyle James; Ivanov, Vladimir; Mancini, Roberto; Mayes, Daniel C.

    2017-06-01

    In a series of experiments performed at the 1MA Zebra pulsed power accelerator of the Nevada Terawatt Facility nitrogen gas jets were driven with the broadband x-ray flux produced during the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch implosion. The wire arrays were comprised of 4 and 8, 10μm-thick gold wires and 17μm-thick nickel wires, 2cm and 3cm tall, and 0.3cm in diameter. They radiated 12kJ to 16kJ of x-ray energy, most of it in soft x-ray photons of less than 1keV of energy, in a time interval of 30ns. This x-ray flux was used to drive a nitrogen gas jet located at 0.8cm from the axis of the z-pinch radiation source and produced with a supersonic nozzle. The x-ray flux ionizes the nitrogen gas thus turning it into a photoionized plasma. We used laser interferometry to probe the ionization of the plasma. To this end, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at the wavelength of 266 nm was set up to extract the atom number density profile of the gas jet just before the Zebra shot, and air-wedge interferometers at 266 and 532 nm were used to determine the electron number density of the plasma right during the Zebra shot. The ratio of electron to atom number densities gives the distribution of average ionization state of the plasma. A python code was developed to perform the image data processing, extract phase shift spatial maps, and obtain the atom and electron number densities via Abel inversion. Preliminary results from the experiment are promising and do show that a plasma has been created in the gas jet driven by the x-ray flux, thus demonstrating the feasibility of a new experimental platform to study photoionized plasmas in the laboratory. These plasmas are found in astrophysical scenarios including x-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, and the accretion disks surrounding black holes1. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451.1R. C. Mancini et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041001 (2009)

  9. Radiation damage of all-silica fibers in the UV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Joerg; Ziegler, M.; Assmus, J.; Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Nelson, Gary W.; Clarkin, James P.; Pross, H.; Kiefer, J.

    1999-04-01

    Since several years, UVI-fibers having higher solarization- resistance are well known stimulating new fiber-optic applications in the UV-region below 250 nm. Besides the description of the improved transmission properties of UV- light from different UV-sources, the mechanisms of improvement have been discussed in detail. The UV-defects, mainly the E'- center with the UV-absorption band around 215 nm, were passivated by using hydrogen-doping. Besides DUV-light, ionizing radiation like Gamma-radiation or X-rays can create similar defects in the UV-region. In the past, the radiation- damage in the UV-region was studied on silica bulk samples: again, E'-centers were generated. Up to now, no UV- transmission through a 1 m long fiber during or after Gamma- radiation had been observed. However, the hydrogen in the UVI- fibers behaves the same for Gamma-irradiation, leading to a passivation of the radiation-induced defects and an improved transmission in the UV-C region below 250 nm. On this report, the influence of total dose and fiber diameter on the UV- damage after irradiation will be described and discussed. In addition, we will include annealing studies, with and without UV-light. Based on our results, the standard process of Gamma- sterilization with a total dose of approx. 2 Mrad can be used for UVI-fibers resulting in a good UV-transmission below 320 nm. Excimer-laser light at 308 nm (XeCl) and 248 nm (KrF) and deuterium-lamp light with the full spectrum starting at 200 nm can also be transmitted.

  10. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  11. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  12. Radiative shocks in gas on the Omega laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reighard, A.; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P.; Korreck, K. E.; Perry, T. S.; Robey, H. A.; Remington, B. A.; Wallace, R. J.; Ryutov, D. D.; Knauer, J.; Calder, A.; Rosner, R.; Fryxell, B.; Arnett, D.; Turner, N.; Stone, J.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, Serge

    2002-11-01

    A number of astrophysical systems involve radiative shocks that collapse spatially in response to the energy lost through radiation. This is believed to produce thin, dense, unstable shells. We have begun experiments on the Omega laser intended to produce such collapsing shocks and to study their evolution. The experiments use the laser to accelerate a thin slab of Be, which becomes a piston that drives a shock through 1.1 atm of Ar gas at 100 km/s. The shock is predicted to collapse. Experiments are in preparation that will detect the dense layer and also the radiative precursor in front of the shock. We will report their results.

  13. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  15. Application to radiation damage simulation calculation of Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruga, Takeo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in Monte Carlo calculation for radiation damage simulation of structural materials to be used in fast breeder reactors or thermonuclear fusion reactors under energetic neutron or charged particle bombardment is reviewed. Specifically usefulness of employing Monte Carlo methods in molecular dynamics calculations to understand mechanical properties change such as dimensional change, strength, creep, fatigue, corrosion, and crack growth of materials under irradiation on the basis of atomic collision processes is stressed. Structure and spatial distribution of point defects in iron, gold, or cooper as demonstrative examples at several hundreds of ps after the movement of primary knock-on atom (PKA) takes place are calculated as a function of PKA energy. The results are compared with those obtained by the method developed by Norgett, Robinson and Torrens and the usefulness is discussed. (S. Ohno)

  16. Ultraviolet radiation-mediated damage to cellular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadet, Jean [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, Av. des Martyrs, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38054 (France)]. E-mail: jcadet@cea.fr; Sage, Evelyne [Institut Curie, CNRS/IC UMR 2027, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Douki, Thierry [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, Av. des Martyrs, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38054 (France)

    2005-04-01

    Emphasis is placed in this review article on recent aspects of the photochemistry of cellular DNA in which both the UVB and UVA components of solar radiation are implicated individually or synergistically. Interestingly, further mechanistic insights into the UV-induced formation of DNA photoproducts were gained from the application of new accurate and sensitive chromatographic and enzymic assays aimed at measuring base damage. Thus, each of the twelve possible dimeric photoproducts that are produced at the four main bipyrimidine sites can now be singled out as dinucleoside monophosphates that are enzymatically released from UV-irradiated DNA. This was achieved using a recently developed high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay (HPLC-MS/MS) assay after DNA extraction and appropriate enzymic digestion. Interestingly, a similar photoproduct distribution pattern is observed in both isolated and cellular DNA upon exposure to low doses of either UVC or UVB radiation. This applies more specifically to the DNA of rodent and human cells, the cis-syn cyclobutadithymine being predominant over the two other main photolesions, namely thymine-cytosine pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adduct and the related cyclobutyl dimer. UVA-irradiation was found to generate cyclobutane dimers at TT and to a lower extent at TC sites as a likely result of energy transfer mechanism involving still unknown photoexcited chromophore(s). Oxidative damage to DNA is also induced although less efficiently by UVA-mediated photosensitization processes that mostly involved {sup 1}O{sub 2} together with a smaller contribution of hydroxyl radical-mediated reactions through initially generated superoxide radicals.

  17. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shestakov, Aleksei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  18. Optical scattering measurements of laser induced damage in the inrtaocular lens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, B.; van den Berg, T.J.T.P.

    2012-01-01

    This study optically determines whether the amount of light scatter due to laser-induced damage to the intraocular lens (IOL) is significant in relation to normal straylight values in the human eye. Two IOLs with laser-induced damage were extracted from two donor eyes. Each IOL had 15 pits and/or

  19. Evaluating experimental molecular physics studies of radiation damage in DNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMP) is a mature field exploring the spectroscopy, excitation, ionisation of atoms and molecules in all three phases. Understanding of the spectroscopy and collisional dynamics of AMP has been fundamental to the development and application of quantum mechanics and is applied across a broad range of disparate disciplines including atmospheric sciences, astrochemistry, combustion and environmental science, and in central to core technologies such as semiconductor fabrications, nanotechnology and plasma processing. In recent years the molecular physics also started significantly contributing to the area of the radiation damage at molecular level and thus cancer therapy improvement through both experimental and theoretical advances, developing new damage measurement and analysis techniques. It is therefore worth to summarise and highlight the most prominent findings from the AMP community that contribute towards better understanding of the fundamental processes in biologically-relevant systems as well as to comment on the experimental challenges that were met for more complex investigation targets. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  20. Counterpropagating Radiative Shock Experiments on the Orion Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Clayson, T.; Stehlé, C.; Swadling, G. F.; Foster, J. M.; Skidmore, J.; Graham, P.; Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chaulagain, U.; Singh, R. L.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Patankar, S.; Spindloe, C.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Velarde, P.; Danson, C.

    2017-08-01

    We present new experiments to study the formation of radiative shocks and the interaction between two counterpropagating radiative shocks. The experiments are performed at the Orion laser facility, which is used to drive shocks in xenon inside large aspect ratio gas cells. The collision between the two shocks and their respective radiative precursors, combined with the formation of inherently three-dimensional shocks, provides a novel platform particularly suited for the benchmarking of numerical codes. The dynamics of the shocks before and after the collision are investigated using point-projection x-ray backlighting while, simultaneously, the electron density in the radiative precursor was measured via optical laser interferometry. Modeling of the experiments using the 2D radiation hydrodynamic codes nym and petra shows very good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Counterpropagating Radiative Shock Experiments on the Orion Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F; Clayson, T; Stehlé, C; Swadling, G F; Foster, J M; Skidmore, J; Graham, P; Burdiak, G C; Lebedev, S V; Chaulagain, U; Singh, R L; Gumbrell, E T; Patankar, S; Spindloe, C; Larour, J; Kozlova, M; Rodriguez, R; Gil, J M; Espinosa, G; Velarde, P; Danson, C

    2017-08-04

    We present new experiments to study the formation of radiative shocks and the interaction between two counterpropagating radiative shocks. The experiments are performed at the Orion laser facility, which is used to drive shocks in xenon inside large aspect ratio gas cells. The collision between the two shocks and their respective radiative precursors, combined with the formation of inherently three-dimensional shocks, provides a novel platform particularly suited for the benchmarking of numerical codes. The dynamics of the shocks before and after the collision are investigated using point-projection x-ray backlighting while, simultaneously, the electron density in the radiative precursor was measured via optical laser interferometry. Modeling of the experiments using the 2D radiation hydrodynamic codes nym and petra shows very good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Caries inhibition potential of Er:YAG and Er:YSGG laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D. B.; Visuri, Steven R.; Seka, Wolf D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dental hard tissues can be ablated efficiency by (lambda) equals 3 micrometers laser irradiation with minimal subsurface thermal damage. However, the potential of lasers operating in the region of the infrared for caries preventive treatments has not been investigated. In this study, the caries inhibition potential of Er:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.94 micrometers ) and Er:YSGG ((lambda) equals 2.79 micrometers ) laser radiation on dental enamel was evaluated at various irradiation intensities. Pulsed IR radiometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to measure the time-resolved surface temperatures during laser irradiation and to detect changes in the surface morphology. The magnitude and temporal evolution of the surface temperature during multiple pulse irradiation of the tissue was dependent on the wavelength, irradiation intensity, and the number of laser pulses. Radiometry and SEM micrographs indicated that ablation was initiated at temperatures of approximately 300 degree(s)C for Er:YAG and 800 degree(s)C for Er:YSGG laser irradiation, well below the melting and vaporization temperatures of the carbonated hydroxyapatite mineral component (m.p. equals 1200 degree(s)C). Nevertheless, there was marked caries inhibition for irradiation intensities below those temperature thresholds, notably 60% and 40% inhibition was achieved after Er:YSGG and Er:YAG laser irradiation, respectively. These results indicate that the Er:YSGG laser can be used effectively for both preventive dental treatments and for hard tissue removal.

  3. Study of the radiation damage of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitschke, Michael; Chmill, Valery; Garutti, Erika; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joern [Institute for Experimental Physics, Hamburg University, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation damage significantly changes the performance of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). In this work, we first have characterized KETEK SiPMs with a pixel size of 15 x 15 μm{sup 2} using I-V (current-voltage), C/G-V/f (capacitance/impedance-voltage/frequency) and Q-V (charge-voltage) measurements with and without illumination with blue light of 470 nm from an LED. The SiPM parameters determined are DCR (dark count rate), relative PDE (photon detection efficiency), G (Gain), XT (cross-talk), Geiger breakdown characteristics, C{sub pix} (pixel capacitance) and R{sub q} (quenching resistance). Following this first characterization, the SiPMs were irradiated using reactor neutrons with fluences of 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, 5 . 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}. Afterwards, the same measurements were repeated, and the dependence of the SiPM parameters on neutron fluence was determined. The results are used to optimize the radiation tolerance of SiPMs.

  4. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  5. Effects of lactic bacteria on immunological activation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Hajime; Yuki, Rumio [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan). Graduate School

    2003-03-01

    Although some studies have suggested that certain substances, such as vitamins and glucan, found in natural food products may have protective effect against radiation injuries, no substance is used practically as radioprotectors. Safe radioprotectors without side effects are, however, yet to see. Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) in intestines is known to enhance immunity of the host as a biological response modifier. In this report, we have examined the radiation protection effect of Ef using C3H mice and assessed the effect of Ef on the natural killer (NK) cells activity of the splenic cells in the mice. Less body weight losses after irradiation were observed among Ef injection groups, in comparison with control groups. Our data showed a strong tendency to prolong the surviving fraction among the groups with the Ef injection. Hence, the Ef treatment appeared to have protected mucosal damage caused by the X-ray irradiation. The NK cells activities were markedly enhanced after the Ef injection as well. With the evidence mentioned above, we conclude that the Ef may have positive effect on patients who undergo a radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Surface treatment of CFRP composites using femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, V.; Sharma, S. P.; de Moura, M. F. S. F.; Moreira, R. D. F.; Vilar, R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the surface treatment of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites by laser ablation with femtosecond laser radiation. For this purpose, unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites were treated with femtosecond laser pulses of 1024 nm wavelength and 550 fs duration. Laser tracks were inscribed on the material surface using pulse energies and scanning speeds in the range 0.1-0.5 mJ and 0.1-5 mm/s, respectively. The morphology of the laser treated surfaces was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We show that, by using the appropriate processing parameters, a selective removal of the epoxy resin can be achieved, leaving the carbon fibers exposed. In addition, sub-micron laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are created on the carbon fibers surface, which may be potentially beneficial for the improvement of the fiber to matrix adhesion in adhesive bonds between CFRP parts.

  7. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities.

  8. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2003-06-10

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  9. Initiation, Growth and Mitigation of UV Laser Induced Damage in Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, A M; Feit, M D

    2001-12-21

    Laser damage of large fused silica optics initiates at imperfections. Possible initiation mechanisms are considered. We demonstrate that a model based on nanoparticle explosions is consistent with the observed initiation craters. Possible mechanisms for growth upon subsequent laser irradiation, including material modification and laser intensification, are discussed. Large aperture experiments indicate an exponential increase in damage size with number of laser shots. Physical processes associated with this growth and a qualitative explanation of self-accelerated growth is presented. Rapid growth necessitates damage growth mitigation techniques. Several possible mitigation techniques are mentioned, with special emphasis on CO{sub 2} processing. Analysis of material evaporation, crack healing, and thermally induced stress are presented.

  10. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  11. An edge-TCT setup for the investigation of radiation damaged silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feindt, Finn; Scharf, Christian; Garutti, Erika; Klanner, Robert [Institute for Experimental Physics, Hamburg University, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the electric field, drift velocity and charge collection of electrons and holes in radiation-damaged silicon strip sensors. For this purpose the edge Transient Current Technique (TCT) is employed. In contrast to conventional TCT, this method requires light from a sub-ns pulsed, infrared laser to be focused to a μm-size spot and scanned across the polished edge of a strip sensor. Thus electron-hole pairs are generated at a known depth in the sensor. Electrons and holes drift in the electric field and induce transient currents on the sensor electrodes. The current wave forms are analyzed as a function of the applied voltage and the position of the laser focus in order to determine the electric field, the drift velocities and the charge collection. In this talk the setup and the procedure for polishing the sensor edge are described, and first results, regarding the measurement of the laser light focus are presented.

  12. Maculopathy following exposure to visible and infrared radiation from a laser pointer: a clinical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, James V M; Sromicki, Julian; Mangold, Mario; Golling, Matthias; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Laser pointer devices have become increasingly available in recent years, and their misuse has caused a number of ocular injuries. Online distribution channels permit trade in devices which may not conform to international standards in terms of their output power and spectral content. We present a case study of ocular injury caused by one such device. The patient was examined approximately 9 months following laser exposure using full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ERG and MF-ERG), electrooculography (EOG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), in addition to a full ophthalmological examination. MF-ERG, OCT, and the ophthalmological examination were repeated 7 months after the first examination. The output of the laser pointer was measured. Despite severe focal damage to the central retina visible fundoscopically and with OCT, all electrophysiological examinations were quantitatively normal; however, qualitatively the central responses of the MF-ERG appeared slightly reduced. When the MF-ERG was repeated 7 months later, all findings were normal. The laser pointer was found to emit both visible and infrared radiation in dangerous amounts. Loss of retinal function following laser pointer injury may not always be detectable using standard electrophysiological tests. Exposure to non-visible radiation should be considered as a possible aggravating factor when assessing cases of alleged laser pointer injury.

  13. Laser induced damage of fused silica polished optics due to a droplet forming organic contaminant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bien-Aime, Karell; Neauport, Jerome; Tovena-Pecault, Isabelle; Fargin, Evelyne; Labrugere, Christine; Belin, Colette; Couzi, Michel

    2009-04-20

    We report on the effect of organic molecular contamination on single shot laser induced damage density at the wavelength of 351 nm, with a 3 ns pulse length. Specific contamination experiments were made with dioctylphthalate (DOP) in liquid or gaseous phase, on the surface of fused silica polished samples, bare or solgel coated. Systematic laser induced damage was observed only in the case of liquid phase contamination. Different chemical and morphological characterization methods were used to identify and understand the damage process. We demonstrate that the contaminant morphology, rather than its physicochemical nature, can be responsible for the decrease of laser induced damage threshold of optics.

  14. Plastic hollow waveguides: properties and possibilities as a flexible radiation delivery system for CO2-laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossmann, P H; Romano, V; Spörri, S; Altermatt, H J; Croitoru, N; Frenz, M; Weber, H P

    1995-01-01

    One significant inconvenience of the CO2 laser is the lack of flexible fibers essential for endoscopic applications. The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of hollow waveguides in view of a practical use in medicine. Various types of plastic hollow waveguides for flexible delivery of CO2 laser radiation were examined. The transmission losses, divergence angle, damage threshold, and input and output beam profiles were determined. The interaction process between radiation transmitted through these guides with soft as well as hard tissues was studied. Plastic hollow waveguides can transmit high power (up to 50 W) with low losses (straight guide 1 dB/m) even through bendings. The divergence angle is laser beam. The results of this study show good cutting quality and durability of these flexible plastic hollow waveguides, which render possible to deliver CO2 radiation in the power range needed for most surgical applications with affordable transmission losses. Plastic hollow waveguides are, therefore, a real alternative to replace the mirror arms.

  15. Response of antioxidant defense system to laser radiation apical meristem of Isatis indigotica seedlings exposed to UV-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ping

    2009-07-01

    To determine the response of antioxidant defense system to laser radiation apical meristem of Isatis indigotica seedlings, Isatis indigotica seedlings were subjected to UV-B radiation (10.08 kJ m(-2)) for 8 h day(-1) for 8 days (PAR, 220 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and then exposed to He-Ne laser radiation (633 nm; 5.23 mW mm(-2); beam diameter: 1.5 mm) for 5 min each day without ambient light radiation. Changes in free radical elimination systems were measured, the results indicate that: (1) UV-B radiation enhanced the concentration of Malondialdahyde (MDA) and decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in seedlings compared with the control. The concentration of MDA was decreased and the activities of SOD, CAT and POD were increased when seedlings were subjected to elevated UV-B damage followed by laser; (2) the concentration of UV absorbing compounds and proline were increased progressively with UV-B irradiation, laser irradiation and He-Ne laser irradiation plus UV-B irradiation compared with the control. These results suggest that laser radiation has an active function in repairing UV-B-induced lesions in seedlings.

  16. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  17. Detection of DNA Damage by Space Radiation in Human Fibroblasts Flown on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; hide

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation consists of energetic charged particles of varying charges and energies. Exposure of astronauts to space radiation on future long duration missions to Mars, or missions back to the Moon, is expected to result in deleterious consequences such as cancer and comprised central nervous system (CNS) functions. Space radiation can also cause mutation in microorganisms, and potentially influence the evolution of life in space. Measurement of the space radiation environment has been conducted since the very beginning of the space program. Compared to the quantification of the space radiation environment using physical detectors, reports on the direct measurement of biological consequences of space radiation exposure have been limited, due primarily to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the environment. Most of the biological assays fail to detect the radiation effects at acute doses that are lower than 5 centiSieverts. In a recent study, we flew cultured confluent human fibroblasts in mostly G1 phase of the cell cycle to the International Space Station (ISS). The cells were fixed in space after arriving on the ISS for 3 and 14 days, respectively. The fixed cells were later returned to the ground and subsequently stained with the gamma-H2AX (Histone family, member X) antibody that are commonly used as a marker for DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks, induced by both low-and high-linear energy transfer radiation. In our present study, the gamma-H2AX (Histone family, member X) foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. To confirm that some large track-like foci were from space radiation exposure, we also exposed, on the ground, the same type of cells to both low-and high-linear energy transfer protons, and high-linear energy transfer Fe ions. In addition, we exposed the cells to low dose rate gamma rays, in order to rule out the possibility that the large track-like foci can be induced by chronic low-linear energy transfer

  18. [Effects of laser shot frequency on plasma radiation characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Bai, Jin-Ning; Song, Guang-Ju; Sun, Jiang; Deng, Ze-Chao; Wang, Ying-Long

    2012-11-01

    To improve the quality of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, nanosecond pulse laser generated by Nd:YAG laser was used to excite soil sample. The intensity and signal-to-background ratio of A1 I 394.401 nm, Ba I 455.403 nm, Fe I 430.791 nm and Ti I 498.173 nm were observed using a grating spectrometer and a photoelectric detection system. The effects of laser shot frequency (5, 10 and 15 Hz)on the radiation characteristics of laser-induced plasma was studied. The experimental results show that as compared with the laser shot frequency of 5 Hz, the spectral line intensity of A1, Ba, Fe and Ti increased by about 50.94%, 112.7%, 107.46%, and 99.38% at 15 Hz respectively under the same laser energy, while the spectral signal-to-background ratio increased by about 15.16%, 24.08%, 40.26% and 72.06% respectively. The effects mechanism of the laser shot frequency on radiation characteristics of plasma is explained by measuring plasma parameters.

  19. Radiation Damage and Fission Product Release in Zirconium Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Gerald W. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-08-29

    Zirconium nitride is a material of interest to the AFCI program due to some of its particular properties, such as its high melting point, strength and thermal conductivity. It is to be used as an inert matrix or diluent with a nuclear fuel based on transuranics. As such, it must sustain not only high temperatures, but also continuous irradiation from fission and decay products. This study addresses the issues of irradiation damage and fission product retention in zirconium nitride through an assessment of defects that are produced, how they react, and how predictions can be made as to the overall lifespan of the complete nuclear fuel package. Ion irradiation experiments are a standard method for producing radiation damage to a surface for observation. Cryogenic irradiations are performed to produce the maximum accumulation of defects, while elevated temperature irradiations may be used to allow defects to migrate and react to form clusters and loops. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence x-ray diffractometry were used in evaluating the effects that irradiation has on the crystal structure and microstructure of the material. Other techniques were employed to evaluate physical effects, such as nanoindentation and helium release measurements. Results of the irradiations showed that, at cryogenic temperatures, ZrN withstood over 200 displacements per atom without amorphization. No significant change to the lattice or microstructure was observed. At elevated temperatures, the large amount of damage showed mobility, but did not anneal significantly. Defect clustering was possibly observed, yet the size was too small to evaluate, and bubble formation was not observed. Defects, specifically nitrogen vacancies, affect the mechanical behavior of ZrN dramatically. Current and previous work on dislocations shows a distinct change in slip plane, which is evidence of the bonding characteristics. The stacking-fault energy changes dramatically with

  20. Interaction of laser radiation with metal island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditskii, A. A.; Viduta, L. V.; Ostranitsa, A. P.; Tomchuk, P. M.; Iakovlev, V. A.

    1986-08-01

    The emission phenomena arising during the interaction of pulsed laser emission with island films are examined with reference to experimental results obtained for island films of gold irradiated by a CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Well reproducible emission pulses that are also accompanied by light pulses are produced at intensities less than 10 to the 5th W/sq cm, with the film structure remaining unchanged. The maximum energy of the electrons emitted under the effect of laser radiation is estimated at 3 eV; the work function is 2.1 eV.

  1. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar [Conservation Department, Faculty of Archaeology, Cairo University, El-Gamaa Street, El-Giza (Egypt)], E-mail: Omaa67@yahoo.com; Harith, M.A. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: mharithm@niles.edu.eg

    2008-07-15

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  2. Confocal scanning laser evaluation of repeated Q-switched laser exposure and possible retinal NFL damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Gagliano, Donald A.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Lund, David J.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1995-05-01

    Repeated extended source Q-switched exposure centered on the macula has been shown to produce a Bullseye maculopathy. This paper provides a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopic evaluation with regard to the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) and deeper choroidal vascular network. Confocal imaging revealed that the punctate annular appearance of this lesion in the deeper retinal layers is associated with retinal nerve fiber bundle disruptions and small gaps in the retinal NFL. No choroidal dysfunction was noticed with Indocyanine green angiography. It is hypothesized that retinal NFL damage occurs either through disruption of retinal pigment epithelial cell layer support to the NFL or through direct exposure to high spatial peak powers within the extended source beam profile, causing direct microthermal injury to the NFL. The apparent sparring of the fovea reflects central retinal morphology rather than a lack of retinal damage to the fovea.

