WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiance measurement experiment

  1. Measured and Modeled Downwelling Far-Infrared Radiances in Very Dry Environments and Calibration Requirements for Future Experiments

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Latvakoski, H.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    Downwelling radiances measured by the Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument in an environment with integrated precipitable water as low as 0.03 cm are compared with calculated spectra in the far-infrared and mid-infrared. In its current ground-based configuration FIRST was deployed to 5.38 km on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile, from August to October 2009. There FIRST took part in the Radiative Heating in Unexplored Bands Campaign Part 2. Water vapor and temperature profiles from an optimal-estimation-based physical retrieval algorithm (using simultaneous radiosonde and multichannel 183 GHz microwave radiometer measurements) are input to the AER Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to compute radiances for comparison with FIRST. The AER v3.4 line parameter database is used. The low water vapor amounts and relatively cold atmosphere result in extremely small far-IR radiances (1.5 mW/m2/sr/cm-1) with corresponding brightness temperatures of 120 K. The residual LBLRTM minus FIRST is calculated to assess agreement between the measured and modeled spectra. Uncertainties in both the measured and modeled radiances are accounted for in the comparison. A goal of the deployment and subsequent analysis is the assessment of water vapor spectroscopy in the far-infrared and mid-infrared. While agreement is found between measured and modeled radiances within the combined uncertainties across all spectra, uncertainties in the measured water vapor profiles and from the laboratory calibration exceed those associated with water vapor spectroscopy in this very low radiance environment. Consequently, no improvement in water vapor spectroscopy is afforded by these measurements. However, we use these results to place requirements on instrument calibration accuracy and water vapor profile accuracy for future campaigns to similarly dry environments. Instrument calibration uncertainty needs to be at 2% (1-sigma) of measured radiance

  2. Sky glint correction in measurements of upward radiance above the sea surface

    Jerzy Olszewski

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment has been performed to determine the upward water-leaving radiance by non-contact measurement of the total upward and downward radiance above the sea surface from a moving ship. The method for achieving this aim is described: the radiance meters are both tilted in such a way that the upward radiance meter can 'see' that part of the measured downward radiance which would be reflected if the water surface were smooth and which is not derived directly from solar glitter. Both meters are firmly fixed in a special frame, which ensures that the required orientation is the most probable one. Time records of the measured parameters are analysed. The results are presented in several forms: frequency (histogram analysis appears to be the most promising one.

  3. New stratospheric UV/visible radiance measurements

    F. J. Marceau

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A stratospheric balloon was launched on 12 October 1986 from the "CNES" base at Aire sur l'Adour (France to record twilight radiance in the stratosphere. The near-UV and visible radiances were continuously monitored by a photometer during sunrise. Some observations are presented for different viewing azimuthal planes and viewing elevation angles. They show the influence of aerosols layers and clouds which can be also seen on related photographs. The results as a whole may be used for testing some radiative models, especially for twilight conditions.

  4. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  5. General theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes RID A-1977-2009

    FukshanskyKazarinova, N.; Fukshansky, L.; Kuhl, M.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the radiance distribution and fluence rate within turbid samples with fiber-optic radiance microprobes contain a large variable instrumental error caused by the nonuniform directional sensitivity of the microprobes. A general theory of three-dimensional radiance measurements...

  6. A comparison of measured and calculated upwelling radiance over water as a function of sensor altitude

    Coney, T. A.; Salzman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper compares remote sensing data measured over water at altitudes ranging from 30 m to 15.2 km to data calculated for corresponding altitudes using surface measurements and an atmospheric radiative transfer model. The data were acquired on June 22, 1978 in Lake Erie and it was found that suspended solids and chlorophyll concentrations were 0.59 + or - 0.02 mg/liter and 2.42 + or - 0.03 micro gram/liter respectively throughout the duration of the experiment. Calculated and measured nadir radiances for altitudes of 152 m and 12.5 km agree to within 16% and 14% respectively. It is noted that the model offered a poor simulation of the variation in measured radiance with look angle. Finally, it is concluded that an accurate assessment of the source of error will require the inclusion in the analysis of the contributions made by the sea state and specular sky reflectance

  7. Theory of equidistant three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes RID A-1977-2009

    FukshanskyKazarinova, N.; Fukshansky, L.; Kuhl, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Fiber-optic radiance microprobes, increasingly applied for measurements of internal light fields in living tissues, provide three-dimensional radiance distribution solids and radiant energy fluence rates at different depths of turbid samples. These data are, however, distorted because of an inher...... of application is presented. The limitations of this theory and the prospects for this approach are discussed....... of an inherent feature of optical fibers: nonuniform angular sensitivity. Because of this property a radiance microprobe during a single measurement partly underestimates light from the envisaged direction and partly senses light from other directions. A theory of three-dimensional equidistant radiance...

  8. Long-term stability of TES satellite radiance measurements

    T. C. Connor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES Level 2 (L2 retrieval products for the purpose of assessing long term changes in atmospheric trace gas composition requires knowledge of the overall radiometric stability of the Level 1B (L1B radiances. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the stability of the radiometric calibration of the TES instrument by analyzing the difference between measured and calculated brightness temperatures in selected window regions of the spectrum. The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO profiles for temperature and water vapor and the Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature (RTGSST are used as input to the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS radiative transfer model to calculate the simulated spectra. The TES reference measurements selected cover a 4-year period of time from mid 2005 through mid 2009 with the selection criteria being; observation latitudes greater than −30° and less than 30°, over ocean, Global Survey mode (nadir view and retrieved cloud optical depth of less than or equal to 0.01. The TES cloud optical depth retrievals are used only for screening purposes and no effects of clouds on the radiances are included in the forward model. This initial screening results in over 55 000 potential reference spectra spanning the four year period. Presented is a trend analysis of the time series of the residuals (observation minus calculations in the TES 2B1, 1B2, 2A1, and 1A1 bands, with the standard deviation of the residuals being approximately equal to 0.6 K for bands 2B1, 1B2, 2A1, and 0.9 K for band 1A1. The analysis demonstrates that the trend in the residuals is not significantly different from zero over the 4-year period. This is one method used to demonstrate that the relative radiometric calibration is stable over time, which is very important for any longer term analysis of TES retrieved products (L2, particularly well-mixed species such as carbon dioxide and methane.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of spectral sky radiance by a non-scanning multidirectional spectroradiometer (MUDIS)

    Riechelmann, Stefan; Schrempf, Michael; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel non-scanning multidirectional spectroradiometer (MUDIS) measuring the spectral sky radiance as a function of zenith and azimuth angle with a high spectral and temporal resolution. The instrument is based on a hyperspectral imager and measures spectral sky radiance in the wavelength range of 250–600 nm at 113 different directions simultaneously. MUDIS has been intercalibrated with a sky scanning CCD spectroradiometer (SCCD). Sky radiance measurements have been performed with both instruments under cloudless and overcast sky. The spectral actinic irradiance derived from those measurements agrees within 8% for wavelengths higher than 320 nm. The bias between synchronous MUDIS and SCCD sky radiance measurements during cloudless and overcast sky is below 5% for 320 and 500 nm with a 1σ standard deviation of less than 10%. MUDIS enables us to perform more than 220 000 spectral sky radiance measurements instead of approximately 6000 SCCD spectral sky radiance measurements per day and to measure spatial variations of spectral sky radiance simultaneously. (paper)

  10. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  11. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  12. Spectral and Spatial UV Sky Radiance Measurements at a Seaside Resort Under Clear Sky and Slightly Overcast Conditions.

    Sandmann, Henner; Stick, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Spatial measurements of the diffusely scattered sky radiance at a seaside resort under clear sky and slightly overcast conditions have been used to calculate the sky radiance distribution across the upper hemisphere. The measurements were done in the summer season when solar UV radiation is highest. The selected wavelengths were 307, 350 and 550 nm representing the UVB, UVA and VIS band. Absolute values of radiance differ considerably between the wavelengths. Normalizing the measured values by use of direct solar radiance made the spatial distributions of unequal sky radiance comparable. The results convey a spatial impression of the different distributions of the radiance at the three wavelengths. Relative scattered radiance intensity is one order of magnitude greater in UVB than in VIS, whereas in UVA lies roughly in between. Under slightly overcast conditions scattered radiance is increased at all three wavelengths by about one order of magnitude. These measurements taken at the seaside underline the importance of diffuse scattered radiance. The effect of shading parts of the sky can be estimated from the distribution of sky radiance. This knowledge might be useful for sun seekers and in the treatment of people staying at the seaside for therapeutic purposes. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Model and measurements of linear mixing in thermal IR ground leaving radiance spectra

    Balick, Lee; Clodius, William; Jeffery, Christopher; Theiler, James; McCabe, Matthew; Gillespie, Alan; Mushkin, Amit; Danilina, Iryna

    2007-10-01

    Hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing is an effective tool for the detection and identification of gas plumes and solid materials. Virtually all remotely sensed thermal IR pixels are mixtures of different materials and temperatures. As sensors improve and hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing becomes more quantitative, the concept of homogeneous pixels becomes inadequate. The contributions of the constituents to the pixel spectral ground leaving radiance are weighted by their spectral emissivities and their temperature, or more correctly, temperature distributions, because real pixels are rarely thermally homogeneous. Planck's Law defines a relationship between temperature and radiance that is strongly wavelength dependent, even for blackbodies. Spectral ground leaving radiance (GLR) from mixed pixels is temperature and wavelength dependent and the relationship between observed radiance spectra from mixed pixels and library emissivity spectra of mixtures of 'pure' materials is indirect. A simple model of linear mixing of subpixel radiance as a function of material type, the temperature distribution of each material and the abundance of the material within a pixel is presented. The model indicates that, qualitatively and given normal environmental temperature variability, spectral features remain observable in mixtures as long as the material occupies more than roughly 10% of the pixel. Field measurements of known targets made on the ground and by an airborne sensor are presented here and serve as a reality check on the model. Target spectral GLR from mixtures as a function of temperature distribution and abundance within the pixel at day and night are presented and compare well qualitatively with model output.

  14. Potential of remote sensing of cirrus optical thickness by airborne spectral radiance measurements at different sideward viewing angles

    Wolf, Kevin; Ehrlich, André; Hüneke, Tilman; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Werner, Frank; Wirth, Martin; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    Spectral radiance measurements collected in nadir and sideward viewing directions by two airborne passive solar remote sensing instruments, the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART) and the Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (mini-DOAS), are used to compare the remote sensing results of cirrus optical thickness τ. The comparison is based on a sensitivity study using radiative transfer simulations (RTS) and on data obtained during three airborne field campaigns: the North Atlantic Rainfall VALidation (NARVAL) mission, the Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment (ML-CIRRUS) and the Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems (ACRIDICON) campaign. Radiative transfer simulations are used to quantify the sensitivity of measured upward radiance I with respect to τ, ice crystal effective radius reff, viewing angle of the sensor θV, spectral surface albedo α, and ice crystal shape. From the calculations it is concluded that sideward viewing measurements are generally better suited than radiance data from the nadir direction to retrieve τ of optically thin cirrus, especially at wavelengths larger than λ = 900 nm. Using sideward instead of nadir-directed spectral radiance measurements significantly improves the sensitivity and accuracy in retrieving τ, in particular for optically thin cirrus of τ ≤ 2. The comparison of retrievals of τ based on nadir and sideward viewing radiance measurements from SMART, mini-DOAS and independent estimates of τ from an additional active remote sensing instrument, the Water Vapor Lidar Experiment in Space (WALES), shows general agreement within the range of measurement uncertainties. For the selected example a mean τ of 0.54 ± 0.2 is derived from SMART, and 0.49 ± 0.2 by mini-DOAS nadir channels, while WALES obtained a mean value of τ = 0.32 ± 0.02 at 532 nm wavelength, respectively. The mean of τ derived from the sideward viewing mini

  15. Cloud and radiance measurements with the VIS/NIR Daylight Whole Sky Imager at Lindenberg (Germany)

    Feister, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg (Germany); Shields, J. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Ground-based cloud data acquired with the whole sky imager (WSI) are analyzed in relation to measurements of solar radiation performed at the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory. Cloud fractions derived by the cloud detection algorithm from WSI images acquired during daylight hours between 2002 and 2004 are compared with conventional cloud observations for the two sites Potsdam and Lindenberg, and also with ceilometer data of cloud-base heights at Lindenberg. The comparison statistics are discussed in the context of different principles of measurement. A few case studies illustrate the strong scattering effect of clouds on solar radiance and irradiance measured at the ground in different spectral regions. Particularly clouds close to the apparent position of the sun lead to strong enhancements of solar diffuse irradiance incident on horizontal planes and hemispheres that substantially exceed corresponding clear-sky values. Irradiances derived from WSI sky radiance fields are shown in comparison to pyranometer data of diffuse irradiance and radiative transfer model calculations performed for clear sky conditions. Examples of spectral sky radiances with moving contrails illustrate the significant enhancement the contrails have compared to clear sky, even though they may have a relatively small direct effect on global irradiance values. As contrails are observed at Lindenberg for about 18 to 19% of daylight hours, and part of them become clouds, the indirect impact of these changes on solar irradiance received at the ground may not be negligible. (orig.)

  16. GOSAT and OCO-2 Inter-comparison on Measured Spectral Radiance and Retrieved Carbon Dioxide

    Kataoka, F.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Crisp, D.; Bruegge, C. J.; Schwandner, F. M.

    2016-12-01

    TANSO-FTS onboard GOSAT and grating spectrometer on OCO-2 use different measurement techniques to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) and molecular oxygen (O2). Both instruments observe sunlight reflected from the Earth's surface in almost the same spectral range. As a first step in cross calibrating these two instruments, we compared spectral radiance observations within the three short wave infrared (SWIR) spectral bands centered on the O2 A-band (O2A), the weak CO2 band near 1.6 microns (Weak-CO2) and 2.06 micons (Strong-CO2) bands at temporally coincident and spatially collocated points. In this work, we reconciled the different size of the footprints and evaluated at various types of surface targets such as ocean, desert and forest. For radiometric inter-comparisons, we consider long term instrument sensitivity degradation in orbit and differences in viewing geometry and associated differences in surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). Measured spectral radiances agree very well within 5% for all bands. This presentation will summarize these comparisons of GOSAT and OCO-2 spectral radiance observations and associated estimates of carbon dioxide and related parameters retrieved with the same algorithm at matchup points. We will also discuss instrument related uncertainties from various target observations.

  17. Measurements of downwelling far-infrared radiance during the RHUBC-II campaign at Cerro Toco, Chile and comparisons with line-by-line radiative transfer calculations

    Mast, Jeffrey C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Kratz, David P.; Latvakoski, Harri; Johnson, David G.; Turner, David D.; Mlawer, Eli J.

    2017-09-01

    Downwelling radiances at the Earth's surface measured by the Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument in an environment with integrated precipitable water (IPW) as low as 0.03 cm are compared with calculated spectra in the far-infrared and mid-infrared. FIRST (a Fourier transform spectrometer) was deployed from August through October 2009 at 5.38 km MSL on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile. There FIRST took part in the Radiative Heating in Unexplored Bands Campaign Part 2 (RHUBC-II), the goal of which is the assessment of water vapor spectroscopy. Radiosonde water vapor and temperature vertical profiles are input into the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to compute modeled radiances. The LBLRTM minus FIRST residual spectrum is calculated to assess agreement. Uncertainties (1-σ) in both the measured and modeled radiances are also determined. Measured and modeled radiances nearly all agree to within combined (total) uncertainties. Features exceeding uncertainties can be corrected into the combined uncertainty by increasing water vapor and model continuum absorption, however this may not be necessary due to 1-σ uncertainties (68% confidence). Furthermore, the uncertainty in the measurement-model residual is very large and no additional information on the adequacy of current water vapor spectral line or continuum absorption parameters may be derived. Similar future experiments in similarly cold and dry environments will require absolute accuracy of 0.1% of a 273 K blackbody in radiance and water vapor accuracy of ∼3% in the profile layers contributing to downwelling radiance at the surface.

  18. The Accuracy of RADIANCE Software in Modelling Overcast Sky Condition

    Baharuddin

    2013-01-01

    A validation study of the sky models of RADIANCE simulation software against the overcast sky condition has been carried out in order to test the accuracy of sky model of RADIANCE for modeling the overcast sky condition in Hong Kong. Two sets of data have been analysed. Firstly, data collected from a set of experiments using a physical scale model. In this experiment, the illuminance of four points inside the model was measured under real sky conditions. Secondly, the RADIANCE simulation has ...

  19. Downwelling Far-Infrared Radiance Spectra Measured by FIRST at Cerro Toco, Chile

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Latvakoski, H.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed by NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Space Dynamics Laboratory and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. FIRST was initially developed for measuring the far-infrared portion of Earth's longwave spectrum as a balloon borne instrument and later was reconfigured to operate as a ground-based instrument. In its current ground-based configuration FIRST was deployed at 17500 ft on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile, from August to October, 2009. There the integrated precipitable water (IPW) was as low as 0.02 cm. FIRST measurements from days with IPW between 0.024 and 0.035 cm during the campaign are presented here between 200 cm-1 and 800 cm-1. Significant spectral development in the far-IR is observed over the entire 200 cm-1 to 800 cm-1 band. Water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosonde and GVRP measurements are used as inputs to the AER Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) utilizing the AER v3.2 line parameter database. Uncertainties in both the measured and modeled radiances are accounted for in this study. The residual LBLRTM - FIRST is calculated to assess agreement between the measured and modeled spectra. Measured and model radiances generally agree to within the combined uncertainties for wavenumbers greater than 360 cm-1. At wavenumbers less than 360 cm-1 persistent troughs in the residual are present outside of the combined uncertainties. These features are present on different days and at different water vapor amounts. Possible solutions for these features are discussed.

  20. A comparison of measured radiances from AIRS and HIRS across different cloud types

    Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Staten, P.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of Earth's atmosphere with passive remote sensing instruments is ongoing for decades and resulting in a long-term global dataset. Two prominent examples are operational satellite platforms from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or research platforms like NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The observed spectral ranges of these observations are often similar among the different platforms, but have large differences when it comes to resolution, accuracy and quality control. Our approach is to combine different kinds of instruments at the pixel-scale to improve the characterization of infrared radiances. We focus on data from the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and compare the observations to radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua. The high spectral resolution of AIRS is used to characterize and possibly recalibrate the observed radiances from HIRS. Our approach is unique in that we use additional information from other passive instruments on the same platforms including the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We will present comparisons of radiances from HIRS and AIRS within different types of clouds that are determined from the imagers. In this way, we can analyze and select the most homogeneous conditions for radiance comparisons and a possible re-calibration of HIRS. We hope to achieve a cloud-type-dependent calibration and quality control for HIRS, which can be extrapolated into the past via inter-calibration of the different HIRS instruments beyond the time of AIRS.

  1. Potential of remote sensing of cirrus optical thickness by airborne spectral radiance measurements at different sideward viewing angles

    Wolf, Kevin; Ehrlich, André; Hüneke, Tilman; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Werner, Frank; Wirth, Martin; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Spectral radiance measurements collected in nadir and sideward viewing directions by two airborne passive solar remote sensing instruments, the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART) and the Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (mini-DOAS), are used to compare the remote sensing results of cirrus optical thickness τ. The comparison is based on a sensitivity study using radiative transfer simulations (RTS) and on data obtained during three airb...

  2. SO2 plume height retrieval from direct fitting of GOME-2 backscattered radiance measurements

    van Gent, J.; Spurr, R.; Theys, N.; Lerot, C.; Brenot, H.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2012-04-01

    The use of satellite measurements for SO2 monitoring has become an important aspect in the support of aviation control. Satellite measurements are sometimes the only information available on SO2 concentrations from volcanic eruption events. The detection of SO2 can furthermore serve as a proxy for the presence of volcanic ash that poses a possible hazard to air traffic. In that respect, knowledge of both the total vertical column amount and the effective altitude of the volcanic SO2 plume is valuable information to air traffic control. The Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) hosts the ESA-funded Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). This system provides Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) worldwide with near real-time SO2 and volcanic ash data, derived from measurements from space. We present results from our algorithm for the simultaneous retrieval of total vertical columns of O3 and SO2 and effective SO2 plume height from GOME-2 backscattered radiance measurements. The algorithm is an extension to the GODFIT direct fitting algorithm, initially developed at BIRA-IASB for the derivation of improved total ozone columns from satellite data. The algorithm uses parameterized vertical SO2 profiles which allow for the derivation of the peak height of the SO2 plume, along with the trace gas total column amounts. To illustrate the applicability of the method, we present three case studies on recent volcanic eruptions: Merapi (2010), Grímsvotn (2011), and Nabro (2011). The derived SO2 plume altitude values are validated with the trajectory model FLEXPART and with aerosol altitude estimations from the CALIOP instrument on-board the NASA A-train CALIPSO platform. We find that the effective plume height can be obtained with a precision as fine as 1 km for moderate and strong volcanic events. Since this is valuable information for air traffic, we aim at incorporating the plume height information in the SACS system.

  3. One year of downwelling spectral radiance measurements from 100 to 1400 cm-1 at Dome Concordia: Results in clear conditions

    Rizzi, R.; Arosio, C.; Maestri, T.; Palchetti, L.; Bianchini, G.; Del Guasta, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work examines downwelling radiance spectra measured at the ground during 2013 by a Far Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer at Dome C, Antarctica. A tropospheric backscatter and depolarization lidar is also deployed at same site, and a radiosonde system is routinely operative. The measurements allow characterization of the water vapor and clouds infrared properties in Antarctica under all sky conditions. In this paper we specifically discuss cloud detection and the analysis in clear sky condition, required for the discussion of the results obtained in cloudy conditions. First, the paper discusses the procedures adopted for the quality control of spectra acquired automatically. Then it describes the classification procedure used to discriminate spectra measured in clear sky from cloudy conditions. Finally a selection is performed and 66 clear cases, spanning the whole year, are compared to simulations. The computation of layer molecular optical depth is performed with line-by-line techniques and a convolution to simulate the Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed-Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) measurements; the downwelling radiance for selected clear cases is computed with a state-of-the-art adding-doubling code. The mean difference over all selected cases between simulated and measured radiance is within experimental error for all the selected microwindows except for the negative residuals found for all microwindows in the range 200 to 400 cm-1, with largest values around 295.1 cm-1. The paper discusses possible reasons for the discrepancy and identifies the incorrect magnitude of the water vapor total absorption coefficient as the cause of such large negative radiance bias below 400 cm-1.

  4. Determining the Optimum Tilt Angle and Orientation for Solar Energy Collection Based on Measured Solar Radiance Data

    Li, Danny H. W.; Lam, Tony N. T.

    2007-01-01

    A prior requirement to the design of any solar-based conversion systems is the knowledge of optimum orientation and tilt surface at which peak solar energy can be collected. In many parts of the world, however, the solar radiation data for the surfaces of interest are not always available. This paper presents a numerical approach to calculate the solar radiation on sloped planes by integrating the measured sky radiance distributions. The annual total solar yield at different sloped surfaces ...

  5. Instrument development for atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM): Status of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - extended Resolution (AERI-X), the Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer (SORTI), and the Absolute Solar Transmission Inferometer (ASTI)

    Murcray, F.; Stephen, T.; Kosters, J. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes three instruments currently under developemnt for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the University of Denver: the AERI-X (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer-Extended Resolution) and the SORTI (Solar R adiance Transmission Interferometer), and ASTI (Absolute Solar transmission Interferometer).

  6. Remote measurement of water color in coastal waters. [spectral radiance data used to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity

    Weldon, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop procedure to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity in coastal waters by observing the changes in spectral radiance of the backscattered spectrum. The technique under consideration consists of Examining Exotech model 20-D spectral radiometer data and determining which radiance ratios best correlated with chlorophyll and turbidity measurements as obtained from analyses of water samples and sechi visibility readings. Preliminary results indicate that there is a correlation between backscattered light and chlorophyll concentration and secchi visibility. The tests were conducted with the spectrometer mounted in a light aircraft over the Mississippi Sound at altitudes of 2.5K, 2.8K and 10K feet.

  7. Spectrally adjustable quasi-monochromatic radiance source based on LEDs and its application for measuring spectral responsivity of a luminance meter

    Hirvonen, Juha-Matti; Poikonen, Tuomas; Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    A spectrally adjustable radiance source based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been constructed for spectral responsivity measurements of radiance and luminance meters. A 300 mm integrating sphere source with adjustable output port is illuminated using 30 thermally stabilized narrow-band LEDs covering the visible wavelength range of 380–780 nm. The functionality of the measurement setup is demonstrated by measuring the relative spectral responsivities of a luminance meter and a photometer head with cosine-corrected input optics. (paper)

  8. Modeling bidirectional radiance measurements collected by the advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS) over Oregon transect conifer forests

    Abuelgasim, A.A.; Strahler, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    A geometric-optical model of the bidirectional reflectance of a forest canopy, developed by Li and Strahler, fits observed directional radiance measurements with good accuracy. This model treats the forest cover as a scene of discrete, three-dimensional objects (trees) that are illuminated and viewed from different positions in the hemisphere. The shapes of the objects, their count densities and patterns of placement, are the driving variables, and they condition the mixture of sunlit and shaded objects and background that are observed from a particular viewing direction, given a direction of illumination. This mixture, in turn, controls the brightness apparent to an observer or a radiometric instrument. The Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) was used to validate this model. This aircraft sensor presently acquires images in 29 spectral bands in the range (465–871 nm) and is pointable fore-and-aft, allowing directional measurements of radiance as a target is approached and imaged at view angles ranging ± 45° from nadir. Through atmospheric correction, ASAS radiances were reduced to bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs). These were compared to corresponding BRF values computed from the Li-Strahler model using, wherever possible, ground measured component BRFs for calibration. The comparisons showed a good match between the modeled and measured reflectance factors for four of the five Oregon Transect Sites. Thus, the geometric-optical approach provides a realistic model for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of such natural vegetation canopies. Further modifications are suggested to improve the predicted BRFs and yield still better results. (author)

  9. The possible direct use of satellite radiance measurements by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    1993-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a major research program initiated by the Department of Energy to improve our understanding of radiative and cloud processes critical to predicting the Earth's climate and its changes. Central to this concept is the use of four to six intensively instrumented sites for long-term study and characterization of the processes of interest. The instrumentation suites will include ground-based, high-accuracy radiometers for measuring the short and longwave surface flux, as well as an extensive set of ground-and air-based instrumentation for characterizing the intervening atmospheric column. Satellite-based measurements are expected to play a very important role in providing top-of-the-atmosphere measurements. In this study, we examine the possibility of comparing ARM outputs directly with satellite measurements, thereby ensuring the independence of these two important data sets. Thus we focused on what do satellites really measure and how well do they measure it. On what can we do about the general lack of adequate visible channel calibration. On what is the best way for ARM to obtain near-real-time access to this unprocessed data. And on what is the optimum way for ARM to make use of satellite data

  10. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  11. Validation of the Five-Phase Method for Simulating Complex Fenestration Systems with Radiance against Field Measurements

    Geisler-Moroder, David [Bartenbach GmbH, Aldrans (Austria); Lee, Eleanor S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ward, Gregory J. [Anyhere Software, Albany, NY (United States)

    2016-08-29

    The Five-Phase Method (5-pm) for simulating complex fenestration systems with Radiance is validated against field measurements. The capability of the method to predict workplane illuminances, vertical sensor illuminances, and glare indices derived from captured and rendered high dynamic range (HDR) images is investigated. To be able to accurately represent the direct sun part of the daylight not only in sensor point simulations, but also in renderings of interior scenes, the 5-pm calculation procedure was extended. The validation shows that the 5-pm is superior to the Three-Phase Method for predicting horizontal and vertical illuminance sensor values as well as glare indices derived from rendered images. Even with input data from global and diffuse horizontal irradiance measurements only, daylight glare probability (DGP) values can be predicted within 10% error of measured values for most situations.

  12. Simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness and water-leaving radiance from multispectral measurements in coastal waters

    Shi, Chong; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2018-03-01

    Retrieval of aerosol optical properties and water-leaving radiance over ocean is challenging since the latter mostly accounts for ˜ 10 % of the satellite-observed signal and can be easily influenced by the atmospheric scattering. Such an effort would be more difficult in turbid coastal waters due to the existence of optically complex oceanic substances or high aerosol loading. In an effort to solve such problems, we present an optimization approach for the simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral satellite measurements. In this algorithm, a coupled atmosphere-ocean radiative transfer model combined with a comprehensive bio-optical oceanic module is used to jointly simulate the satellite-observed reflectance at the top of atmosphere and water-leaving radiance just above the ocean surface. Then, an optimal estimation method is adopted to retrieve AOT and nLw iteratively. The algorithm is validated using Aerosol Robotic Network - Ocean Color (AERONET-OC) products selected from eight OC sites distributed over different waters, consisting of observations that covered glint and non-glint conditions from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. Results show a good consistency between retrieved and in situ measurements at each site. It is demonstrated that more accurate AOTs are determined based on the simultaneous retrieval method, particularly in shorter wavelengths and sunglint conditions, where the averaged percentage difference (APD) of retrieved AOT is generally reduced by approximate 10 % in visible bands compared with those derived from the standard atmospheric correction (AC) scheme, since all the spectral measurements can be used jointly to increase the information content in the inversion of AOT, and the wind speed is also simultaneously retrieved to compensate the specular reflectance error estimated from the rough ocean surface model. For the

  13. A sphere-scanning radiometer for rapid directional measurements of sky and ground radiance: The PARABOLA field instrument

    Deering, D. W.; Leone, P.

    1984-11-01

    A unique field instrument, called the PARABOLA, a collapsable support boom, which is self contained and easily transportable to remote sites to enable the acquisition of radiance data for almost the complete (4 pi) sky and ground-looking hemispheres in only 11 seconds was designed. The PARABOLA samples in 15 deg instantaneous field of view sectors in three narrow bandpass spectral channels simultaneously. Field measurement on a variety of earth surface cover types using a truck boom, a specially designed pickup truck mounting system, and a hot air balloon were studied. The PARABOLA instrument has potential for climatological and other studies which require characterization of the distribution of diffuse solar radiation within the sky hemisphere.

  14. Retrieval of aerosol properties and water leaving radiance from multi-angle spectro-polarimetric measurement over coastal waters

    Gao, M.; Zhai, P.; Franz, B. A.; Hu, Y.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Xu, F.; Ibrahim, A.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean color remote sensing in coastal waters remains a challenging task due to the complex optical properties of aerosols and ocean water properties. It is highly desirable to develop an advanced ocean color and aerosol retrieval algorithm for coastal waters, to advance our capabilities in monitoring water quality, improve our understanding of coastal carbon cycle dynamics, and allow for the development of more accurate circulation models. However, distinguishing the dissolved and suspended material from absorbing aerosols over coastal waters is challenging as they share similar absorption spectrum within the deep blue to UV range. In this paper we report a research algorithm on aerosol and ocean color retrieval with emphasis on coastal waters. The main features of our algorithm include: 1) combining co-located measurements from a hyperspectral ocean color instrument (OCI) and a multi-angle polarimeter (MAP); 2) using the radiative transfer model for coupled atmosphere and ocean system (CAOS), which is based on the highly accurate and efficient successive order of scattering method; and 3) incorporating a generalized bio-optical model with direct accounting of the total absorption of phytoplankton, CDOM and non-algal particles(NAP), and the total scattering of phytoplankton and NAP for improved description of ocean light scattering. The non-linear least square fitting algorithm is used to optimize the bio-optical model parameters and the aerosol optical and microphysical properties including refractive indices and size distributions for both fine and coarse modes. The retrieved aerosol information is used to calculate the atmospheric path radiance, which is then subtracted from the OCI observations to obtain the water leaving radiance contribution. Our work aims to maximize the use of available information from the co-located dataset and conduct the atmospheric correction with minimal assumptions. The algorithm will contribute to the success of current MAP

  15. Upgrade of goniospectrophtometer GEFE for near-field scattering and fluorescence radiance measurements

    Bernad, Berta; Ferrero, Alejandro; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, Joaquín.

    2015-03-01

    The goniospectrophotometer GEFE, designed and developed at IO-CSIC (Instituto de Optica, Agencia Estatal Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas), was conceived to measure the spectral Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) at any pair of irradiation and detection directions. Although the potential of this instrument has largely been proved, it still required to be upgraded to deal with some important scattering features for the assessment of the appearance. Since it was not provided with a detector with spatial resolution, it simply could not measure spectrophotometric quantities to characterize texture through the Bidirectional Texture Function (BTF) or translucency through the more complex Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF). Another requirement in the GEFE upgrading was to provide it with the capability of measuring fluorescence at different geometries, since some of the new pigments used in industry are fluorescent, which can have a non-negligible impact in the color of the product. Then, spectral resolution at irradiation and detection had to be available in GEFE. This paper describes the upgrading of the goniospectrophotometer GEFE, and its new capabilities through the presentation of sparkle and goniofluorescence measurements. In addition, the potential of the instrument to evaluate translucency by the measurement of the BSSRDF is briefly discussed.

  16. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke-like model is used for the ground reflectivity, and the variation of the Hapke single scattering albedo with wavelength is given. Fits to the visible spectrometers looking upward and downward are achieved except in the methane bands longward of 720 nm. This is possibly due to uncertainties in extrapolation of laboratory measurements from 1 km-am paths to much longer paths at lower pressures. It could also be due to changes in the single scattering phase functions at low altitudes, which

  17. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  18. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  19. A Microwave Radiance Assimilation Study for a Tundra Snowpack

    Kim, Edward; Durand, Michael; Margulis, Steve; England, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have begun exploring the assimilation of microwave radiances for the modeling and retrieval of snow properties. At a point scale, and for short durations (i week), radiance assimilation (RA) results are encouraging. However, in order to determine how practical RA might be for snow retrievals when applied over longer durations, larger spatial scales, and/or different snow types, we must expand the scope of the tests. In this paper we use coincident microwave radiance measurements and station data from a tundra site on the North Slope of Alaska. The field data are from the 3rd Radio-brightness Energy Balance Experiment (REBEX-3) carried out in 1994-95 by the University of Michigan. This dataset will provide a test of RA over months instead of one week, and for a very different type of snow than previous snow RA studies. We will address the following questions: flow well can a snowpack physical model (SM), forced with local weather, match measured conditions for a tundra snowpack?; How well can a microwave emission model, driven by the snowpack model, match measured microwave brightnesses for a tundra snowpack?; How well does RA increase or decrease the fidelity of estimates of snow depth and temperatures for a tundra snowpack?

  20. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiance: impact on hyperspectral radiances in 4D-VAR

    Indira Rani, S.; Doherty, Amy; Atkinson, Nigel; Bell, William; Newman, Stuart; Renshaw, Richard; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Assimilation of a new observation dataset in an NWP system may affect the quality of an existing observation data set against the model background (short forecast), which in-turn influence the use of an existing observation in the NWP system. Effect of the use of one data set on the use of another data set can be quantified as positive, negative or neutral. Impact of the addition of new dataset is defined as positive if the number of assimilated observations of an existing type of observation increases, and bias and standard deviation decreases compared to the control (without the new dataset) experiment. Recently a new dataset, Megha Tropiques SAPHIR radiances, which provides atmospheric humidity information, is added in the Unified Model 4D-VAR assimilation system. In this paper we discuss the impact of SAPHIR on the assimilation of hyper-spectral radiances like AIRS, IASI and CrIS. Though SAPHIR is a Microwave instrument, its impact can be clearly seen in the use of hyper-spectral radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation systems in addition to other Microwave and InfraRed observation. SAPHIR assimilation decreased the standard deviation of the spectral channels of wave number from 650 -1600 cm-1 in all the three hyperspectral radiances. Similar impact on the hyperspectral radiances can be seen due to the assimilation of other Microwave radiances like from AMSR2 and SSMIS Imager.

  1. Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds

    P. Haapanala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ice clouds on solar disk and circumsolar radiances is investigated using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The monochromatic direct and diffuse radiances are simulated at angles of 0 to 8° from the center of the sun. Input data for the model are derived from measurements conducted during the 2010 Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS campaign together with state-of-the-art databases of optical properties of ice crystals and aerosols. For selected cases, the simulated radiances are compared with ground-based radiance measurements obtained by the Sun and Aureole Measurements (SAM instrument. First, the sensitivity of the radiances to the ice cloud properties and aerosol optical thickness is addressed. The angular dependence of the disk and circumsolar radiances is found to be most sensitive to assumptions about ice crystal roughness (or, more generally, non-ideal features of ice crystals and size distribution, with ice crystal habit playing a somewhat smaller role. Second, in comparisons with SAM data, the ice cloud optical thickness is adjusted for each case so that the simulated radiances agree closely (i.e., within 3 % with the measured disk radiances. Circumsolar radiances at angles larger than ≈ 3° are systematically underestimated when assuming smooth ice crystals, whereas the agreement with the measurements is better when rough ice crystals are assumed. Our results suggest that it may well be possible to infer the particle roughness directly from ground-based SAM measurements. In addition, the results show the necessity of correcting the ground-based measurements of direct radiation for the presence of diffuse radiation in the instrument's field of view, in particular in the presence of ice clouds.