  3. Radiation damage to DNA in DNA-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, M. [Centre de Biophysiqe Moleculaire, CNRS, rue C. Sadron, 45071 Orleans (France); Davidkova, M., E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.cz [Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-03

    Graphical abstract: RADACK model: studied biomolecules of known molecular structure are located in a water volume where OH{center_dot} radicals are randomly generated. The radicals diffuse and either react with the encountered target atom or escape from the box. The model allows to assess the yields and distributions of radiolytic attack. Research highlights: {yields} Radiation-induced lesions are inhomogeneously distributed along DNA. {yields} The distribution is modulated by DNA sequence and structure. {yields} DNA radiosensitivity is modified by positively charged molecules or by proteins. {yields} Our original model RADACK accounts for these observations. - Abstract: The most aggressive product of water radiolysis, the hydroxyl (OH{center_dot}) radical, is responsible for the indirect effect of ionizing radiations on DNA in solution and aerobic conditions. According to radiolytic footprinting experiments, the resulting strand breaks and base modifications are inhomogeneously distributed along the DNA molecule irradiated free or bound to ligands (polyamines, thiols, proteins). A Monte-Carlo based model of simulation of the reaction of OH{center_dot} radicals with the macromolecules, called RADACK, allows calculating the relative probability of damage of each nucleotide of DNA irradiated alone or in complexes with proteins. RADACK calculations require the knowledge of the three dimensional structure of DNA and its complexes (determined by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy or molecular modeling). The confrontation of the calculated values with the results of the radiolytic footprinting experiments together with molecular modeling calculations show that: (1) the extent and location of the lesions are strongly dependent on the structure of DNA, which in turns is modulated by the base sequence and by the binding of proteins and (2) the regions in contact with the protein can be protected against the attack by the hydroxyl radicals via masking of the binding

  4. Base-Level Management of Laser Radiation Protection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs), or alexandrite. Liquid materials that are used as active mediums include: rhodamine dye and coumarin . Section D...a source of radiation and the dye emits radiation at a longer wavelength. Coumarin dyes are useful as active media for emissions inthe blue to green...plastic, or quartz. Optical fibers have found uses in many areas including: industrial laser welding; medical surgery; dental work; product-code

  5. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  6. [Cellphone electromagnetic radiation damages the testicular ultrastructure of male rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Hui-Rong; Ma, Xue-Lian; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Guo-Hong

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the influence of cellphone electromagnetic radiation (CER) on the testicular ultrastructure and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in male rats.atability, feasibility, applicability, and controllability in the construction of experimental animal models, we compared the major anatomic features of the penis of 20 adult beagle dogs with those of 10 adult men. Using microsurgical techniques, we performed cross-transplantation of the penis in the 20 (10 pairs) beagle dogs and observed the survival rate of the transplanted penises by FK506+MMF+MP immune induction. We compared the relevant indexes with those of the 10 cases of microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis. Thirty adult male SD rats were equally randomized into a 2 h CER, a 4 h CER, and a normal control group, the former two groups exposed to 30 days of 900 MHz CER for 2 and 4 hours a day, respectively, while the latter left untreated. Then the changes in the ultrastructure of the testis tissue were observed under the transmission electron microscope and the apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells was determined by TUNEL. Compared with the normal controls, the rats of the 2 h CER group showed swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, increased cell intervals, apparent vacuoles and medullization in some mitochondria, and increased apoptosis of spermatogenic cells, mainly the apoptosis of primary spermatocytes (P<0.05 ). In comparison with the 2 h CER group, the animals of the 4 h CER group exhibited swollen basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, more separated tight junction of Sertoli cells, wider cell intervals, incomplete membrane of spermatogonial cells, fragments of cytoplasm, nuclear pyknosis and notch, slight dilation of perinuclear space, abnormalities of intracellular mitochondria with vacuoles, fuzzy structure, and fusion or disappearance of some cristae, and increased damage of mitochondria and apoptosis of spermatogenic

  7. Laser conditioning characterization and damage threshold prediction of hafnia/silica multilayer mirrors by photothermal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papandrew, A B; Stolz, C J; Wu, Z L; Loomis, G E; Falabella, S

    2000-12-11

    Laser conditioning has been shown to improve the laser damage threshold of some optical coatings by greater than 2x. Debate continues within the damage community regarding laser-conditioning mechanisms, but it is clear that nodular ejection is one of the byproducts of the laser conditioning process. To better understand why laser conditioning is so effective, photothermal microscopy was used to measure absorption of coating defects before and after laser exposure. Although a modest absorption reduction was expected due to the lower electric field peaks within a pit and the absence of potentially absorbing nodular seeds, surprisingly, absorption reductions up to 150x were observed. Photothermal microscopy has also been successfully used to correlate laser-induced damage threshold and absorption of defects in hafnia/silica multilayer optical coatings. Defects with high absorption, as indicated by high photothermal signal, have low damage thresholds. Previously a linear correlation of damage threshold and defect photothermal signal was established with films designed and damage tested at 1{omega} (1053 nm) and Brewster's angle (56.4{sup o}), but characterized by photothermal microscopy at 514.5 nm and near-normal angle of incidence (10{sup o}). In this study coatings designed, characterized by photothermal microscopy, and damage tested at the same wavelength, incident angle, and polarization did not have a correlation between defect photothermal signal and absorption.

  8. High-Resolution In Vivo Imaging of Regimes of Laser Damage to the Primate Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginger M. Pocock

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate fundamental mechanisms of regimes of laser induced damage to the retina and the morphological changes associated with the damage response. Methods. Varying grades of photothermal, photochemical, and photomechanical retinal laser damage were produced in eyes of eight cynomolgus monkeys. An adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and spectral domain optical coherence tomographer were combined to simultaneously collect complementary in vivo images of retinal laser damage during and following exposure. Baseline color fundus photography was performed to complement high-resolution imaging. Monkeys were perfused with 10% buffered formalin and eyes were enucleated for histological analysis. Results. Laser energies for visible retinal damage in this study were consistent with previously reported damage thresholds. Lesions were identified in OCT images that were not visible in direct ophthalmoscopic examination or fundus photos. Unique diagnostic characteristics, specific to each damage regime, were identified and associated with shape and localization of lesions to specific retinal layers. Previously undocumented retinal healing response to blue continuous wave laser exposure was recorded through a novel experimental methodology. Conclusion. This study revealed increased sensitivity of lesion detection and improved specificity to the laser of origin utilizing high-resolution imaging when compared to traditional ophthalmic imaging techniques in the retina.

  9. Development of radiation biological dosimetry and treatment of radiation-induced damaged tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Yun Sil [and others

    2000-04-01

    Util now, only a few methods have been developed for radiation biological dosimetry such as conventional chromosome aberration and micronucleus in peripheral blood cell. However, because these methods not only can be estimated by the expert, but also have a little limitation due to need high technique and many times in the case of radiation accident, it is very difficult to evaluate the absorbed dose of victims. Therefore, we should develop effective, easy, simple and rapid biodosimetry and its guideline(triage) to be able to be treated the victims as fast as possible. We established the apoptotic fragment assay, PCC, comet assay, and micronucleus assay which was the significant relationship between dose and cell damages to evaluate the irradiated dose as correct and rapid as possible using lymphocytes and crypt cells, and compared with chromosome dosimetry and micronucleus assay.

  10. Initiation of laser-induced damage sites in fused silica optical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertussi, Bertrand; Cormont, Philippe; Palmier, Stéphanie; Legros, Philippe; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2009-07-06

    Significant improvement in the polishing process of fused silica optical components has increased their lifetimes at 351 nm. Nevertheless, for large laser facilities like the LaserMegaJoule (LMJ), zero defect optical components are not yet available. Therefore, a damage mitigation technique has been developed to prevent the growth of the laser-initiated damage sites. Because of the difficulty to produce mitigated sites with sufficiently large depth, the initial morphology of damage to mitigate is a critical issue. The aim of this work is to determine laser parameters (pulse duration, fluence) which permit us to initiate damage sites in accordance with our mitigation process. Confocal microscopy is used to observe damage sites that have sub-surface cracks and consequently to measure precisely the diameter and the depth of the area to mitigate.

  11. PWO crystals for CMS electromagnetic calorimeter studies of the radiation damage kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Drobychev, G Yu; Dormenev, V; Korzhik, M; Lecoq, P; Lopatic, A; Nédélec, P; Peigneux, J P; Sillou, D

    2005-01-01

    Kinetics of radiation damage of the PWO crystals under irradiation and recovery were studied. Crystals were irradiated with dose corresponding to average one expected in the electromagnetic calorimeter (working dose irradiation). Radiation damage and recovery were monitored through measurements of PWO optical transmission. An approach is proposed which allows evaluating the influence of the PWO crystals properties on the statistical term in the energy resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The analysis also gives important information about the nature of the radiation damage mechanism in scintillation crystals. The method was used during development of technology of the mass production of radiation hard crystals and during development of methods for crystals certification

  12. Monitoring radiation damage in the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Graverini, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of LHCb is to search for indirect evidence of new physics in decays of heavy hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer with precise silicon-strip detectors in the regions with highest particle occupancies. The non-uniform exposure of the LHCb sensors makes it an ideal laboratory to study radiation damage effects in silicon detectors. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is composed of an upstream tracker, the TT, and of the inner part of the downstream tracker (IT). Dedicated scans are regularly taken, which allow a precise measurement of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the calibration of the operational voltages. The measured evolution of the effective depletion voltage $V_{depl}$ is shown, and compared with the Hamburg model prediction. The magnitudes of the sensor leakage current are also analysed and compared to their expected evolution according to phenomenological models. Our results prove that both the TT and the IT will withstand normal operation until the end of the L...

  13. Particle damage sources for fused silica optics and their mitigation on high energy laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bude, J; Carr, C W; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Whitman, P; Monticelli, M; Raman, R; Cross, D; Welday, B; Ravizza, F; Suratwala, T; Davis, J; Fischer, M; Hawley, R; Lee, H; Matthews, M; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; VanBlarcom, D; Sommer, S

    2017-05-15

    High energy laser systems are ultimately limited by laser-induced damage to their critical components. This is especially true of damage to critical fused silica optics, which grows rapidly upon exposure to additional laser pulses. Much progress has been made in eliminating damage precursors in as-processed fused silica optics (the advanced mitigation process, AMP3), and very high damage resistance has been demonstrated in laboratory studies. However, the full potential of these improvements has not yet been realized in actual laser systems. In this work, we explore the importance of additional damage sources-in particular, particle contamination-for fused silica optics fielded in a high-performance laser environment, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. We demonstrate that the most dangerous sources of particle contamination in a system-level environment are laser-driven particle sources. In the specific case of the NIF laser, we have identified the two important particle sources which account for nearly all the damage observed on AMP3 optics during full laser operation and present mitigations for these particle sources. Finally, with the elimination of these laser-driven particle sources, we demonstrate essentially damage free operation of AMP3 fused silica for ten large optics (a total of 12,000 cm 2 of beam area) for shots from 8.6 J/cm 2 to 9.5 J/cm 2 of 351 nm light (3 ns Gaussian pulse shapes). Potentially many other pulsed high energy laser systems have similar particle sources, and given the insight provided by this study, their identification and elimination should be possible. The mitigations demonstrated here are currently being employed for all large UV silica optics on the National Ignition Facility.

  14. Investigation of laser-induced damage by various initiators on the subsurface of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Feng, Guoying; Han, Jinghua; Zhai, Lingling

    2012-09-24

    We develop a model that describes the effect of size distribution of nanoabsorbers on the subsurface of fused silica on laser-damage probability. Using Mie theory and heat equation, we obtain the correlation between the critical fluence and particle radius. Considering a power law distribution of nanoabsorbers, the curves of laser-damage probability are calculated based on experimental results of contents of contaminations and a fit parameter of size distribution of nanoabsorbers. This paper presents the influence of various potential candidates, jointly, on laser-induced damage.

  15. Effect of Infrared Laser Radiation on Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    Streptococcus faecium . The deactivation obtained in 60 seconds in the CO2 beam was the equivalent to that produced by a radiation dose of 2.5 M rad...laser pulse of the order of 10-2 seconds duration if all the energy absorbed were taken up by specific vibrational modes of the irradiated molecules

  16. Recruitment of TRF2 to laser-induced DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Abe, Satoshi; Gu, Ling; Mendonca, Marc S; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gilley, David

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the telomere-associated protein TRF2 plays critical roles in the DNA damage response. TRF2 is rapidly and transiently phosphorylated by an ATM-dependent pathway in response to DNA damage and this DNA damage-induced phosphoryation is essential for the DNA-PK-dependent pathway of DNA double-strand break repair (DSB). However, the type of DNA damage that induces TRF2 localization to the damage sites, the requirement for DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of TRF2 for its recruitment, as well as the detailed kinetics of TRF2 accumulation at DNA damage sites have not been fully investigated. In order to address these questions, we used an ultrafast femtosecond multiphoton laser and a continuous wave 405-nm single photon laser to induce DNA damage at defined nuclear locations. Our results showed that DNA damage produced by a femtosecond multiphoton laser was sufficient for localization of TRF2 to these DNA damage sites. We also demonstrate that ectopically expressed TRF2 was recruited to DNA lesions created by a 405-nm laser. Our data suggest that ATM and DNA-PKcs kinases are not required for TRF2 localization to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of TRF2 at residue T188 was not essential for its recruitment to laser-induced DNA damage sites. Thus, we provide further evidence that a protein known to function in telomere maintenance, TRF2, is recruited to sites of DNA damage and plays critical roles in the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Extent of Tissue Damage in the Epidural Space by Ho / YAG Laser During Epiduroscopic Laser Neural Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Daehyun; Lee, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Lasers have recently become very useful for epiduroscopy. As the use of lasers increases, the potential for unwanted complications with direct application of laser energy to nerve tissue has also increased. Even using the lowest laser power to test for nerve stimulation, there are still risks of laser ablation. However, there are no studies investigating tissue damage from laser procedures in the epidural space. This is a study on the risks of Ho/YAG laser usage during epiduroscopy. Observatory cadaver study. Department of anatomy and clinical research institute at the University Hospital. We used 5 cadavers for this study. After removing the dura and nerve root from the spinal column, laser energy from a Ho/YAG laser was applied directly to the dura and nerve root as well as in the virtual epidural space, which mimicked the conditions of epiduroscopy with the dura folded. Tissue destruction at all laser ablation sites was observed with the naked eye as well as with a microscope. Specimens were collected from each site of laser exposure, fixed in 10% neutral formalin, and dyed with H/E staining. Tissue destruction was observed in all laser ablation sites, regardless of the length of exposure and the power of the laser beam. A cadaver is not exactly the same as a living human because dura characteristics change and tissue damage can be influenced by dura thickness according to the spinal level. Even with low power and short duration, a laser can destroy tissue if the laser beam makes direct contact with the tissue.

  18. In-situ microscopy of front and rear side ablation processes in alkali aluminosilicate glass using ultra short pulsed laser radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.; Kalupka, C.; Jenne, M.; Kumkar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The visualization of the nonlinear absorption, the subsequent relaxation of excited states and the formation of defects enables the investigation of fundamental laser-material-interaction as well as the identification of process windows for micromachining of transparent materials with ultra short pulsed laser radiation. In this work, time resolved pump probe microscopy is applied to analyze the laser-material-interaction and to reduce damage inside the material during front- and rear side abl...

  19. Proceedings of the Symposium of Medical (Ophthalmic) Surveillance of Personnel Potentially Exposed to Laser Radiation Held on 8-9 September 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    somewhat difficult to maintain that damage to Bruch’s membrane from a laser would predispose the subject to the formation of disciform maculopathy ...because that is the way one treats disciform maculopathy . COL Whitmore: We are referring to reports in the literature of this pathology following laser ...Medical (Ophthalmic) Surveillance of Personnel Potentially Exposed to Laser Radiation, 8-9 September 1982 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) r Pitf Dyrid H_

  20. Laser sources in dentistry and radiation safety regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, D.; Gaeta, G. M.; Lepore, M.

    2007-02-01

    Nowadays laser sources are largely adopted in dentistry due to their unique properties making them good candidates to substitute traditional scalpel and conventional diamond bur in the surgery of the soft and hard oral tissue, respectively. The large use of laser sources outside the research laboratories without the need of highly specialized personnel can ask for a widespread knowledge of safety issues related to this kind of equipment. The main hazard of accidental exposures regards eyes injury but increasing the power of the laser beam also skin can be involved. Safety legislations in Europe and U.S.A. take into account non ionizing radiations and laser radiation for the hazards for the health deriving from physical agents. Laser safety standards introduce 3 useful parameters for hazard characterization: "Accessible Emission Limit" (AEL), "Maximum Permissible Exposure" (MPE) and "Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance" (NOHD). We measured the MPE and NOHD for Er:YAG and other laser sources currently adopted in dentistry and we compared our results with data elaborated from standards in order to single out safe and comfortable working conditions. In fact an experimental assessment of the hazard parameters and the comparison with those of reference from safety standards turns out to be useful in order to estimate the residual hazard that can be still present after applying all the engineering protection and administrative rules.

  1. Current ideas to reduce or salvage radiation damage to salivary glands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A; van Luijk, P; Langendijk, J A; Coppes, R P

    Radiation-induced hyposalivation is still a major problem after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Current and promising new thoughts to reduce or salvage radiation damage to salivary gland tissue are explored. The main cause underlying radiation-induced hyposalivation is a lack of functional

  2. Characterization of laser damage performance of fused silica using photothermal absorption technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wen; Shi, Feng; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang

    2017-06-01

    The subsurface damage and metal impurities have been the main laser damage precursors of fused silica while subjected to high power laser irradiation. Light field enhancement and thermal absorption were used to explain the appearance of damage pits while the laser energy is far smaller than the energy that can reach the intrinsic threshold of fused silica. For fused silica optics manufactured by magnetorheological finishing or advanced mitigation process, no scratch-related damage site occurs can be found on the surface. In this work, we implemented a photothermal absorption technique based on thermal lens method to characterize the subsurface defects of fused silica optics. The pump beam is CW 532 nm wavelength laser. The probe beam is a He-Ne laser. They are collinear and focused through the same objective. When pump beam pass through the sample, optical absorption induces the local temperature rise. The lowest absorptance that we can detect is about the order of magnitude of 0.01 ppm. When pump beam pass through the sample, optical absorption induces the local temperature rise. The photothermal absorption value of fused silica samples range from 0.5 to 10 ppm. The damage densities of the samples were plotted. The damage threshold of samples at 8J/cm2 were gived to show laser damage performance of fused silica.The results show that there is a strong correlation between the thermal absorption and laser damage density. The photothermal absorption technique can be used to predict and evaluate the laser damage performance of fused silica optics.

  3. Growth of laser damage in fused silica: diameter to depth ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Adams, J J; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hollingsworth, W G; Jarboe, J A; Matthews, M; Rubenchik, A M; Spaeth, M L

    2007-10-29

    Growth of laser initiated damage plays a major role in determining optics lifetime in high power laser systems. Previous measurements have established that the lateral diameter grows exponentially. Knowledge of the growth of the site in the propagation direction is also important, especially so when considering techniques designed to mitigate damage growth, where it is required to reach all the subsurface damage. In this work, we present data on both the diameter and the depth of a growing exit surface damage sites in fused silica. Measured growth rates with both 351 nm illumination and with combined 351 nm and 1054 nm illumination are discussed.

  4. Ovarian response to laser puncture in conditions of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vylegzhanina, T. A.; Ryzhkovskaya, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results on long-term consequences of laser puncture applied to active points of the projection zones for the reproductive organs in guinea pigs after preliminary exposure to (gamma) -radiation are given. In female guinea pigs, it was shown that combination of external radiation (12.9 mCoul/kg) and incorporated 131I (6.5 mCi/kg) induced morphohistochemical and electron microscopic changes in the ovaries long (6 months) after, which indicated functional tension in the ovarian functioning. Laser biostimulation 3 months after the exposure to (gamma) - radiation induced severe injuries of the ovary, i.e. formation of thin-walled cysts, destruction of interstitial cells of the thecal sheath, by 6 months of the experiment. Functional incompetence of the organ was observed.

  5. Recent radiation damage studies and developments of the Marlowe code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Hou, M.

    2014-07-01

    Radiation damage in materials relevant to applications evolves over time scales spanning from the femtosecond - the characteristic time for an atomic collision - to decades - the aging time expected for nuclear materials. The relevant kinetic energies of atoms span from thermal motion to the MeV range.The question motivating this contribution is to identify the relationship between elementary atomic displacements triggered by irradiation and the subsequent microstructural evolution of metals in the long term. The Marlowe code, based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) is used to simulate the sequences of atomic displacements generated by energetic primary recoils and the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA, parameterized on a range of ab initio calculations, is used to predict the subsequent long-term evolution of point defect and clusters thereof. In agreement with full Molecular Dynamics, BCA displacement cascades in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and a face-centered cubic (FCC) Febond Nibond Cr alloy display recursive properties that are found useful for predictions in the long term.The case of defects evolution in W due to external irradiation with energetic H and He is also discussed. To this purpose, it was useful to extend the inelastic energy loss model available in Marlowe up to the Bethe regime. The last version of the Marlowe code (version 15) was delivered before message passing instructions softwares (such as MPI) were available but the structure of the code was designed in such a way to permit parallel executions within a distributed memory environment. This makes possible to obtain N different cascades simultaneously using N independent nodes without any communication between processors. The parallelization of the code using MPI was recently achieved by one author of this report (C.J.O.). Typically, the parallelized version of Marlowe allows simulating millions of displacement cascades using a limited number of processors (CPU time.

  6. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  7. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  8. An Alternative Method of Evaluating 1540NM Exposure Laser Damage using an Optical Tissue Phantom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jindra, Nichole M; Figueroa, Manuel A; Rockwell, Benjamin A; Chavey, Lucas J; Zohner, Justin J

    2006-01-01

    An optical phantom was designed to physically and optically resemble human tissue, in an effort to provide an alternative for detecting visual damage resulting from inadvertent exposure to infrared lasers...

  9. Using NBOHC fluorescence to predict multi-pulse laser-induced damage in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudier, Alexandre; Wagner, Frank R.; Natoli, Jean-Yves

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of the fluorescence signal as function of repeated nanosecond laser pulses up to laser-induced damage in fused silica at 266 nm. We observed a maximum in the fluorescence spectrum at 664 nm linked to NBOHCs (Non-Bridging Oxygen Hole Centers). This peak increases with shot number for a fixed fluence until damage occurs. Thanks to the data from the in situ fluorescence measurements, we propose a new method to predict the occurrence of laser damage in high quality fused silica samples like Herasil©and Suprasil 1©. This new method allows to reduce drastically the time of test and the area under study that are required to record the reference data for damage occurrence. Furthermore we measured that the lifetime of the laser-induced modifications is about 2 h in Herasil.

  10. Damage Considerations of a Flexible Micro Air Vehicle Wing Using 3-D Laser Vibrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendoza, Jr, Leo L

    2007-01-01

    .... The focus of this research is to evaluate the effects of damage on a flexible micro air vehicle wing, particularly its natural frequencies and mode shapes, using three dimensional laser vibrometry...

  11. Counter-propagating radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser and the formation of radiative precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, T.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Stehlé, C.; Burdiak, G. C.; Foster, J. M.; Skidmore, J.; Graham, P.; Gumbrell, E.; Patankar, S.; Spindloe, C.; Chaulagain, U.; Kozlová, M.; Larour, J.; Singh, R. L.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Velarde, P.; Danson, C.

    2017-06-01

    We present results from new experiments to study the dynamics of radiative shocks, reverse shocks and radiative precursors. Laser ablation of a solid piston by the Orion high-power laser at AWE Aldermaston UK was used to drive radiative shocks into a gas cell initially pressurised between 0.1 and 1.0 bar with different noble gases. Shocks propagated at 80 ± 10 km/s and experienced strong radiative cooling resulting in post-shock compressions of ×25 ± 2. A combination of X-ray backlighting, optical self-emission streak imaging and interferometry (multi-frame and streak imaging) were used to simultaneously study both the shock front and the radiative precursor. These experiments present a new configuration to produce counter-propagating radiative shocks, allowing for the study of reverse shocks and providing a unique platform for numerical validation. In addition, the radiative shocks were able to expand freely into a large gas volume without being confined by the walls of the gas cell. This allows for 3-D effects of the shocks to be studied which, in principle, could lead to a more direct comparison to astrophysical phenomena. By maintaining a constant mass density between different gas fills the shocks evolved with similar hydrodynamics but the radiative precursor was found to extend significantly further in higher atomic number gases (∼4 times further in xenon than neon). Finally, 1-D and 2-D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations are presented showing good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Microsecond enamel ablation with 10.6μm CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, W. S.; McDonald, A.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Lasers have been previously been used for dental applications, however there remain issues with thermally-induced cracking. In this paper we investigate the impact of pulse length on CO2 laser ablation of human dental enamel. Experiments were carried in vitro on molar teeth without any modification to the enamel surface, such as grinding or polishing. In addition to varying the pulse length, we also varied pulse energy and focal position, to determine the most efficient ablation of dental hard tissue and more importantly to minimize or eradicate cracking. The maximum temperature rise during the multi pulse ablation process was monitored using a set of thermocouples embedded into the pulpal chamber. The application of a laser device in dental surgery allows removal of tissue with higher precision, which results in minimal loss of healthy dental tissue. In this study we use an RF discharge excited CO2 laser operating at 10.6μm. The wavelength of 10.6 μm overlaps with a phosphate band (PO3-4) absorption in dental hard tissue hence the CO2 laser radiation has been selected as a potential source for modification of the tissue. This research describes an in-depth analysis of single pulse laser ablation. To determine the parameters that are best suited for the ablation of hard dental tissue without thermal cracking, a range of pulse lengths (10-200 μs), and fluences (0-100 J/cm2) are tested. In addition, different laser focusing approaches are investigated to select the most beneficial way of delivering laser radiation to the surface (divergent/convergent beam). To ensure that these processes do not increase the temperature above the critical threshold and cause the necrosis of the tissue a set of thermocouples was placed into the pulpal chambers. Intermittent laser radiation was investigated with and without application of a water spray to cool down the ablation site and the adjacent area. Results show that the temperature can be kept below the critical threshold

  13. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  14. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Burak, Miroslaw [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Poland); Kalinski, Thomas [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Pathologie (Germany); Garlipp, Benjamin [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefäßchirurgie (Germany); Koelble, Konrad [Philipps Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Medizin der, Abteilung für Neuropathologie (Germany); Wust, Peter [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie (Germany); Antweiler, Kai [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Biometrie und Medizinische Informatik (Germany); Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  15. Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

    2010-11-03

    Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

  16. Interaction of Er:YAG laser radiation with ureter tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínkova, Helena; Koranda, Petr; Němec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Köhler, Oto; Drlík, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the possibility of the ureter wall perforation by Er:YAG laser radiation and to explore the basic interaction characteristics for ureter surface and its deep structures. For these experiments Er:YAG laser system (wavelength 2.94 μm) working in free-running and Q-switched regime was utilized. Laser radiation was delivered to the investigated tissue by a special waveguide system. The basic part was a cyclic olefin polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide (inner/outer diameter 700/850 μm or 320/450 μm). Sealed cap of the waveguide was used for contact treatment. Maximum interaction pulse energy and length for free-running Er:YAG I laser with the 700μm waveguide were 100mJ and 200μs, respectively (corresponding intensity was 130 kW/cm2). Similarly the maximum interaction pulse energy and length for free-running Er:YAG II laser with the 320 μm waveguide were 80 mJ and 200 μs , respectively (corresponding intensity was 500 kW/cm2). Maximum interaction pulse energy and length in Q-switched regime were 17 mJ and 70 ns, respectively (corresponding intensity 63 MW/cm2). The number of pulses needed to perforate the ureter wall tissue (thickness ~1 mm) for using long 200 μs Er:YAG pulses (thermal ablation) and short 70 ns Er:YAG pulses (photoablation) was found. From the histological evaluation it follows that the application of Q-switched Er:YAG laser radiation on ureteral tissue resulted in minimum adjacent tissue alteration (up to 50μm from the surface) without any influence on the deeper layers.