  2. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  3. Completeness of Carotid Intima Media Thickness Measurements Depends on Body Composition: The RADIANCE 1 and 2 trials

    Dogan, Soner; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Grobbee, E. Diederick; Kastelein, John J. P.; Shear, Charles L.; Evans, Gregory W.; Visseren, Frank L.; Bots, Michiel L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Ultrasound protocols to measure carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) differ considerably with regard to the inclusion of the number of carotid segments and angles used. Detailed information on the completeness of CIMT information is often lacking in published reports, and at most, overall

  4. A Novel Method making direct use of AIRS and IASI Calibrated Radiances for Measuring Trends in Surface Temperatures

    Aumann, H. H.; Ruzmaikin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Making unbiased measurements of trends in the surface temperatures, particularly on a gobal scale, is challenging: While the non-frozen oceans temperature measurements are plentiful and accurate, land and polar areas are much less accurately or fairly sampled. Surface temperature deduced from infrared radiometers on polar orbiting satellites (e.g. the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) at 1:30PM, the Interferometer Atmosphere Sounding Interferometer (IASI) at 9:30 AM and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) at 1:30PM), can produce what appear to be well sampled data, but dealing with clouds either by cloud filtering (MODIS, IASI) or cloud-clearing (AIRS) can create sampling bias. We use a novel method: Random Nadir Sampling (RNS) combined with Probability Density Function (PDF) analysis. We analyze the trend in the PDF of st1231, the water vapor absorption corrected brightness temperatures measured in the 1231 cm-1 atmospheric window channel. The advantage of this method is that trends can be directly traced to the known, less than 3 mK/yr trend for AIRS, in st1231. For this study we created PDFs from 22,000 daily RNS from the AIRS and IASI data. We characterized the PDFs by its daily 90%tile value, st1231p90, and analysed the statistical properties of the this time series between 2002 and 2014. The method was validated using the daily NOAA SST (RTGSST) from the non-frozen oceans: The mean, seasonal variability and anomaly trend of st1231p90 agree with the corrsponding values from the RTGSST and the anomaly correlation is larger than 0.9. Preliminary results (August 2014) confirm the global hiatus in the increase of the globally averaged surface temperatures between 2002 and 2014, with a change of less than 10 mK/yr. This uncertainty is dominated by the large interannual variability related to El Niño events. Further insite is gained by analyzing land/ocean, day/night, artic and antarctic trends. We observe a massive warming trend in the

  5. Advances in simultaneous atmospheric profile and cloud parameter regression based retrieval from high-spectral resolution radiance measurements

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Smith, William L.; Smith, Nadia

    2013-06-01

    The dual-regression (DR) method retrieves information about the Earth surface and vertical atmospheric conditions from measurements made by any high-spectral resolution infrared sounder in space. The retrieved information includes temperature and atmospheric gases (such as water vapor, ozone, and carbon species) as well as surface and cloud top parameters. The algorithm was designed to produce a high-quality product with low latency and has been demonstrated to yield accurate results in real-time environments. The speed of the retrieval is achieved through linear regression, while accuracy is achieved through a series of classification schemes and decision-making steps. These steps are necessary to account for the nonlinearity of hyperspectral retrievals. In this work, we detail the key steps that have been developed in the DR method to advance accuracy in the retrieval of nonlinear parameters, specifically cloud top pressure. The steps and their impact on retrieval results are discussed in-depth and illustrated through relevant case studies. In addition to discussing and demonstrating advances made in addressing nonlinearity in a linear geophysical retrieval method, advances toward multi-instrument geophysical analysis by applying the DR to three different operational sounders in polar orbit are also noted. For any area on the globe, the DR method achieves consistent accuracy and precision, making it potentially very valuable to both the meteorological and environmental user communities.

  6. Measuring the patient experience.

    Lees, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the complex issues of measuring the patient experience and evaluating the quality of health care. It discusses the use of surveys, patient stories and narrative methods of data collection in an attempt to define quality and how it should be measured. A recent Department of Health (DH) document insists that patients will be at the heart of decision making in the NHS by having greater control in informing strategic commissioning decisions (DH 2010c). The government aims to improve patient experience, enabling patients to rate services according to the quality of care they receive. This will be carried out using information generated by patients. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using surveys in gathering patient satisfaction data. It considers the value of surveys in measuring quality of care and appraises their usefulness in strengthening patients' collective voice. The paper investigates the use of another source of feedback - it examines the design of qualitative data collection methods as a means of gaining feedback from service users in encouraging providers of health care to be more responsive to their needs. Too often, patients are expected to fit the services, rather than services meeting the patients' needs. The most effective way of exploring and representing the patient's experience is by using a mixed-method approach. In other words, an integrated approach with the use of surveys and more narrative methods, such as patient stories, will effectively define quality and how it should be measured, ensuring that the focus is always on what matters most to patients.

  7. Measuring the User Experience

    Harry B. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires available to measure user experience of any products, especially learning management systems. Two hundreds and thirteen computer science students participated and completed the adapted version of UEQ. In the study, the researchers used a learning management system named Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCELE. Several types of learning materials are posted in SCELE such as audio files, simulations, PowerPoint slides, multimedia contents, and webpage links. Most of the lecturers use discussion forums in their courses to encourage students to participate in active learning setting. Staff and lecturers sometimes post academic-related announcements on the SCELE homepage. Two hundred thirteen students enrolled in Computer Science program were invited to evaluate the SCELE. This study will benefit UX practitioners, HCI educators, program and center of learning resources administrators, and learning management system developers. Findings of the present study may also be valuable for universities and high schools which are using computer-based learning environments.

  8. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  9. Observation of Tidal Effects on LWIR Radiance Above the Mesopause

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An examination of CO2 infrared limb radiance, directly measured by the SABER instrument aboard the TIMED satellite, reveals unusual structure in the region just above the mesopause, at tangent heights...

  10. Observation of Tidal Effects on LWIR Radiance Above the Mesopause

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An examination of CO2 infrared limb radiance, directly measured by the SABER instrument aboard the TIMED satellite, reveals unusual structure in the region just above the mesopause, at tangent heights of -95-110 km...

  11. An overview of surface radiance and biology studies in FIFE

    Blad, B. L.; Schimel, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The use of satellite data to study and to understand energy and mass exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere requires information about various biological processes and how various reflected or emitted spectral radiances are influenced by or manifested in these processes. To obtain such information, studies were conducted by the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) surface radiances and biology (SRB) group using surface, near-surface, helicopter, and aircraft measurements. The two primary objectives of this group were to relate radiative fluxes to biophysical parameters and physiological processes and to assess how various management treatments affect important biological processes. This overview paper summarizes the results obtained by various SRB teams working in nine different areas: (1) measurements of bidirectional reflectance and estimation of hemispherical albedo; (2) evaluation of spatial and seasonal variability reflectance and vegetation indices; (3) determination of surface and radiational factors and their effects on vegetation indices and photosynthetically active radiation relationships; (4) use of surface temperatures to estimate sensible heat flux; (5) controls over photosynthesis and respiration at small scales; (6) soil surface CO2 fluxes and grassland carbon budget; (7) landscape variations in controls over gas exchange and energy partitioning; (8) radiometric response of prairie to management and topography; and (9) determination of nitrogen gas exchanges in a tallgrass prairie.

  12. An overview of surface radiance and biology studies in FIFE

    Blad, B. L.; Schimel, D. S.

    1992-11-01

    The use of satellite data to study and to understand energy and mass exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere requires information about various biological processes and how various reflected or emitted spectral radiances are influenced by or manifested in these processes. To obtain such information, studies were conducted by the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) surface radiances and biology (SRB) group using surface, near-surface, helicopter, and aircraft measurements. The two primary objectives of this group were to relate radiative fluxes to biophysical parameters and physiological processes and to assess how various management treatments affect important biological processes. This overview paper summarizes the results obtained by various SRB teams working in nine different areas: (1) measurement of bidirectional reflectance and estimation of hemispherical albedo; (2) evaluation of spatial and seasonal variability of spectral reflectance and vegetation indices; (3) determination of surface and radiational factors and their effects on vegetation indices and PAR relationships; (4) use of surface temperatures to estimate sensible heat flux; (5) controls over photosynthesis and respiration at small scales; (6) soil surface CO2 fluxes and grassland carbon budget; (7) landscape variations in controls over gas exchange and energy partitioning; (8) radiometric response of prairie to management and topography; and (9) determination of nitrogen gas exchanges in a tallgrass prairie.

  13. Coincidence measurements with the use of detectors measuring the energy of the radiances (proportional meters and scintillation counter); Mesures de coincidences avec utilisation de detecteurs mesurant l'energie des rayonnements (compteurs proportionnels et compteur a scintillations)

    Sartory, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-07-01

    In the setting of the realization of a set of installations permitting of the measures of coincidences between sorted radiances according to their energies, an installation understanding a proportional counter and a scintillation counter has been constructed and optimized. It has been used to do some measures of coincidences between X{sub K} photons and photons {gamma} issued at the time of the radioactive transformation of the selenium 75 (electronic capture). The efficiency of the proportional meter has been determined roughly. Besides, a proportional counter of solid angle neighboring of 4{pi} was able to achieve measures of coincidences while only doing one selection of amplitudes: indeed, the simultaneity of the detection of two radiances appear by an impulse whose amplitude is the sum of the amplitudes of the impulses resulting from each of the studied radiations. This method, applied to the coincidences between X-rays, permitted to bring the information on the diagram of decay of the arsenic 73. Besides, the coefficient of internal conversion of a consecutive transition to this decay has been valued. (author) [French] Dans le cadre de la realisation d'une serie de montages permettant des mesures de coincidences entre rayonnements tries d'apres leurs energies, un montage comprenant un compteur proportionnel et un compteur a scintillations a ete construit et mis au point. Il a ete utilise pour effectuer quelques mesures de coincidences entre photons X{sub K} et photons {gamma} emis lors de la transformation radioactive du selenium 75 (capture electronique). L'efficacite du compteur proportionnel a ete approximativement determinee. De plus, un compteur proportionnel d'angle solide voisin de 4{pi} a pu etre utilise pour realiser des mesures de coincidences en n'effectuant qu'une selection d'amplitudes: en effet, la simultaneite de la detection de deux rayonnements se manifeste par une impulsion dont l'amplitude est la somme des amplitudes des impulsions

  14. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  15. IASI Radiance Data Assimilation in Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter

    Cho, K.; Hyoung-Wook, C.; Jo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Korea institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) is developing NWP model with data assimilation systems. Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) system, one of the data assimilation systems, has been developed for KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM) based on cubed-sphere grid and has successfully assimilated real data. LETKF data assimilation system has been extended to 4D- LETKF which considers time-evolving error covariance within assimilation window and IASI radiance data assimilation using KPOP (KIAPS package for observation processing) with RTTOV (Radiative Transfer for TOVS). The LETKF system is implementing semi operational prediction including conventional (sonde, aircraft) observation and AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) radiance data from April. Recently, the semi operational prediction system updated radiance observations including GPS-RO, AMV, IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) data at July. A set of simulation of KIM with ne30np4 and 50 vertical levels (of top 0.3hPa) were carried out for short range forecast (10days) within semi operation prediction LETKF system with ensemble forecast 50 members. In order to only IASI impact, our experiments used only conventional and IAIS radiance data to same semi operational prediction set. We carried out sensitivity test for IAIS thinning method (3D and 4D). IASI observation number was increased by temporal (4D) thinning and the improvement of IASI radiance data impact on the forecast skill of model will expect.

  16. The DMSP/MFR total ozone and radiance data base

    Ellis, J.S.; Lovill, J.E.; Luther, F.M.; Sullivan, T.J.; Taylor, S.S.; Weichel, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The radiance measurements by the multichannel filter radiometer (MFR), a scanning instrument carried on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block 5D series of satellites (flight models F1, F2, F3 and F4), were used to calculate the total column ozone globally for the period March 1977 through February 1980. These data were then calibrated and mapped to earth coordinates at LLNL. Total column ozone was derived from these calibrated radiance data and placed both the ozone and calibrated radiance data into a computer data base called SOAC (Satellite Ozone Analysis Center) using the FRAMIS database manager. The uncalibrated radiance data tapes were initially sent on to the National Climate Center, Asheville, North Carolina and then to the Satellite Data Services Branch /EDS/NOAA in Suitland, Maryland where they were archived. Copies of the data base containing the total ozone and the calibrated radiance data reside both at LLNL and at the National Space Science Data Center, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland. This report describes the entries into the data base in sufficient detail so that the data base might be useful to others. The characteristics of the MFR sensor are briefly discussed and a complete index to the data base tapes is given

  17. Radiance and particle fluence

    Papiez, L.; Battista, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined fluence in terms of the number of the radiation particles crossing a small sampling sphere. A second definition has been proposed in which the length of track segments contained within any sampling volume are used to calculate the incident fluence. This approach is often used in Monte Carlo simulations of individual particle tracks, allowing the fluence to be scored in small volumes of any shape. In this paper we stress that the second definition generalizes the classical (ICRU) concept of fluence. We also identify the assumptions inherent in the two definitions of fluence and prove their equivalence for the case of straight-line particle trajectories. (author)

  18. MOPITT Beta Level 1 Radiances V107

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT Beta Level 1 data product consists of the geolocated, calibrated earth scene radiances, associated instrument engineering data summaries, and inflight...

  19. MOPITT Level 1 Radiances V007

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT Level 1 data product consists of the geolocated, calibrated earth scene radiances, associated instrument engineering data summaries, and inflight...

  20. Experience of executing security measures

    Nakano, Hiromasa

    1995-01-01

    Japan possesses many nuclear power stations and atomic energy research and development facilities, and obtained much experience of security measures such as the inspection by the government and IAEA, the technical development and so on in respective facilities. In this report, the activities of security measures in Japan are introduced, centering around the experience of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Japan ratified the nuclear nonproliferation treaty (NPT) in 1976, and concluded the agreement with IAEA in 1977. It is called security measures to technically confirm that nuclear substances are not used for nuclear weapons, and to find early and prevent the production of nuclear weapons. The security measures consist of the quantity management by the balance of nuclear substances are the inspection by the government and IAEA. The present state of security measures in centrifugal uranium enrichment plants, the fabrication factories of low enriched uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, and plutonium fuel factories is reported. The amount of inspection works of the government was 1861 man-day/year in 1993. As the subjects related to security measures of hereafter, the quantity management by respective facilities, the technology of verifying the measurement by inspectors, the points of beginning and finishing security measures, the security measures of hereafter and the international cooperation are described. (K.I.)

  1. Remote Experiments in Resistor Measurement

    Popescu Viorel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes blended learningapproach to teaching resistor measurement. It is basedon “Learning by Doing” paradigm: interacticesimulation, laboratory plants, real experimentsaccessed by Web Publishing Tools under LabVIEW.Studying and experimenting access is opened for 24hours a day, 7 days a week under Moodle bookingsystem.

  2. Acceleration of Radiance for Lighting Simulation by Using Parallel Computing with OpenCL

    Zuo, Wangda; McNeil, Andrew; Wetter, Michael; Lee, Eleanor

    2011-09-06

    We report on the acceleration of annual daylighting simulations for fenestration systems in the Radiance ray-tracing program. The algorithm was optimized to reduce both the redundant data input/output operations and the floating-point operations. To further accelerate the simulation speed, the calculation for matrix multiplications was implemented using parallel computing on a graphics processing unit. We used OpenCL, which is a cross-platform parallel programming language. Numerical experiments show that the combination of the above measures can speed up the annual daylighting simulations 101.7 times or 28.6 times when the sky vector has 146 or 2306 elements, respectively.

  3. Carbon dioxide /V2/ radiance results using a new nonequilibrium model

    Sharma, R. D.; Nadile, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    It was observed during the SPIRE experiment (Spectral Infrared Rocket Experiment) that the 15 micron limb radiance stays constant from 95 to 110 km despite the fact that CO2 concentration over this altitude range decreases by a factor of 20. The results of a 15 micron CO2 radiance model are presented which explain the observed anomaly. It is shown that CO2 deactivation by oxygen is the predominant factor in 15 micron emission above 95 km.

  4. Impact of AIRS radiance in the NCUM 4D-VAR assimilation system

    Srinivas, Desamsetti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Sharma, Priti

    2016-04-01

    The hyperspectral radiances from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), on board NASA-AQUA satellite, have been processed through the Observation Processing System (OPS) and assimilated in the Variational Assimilation (VAR) System of NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). Numerical experiments are conducted in order to study the impact of the AIRS radiance in the NCUM analysis and forecast system. NCMRWF receives AIRS radiance from EUMETCAST through MOSDAC. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 channels covering the thermal infrared spectrum between 3 and 15 μm. Out of 2378 channels, 324 channels are selected for assimilation according to the peaking of weighting function and meteorological importance. According to the surface type and day-night conditions, some of the channels are not assimilated in the VAR. Observation Simulation Experiments (OSEs) are conducted for a period of 15 days to see the impact of AIRS radiances in NCUM. Statistical parameters like bias and RMSE are calculated to see the real impact of AIRS radiances in the assimilation system. Assimilation of AIRS in the NCUM system reduced the bias and RMSE in the radiances from instruments onboard other satellites. The impact of AIRS is clearly seen in the hyperspectral radiances like IASI and CrIS and also in infrared (HIRS) and microwave (AMSU, ATMS, etc.) sensors.

  5. Modeling directional thermal radiance from a forest canopy

    McGuire, M.J.; Balick, L.K.; Smith, J.A.; Hutchison, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology have increased interest in utilizing the thermal-infared region to gain additional information about surface features such as vegetation canopies. Studies have shown that sensor view angle, canopy structure, and percentage of canopy coverage can affect the response of a thermal sensor. These studies have been primarily of agricultural regions and there have been relatively few examples describing the thermal characteristics of forested regions. This paper describes an extension of an existing thermal vegetation canopy radiance model which has been modified to partially account for the geometrically rough structure of a forest canopy. Fourier series expansion of a canopy height profile is used to calculate improved view factors which partially account for the directional variations in canopy thermal radiance transfers. The original and updated radiance model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained over a deciduous (oak-hickory) forest site. The experimental observations are also used to document azimuthal and nadir directional radiance variations. Maximum angular variations in measured canopy temperatures were 4–6°C (azimuth) and 2.5°C (nadir). Maximum angular variations in simulated temperatures using the modified rough surface model was 4°C. The rough surface model appeared to be sensitive to large gaps in the canopy height profile, which influenced the resultant predicted temperature. (author)

  6. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  7. Observations and Modeling of Atmospheric Radiance Structure

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The overall purpose of the work that we have undertaken is to provide new capabilities for observing and modeling structured radiance in the atmosphere, particularly the non-LTE regions of the atmosphere...

  8. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  9. The impact of instrument field of view on measurements of cloudy-sky spectral radiances from space: application to IRIS and IMG

    Brindley, H.E. E-mail: h.brindley@ic.ac.uk; Harries, J.E

    2003-05-15

    Spatially resolved images from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument are used to investigate the impact of a change in spatial field of view, from that typical of the Nimbus 4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) to that of the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse Gases (IMG), upon the spectral outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Considering all-sky conditions it is found that for a typical tropical scene, approximately 150 paired measurements are required to obtain agreement to within {+-}2 K in the average brightness temperature (T{sub B}), in the most transparent window channels. At mid-latitudes, the reduced scene variability means that fewer observations are required to meet the same criterion. For clear- and cloudy-sky separation a simple threshold technique based on the window T{sub B} and underlying sea-surface temperature tends to result in a systematic underestimate of the average cloudy T{sub B} by the larger field of view. A better estimate can be obtained by applying a double threshold to discriminate against the most mixed scenes.

  10. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 2: Validation case study

    S. D. Eckermann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional radiance maps from Channel 9 (~60–90 hPa of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A, acquired over southern Scandinavia on 14 January 2003, show plane-wave-like oscillations with a wavelength λh of ~400–500 km and peak brightness temperature amplitudes of up to 0.9 K. The wave-like pattern is observed in AMSU-A radiances from 8 overpasses of this region by 4 different satellites, revealing a growth in the disturbance amplitude from 00:00 UTC to 12:00 UTC and a change in its horizontal structure between 12:00 UTC and 20:00 UTC. Forecast and hindcast runs for 14 January 2003 using high-resolution global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP models generate a lower stratospheric mountain wave over southern Scandinavia with peak 90 hPa temperature amplitudes of ~5–7 K at 12:00 UTC and a similar horizontal wavelength, packet width, phase structure and time evolution to the disturbance observed in AMSU-A radiances. The wave's vertical wavelength is ~12 km. These NWP fields are validated against radiosonde wind and temperature profiles and airborne lidar profiles of temperature and aerosol backscatter ratios acquired from the NASA DC-8 during the second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II. Both the amplitude and phase of the stratospheric mountain wave in the various NWP fields agree well with localized perturbation features in these suborbital measurements. In particular, we show that this wave formed the type II polar stratospheric clouds measured by the DC-8 lidar. To compare directly with the AMSU-A data, we convert these validated NWP temperature fields into swath-scanned brightness temperatures using three-dimensional Channel 9 weighting functions and the actual AMSU-A scan patterns from each of the 8 overpasses of this region. These NWP-based brightness temperatures contain two-dimensional oscillations due to this resolved stratospheric mountain wave that have an amplitude, wavelength

  11. Quantifying the Qualitative: Measuring the Insight Experience

    Jarman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    No scales currently exist that measure variability in the insight experience. Two scales were created to measure two factors hypothesized to be key drivers of the insight experience: insight radicality (i.e., perceived deviation between previous and new problem representations) and restructuring experience (i.e., the subjective experience of the…

  12. Nonuniformity correction of infrared cameras by reading radiance temperatures with a spatially nonhomogeneous radiation source

    Gutschwager, Berndt; Hollandt, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method of nonuniformity correction (NUC) of infrared cameras and focal plane arrays (FPA) in a wide optical spectral range by reading radiance temperatures and by applying a radiation source with an unknown and spatially nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution. The benefit of this novel method is that it works with the display and the calculation of radiance temperatures, it can be applied to radiation sources of arbitrary spatial radiance temperature distribution, and it only requires sufficient temporal stability of this distribution during the measurement process. In contrast to this method, an initially presented method described the calculation of NUC correction with the reading of monitored radiance values. Both methods are based on the recording of several (at least three) images of a radiation source and a purposeful row- and line-shift of these sequent images in relation to the first primary image. The mathematical procedure is explained in detail. Its numerical verification with a source of a predefined nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution and a thermal imager of a predefined nonuniform FPA responsivity is presented. (paper)

  13. Super-radiance in Nuclear Physics

    Auerbach, N

    2015-01-01

    The theory of the super-radiant mechanism as applied to various phenomena in nuclear physics is presented. The connection between super-radiance and the notion of doorway is presented. The statistics of resonance widths in a many-body Fermi system with open channels is discussed. Depending on the strength of the coupling to the continuum such systems show deviations from the standard Porter-Thomas distribution. The deviations result from the process of increasing interaction of the intrinsic states via the common decay channels. In the limit of very strong coupling this leads to super-radiance. (paper)

  14. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    User experience is being used to denote what a user goes through while using a computerized system. The concept has gained momentum as a means to distinguish new types of applications such as games and entertainment software from more traditional work-related applications. This paper focuses on t...

  15. Sky radiance at a coastline and effects of land and ocean reflectivities

    A. Kreuter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique case study of the spectral sky radiance distribution above a coastline. Results are shown from a measurement campaign in Italy involving three diode array spectroradiometers which are compared to 3-D model simulations from the Monte Carlo model MYSTIC. On the coast, the surrounding is split into two regions, a diffusely reflecting land surface and a water surface which features a highly anisotropic reflectance function. The reflectivities and hence the resulting radiances are a nontrivial function of solar zenith and azimuth angle and wavelength. We show that for low solar zenith angles (SZAs around noon, the higher land albedo causes the sky radiance at 20° above the horizon to increase by 50 % in the near infrared at 850 nm for viewing directions towards the land with respect to the ocean. Comparing morning and afternoon radiances highlights the effect of the ocean's sun glint at high SZA, which contributes around 10 % to the measured radiance ratios. The model simulations generally agree with the measurements to better than 10 %. We investigate the individual effects of model input parameters representing land and ocean albedo and aerosols. Different land and ocean bi-directional reflectance functions (BRDFs do not generally improve the model agreement. However, consideration of the uncertainties in the diurnal variation of aerosol optical depth can explain the remaining discrepancies between measurements and model. We further investigate the anisotropy effect of the ocean BRDF which is featured in the zenith radiances. Again, the uncertainty of the aerosol loading is dominant and obscures the modelled sun glint effect of 7 % at 650 nm. Finally, we show that the effect on the zenith radiance is restricted to a few kilometres from the coastline by model simulations along a perpendicular transect and by comparing the radiances at the coast to those measured at a site 15 km inland. Our findings are relevant to

  16. Sky radiance at a coastline and effects of land and ocean reflectivities

    Kreuter, Axel; Blumthaler, Mario; Tiefengraber, Martin; Kift, Richard; Webb, Ann R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a unique case study of the spectral sky radiance distribution above a coastline. Results are shown from a measurement campaign in Italy involving three diode array spectroradiometers which are compared to 3-D model simulations from the Monte Carlo model MYSTIC. On the coast, the surrounding is split into two regions, a diffusely reflecting land surface and a water surface which features a highly anisotropic reflectance function. The reflectivities and hence the resulting radiances are a nontrivial function of solar zenith and azimuth angle and wavelength. We show that for low solar zenith angles (SZAs) around noon, the higher land albedo causes the sky radiance at 20° above the horizon to increase by 50 % in the near infrared at 850 nm for viewing directions towards the land with respect to the ocean. Comparing morning and afternoon radiances highlights the effect of the ocean's sun glint at high SZA, which contributes around 10 % to the measured radiance ratios. The model simulations generally agree with the measurements to better than 10 %. We investigate the individual effects of model input parameters representing land and ocean albedo and aerosols. Different land and ocean bi-directional reflectance functions (BRDFs) do not generally improve the model agreement. However, consideration of the uncertainties in the diurnal variation of aerosol optical depth can explain the remaining discrepancies between measurements and model. We further investigate the anisotropy effect of the ocean BRDF which is featured in the zenith radiances. Again, the uncertainty of the aerosol loading is dominant and obscures the modelled sun glint effect of 7 % at 650 nm. Finally, we show that the effect on the zenith radiance is restricted to a few kilometres from the coastline by model simulations along a perpendicular transect and by comparing the radiances at the coast to those measured at a site 15 km inland. Our findings are relevant to, for example, ground

  17. Evaluation of Daytime Evaporative Fraction from MODIS TOA Radiances Using FLUXNET Observations

    Jian Peng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the land surface temperature/vegetation index (LST/NDVI feature space has been widely used to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ETa or evaporative fraction (EF, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to surface available energy. Traditionally, it is essential to pre-process satellite top of atmosphere (TOA radiances to obtain LST before estimating EF. However, pre-processing TOA radiances is a cumbersome task including corrections for atmospheric, adjacency and directional effects. Based on the contextual relationship between LST and NDVI, some studies proposed the direct use of TOA radiances instead of satellite retrieved LST products to estimate EF, and found that use of TOA radiances is applicable in some regional studies. The purpose of the present study is to test the robustness of the TOA radiances based EF estimation scheme over different climatic and surface conditions. Flux measurements from 16 FLUXNET (a global network of eddy covariance towers sites were used to validate the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer (MODIS TOA radiances estimated daytime EF. It is found that the EF estimates perform well across a wide variety of climate and biome types—Grasslands, crops, cropland/natural vegetation mosaic, closed shrublands, mixed forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, and savannas. The overall mean bias error (BIAS, mean absolute difference (MAD, root mean square difference (RMSD and correlation coefficient (R values for all the sites are 0.018, 0.147, 0.178 and 0.590, respectively, which are comparable with published results in the literature. We conclude that the direct use of measured TOA radiances instead of LST to estimate daytime EF can avoid complex atmospheric corrections associated with the satellite derived products, and would facilitate the relevant applications where minimum pre-processing is important.

  18. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  19. Service Oriented Gridded Atmospheric Radiances (SOAR)

    Halem, M.; Goldberg, M. D.; Tilmes, C.; Zhou, L.; Shen, S.; Yesha, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We are developing a scalable web service tool that can provide complex griding services on-demand for atmospheric radiance data sets from multiple temperature and moisture sounding sensors on the NASA and NOAA polar orbiting satellites collected over the past three decades. This server-to-server middle ware tool will provide the framework for transforming user requests for an arbitrary spatial/temporal/spectral gridded radiance data set from one or more instruments into an action to invoke a griding process from a set of scientifically validated application programs that have been developed to perform such functions. The invoked web service agents will access, subset, concatenate, convolve, perform statistical and physically based griding operations and present the data as specified level 3 gridded fields for analysis and visualization in multiple formats. Examples of the griding operations consist of spatial-temporal radiance averaging accounting for the field of view instrument response function, first footprint in grid bin, selecting min/max brightness temperatures within a grid element, ratios of channels, filtering, convolving high resolution spectral radiances to match broader band spectral radiances, limb adjustments, calculating variances of radiances falling in grid box and creating visual displays of these fields. The gridded web services tool will support both human input through a WWW GUI as well as a direct computer request through a W3C SOAP/XML web service interface. It will generate regional and global gridded data sets on demand. A second effort will demonstrate the ability to locate, access, subset and grid radiance data for any time period and resolution from remote archives of NOAA and NASA data. The system will queue the work flow requests, stage processing and delivery of arbitrary gridded data sets in a data base and notify the users when the request is completed. This tool will greatly expand satellite sounding data utilization by

  20. MODIS/Aqua Clear Radiance Statistics Indexed to Global Grid 5-Min L2 Swath 10km V006

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Clear Radiance Statistics Indexed to Global Grid 5-Min L2 Swath 10km (MYDCSR_G) provides a variety of statistical measures that characterize observed...

  1. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations. AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description

    Feltz, W. F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Howell, H. B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United; Knuteson, R. O. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Comstock, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahon, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Turner, D. D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Smith, W. L. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Woolf, H. M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United; Sivaraman, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halter, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-04-01

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to collect a long-term series of radiative and atmospheric state observations to improve the parameterization of these processes in global climate models. The ARM Program intended to move away from the traditional approach of directly measuring profiles of temperature and moisture using radiosondes, which is expensive in terms of expendables and manpower, and develop methods to retrieve these profiles with ground-based remote sensors. The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), whose radiance data contains information on the vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature, is an integral part of the ARM profiling plan.

  2. Normalization and calibration of geostationary satellite radiances for the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project

    Desormeaux, Yves; Rossow, William B.; Brest, Christopher L.; Campbell, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures are described for normalizing the radiometric calibration of image radiances obtained from geostationary weather satellites that contributed data to the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The key step is comparison of coincident and collocated measurements made by each satellite and the concurrent AVHRR on the 'afternoon' NOAA polar-orbiting weather satellite at the same viewing geometry. The results of this comparison allow transfer of the AVHRR absolute calibration, which has been established over the whole series, to the radiometers on the geostationary satellites. Results are given for Meteosat-2, 3, and 4, for GOES-5, 6, and 7, for GMS-2, 3, and 4 and for Insat-1B. The relative stability of the calibrations of these radiance data is estimated to be within +/- 3 percent; the uncertainty of the absolute calibrations is estimated to be less than 10 percent. The remaining uncertainties are at least two times smaller than for the original radiance data.

  3. [Review of experiments measuring CP nonconservation

    Gollin, G.D.

    1985-08-01

    Recent experiments setting limits on the magnitude of the ratio of two CP nonconservation parameters epsilon'/epsilon are discussed. Gauge theory calculations suggest that epsilon'/epsilon > .005, somewhat at odds with the results epsilon'/epsilon = -.0046 +- .0058 from a Chicago-Saclay measurement and epsilon'/epsilon = .0017 +- .0082 from a Yale-BNL experiment. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Cloud Computing Infusion for Generating ESDRs of Visible Spectra Radiances

    Golpayegani, N.; Halem, M.; Nguyen, P.

    2008-12-01

    The AIRS and AVHRR instruments have been collecting radiances of the Earth in the visible spectrum for over 25 years. These measurements have been used to develop such useful products as NDVI, Snow cover and depth, Outgoing long wave radiation and other products. Yet, no long-term data record of the level 1b visible spectra is available in a grid form to researchers for various climate studies. We present here an Earth System Data Record observed in the visible spectrum as gridded radiance fields of 8kmx10km grid resolution for the six years in the case of AIRS and from 1981 to the present for AVHRR. The AIRS data has four visible channels from 0.41μm to 0.94μm with an IFOV of 1 km and AVHRR has two visible channels in the 0.58μm to 1.00μm range also at 1 km. In order to process such large amounts of data on demand, two components need to be implemented,(i) a processing system capable of gridding TBs of data in a reasonable amount of time and (ii) a download mechanism to access and deliver the data to the processing system. We implemented a cloud computing approach to be able to process such large amounts of data. We use Hadoop, a distributed computation system developed by the Apache Software Foundation. With Hadoop, we are able to store the data in a distributed fashion, taking advantage of Hadoop's distributed file system (dfs). We also take advantage of Hadoop's MapReduce functionality to perform as much computations as is possible on available nodes of the UMBC bluegrit Cell cluster system that contain the data. We make use of the SOAR system developed under the ACCESS program to acquire and process the AIRS and AVHRR observations. Comparisons of the AIRS data witth selected periods of MODIS visible spectral channels on the same sattelite indicate the two instruments have maintained calibration consistency and continuity of their measurements over the six year period. Our download mechanism transfers the data from these instruments into hadoop's dfs. Our

  5. Measuring the Subjective User eXperience

    Kaptein, Maurits

    Measuring the subjective user experience is a challenging task. In this tutorial we will demonstrate how psychological constructs can be divided in separate variables, each measured by its individual questionnaire items. The tutorial will address the analysis of the questionnaire data to estimate its validity and reliability. Analysis will be demonstrated using SPSS.

  6. The Light-Field of Microbenthic Communities - Radiance Distribution and Microscale Optics of Sandy Coastal Sediments Rid A-1977-2009

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    radiance distribution. Comparison of light fields in wet and dry quartz sand showed that the lower refractive index of air than of water caused a more forward-biased scattering in wet sand. Light penetration was therefore deeper and surface irradiance reflectance was lower in wet sand than in dry sand......The light field in coastal sediments was investigated at a spatial resolution of 0.2-0.5 mm by spectral measurements (450-850 nm) of field radiance and scalar irradiance using fiber-optic microprobes. Depth profiles of field radiance were measured with radiance microprobes at representative angles...... relative to vertically incident collimated light in rinsed quartz sand and in a coastal sandy sediment colonized by microalgae. Upwelling and downwelling components of irradiance and scalar irradiance were calculated from the radiance distributions. Calculated total scalar irradiance agreed well...

  7. CAMEX-3 ATMOSPHERIC EMITTED RADIANCE INTERFEROMETER (AERI) V1

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) was used to make atmospheric temperature and moisture retrievals. AERI provides absolutely calibrated...

  8. MOPITT Level 1 Radiances HDF file V006

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT Level 1 data product consists of the geolocated, calibrated earth scene radiances, associated instrument engineering data summaries, and inflight...

  9. Intercomparison of integrated IASI and AATSR calibrated radiances at 11 and 12 μm

    R. J. Parker

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The mission objectives of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI are driven by the needs of the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP and climate monitoring communities. These objectives rely upon the IASI instrument being able to measure top of atmosphere radiances accurately. This paper presents a technique and first results for the validation of the radiometric calibration of radiances for IASI, using a cross-calibration with the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR. The AATSR is able to measure Brightness Temperature (BT to an accuracy of 30 mK, and by applying the AATSR spectral filter functions to the IASI measured radiances we are able to compare AATSR and IASI Brightness Temperatures. By choosing coincident data points that are over the sea and in clear sky conditions, a threshold of homogeneity is derived. It is found that in these homogenous conditions, the IASI BTs agree with those measured by the AATSR to within 0.3 K, with an uncertainty of order 0.1 K. The agreement is particularly good at 11 μm where the difference is less than 0.1 K. These first results indicate that IASI is meeting its target objective of 0.5 K accuracy. It is believed that a refinement of the AATSR spectral filter functions will hopefully permit a tighter error constraint on the quality of the IASI data and hence further assessment of the climate quality of the radiances.

  10. Sky-Radiance Models for Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Applications

    Santos, I.; Dalimonte, D.; Santos, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Photon-tracing can be initialized through sky-radiance (Lsky) distribution models when executing Monte Carlo simulations for ocean color studies. To be effective, the Lsky model should: 1) properly represent sky-radiance features of interest; 2) require low computing time; and 3) depend on a limited number of input parameters. The present study verifies the satisfiability of these prerequisite by comparing results from different Lsky formulations. Specifically, two Lsky models were considered as reference cases because of their different approach among solutions presented in the literature. The first model, developed by the Harrisson and Coombes (HC), is based on a parametric expression where the sun geometry is the unique input. The HC model is one of the sky-radiance analytical distribution applied in state-of-art simulations for ocean optics. The coefficients of the HC model were set upon broad-band field measurements and the result is a model that requires a few implementation steps. The second model, implemented by Zibordi and Voss (ZV), is based on physical expressions that accounts for the optical thickness of permanent gases, aerosol, ozone and water vapour at specific wavelengths. Inter-comparisons between normalized ^LskyZV and ^LskyHC (i.e., with unitary scalar irradiance) are discussed by means of individual polar maps and percent difference between sky-radiance distributions. Sky-radiance cross-sections are presented as well. Considered cases include different sun zenith values and wavelengths (i.e., λ=413, 490 and 665 nm, corresponding to selected center-bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer MERIS). Results have shown a significant convergence between ^LskyHC and ^LskyZV at 665 nm. Differences between models increase with the sun zenith and mostly with wavelength. For Instance, relative differences up to 50% between ^ L skyHC and ^ LskyZV can be observed in the antisolar region for λ=665 nm and θ*=45°. The effects of these

  11. The Expected Impacts of NPOESS Microwave and Infrared Sounder Radiances on Operational Numerical Weather Prediction and Data Assimilation Systems

    Swadley, S. D.; Baker, N.; Derber, J.; Collard, A.; Hilton, F.; Ruston, B.; Bell, W.; Candy, B.; Kleespies, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The NPOESS atmospheric sounding functionality will be accomplished using two separate sensor suites, the combined infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) sensor suite (CrIMSS), and the Microwave Imager/Sounder (MIS) instrument. CrIMSS consists of the Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the cross track Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and is scheduled to fly on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), and NPOESS operational flight units C1 and C3. The MIS is a conical scanning polarimetric imager and sounder patterned after the heritage WindSat, and DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imagers and Sounders (SSMI and SSMIS), and is scheduled for flight units C2, C3 and C4. ATMS combines the current operational Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), but with an additional channel in the 51.76 GHz oxygen absorption region and 3 additional channels in the 165.5 and 183 GHz water vapor absorption band. CrIS is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and will provide 159 shortwave IR channels, 433 mid-range IR channels, and 713 longwave IR channels. The heritage sensors for CrIS are the NASA Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the MetOp-A Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). Both AIRS and IASI are high quality, high spectral resolution sounders which represent a significant improvement in the effective vertical resolution over previous IR sounders. This presentation will give an overview of preparations underway for day-1 monitoring of NPP/NPOESS radiances, and subsequent operational radiance assimilation. These preparations capitalize on experience gained during the pre-launch preparations, sensor calibration/validation and operational assimilation for the heritage sensors. One important step is to use pre-flight sensor channel specifications, noise estimates and knowledge of the antenna patterns, to generate and test proxy NPP/NPOESS sensor observations in existing assimilation systems. Other critical factors for

  12. Experiment for a precision neutrino mass measurement

    Fackler, O.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Woerner, R.

    1984-04-01

    We describe an experiment which is designed to determine the electron neutrino mass to better than 2 eV. Key features of the experiment are a high activity frozen tritium source and a high resolution electrostatic spectrometer designed to make a careful measurement of the tritium beta decay end point spectrum. The goal is to determine the neutrino mass to better than 1 eV statistically in a four day run. A series of these runs will allow study of potential systematics. The construction phase is nearly complete and preliminary data will be taken in late spring

  13. Platform and Environmental Effects on Above- and In-Water Determinations of Water-Leaving Radiances

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Morel, Andre; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comparison of above- and in-water spectral measurements in Case-1 conditions showed the uncertainty in above-water determinations of water-leaving radiances depended on the pointing angle of the above-water instruments with respect to the side of the ship. Two above-water methods were used to create a diagnostic variable to quantify the presence of superstructure reflections which degraded the above-water intracomparisons of water-leaving radiances by 10.9-33.4% (for far-to-near viewing distances, respectively). The primary conclusions of the above- and in-water intercomparison of water-leaving radiances were as follows: a) the SeaWiFS 5% radiometric objective was achieved with the above-water approach, but reliably with only one method and only for about half the data; b) a decrease in water-leaving radiance values was seen in the presence of swell, although, wave crests were radiometrically brighter than the troughs; and c) standard band ratios used in ocean color algorithms remained severely affected, because of the relatively low signal and, thus, proportionally significant contamination at the 555nm wavelength.