  17. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  18. Nd : YAG surgical laser effects in canine prostate tissue: temperature and damage distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, S. A.; L'Eplattenier, H. F.; Rem, A. I.; van der Lugt, J. J.; Kirpensteijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    An in vitro model was used to predict short-term, laser-induced, thermal damage in canine prostate tissue. Canine prostate tissue samples were equipped with thermocouple probes to measure tissue temperature at 3, 6, 9 and 12 mm depths. The tissue surface was irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser in contact

  19. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Laser: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripal, Krishna; Sirajuddin, Syed; Rafiuddin, Syed; MP, Rakesh; Chungkham, Sachidananda

    2015-01-01

    Lasers have been used in dentistry since 1994 to treat a number of dental problems. A variety of lasers are now available for use in dentistry. Once stated as an intricate technology with restricted usage in clinical dentistry, there is a growing awareness of the usefulness of lasers in the armamentarium of the modern dental practice, where they can be used as an adjunct or alternative to various long-standing approaches. PMID:26312089

  20. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Laser: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kripal, Krishna; Sirajuddin, Syed; Rafiuddin, Syed; MP, Rakesh; Chungkham, Sachidananda

    2015-01-01

    Lasers have been used in dentistry since 1994 to treat a number of dental problems. A variety of lasers are now available for use in dentistry. Once stated as an intricate technology with restricted usage in clinical dentistry, there is a growing awareness of the usefulness of lasers in the armamentarium of the modern dental practice, where they can be used as an adjunct or alternative to various long-standing approaches.

  1. TEA HF laser with a high specific radiation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchikin, A. V.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the chemical HF laser with a non-chain reaction are presented. The possibility of the total laser efficiency of 5 % is shown when a traditional C-to-C pumping circuit with the charging voltage of 20-24 kV is used. It is experimentally shown that the specific radiation output energy of 21 J/l is reached at the specific pump energy of 350 J/l in SF6/H2 = 14/1 mixture at the total pressure of 0.27 bar.

  2. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  3. Physical limits of semiconductor laser operation: A time-resolved analysis of catastrophic optical damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Mathias; Hempel, Martin; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht

    2010-01-01

    The early stages of catastrophic optical damage (COD) in 808 nm emitting diode lasers are mapped by simultaneously monitoring the optical emission with a 1 ns time resolution and deriving the device temperature from thermal images. COD occurs in highly localized damage regions on a 30 to 400 ns t...

  4. Multithreshold Measurement and Analysis of Pulsed Laser Damage on Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF-THIS PAGEtWhein Date b•n’feId) MULTITHRESHOLD MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF PULSED LASER DAMAGE ON OPTICAL SURFACES J. 0. Po- zeus , J. L...8. [61 Temple , P. A. and Soileau, M. J., in Loael j7] Donovan, T. H., Baer, A. D., Dancy, J. H. and Induced Damage in Optical Materials: ;976, Porteus

  5. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a clear and well-identified need for rapid, efficient, non-destructive detection and isolation of radiation damaged cells. Available commercial technologies...

  6. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to develop and demonstrate a novel microfluidic device for non-destructive identification, sorting and counting of radiation damaged cells. A major...

  7. Laser radiation induced thermal effects on the interactions between the tangential airflow and aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shengying; Han, Bing; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian

    2017-05-01

    The laser radiation induced thermal effects on the interactions between the tangential airflow and aluminum alloy are investigated numerically in this paper. A two dimensional model is developed for analysis of the evolutions of the temperature, stress and displacement of the flow and the aluminum alloy sheet at different flow speed through finite element method (FEM). It is found that in order to reach the same temperature in the aluminum alloy sheet, the input laser fluence needs to increase 4W/cm2 approximately, while the airflow speed increases one meter per second. Furthermore, in the situation of a thin aluminum alloy sheet irradiated by a large laser spot, the laser-induced thermal stress plays a leading role in the rupture of the sheet below the melting temperature. The airflow-induced shear stress and the pressure difference between the front and the rear surfaces of the sheet are minor effects compared to the thermal stress mentioned above. In addition, the bulge of the sheet induced by the laser heating would interact with the tangential airflow and lead to the formation of the downwind vortices, which may lead to a stronger shear stress. A vortex-induced oscillation appears when the Reynolds number of the airflow changes caused by the increase of the bulge height. And this vortex-induced oscillation would contribute to the damage of the aluminum sheet.

  8. DNA damage in blood cells exposed to low-level lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe da Silva; Silva, Ana Paula Almeida da; Amorim, Philipi Freitas; Campos, Vera Maria Araújo; Magalhães, Luis Alexandre Gonçalves; de Paoli, Flavia; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-04-01

    In regenerative medicine, there are increasing applications of low-level lasers in therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases in soft and in bone tissues. However, there are doubts about effects on DNA, and an adequate dosimetry could improve the safety of clinical applications of these lasers. This work aimed to evaluate DNA damage in peripheral blood cells of Wistar rats induced by low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences, powers, and emission modes according to therapeutic protocols. Peripheral blood samples were exposed to lasers and DNA damage was accessed by comet assay. In other experiments, DNA damage was accessed in blood cells by modified comet assay using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III enzymes. Data show that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers induce DNA damage depending on fluence, power and emission mode, which are targeted by Fpg and endonuclease III. Oxidative DNA damage should be considered for therapeutic efficacy and patient safety in clinical applications based on low-level red and infrared lasers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Transient transmittance and scattering changes during nanosecond laser-induced damage in fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Hu, Guohang; He, Hongbo; Zhao, Yuanan; Yang, Liujiang; Luo, Yang; Peng, Xiaocong; Shan, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Transient transmission and scattering changes was observed to study the dynamics during the laser-induced bulk damage in fused silica at the wavelength of 532 and 355 nm. Within the nanosecond high power laser irradiation, the transmittance decreased dramatically, indicating an intense absorption. With fluence increasing, the time required to form the intense absorption was shortened, and at similar fluence, this time interval at the wavelength of 355 nm is shorter than that at 532 nm. At times, the intense absorption did not cause the macroscopic damage because no variation in scattering was observed. While the macroscopic damage occurred, the scattering kept on increasing until the end of pulse.

  10. Ideal radiation source for plasma spectroscopy generated by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Grojo, David; Axente, Emanuel; Gerhard, Christoph; Burger, Miloš; Craciun, Valentin

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory plasmas inherently exhibit temperature and density gradients leading to complex investigations. We show that plasmas generated by laser ablation can constitute a robust exception to this. Supported by emission features not observed with other sources, we achieve plasmas of various compositions which are both uniform and in local thermodynamic equilibrium. These properties characterize an ideal radiation source opening multiple perspectives in plasma spectroscopy. The finding also constitutes a breakthrough in the analytical field as fast analyses of complex materials become possible.

  11. Laser-plasma accelerator and femtosecond photon sources-based ultrafast radiation chemistry and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y. A.

    2017-02-01

    The initial distribution of energy deposition triggered by the interaction of ionizing radiations (far UV and X rays, electron, proton and accelerated ions) with molecular targets or integrated biological systems is often decisive for the spatio-temporal behavior of radiation effects that take place on several orders of magnitude. This contribution deals with an interdisciplinary approach that concerns cutting-edge advances on primary radiation events, considering the potentialities of innovating strategies based on ultrafast laser science, from femtosecond photon sources to laser-driven relativistic particles acceleration. Recent advances of powerful TW laser sources (~ 1019 Wcm-2) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultrashort relativistic particle beams in the energy domain 2.5-150 MeV open exciting opportunities for the development of high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF). Early radiation damages being dependent on the survival probability of secondary electrons and radial distribution of short-lived radicals inside ionization clusters, a thorough knowledge of these processes involves the real-time probing of primary events in the temporal range 10-14-10-11 s. In the framework of a closed synergy between low-energy radiation femtochemistry (LERF) and the emerging domain of HERF, the paper focuses on early phenomena that occur in the prethermal regime of low-energy secondary electrons, considering very short-lived quantum effects in aqueous environments. A high dose-rate delivered by femtosecond electron beam (~ 1011-1013 Gy s-1) can be used to investigate early radiation processes in native ionization tracks, down to 10-12 s and 10-9 m. We explain how this breakthrough favours the innovating development of real-time nanodosimetry in biologically relevant environments and open new perspectives for spatio-temporal radiation biophysics. The emerging domain of HERF would provide guidance for understanding the specific bioeffects of ultrashort particle

  12. Cooling prevents induction of corneal damage by argon laser peripheral iridotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Takuya; Zako, Masahiro; Takeyama, Masayuki; Ohno-Jinno, Akiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Iwaki, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are many reports of corneal complications caused by argon laser peripheral iridotomy. In this study, we investigated whether cooling the anterior ocular segment during laser iridotomy prevented corneal damage. A space for cooling the anterior ocular segment by perfusion with ice-cold water was made between the cornea and a contact lens. Dutch pigmented rabbits were excessively irradiated by an argon green laser, aiming at the peripheral iris. We used a contact lens without a cooling system as a control. Temperature in the anterior chamber and intraocular pressure were also monitored throughout the experiment. During laser treatment, the temperature without the cooling system rose to a maximum of 44.5 degrees C in the anterior chamber, whereas use of the cooling system consistently kept this temperature at 11.1 degrees -16.1 degrees C. Although most eyes treated without cooling showed corneal damage, damage was seen in only a few or in no eyes cooled during laser treatment. Argon laser treatment using contact lenses with a cooling system drastically reduced the corneal damage induced by argon laser peripheral iridotomy. This technique may be acceptable for clinical use, considering its technical simplicity and low incidence of treatment-related complications.

  13. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  14. Implantation of keV-energy argon clusters and radiation damage in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-01-01

    We show that for impacting argon clusters, both mean projected ranges of the constituents and depths of radiation damage in diamond scale linearly with momentum. The same dependence was earlier found for keV-energy cluster implantation in graphite, thus suggesting the universality of this scaling...... law. For diamond, a good agreement for the value of displacement energy for the case of cluster impact is found by comparing the calculated target sputtering and experimentally measured depth of radiation damage....

  15. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  16. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  17. High resolution laser micro sintering / melting using q-switched and high brilliant laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, H.; Streek, A.

    2015-03-01

    Since the discovery of selective laser sintering/melting, numerous modifications have been made to upgrade or customize this technology for industrial purposes. Laser micro sintering (LMS) is one of those modifications: Powders with particles in the range of a few micrometers are used to obtain products with highly resolved structures. Pulses of a q-switched laser had been considered necessary in order to generate sinter layers from the micrometer scaled metal powders. LMS has been applied with powders from metals as well as from ceramic and cermet feedstock's to generate micro parts. Recent technological progress and the application of high brilliant continuous laser radiation have now allowed an efficient laser sintering/melting of micrometer scaled metal powders. Thereby it is remarkable that thin sinter layers are generated using high continuous laser power. The principles of the process, the state of the art in LMS concerning its advantages and limitations and furthermore the latest results of the recent development of this technology will be presented. Laser Micro Sintering / Laser Micro Melting (LMM) offer a vision for a new dimension of additive fabrication of miniature and precise parts also with application potential in all engineering fields.

  18. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    colorful names with difficult relatability to the physical units, -.e. nits, apostilbs, lux, lumens, trolands, candelas and others. All have their...9,39Sperling in his monkey studies He and his group have shown color specific destructive light adaptation in primates using light levels approximately...without the grader having knowledge of the exposure level. The slightest question of edema or pigmentary change was graded as +. A definite change in

  19. Residual stress analysis of laser cladding repair for nuclear steam generator damaged tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Won Jin; Lee, Sang Cheol; Lee, Seon Ho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Laser cladding technology was studied as a method for upgrading the present repair procedures of damaged tubes in a nuclear steam generator and Doosan subsequently developed and designed a new Laser Cladding Repair System. One of the important features of this newly developed Laser Cladding Repair System is that molten metal can be deposited on damaged tube surfaces using a laser beam and filler wire without the need to install sleeves inside the tube. Laser cladding qualification tests on the steam generator tube material, Alloy 600, were performed according to ASME Section IX. Residual stress analyses were performed for weld metal and heat affected zone of as-welded and PWHT with SYSWELD software.

  20. Nozzle flow of laser-heated radiating hydrogen with application to a laser-heated rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, N. H.; Root, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the steady heating of flowing hydrogen by a CW 10.6 micron laser, to consider the feasibility of a laser-heated rocket. The hydrogen flow and the laser beam are parallel, and move into a converging-diverging nozzle. The absorption of laser energy is initiated by a laser-supported combustion wave. The hydrogen is in chemical equilibrium, absorbs laser energy by inverse Bremsstrahlung, and loses energy by radiation. The hydrogen flow was calculated from the rear of the LSC wave to the throat. Estimates of convective heat losses were made using a hydrogen boundary layer analysis. Specific impulse, obtained by expanding isentropically from the throat to 1 atm or a vacuum, varies from 1400 to 3000 s. Radiation losses are 5 to 20%, though the energy fluxes to the walls are quite high. Convective loss estimates are high enough to indicate that coupling to the hot gas flow is required for a 10 kW engine, but not for a 5 MW engine.

  1. Measurements of Ionizing Radiation Doses Induced by High Irradiance Laser on Targets in LCLS MEC Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Liu, J. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Prinz, A. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rokni, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tran, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Woods, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xia, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Galter, e. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Milathianaki, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nagler, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Comprehensive measurements for photon and neutron radiation doses generated from laser-plasma interaction at SLAC’s MEC laser facility have been conducted. The goals of the measurements were to; determine the radiation dose per laser shot as a function of laser, optic and target parameters that are relevant to the MEC laser operations; validate the RPD-developed analytic model for photon dose calculations; and evaluate the performance of various types of passive and active detectors in the laser-induced radiation fields.

  2. Radiation damage in indium tin oxide (ITO) layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.V. [University Coll. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Electric, Electronic and System Engineering; Salehi, A. [University Coll. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Electric, Electronic and System Engineering; Aliyu, Y.H. [University Coll. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Electric, Electronic and System Engineering; Bunce, R.W. [University Coll. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Electric, Electronic and System Engineering; Diskett, D. [Applied Physics and Electro-optics Group, Cranfield University RMCS, Shrivenham, Swindon SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-15

    The effects of proton damage on transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) layers were investigated by electrical and optical techniques. ITO layers were found to be highly resistant to proton damage for fluences up to 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. For fluences greater than 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} the resistivity rises rapidly with a corresponding degradation of the transmittance. ((orig.))

  3. Nanocrystal ghosting: Extensive radiation damage in MgO induced by low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenfield, Zackery [Department of Physics, West Chester University of PA, West Chester, PA 19382 (United States); Kane, Kenneth [Department of Physics, West Chester University of PA, West Chester, PA 19382 (United States); Current address: Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23228 (United States); Sawyer, William H., E-mail: wsawyer@wcupa.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of PA, West Chester, PA 19382 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We report direct evidence of extensive radiation damage in MgO nanocrystals due to intense bombardment (2 × 10 electrons/nm sec) by electrons with beam energies between 60 keV and 120 keV. Based upon a minimum intensity necessary to produce the observed damage, we present an explanation based on the Knotek-Feibelman process.

  4. Current ideas to reduce or salvage radiation damage to salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissink, A; van Luijk, P; Langendijk, J A; Coppes, R P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced hyposalivation is still a major problem after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Current and promising new thoughts to reduce or salvage radiation damage to salivary gland tissue are explored. The main cause underlying radiation-induced hyposalivation is a lack of functional saliva-producing acinar cells resulting from radiation-induced stem cell sterilization. Current methods to prevent that damage are radiation techniques to reduce radiation-injury to salivary gland tissue, surgical techniques to relocate salivary glands to a region receiving a lower cumulative radiation dose, and techniques to make salivary gland cells more resistant to radiation injury. These preventive techniques cannot be applied in all cases, also reduce tumor sensitivity, or do not result in a sufficient amelioration of the dryness-related complaints. Therefore, alternative methods on techniques to salvage salivary glands that are damaged by radiation are explored with promising results, such as stem cell therapies and gene transfer techniques to allow the radiation-injured salivary gland tissue to secrete water. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transparent laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell "LCNP3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Dąbrowski, R.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Soms, L.; Olifierczuk, M.; Kędzierski, J.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.; Miszczyk, E.; Mrukiewicz, M.; Kowiorski, K.

    2014-09-01

    There exists the problem in diagnostics of dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. The energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, the pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along the same optical path. To form an optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the laser pulse energy of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell of type LCNP3, with switching on time τON smaller than 3 μs was applied.

  6. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, J.; Özkan, C.; Coppola, N.; Farahani, S.D.; Schulz, J.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Gaudin, J.; Bajt, S.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.N.; Loch, R.A.; Jurek, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Harmand, M.; Galasso, G.; Nagasono, M.; Saskl, K.; Sovák, P.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2015), 254-264 ISSN 2159-3930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fluorescent and luminescent materials * laser damage * free-electron lasers * soft x-rays * laser materials processing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.657, year: 2015

  7. From electrons to stars : modelling and mitigation of radiation damage effects on astronomical CCDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prod'homme, Thibaut

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is part of an on-going effort to understand and mitigate the effects of radiation damage in astronomical CCDs. My research was motivated by and took place in the challenging context of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) astrometric mission, Gaia, for which radiation

  8. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  9. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  10. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  11. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto [Univ. of the Basque Country, Leioa (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  12. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  13. Counter-streaming radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Clayson, T.; Swadling, G. F.; Patankar, S.; Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Stehle, C.; Chaulagain, U.; Singh, R. L.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Spindloe, C.; Foster, J.; Skidmore, J.; Gumbrell, E.; Graham, P.; Danson, C.

    2016-10-01

    The formation of radiative shocks, shocks in which the structure of density and temperature is affected by radiation from the shock-heated matter, is ubiquitous in many astrophysical scenarios. Experiments were performed at the Orion laser using a new target configuration that allows studying the formation of single and counter-streaming radiative shocks in gas-filled targets (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), with initial pressures 0.1-1 bar and a driver intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 . The shocks propagate at velocities >60 km/s and were diagnosed with optical interferometry (streaked and time-resolved) and point-projection X-ray backlighting allowing to probe simultaneously the pre-shock radiative precursor and the shock front itself. Besides varying the extent of the radiative precursor the results show that different gases seem to have an effect on the shock front as evidenced by a number of spatial features. The results are compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations in 1-D (HELIOS) and 2-D (NYM/PETRA). Supported by Orion Academic Access, the Royal Society, EPSRC, Labex PLAS@PAR. Currently at (2) LLNL, USA, (3) ELI, CZ, (4) First Light Fusion, UK.

  14. [Association of genetic polymorphism of XPD with chromosomal damage in workers exposed to radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xue-Yun; Jin, Yu-Lan; Yao, San-Qiao; Bai, Yu-Ping; Wu, Xu-Mei; Ren, Da-Wei; Pen, Jian

    2007-12-01

    To explore association genetic polymorphism of XPD with chromosomal damage in workers exposed to radiation. 182 workers exposed to radiation for at least one year with chromosomal damage were selected as cases based on a general health examination for all workers exposed to radiation in Tangshan city. The control group without chromosomal damage was matched to case by age (within 5 years), sex, work unit, type of exposed to radiation, cumulate serve length (within 1 year) according to 1:1. The micro whole blood cultivation was used for the chromosome analysis. The chromosome aberration type and rate were observed and counted. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to examine the genotype of three XPD loci (751, 312 and 156). The frequency of XPD 751 AA in cases was higher than that in controls (P 0.05). 156 mutant gene type in case group was higher than that in the control groups. The frequency of 156 A allele in case group were higher than that of the control groups (P < 0.05). The frequency of genotype with both 751AA and 156CA or 751AA and 156AA was higher in cases than that of controls (P < 0.05). XPD 751AA genotype is a possible risk factor for radiation-induced chromosomal damage. XPD 156 mutant gene type is a possible risk factor for radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Individuals with both XPD 751AA and 156 (CA+AA) genotypes are susceptible to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. No association of XPD 312 polymorphism with radiation-induced chromosomal damage is found.

  15. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  16. Damage Detection on Thin-walled Structures Utilizing Laser Scanning and Standing Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Hyeok; Jeon, Jun Young; Kim, Du Hwan; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes wavenumber filtering for damage detection using single-frequency standing wave excitation and laser scanning sensing. An embedded piezoelectric sensor generates ultrasonic standing waves, and the responses are measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer and mirror tilting device. After scanning, newly developed damage detection techniques based on wavenumber filtering are applied to the full standing wave field. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed techniques, several experiments were performed on composite plates with delamination and aluminum plates with corrosion damage. The results demonstrated that the developed techniques could be applied to various structures to localize the damage, with the potential to improve the damage detection capability at a high interrogation speed.

  17. Laser-induced damage morphology in fused silica at 1064 nm in the nanosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambonneau, Maxime; Diaz, Romain; Duchateau, Guillaume; Grua, Pierre; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Rullier, Jean-Luc; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    The morphology of laser-induced damage sites at the exit surface of fused silica is tightly correlated to the mode composition of the nanosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. In the single longitudinal mode (SLM) configuration, a molten and fractured central zone is surrounded by a funnel-shaped surface modification. Ring patterns surround the damage sites when these are initiated by multiple longitudinal modes (MLM) laser pulses. In this last mode configuration, the pulses temporal profiles as well as the damage ring patterns differ from pulse to pulse. The appearance chronology of the rings is found to be closely related to the temporal shape of the laser pulses. This supports that the damage morphology originates from the coupling of a laser-supported detonation wave propagating in air with an ablation mechanism in silica. In our experiments, the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theory.

  18. Laser Wire Stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  19. Mitigation of organic laser damage precursors from chemical processing of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxamusa, S; Miller, P E; Wong, L; Steele, R; Shen, N; Bude, J

    2014-12-01

    Increases in the laser damage threshold of fused silica have been driven by the successive elimination of near-surface damage precursors such as polishing residue, fractures, and inorganic salts. In this work, we show that trace impurities in ultrapure water used to process fused silica optics may be responsible for the formation of carbonaceous deposits. We use surrogate materials to show that organic compounds precipitated onto fused silica surfaces form discrete damage precursors. Following a standard etching process, solvent-free oxidative decomposition using oxygen plasma or high-temperature thermal treatments in air reduced the total density of damage precursors to as low as silica.

  20. Refurbishment of damaged tools using the combination of GTAW and laser beam welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of two welding processes for the refurbishment of damaged industrial tools. In the first part the problem is presented followed by the comparison of GTAW and laser welding in terms of repair welding of damaged tools. The macrosections of the welds show the difference between both welding processes in repairing of damaged tools. At the conclusion the main findings are presented. In many cases it is useful to use both welding processes in order to achieve better weld quality and to make welding more economical. The order of the technology used depends on the tool material, the use of the tool and the tool damage.

  1. Radiation damage in plastic detectors; Dano por radiacion en detectores plasticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Tavera, L. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: The damage induced by ionizing radiation in plastics produce a wide diversity of changes in the either the whole polymer structure or a localized high destruction. The first effect is achieved by using gamma and/or electron irradiation, whereas the second is carry out by employing positive ions irradiation. The damage intensity can be controlled by the dose delivery to the plastic, in the first case and by the rate of energy loss of the incident ion in the second case. Damage deepness in the thickness of the plastic, depends of radiation energy, although, attenuation effects have to be considered for gamma and electron irradiation. This paper presents an overview of those effects, the applications for radiation dosimetry and the production of micro and nano pores, as well as the methodology for control all parameters involved in the damage. Techniques for visualization the localized high destruction in the plastics are also presented. (Author)

  2. Reduction in lateral thermal damage using heat-conducting templates: a comparison of continuous wave and pulsed CO2 lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Nicole; Spector, Jared; Ellis, Darrel L; Reinisch, Lou

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of the continuous wave (c.w.) CO(2) laser are offset by the delay in laser wound healing secondary to thermal damage. We have developed novel heat-conducting templates to reduce laser thermal damage. Because shortened pulse durations also decrease thermal damage, we tested the effectiveness of heat-conducting templates with a c.w. CO(2) clinical laser and a short-pulsed CO(2) laser to determine the best method and mechanism to minimize thermal damage. Comparison of 0.2-second shuttered c.w. and 5-microsecond pulsed CO(2) lasers were made by doing incisions on 150 tissue samples from reduction mammoplasties and abdominoplasties. Copper, aluminum, glass, and Plexiglass heat-conducting templates were tested against no template (air) with both lasers. Histological samples were evaluated using computerized morphometrics analysis. Statistically significant reductions in lateral thermal damage were seen with the copper (50%) and aluminum (39%) templates used with the c.w. CO(2) laser. Only the copper template (39%) significantly reduced thermal damage when used with the pulsed CO(2) laser. Less thermal damage was seen using the pulsed CO(2) laser compared to the c.w. CO(2) laser with each template. Heat-conducting templates significantly reduced the amount of lateral thermal damage when used with the c.w. CO(2) laser (copper and aluminum) and short-pulsed CO(2) laser (copper). The c.w. CO(2) laser with the copper template compared favorably to the short-pulsed CO(2) laser without a template. Therefore, both heat conductive templates and short-pulse structure provide successful methods for reducing lateral thermal damage, and a combination of the two appears to provide optimal results.

  3. Complex DNA Damage: A Route to Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigeneia V. Mavragani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular effects of ionizing radiation (IR are of great variety and level, but they are mainly damaging since radiation can perturb all important components of the cell, from the membrane to the nucleus, due to alteration of different biological molecules ranging from lipids to proteins or DNA. Regarding DNA damage, which is the main focus of this review, as well as its repair, all current knowledge indicates that IR-induced DNA damage is always more complex than the corresponding endogenous damage resulting from endogenous oxidative stress. Specifically, it is expected that IR will create clusters of damage comprised of a diversity of DNA lesions like double strand breaks (DSBs, single strand breaks (SSBs and base lesions within a short DNA region of up to 15–20 bp. Recent data from our groups and others support two main notions, that these damaged clusters are: (1 repair resistant, increasing genomic instability (GI and malignant transformation and (2 can be considered as persistent “danger” signals promoting chronic inflammation and immune response, causing detrimental effects to the organism (like radiation toxicity. Last but not least, the paradigm shift for the role of radiation-induced systemic effects is also incorporated in this picture of IR-effects and consequences of complex DNA damage induction and its erroneous repair.

  4. Tools for Predicting Optical Damage on Inertial Confinement Fusion-Class Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nostrand, M C; Carr, C W; Liao, Z M; Honig, J; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Johnson, M A; Adams, J J; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W H; Matthews, M J; Jancaitis, K S; Kegelmeyer, L M

    2010-12-20

    Operating a fusion-class laser to its full potential requires a balance of operating constraints. On the one hand, the total laser energy delivered must be high enough to give an acceptable probability for ignition success. On the other hand, the laser-induced optical damage levels must be low enough to be acceptably handled with the available infrastructure and budget for optics recycle. Our research goal was to develop the models, database structures, and algorithmic tools (which we collectively refer to as ''Loop Tools'') needed to successfully maintain this balance. Predictive models are needed to plan for and manage the impact of shot campaigns from proposal, to shot, and beyond, covering a time span of years. The cost of a proposed shot campaign must be determined from these models, and governance boards must decide, based on predictions, whether to incorporate a given campaign into the facility shot plan based upon available resources. Predictive models are often built on damage ''rules'' derived from small beam damage tests on small optics. These off-line studies vary the energy, pulse-shape and wavelength in order to understand how these variables influence the initiation of damage sites and how initiated damage sites can grow upon further exposure to UV light. It is essential to test these damage ''rules'' on full-scale optics exposed to the complex conditions of an integrated ICF-class laser system. Furthermore, monitoring damage of optics on an ICF-class laser system can help refine damage rules and aid in the development of new rules. Finally, we need to develop the algorithms and data base management tools for implementing these rules in the Loop Tools. The following highlights progress in the development of the loop tools and their implementation.

  5. \\title{Development of Radiation Damage Models for Irradiated Silicon Sensors Using TCAD Tools}

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Lalwani, Kavita; Ranjan, Kirti; Printz, Martin; Ranjeet, Ranjeet; Eber, Robert; Eichhorn, Thomas; Peltola, Timo Hannu Tapani

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. During the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) the CMS tracking system will face a more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. In order to design radiation tolerant silicon sensors for the future CMS tracker upgrade it is fundamental to complement the measurement with device simulation. This will help in both the understanding of the device performance and in the optimization of the design parameters. One of the important ingredients of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this paper we will discuss the development of a radiation damage model by using commercial TCAD packages (Silvaco and Synopsys), which successfully reproduce the recent measurements like leakage current, depletion voltage, interstrip capacitance and interstrip resistance, and provides an insight into the performance of irradiated silicon strip sensors.

  6. Thermomechanical effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation on cartilaginous and eye tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, O. I.; Zheltov, G. I.; Omelchenko, A. I.; Romanov, G. S.; Romanov, O. G.; Sobol, E. N.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental studies into the thermomechanical action of laser radiation on biological tissues. The thermal stresses and strains developing in biological tissues under the effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation are theoretically modeled for a wide range of laser pulse durations. The models constructed allow one to calculate the magnitude of pressures developing in cartilaginous and eye tissues exposed to laser radiation and predict the evolution of cavitation phenomena occurring therein. The calculation results agree well with experimental data on the growth of pressure and deformations, as well as the dynamics of formation of gas bubbles, in the laser-affected tissues. Experiments on the effect of laser radiation on the trabecular region of the eye in minipigs demonstrated that there existed optimal laser irradiation regimens causing a substantial increase in the hydraulic permeability of the radiation-exposed tissue, which can be used to develop a novel glaucoma treatment method.

  7. LASERS: Atomic xenon recombination laser excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a magnetoplasma compressor and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, N. P.; Opekan, A. G.; Protasov, Yu S.; Rudoĭ, I. G.; Soroka, A. M.

    1989-07-01

    A description is given and the results are reported of the first photoionization-recombination laser using atomic xenon excited by thermal ionizing radiation from a plasma. The pump source was a multichannel plasmadynamic discharge in magnetoplasma compressors, which was ignited in the active medium of the laser. When the composition of the working mixture was optimal (Xe:Ar = 1:250) and the total pressure was 1 atm, the output energy was ~ 0.5 J in the form of pulses of ~ 10 μs duration and the maximum specific output energy represented by laser radiation was 1-2 J/liter. The unsaturated gain was 27 m - 1. A kinetic laser scheme was proposed and analyzed. It allowed for the processes of photoionization, ion conversion, dissociative recombination, interaction of excited states with electron and buffer gases, etc. An important role played by heating of the active medium during pumping was demonstrated and it explained the observed characteristics of the spatial and temporal structure of the lasing process, particularly bleaching of large volumes of the active medium. The potential output energy of the laser was considered and specific constructions were proposed to attain a lasing efficiency amounting to a few percent.

  8. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  9. Ionizing radiation, antioxidant response and oxidative damage: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einor, D., E-mail: daniel@einor.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Bonisoli-Alquati, A., E-mail: andreabonisoli@gmail.com [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Costantini, D., E-mail: davidcostantini@libero.it [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, B-2610, Antwerp (Belgium); Mousseau, T.A., E-mail: mousseau@sc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Faculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Møller, A.P., E-mail: anders.moller@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire d' Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, CNRS UMR 8079, Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 362, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2016-04-01

    One mechanism proposed as a link between exposure to ionizing radiation and detrimental effects on organisms is oxidative damage. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the scientific literature on the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on antioxidant responses and oxidative damage. We found 40 publications and 212 effect sizes for antioxidant responses and 288 effect sizes for effects of oxidative damage. We performed a meta-analysis of signed and unsigned effect sizes. We found large unsigned effects for both categories (0.918 for oxidative damage; 0.973 for antioxidant response). Mean signed effect size weighted by sample size was 0.276 for oxidative damage and − 0.350 for antioxidant defenses, with significant heterogeneity among effects for both categories, implying that ionizing radiation caused small to intermediate increases in oxidative damage and small to intermediate decreases in antioxidant defenses. Our estimates are robust, as shown by very high fail-safe numbers. Species, biological matrix (tissue, blood, sperm) and age predicted the magnitude of effects for oxidative damage as well as antioxidant response. Meta-regression models showed that effect sizes for oxidative damage varied among species and age classes, while effect sizes for antioxidant responses varied among species and biological matrices. Our results are consistent with the description of mechanisms underlying pathological effects of chronic exposure to LDIR. Our results also highlight the importance of resistance to oxidative stress as one possible mechanism associated with variation in species responses to LDIR-contaminated areas. - Highlights: • There is interest in variation in metabolic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation • A random effect meta-analysis of effect sizes of radioactive contamination was performed • We found significant effects of radiation on oxidative damage and antioxidant response • We found significant heterogeneity among

  10. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  11. Mechanical failure characterization of optical components caused by laser induced damage initiated at contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faux, D. R., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this research is to quantify by numerical techniques the effects of surface and subsurface absorbing defects on damage initiation and growth in high power laser optical components. The defects include laser absorbing spots (e.g., surface particulate contamination) and surface damage regions (e.g., micro-cracks and voids) which are present due to environmental exposure and fabrication processes. This report focuses on three sources of contamination that can cause damage to optical components: (1) Front surface particle contamination, (2) Back surface particle contamination, and (3) Subsurface particle contamination. The DYNA2D (non-linear structural mechanics) code was used to model the growth of damage in the glass substrate. The damage in the nominally transparent glass substrate as a result of front surface particle contamination was found to be dependent on the magnitude of the resultant pressure pulse applied to the particle and the initial area of contact between the particle and glass substrate. The pressures generated from a back surface particle being blown off the surface provided sufficient loading to severely damage (crack) the glass substrate. A subsurface Ceria dioxide particle showed a strong surface interaction that influenced the formation and direction of the damage (cracking) that ultimately resulted in the blow-out of the damaged material leaving a relatively clean crater in the glass. Crater shape and size was determined. Since fused silica is the most transparent, and therefore laser damage resistant, of the optical materials, it is used for the most at-risk optical elements. The present studies are for a fused silica substrate. Some oxides such as Ceria are transparent in the infrared and visible, but absorbing in the UV part of the spectrum. Because ICF lasers like NIF use frequency tripling, effects of such oxides must be included.

  12. The effect of dynamic etching on surface quality and laser damage resistance for fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Li, Yuan; Yang, Ke; Yan, Lianghong; Zhang, Lijuan; Liu, Taixiang; Li, Heyang

    2017-05-01

    Fused silica optics were treated by dynamic etching using buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) with different etching depths. The transmissivity of fused silica slightly increases in deep UV (DUV) range after dynamic etching. Surface qualities of fused silica were characterized in terms of surface roughness, surface profile and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results show that dynamic etching has a slight impact on surface RMS roughness.PL defects gradually reduces by dynamic etching, and laser damage resistance of fused silica continuously increases with etching depth extending. When removal depth increases to 12μm, the damage threshold is the double that of the unetched surface. However, surface profile continuously deteriorates with etching depth increasing. Appropriate etching amount is very important for improving damage resistance and mitigating surface profile deteriorating of fused silica during etching process simultaneously. The study is expected to contribute to the practical application of dynamic etching for mitigating laser induced degradation of fused silica optics under UV laser irradiation.

  13. Investigation of laser induced damage threshold measurement with single-shot on thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Lin, Qi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    A method for rapid determination of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical coatings is proposed and investigated in this paper. By use of this method, the LIDT of thin film can be rapidly obtained by only one shot. The modulation of laser beam profile, which is considered as a negative factor in conventional LIDT test, is utilized in this method. Basing on image processing technique, the damage information could be extracted from the comparison between the damage pattern and beam intensity distribution in the test region. The applicability and repeatability of this testing method has been verified on three type reflectors, HfO2/SiO2, HfO2/Al2O3 and Ta2O5/SiO2. In addition, the experimental results showed that appropriate beam size, laser energy and image compression ratio are the key factors to ensure a high accuracy of LIDT.

  14. Photolysis of tryptophan with 337. 1 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkman, R.F.; Hibbard, L.B.; Dillon, J.

    1986-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of L-tryptophan were photolyzed by exposure to 337.1 nm radiation from a pulsed nitrogen laser. These data were compared with results for the 290 nm conventional-source photolysis of tryptophan. The loss of Trp was observed to be first order for 290 nm photolysis but of mixed order for 337.1 nm photolysis. Five photolysis products including N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, tryptamine and two unknown products were detected. The tryptophan-containing peptides N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) and tryptophylglycine (Trp-Gly) were also observed to photolyze upon 337.1 nm laser radiation demonstrating that this phenomenon is not restricted to free tryptophan monomer. A number of experiments were performed in an effort to determine the mechanism of photolysis at this wavelength. It is concluded that this photolysis results either from a very weak absorption tail extending to 337.1 nm in tryptophan itself or from a reaction involving an impurity sensitizer which absorbs the 337.1 nm radiation.

  15. Experimental comparison of laser energy losses in high-quality laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using radiation from fibre and CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyshev, A. A.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Shulyat'ev, V. B.

    2015-09-01

    We report a comparative experimental study of laseroxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using a fibre laser with a wavelength of 1.07 μm and a CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm at the sheet thickness of 3 - 16 mm. For the two lasers we have measured the dependence of the cutting speed on the radiation power and determined the cutting speed at which the surface roughness is minimal. The coefficient of laser radiation absorption in the laser cutting process is measured for these lasers at different values of the cutting speed and radiation power. It is found that the minimal roughness of the cut surface is reached at the absorbed laser energy per unit volume of the removed material, equal to 11 - 13 J mm-3; this value is the same for the two lasers and does not depend on the sheet thickness.

  16. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  17. Ion induced radiation damage on the molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarado Chacon, Fresia

    2007-01-01

    Throughout our lives we are exposed to ionizing radiation from cosmic and environmental sources or from medical diagnostics and treatments. In conventional therapy of malignant tumors, photons or electrons are used. Nowadays we witness the introduction of proton and heavy ion beams which have a

  18. Radiation damage measurements on CZT drift strip detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of fluences in the ran...

  19. Determination of the radiation axis position of an unstable-cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agroskin, V. Ya; Bravyi, B. G.; Vasil'ev, G. K.; Gur'ev, V. I.; Karel'skii, V. G.; Kashtanov, S. A.; Makarov, E. F.; Sotnichenko, S. A.; Chernyshev, Yu A.

    2017-08-01

    Propagation of an alignment laser beam through an unstable cavity laser is numerically simulated. It is shown that the axis of the expanded beam coincides with that of the fundamental laser radiation within an accuracy of no less than 1'' even under cavity misalignment of up to 30''. Experiments on determining the position of the radiation axis of a high-power pulsed unstable cavity chemical laser and various cavity misalignments confirm the calculation results.

  20. Compensation for damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Sobehart, L J

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the possibility to establish a scheme to compensate damage to workers health exposed to ionizing radiation in Argentina for those cases in which it is possible to assume that the exposure to ionizing radiation is the cause of the cancer suffered by the worker. The proposed scheme is based on the recommendations set out in the 'International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection: Protecting Workers against Exposure to Ionization Radiation, held in Geneva, Switzerland, August 26-30, 2002. To this end, the study analyzes the present state of scientific knowledge on cancer causation due to genotoxic factors, and the accepted form of the doses-response curve, for the human beings exposure to ionization radiation at low doses with low doses rates. Finally, the labor laws and regulations related to damage compensation; in particular the present Argentine Labor Law; the National Russian Federal Occupational Radiological Health Impairment and Workmen Compensation, t...

  1. Xenon plasma sustained by pulse-periodic laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudoy, I. G.; Solovyov, N. G.; Soroka, A. M.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu., E-mail: yakimov@lantanlaser.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, A. Ishlinsky Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The possibility of sustaining a quasi-stationary pulse-periodic optical discharge (POD) in xenon at a pressure of p = 10–20 bar in a focused 1.07-μm Yb{sup 3+} laser beam with a pulse repetition rate of f{sub rep} ⩾ 2 kHz, pulse duration of τ ⩾ 200 μs, and power of P = 200–300 W has been demonstrated. In the plasma development phase, the POD pulse brightness is generally several times higher than the stationary brightness of a continuous optical discharge at the same laser power, which indicates a higher plasma temperature in the POD regime. Upon termination of the laser pulse, plasma recombines and is then reinitiated in the next pulse. The initial absorption of laser radiation in successive POD pulses is provided by 5p{sup 5}6s excited states of xenon atoms. This kind of discharge can be applied in plasma-based high-brightness broadband light sources.

  2. High-Damage-Threshold Pinhole for Glass Fusion Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumit, N.A.; Letzring, S.A.; Johnson, R.P.

    1998-06-07

    We are investigating methods to fabricate high-damage-threshold spatial-filter pinholes that might not be susceptible to plasma closure for relatively high energies and long pulses. These are based on the observation that grazing-incidence reflection from glass can withstand in excess of 5 kJ/cm{sup 2} (normal to the beam) without plasma formation. The high damage threshold results from both the cos q spreading of the energy across the surface and the reflection of a large fraction of the energy from the surface, thereby greatly reducing the field strength within the medium.

  3. X-radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes detected by real-time X-ray diffraction using wiggler-enhanced synchrotron radiation as the ionizing radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    1984-05-01

    Radiation damage of hydrated lecithin membranes brought about by exposure to wiggler-derived synchrotron radiation at 8.3 keV (1.5 Å) is reported. Considerable damage was observed with exposures under 1 h at an incident flux density of 3 × 10 10 photon s -1 mm -2, corresponding to a cumulative radiation dose of ≦10 MRad. Damage was so dramatic as to be initially observed while making real-time X-ray diffraction measurements on the sample. The damaging effects of 8.3 keV X-rays on dispersions of dipalmitoyllecithin and lecithin derived from hen egg yolk are as follows: (1) marked changes were noted in the X-ray diffraction behaviour, indicating disruption of membrane stacking. (2) Chemical breakdown of lecithin was observed. (3) The X-ray beam visibly damaged the sample and changed the appearance of the lipid dispersion, when viewed under the light microscope. Considering the importance of X-ray diffraction as a structural probe and the anticipated use of synchrotron radiation in studies involving membranes, the problem of radiation damage must be duly recognized. Furthermore, since dipalmitoyllecithin, the major lipid used in the present study, is a relatively stable compound, it is not unreasonable to expect that X-ray damage may be a problem with other less stable biological and non-biological materials. These results serve to emphasize that whenever a high intensity X-ray source is used, radiation damage can be a problem and that the sensitivity of the sample must always be evaluated under the conditions of measurement.

  4. Retinal Damage from Laser Pointer Misuse - Case Series from the Military Sector in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Radha; Bialasiewicz, Alexander A; Bandara, Asoka; Isaac, Roshini

    2015-01-01

    Laser pointers are practical and safe training tools when used properly. If used incorrectly they can cause ocular damage, potentially resulting in devastating vision loss. The ocular and visual morbidity can result in significant expenses for medical care and inability to work (temporarily or permanently) for civilians and military personnel. We present three cases of soldiers who experienced vision loss following exposure to laser pointers, while celebrating successful football game.

  5. Understanding the Femtosecond Laser-Solid Interaction Near and Beyond the Material Damage Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    Simeon Trendafilov, Gennady Shvets, Douglas Smith, and Enam Chowdhury, Femtosecond laser damage threshold of pulse compression gratings for petawatt...Periodic Surface Structures from Single femtosecond Pulses, K. Kafka , D. Austin, J. Chen, H. Li, S. lambert , L. Hanzlik, S. Akbar, S. Dregia, A. Yi...molding," Optics and Lasers in Engineering 73, 62–68 (2015). 7. Patrick Poole, Simeon Trendafilov, Gennady Shvets, Douglas Smith, and Enam Chowdhury

  6. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  7. Laser excitation and fully non-contact sensing ultrasonic propagation imaging system for damage evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Dipesh; Lee, Jung Ryul; Park, Chan Yik; Flynn, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Various types of damages occur in aerospace, mechanical and many other engineering structures, and a reliable nondestructive evaluation technique is essential to detect any possible damage at the initiation phase. Ultrasound has been widely used but the conventional contact ultrasonic inspection techniques are not suitable for mass and couplant sensitive structures and are relatively slow. This study presents a fully non-contact hybrid laser ultrasonic generation and piezoelectric air-coupled transducer (ACT)/laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) sensing technique combined with ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI), ultrasonic spectral imaging (USI) and wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging (WUPI) algorithms to extract defect-sensitive features aimed at performing a thorough diagnosis of damage. Optimization enables improved performance efficiency of ACT and LDV to be used as receivers for non-contact hybrid laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) system as shown from the experimental results in this study. Real fatigue closed surface micro crack on metal structure was detected using hybrid laser ultrasonic generation/ACT sensing system, with size detection accuracy as high as 96%. Impact damages on carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite wing-box specimen were detected and localized using hybrid laser ultrasonic generation/LDV sensing system.

  8. Temporal scaling law and intrinsic characteristic of laser induced damage on the dielectric coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Jiang, Youen; Wang, Chao; Wei, Hui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Wei; Li, Xuechun

    2018-01-01

    High power laser is essential for optical manipulation and fabrication. When the laser travels through optics and to the target finally, irreversible damage on the dielectric coating is always accompanied without knowing the law and principle of laser induced damage. Here, an experimental study of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) Fth of the dielectric coating under different pulse duration t is implemented. We observe that the temporal scaling law of square pulse for high-reflectivity (HR) coating and anti-reflectivity (AR) coating are Fth = 9.53t0.47 and Fth = 6.43t0.28 at 1064 nm, respectively. Moreover, the intrinsic LIDT of HR coating is 62.7 J/cm2 where the coating is just 100% damaged by gradually increasing the fluence densities of a 5ns-duration pulse, which is much higher than the actual LIDT of 18.6 J/cm2. Thus, a more robust and reliable high power laser system will be a reality, even working at very high fluence, if measures are taken to improve the actual LIDT to a considerable level near the intrinsic value.

  9. BGO radiation damage effects optical absorption, thermoluminescence and thermoconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Rostaing, B

    1991-01-01

    After irradiation, the light transmission of bismuth germanate monocrystals decreases, mainly in the blue, as a consequence of the formation of colour centres. The absorption, thermoluminescence and thermoconductivity spectra were studied for different kinds of irradiation, different doses and at different temperatures. Doped samples were also tested, showing the role of impurities, mainly iron, in the process of damage. Finally a model is proposed which explains all the experimental results.

  10. A study of ps-laser-induced-damage-threshold in hybrid metal-dielectric mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škoda, Václav; Vanda, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced-damage-threshold of two types of metal-dielectric mirrors was tested using a laser apparatus working at 800 nm wavelength with 1 ps pulse length at 1 kHz repetition rate and in 106-on-1 test mode. Four sets of mirror samples with different layer system designs using a multilayer Ta2O5/SiO2 coating on silver or gold metal layer were manufactured. Both BK7 and fused silica substrate materials were used for manufacturing of samples. The measured damage thresholds at 45 deg incidence and P-polarization were compared with computed properties of layer system and used materials.

  11. Damage Thresholds for Cultures RPE Cells Exposed to Lasers at 532 nm and 458 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    in onhuman primate studies. Results of in vivo studies have hown that laser damage in the retina depends upon wave- ength, power level, and duration...condi- ions 37 °C; 95:5 air:CO2 using 1:1 DMEM/F12 media con- aining 10% fetal bovine serum, antibiotics, and 10-mM EPES buffer pH 7.4. Cells used...laser exposure similarly to RPE cells in nonhuman primate models. Our approach was to determine threshold ED50 radiant exposures for damage over a broad

  12. Automated laser damage threshold test systems of different test modes for optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Yanyun; Ma, Hongping; Liu, Huasong; Ji, Yiqin

    2012-11-01

    The automated laser damage threshold test systems of different test modes are developed recently with micron-scale damage events automated detection, location and re-inspection. The system is carried out using a 10 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a repetition rate of 10 Hz. In view of the requirements of weak site identification and growth test for initial damage sites, we pay more attention to the raster scan protocol. The automated test system is enabled by the pulsed stage movement method. A one pulse to one image correspondence have been set up during scans, which is available for the later confirmation of the automated damage detection results and the growth study at specified test sites. The new and grown defects are decided by comparing the pre-image and current image at the same place during different scans. Currently, the defect comparison rules and tolerance are being optimized to improve the accuracy of test systems.

  13. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-15

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after {gamma}-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}C{sub s}, VP or V{sub 2} several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO{sub 2} defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep

  14. Investigation of temperature feedback signal parameters during neoplasms treatment by diode laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Gelfond, Mark L.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of temperature signal in operation area and laser power at nevus, papilloma, and keratoma in vivo removal by a 980+/-10 nm diode laser with "blackened" tip operating in continuous (CW) mode and with temperature feedback (APC) mode are presented. Feedback allows maintaining temperature in the area of laser treatment at a preset level by regulating power of diode laser radiation (automatic power control). Temperature in the area of laser treatment was controlled by measuring the amplitude of thermal radiation, which occurs when tissue is heated by laser radiation. Removal of neoplasm was carried out in CW mode with laser radiation average power of 12.5+/-0.5 W; mean temperature in the area of laser treatment was 900+/-10°C for nevus, 800+/-15°C for papilloma, and 850+/-20°C for keratoma. The same laser radiation maximal power (12.5 W) and targeted temperature (900°C) were set for nevus removal in APC mode. The results of investigation are real time oscillograms of the laser power and temperature in the area of laser treatment at neoplasms removal in two described above modes. Simultaneously with the measurement of laser power and the temperature in the area of laser treatment video recording of surgeon manipulations was carried out. We discuss the correlation between the power of the laser radiation, the temperature in the area of laser treatment and consistency of surgeon manipulation. It is shown that the method of removal (excision with or without traction, scanning) influences the temperature in the area of laser treatment. It was found, that at removal of nevus with temperature feedback (APC) mode to achieve comparable with CW mode temperature in the area of laser treatment (900+/-10°C) 20-50% less laser power is required. Consequently, removing these neoplasms in temperature feedback mode can be less traumatic than the removal in CW mode.