  14. Technology for detecting spectral radiance by a snapshot multi-imaging spectroradiometer

    Zuber, Ralf; Stührmann, Ansgar; Gugg-Helminger, Anton; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2017-12-01

    Technologies to determine spectral sky radiance distributions have evolved in recent years and have enabled new applications in remote sensing, for sky radiance measurements, in biological/diagnostic applications and luminance measurements. Most classical spectral imaging radiance technologies are based on mechanical and/or spectral scans. However, these methods require scanning time in which the spectral radiance distribution might change. To overcome this limitation, different so-called snapshot spectral imaging technologies have been developed that enable spectral and spatial non-scanning measurements. We present a new setup based on a facet mirror that is already used in imaging slicing spectrometers. By duplicating the input image instead of slicing it and using a specially designed entrance slit, we are able to select nearly 200 (14 × 14) channels within the field of view (FOV) for detecting spectral radiance in different directions. In addition, a megapixel image of the FOV is captured by an additional RGB camera. This image can be mapped onto the snapshot spectral image. In this paper, the mechanical setup, technical design considerations and first measurement results of a prototype are presented. For a proof of concept, the device is radiometrically calibrated and a 10 mm × 10 mm test pattern measured within a spectral range of 380 nm-800 nm with an optical bandwidth of 10 nm (full width at half maximum or FWHM). To show its potential in the UV spectral region, zenith sky radiance measurements in the UV of a clear sky were performed. Hence, the prototype was equipped with an entrance optic with a FOV of 0.5° and modified to obtain a radiometrically calibrated spectral range of 280 nm-470 nm with a FWHM of 3 nm. The measurement results have been compared to modeled data processed by UVSPEC, which showed deviations of less than 30%. This is far from being ideal, but an acceptable result with respect to available state

  15. Retrieving SW fluxes from geostationary narrowband radiances for the NASA-CERES SYN1deg product

    Wrenn, F. J., IV; Doelling, D. R.; Liang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The CERES mission was designed to measure the natural variability of the net TOA flux over long time scales relevant to climate monitoring. To achieve this goal, CERES provides the level-3 SSF1deg, SYN1deg, and EBAF monthly 1° by 1° regional TOA flux. The single satellite (Terra or Aqua) SSF1deg 24-hour shortwave flux is based on one daytime measurements and assumes constant meteorology to model the diurnal change in albedo. To accurately describe regions with a prominent diurnal signal, the SYN1deg Edition4 dataset employs hourly geostationary (GEO) measurements. This improves upon Edition3, which used 3-hourly GEO measurements and with temporal interpolation. The EBAF product combines the temporal stability of the SSF1deg product with the diurnal information from SYN1deg and removes the CERES instrument calibration bias by constraining the net flux balance to the ocean heat storage term. The SYN-1deg product retrieves hourly SW fluxes from GEO measurements. Over regions with large diurnal cycles, such as maritime stratus and land afternoon convective locations, the GEO derived SW fluxes will capture the diurnal flux not observed with Terra or Aqua sun-synchronous satellites. Obtaining fluxes from geostationary satellite radiance is a multistep process. First, most GEO visible imagers lack calibration and must be calibrated to MODIS and VIIRS. Second, the GEO imager visible channel radiances are converted to broadband radiances using empirical and theoretical models. The lack of coincident, collocated, and co-angled GEO and CERES measurements makes building an empirical model difficult. The narrowband to broadband models are a function of surface and cloud conditions, which are difficult to identify due to the inconsistent cloud retrievals between the 16 GEO imagers used in the CERES record. Third, the GEO derived broadband radiances are passed through the CERES angular distribution model (ADM) to convert the radiances to fluxes. Lastly, the GEO derived

  16. Mechanical measurements in RFX-mod experiment

    Dalla Palma, M., E-mail: mauro.dallapalma@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ravarotto, D.; Dal Bello, S.; Fincato, M.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Marchiori, G.; Taliercio, C.; Zaccaria, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The ongoing experimental campaigns of RFX-mod are performed setting operational parameters at the nominal or exceeding design values of the experiment. Compressive forces up to 11 MN are produced by high magnetizing currents that reach values up to 50 kA. These forces heavily load the mechanical structure of RFX-mod and their effects are measured and monitored in order to assess the expected structural response and machine reliability during operation. Mechanical strains and relative displacements are real time measured during each experimental pulse by 48 strain gauges located on 12 mechanical struts and 16 potentiometers positioned between the toroidal assembly and the support mechanical structure. The strains in the most stressed components are measured by means of 24 half bridge gauges preliminarily calibrated. Particular care has been given to sensor choices and installation in order to minimize signal noises induced by the electrical and magnetic fields. The residual noises have been further reduced by proper sampling frequency and averaging techniques. The strains measured on the struts are then post-processed to calculate the resultant forces and bending moments, while the displacement measurements give an estimate of the overall stiffness of the mechanical structure. The measured forces and displacements are shown per toroidal locations and as a function of the current intensity, so verifying the uniform sharing of forces among the different struts and the proper square law correlation with the magnetizing current intensity.

  17. The Goddard Snow Radiance Assimilation Project: An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Snow/cold Land Surface Modeling

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; Reichle, R.; Choudhury, B.; Peters-Lidard C.; Foster, J.; Hall, D.; Riggs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-based retrievals of snow parameters from satellite observations have a long heritage and have so far been generated primarily by regression-based empirical "inversion" methods based on snapshots in time. Direct assimilation of microwave radiance into physical land surface models can be used to avoid errors associated with such retrieval/inversion methods, instead utilizing more straightforward forward models and temporal information. This approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success. Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling, physical land surface modeling, and land data assimilation are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated framework for snow/cold lands modeling and radiance assimilation. The objective of the Goddard snow radiance assimilation project is to develop such a framework and explore its capabilities. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. In fact, multiple models are available for each element enabling optimization to match the needs of a particular study. Together these form a modular and flexible framework for self-consistent, physically-based remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster. Capabilities for assimilation of snow retrieval products are already under development for LIS. We will describe plans to add radiance-based assimilation capabilities. Plans for validation activities using field measurements will also be discussed.

  18. Snowpack modeling in the context of radiance assimilation for snow water equivalent mapping

    Durand, M. T.; Kim, R. S.; Li, D.; Dumont, M.; Margulis, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    Data assimilation is often touted as a means of overcoming deficiences in both snowpack modeling and snowpack remote sensing. Direct assimilation of microwave radiances, rather than assimilating microwave retrievals, has shown promise, in this context. This is especially the case for deep mountain snow, which is often assumed to be infeasible to measure with microwave measurements, due to saturation issues. We first demonstrate that the typical way of understanding saturation has often been misunderstood. We show that deep snow leads to a complex microwave signature, but not to saturation per se, because of snowpack stratigraphy. This explains why radiance assimilation requires detailed snowpack models that adequatley stratgigraphy to function accurately. We examine this with two case studies. First, we show how the CROCUS predictions of snowpack stratigraphy allows for assimilation of airborne passive microwave measurements over three 1km2 CLPX Intensive Study Areas. Snowpack modeling and particle filter analysis is performed at 120 m spatial resolution. When run without the benefit of radiance assimilation, CROCUS does not fully capture spatial patterns in the data (R2=0.44; RMSE=26 cm). Assimlilation of microwave radiances for a single flight recovers the spatial pattern of snow depth (R2=0.85; RMSE = 13 cm). This is despite the presence of deep snow; measured depths range from 150 to 325 cm. Adequate results are obtained even for partial forest cover, and bias in precipitation forcing. The results are severely degraded if a three-layer snow model is used, however. The importance of modeling snowpack stratigraphy is highlighted. Second, we compare this study to a recent analysis assimilating spaceborne radiances for a 511 km2 sub-watershed of the Kern River, in the Sierra Nevada. Here, the daily Level 2A AMSR-E footprints (88 km2) are assimilated into a model running at 90 m spatial resolution. The three-layer model is specially adapted to predict "effective

  19. ASTER L2 Surface Radiance TIR V003

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER L2 Surface Radiance TIR is an on-demand product generated using the five thermal infra-red (TIR) Bands (acquired either during the day or night time)...

  20. Observation of Tidal Effects on LWIR Radiance Above the Mesopause

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    ..., and season The local-time dependence, in particular, suggests a role for atmospheric tides using a tidal model, Global Scale Wave Model, and our non-GTE ARC rode, we modeled the 15 Om radiance...

  1. ASTER L2 Surface Radiance VNIR and SWIR V003

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER L2 Surface Radiance is a multi-file product that contains atmospherically corrected data for both the Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) and Shortwave Infrared...

  2. Plane parallel radiance transport for global illumination in vegetation

    Max, N.; Mobley, C.; Keating, B.; Wu, E.H.

    1997-01-05

    This paper applies plane parallel radiance transport techniques to scattering from vegetation. The leaves, stems, and branches are represented as a volume density of scattering surfaces, depending only on height and the vertical component of the surface normal. Ordinary differential equations are written for the multiply scattered radiance as a function of the height above the ground, with the sky radiance and ground reflectance as boundary conditions. They are solved using a two-pass integration scheme to unify the two-point boundary conditions, and Fourier series for the dependence on the azimuthal angle. The resulting radiance distribution is used to precompute diffuse and specular `ambient` shading tables, as a function of height and surface normal, to be used in rendering, together with a z-buffer shadow algorithm for direct solar illumination.

  3. Cavity QED experiments, entanglement and quantum measurement

    Brune, M.

    2001-01-01

    This course is devoted to the physics of entanglement in microwave CQED (cavity quantum electrodynamics) experiments. The heart of this system is a microwave photon trap, made of superconducting mirrors, which stores a few-photon field in a small volume of space for times as long as milliseconds. This field interacts with circular Rydberg atoms injected one by one into the cavity. Section 2 is devoted to the description of the strong coupling regime in Rydberg atom CQED. The tools of the experiment are briefly presented at the beginning of this section as well as the main characteristics of the strong coupling regime. We then show in section 3 how to use the strong interaction with a single photon to perform a non-destructive detection of a single photon with a single atom as a meter. In section 4, we show that the achieved QND (quantum non-demolition) measurement process corresponds to the operation of a quantum phase gate. It allows, in principle, to prepare arbitrary atom + field entangled states. Various methods will be presented for preparing entangled states such as a two atom EPR (Einstein Podolsky Rosen) pair as well as a GHZ triplet. Entanglement involving more and more complex systems will then be investigated in section 5 where the preparation of a ''Schroedinger cat state'' of the cavity field is presented. We especially address in this last section the problem of entanglement between the system and the meter which occurs during any quantum measurement process

  4. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  5. Measuring Antineutrino Oscillations with the MINOS Experiment

    Evans, Justin John [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A manmade beam of predominantly muon neutrinos is detected both 1 km and 735 km from the production point by two functionally identical detectors. A comparison of the energy spectra measured by the two detectors shows the energy-dependent disappearance of muon neutrinos characteristic of oscillations and allows a measurement of the parameters governing the oscillations. This thesis presents work leading to measurements of disappearance in the 6% $\\bar{v}$μ background in that beam. A calibration is developed to correct for time-dependent changes in the responses of both detectors, reducing the corresponding uncertainty on hadronic energy measurements from 1.8% to 0.4% in the near detector and from 0.8% to 0.4% in the far detector. A method of selecting charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events is developed, with purities (efficiencies) of 96.5% (74.4%) at the near detector, and 98.8% (70.9%) at the far detector in the region below 10 GeV reconstructed antineutrino energy. A method of using the measured near detector neutrino energy spectrum to predict that expected at the far detector is discussed, and developed for use in the $\\bar{v}$μ analysis. Sources of systematic uncertainty contributing to the oscillation measurements are discussed. In the far detector, 32 charged current $\\bar{v}$μ events are observed below a reconstructed energy of 30 GeV, compared to an expectation of 47.8 for Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2 = Δ$\\bar{m}$atm2, sin2(2$\\bar{θ}$23) = sin2(2θ23). This deficit, in such a low-statistics sample, makes the result difficult to interpret in the context of an oscillation parameter measurement. Possible sources for the discrepancy are discussed, concluding that considerably more data are required for a definitive solution. Running MINOS with a dedicated $\\bar

  6. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  7. Compression measurement in laser driven implosion experiments

    Attwood, D.T.; Cambell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.M.; Lane, S.L.; Larsen, J.T.; Matthews, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurement of compression in the context of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Programs' transition from thin-walled exploding pusher targets, to thicker walled targets which are designed to lead the way towards ablative type implosions which will result in higher fuel density and pR at burn time. These experiments promote desirable reactor conditions but pose diagnostic problems because of reduced multi-kilovolt x-ray and reaction product emissions, as well as increasingly more difficult transport problems for these emissions as they pass through the thicker pR pusher conditions. Solutions to these problems, pointing the way toward higher energy twodimensional x-ray images, new reaction product imaging ideas and the use of seed gases for both x-ray spectroscopic and nuclear activation techniques are identified

  8. Strangeness measurements with the PHOBOS experiment

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.

    2006-12-01

    Recent results on identified particle production from the PHOBOS experiment at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) are summarized. Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62.4\\,GeV are presented close to mid-rapidity. Baryons have been found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The p/π+ ratio reaches unity at high pT, which fits into a smooth trend together with measurements at lower and higher collision energies. At very low transverse momenta no significant excess of particle yield was found, compared to extrapolations from higher pT. The net proton yield at mid-rapidity appears to be proportional to the number of participant nucleons in Au+Au collisions. The PHOBOS acceptance and mass resolution for the phi meson at low pT were studied in detail.

  9. Interstitial diffuse radiance spectroscopy of gold nanocages and nanorods in bulk muscle tissues.

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G; Pang, Bo; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zhiyuan; Xia, Younan; Whelan, William M

    2015-01-01

    Radiance spectroscopy was applied to the interstitial detection of localized inclusions containing Au nanocages or nanorods with various concentrations embedded in porcine muscle phantoms. The radiance was quantified using a perturbation approach, which enabled the separation of contributions from the porcine phantom and the localized inclusion, with the inclusion serving as a perturbation probe of photon distributions in the turbid medium. Positioning the inclusion at various places in the phantom allowed for tracking of photons that originated from a light source, passed through the inclusion's location, and reached a detector. The inclusions with high extinction coefficients were able to absorb nearly all photons in the range of 650-900 nm, leading to a spectrally flat radiance signal. This signal could be converted to the relative density of photons incident on the inclusion. Finally, the experimentally measured quantities were expressed via the relative perturbation and arranged into the classical Beer-Lambert law that allowed one to extract the extinction coefficients of various types of Au nanoparticles in both the transmission and back reflection geometries. It was shown that the spatial variation of perturbation could be described as 1/r dependence, where r is the distance between the inclusion and the detector. Due to a larger absorption cross section, Au nanocages produced greater perturbations than Au nanorods of equal particle concentration, indicating a better suitability of Au nanocages as contrast agents for optical measurements in turbid media. Individual measurements from different inclusions were combined into detectability maps.

  10. A Method of Retrieving BRDF from Surface-Reflected Radiance Using Decoupling of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer and Surface Reflection

    Alexander Radkevich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bi-directional reflection distribution function (BRDF defines anisotropy of the surface reflection. It is required to specify the boundary condition for radiative transfer (RT modeling used in aerosol retrievals, cloud retrievals, atmospheric modeling, and other applications. Ground based measurements of reflected radiance draw increasing attention as a source of information about anisotropy of surface reflection. Derivation of BRDF from surface radiance requires atmospheric correction. This study develops a new method of retrieving BRDF on its whole domain, making it immediately suitable for further atmospheric RT modeling applications. The method is based on the integral equation relating surface-reflected radiance, BRDF, and solutions of two auxiliary atmosphere-only RT problems. The method requires kernel-based BRDF. The weights of the kernels are obtained with a quickly converging iterative procedure. RT modeling has to be done only one time before the start of iterative process.

  11. Clinical effects of an oral supplement rich in antioxidants on skin radiance in women

    Dumoulin M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marion Dumoulin, David Gaudout, Benoit Lemaire Activ’Inside, Libourne, France Background: Environmental factors impact the skin aging resulting in decrease of skin radiance. Nutrition and particularly antioxidants could help to fight against skin degradation.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an oral supplement rich in specific antioxidants, SkinAx2TM, on the improvement of the skin radiance in women.Methods: The open-label clinical study enrolled 35 women, aged 40–70, with facial dull complexion. Subjects were supplemented orally with a daily dosage of 150 mg of an antioxidant-rich formulation containing superoxide dismutase-rich melon concentrate, grape seed extract rich in monomers of flavanols, vitamin C, and zinc for 8 weeks. Each subject served as her own control. The C.L.B.T.™ test has been used to evaluate facial skin coloring (C, luminosity (L, brightness (B, and transparency (T involved in skin radiance. Facial skin imperfections have been assessed by clinical assessment. Firmness has been evaluated by clinical assessment and cutometer measurement. Finally, an auto-questionnaire has been carried out in order to evaluate the satisfaction of the subjects concerning different parameters involved in skin radiance and the global efficacy of the supplement.Results: Skin “red pink” and “olive” colors were significantly improved after supplementation (P<0.0001. Luminosity was increased by 25.9% (P<0.0001 whereas brightness and transparency were not affected by the supplementation. Facial skin imperfections were significantly reduced after the antioxidant-rich formulation intake (global reduction: –18.0%; P<0.0001. Indeed, dark circles, redness, and spots significantly diminished after oral treatment. Firmness and elasticity have been shown to be improved. Subjects were globally satisfied by the product (82.4% and have found improvements on their facial skin. Furthermore, 64.7% reported to look

  12. Polarization-based enhancement of ocean color signal for estimating suspended particulate matter: radiative transfer simulations and laboratory measurements.

    Liu, Jia; He, Xianqiang; Liu, Jiahang; Bai, Yan; Wang, Difeng; Chen, Tieqiao; Wang, Yihao; Zhu, Feng

    2017-04-17

    Absorption and scattering by molecules, aerosols and hydrosols, and the reflection and transmission over the sea surface can modify the original polarization state of sunlight. However, water-leaving radiance polarization, containing embedded water constituent information, has largely been neglected. Here, the efficiency of the parallel polarization radiance (PPR) for enhancing ocean color signal of suspended particulate matter is examined via vector radiative transfer simulations and laboratory experiments. The simulation results demonstrate that the PPR has a slightly higher ocean color signal at the top-of-atmosphere as compared with that of the total radiance. Moreover, both the simulations and laboratory measurements reveal that, compared with total radiance, PPR can effectively enhance the normalized ocean color signal for a large range of observation geometries, wavelengths, and suspended particle concentrations. Thus, PPR has great potential for improving the ocean color signal detection from satellite.

  13. Using MODIS spectral information to classify sea ice scenes for CERES radiance-to-flux inversion

    Corbett, J.; Su, W.; Liang, L.; Eitzen, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites measure the shortwave (SW) radiance reflected from the Earth. In order to provide an estimate of the top-of-atmosphere reflected SW flux we need to know the anisotropy of the radiance reflected from the scene. Sea Ice scenes are particularly complex due to the wide range of surface conditions that comprise sea ice. For example, the anisotropy of snow-covered sea ice is quite different to that of sea ice with melt-ponds. To attempt to provide a consistent scene classification we have developed the Sea Ice Brightness Index (SIBI). The SIBI is defined as one minus the normalized difference between reflectances from the 0.469 micron and 0.858 micron bands from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. For brighter snow-covered sea ice scenes the SIBI value is close to 1.0. As the surface changes to bare ice, melt ponds, etc. the SIBI decreases. For open water the SIBI value is around 0.2-0.3. The SIBI exhibits no dependence on viewing zenith or solar zenith angle, allowing for consistent scene identification. To use the SIBI we classify clear-sky CERES field-of-views over sea ice into 3 groups; SIBI≥0.935, 0.935>SIBI≥0.85 and SIBISIBI based ADMs. Using the second metric, we see a reduction in the latitude/longitude binned mean RMS error between the ADM predicted radiance and the measured radiance from 8% to 7% in May and from 17% to 12% in July. These improvements suggest that using the SIBI to account for changes in the sea ice surface will lead to improved CERES flux retrievals.

  14. Strain measurements during pressurized thermal shock experiment

    Tarso Vida Gomes, P. de; Julio Ricardo Barreto Cruz; Tanius Rodrigues Mansur; Denis Henrique Bianchi Scaldaferri; Miguel Mattar Neto

    2005-01-01

    For the life extension of nuclear power plants, the residual life of most of their components must be evaluated along all their operating time. Concerning the reactor pressure vessel, the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is a very important event to be considered. For better understanding the effects of this kind of event, tests are made. The approach described here consisted of building a simplified in-scale physical model of the reactor pressure vessel, submitting it to the actual operating temperature and pressure conditions and provoking a thermal shock by means of cold water flow in its external surface. To conduct such test, the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been conducting several studies related to PTS and has also built a laboratory that has made possible the simulation of the PTS loading conditions. Several cracks were produced in the external surface of the reactor pressure vessel model. Strain gages were fixed by means of electrical discharge welding over the cracks regions in both external and internal surfaces. The temperature was monitored in 10 points across the vessel wall. The internal pressure was manually controlled and monitored using a pressure transducer. Two PTS experiments were conducted and this paper presents the strain measurement procedures applied to the reactor pressure vessel model, during the PTS, using strain gages experimental methodology. (authors)

  15. RADIANCE DOMAIN COMPOSITING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGING

    M.R. Renu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range imaging aims at creating an image with a range of intensity variations larger than the range supported by a camera sensor. Most commonly used methods combine multiple exposure low dynamic range (LDR images, to obtain the high dynamic range (HDR image. Available methods typically neglect the noise term while finding appropriate weighting functions to estimate the camera response function as well as the radiance map. We look at the HDR imaging problem in a denoising frame work and aim at reconstructing a low noise radiance map from noisy low dynamic range images, which is tone mapped to get the LDR equivalent of the HDR image. We propose a maximum aposteriori probability (MAP based reconstruction of the HDR image using Gibb’s prior to model the radiance map, with total variation (TV as the prior to avoid unnecessary smoothing of the radiance field. To make the computation with TV prior efficient, we extend the majorize-minimize method of upper bounding the total variation by a quadratic function to our case which has a nonlinear term arising from the camera response function. A theoretical justification for doing radiance domain denoising as opposed to image domain denoising is also provided.

  16. SIMBIOS Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance Calibration and Validation: Sensor Response, Atmospheric Corrections, Stray Light and Sun Glint. Chapter 14

    Mueller, James L.

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) contract supports acquisition of match up radiometric and bio-optical data for validation of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and other ocean color satellites, and evaluation of uncertainty budgets and protocols for in situ measurements of normalized water leaving radiances.

  17. Improving the description of sunglint for accurate prediction of remotely sensed radiances

    Ottaviani, Matteo [Light and Life Laboratory, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)], E-mail: mottavia@stevens.edu; Spurr, Robert [RT Solutions Inc., 9 Channing Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stamnes, Knut; Li Wei [Light and Life Laboratory, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States); Su Wenying [Science Systems and Applications Inc., 1 Enterprise Parkway, Hampton, VA 23666 (United States); Wiscombe, Warren [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) of the ocean is a critical boundary condition for radiative transfer calculations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Existing models express the extent of the glint-contaminated region and its contribution to the radiance essentially as a function of the wind speed. An accurate treatment of the glint contribution and its propagation in the atmosphere would improve current correction schemes and hence rescue a significant portion of data presently discarded as 'glint contaminated'. In current satellite imagery, a correction to the sensor-measured radiances is limited to the region at the edge of the glint, where the contribution is below a certain threshold. This correction assumes the sunglint radiance to be directly transmitted through the atmosphere. To quantify the error introduced by this approximation we employ a radiative transfer code that allows for a user-specified BRDF at the atmosphere-ocean interface and rigorously accounts for multiple scattering. We show that the errors incurred by ignoring multiple scattering are very significant and typically lie in the range 10-90%. Multiple reflections and shadowing at the surface can also be accounted for, and we illustrate the importance of such processes at grazing geometries.

  18. Experience with confirmation measurement at Los Alamos

    Marshall, R.S.; Wagner, R.P.; Hsue, F.

    1985-01-01

    Confirmation measurements are used at Los Alamos in support of incoming and outgoing shipment accountibility and for support of both at 235 U and Pu inventories. Statistical data are presented to show the consistency of measurements on items of identical composition and on items measured at two facilitis using similar instruments. A description of confirmation measurement techniques used in support of 235 U and Pu inventories and a discussion on the ability of the measurements to identify items with misstated SNM are given

  19. Experience with confirmation measurement at Los Alamos

    Marshall, R.S.; Wagner, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Confirmation measurements are used at Los Alamos in support of incoming and outgoing shipment accountability and for support of both 235 U and Pu inventories. Statistical data are presented to show the consistency of measurements on items of identical composition and on items measured at two facilities using similar instruments. A description of confirmation measurement techniques used in support of 235 U and Pu inventories and a discussion on the ability of the measurements to identify items with misstated SNM are given

  20. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  1. Sensitive detection of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance

    Quan, X.; Huang, H.-L.; Zhang, L.; Weisz, E.; Cao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by radiative transfer modeling of the effects of dust (aerosol) on satellite thermal infrared radiance by many different imaging radiometers, in this article, we present the aerosol-effected satellite radiative signal changes in the top of atmosphere (TOA). The simulation of TOA radiance for Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is performed by using the RTTOV fast radiative transfer model. The model computation is carried out with setting representative geographical atmospheric models and typical default aerosol climatological models under clear sky condition. The radiative differences (in units of equivalent black body brightness temperature differences (BTDs)) between simulated radiances without consideration of the impact of aerosol (Aerosol-free) and with various aerosol models (Aerosol-modified) are calculated for the whole IASI spectrum between 3.62 and 15.5 μm. The comparisons of BTDs are performed through 11 aerosol models in 5 classified atmospheric models. The results show that the Desert aerosol model has the most significant impact on IASI spectral simulated radiances than the other aerosol models (Continental, Urban, Maritime types and so on) in Mid-latitude Summer, contributing to the mineral aerosol components contained. The value of BTDs could reach up to 1 K at peak points. The atmospheric window spectral region between 900 and 1100 cm −1 (9.09–11.11 μm) is concentrated after the investigation for the largest values of aerosol-affected radiance differences. BTDs in IASI spectral region between 645 and 1200 cm −1 occupies the largest oscillation and the major part of the whole spectrum. The IASI highest window peak-points channels (such as 9.4 and 10.2 μm) are obtained finally, which are the most sensitive ones to the simulated IASI radiance. -- Highlights: ► Sensitive study of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance is performed. ► The aerosol components have influenced IASI spectral regions

  2. Measuring Emotions in the Consumption Experience.

    Richins, Marsha L

    1997-01-01

    Although consumption-related emotions have been studied with increasing frequency in consumer behavior, issues concerning the appropriate way to measure these emotions remain unresolved This article reviews the emotion measures currently used in consumer research and the theories on which they are based; it concludes that the existing measures are unsuited for the purpose of measuring consumption-related emotions. The article describes six empirical studies that assess the domain of consumpti...

  3. Cloud and Thermodynamic Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric-thermodynamic parameters and surface properties are basic meteorological parameters for weather forecasting. A physical geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiance observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed and applied to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS). The retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx). JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  4. Impact of Assimilation of Conventional and Satellite Radiance GTS Observations on Simulation of Mesoscale Convective System Over Southeast India Using WRF-3DVar

    Madhulatha, A.; Rajeevan, M.; Bhowmik, S. K. Roy; Das, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    The primary goal of present study is to investigate the impact of assimilation of conventional and satellite radiance observations in simulating the mesoscale convective system (MCS) formed over south east India. An assimilation methodology based on Weather Research and Forecasting model three dimensional variational data assimilation is considered. Few numerical experiments are carried out to examine the individual and combined impact of conventional and non-conventional (satellite radiance) observations. After the successful inclusion of additional observations, strong analysis increments of temperature and moisture fields are noticed and contributed to significant improvement in model's initial fields. The resulting model simulations are able to successfully reproduce the prominent synoptic features responsible for the initiation of MCS. Among all the experiments, the final experiment in which both conventional and satellite radiance observations assimilated has showed considerable impact on the prediction of MCS. The location, genesis, intensity, propagation and development of rain bands associated with the MCS are simulated reasonably well. The biases of simulated temperature, moisture and wind fields at surface and different pressure levels are reduced. Thermodynamic, dynamic and vertical structure of convective cells associated with the passage of MCS are well captured. Spatial distribution of rainfall is fairly reproduced and comparable to TRMM observations. It is demonstrated that incorporation of conventional and satellite radiance observations improved the local and synoptic representation of temperature, moisture fields from surface to different levels of atmosphere. This study highlights the importance of assimilation of conventional and satellite radiances in improving the models initial conditions and simulation of MCS.

  5. Planar impact experiments for EOS measurements

    Furnish, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    The community concerned with the numerical modeling of groundshock produced by underground nuclear tests must have access to materials data to benchmark models of rock behavior. Historically the primary source of these data has been planar impact experiments. These experiments have involved gun, explosive and electrical launchers. Other methods of introducing planar shocks include shock driving by in-contact explosives or laser bursts. This paper briefly describes gun launcher-based planar impact methods used to characterize geological materials at Sandia National Laboratories

  6. All-sky radiance simulation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR microwave ...

    used as input to the RTTOV model to simulate cloud-affected SAPHIR radiances. ... All-sky radiance simulation; Megha tropiques; microwave SAPHIR sensor; radiative transfer; data ... versions of these non-linear processes (Ohring and.

  7. Photosynthetically-active radiation: sky radiance distributions under clear and overcast conditions

    Grant, R.H.; Heisler, G.M.; Gao, W.

    1996-01-01

    The photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), defined as the wavelength band of 0.400 μm to 0.700 μm, represents most of the visible solar radiation. Although the proportion of global irradiance that originates from diffuse sky radiation is higher for PAR than for all solar shortwave radiation, it is often assumed that the PAR diffuse sky radiation is distributed identically to that of all shortwave solar radiation. This assumption has not been tested. PAR sky radiance measurements were made in a rural area over a wide range of solar zenith angles. The distribution of PAR sky radiance was modeled using physically-based, non-linear equations.For clear skies, the normalized sky radiance distribution (N) was best modeled using the scattering angle (ψ) and the zenith position in the sky (Θ) as N (Θ, ψ) = 0.0361 [6.3 + (1 + cos 2 Θ / (1 - cos ψ)] [1-e -0.31 sec ( Θ]. The angle Ψ is defined by cos ψ = cos Θ cos Θ * + sin Θ sin Θ * cos Φ, where solar zenith angle is Θ* and the difference in azimuth between the sun and the position in the sky is Φ. Modeling of the overcast sky depended on the visibility of the solar disk. The translucent middle/high cloud overcast conditions (cloud base greater than 300 m above ground level) were best modeled as: N(Θ∗, ψ) = 0.149 + 0.084Θ∗ + 1.305e −2.5ψ while the translucent low cloud overcast conditions (cloud base less than 300 m above ground level) were best modeled as: N(Θ∗, ψ) = 0.080 + 0.058Θ∗ + 0.652e −2.1ψ . The obscured overcast sky condition (solar disk obscured) was best modeled as: N(Θ) = 0.441 [1 + 4.6cos Θ] /[1 + 4.6]. The unit of N for all equations is π Sr −1 , so that integration of each function over the sky hemisphere yields 1.0.These equations can be applied directly to the sky diffuse irradiance on the horizontal, I diff , to provide radiance distributions for the sky. Estimates of actual sky radiance distribution can be estimated from N a (Θ, ψ) = I diff N(Θ,

  8. A new theory and its application to remove the effect of surface-reflected light in above-surface radiance data from clear and turbid waters

    Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2014-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances (L w ) measured from the deck of a ship or boat in oceanic and lake waters are widely and operationally used for satellite sensor vicarious calibration and validation and development of remote-sensing algorithms to understand interdisciplinary coastal ocean properties and processes. However, accurate determination of L w remains to be a challenging issue because of the limitations of the existing methods to accurately remove the undesired signal (surface-reflected light of the sky and sun) from above-surface measurements of the total upwelling radiance leaving the water surface. In this study, a new theory is developed and applied to the above-surface radiometric data measured from clear, turbid and eutrophic waters. The new method effectively removes surface-reflected contributions from the total upwelling radiance signal under different sky (clear sky to overcast sky) and sun glint conditions. The L w spectra obtained from the above-surface radiance data using the new method are found to match well with those extrapolated from the upwelling radiances (L u ) measured with another set of underwater radiometers (used just below the sea surface). The new method proves to be a viable alternative, especially in circumstances when the above-surface measurements of radiances are severally contaminated by the surface-reflected light fields. Since spectral radiance measurements are also sensitive to the observation angles, and to the magnitude of the radiometer's solid angle field of view, above-surface radiances are also measured for different viewing angles in highly eutrophic waters. Such measurements show large deviations in L w spectra except at lower viewing angles (30°). When applied to these data, the new method eliminates the undesired signal encountered at higher viewing angles and delivers accurate water-leaving radiance data. These results suggest that the new method is capable of removing the surface-reflected light fields from both

  9. Instrumentation, measurements, and experiments in fluids

    Rathakrishnan, E

    2007-01-01

    NEED AND OBJECTIVE OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDY Some Fluid Mechanics MeasurementsMeasurement SystemsSome of the Important Quantities Associated with FluidFlow MeasurementsFUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICSProperties of FluidsThermodynamic PropertiesSurface TensionAnalysis of Fluid FlowBasic and Subsidiary Laws for Continuous MediaKinematics of Fluid FlowStreamlinesPotential FlowViscous FlowsGas DynamicsWIND TUNNELSLow-Speed Wind TunnelsPower Losses in a Wind TunnelHigh-Speed Wind TunnelsHypersonic TunnelsInstrume

  10. Recent Multiboson measurements with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of two electroweak gauge bosons constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. We present recent ATLAS measurements of inclusive and differential cross sections for WW, WZ, ZZ and Z + photon at centre of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. Large next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections were recently calculated and are confronted with the measurements. We also present recent ATLAS measurements of inclusive cross sections for electroweak production of WZ + 2 jets and production of Z + di-photon at 8 TeV. Differential distributions sensitive to anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings have been studied and limits on new physics have been derived.

  11. Virtual experiment instrument of nuclear pulse measuring

    Shan Jian; Zhao Xiuliang; Yu Hong; Zhang Meiqin

    2009-01-01

    Study on the scheme of application of virtual instrument(VI) technique in measuring of nuclear pulse. The system of Counter based on technology of LabVIEW and NI company's products USB-6009-DAQ is developed. Virtual nuclear instrument-Virtual Counter is realized. This system extends the application of technology of virtual instrument. The experimental results indicate that the system of Counter had the good counting measuring function of Nuclear Pulse. (authors)

  12. Calculation of the radiance distribution at the boundary of an isotropically scattering slab

    Doosje, M; Hoenders, B.J; Rinzema, K.

    The radiance arising from an anisotropically scattering illuminated stack of n slabs is calulated using the equation of radiative transfer. It appears to be unnecessary to calculate the radiance inside the material; including only the radiance at the boundary surfaces is sufficient to obtain the

  13. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F; Flanz, J; Alexandrov, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  14. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F [ProTom International, Inc., Flower Mound, TX (United States); Flanz, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Alexandrov, V [ZAO ProTom, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  15. Experiment to measure vacuum birefringence: Conceptual design

    Mueller, Guido; Tanner, David; Doebrich, Babette; Poeld, Jan; Lindner, Axel; Willke, Benno

    2016-03-01

    Vacuum birefringence is another lingering challenge which will soon become accessible to experimental verification. The effect was first calculated by Euler and Heisenberg in 1936 and is these days described as a one-loop correction to the differential index of refraction between light which is polarized parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. Our plan is to realize (and slightly modify) an idea which was originally published by Hall, Ye, and Ma using advanced LIGO and LISA technology and the infrastructure of the ALPS light-shining-through-walls experiment following the ALPS IIc science run. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  16. Coulomb's Electrical Measurements. Experiment No. 14.