  15. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE...MM-YYYY)   14-03-2017 2. REPORT TYPE  Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  01 May 2013 to 31 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High energy ion acceleration...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Page 1 of 1FORM SF 298 3/15/2017https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll 1 HIGH ENERGY ION ACCELERATION BY

  16. Radiation damage in diagnostic window materials for the TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1981-07-01

    The general problem of evaluating diagnostic window materials for the TFTR at the tank wall location is described. Specific evaluations are presented for several materials: vitreous silica, crystal quartz, sapphire, zinc selenide, and several fluorides: lithium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and calcium fluoride; and seal glasses are discussed. The effects of the neutrons will be minimal. The major problems arise from the high flux of ionizing radiation, mainly the soft x rays which are absorbed near the surface of the materials. Additionally, this large energy deposition causes a significant thermal pulse with attendant thermal stresses. It is thus desirable to protect the windows with cover slips where this is feasible or to reduce the incident radiation by mounting the windows on long pipes. A more detailed summary is given at the end of this report.

  17. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Nondestructive Evaluation of Incipient Heat Damage in Polymer Matrix Composites, A2476

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-15

    02-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct 2011 - Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF...Instances of mechanical strength degradation from incipient heat damage in aircraft PMCs exceeding 60% have been reported (Fisher et al., 1995). Currently...forms of exposure. Bowie’s master’s thesis (2017) includes a review of the scientific and engineering literature on incipient heat damage in PMCs

  18. Comparison of the external physical damages between laser-assisted and mechanical immobilized human sperm using scanning electronic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David Y L; Li, Tin Chiu

    2017-01-01

    We aim to visualize the external physical damages and distinct external phenotypic effects between mechanical and laser-assisted immobilized human spermatozoa using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Human spermatozoa were immobilized mechanically or with laser assistance for SEM examination and the membrane integrities were checked on both types of immobilized spermatozoa. We found evidence of external damages at SEM level on mechanically kinked sperm, but not on laser-assisted immobilized sperm. Although no external damage was found on laser-assist immobilized sperm, there were two distinct types of morphological changes when spermatozoa were stricken by infra-red laser. Coiled tails were immediately formed when Laser pulse was applied to the sperm end piece area, whereas laser applied to the sperm principal piece area resulted in a sharp bend of sperm tails. Sperm immobilized by laser did not exhibit any morphological change if the laser did not hit within the on-screen central target zone or if the laser hit the sperm mid piece or head. Our modified membrane integrity assay revealed that the external membrane of more than half of the laser-assisted immobilized sperm remained intact. In conclusion, mechanical immobilization produced membrane damages whilst laser-assisted immobilization did not result in any external membrane damages besides morphological changes at SEM level.

  19. Effects of radiation damage in studies of protein-DNA complexes by cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishyna, M; Volokh, O; Danilova, Ya; Gerasimova, N; Pechnikova, E; Sokolova, O S

    2017-05-01

    Nucleic acids are responsible for the storage, transfer and realization of genetic information in the cell, which provides correct development and functioning of organisms. DNA interaction with ligands ensures the safety of this information. Over the past 10 years, advances in electron microscopy and image processing allowed to obtain the structures of key DNA-protein complexes with resolution below 4Å. However, radiation damage is a limiting factor to the potentially attainable resolution in cryo-EM. The prospect and limitations of studying protein-DNA complex interactions using cryo-electron microscopy are discussed here. We reviewed the ways to minimize radiation damage in biological specimens and the possibilities of using radiation damage (so-called 'bubblegrams') to obtain additional structural information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence of radiation damage impact on material erosion in plasma environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khripunov, B.I., E-mail: boris@nfi.kiae.r [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Kurchatov Sq., 1 Moscow (Russian Federation); Brukhanov, A.N.; Chugunov, O.K.; Gureev, V.M.; Koidan, V.S.; Kornienko, S.N.; Kuteev, B.V.; Latushkin, S.T.; Muksunov, A.M.; Petrov, V.B.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Semenov, E.V.; Smirnov, V.P.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Unezhev, V.N. [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Kurchatov Sq., 1 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Plasma facing materials in a fusion reactor will suffer from both plasma fluxes and DT-neutron irradiations. Experimental investigations have been initiated aiming at assessment of the combined effect of high-level radiation damage and plasma induced erosion on these materials. Complex modeling studies were performed on the ion cyclotron and LENTA plasma simulator at Kurchatov Institute. Carbon materials and tungsten have been irradiated with 3-5 MeV ions to reach 1-10 dpa of radiation damage. The features of irradiated materials are described. Irradiated materials response to deuterium plasma (100-250 eV D{sup +} ions) at fluence 10{sup 25} ion/m{sup 2} was studied. Deformation effect and surface microstructure modification have been observed. Evaluation of erosion rate indicated erosion enhancement for radiation-damaged materials.

  1. Collateral damage to the ureter and Nitinol stone baskets during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-07-01

    The experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is currently being studied as a potential alternative lithotripter to the clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. Safety studies characterizing undesirable Holmium:YAG laser-induced damage to ureter tissue and stone baskets have been previously reported. Similarly, this study characterizes TFL induced ureter and stone basket damage. A TFL beam with energy of 35 mJ per pulse, pulse duration of 500 µs, and variable pulse rates of 50-500 Hz, was delivered through 100-µm-core optical fibers, to either porcine ureter wall, in vitro, or a standard 1.9-Fr Nitinol stone basket wire. Ureter perforation times were measured and gross, histological, and optical coherence tomography images of the ablation area were acquired. Stone basket damage was graded as a function of pulse rate, number of pulses, and working distance. TFL operation at 150, 300, and 500 Hz produced mean ureter perforation times of 7.9, 3.8, and 1.8 seconds, respectively. Collateral damage widths averaged 510, 370, and 310 µm. Nitinol wire damage decreased with working distance and was non-existent at distances greater than 1.0 mm. In contact mode, 500 pulses delivered at pulse rates ≥300 Hz (≤1.5 seconds) were sufficient to cut Nitinol wires. The TFL, operated in low pulse energy and high pulse rate mode, may provide a greater safety margin than the standard Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy, as evidenced by longer TFL ureter perforation times and shorter non-contact working distances for stone basket damage than previously reported with Holmium:YAG laser. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Radiation Damage of Polypropylene Fiber Targets in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Rohdjess, H; Bisplinghoff, J; Bollmann, R; Büsser, K; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Igelbrink, M; Langkau, R; Maier, R; Mosel, F; Müller, M; Muenstermann, M; Prasuhn, D; Von Rossen, P; Scheid, H; Schirm, N; Schwandt, F; Scobel, W; Trelle, H J; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    2004-01-01

    Thin polypropylene (CH$_2$) fibers have been used for internal experiments in storage rings as an option for hydrogen targets. The change of the hydrogen content due to the radiation dose applied by the circulating proton beam has been investigated in the range $1\\cdot10^6$ to $2\\cdot10^8$~Gy at beam momenta of 1.5 to 3 GeV/c by comparing the elastic pp-scattering yield to that from inelastic p-carbon reactions. It is found that the loss of hydrogen as a function of applied dose receives contributions from a fast and a slow component.

  3. Radiation damage of polypropylene fiber targets in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdjeß, H.; Albers, D.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Büßer, K.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.-P.; Eversheim, P. D.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Maier, R.; Mosel, F.; Müller, M.; Münstermann, M.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schwandt, F.; Scobel, W.; Trelle, H. J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.

    2006-01-01

    Thin polypropylene fibers have been used for internal experiments in storage rings as an option for hydrogen targets. The change of the hydrogen content due to the radiation dose applied by the circulating proton beam has been investigated in the range 1 × 106-2 × 108 Gy at beam momenta of 1.5-3 GeV/c by comparing the elastic pp-scattering yield to that from inelastic p-carbon reactions. It is found that the loss of hydrogen as a function of applied dose receives contributions from a fast and a slow component.

  4. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  5. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  6. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...... is verified by comparison with recent experimental measurements of the transient optical properties in combination with ablation-depth determinations. The excitation process from the first creation of conduction-band electrons at low intensities to the formation of a highly-excited plasma and associated...

  7. Graphene damage effects on radiation-resistance and configuration of copper?graphene nanocomposite under irradiation: A molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Chen, Da

    2016-01-01

    Metal?graphene nanocomposite is a kind of potential radiation tolerant material. Graphene damage of the composite is inevitable within radiation environments. In this paper, two kinds of copper?graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems containing perfect graphene and prefabricated damage graphene, respectively, were adopted to expound the influences of graphene damage on the properties (radiation-resistance and configuration) of CGNC under irradiation by atomistic simulations. In the CGNC contain...

  8. Catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) in high power multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Ives, Neil; LaLumondiere, Stephen; Presser, Nathan; Moss, Steven C.

    2011-03-01

    State-of-the-art broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers show an optical output power of over 20 W and a power conversion efficiency of over 70% under CW operation. Unlike broad-area (Al)GaAs QW lasers, broad-area InGaAs strained QW lasers show two failure types including facet catastrophic optical damage (COD) and bulk failure. Optimization of facet passivation processes has led to significant reduction in occurrence of facet COD (or COMD), but bulk failure (or COBD) has received little attention although it is crucial to understand degradation processes responsible for COBD and then develop COBD-free lasers for high reliability applications including potential satellite systems. Our group recently proposed a model for the COBD process and this paper further investigates the root causes of COBD in the broad-area lasers. We performed accelerated life-tests of MOCVD-grown broad-area strained InGaAs-AlGaAs single QW lasers at ~975 nm, which predominantly yielded catastrophic bulk failures. We employed various non-destructive techniques to study pre- and post-stressed lasers. Time resolved electroluminescence (TR-EL) was employed to observe formation and progression of dark spots and dark lines through windowed n-contacts during entire life-tests that eventually led to COBD. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) was employed to investigate trap characteristics in degraded devices at different stages of degradation to study the role that non-radiative recombination centers (NRCs) play in COBD processes. Time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) was employed to measure carrier lifetimes from both undamaged and damaged active areas to find correlation between dark line defects in degraded lasers and non-radiative recombination processes.

  9. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); Zeng, Jing [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Wang, Hong-Mei [Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Polishing-Induced Subsurface Impurity Defects on Laser Damage Resistance of Fused Silica Optics and Their Removal with HF Acid Etching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jian Cheng; Jinghe Wang; Jing Hou; Hongxiang Wang; Lei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    .... Subsurface impurity defects inevitably introduced in the practical polishing process incur strong thermal absorption for incident lasers, seriously lowering the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT...

  11. Non-damaging laser therapy of the macula: Titration algorithm and tissue response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Lavinsky, Daniel; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Retinal photocoagulation typically results in permanent scarring and scotomata, which limit its applicability to the macula, preclude treatments in the fovea, and restrict the retreatments. Non-damaging approaches to laser therapy have been tested in the past, but the lack of reliable titration and slow treatment paradigms limited their clinical use. We developed and tested a titration algorithm for sub-visible and non-damaging treatments of the retina with pulses sufficiently short to be used with pattern laser scanning. The algorithm based on Arrhenius model of tissue damage optimizes the power and duration for every energy level, relative to the threshold of lesion visibility established during titration (and defined as 100%). Experiments with pigmented rabbits established that lesions in the 50-75% energy range were invisible ophthalmoscopically, but detectable with Fluorescein Angiography and OCT, while at 30% energy there was only very minor damage to the RPE, which recovered within a few days. Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR) have been treated over the edematous areas at 30% energy, using 200μm spots with 0.25 diameter spacing. No signs of laser damage have been detected with any imaging modality. In CSR patients, subretinal fluid resolved within 45 days. In DME patients the edema decreased by approximately 150μm over 60 days. After 3-4 months some patients presented with recurrence of edema, and they responded well to retreatment with the same parameters, without any clinically visible damage. This pilot data indicates a possibility of effective and repeatable macular laser therapy below the tissue damage threshold.

  12. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Laurence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Qu, Jisnmin [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wall, Joe [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  13. Atomic-scale modelling of primary damage and properties of radiation defects in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Osetsky, Y N

    2003-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in recent years in the understanding of radiation damage production in high-energy displacement cascades, the properties of the defects and evolution of radiation damage in metals. Two main reasons form the basis of this success. First, the significant increase in computing power has allowed simulation of realistic cascade energies with good statistics and relatively long-time evolution of defects to be carried out. Second, new experimental findings and corresponding theoretical calculations have allowed interpretation of a number of mechanisms and phenomena crucial for understanding and prediction of practically important radiation effects, such as void swelling, radiation growth, matrix hardening and plastic flow localisation. In this paper we review the most significant results in atomic-scale computer modelling related to these issues, mainly focusing on new achievements such as the formation of extended defect clusters, the dynamic properties of defect clusters, int...

  14. Comparison of radiation damage in silicon induced by proton and neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A; Glaser, M; Zanet, A; Lemeilleur, F; Watts, S

    1999-01-01

    The subject of radiation damage to Si detectors induced by 24-GeV/c protons and nuclear reactor neutrons has been studied. Detectors fabricated on single-crystal silicon enriched with various impurities have been tested. Significant differences in electrically active defects have been found between the various types of material. The results of the study suggest for the first time that the widely used nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) factors are insufficient for normalization of the electrically active damage in case of oxygen- and carbon-enriched silicon detectors. It has been found that a deliberate introduction of impurities into the semiconductor can affect the radiation hardness of silicon detectors. (16 refs).

  15. The influence of neutron radiation damage on the optical properties of plastic scintillator UPS 923A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Skhathisomusa; Davydov, Yuri; Baranov, Vladimir; Mellado Garcia, Bruce; Mdhluli, Joyful; Sideras-Haddad, Elias

    2017-09-01

    Plastic scintillators are vital in the reconstruction of hadronic particle energy and tracks resulting from the collision of high energy particles in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These plastic scintillators are exposed to harsh radiation environments and are susceptible to radiation damage. The effects of radiation damage on the transmittance, luminescence and light yield of Ukraine polystyrene-based scintillator UPS 923A were studied. Samples were irradiated with fast neutrons, of varying energies and fluences, using the IBR-2 reactor FLNP (Frank Laboratory for Nuclear Problems) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. Results show a small change in the transmittance of the higher energy visible spectrum, and a noticeable change in the light yield of the samples as a result of the damage. There is no change observed on the luminescence as a result of radiation damage at studied fluences. The doses and uences of the neutrons shall be increased and changes in optical properties as a result of the radiation shall be further studied.

  16. Investigation of laser induced damage threshold measurement with single-shot on thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhichao, E-mail: zcliu44@163.com; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Lin, Qi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Developed a rapid-testing method of the laser induced damage threshold for thin film surface within only one shot. • Comparison of single shot test and the ISO standard test has been performed on several types of reflectors. • Factors that impacted the measurement accuracy were discussed, and the optimization process was mentioned in this paper as well. - Abstract: A method for rapid determination of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optical coatings is proposed and investigated in this paper. By use of this method, the LIDT of thin film can be rapidly obtained by only one shot. The modulation of laser beam profile, which is considered as a negative factor in conventional LIDT test, is utilized in this method. Basing on image processing technique, the damage information could be extracted from the comparison between the damage pattern and beam intensity distribution in the test region. The applicability and repeatability of this testing method has been verified on three type reflectors, HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2}. In addition, the experimental results showed that appropriate beam size, laser energy and image compression ratio are the key factors to ensure a high accuracy of LIDT.

  17. Damage to the macula associated with LED-derived blue laser exposure: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lingling; Cui, Zhihua; Lu, Chengwei; Hao, Qian; Zheng, Yajuan

    2017-04-24

    Light emitting diodes laser is emerging as an important source of light replacing conventional lights. It is widely used for illumination in the bar where young people love to go. But not everyone knows about the light damage to the eye especially to the macula. In this article, we report the case of a macular damage induced by LED-derived blue laser in a bar, studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate the retinal lesion and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) to evaluate functional damage. Four days after the photo injury to the right eye, the visual acuity was 0.5. Funduscopy revealed a round red lesion in the macula of the right eye. Fluorescein angiography (FA) revealed no leakage. OCT revealed a deficiency in the center of the fovea. MfERG revealed a reduction of the peak value in the right eye compared to the left eye. One month later, although the vision was 1.0 in the right eye, OCT revealed a hyporeflectivity of the ellipsoid zone. MfERG still showed a reduction of the peak value in the right eye compared to the left eye. We believe that general knowledge about laser injuries to the eye should be realized widely. We also think in cases of macular laser damage, the recovery of vision can not demonstrate the recovery of the function of photoreceptors.

  18. Femtosecond-laser-induced damage initiation mechanism on metal multilayer dielectric gratings for pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haopeng; Kong, Fanyu; Xia, Zhilin; Jin, Yunxia; Li, Linxin; Wang, Leilei; Chen, Junming; Cui, Yun; Shao, Jianda

    2018-01-01

    The femtosecond-laser-induced damage behaviors of metal multilayer dielectric gratings (MMDG) for pulse compression are explored. The grating ridge of this type of MMDG consists of a layer of HfO2 sandwiched between two SiO2 layers. The initial damage position is on the HfO2 layer of the ridge which opposite to the laser beam direction. A theoretical model is constructed to explain the femtosecond-laser-induced damage initiation mechanism on the MMDG, and the model can simulate the evolution of the electron density in the conduction band and the change of the dielectric constants of HfO2 and SiO2 in the sandwiched grating structure. The dramatic increase in the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of the middle HfO2 layer indicates that it strongly absorbs laser energy, resulting in damage to the MMDG. The experimental results and theoretical calculation agree very well with each other.

  19. Catastrophic optical mirror damage in diode lasers monitored during single-pulse operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zegler, M.; Tomm, J.W.; Reeber, D.

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) is analyzed for 808 nm emitting diode lasers in single-pulse operation in order to separate facet degradation from subsequent degradation processes. During each pulse, nearfield and thermal images are monitored. A temporal resolution better than 7 µs...

  20. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviate nasal mucosa radiation damage in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hong-Gang; Ji, Fang; Zheng, Chun-Quan; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Nasal complications after radiotherapy severely affect the quality of life of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, and there is a compelling need to find novel therapies for nasal epithelial cell radiation damage. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) in guinea pig model of nasal mucosa radiation damage and explored its therapeutic mechanism. Cultured hUC-MSCs were injected intravenously immediately after radiation in the nasal mucosa-radiation-damage guinea pig model. Migration of hUC-MSCs into the nasal mucosa and the potential for differentiation into nasal epithelial cells were evaluated by immunofluorescence. The therapeutic effects of hUC-MSCs were evaluated by mucus clearance time (MCT), degree of nasal mucosa edema, and the nasal mucosa cilia form and coverage ratio. Results indicate that the hUC-MSCs migrated to the nasal mucosa lamina propria and did not differentiate into nasal epithelial cells in this model. The MCT and degree of mucosal edema were improved at 1 week and 1 month after radiation, respectively, but no difference was found at 3 months and 6 months after radiation. The nasal mucosa cilia form and coverage ratio was not improved 6 months after radiation. Thus, hUC-MSCs can migrate to the nasal mucosa lamina propria and improve MCT and mucosa edema within a short time period, but these cells are unable to differentiate into nasal epithelial cells and improve nasal epithelial regeneration in the nasal mucosa radiation damage guinea pig model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bridge Surface Damage Detection Application with a Laser-Based Software Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldür Erkal, B.; Apaydın, N. M.

    2017-11-01

    In order to determine the necessary actions such as rehabilitation, repair and etc. required for maintaining the operating status of aging bridges, the current conditions of these structures need to be assessed. Terrestrial laser scanners that are used to capture texture-mapped point clouds have been frequently used for assessing the current conditions of these structures. Authors' have already developed surface damage detection algorithms in their previous work. The developed algorithms are capable of detecting several damage types from the collected texture-mapped point clouds. This short paper focuses on presenting the field application of a recently developed prototype software application that uses the previously developed surface damage detection algorithms. Capabilities of the prototype software application can be listed as importing point clouds, working with images, extracting damage features such as shape and size, determining condition ratings and producing damage reports for future investigations.

  3. Radiation-induced damage to mitochondrial D-. beta. -hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, O.; Nakazawa, T. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Miyahara, M.; Shiraishi, N. (Kochi Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Medical Biology)

    1985-07-01

    Radiation-induced damage to the reconstituted system of membrane-bound enzyme, D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase obtained from rat liver mitochondria, was investigated in relation to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. The D-..beta.. hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in fresh mitochondria was very low in general and not affected by irradiation because of little incorporation of substrates into mitochondria. Enzyme activity in one-day-aged mitochondria or submitochondrial particles was five times higher than that of fresh mitochondria and decreased with increasing radiation dose accompanying the increase in peroxidation of membrane lipids. D-..beta..-hydroxyl-butyrate dehydrogenase activity in the reconstituted system of the purified enzyme with irradiated liver microsomes or irradiated liposomes was decreased considerably in comparison with either unirradiated control or irradiated enzyme. Radiation-induced decrease in the enzyme activity was thought to be caused mainly by peroxidation of membrane lipids and not due to direct damage by radiation to the enzyme molecule itself. Irradiation of microsomes caused decreases in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content and an increase in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Arachidonic acid contents in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine were also markedly decreased with increasing radiation dose. These results are discussed in terms of a mechanism involving radiation-induced damage to membrane function and structures.

  4. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  5. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  6. Laser beam shaping for studying thermally induced damage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available is dependant only on r and t. Where r is the radial coordinate and t is time. The source term of this study was a continuous wave laser beam of Gaussian intensity distribution, which leads to a source term given by13: plC rI rQ ? ?)( )( = (2...E P =? . (8) Since the intensity is given by A P I = and the power is given by dt dE P = , equation (8) becomes: dt dU lC rI P =? )( . (9) Therefore the source term is given as PlC rI dt dU rQ ? )( )( == . (10...

  7. Intensity enhancement of Te Raman modes by laser damage in ZnTe epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larramendi, E. M.; Berth, G.; Wiedemeier, V.; Hüsch, K.-P.; Zrenner, A.; Woggon, U.; Tschumak, E.; Lischka, K.; Schikora, D.

    2010-07-01

    Damage caused by laser irradiation on the surface of ZnTe epilayers was studied by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). ZnTe LO-phonon overtones up to four order and TO + (n - 1)LO zone-center phonons were observed in the resonant micro-Raman spectra at room temperature. Discrepancies in the literature regarding the origin of two features observed at low frequencies around 120 and 140 cm-1 in the Raman spectrum of ZnTe are discussed and resolved. These Raman peaks were not detected by using a low excitation laser power density on a Zn-terminated ZnTe surface; however, with the increase of the laser power density they were found to arise irreversibly. The correspondence of these peaks in a wave number with the strongest Raman peaks of the crystalline tellurium phase and the intensity enhancement behavior with the laser power in a similar way as for CdTe strongly suggests the formation of crystalline tellurium aggregates on the layer surface due to laser irradiation damage. AFM data reveal the occurrence of laser ablation on the ZnTe surface even though the surface temperature of the sample is below the melting point.

  8. Pathological study on the mucosal damage of gastric replacement of the esophagus after the postoperative radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Takashi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Hirai, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Kuwahara, Masaki; Toge, Tetsuya [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1997-12-01

    Mucosal damage to the whole stomach as an esohageal substitute, via the postmediastinal route, was pathologically investigated to elucidate the influence of postoperative radiation therapy. Subjects were 26 and 16 operated cases of esophageal cancer with and without postoperative radiation therapy, respectively. Endoscopic biopsy of the replaced stomach was performed preoperatively, before and after the radiation, and then at various different times for 2 years. The biopsy specimens obtained by endoscopic examination from the upper, middle and lower sites of the stomach were evaluated for the following pathological factors; atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, neutrophil infiltration, edema, erosion, necrosis and atypia. These findings were rated in score and changes in scores were studied. In both radiation and non-radiation groups, the degree of inflammatory change was strongest in the upper site, following middle and lower site in this order, in that some hematogenic involvement was considered. When the both groups compared for the inflammatory change, the changes in the radiation group were stronger than the other group in all sites. Necrosis and especially atypia were seen only in the upper and middle sites of radiated patients. Chronological inflammatory changes in each patient revealed that, as the site went up, the inflammation became stronger and was intensified by radiation therapy. But these inflammatory changes and atypia disappeared within a year after radiation therapy. These results suggest that postoperative radiation therapy would not be contraindicated for patients undergoing an esophageal substitution. (author)

  9. RESEARCH OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR PROCESSES AT FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION PROPAGATION IN THE MEDIUM SIMULATING THE HUMAN EYE VITREOUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Rogov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical model of linear and nonlinear processes occurring at the propagation of femtosecond laser pulses in the vitreous of the human eye. Methods of computing modeling are applied for the nonlinear spectral equation solution describing the dynamics of a two-dimensional TE-polarized radiation in a homogeneous isotropic medium with cubic fast-response nonlinearity without the usage of slowly varying envelope approximation. Environments close to the optical media parameters of the eye were used for the simulation. The model of femtosecond radiation propagation takes into account the process dynamics for dispersion broadening of pulses in time and the occurence of the self-focusing near the retina when passing through the vitreous body of the eye. Dependence between the pulse duration on the retina has been revealed and the duration of the input pulse and the values of power density at which there is self-focusing have been found. It is shown that the main mechanism of radiation damage with the use of titanium-sapphire laser is photoionization. The results coincide with those obtained by the other scientists, and are usable for creation Russian laser safety standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  10. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  11. Femtosecond near-infrared laser microirradiation reveals a crucial role for PARP signaling on factor assemblies at DNA damage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquilabon Cruz, Gladys Mae; Kong, Xiangduo; Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Thai, Ryan; Berns, Michael W.; Yokomori, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Laser microirradiation is a powerful tool for real-time single-cell analysis of the DNA damage response (DDR). It is often found, however, that factor recruitment or modification profiles vary depending on the laser system employed. This is likely due to an incomplete understanding of how laser conditions/dosages affect the amounts and types of damage and the DDR. We compared different irradiation conditions using a femtosecond near-infrared laser and found distinct damage site recruitment thresholds for 53BP1 and TRF2 correlating with the dose-dependent increase of strand breaks and damage complexity. Low input-power microirradiation that induces relatively simple strand breaks led to robust recruitment of 53BP1 but not TRF2. In contrast, increased strand breaks with complex damage including crosslinking and base damage generated by high input-power microirradiation resulted in TRF2 recruitment to damage sites with no 53BP1 clustering. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation distinguishes between the two damage states and that PARP activation is essential for rapid TRF2 recruitment while suppressing 53BP1 accumulation at damage sites. Thus, our results reveal that careful titration of laser irradiation conditions allows induction of varying amounts and complexities of DNA damage that are gauged by differential PARP activation regulating protein assembly at the damage site. PMID:26424850

  12. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, Korolev, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat' ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ∼10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  13. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Matyunin, S N [Section of Applied Problems at the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  14. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  15. Radiation damage induced by neutrons in CMS silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Forton, Eric

    Les expériences conduites auprès du futur accélérateur LHC au CERN nécessitent la construction des détecteurs les plus grands et les plus complexes jamais conçus. En particulier, le trajectographe de la collaboration CMS utilisera uniquement des détecteurs micropiste silicium et ce, en très grandes quantités. Ce dernier dépend donc de manière capitale de la qualité de toute la production des senseurs et la collaboration CMS a ainsi décidé de mettre en place un vaste programme de contrôle de cette qualité. Cette thèse présente une partie des travaux réalisés à l'UCL dans ce cadre. La discussion porte en particulier sur résistance aux radiations des senseurs en silicium, testée de manière routinière à Louvain-la-Neuve. Le texte débute par une présentation du détecteur CMS et des dégâts radiatifs subits par les détecteurs micropiste silicium. Les dispositifs expérimentaux mis en place auprès des cyclotrons et dans le laboratoire de l'institut de Physique nucléaire sont ensuite...