    Devons, Samuel

    Presented is information related to the life and work of Charles Coulomb as well as detailed notes of his measurements of the distribution of electricity on conductors. The two methods that he used (the large torsion balance, and the timing of "force" oscillations) are described. (SA)

  17. IASI hyperspectral radiances in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system: OSE

    Sharma, Priti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; Srinivas, D.; George, John P.; Dasgupta, Munmun

    2016-04-01

    Accuracy of global NWP depends more on the contribution of satellite data than the surface based observations. This is achieved through the better usage of satellite data within the data assimilation system. Efforts are going on at NCMRWF to add more and more satellite data in the assimilation system both from Indian and international satellites in geostationary and polar orbits. Impact of the new dataset is assessed through Observation System Experiments (OSEs), through which the impact of the data is evaluated comparing the forecast output with that of a control run. This paper discusses one such OSEs with Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) onboard MetOp-A and B. IASI is the main payload instrument for the purpose of supporting NWP. IASI provides information on the vertical structure of the atmospheric temperature and humidity with an accuracy of 1K and a vertical resolution of 1 km, which is necessary to improve NWP. IASI measures the radiance emitted from the Earth in 8641 channels, covering the spectral interval 645-2760 cm-1. The high volume data resulting from IASI presents many challenges, particularly in the area of assimilation. Out of these 8641 channels, 314 channels are selected depending on the relevance of information in each channel to assimilate in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system. Studies show that the use of IASI data in NWP accounts for 40% of the impact of all satellite observations in the NWP forecasts, especially microwave and hyperspectral infrared sounding techniques are found to give the largest impacts

  18. Experiences in integrated leak rate measurements

    Shirk, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During a hypothetical design basis accident for nuclear power plants, the reactor containment system is relied upon to maintain radioactive exposure limits below acceptable limits. Integrated leak rate testing is a means of verifying that the leakage of radioactivity material from the reactor containment will be below allowable limits. Leakage rate computations are based on the ideal gas law. The absolute method of leakage rate testing utilizing mass point method of data analysis is recommended. Integrated leak rate testing data is obtained from pressure, drybulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, and flow measuring systems. Test data does not support the usual leakage (flow) - pressure square root relationship. The major source of potential leakage from the reactor containment is reactor containment isolation valves

  19. Deuterium lamps as transfer standards for spectral radiance measurements

    Key, P.J.; Nettleton, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the work carried out at NPL and PTB to improve the performance of a low pressure deuterium discharge lamp, so that it can be used as a transfer standard in the spectral range 120 to 350 nm. To this end it was necessary: - to replace the original quartz windows by magnesium fluoride single crystal plates, which were cut perpendicular to the c-axis of the crystal and which had to be free of impurities, - to construct the lamps in that way that the directional uniformity of the emitted radiation is within the demands, - to age the lamps and to preselect only those of which the irradiance was stable within ± 1% during a thirty minute period after warm-up, - to improve the commercially available electrical power supply to meet the operational needs of the lamps. Thus, the deuterium lamps drifted by about 3% over a period of 100 h at all wavelengths except at 250 nm, where the ageing increased to 4.5%. A liquid nitrogen trap has been developed which can be installed between the vacuum system and the lamp. This reduced to about 2% the decrease of the window's transmission during the first hour of operation, caused by the deposition of oil from the vacuum system

  20. Satellite Atmospheric Radiance Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet.

    1979-07-05

    APERTURE I I 1_ _~~J ;~- WHEEL MOTOR IDRIVE r~~ II I :_-~I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~_I ~~APERT URE WHEEL\\ ELLIPSOIDAL PRIMARY MIRROR VV ~ V SUNSHADE V I...Table 1. Vacuum Ultraviolet Backg rounds Sensors (Cont ) P~ iot ometer Interf erence Filters (A) 1216 1340 1550 1750 no f

  1. Interstitial diffuse radiance spectroscopy of gold nanocages and nanorods in bulk muscle tissues

    Grabtchak S

    2015-02-01

    converted to the relative density of photons incident on the inclusion. Finally, the experimentally measured quantities were expressed via the relative perturbation and arranged into the classical Beer–Lambert law that allowed one to extract the extinction coefficients of various types of Au nanoparticles in both the transmission and back reflection geometries. It was shown that the spatial variation of perturbation could be described as 1/r dependence, where r is the distance between the inclusion and the detector. Due to a larger absorption cross section, Au nanocages produced greater perturbations than Au nanorods of equal particle concentration, indicating a better suitability of Au nanocages as contrast agents for optical measurements in turbid media. Individual measurements from different inclusions were combined into detectability maps.Keywords: gold nanocages, gold nanorods, turbid media, porcine muscles, diffuse radiance spectroscopy, Beer–Lambert law, perturbation

  2. Measurement of kaons in the Helios experiment

    van Hecke, H.

    1990-01-01

    We have measured kaons and pions in the rapidity interval 0.8--1.3 and p T interval 100--600 MeV/c. We have observed an excess in the ratio of positive kaons to pions over what is expected from p-p for transverse momenta above 300 MeV/c. No such excess is seen for negatives. This excess of K/π increasing with p T has been observed in 14.5 GeV/A Si + Au collisions by E802 at the AGS. Though their data are concentrated at high p T , there is a small region of overlap between the coverage of HELIOS and E802 for p T = 0.4--0.5 GeV/c. In this region the K/π ratios for both positive and negative particles are very similar even though the bombarding energies differ by more than an order of magnitude. We find no strong indication that the rise in K/π above values expected from p-p collisions is higher for high-E T events than for low-E T events

  3. Measuring the experience of hospitality : Scale development and validation

    Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Groen, Brenda H.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper identifies what customers experience as hospitality and subsequently presents a novel and compact assessment scale for measuring customers’ experience of hospitality at any kind of service organization. The Experience of Hospitality Scale (EH-Scale) takes a broader perspective compared to

  4. Model for the angular distribution of sky radiance

    Hooper, F C; Brunger, A P

    1979-08-01

    A flexible mathematical model is introduced which describes the radiance of the dome of the sky under various conditions. This three-component continuous distribution (TCCD) model is compounded by the superposition of three separate terms, the isotropic, circumsolar and horizon brightening terms, each representing the contribution of a particular sky characteristic. In use a particular sky condition is characterized by the values of the coefficients of each of these three terms, defining the distribution of the total diffuse component. The TCCD model has been demonstrated to fit both the normalized clear sky data and the normalized overcast sky data with an RMS error of about ten percent of the man overall sky radiance. By extension the model could describe variable or partly clouded sky conditions. The model can aid in improving the prediction of solar collector performance.

  5. Radiance Research Particle Soot/Absorption Photometer Instrument Handbook

    Springston, S. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Radiance Research PSAPs as described in this Handbook are deployed in the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) Aerosol Observing System (AOS), the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) AOS, ENA AOS and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)-A. An earlier version of the PSAP is currently operated in the ARM Aerial Facility and at SGP. The older SGP instrument is covered in a separate Handbook.

  6. Analytical properties of the radiance in atmospheric radiative transfer theory

    Otto, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated mathematically strictly that state density functions, as the radiance (specific intensity), exist to describe certain state properties of transported photons on microscopic and the state of the radiation field on macroscopic scale, which have independent physical meanings. Analytical properties as boundedness, continuity, differentiability and integrability of these functions to describe the photon transport are discussed. It is shown that the density functions may be derived based on the assumption of photons as real particles of non-zero and finite size, independently of usual electrodynamics, and certain historically postulated functional relationships between them were proved, that is, these functions can be derived mathematically strictly and consistently within the framework of the theory of the phenomenological radiative transfer if one takes the theory seriously by really assuming photons as particles. In this sense these functions may be treated as fundamental physical quantities within the scope of this theory, if one considers the possibility of the existence of photons. -- Highlights: • Proof of existence of the radiance within the scope of the theory of atmospheric radiative transfer. • Proof of relations between the photon number and photon energy density function and the radiance. • Strictly mathematical derivation of the analytical properties of these state density functions

  7. Patient Experiences with the Preoperative Assessment Clinic (PEPAC): validation of an instrument to measure patient experiences

    Edward, G. M.; Lemaire, L. C.; Preckel, B.; Oort, F. J.; Bucx, M. J. L.; Hollmann, M. W.; de Haes, J. C. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Presently, no comprehensive and validated questionnaire to measure patient experiences of the preoperative assessment clinic (PAC) is available. We developed and validated the Patient Experiences with the Preoperative Assessment Clinic (PEPAC) questionnaire, which can be used for

  8. A neural network method to correct bidirectional effects in water-leaving radiance

    Fan, Yongzhen; Li, Wei; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Stamnes, Knut

    2017-02-01

    The standard method to convert the measured water-leaving radiances from the observation direction to the nadir direction developed by Morel and coworkers requires knowledge of the chlorophyll concentration (CHL). Also, the standard method was developed for open ocean water, which makes it unsuitable for turbid coastal waters. We introduce a neural network method to convert the water-leaving radiance (or the corresponding remote sensing reflectance) from the observation direction to the nadir direction. This method does not require any prior knowledge of the water constituents or the inherent optical properties (IOPs). This method is fast, accurate and can be easily adapted to different remote sensing instruments. Validation using NuRADS measurements in different types of water shows that this method is suitable for both open ocean and coastal waters. In open ocean or chlorophyll-dominated waters, our neural network method produces corrections similar to those of the standard method. In turbid coastal waters, especially sediment-dominated waters, a significant improvement was obtained compared to the standard method.

  9. Measuring the user experience collecting, analyzing, and presenting usability metrics

    Tullis, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the User Experience was the first book that focused on how to quantify the user experience. Now in the second edition, the authors include new material on how recent technologies have made it easier and more effective to collect a broader range of data about the user experience. As more UX and web professionals need to justify their design decisions with solid, reliable data, Measuring the User Experience provides the quantitative analysis training that these professionals need. The second edition presents new metrics such as emotional engagement, personas, k

  10. Estimating snow depth of alpine snowpack via airborne multifrequency passive microwave radiance observations: Colorado, USA

    Kim, R. S.; Durand, M. T.; Li, D.; Baldo, E.; Margulis, S. A.; Dumont, M.; Morin, S.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a newly-proposed snow depth retrieval approach for mountainous deep snow using airborne multifrequency passive microwave (PM) radiance observation. In contrast to previous snow depth estimations using satellite PM radiance assimilation, the newly-proposed method utilized single flight observation and deployed the snow hydrologic models. This method is promising since the satellite-based retrieval methods have difficulties to estimate snow depth due to their coarse resolution and computational effort. Indeed, this approach consists of particle filter using combinations of multiple PM frequencies and multi-layer snow physical model (i.e., Crocus) to resolve melt-refreeze crusts. The method was performed over NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) area in Colorado during 2002 and 2003. Results showed that there was a significant improvement over the prior snow depth estimates and the capability to reduce the prior snow depth biases. When applying our snow depth retrieval algorithm using a combination of four PM frequencies (10.7,18.7, 37.0 and 89.0 GHz), the RMSE values were reduced by 48 % at the snow depth transects sites where forest density was less than 5% despite deep snow conditions. This method displayed a sensitivity to different combinations of frequencies, model stratigraphy (i.e. different number of layering scheme for snow physical model) and estimation methods (particle filter and Kalman filter). The prior RMSE values at the forest-covered areas were reduced by 37 - 42 % even in the presence of forest cover.

  11. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Cloud Cleared Radiances RiCC

    Susskind, Joel; Rosenberg, Robert I.; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    ECMWF, NCEP, and GMAO routinely assimilate radiosonde and other in-situ observations along with satellite IR and MW Sounder radiance observations. NCEP and GMAO use the NCEP GSI Data Assimilation System (DAS).GSI DAS assimilates AIRS, CrIS, IASI channel radiances Ri on a channel-by-channel, case-by-case basis, only for those channels i thought to be unaffected by cloud cover. This test excludes Ri for most tropospheric sounding channels under partial cloud cover conditions. AIRS Version-6 RiCC is a derived quantity representative of what AIRS channel i would have seen if the AIRS FOR were cloud free. All values of RiCC have case-by-case error estimates RiCC associated with them. Our experiments present to the GSI QCd values of AIRS RiCC in place of AIRS Ri observations. GSI DAS assimilates only those values of RiCC it thinks are cloud free. This potentially allows for better coverage of assimilated QCd values of RiCC as compared to Ri.

  12. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    E. Aas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of less than 5%. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  13. Magnetic measurements for RFP experiment on STP-3(M)

    Nagata, Akiyoshi; Tamaru, Takeshi; Arimoto, Hideki; Yamada, Shuichi; Sato, Koichi.

    1984-03-01

    Magnetic measurements are arranged for RFP experiment on STP-3(M). Magnetic measurements will be applied to investigate the discharge parameters, F(field reversal ratio) - theta(pinch parameter) diagram, the physical mechanism of flux enhancement and the toroidal and poloidal mode numbers due to the MHD instability. Theoretical considerations and instrumental techniques for magnetic measurements are described in detail. (author)

  14. Measuring Instructional Differentiation in a Large-Scale Experiment

    Williams, Ryan T.; Swanlund, Andrew; Miller, Shazia; Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Eno, Jared; van der Ploeg, Arie; Meyers, Coby

    2014-01-01

    This study operationalizes four measures of instructional differentiation: one for Grade 2 English language arts (ELA), one for Grade 2 mathematics, one for Grade 5 ELA, and one for Grade 5 mathematics. Our study evaluates their measurement properties of each measure in a large field experiment: the Indiana Diagnostic Assessment Tools Study, which…

  15. The Impact of Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Cloud-Cleared Radiances on Hurricane Joaquin (2015) and Matthew (2016) Forecasts

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Zhenglong; Lim, Agnes H. N.; Li, Jinlong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Goldberg, Mitchell D.

    2017-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders provide high vertical resolution atmospheric sounding information that can improve the forecast skill in numerical weather prediction. Commonly, only clear radiances are assimilated, because IR sounder observations are highly affected by clouds. A cloud-clearing (CC) technique, which removes the cloud effects from an IR cloudy field of view (FOV) and derives the cloud-cleared radiances (CCRs) or clear-sky equivalent radiances, can be an alternative yet effective way to take advantage of the thermodynamic information from cloudy skies in data assimilation. This study develops a Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)-based CC method for deriving Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) CCRs under partially cloudy conditions. Due to the lack of absorption bands on VIIRS, two important quality control steps are implemented in the CC process. Validation using VIIRS clear radiances indicates that the CC method can effectively obtain the CrIS CCRs for FOVs with partial cloud cover. To compare the impacts from assimilation of CrIS original radiances and CCRs, three experiments are carried out on two storm cases, Hurricane Joaquin (2015) and Hurricane Matthew (2016), using Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation assimilation system and Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research Version models. At the analysis time, more CrIS observations are assimilated when using CrIS CCRs than with CrIS original radiances. Comparing temperature, specific humidity, and U/V winds with radiosondes indicates that the data impacts are growing larger with longer time forecasts (beyond 72 h forecast). Hurricane track forecasts also show improvements from the assimilation of CrIS CCRs due to better weather system forecasts. The impacts of CCRs on intensity are basically neutral with mixed positive and negative results.

  16. Introducing Multisensor Satellite Radiance-Based Evaluation for Regional Earth System Modeling

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  17. Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance in the Transition Zone Between Cloud-Free and Cloudy Regions

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, C.; Wiscombe, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) new Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) looks straight up and measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2200 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A surprising spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free atmosphere. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is found to be a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. This new finding may help us to better understand and quantify such physical phenomena as humidification of aerosols in the relatively moist cloud environment and evaporation and activation of cloud droplets.

  18. Retrieving mesospheric water vapour from observations of volume scattering radiances

    P. Vergados

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possibility for a theoretical approach in the estimation of water vapour mixing ratios in the vicinity of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC using satellite observations of Volume Scattering Radiances (VSR obtained at the wavelength of 553 nm. The PMC scattering properties perturb the underlying molecular Rayleigh scattered solar radiance of the background atmosphere. As a result, the presence of PMC leads to an enhancement in the observed VSR at the altitude of the layer; the PMC VSRs are superimposed on the exponentially decreasing with height Rayleigh VSR, of the PMC-free atmosphere. The ratio between the observed and the Rayleigh VSR of the background atmosphere is used to simulate the environment in which the cloud layer is formed. In addition, a microphysical model of ice particle formation is employed to predict the PMC VSRs. The initial water vapour profile is perturbed until the modelled VSRs match the observed, at which point the corresponding temperature and water vapour profiles can be considered as a first approximation of those describing the atmosphere at the time of the observations. The role of temperature and water vapour in the cloud formation is examined by a number of sensitivity tests suggesting that the water vapour plays a dominant role in the cloud formation in agreement with experimental results. The estimated water vapour profiles are compared with independent observations to examine the model capability in the context of this study. The results obtained are in a good agreement at the peak of the PMC layer although the radiance rapidly decreases with height below the peak. This simplified scenario indicates that the technique employed can give a first approximation estimate of the water vapour mixing ratio, giving rise to the VSR observed in the presence of PMC.

  19. Shaping the Future of Patient Experience Measurement in Canadian Healthcare.

    Sutherland, Jason M

    2017-10-01

    Patients' experiences with healthcare providers can be tumultuous and stressful. Focusing on what matters, the experience of care is important to improving patients' quality of life. In this issue's lead article, Kuluski and colleagues (2017) propose moving beyond setting-based patient experience measures. In doing so, the authors emphasize the importance of caregivers and the communities in which patients live in improving patients' and caregivers' care experiences. To achieve these aims, however, the authors demand a higher level of reflexivity from provinces' healthcare funders and providers. © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  20. Measuring Patient Experiences: Is It Meaningful and Actionable?

    Wong, Sabrina T; Johnston, Sharon; Burge, Fred; McGrail, Kim; Hogg, William

    2017-10-01

    Performance measurement must be meaningful to those being asked to contribute data and to the clinicians who are collecting the information. It must be actionable if performance measurement and reporting is to influence health system transformation. To date, measuring patient experiences in all parts of the healthcare system in Canada lags behind other countries. More attention needs to be paid to capturing patients with complex intersecting health and social problems that result from inequitable distribution of wealth and/or underlying structural inequities related to systemic issues such as racism and discrimination, colonialism and patriarchy. Efforts to better capture the experiences of patients who do not regularly access care and who speak English or French as a second language are also needed. Before investing heavily into collecting patient experience data as part of a performance measurement system the following ought to be considered: (1) ensuring value for and buy-in from clinicians who are being asked to collect the data and/or act on the results; (2) investment in the infrastructure to administer iterative, cost-effective patient/family experience data collection, analysis and reporting (e.g., automated software tools) and (3) incorporating practice support (e.g., facilitation) and health system opportunities to integrate the findings from patient experience surveys into policy and practice. Investment into the infrastructure of measuring, reporting and engaging clinicians in improving practice is needed for patient/caregiver experiences to be acted upon. © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  1. Experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton

    Brown, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    A collaboration has been formed to measure the acceleration of antiprotons in the earth's gravitational field. The technique is to produce, decelerate, and trap quantities of antiprotons, to cool them to untralow energy, and to measure their acceleration in a time-of-flight experiment. Present plans and the results of initial efforts toward this end are presented

  2. Estimation of the Potential Detection of Diatom Assemblages Based on Ocean Color Radiance Anomalies in the North Sea

    Anne-Hélène Rêve-Lamarche

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, a large number of new approaches in the domain of ocean-color have been developed, leading to a variety of innovative descriptors for phytoplankton communities. One of these methods, named PHYSAT, currently allows for the qualitative detection of five main phytoplankton groups from ocean-color measurements. Even though PHYSAT products are widely used in various applications and projects, the approach is limited by the fact it identifies only dominant phytoplankton groups. This current limitation is due to the use of biomarker pigment ratios for establishing empirical relationships between in-situ information and specific ocean-color radiance anomalies in open ocean waters. However, theoretical explanations of PHYSAT suggests that it could be possible to detect more than dominance cases but move more toward phytoplanktonic assemblage detection. Thus, to evaluate the potential of PHYSAT for the detection of phytoplankton assemblages, we took advantage of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR survey, collected in both the English Channel and the North Sea. The available CPR dataset contains information on diatom abundance in two large areas of the North Sea for the period 1998-2010. Using this unique dataset, recurrent diatom assemblages were retrieved based on classification of CPR samples. Six diatom assemblages were identified in-situ, each having indicators taxa or species. Once this first step was completed, the in-situ analysis was used to empirically associate the diatom assemblages with specific PHYSAT spectral anomalies. This step was facilitated by the use of previous classifications of regional radiance anomalies in terms of shape and amplitude, coupled with phenological tools. Through a matchup exercise, three CPR assemblages were associated with specific radiance anomalies. The maps of detection of these specific radiances anomalies are in close agreement with current in-situ ecological knowledge.

  3. Development of multi-sensor global cloud and radiance composites for earth radiation budget monitoring from DSCOVR

    Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Duda, David; Thieman, Mandana; Minnis, Patrick; Su, Wenying; Bedka, Kristopher

    2017-10-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) enables analysis of the daytime Earth radiation budget via the onboard Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). Radiance observations and cloud property retrievals from low earth orbit and geostationary satellite imagers have to be co-located with EPIC pixels to provide scene identification in order to select anisotropic directional models needed to calculate shortwave and longwave fluxes. A new algorithm is proposed for optimal merging of selected radiances and cloud properties derived from multiple satellite imagers to obtain seamless global hourly composites at 5-km resolution. An aggregated rating is employed to incorporate several factors and to select the best observation at the time nearest to the EPIC measurement. Spatial accuracy is improved using inverse mapping with gradient search during reprojection and bicubic interpolation for pixel resampling. The composite data are subsequently remapped into EPIC-view domain by convolving composite pixels with the EPIC point spread function defined with a half-pixel accuracy. PSF-weighted average radiances and cloud properties are computed separately for each cloud phase. The algorithm has demonstrated contiguous global coverage for any requested time of day with a temporal lag of under 2 hours in over 95% of the globe.