  16. Computational determination of radiation damage effects on DNA structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies of several radiation originated lesions on the DNA molecules are presented. The pyrimidine lesions (cytosinyl radical, thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine lesion (8-oxoguanine) were subjected to the MD simulations for several hundred picoseconds using MD simulation code AMBER 5.0 (4.0). The simulations were performed for fully dissolved solute molecules in water. Significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed in all cases which may be categorized as: a) the breaking of hydrogen bonds network between complementary bases and resulted opening of the double helix (cytosinyl, radical, 8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flippingout of adenine on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes related to the overall collapsing of the double helical structure around the lesion, are expected to facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA in the formation of DNA-enzyme complex. The stable DNA-enzyme complex is a necessary condition for the onset of the enzymatic repair process. In addition to structural changes, specific values of electrostatic interaction energy were determined at several lesion sites (thymine dimer, thymine glycol and 8-oxoguanine). This lesion-specific electrostatic energy is a factor that enables repair enzyme to discriminate lesion from the native site during the scanning of the DNA surface.

  17. The influence of resonance IR laser radiation on magnetoabsorption in quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyavskii, E. P.; Karapetyan, S. A.; Kostyukevich, N. S.

    2017-04-01

    The coefficient of interband absorption of a weak electromagnetic wave by quantum wires in a transverse magnetic field and an intense laser radiation field is calculated. It is shown that, if the laser radiation frequency is equal either to the size quantization frequency (dimensional infrared resonance) or to a hybrid frequency (magnetoinfrared resonance), laser illumination can determine the shape of absorption oscillations. In particular, it is shown that the second magnetoabsorption peak is split into two peaks, the half-widths of which and the distance between which depend on the intensity of resonance laser radiation. The influence of the polarization of IR radiation on the interband absorption in quantum wires is discussed. The dynamics of the frequency dependence of the optical absorption coefficient with increasing intensity of resonance laser radiation is studied.

  18. Interaction of laser radiation with a low-density structured absorber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rozanov, V. B.; Barishpol’tsev, D.V.; Vergunova, G.A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ivanov, E.M.; Aristova, E.N.; Zmitrenko, N.V.; Limpouch, I.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 2 (2016), s. 256-276 ISSN 1063-7761 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser radiation interaction * laser with low-density Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.196, year: 2016

  19. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  20. Assessment of DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by radiation in Eisenia fetida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Exposure of eukaryotic cells to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and the occurrence of oxidative cell damage. Recently International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) requires the effect data of ionizing radiation on non-human biota for the radiological protection of the environment. Based on their radioecological properties and their important role in the soil ecosystem, earthworms have been identified by the ICRP as one of the reference animals and plants (RAPs) to be used in environmental radiation protection. The investigation shows that oxidative stress is closely related to the exposed dose of radiation in the environment. To evaluate oxidative stress by ionizing radiation in the earthworm, we performed several experiments. The comet assay is known as a measurement which is one of the best techniques in assessing the DNA damage by oxidative stress. The SOD is a key enzyme in protecting cells against oxidative stress. An increase in the level of antioxidant enzyme such as SOD indicated that the exposure to radiation caused stress responses. Glutathione oxidation is considered as a maker for detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The GSSG levels increased progressively with increased exposure dose of ionizing radiation, which suggested a dose-dependent ROS generation.

  1. A role for Lsmlp in response to ultraviolet-radiation damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicakova, Tatiana; McCann, Kelly; Brown, J Martin

    2008-10-01

    A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified LSM1 as a new gene affecting sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Lsmlp is a member of a cytoplasmic complex composed of Lsmlp-7p that interacts with the yeast mRNA degradation machinery. To investigate the potential role of Lsmlp in response to UV radiation, we constructed double mutant strains in which LSM1 was deleted in combination with a representative gene from each of three known yeast DNA repair pathways. Our results show that lsm1delta increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rad1delta and rad51delta mutants, but not the radl8delta mutant, placing LSM1 within the post-replication repair/damage tolerance pathway (PRR). When combined with other deletions affecting PRR, lsm1delta increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rev3delta, rad30delta and pol30-K164R mutants but not rad5delta. Furthermore, the UV-radiation sensitivity phenotype of lsmldelta is partially rescued by mutations in genes involved in 3' to 5' mRNA degradation, and mutations predicted to function in RNA interactions confer the most UV-radiation sensitivity. Together, these results suggest that Lsmlp may confer protection against UV-radiation damage by protecting the 3' ends of mRNAs from exosome-dependent 3' to 5' degradation as part of a novel RAD5-mediated, PCNA-K164 ubiquitylation-independent subpathway of PRR.

  2. Stem Cell Therapy to Reduce Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Rob P.; van der Goot, Annemieke; Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.

    Normal tissue damage after radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced side effects and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in stem cell research with respect to their

  3. Strongly Reduced Penetration of Atomic Deuterium in Radiation-Damaged Tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hoen, M. H. J.; Mayer, M.; Kleyn, A.W.; van Emmichoven, P.A.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-damaged tungsten is exposed to high-flux, low-energy deuterium plasmas at self-bias conditions. We observe that the fraction of deuterium that penetrates is only 10(-5)-10(-7) of the plasma flux and strongly dependent on the local surface temperature. We propose that deuterium does not

  4. Retinal damage by optical radiation. An alternative approach to current, ACGIH-inspired guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.J.; Norren, D. van

    2005-01-01

    Background: The ACGIH guidelines for protection against retinal damage by optical radiation are often difficult to apply due to their lack of transparency. The less known guidelines by the Netherlands Health Council (HCN), dating from 1978 and updated in 1993, might offer a way out in many cases.

  5. Laser-induced damage of rugate and quarter-wave stacks high reflectors deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhao; Ma, Ping; Liu, Hao; Pu, Yunti; Liu, Zhichao

    2013-08-01

    Rugate and high/low quarter-wave stacks high reflector coatings for 1064 nm have been prepared with Ta2O5 and SiO by an ion-beam sputtering technique. A laser-induced damage experiment of the samples has been conducted at 1064 nm with pulse duration of 5 ns [full width at half maximum (FWHM)]. These two samples' damages both initiate at defects and show almost the same damage threshold within the experimental error. Nevertheless, the damage morphology on rugate is less severe at higher fluences. The thermal shock wave induced by a nanosecond pulsed laser is considered to be the main cause of catastrophic damage.

  6. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herst, Patries M [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2014-06-15

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin.

  7. Laser-induced damage of multilayer dielectric for broadband pulse compression grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanyu; Chen, Shunli; Liu, Shijie; Jin, Yunxia; Guan, Heyuan; Du, Ying; Wei, Chaoyang; He, Hongbo; Yi, Kui

    2012-01-01

    The multilayer dielectrics (MLDs) for broad bandwidth 800nm pulse compression gratings were fabricated with optimized design by electron beam evaporation using three different kinds of materials (Ta2O5/SiO2/HfO2), which had more than 99% reflectance with bandwidth larger than 160nm around the center wavelength of 800 nm and high transmission at the exposure wavelength of 413nm. Laser-induced damage behaviors of the mirrors were investigated. It was found that the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the samples could reach 1.0J/cm2 and 2.0J/cm2 in the normal beam (57 degrees, TE mode) at pulse duration of 50fs and 120fs, respectively. The depth information of the damage sites at these two cases was explored by atomic force microscope (AFM). The reason of the sample having so high LIDT was also discussed in this paper. The MLDs provide a solid base for the high laser threshold 800nm pulse compression gratings and may open a new way for broad bandwidth 800nm reflectance coatings used in the ultrashort pulse laser system.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  9. An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

    2006-07-10

    Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

  10. A simple model of space radiation damage in GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stith, J. J.; Stock, L. V.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model is derived for the radiation damage of shallow junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. Reasonable agreement is found between the model and specific experimental studies of radiation effects with electron and proton beams. In particular, the extreme sensitivity of the cell to protons stopping near the cell junction is predicted by the model. The equivalent fluence concept is of questionable validity for monoenergetic proton beams. Angular factors are quite important in establishing the cell sensitivity to incident particle types and energies. A fluence of isotropic incidence 1 MeV electrons (assuming infinite backing) is equivalent to four times the fluence of normal incidence 1 MeV electrons. Spectral factors common to the space radiations are considered, and cover glass thickness required to minimize the initial damage for a typical cell configuration is calculated. Rough equivalence between the geosynchronous environment and an equivalent 1 MeV electron fluence (normal incidence) is established.

  11. Catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) processes in aged and proton-irradiated high power InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; LaLumondiere, Stephen; Foran, Brendan; Lotshaw, William; Moss, Steven C.

    2013-02-01

    Recent remarkable success of fiber lasers and amplifiers results from continued improvements in performance characteristics of broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers. Unprecedented characteristics of single emitters include optical output powers of over 20 W and power conversion efficiencies of over 70% under CW operation. Leading high power laser diode manufacturers have recently demonstrated encouraging reliability in these lasers mainly targeted for industrial applications, but long-term reliability of these lasers has never been demonstrated for satellite communication systems in the space environment. Furthermore, as reported by two groups in 2009, the dominant failure mode of these lasers is catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD), which is a new failure type that requires physics of failure investigation to understand its root causes. For the present study, we investigated reliability, proton radiation effects, and the root causes of COBD processes in MOCVD-grown broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers using various failure mode analysis (FMA) techniques. Two different approaches, accelerated life-testing and proton irradiation, were taken to generate lasers at different stages of degradation. Our objectives were to (i) study the effects of point defects introduced during crystal growth and those induced by proton irradiation with different energies and fluences in the lasers on degradation processes and to (ii) compare trap characteristics and carrier dynamics in pre- and post-stressed lasers with those in pre- and post-proton irradiated lasers. During entire accelerated life-tests, time resolved electroluminescence (TREL) techniques were employed to observe formation of a hot spot and subsequent formation and progression of dark spots and dark lines through windowed n-contacts.

  12. Mechanical, thermal and laser damage threshold analyses of II group metal complexes of thiourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanuskodi, S., E-mail: dhanus2k3@yahoo.com [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sabari Girisun, T.C. [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Bishop Heber College, Tiruchirappalli 620 017, Tamil Nadu (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Material Characterization Division, National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Uma, S.; Phillip, J. [Sophisticated Test and Instrumentation Center, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The role of the Group II metal ions in improving the stability is discussed. {yields} BTCC has a higher heat capacity than BTZC. {yields} Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC than BTZC. {yields} Microscopy studies confirm the damage is due to thermo-chemical ablation. {yields} BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold than BTZC. - Abstract: Single crystals of thiourea metal complexes with selected Group II metal ions, Zinc and Cadmium, have been grown by solvent evaporation technique. The crystals grown are bisthiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) and bisthiourea cadmium chloride (BTCC). Following an improved photopyroelectric technique, the thermal transport properties have been determined. It is found that BTCC has a higher heat capacity (304.09 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}) than BTZC (255.24 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}), and hence BTCC has better thermal stability. Vicker's microhardness measurements reveal that these materials have reverse indentation size effect and belong to the category of soft materials. Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC (1.57 GPa) than BTZC (0.76 GPa). The roles of the Group II metal ions in improving the mechanical and thermal stability of the metal complexes are discussed. Multi-shot laser damage studies on these materials reveal that BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold (15 GW cm{sup -2}) than BTZC (6 GW cm{sup -2}).

  13. Mobility of Electron in DNA Crystals by Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    The mobility of electrons in laser radiated DNA is closed to the energy transfer and energy migration of a biological molecule. Arrhenius has studied the conductivity of the electrons in a biological molecule. But his result is far from the experimental result and meanwhile the relation between some parameters in his theory and the micro-quantities in DNA is not very clear. In this paper, we propose a new phonon model of electron mobility in DNA and use Lippman-Schwinger equation and S-matrix theory to study the mobility of electrons in DNA crystal. The result is relatively close to the experiment result and some parameters in Arrhenius theory are explained in our work.

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Plasma heating near a metal target by nanosecond pulses of the first, second, and fourth Nd-laser harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufetov, Igor'A.; Bufetova, G. A.; Kravtsov, S. B.; Fyodorov, V. B.; Fomin, V. K.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements were made of the electron temperature Te of a laser plasma formed on the surface of a metal target by the action of nanosecond pulses of wavelengths λ = 1060, 530, and 265 nm. The laser radiation intensity was I approx 109—1013 W cm-2. The electron temperature was determined from the emf of a double charge layer at the plasma boundary. Within the limits of the scatter of the experimental results, the plasma temperature was independent of the laser radiation wavelength (in the range 1060-265 nm). The dependence of this temperature on the radiation intensity obeyed approximately Te propto I1/3 throughout the investigated range.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation-specific DNA damage and embryonic viability in sea urchins from Kasitsna Bay, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakis, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Anderson, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Ripe ova and sperm were obtained from Green Sea Urchins (Strongvlocentrotus drochbachiensis) collected from Kasitsna Bay, Alaska, and ova were fertilized in vitro. Embryos were immediately placed in plastic bags secured to floating racks deployed in the bay. The bags were suspended just below the surface of the water and at 1 and 2 meter depths for up to 120 hours. Bags were either left uncovered, covered with Mylar plastic (which blocks out UV-B but not UV-A radiations), or covered with dark plastic. The number of damaged DNA sites was determined by digesting the DNA with enzymes isolated from the bacterium Micrococcus luteus which cleave the DNA at damaged sites. It was found that DNA damage was present in a dose-dependent fashion with the amount of damage in embryos from the uncovered bags > Mylar covered bags > dark covered bags. No dimers were detected from embryos at 1 or 2 m. depths. Also, the number of damaged sites varied from day to day. Finally, the number of damaged sites was positively correlated with percent abnormal embryos in each bag. The results are discussed with relation to monitoring UV-B effects and ecological consequences of enhanced UV-B radiation.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of electron beam deposited dielectrics for 1-m class optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervy, Adrien; Gallais, Laurent; Chériaux, Gilles; Mouricaud, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In order to transport multi-petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser beams with large spectral bandwidth, specific mirrors have to be designed and manufactured. We report on an experimental study of the laser-damage resistance and other optical properties of coating materials deposited in a 1-m class coating chamber. The study is conducted on single-layer coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation at 500 fs. Based on the experience of large optics for nanosecond applications, hafnia and silica are particularly investigated. However, in the case of sub-15 fs, the spectral specifications for PW beam transport mirrors cannot be reached by classical high laser-resistant quarter-wave SiO2/HfO2 stacks. Therefore, we investigate the laser resistance of different dielectrics of interest deposited with electron-beam processes: Al2O3, Y2O3, Sc2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5, TiO2. The influence of multiple pulse irradiations and environmental conditions, such as vacuum and temperature, is studied. With the investigation of multilayer stacks, we also show that there is no difference in behavior when a film is studied as a single layer or embedded in a stack. Based on these results, we were able to optimize high reflective (>99.5%), broadband (300 nm) and high laser-induced damage threshold (2.5 J/cm2) mirrors for PW applications.

  17. A theoretical analysis for temperature dependences of laser-induced damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperature using Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm and pulse width 4 ns) and Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength 800 nm and pulse width 100 fs, 2 ps, and 200 ps). The six kinds of optical monolayer coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation and the coating materials were SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, and MgF2. For pulses longer than a few picoseconds, the laser-induced damage threshold of single-layer coatings increased with decreasing temperature. This temperature dependence was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds. We describe the physics models to explain the observed scaling. The electron avalanche is essential to explain the differences in the temperature dependence. In other words, the balance between linear process such as electron avalanche etc. and nonlinear process such as multiphoton ionization etc. will be able to decide the tendency of the temperature dependence. The proposed model also gives one of possibility for an extremely high LIDT optics.

  18. Comparing simulations and test data of a radiation damaged CCD for the Euclid mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottfelt, Jesper; Hall, David; Gow, Jason; Murray, Neil; Holland, Andrew; Prod'homme, Thibaut

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage effects from the harsh radiative environment outside the Earth's atmosphere can be a cause for concern for most space missions. With the science goals becoming ever more demanding, the requirements on the precision of the instruments on board these missions also increases, and it is therefore important to investigate how the radiation induced damage affects the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) that most of these instruments rely on. The primary goal of the Euclid mission is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy using weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillation techniques. The weak lensing technique depends on very precise shape measurements of distant galaxies obtained by a large CCD array. It is anticipated that over the 6 year nominal lifetime of mission, the CCDs will be degraded to an extent that these measurements will not be possible unless the radiation damage effects are corrected. We have therefore created a Monte Carlo model that simulates the physical processes taking place when transferring signal through a radiation damaged CCD. The software is based on Shockley-Read-Hall theory, and is made to mimic the physical properties in the CCD as close as possible. The code runs on a single electrode level and takes charge cloud size and density, three dimensional trap position, and multi-level clocking into account. A key element of the model is that it takes device specific simulations of electron density as a direct input, thereby avoiding to make any analytical assumptions about the size and density of the charge cloud. This paper illustrates how test data and simulated data can be compared in order to further our understanding of the positions and properties of the individual radiation-induced traps.

  19. Analysis of induced stress on materials exposed to laser-plasma radiation during high-intensity laser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Barberio, M.; Liberatore, C.; Veltri, S.; Laramée, A.; Palumbo, L.; Legaré, F.; Antici, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the damage produced in materials when exposed to a laser-generated plasma. The plasma was generated by interaction of a high-intensity laser with Oxygen. We demonstrate that the stress induced on the target surface of a Tantalum target (typical materials used as Plasma Facing Material) after 10 h of plasma exposure is equivalent to the stress induced during 1 h of conventional laser ablation using a pulsed 0.5 J laser. In both cases we obtain a surface erosion in the tens of μm, and a change in the surface roughness in the tens of nm for the stressed materials. The erosion rate of 1 nm/s, explained in terms of surface fragmentation at thermodynamic equilibrium, generates a slow damage to the materials exposed to the plasma. Our method allows indicating safety parameters for the maintenance of materials used in high-intensity laser experiments.

  20. A Combination of Pre- and Post-Exposure Ascorbic Acid Rescues Mice from Radiation-Induced Lethal Gastrointestinal Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasutoshi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Sato, Tomohito; Obara, Takeyuki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    The development of an effective therapy for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage is important, because it is currently a major complication of treatment and there are few effective therapies available. Although we have recently demonstrated that pretreatment with ascorbic acid attenuates lethal gastrointestinal damage in irradiated mice, more than half of mice eventually died, thus indicating that better approach was needed. We then investigated a more effective therapy for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. Mice receiving abdominal radiation at 13 Gy were orally administered ascorbic acid (250 mg/kg/day) for three days before radiation (pretreatment), one shot of engulfment (250 mg/kg) at 8 h before radiation, or were administered the agent for seven days after radiation (post-treatment). None of the control mice survived the abdominal radiation at 13 Gy due to severe gastrointestinal damage (without bone marrow damage). Neither pretreatment with ascorbic acid (20% survival), engulfment (20%), nor post-treatment (0%) was effective in irradiated mice. However, combination therapy using ascorbic acid, including pretreatment, engulfment and post-treatment, rescued all of the mice from lethal abdominal radiation, and was accompanied by remarkable improvements in the gastrointestinal damage (100% survival). Omitting post-treatment from the combination therapy with ascorbic acid markedly reduced the mouse survival (20% survival), suggesting the importance of post-treatment with ascorbic acid. Combination therapy with ascorbic acid may be a potent therapeutic tool for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. PMID:24084715

  1. Influence of He-Ne laser radiation of pacemaker on the frog's heart function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porozov, Yury B.; Brill, Gregory E.; Kiritchuk, Vyacheslav F.

    1997-02-01

    In experiments on isolated amphibian hearts changes in photoreactivity of pacemaker cells under the influence of He-Ne laser radiation in different phases of the heart cycle were studied. The specificity of heart photoreaction, peculiarities of relaxation period after laser light action and laser modification of hypodynamic depression development were revealed. Adaptation of pacemaker cells to the He-Ne laser exposure was observed.

  2. Multidisciplinary approaches to radiation-balanced lasers (MARBLE): a MURI program by AFOSR (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2017-02-01

    An overview of the diverse research activities under the newly funded MURI project by AFOSR will be presented. The main goal is to advance the science of radiation-balanced lasers, also known as athermal lasers, in order to mitigate the thermal degradation of the high-power laser beams. The MARBLE project involves researchers from four universities and spans research activities in rare-earth doped crystals and fibers to semiconductor disc lasers.

  3. Coherent and incoherent radiation from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is calculated based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically

  4. Extracting the distribution of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces for 351 nm, 3 ns laser pulses at high fluences (20-150 J/cm2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Ted A; Bude, Jeff D; Ly, Sonny; Shen, Nan; Feit, Michael D

    2012-05-07

    Surface laser damage limits the lifetime of optics for systems guiding high fluence pulses, particularly damage in silica optics used for inertial confinement fusion-class lasers (nanosecond-scale high energy pulses at 355 nm/3.5 eV). The density of damage precursors at low fluence has been measured using large beams (1-3 cm); higher fluences cannot be measured easily since the high density of resulting damage initiation sites results in clustering. We developed automated experiments and analysis that allow us to damage test thousands of sites with small beams (10-30 µm), and automatically image the test sites to determine if laser damage occurred. We developed an analysis method that provides a rigorous connection between these small beam damage test results of damage probability versus laser pulse energy and the large beam damage results of damage precursor densities versus fluence. We find that for uncoated and coated fused silica samples, the distribution of precursors nearly flattens at very high fluences, up to 150 J/cm2, providing important constraints on the physical distribution and nature of these precursors.

  5. Protection of DPPC phospholipid liposomal membrane against radiation oxidative damage by antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marathe, D.L.; Pandey, B.N.; Mishra, K.P [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2000-05-01

    Investigations in our laboratory on egg lecithin liposomes have recently showed a marked protection against damage by gamma radiation when cholesterol was present in the composition of vesicles suggesting a role of bilayer molecular architecture in the mechanism of free radical mediated lipid peroxidation. Present study was designed to determine the changes in bilayer permeability in DPPC unilamelar vesicles after exposure to gamma radiation by monitoring the leakage of pre-loaded carboxyfluorescein (CF), a marker loaded in aqueous interior of vesicle and fluidity alterations in the bilayer using fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), a membrane bilayer probe. It was found that radiation doses of an order of magnitude higher were required to produce detectable changes in vesicles of DPPC than in the vesicles of egg lecithin suggesting a modulating role of chemical nature of composition in the membrane radiation sensitivity. It was significant to find that the leakage of CF from and incorporation of DPH into vesicle bilayer showed similar response pattern to radiation doses (0.1-6 kGy) which was also found to be dose rate dependent. Presence of antioxidants; alpha-tocopherol (0.15 mole %) in the bilayer membrane or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM) in the aqueous region significantly protected DPPC vesicles from radiation damage as determined from DPH uptake kinetics suggesting involvement of reactive free radicals of lipids as well as water radicals in the mechanism of membrane peroxidative damage. The magnitude of protection was found to increase with the increasing concentration of both these antioxidants but comparisons showed that {alpha}-tocopherol was far more effective in protecting the vesicles than ascorbic acid. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of radiation oxidative damage and its modification by radical scavenging and/or organizational modulation which emphasize the importance of structure and composition of

  6. Modification of multilayer mirror top-layer design for increased laser damage resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, D.; Patel, D.; Emmert, L.; Baumgarten, C.; Reagan, B.; Rudolph, W.; Rocca, J. J.; Menoni, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    This work focuses on the optimization of a high reflector design for operation at 1 μm wavelength to achieve a high laser damage threshold when tested at pulse durations of 0.19 and 4 ns. Different designs that modify the standing wave electric field distribution of a quarter wave Ta2O5/SiO2 multilayer dielectric coating are considered. It is found that the addition of an extra SiO2 quarter wave to reduce the peak electric field in the coating, increases the 50% damage probability by over 100% at both pulse durations.

  7. Transurethral coagulation for radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis using Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Xue, Boxin; Shan, Yuxi; Yang, Dongrong; Zang, Yachen

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to to demonstrate the initial treatment outcomes of Greenlight™ potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser on radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common complication of radiation therapy for pelvic tumors. From September 2004 to February 2011, 10 patients with radiation-induced intractable hemorrhagic cystitis underwent transurethral Greenlight KTP laser coagulation of the bladder. The power setting was limited to 20-30 W. Bleeding stopped in all cases after one session of laser treatment. Mean follow-up time was 17 months (6-36 months). All patients underwent cystoscopy 3 months postoperatively, and no bleeding or significant scar was found. Recurrence of significant bleeding was seen in one case 7 months post-operation, and was again cured by KTP laser. There were no complications from the procedures. Our experience suggests that transurethral coagulation using KTP laser is a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

  8. Comparison of defects responsible for nanosecond laser-induced damage and ablation in common high index optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yejia; Abdulameer, Mohammed R.; Emmert, Luke A.; Day, Travis; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporally resolved optical laser-induced damage is an experimental technique used to study nanosecond laser damage and initiation of ablation in dielectric metal-oxide films used for optical coatings. It measures the fluence (intensity) at the initiation of damage during a single laser pulse. The technique was applied to coatings of HfO2, Sc2O3, and Ta2O5, which were prepared by ion-beam sputtering, and HfO2 which was prepared by electron-beam evaporation. Using the data obtained, we were able to retrieve the defect density distributions of these films without a priori assumptions about their functional form.

  9. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, A V; Skrypnik, A V; Shatilova, K V [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained. (laser biophotonics)

  10. Laser damage of KU-1 quartz glass coated with hydrocarbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunov, A.V. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klassen, N.V. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Orlinski, D.V. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vukolov, K.Yu. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: vukolov@nfi.kiae.ru

    2005-11-15

    The effect of high power pulsed YAG:Nd laser radiation on KU-1 quartz glass coated with CH- and CD-films of different thickness and properties has been investigated experimentally. The laser energy densities for film ablation and optical breakdown of glasses coated with the films have been determined. The film cleaning thresholds have been found to be in the range of 0.1-0.3 J/cm{sup 2}, whereas the optical breakdown thresholds were as high as 50-70 J/cm{sup 2}. All measurements have been performed in atmosphere.

  11. Recycling of laser and plasma radiation energy for enhancement of extreme ultraviolet sources for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Johnson, K.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed comprehensive integrated models for detailed simulation of laser-produced plasma (LPP) and laser/target interaction, with potential recycling of the escaping laser and out-of-band plasma radiation. Recycling, i.e., returning the escaping laser and plasma radiation to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) generation region using retroreflective mirrors, has the potential of increasing the EUV conversion efficiency (CE) by up to 60% according to our simulations. This would result in significantly reduced power consumption and/or increased EUV output. Based on our recently developed models, our High Energy Interaction with General Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) computer simulation package was upgraded for LPP devices to include various radiation recycling regimes and to estimate the potential CE enhancement. The upgraded HEIGHTS was used to study recycling of both laser and plasma-generated radiation and to predict possible gains in conversion efficiency compared to no-recycling LPP devices when using droplets of tin target. We considered three versions of the LPP system including a single CO2 laser, a single Nd:YAG laser, and a dual-pulse device combining both laser systems. The gains in generating EUV energy were predicted and compared for these systems. Overall, laser and radiation energy recycling showed the potential for significant enhancement in source efficiency of up to 60% for the dual-pulse system. Significantly higher CE gains might be possible with optimization of the pre-pulse and main pulse parameters and source size.

  12. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    CERN Document Server

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  13. The interaction of melanin with ionizing and UVC radiations: Characterization of thymine damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huselton, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether melanin could protect DNA against the harmful effects of ionizing or UVC radiations. A simple, in vitro, model system was developed to evaluate eumelanin (Sigma melanin) as a radioprotector of solutions of 0.1 mM thymine or thymidine exposed to 570Gy of ionizing radiation. Sigma melanin was compared to several amino acids, other biomolecules or to other forms of melanin. To investigate the role of melanin as a passive screen of UVC radiation, melanotic (I{sub 3}), amelanotic (AMEL) cells (both derived from a Cloudman S91 melanoma) and non-melanotic (EMT6) cells were labelled with radioactive dTHd and exposed to 0, 1, 5 or 10KJ/m{sup 2} of UVC. The DNA was extracted; the bases hydrolyzed with concentrated HCl. Thymine bases were separated by reverse phase HPLC. No difference in dimer content was observed between I{sub 3} and AMEL cells, but EMT6 cells had nearly twice the amount of dimer. Overall thymine degradation was more pronounced in I{sub 3} cells than in the other two cell lines, due to the production of non-dimer thymine damage. This damage was identified as thymine glycol by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Melanin, upon exposure to UVC, appears to enhance thymine damage by producing oxidative damage.

  14. Radiation damage studies of mineral apatite, using fission tracks and thermoluminescence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Khalifa, I.J.M. (Arabian Gulf Univ., Manama, Bahrain); James, K.; Durrani, S.A. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Khalifa, M.S. (Tajoura Research Centre, Tripoli (Libya))

    1988-01-01

    In a uranium (/thorium)-rich mineral sample which has not suffered a recent geological high-temperature excursion, the fossil fission track density (FFTD) will give a good indication of its natural radiation damage, provided that its U/Th ratio is known. From our studies of FFTD and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of several samples of apatite from different locations, and containing varying degrees of natural-radiation damage, an anti-correlation is observed between FFTD and TL sensitivity. It is also found that an anti-correlation exists between TL sensitivity and the amount of damage produced artificially by bombarding apatite crystals with different fluences of approx30 MeV alpha-particles from a cyclotron. These results indicate that the presence of radiation damage in this mineral (viz., fluorapatite) can severely affect its TL sensitivity (i.e. TL output per unit test dose). The effect of crystal composition on the thermoluminescence and fission track annealing properties of mineral apatite is also reported. We have found that fission track annealing sensitivity and TL sensitivity are both significantly lower in samples of chlorapatite than in samples consisting predominantly of fluorapatite. (author).

  15. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  16. Radiation damage and sensitization effects on thermoluminescence of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, M. A.; Sadek, A. M.; Shousha, Hany. A.; El-Hagg, A. A.; Atta, M. R.; Kitis, G.

    2017-09-01

    The radiation damage effects and enhancement the thermoluminescence (TL) efficiency of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700)dosimeters via sensitization method were discussed. Attempts to eliminate the effects of damage and sensitization were made using different types of annealing processes. The results showed that after irradiating the dosimeters with dose > 250 Gy of 60Co gamma source, damage effects were observed. The sensitivity of the total area under the curve was decreased by a factor of ∼0.5 after irradiation at a pre-test dose of 2 kGy. However, the effects of radiation damage on each glow-peak are different. The glow-peak 2 was the only peak that was not affected by the high-dose irradiation. It has been shown that the degree of the radiation damage effect is related to the maximum dose-response function, f(D)max of the glow-peak. In general, significant radiation damage effects were observed for the glow-peaks of high f(D)max . Post-irradiation anneal at 280 °C for 30 min causes dramatic effects on the shape of the glow-curve and as well as on the sensitivity of the dosimeters. An increasing by a factor of ∼35 in the sensitivity of the total area under the curve was observed at a pre-test dose of 2 kGy. Improving the sensitivity of peak 7 by a factor of∼22 was the dominant factor in increasing the sensitivity of the dosimeters. On the other hand, an increasing by factors of ∼2.5 and ∼4 was found for peaks 2 and 5 respectively. On the other hand, a decreasing by a factor ∼0.5 was observed for peaks 3 and 4. At pre-test dose levels >250 Gy, a very strange and high intensity tail was observed in the high-temperature region of the glow-curves. The readout anneal was not enough to remove this tail. While, the furnace anneal could eliminate the sensitization effects but not the radiation damage effects on the sensitivity of the dosimeters.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser ablation plume dynamics in nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, V. V.; Platonov, V. V.; Lisenkov, V. V.

    2009-06-01

    The dynamics of the plume ejected from the surface of solid targets (YSZ, Nd:YAG and graphite) by a CO2 laser pulse with a duration of ~500 μs (at the 0.03 level), energy of 1.0-1.3 J and peak power of 6-7 kW have been studied using high-speed photography of the plume luminescence and shadow. The targets were used to produce nanopowders by laser evaporation. About 200 μs after termination of the pulse, shadowgraph images of the plumes above the YSZ and Nd:YAG targets showed dark straight tracks produced by large particles. The formation of large (~10 μm) particles is tentatively attributed to cracking of the solidified melt at the bottom of the ablation crater. This is supported by the fact that no large particles are ejected from graphite, which sublimes without melting. Further support to this hypothesis is provided by numerical 3D modelling of melt cooling in craters produced by laser pulses of different shapes.

  18. Comparison of the ablation ability of nucleus pulposus after 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser and 980 nm diode laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Zhengfeng; Guo, Baofeng; Guo, Han; Zhang, Tongtong; Zeng, Yanjun; Ren, Longxi

    2015-07-01

    To compare the ablation ability of nucleus pulposus after 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser and 980 nm diode laser radiation. Goat spine specimen (GSS) was radiated using Nd:YAG laser and 980 nm diode laser and then divided into five groups based on the final energy--200, 400, 600, 800 and 1,000 J groups. The ablation quality of nucleus pulposus after radiation was recorded. The ablation quality of GSS was greater at higher radiation energies in both lasers. When compared at the same energy level, the ablation quality of GSS was greater in 980 nm diode laser than in 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser. Statistical significance was observed in 200 and 400 J groups (P laser showed better ablation ability than 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser.

  19. Study of radiation damage in metals by positron annihilation. [Neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauster, W.B

    1977-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a sensitive technique for probing defects in metals and it has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for the study of radiation damage. After an introduction to the three basic experimental methods (angular correlation, Doppler broadening, and lifetime measurements), the interaction of positrons with lattice defects is reviewed. Results for the annealing of damage after low temperature irradiation are used to show that positron annihilation has provided new information on annealing kinetics. The role of positron techniques in characterizing complex defect structures resulting from high-temperature neutron irradiation is reviewed and the possible utility of positron annihilation as a nondestructive monitor of property changes is pointed out.

  20. Radiation damage study of thin YAG:Ce scintillator using low-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, P.; Linhart, V.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation hardness of a 50 μ m thin YAG:Ce scintillator in a form of dependence of a signal efficiency on 3.1 MeV proton fluence was measured and analysed using X-ray beam. The signal efficiency is a ratio of signals given by a CCD chip after and before radiation damage. The CCD chip was placed outside the primary beam because of its protection from damage which could be caused by radiation. Using simplified assumptions, the 3.1 MeV proton fluences were recalculated to: ṡ 150 MeV proton fluences with intention to estimate radiation damage of this sample under conditions at proton therapy centres during medical treatment, ṡ 150 MeV proton doses with intention to give a chance to compare radiation hardness of the studied sample with radiation hardness of other detectors used in medical physics, ṡ 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences with intention to compare radiation hardness of the studied sample with properties of position sensitive silicon and diamond detectors used in nuclear and particle physics. The following results of our research were obtained. The signal efficiency of the studied sample varies slightly (± 3%) up to 3.1 MeV proton fluence of c. (4 - 8) × 1014 cm-2. This limit is equivalent to 150 MeV proton fluence of (5 - 9) × 1016 cm-2, 150 MeV proton dose of (350 - 600) kGy and 1 MeV neutron fluence of (1 - 2) × 1016 cm-2. Beyond the limit, the signal efficiency goes gradually down. Fifty percent decrease in the signal efficiency is reached around 3.1 MeV fluence of (1 - 2) × 1016 cm-2 which is equivalent to 150 MeV proton fluence of around 2 × 1018 cm-2, 150 MeV proton dose of around 15 MGy and 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of (4 - 8) × 1017 cm-2. In contrast with position sensitive silicon and diamond radiation detectors, the studied sample has at least two order of magnitude greater radiation resistance. Therefore, YAG:Ce scintillator is a suitable material for monitoring of primary beams of particles of ionizing radiation.

  1. Mechanisms of graphene exfoliation under the action of femtosecond laser radiation in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorkov, K. S.; Kochuev, D. A.; Ilin, V. A.; Chkalov, R. V.; Prokoshev, V. G.; Arakelian, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    The processes of graphene structures formation under the action of the femtosecond laser radiation on carbon samples in liquid nitrogen are discussed. Mechanisms of graphene sheets exfoliation are proposed depending on the power density of the laser radiation: in the first case, the separation occurs due to the volumetric expansion during heating the region occupied by nitrogen molecules; at a laser radiation energy exceeding the ablation threshold, the surface of graphite begins to breakdown in the region of the action, followed by separation into graphene layers.

  2. Analytical modeling of polarization transformation of laser radiation of various spectral ranges by birefringent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrich, A. V.; Ushenko, O. G.

    2018-01-01

    The results of statistical dependence and correlation structures of two-dimensional Mueller matrix elements in various spectral regions of laser radiation by changes in the distribution of orientations of optical axes and birefringence of protein crystals. Namely, a two-wave ("red-blue") approach - layer of biological tissues irradiated by He-Ne laser (λ1 = 0,63μm ) and He-Cd laser (λ1 = 0,41μm )was used Conducted analysis of polarimetric sensitivity was made, a state of polarization points that contain volumetric structures of biological objects to spectral region of laser radiation was detected.

  3. Role of laser radiation in activating anodic dissolution under electrochemical machining of metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhimyanov Kharis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific features of electrochemical dissolution of the 12X18H9T stainless steel, the OT-4 titanium alloy and the BK8 hard alloy in the sodium nitrate water solution exposed to 1.06 micrometer wavelength laser radiation were considered. It is found that depassivation of the anode surface is the main mechanism of laser activation in electrochemical dissolving of materials. It is established that the maximum efficiency of laser electrochemical machining is achieved at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 kHz laser radiation. It is connected with the photoactivation mechanism of electrolyte solution molecules, which increases their reaction capacity.

  4. ARTICLES: Physical laws governing the interaction of pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Pavlovich, Yu V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the efficiency of welding metals with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser beam of low duty ratio, at low velocities, can exceed that of welding with cw lasers and with electron beams. For the first time an investigation was made of the influence of the laser radiation parameters (energy and frequency) and of the welding velocity on the characteristics of the weld and on the shape of the weldpool. The influence of the laser radiation polarization on the efficiency of deep penetration was analyzed.

  5. Radiation Tolerant Interfaces: Influence of Local Stoichiometry at the Misfit Dislocation on Radiation Damage Resistance of Metal/Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Choudhury, Samrat [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Manandhar, Sandeep [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Kaspar, Tiffany C. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Devaraj, Arun [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN 37996 USA; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilli [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Hoagland, Richard G. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Dholabhai, Pratik P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-04-24

    To understand how variations in interface properties such as misfit-dislocation density and local chemistry affect radiation-induced defect absorption and recombination, we have explored a model system of CrxV1-x alloy epitaxial films deposited on MgO single crystals. By controlling film composition, the lattice mismatch with MgO was adjusted so that the misfit-dislocation density varies at the interface. These interfaces were exposed to irradiation and in situ results show that the film with a semi-coherent interface (Cr) withstands irradiation while V film, which has similar semi-coherent interface like Cr, showed the largest damage. Theoretical calculations indicate that, unlike at metal/metal interfaces, the misfit dislocation density does not dominate radiation damage tolerance at metal/oxide interfaces. Rather, the stoichiometry, and the precise location of the misfit-dislocation density relative to the interface, drives defect behavior. Together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity of defect recombination to interfacial chemistry and provide new avenues for engineering radiation-tolerant nanomaterials.

  6. ON01210.Na (Ex-RAD® mitigates radiation damage through activation of the AKT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D Kang

    Full Text Available Development of radio-protective agents that are non-toxic is critical in light of ever increasing threats associated with proliferation of nuclear materials, terrorism and occupational risks associated with medical and space exploration. In this communication, we describe the discovery, characterization and mechanism of action of ON01210.Na, which effectively protects mouse and human bone marrow cells from radiation-induced damage both in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that treatment of normal fibroblasts with ON01210.Na before and after exposure to ionizing radiation provides dose dependent protection against radiation-induced damage. Treatment of mice with ON01210.Na prior to radiation exposure was found to result in a more rapid recovery of their hematopoietic system. The mechanistic studies described here show that ON01210.Na manifests its protective effects through the up-regulation of PI3-Kinase/AKT pathways in cells exposed to radiation. These results suggest that ON 01210.Na is a safe and effective radioprotectant and could be a novel agent for use in radiobiological disasters.

  7. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Solar radiation and galactic cosmic radiation is believed to be major restriction factors influencing survival and evolution of life. On planet earth, geomagnetic field along with atmosphere protect living beings from the harmful radiation. During a geomagnetic reversal or excursion, however, the efflux of charged particles on earth surface would increase as the shielding effect of magnetic field decrease. The stratospheric ozone can also be partially stripped away by solar wind when the strength of the field is weak, leading to an increasing ultraviolet radiation penetration to the earth surface. However, studies on the mechanism of radiation induced stress and damage are focused only on bacteria that have no response to magnetic field. This study was motivated by the need to fill the gap upon knowledge of that on magnetic field sensitive microorganism. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of microbes that are able to synthesis intracellular nano-sized magnetic particles (named magnetosomes). These chain-arranged magnetosomes help MTB sense and swim along the magnetic field to find their optimal living environment efficiently. In this paper, in silico prediction of stress and damage repair genes in response to different radiation were carried out on the complete genome of four nonmagnetotactic and four magnetotactic spirilla. In silico analyses of the genomes of magnetic field sensitive and non-sensitive spirilla revealed: 1) all strains contain genes for regulate responses superoxide and peroxide stress, DNA pyrimidine dimer and string breaks; 2) non-magnetotactic spirilla have more genes dealing with oxidative stress, while magnetotactic spirilla may benefit from magnetotaxis by swimming into oxic-anoxic zone away from oxidative stress and direct radiation damage; yet, the lipid hydroperoxide peroxidase gene in MTB may be responsible for possible ROS generated by the membrane enveloped magnetite magnetosome; 3) magnetotactic spirilla possess SOS rec

  8. Modeling Radiation Damage Effects in 3D Pixel Digitization for the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Giugliarelli, Gilberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This poster presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS Detector.

  9. Radiation damage to bull sperm motility. III. Further x-ray studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rikmenspoel, R.

    1975-08-01

    The results of previous radiation experiments, which indicated that the centriole serves as a control center for bull sperm motility, appear to be in conflict with experiments showing that the bull sperm flagellum is an autonomous oscillator. To resolve this conflict experiments were conducted to calibrate absolutely the dose-response curves for the radiation damage, and to measure the force production and the mechanochemical energy conversion after irradiation in bull sperm. The results indicate that the centriole acts as a mechanical anchor for the contractile fibers. (auth)

  10. Study of Radiation Damage of Silicon Drift Detectors Induced by Fast Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kugler, A; CERN. Geneva; Hanzal, V

    1995-01-01

    We report results of radiation hardness tests of linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Non-biased SDDs wre irradiated using flux of fast neutrons with fluency up to 3.5 x 1013 neutrons/cm2. Neutrons were generated due to the stopping of 20 MeV deuteron beam in thick Be target. We have found that electron drift is still possible. However substantional increase in the leakage current of SDDs was observed. Hence, radiation damage will result in corresponding increase of heat generation, which has to be taken into account designing the cooling system of ALICE ITS.

  11. Modeling Radiation Damage Effects in 3D Pixel Digitization for the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wallangen, Veronica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10$^{15}$ n$_\\mathrm{eq}$/cm$^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This work presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS detector.

  12. Radiation Damage Modeling for 3D Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wallangen, Veronica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This poster presents the details of a new digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the 3D Pixel sensors for the ATLAS Detector.

  13. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  14. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; van Tilborg, J.; Michel, P.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering.

  15. Femtosecond laser absorption, heat propagation, and damage threshold analysis for Au coating on metallic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslova, Anastassiya; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    The role of metallic substrates as a heat sink for thin layer gold coatings in double-layered optical components exposed to the ultrashort pulsed laser was investigated with the focus on the impact of the gold layer thickness. A two dimensional FEMTO-2D computational code for solid metallic targets with two-layered assemblies has been developed. The model is then used to simulate targets response to fs laser pulses at near damage threshold fluence and to determine the target damage threshold depending on its structure and the substrate material. Considering temperature dependent optical properties of a gold allowed us to make quantitative estimation of the damage threshold unlike many other models. The simulations show decreasing heat sink effect of the substrate with increasing coating thickness until it becomes negligible for 200 nm gold layer. Preliminary results show that a maximum improvement of the damage threshold of about 10% compared to a pure gold target is predicted for 50 nm gold coatings on two substrate materials: copper and nickel.

  16. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  17. Wireless ultrasonic wavefield imaging via laser for hidden damage detection inside a steel box girder bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Song, Homin; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a wireless ultrasonic wavefield imaging (WUWI) technique for detecting hidden damage inside a steel box girder bridge. The proposed technique allows (1) complete wireless excitation of piezoelectric transducers and noncontact sensing of the corresponding responses using laser beams, (2) autonomous damage visualization without comparing against baseline data previously accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure and (3) robust damage diagnosis even for real structures with complex structural geometries. First, a new WUWI hardware system was developed by integrating optoelectronic-based signal transmitting and receiving devices and a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Next, a damage visualization algorithm, self-referencing f-k filter (SRF), was introduced to isolate and visualize only crack-induced ultrasonic modes from measured ultrasonic wavefield images. Finally, the performance of the proposed technique was validated through hidden crack visualization at a decommissioned Ramp-G Bridge in South Korea. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique instantaneously detects and successfully visualizes hidden cracks even in the complex structure of a real bridge.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: The mechanism of the drilling of holes in vertical metallic plates by cw CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, V. V.; Loboiko, A. I.; Antonova, G. F.; Krasyukov, A. G.; Sayapin, V. P.

    1999-02-01

    The possibility of making a hole in a vertical plate with the aid of laser radiation at a surface temperature not exceeding the boiling point is analysed neglecting the vapour pressure. The mechanism of the degradation of the liquid layer involving a reduction of its thickness, as a result of the redistribution of the molten mass owing to the operation of the force of gravity and of thermocapillary convection, is examined. The theoretical dependence of the critical size of the molten zone on the plate thickness is obtained and a comparison is made with experimental data.

  19. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  20. Brilliant radiation sources by laser-plasma accelerators and optical undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Alexander

    2012-09-06

    This thesis investigates the use of high-power lasers for synchrotron radiation sources with high brilliance, from the EUV to the hard X-ray spectral range. Hereby lasers accelerate electrons by laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA), act as optical undulators, or both. Experimental evidence shows for the first time that LWFA electron bunches are shorter than the driving laser and have a length scale comparable to the plasma wavelength. Furthermore, a first proof of principle experiment demonstrates that LWFA electrons can be exploited to generate undulator radiation. Building upon these experimental findings, as well as extensive numerical simulations of Thomson scattering, the theoretical foundations of a novel interaction geometry for laser-matter interaction are developed. This new method is very general and when tailored towards relativistically moving targets not being limited by the focusability (Rayleigh length) of the laser, while it does not require a waveguide. In a theoretical investigation of Thomson scattering, the optical analogue of undulator radiation, the limits of Thomson sources in scaling towards higher peak brilliances are highlighted. This leads to a novel method for generating brilliant, highly tunable X-ray sources, which is highly energy efficient by circumventing the laser Rayleigh limit through a novel traveling-wave Thomson scattering (TWTS) geometry. This new method suggests increases in X-ray photon yields of 2-3 orders of magnitudes using existing lasers and a way towards efficient, optical undulators to drive a free-electron laser. The results presented here extend far beyond the scope of this work. The possibility to use lasers as particle accelerators, as well as optical undulators, leads to very compact and energy efficient synchrotron sources. The resulting monoenergetic radiation of high brilliance in a range from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard X-ray radiation is of fundamental importance for basic research, medical

  1. Short pulse laser-induced optical damage and fracto-emission of amorphous, diamond-like carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN,K.; VON DER LINDE,D.; SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-02-07

    Short pulse laser damage and ablation of amorphous, diamond-like carbon films is investigated. Material removal is due to fracture of the film and ejection of large fragments, which exhibit a broadband emission of microsecond duration.

  2. A Role for Lsm1p in Response to Ultraviolet-Radiation Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicakova, Tatiana; McCann, Kelly; Brown, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified LSM1 as a new gene affecting sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Lsm1p is a member of a cytoplasmic complex composed of Lsm1p–7p that interacts with the yeast mRNA degradation machinery. To investigate the potential role of Lsm1p in response to UV radiation, we constructed double mutant strains in which LSM1 was deleted in combination with a representative gene from each of three known yeast DNA repair pathways. Our results show that lsm1Δ increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rad1Δ and rad51Δ mutants, but not the rad18Δ mutant, placing LSM1 within the post-replication repair/damage tolerance pathway (PRR). When combined with other deletions affecting PRR, lsm1Δ increases the UV-radiation sensitivity of the rev3Δ, rad30Δ and pol30-K164R mutants but not rad5Δ. Furthermore, the UV-radiation sensitivity phenotype of lsm1Δ is partially rescued by mutations in genes involved in 3′ to 5′ mRNA degradation, and mutations predicted to function in RNA interactions confer the most UV-radiation sensitivity. Together, these results suggest that Lsm1p may confer protection against UV-radiation damage by protecting the 3′ ends of mRNAs from exosome-dependent 3′ to 5′ degradation as part of a novel RAD5-mediated, PCNA-K164 ubiquitylation-independent subpathway of PRR. PMID:19024647

  3. Dichromatic and monochromatic laser radiation effects on survival and morphology of Pantoea agglomerans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, A. M. C.; Souza, B. P.; Mendes, J. P. M.; Soares, L. C.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Despite the beneficial effects of low-level lasers on wound healing, their application for treatment of infected injuries is controversial because low-level lasers could stimulate bacterial growth exacerbating the infectious process. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate in vitro effects of low-level lasers on survival, morphology and cell aggregation of Pantoea agglomerans. P. agglomerans samples were isolated from human pressure injuries and cultures were exposed to low-level monochromatic and simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation to study the survival, cell aggregation, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells in exponential and stationary growth phases. Fluence, wavelength and emission mode were those used in therapeutic protocols for wound healing. Data show no changes in morphology and cell aggregation, but dichromatic laser radiation decreased bacterial survival in exponential growth phase and monochromatic red and infrared lasers increased bacterial survival at the same fluence. Simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation and simultaneous dichromatic laser could be the option for treatment of infected pressure injuries by Pantoea agglomerans.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  5. The influence of various factors on the radiation induced structural damage and leakage of liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinz, H.; Franck, U.; Winkler, E.; Schäfer, H.; Kuroptera, Z. V.

    Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin are a membrane model possessing various properties of natural lipids. The modification of chemical groups and the increase of the penetration of europium ions into liposomes after irradiation was measured by means of NMR methods. It is shown that nitrofuraldehyde as well as sodium chloride in physiological concentration may protect against radiation damage. The chloride ion is the ion responsible for the protection effect. The influence of the variation of some irradiation conditions is discussed.

  6. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology 1983. High Efficiency, Radiation Damage, and Blanket Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    This three day conference, sixth in a series that began in 1974, was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on October 18-20, 1983. The conference provided a forum for the discussion of space photovoltaic systems, their research status, and program goals. Papers were presented and workshops were held in a variety of technology areas, including basic cell research, advanced blanket technology, and radiation damage.

  7. Prevention of radiation damages with antioxidative nutritional factors and analysis of the modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umegaki, Keizo; Esashi, Takatoshi [National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The effects of dietary vitamine E, C and carotene on the damages of bone marrow DNA were investigated with mice exposed to X-ray radiation as the functions of radiation dose and time after the radiation. The administrations of vit E and vit C had little preventive effects on the generation of DNA damages due to X-ray irradiation. This may be attributed to small intake of those vitamines by bone marrow. On the contrary, the administration of {beta}-carotene from donaliella, a green algae at a dose of 300 mg/kg of body weight for two weeks significantly repressed the production of DNA damages by X-ray irradiation at 0.3 Gy, whereas the administration of carotene from palm oil had no effects. The vitamine E level was markedly reduced by either administration of the two carotenes to a level nearly 1/100-1/50 of the normal level. This study suggests that to investigate the effects of an antioxidant in vivo, it is important to consider its concentration in the region concerned as well as the effects of other antioxidants. (M.N.)

  8. Femtoradical events in aqueous molecular environments: the tenuous borderline between direct and indirect radiation damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauduel, Y; Glinec, Y; Malka, V [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique - ENS Techniques Avancees, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)], E-mail: yann.gauduel@ensta.fr

    2008-02-01

    The complex links existing between radiation physics and radiobiology concern the complete understanding of spatio-temporal events triggered by an initial energy deposition in confined spaces called spurs. Microscopic radiation effects (photons or relativistic particles) on integrated biological targets such as water 'the solvent of life' and biomolecular architectures (DNA, histones, enzymes) cannot be satisfactorily described from an absorbed dose delivery profile or a linear energy transfer (LET) approach. Primary radiation damages on biological targets being dependent on the survival probability of secondary electrons and short-lived radicals inside nascent nanometric clusters of ionisation, a thorough knowledge of these processes require the real-time probing of early events on sub-micrometric scale, in the temporal range 10{sup -15} - 10{sup -10} s. Major strides concern early water damages: primary water cation formation (H{sub 2}O{sup .+} or positive hole), concerted electron-proton couplings, attachment dynamics of p-like excited prehydrated electron on biomolecule, short-lived radical pairs involving water-bridged radical OH{sup .} and hydronium ion H{sub 3}O{sup +}. The deactivation frequency of electron-radical pairs is comparable to an H-OH deactivation of excited water molecules (v{sub H2O}* {approx} 0.33 x 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}). These short-lived events take place in the prethermal regime of delocalized secondary electrons and represent a tenuous borderline between direct and indirect molecular damages.

  9. Palliative effects of lutein intervention in gamma-radiation-induced cellular damages in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Vidya; Tenkanidiyoor, Yogish Somayaji; Radhakrishna, Vishakh; Shivappa, Pooja; Lakshman, Srikanth Patil; Fernandes, Ronald; Patali, Krishna Ananthapura

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced hematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic damages to the normal cells are major concerns in the field of radiotherapy. The carotenoids and their derivatives have been the source of antioxidants with wide range of medicinal applications. The objective is to evaluate the protective effects of lutein, a carotenoid, against radiation-induced cellular and tissue damages. Swiss albino mice were grouped into 5, 50, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. of lutein treatment groups, a sham and vehicle control group. The groups were irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy y'-radiation. The mortality was recorded for 30 days to optimize the protective dose against radiation. The mice were administered with the compound orally for 15 consecutive days and irradiated with a sublethal dose of 6Gy. The hematological changes in blood and antioxidant parameters were determined in liver, kidney homogenates, and hemolysate/serum. The hematological parameters were recorded using an automated cell counter. The antioxidants such as malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were spectrophotometrically determined. The red blood cell, white blood cell count, lymphocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet levels, and hematocrit value were found to be decreased in the irradiated groups. Lutein pretreatment maintains near-normal levels of these parameters indicating resistance/recovery from the radiation-induced damages. The antioxidant levels were found to be reduced in all the irradiated groups. However, lutein pretreatment (50 mg/kg b.wt.) has increased the catalase activity of hemolysate. Lutein pretreatment has reduced the MDA levels in hemolysate, when administered at doses of 5, 250, and 500 mg/kg b.wt. in comparison to its control. The study demonstrates the radioprotective potential of lutein by maintaining the hematological and antioxidant homeostasis.

  10. Protection against radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Sun, Huiyan; Xiao, Fengjun; Wang, Xiaojie; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Qunwei; Wu, Chutse; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene could prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. Thirty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups, in which phosphate buffer saline (PBS), mock adenovirus vector (Ad-null) or adenovirus vector containing HGF (Ad-HGF) were injected into the tail vein of each group, respectively. After 48 hours, the mice received a single irradiation dose of 6.5 Gy (60)Co gamma rays. Blood samples were extracted via the tail vein at day 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 24 and 30 after irradiation, for red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) and cluster of differentiation4 (CD4)/cluster of differentiation8 (CD8) ratio assessment. At weekly intervals following irradiation, serum erythropoietin (EPO), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). On post-irradiation day 30, the mice were autopsied and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) were evaluated. Adenovirus-mediated HGF gene transfer could increase human HGF level in serum and have a significant elevation in RBC and WBC count. Ad-HGF increased EPO and IL-6 levels and prompted BFU-E formation. Ad-HGF decreased radiation- induced micronucleus frequency in the mouse bone marrow (BM). Most evidence of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage was observed morphologically in bone marrow specimen four weeks after irradiation. Ad-HGF protected against radiation-induced BM failure and increased survival. Finally, Ad-HGF increased the thymic index and enhanced immune function in the irradiated C57BL/6 mice. This is the first report to date that demonstrates the potential of HGF gene transfer to prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage.

  11. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  12. Defective repair of ionizing radiation damage in Cockayne`s syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum group G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Leadon, S.A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Damage produced by ultraviolet light (UV) or certain chemical carcinogens is repaired more rapidly in transcriptionally active DNA than in the genome as a whole by an evolutionarily conserved process coupled to transcription and involving preferential repair of transcribed strands. The generality of strand-specific repair for damage other than UV has not been well-established, but it has generally been assumed to involve the nucleotide excision repair pathway for bulky lesions. There is little overlap in the spectrum of lesions induced by ionizing radiation and UV; consistent with the idea that to a large extent, the repair processes for these two types of damage are separable, there are very few mammalian cell mutants that are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of both.

  13. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  14. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel

    2013-01-01

    -dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry...... to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.......Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  15. Modelling of micromachining of human tooth enamel by erbium laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, A. V.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Shatilova, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    We consider a 3D cellular model of human tooth enamel and a photomechanical cellular model of enamel ablation by erbium laser radiation, taking into account the structural peculiarities of enamel, energy distribution in the laser beam cross section and attenuation of laser energy in biological tissue. The surface area of the texture in enamel is calculated after its micromachining by erbium laser radiation. The influence of the surface area on the bond strength of enamel with dental filling materials is discussed. A good correlation between the computer simulation of the total work of adhesion and experimentally measured bond strength between the dental filling material and the tooth enamel after its micromachining by means of YAG : Er laser radiation is attained.

  16. Solar radiation pumped solid state of lasers for Solar Power Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruiyi [New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Laser Solar Power Satellites (L-SPS) is the most promising way to overcome global energy and environmental and economical problems. The purpose was to use the favorable combination of solar radiation, modern lasers and the extremely promising phenomenon Optical Phase Conjugation (OPC). Direct conversion of solar energy to energy of a high-power laser beam has the advantage of high efficiency and precise energy transportation. In this paper, direct solar radiation pumping of the laser is compared with the pumping using the intermediate stage of the conversion of the solar radiation in electrical energy. Possible solid-state lasers that can be used in L-SPS are also discussed (including optical system and cooling system). [Spanish] Los Satelites de Energia Solar Laser (L-SPS) son la forma mas prometedora para contrarrestar los problemas globales de energia, ambientales y problemas economicos. El proposito fue el de usar la combinacion favorable de radiacion solar, laseres modernos y el fenomeno extremadamente prometedor de conjugacion de fase optica (OPC). La conversion directa de energia solar a energia de un rayo laser de alta potencia tiene la ventaja de la alta eficiencia y precision de la transportacion de la energia. En este documento la radiacion solar directa impulsada por el laser se compara con la impulsion usando el estado intermedio de conversion de la radiacion solar en energia electrica. Tambien se analizan los posibles laseres de estado solido que pueden usarse en L-SPS (incluyendo el sistema optico y el sistema de enfriamiento).

  17. Propagation of the radiation of laser instruments in road telematics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palys, Marek

    2003-10-01

    In this paper I would like to present the necessity of taking into account a deformation of laser radiation in the real atmosphere while conducting measurements providing data for Intelligent Transport Systems.

  18. Radiation damage and nuclear heating studies in selected functional materials during the JET DT campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengar, Igor, E-mail: igor.lengar@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Department, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Čufar, Aljaž [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Department, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Popovichev, Sergey [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Snoj, Luka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Department, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Syme, Brian [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vila, Rafael [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Stankunas, Gediminas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Material damage calculation in during the JET DT campaign nuclear heating ratio of the damage due to 14 MeV neutronsgamma activity and dose rates. - Abstract: A new Deuterium-Tritium campaign (DTE2) is planned at JET in the next years, with a proposed 14 MeV neutron budget of 1.7 × 10{sup 21}, which is nearly an order of magnitude higher than any previous DT campaigns. The neutron and gamma ray fields inside the JET device during DT plasma operations at specific locations have previously been evaluated. It is estimated that a total neutron fluence on the first wall of JET of up to 10{sup 20} n/m{sup 2} could be achieved, which is comparable to the fluence occurring in ITER at the end of life in the rear part of the port plug, where several diagnostic components will be located. The purpose of the present work is to evaluate the radiation damage and nuclear heating in selected functional materials to be irradiated at JET during DT plasma operation. These quantities are calculated with the use of the MCNP6 code and the FISPACT II code. In particular the neutron and gamma ray fields at specific locations inside the JET device, dedicated to material damage studies, were characterized. The emphasis is on a potential long term irradiation station located close to the first wall at outboard midplane, offering the opportunity to irradiate samples of functional materials used in ITER diagnostics, to assess the degradation of the physical properties. The radiation damage and the nuclear heating were calculated for selected materials irradiated in these positions and for the neutron flux and fluence expected in DTE2. The studied candidate functional materials include, among others, Sapphire, YAG, ZnS, Spinel, Diamond. In addition the activation of the internal irradiation holder itself was calculated with FISPACT. Damage levels in the range of 10{sup −5} dpa were found.

  19. [Effects of laser radiation on the periodontium. An animal model approach. Effects of usual radiation dosage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerol Rodriguez, B; Alandez Chamorro, J; Cañizares Garcia, J; Campos Muñoz, A; Sicilia Felechosa, A

    1989-05-01

    Twenty four albino mice of forty days old were selected. Twelve forty days old albino mice were irradiated with a Helium-Neon laser source, dose of 10.50566 Jul/cm2. They were divided in two groups according to time of animal sacrifice (immediately after irradiation and ten days after). As control were used twelve mice using the same time as the experimental groups, but without radiation. T.E.M. ultrathin sections showed alteration only in the conjunctiva and in the bone tissues, but not in the epithelial tissue. The bone showed two osteocyte population according to their response to irradiation. The first population showed characteristic comparable with the controls, and the second showed alterations suggestive of a degenerative process. The connective tissue also showed two fibroblasts populations, the first showed signs of a big synthesizing activity, and the second, degenerative signs. The first fibroblast population appeared in the animals sacrificed immediately after irradiation.

  20. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  1. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto, E-mail: arojasmtz@gmail.com, E-mail: augusto.rojasm@uanl.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. (author)

  2. Study on radiation damage to high energy accelerator components by irradiation in a nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, Helmut; Casta, J; Van de Voorde, M H

    1975-01-01

    The structural and other components used in high energy accelerators are continuously exposed to a wide spectrum of high energy particles and electromagnetic radiation. The resulting radiation damage may severely influence the functional capability of accelerator facilities. In order to arrive at an estimate of the service life of various materials in the radiation field, simulating experiments have to be carried out in a nuclear reactor. A large number of organic and inorganic materials, electronic components, metals, etc., intended specifically for use in 400 GeV proton synchrotron of CERN near Geneva, were irradiated in the ASTRA reactor in Seibersdorf near Vienna. The paper reports on the irradiation facilities available in this reactor for this purpose, on the dosimetry methods used, on the most important materials irradiated and on the results obtained in these experiments. (14 refs).

  3. Therapy of patients with osteoarthritis with low energy laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Vasiljeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess influence oflow energy laser radiation (LELR on glycosaminoglycan (GAG and vitamin С level in pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. 82 pts with primary OA and 25 healthy volunteers signed informed consent were included in an open randomized prospective 12-month study. Inclusion criteria: unsatisfactory effect of previous drug therapy (DT, stable NSAID dose 3-5 days before and during LELR course, absence of comorbid hepatic and kidney diseases in stage of functional decompensation, malignant diseases, exclusion therapy influencing microcirculation, exercise therapy, physical therapy. Intra-articular injections were not done during 3 months before the study. Pts were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 received complex DT and LELR, group 2 - DT. clinical and laboratory parameters were used as efficacy measures. Statistical analysis was performed on personal computer IBM PC (OS — Windows EP Home Edition with Microsoft office and STATISTICA 6.0 programs. Results. Analysis of the results showed significant improvement of most measures in comparison with traditional DT. LELR administration allowed to decrease chondroprotector and NSAID doses. Vitamin С decrease in serum of OA pts may be a risk factor of development and progression of this disease.

  4. Intracavity scanning of the radiation of an electric-discharge nonchain DF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, V. N.; Liber, V. I.; Kotylev, V. N.; Fonin, V. M.

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the possibility of using an electrically controlled space-time light modulator based on the transparent electrooptic ceramic PLZT for intracavity scanning of the radiation of a chemical nonchain DF laser (lasing-wavelength range 3.5-4.0 μm). The radiation pulses are scanned in space in the pulsed and pulse-frequency operating modes of the laser.

  5. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  6. THE ONE CINETIC MODEL DAMAGE OF CELL BY SMALL DOSES OF RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Gubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To explain the known differences in the dose and age dependences of radiogenic mortality from leukemia and solid tumors after single exposure, a model was developed, which is a modification of the Kellerer-Rossi theory of dual radiation action. The model assumes formation in a cell of both single and double primary damages due to radiation and other carcinogens, while the recovery rate of single damages (φ significantly exceeds that for double ones (ψ. Upon achieving a certain stage of the cell cycle (the critical age of cell – T, double damages become permanent and with probability of А can be inherited to daughter cells as “premalignant” defects. In contrast, in the Kellerer-Rossi theory, permanent damage is formed immediately after formation of the second damage at the next energy absorption event in the cell, i.e. ψ=0 .On the assumption that the premalignant defects only occur based on the double primary damages, i.e. φ>>ψ, the expressions for А were derived for the prompt radiation exposure and radiation exposure at a constant dose rate. They reproduce the effect increasing with decreasing of T, whereas the influence of T on the linear term of the dose expression in both cases is the same, but with decreasing of T the quadratic term increases faster for exposure at a constant dose rate than that for the prompt one. Thus, presence of the quadratic term in the dose expression for leukemia and its virtual complete absence for solid tumors may be due to lower T-value for hemopoietic stem cells. Predicted by the model dose rate influence on the quadratic term does not depend on the dose, so the reduction factor should be only applied to the quadratic term of the dose expression. This follows as well from the original version of the Kellerer-Rossi theory.

  7. Study on the electromagnetic radiation characteristics of discharging excimer laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Duliang; Liang, Xu; Fang, Xiaodong; Wang, Qingsheng

    2016-10-01

    Excimer laser in condition of high voltage, large current and fast discharge will produce strong electromagnetic pulse radiation and electromagnetic interference on the around electrical equipment. The research on characteristics and distribution of excimer laser electromagnetic radiation could provide important basis for electromagnetic shielding and suppressing electromagnetic interference, and further improving the electromagnetic compatibility of system. Firstly, electromagnetic radiation source is analyzed according to the working principle of excimer laser. The key test points of the electromagnetic radiation, hydrogen thyratron, main discharge circuit and laser outlet, are determined by the mechanical structure and the theory of electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, characteristics of electromagnetic field were tested using a near field probe on the key positions of the vertical direction at 20, 50, and 80 cm, respectively. The main radiation frequencies and the radiation field characteristics in the near field are obtained. The experimental results show that the main radiation frequencies distribute in 47, 65, and 130 MHz for electric field and the main radiation frequencies distribute in 34, 100, and 165 MHz for magnetic field. The intensity of electromagnetic field decreases rapidly with the increase of test distance. The higher the frequency increases, the faster the amplitude attenuate. Finally, several electromagnetic interference suppression measurement methods are proposed from the perspective of electromagnetic compatibility according to the test results.

  8. A Comparison of Laser Shearography and C-Scan for Assessing a Glass/Epoxy Laminate Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Martin; Růžek, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Impact damage is a serious damage mechanism in composite materials, which limits their performance and reliability. Impact damage can occur during in-service applications or as a result of handling during manufacturing. Methods used currently for damage detection are based on different principles, and for that reason, they give a range of results no matter what the real damage is. Therefore, a comparison of the internal real damage with the flaw indications of a glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) laminate made with two non-destructive technique (NDT) methods has been investigated. Laser shearography measurements and C-scan ultrasonic detection were compared. Metallographic examination and surface indentation measurements provided information about the character of the real damage. Such a comparison has not yet been published because laser shearography is considered a qualitative technique. Each NDT method was able to visualise a different type of damage. The knowledge of the applicability of these methods is the key to taking advantage of both methods by combining their respective strengths. In terms of the reliability, simplicity and rapidity of all of the mentioned techniques, laser shearography turned out to be the most suitable method for the detection of barely visible flaws. The C-scan was more appropriate for precisely defining the inner damage. The tested material was a laminate typically used for ultralight aircraft. Information about the extent of damage is very important for airplane certification and maintenance.

  9. Radiation Damage of the CERN CMS HCAL Scintillator/WLS fiber readout during Run1 and Run2 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, Pawel Jan

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of radiation damage of the CERN CMS HCAL Scintillator/WLS Fiber readout. Data were obtained using the Laser calibration system of the CMS hadron endcap detector during the operation of the LHC in 2010-2017. Scintillators used in the CMS hadron endcap calorimeter (HE) were irradiated at dose rates in the range of 0.1 rad/h to 0.1 krad/h. Results indicate that the radiation damage has a strong dose rate dependence. Using data collected in 2017, we have measured the response loss in a single HE section instrumented with Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The results show a much smaller signal loss for the channels read out by SiPMs compared to signal loss for the channels read out by hybrid photodetectors (HPDs). The results imply that a large fraction of the response loss in the CMS HE detector observed in 2010-2017 comes from deterioration of the HPD photodetectors and not from radiation damage of scintillators.

  10. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M G; Min, Q; Cao, S Q; Sun, D X; Hayden, P; O'Sullivan, G; Dong, C Z

    2017-03-23

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging.

  11. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  12. Reflection of Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) laser radiation from the theatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work has investigated the power of both specular and diffusely reflected beams of CO2 laser radiation from metallic and non-metallic surfaces of an operating theatre including surgical instruments (specula) and different samples of wall paints in theatre 6 of the Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, U.K. where the CO2 laser ...

  13. Third harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation in AgGaSe2 crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    September 2000 physics pp. 405–412. Third harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation in. AgGaSe2 crystal. GOPAL C BHAR, PATHIK KUMBHAKAR. ½. , D V SATYANARAYANA. ¾. ,. N S N BANERJEE. ¾. , U NUNDY. ¾ and C G CHAO. ¿. Laser Laboratory, Physics Department, Burdwan University, Burdwan 713 104, ...

  14. Pulse-periodic iodine photodissociation laser pumped with radiation from magnetoplasma compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashnikov, G. N.; Orlov, V. K.; Panin, A. N.; Piskunov, A. K.; Reznikov, V. A.

    1980-09-01

    The design and operation of an iodine photodissociation laser, pumped by radiation from magnetoplasma compressors, are described. The laser uses a closed-circulation system with C3F7I as the working gas. Repetitive-pulse operation has been achieved with an interval between pulses of 1 minute, a lasing energy of 110 J, and a pulse duration of 30 microseconds.

  15. Hesperidin as radioprotector against radiation-induced lung damage in rat: A histopathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hassan Haddadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated by ionizing radiation, and one of the organs commonly affected by ROS is the lung. Radiation-induced lung injury including pneumonia and lung fibrosis is a dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy (RT of patients with thorax irradiation. Administration of antioxidants has been proved to protect against ROS. The present study was aimed to assess the protective effect of hesperidin (HES against radiation-induced lung injury of male rats. Fifty rats were divided into three groups. G1: Received no HES and radiation (sham. G2: Underwent γ-irradiation to the thorax. G3: Received HES and underwent γ-irradiation. The rats were exposed to a single dose of 18 Gy using cobalt-60 unit and were administered HES (100 mg/kg for 7 days before irradiation. Histopathological analysis was performed 24 h and 8 weeks after RT. Histopathological results in 24 h showed radiation-induced inflammation and presence of more inflammatory cells as compared to G1 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES significantly decreased such an effect when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Histopathological evaluation in 8 weeks showed a significant increase in mast cells, inflammation, inflammatory cells, alveolar thickness, vascular thickness, pulmonary edema, and fibrosis in G2 when compared to G1 (P < 0.05. HES significantly decreased inflammatory response, fibrosis, and mast cells when compared to G2 (P < 0.05. Administration of HES resulted in decreased radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis in the lung tissue. Thus, the present study showed HES to be an efficient radioprotector against radiation-induced damage in the lung of tissue rats.

  16. Combined Impact of Gamma and Laser Radiation on Peripheral Blood of Rats in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Batay, L. E.; Koshlan, I. V.; Nasek, V. M.; Zilberman, R. D.; Milevich, T. I.; Govorun, R. D.; Koshlan, N. A.; Blaga, P.

    2017-11-01

    The impact of γ radiation of 137Cs (doses of 1 and 3 Gy), low-intensity laser radiation (λ = 670 nm, 5.3 or 10.6 J/cm2) as well as the influence of consecutive laser and γ radiation on peripheral blood and blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, lymphocytes, granulocytes) were studied by analyzing the number of blood cells, blood absorption spectra, and activity of antioxidant defense enzymes. Two series of experiments were performed on four groups of rats. The rats of the control group (group 1) were not exposed to γ or laser radiation. In the experimental groups, single irradiation of the whole body of rats with γ radiation (group 2), three- or four-day over-vein irradiation of blood in the tail vein by low-intensity laser radiation (group 3), and successive three- or four-day irradiation of blood by laser and then a single irradiation of the whole body with γ radiation (group 4) were performed. It was shown that changes of the blood cell content in the experimental groups are accompanied by changes in the spectral characteristics of the blood and the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes. The radioprotective effect of low-intensity laser radiation is manifested as an increase in the average number of leukocytes and lymphocytes in the group as compared with the postradiation, as well as an increase in the activity of antioxidant protection enzymes. The possibility of using low-intensity optical radiation for correction of hematological disorders caused by ionizing radiation is discussed.

  17. Damage Identification by Using a Self-Synchronizing Multipoint Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibration-based damage identification method extracts the damage location and severity information from the change of modal properties, such as natural frequency and mode shape. Its performance and accuracy depends on the measurement precision. Laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV provides a noncontact vibration measurement of high quality, but usually it can only do sampling on a single point. Scanning LDV is normally used to obtain the mode shape with a longer scanning time. In this paper, a damage detection technique is proposed using a self-synchronizing multipoint LDV. Multiple laser beams with various frequency shifts are projected on different points of the object, reflected and interfered with a common reference beam. The interference signal containing synchronized temporal vibration information of multiple spatial points is captured by a single photodetector and can be retrieved in a very short period. Experiments are conducted to measure the natural frequencies and mode shapes of pre- and postcrack cantilever beams. Mode shape curvature is calculated by numerical interpolation and windowed Fourier analysis. The results show that the artificial crack can be identified precisely from the change of natural frequencies and the difference of mode shape curvature squares.

  18. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  19. Radiation-Reaction Trapping of Electrons in Extreme Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, L L; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-01-01

    proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  20. Surface damages of zirconia by Nd:YAG dental laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Makoto; Okuda, Yuji; Tsuruki, Jiro; Minesaki, Yoshito; Takenouchi, Yasumi; Ban, Seiji

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the surface damages of zirconia by Nd:YAG dental laser irradiation through a systematic evaluation of the associated microstructural changes. Disk specimens of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and ceria-stabilized zirconia/alumina nanocomposite (Ce-TZP/Al₂O₃ nanocomposite) were irradiated by Nd:YAG dental laser. The specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Every single irradiated spot was indicated by a circular black pit surrounded by a circular raised rim with a sunken depression at the center. On surface changes, many cracks were formed inside each irradiated pit. On changes in elemental composition, the concentration of oxygen decreased while that of zirconium increased. After heating in air, the assembly of circular black pits turned white, although the depression and raised rim remained. This study showed that Nd:YAG dental laser irradiation induced cracking and reduced oxygen content on the surface of zirconia. Consequently, these phenomena reduced the mechanical strength of zirconia. Therefore, Nd:YAG dental laser welding should not be performed on tetragonal zirconia.