  4. Airborne observations of far-infrared upwelling radiance in the Arctic

    Q. Libois

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of the Far-InfraRed Radiometer (FIRR were performed in April 2015 during the panarctic NETCARE campaign. Vertical profiles of spectral upwelling radiance in the range 8–50 µm were measured in clear and cloudy conditions from the surface up to 6 km. The clear sky profiles highlight the strong dependence of radiative fluxes to the temperature inversion typical of the Arctic. Measurements acquired for total column water vapour from 1.5 to 10.5 mm also underline the sensitivity of the far-infrared greenhouse effect to specific humidity. The cloudy cases show that optically thin ice clouds increase the cooling rate of the atmosphere, making them important pieces of the Arctic energy balance. One such cloud exhibited a very complex spatial structure, characterized by large horizontal heterogeneities at the kilometre scale. This emphasizes the difficulty of obtaining representative cloud observations with airborne measurements but also points out how challenging it is to model polar clouds radiative effects. These radiance measurements were successfully compared to simulations, suggesting that state-of-the-art radiative transfer models are suited to study the cold and dry Arctic atmosphere. Although FIRR in situ performances compare well to its laboratory performances, complementary simulations show that upgrading the FIRR radiometric resolution would greatly increase its sensitivity to atmospheric and cloud properties. Improved instrument temperature stability in flight and expected technological progress should help meet this objective. The campaign overall highlights the potential for airborne far-infrared radiometry and constitutes a relevant reference for future similar studies dedicated to the Arctic and for the development of spaceborne instruments.

  5. Temperature profiles of an ablation controlled arc in PTFE: II. Simulation of side-on radiances

    Schneidenbach, H; Uhrlandt, D; Franke, St; Seeger, M

    2007-01-01

    The temperature determination by spectroscopic measurements in high-current high-pressure arcs in a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) nozzle under the assumption of an optically thin plasma has been investigated. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium the radial temperature distributions as well as the plasma pressures have been determined by fitting a model to measured spectral radiances considering line and continuum absorption. It is shown that absorption has to be included in the error estimate of the experimental results. The different effects, which cause deviations from the optically thin case, have been analysed numerically and by using a simplified analytical model. The theoretically estimated pressures sensitively depend on the Stark broadening. In the studied plasmas the calculated large electron densities indicate a marked reduction of the Stark widths by nonideality effects. The applicability of the experimental method has been proved for suitably chosen lines

  6. Our experience of blood flow measurements using radioactive tracers

    Danet, Bernard.

    1974-01-01

    A critical study of blood flow measuring methods is proposed. After a review of the various diffusible and non-diffusible radioactive tracers and the corresponding detector systems, the principles which allow to measure blood flow from the data so obtained, are studied. There is a different principle of flow measurement for each type of tracer. The theory of flow measurement using non-diffusible tracers (human serum albumin labelled with 131 I or sup(99m)Tc, 113 In-labelled siderophiline) and its application to cardiac flow measurement are described first. Then the theory of flow measurement using diffusible tracers ( 133 Xe, 85 Kr) and its application to measurement of blood flow through tissues (muscles and kidney particularly) are described. A personal experience of this various flow measurements is reported. The results obtained, the difficulties encountered and the improvments proposed are developed [fr

  7. Radiance intensity enhanced by thin inhomogeneous lossy films

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Ni Bo

    2004-01-01

    Basically, the classical radiative transfer theory assumes that the coherent component of the radiation field is equal to zero and heuristic considerations about energy conservation are used in the phenomenological derivation of the RTE. Here a self-consistent theory is presented to investigate radiative transport in the presence of diffraction processes within thin inhomogeneous films. The problem of linear optics about the transport of scalar radiation within film is solved, a new definition of the radiance is introduced in agreement with earlier definitions and a corresponding radiative transfer equation is derived. The influence of spatial variations of the bulk properties on the propagating mode is described in detail. It is analytically predicted that, unlike homogeneous media, an inhomogeneous film can enhance the radiance intensity in spite of the diffraction and the local extinction. From a practical point of view, the results of this work should be useful to perform the optimal design for many thermoelectric devices such as the new generations of photovoltaiec cells

  8. Correction for reflected sky radiance in low-altitude coastal hyperspectral images.

    Kim, Minsu; Park, Joong Yong; Kopilevich, Yuri; Tuell, Grady; Philpot, William

    2013-11-10

    Low-altitude coastal hyperspectral imagery is sensitive to reflections of sky radiance at the water surface. Even in the absence of sun glint, and for a calm water surface, the wide range of viewing angles may result in pronounced, low-frequency variations of the reflected sky radiance across the scan line depending on the solar position. The variation in reflected sky radiance can be obscured by strong high-spatial-frequency sun glint and at high altitude by path radiance. However, at low altitudes, the low-spatial-frequency sky radiance effect is frequently significant and is not removed effectively by the typical corrections for sun glint. The reflected sky radiance from the water surface observed by a low-altitude sensor can be modeled in the first approximation as the sum of multiple-scattered Rayleigh path radiance and the single-scattered direct-solar-beam radiance by the aerosol in the lower atmosphere. The path radiance from zenith to the half field of view (FOV) of a typical airborne spectroradiometer has relatively minimal variation and its reflected radiance to detector array results in a flat base. Therefore the along-track variation is mostly contributed by the forward single-scattered solar-beam radiance. The scattered solar-beam radiances arrive at the water surface with different incident angles. Thus the reflected radiance received at the detector array corresponds to a certain scattering angle, and its variation is most effectively parameterized using the downward scattering angle (DSA) of the solar beam. Computation of the DSA must account for the roll, pitch, and heading of the platform and the viewing geometry of the sensor along with the solar ephemeris. Once the DSA image is calculated, the near-infrared (NIR) radiance from selected water scan lines are compared, and a relationship between DSA and NIR radiance is derived. We then apply the relationship to the entire DSA image to create an NIR reference image. Using the NIR reference image

  9. Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Abundance from Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Limb Emission Measurements made by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M., III

    2002-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite in December, 2001. SABER is designed to provide measurements of the key radiative and chemical sources and sinks of energy in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). SABER measures Earth limb emission in 10 broadband radiometer channels ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers. Measurements are made both day and night over the latitude range from 54 deg. S to 87 deg. N with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. In this paper we concentrate on retrieved profiles of kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) and CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr), inferred from SABER-observed 15 micrometer and 4.3 micrometer limb emissions, respectively. SABER-measured limb radiances are in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) in the MLT region. The complexity of non-LTE radiation transfer combined with the large volume of data measured by SABER requires new retrieval approaches and radiative transfer techniques to accurately and efficiently retrieve the data products. In this paper we present the salient features of the coupled non-LTE T(sub k)/CO2 retrieval algorithm, along with preliminary results.

  10. The PVLAS experiment for measuring the magnetic birefringence of vacuum

    Zavattini, G.; Gastaldi, U.; Messineo, G.; Piemontese, L.; Della Valle, F.; Milotti, E.; Pengo, R.; Ruoso, G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principle and status of the PVLAS experiment being prepared at the Department of Physics and INFN section in Ferrara, Italy. The goal of the experiment is to measure the magnetic birefringence of vacuum. This effect is directly connected to the vacuum QED structure and can be detected by measuring the ellipticity acquired by a linearly polarized laser beam traversing a strong magnetic field. Vacuum magnetic birefringence is predicted by the Euler- Heisenberg effective Lagrangian. The experimental method is also sensitive to new physics and could place new laboratory limits to hypothetical particles coupling to two photons, such as axion like particles, or millicharged particles.

  11. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  12. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Bell, Ronald E.; Feder, Russell

    2010-01-01

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  13. Development of Multi-Sensor Global Cloud and Radiance Composites for DSCOVR EPIC Imager with Subpixel Definition

    Khlopenkov, K. V.; Duda, D. P.; Thieman, M. M.; Sun-Mack, S.; Su, W.; Minnis, P.; Bedka, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is designed to study the daytime Earth radiation budget by means of onboard Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). EPIC imager observes in several shortwave bands (317-780 nm), while NISTAR measures the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) whole-disk radiance in shortwave and total broadband windows. Calculation of albedo and outgoing longwave flux requires a high-resolution scene identification such as the radiance observations and cloud property retrievals from low earth orbit and geostationary satellite imagers. These properties have to be co-located with EPIC imager pixels to provide scene identification and to select anisotropic directional models, which are then used to adjust the NISTAR-measured radiance and subsequently obtain the global daytime shortwave and longwave fluxes. This work presents an algorithm for optimal merging of selected radiances and cloud properties derived from multiple satellite imagers to obtain seamless global hourly composites at 5-km resolution. The highest quality observation is selected by means of an aggregated rating which incorporates several factors such as the nearest time relative to EPIC observation, lowest viewing zenith angle, and others. This process provides a smoother transition and avoids abrupt changes in the merged composite data. Higher spatial accuracy in the composite product is achieved by using the inverse mapping with gradient search during reprojection and bicubic interpolation for pixel resampling. The composite data are subsequently remapped into the EPIC-view domain by convolving composite pixels with the EPIC point spread function (PSF) defined with a half-pixel accuracy. Within every EPIC footprint, the PSF-weighted average radiances and cloud properties are computed for each cloud phase and then stored within five data subsets (clear-sky, water cloud, ice cloud, total cloud, and no

  14. Far-infrared Spectral Radiance Observations and Modeling of Arctic Cirrus: Preliminary Results From RHUBC

    Humpage, Neil; Green, Paul D.; Harries, John E.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the important contribution of the far-infrared (electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths greater than 12 μm) to the Earth's radiative energy budget. In a cloud-free atmosphere, a significant fraction of the Earth's cooling to space from the mid- and upper troposphere takes place via the water vapor pure rotational band between 17 and 33 μm. Cirrus clouds also play an important role in the Earth's outgoing longwave radiation. The effect of cirrus on far-infrared radiation is of particular interest, since the refractive index of ice depends strongly on wavelength in this spectral region. The scattering properties of ice crystals are directly related to the refractive index, so consequently the spectral signature of cirrus measured in the FIR is sensitive to the cloud microphysical properties [1, 2]. By examining radiances measured at wavelengths between the strong water vapor absorption lines in the FIR, the understanding of the relationship between cirrus microphysics and the radiative transfer of thermal energy through cirrus may be improved. Until recently, very few observations of FIR spectral radiances had been made. The Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) was developed by Imperial College to address this lack of observational data. TAFTS observes both zenith and nadir radiances at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, between 80 and 600 cm-1. During February and March 2007, TAFTS was involved in RHUBC (the Radiative Heating in Under-explored Bands Campaign), an ARM funded field campaign based at the ACRF-North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow, situated at 71° latitude. Infrared zenith spectral observations were taken by both TAFTS and the AERI-ER (spectral range 400-3300 cm-1) from the ground during both cloud-free and cirrus conditions. A wide range of other instrumentation was also available at the site, including a micropulse lidar, 35 GHz radar and the University of Colorado/NOAA Ground-based Scanning Radiometer

  15. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km V006

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km (MOD021KM) contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 36 discrete bands located in the 0.4...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE: CHEMICAL-FREE CLEANING OF SEMICONDUCTORS BY THE RADIANCE PROCESS

    The Radiance Process is a patented dry process for removing contaminants from surfaces. It uses light, usually from a pulsed laser and a gas inert to the surface, to entrain released contaminants. The focus of this effort is to assess the applicability of the Radiance Process t...

  17. Optimal Design of Experiments by Combining Coarse and Fine Measurements

    Lee, Alpha A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Colwell, Lucy J.

    2017-11-01

    In many contexts, it is extremely costly to perform enough high-quality experimental measurements to accurately parametrize a predictive quantitative model. However, it is often much easier to carry out large numbers of experiments that indicate whether each sample is above or below a given threshold. Can many such categorical or "coarse" measurements be combined with a much smaller number of high-resolution or "fine" measurements to yield accurate models? Here, we demonstrate an intuitive strategy, inspired by statistical physics, wherein the coarse measurements are used to identify the salient features of the data, while the fine measurements determine the relative importance of these features. A linear model is inferred from the fine measurements, augmented by a quadratic term that captures the correlation structure of the coarse data. We illustrate our strategy by considering the problems of predicting the antimalarial potency and aqueous solubility of small organic molecules from their 2D molecular structure.

  18. Assessment of Mars Atmospheric Temperature Retrievals from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer Radiances

    Hoffman, Matthew J.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Weisenstein, Deborah; Uymin, Gennady; Moncet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of Mars data assimilation. particularly quantification of measurement errors and generation of averaging kernels. we have evaluated atmospheric temperature retrievals from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) radiances. Multiple sets of retrievals have been considered in this study; (1) retrievals available from the Planetary Data System (PDS), (2) retrievals based on variants of the retrieval algorithm used to generate the PDS retrievals, and (3) retrievals produced using the Mars 1-Dimensional Retrieval (M1R) algorithm based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS ) forward model. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared to the MGS Radio Science (RS) temperature profiles. For the samples tested, the M1R temperature profiles can be made to agree within 2 K with the RS temperature profiles, but only after tuning the prior and error statistics. Use of a global prior that does not take into account the seasonal dependence leads errors of up 6 K. In polar samples. errors relative to the RS temperature profiles are even larger. In these samples, the PDS temperature profiles also exhibit a poor fit with RS temperatures. This fit is worse than reported in previous studies, indicating that the lack of fit is due to a bias correction to TES radiances implemented after 2004. To explain the differences between the PDS and Ml R temperatures, the algorithms are compared directly, with the OSS forward model inserted into the PDS algorithm. Factors such as the filtering parameter, the use of linear versus nonlinear constrained inversion, and the choice of the forward model, are found to contribute heavily to the differences in the temperature profiles retrieved in the polar regions, resulting in uncertainties of up to 6 K. Even outside the poles, changes in the a priori statistics result in different profile shapes which all fit the radiances within the specified error. The importance of the a priori statistics prevents

  19. Health physics measurements of laser radiation: Experience and competence wanted

    Fischer, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the parameters required for an analysis of hazards involved is a complex task in terms of measuring techniques and calibration, and a costly procedure at that. Although part of the evaluation work can be done with the support of computers, evaluation and interpretation of measured information requires the experience and competence of the human expert. It is to be hoped that the computer industry will soon have developed turn-key solutions of universal applicability for analytical tasks of this kind, so that in the near future determination of the source terms, especially for LED or IRED radiation, will be an easy task. (orig./CB) [de

  20. A conceptual analysis of quantum zeno; paradox, measurement, and experiment

    Home, D.; Whitaker, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Arguments on controversial points concerning quantum measurement theory and the quantum Zeno effect are presented. In particular it is argued that (1) the quantum Zeno effect is a genuine result of quantum theory and current quantum measurement theory, independent of the projection postulate; (2) the effect is of very general nature and rests on analogous arguments to those involved in Bell close-quote s theories; (3) the term open-quotes quantum Zeno effectclose quotes may usefully be restricted to experiments where a measuring device exerts a nonlocal negative-result effect on a microscopic system, mere inhibition of a transition by a directly interacting device not qualifying; (4) since no decay is truly exponential, theoretically all decay phenomena should exhibit the quantum Zeno effect under observation, continuous or discrete. A detailed study is made of the experiments claiming to demonstrate the effect; it is found that they do not meet our criterion above. copyright 1997 Academic Press, Inc

  1. Top Quark Properties Measurements with the ATLAS Experiment

    Quijada, J A Murillo

    2016-01-01

    Results on recent measurements of top quark properties with the ATLAS experiment at the European Laboratory, CERN, are shown. The measurements are performed using the full data set recorded during the LHC Run-I. The full data set consists of a collected integrated luminosities ∫Tdt of 4.6 fb -1 recorded at a proton-proton collision energy of √ s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb -1 collected at 8 TeV. The mentioned top quark properties include: spin correlation, charge asymmetry, W-boson polarization, color flow, top mass and top width in events with a top and anti-top quark pair ( tt ). An introduction to the LHC and the ATLAS detector is included and latest main results from this experiment. The contents include the current world benchmark results for the different properties and plans for future measurements during the ongoing LHC Run-II. (paper)

  2. Surface deposition measurements of the TMI-2 gross decontamination experiment

    McIssac, C.V.; Hetzer, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    In order to measure the effectiveness of the gross decontamination experiment (principally a water spray technique) performed in the TMI-2 reactor building, the Technical Information and Examination Program's Radiation and Environment personnel made surface activity measurements before and after the experiment. In conjunction with surface sampling, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and gamma spectrometry measurements were also performed to distinguish between radiation fields and contamination. The surface sampler used to collect samples from external surfaces within the reactor building is a milling tool having four major components: a 1.27-cm constant-speed drill; a drill support assembly that allows setting sample penetration depth; filter cartridges for intake air purification and sample collection; and an air pump that forces air across the surface being sampled and through the sample filter cartridge

  3. Measurement of the neutrino velocity in OPERA experiment

    Dracos, M., E-mail: marcos.dracos@in2p3.fr [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-02-15

    The OPERA neutrino experiment has measured the neutrino velocity using the CERN CNGS beam over a baseline of 730 km. The measurement is based on data taken by OPERA in the years 2009, 2010, 2011. An arrival time of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum of (6.5±7.4(stat.){sub −8.0}{sup +8.3}(sys.))ns was measured corresponding to a relative difference of the muon neutrino velocity with respect to the speed of light (v−c)/c=(2.7±3.1(stat.){sub −3.3}{sup +3.4}(sys.))×10{sup −6}. During spring 2012 the CNGS provided during two weeks a short proton bunched beam dedicated to the neutrino velocity measurement. The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory has measured the velocity of neutrinos with slightly modified setup compared to 2011 measurements. These modifications increased the timing accuracy and also fixed previous problems. The arrival time of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum has been found to be in agreement with the previous measurement. This result confirms the revised OPERA result and that indeed the neutrino anticipation announced in September 2011 was due to technical problems.

  4. Franck--Hertz experiment with higher excitation level measurements

    Liu, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of the higher levels of 6 3 P 2 and 6 1 P 1 of the mercury atom in the Franck--Hertz experiment has been introduced into the junior and senior laboratory course by using a homemade tetrode Franck--Hertz tube. The main structure of the tube is described. The optimum operating conditions are in the temperature range between 130 and 150 0 C and the collector currents are of the order of 10 -9 A. The additional observations of the famous Franck--Hertz experiment in the laboratory course will give the students more familiarity with the quantum behavior of atoms

  5. AMSR2 all-sky radiance assimilation and its impact on the analysis and forecast of Hurricane Sandy with a limited-area data assimilation system

    Chun Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A method to assimilate all-sky radiances from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 was developed within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model's data assimilation (WRFDA system. The four essential elements are: (1 extending the community radiative transform model's (CRTM interface to include hydrometeor profiles; (2 using total water Qt as the moisture control variable; (3 using a warm-rain physics scheme for partitioning the Qt increment into individual increments of water vapour, cloud liquid water and rain; and (4 adopting a symmetric observation error model for all-sky radiance assimilation.Compared to a benchmark experiment with no AMSR2 data, the impact of assimilating clear-sky or all-sky AMSR2 radiances on the analysis and forecast of Hurricane Sandy (2012 was assessed through analysis/forecast cycling experiments using WRF and WRFDA's three-dimensional variational (3DVAR data assimilation scheme. With more cloud/precipitation-affected data being assimilated around tropical cyclone (TC core areas in the all-sky AMSR2 assimilation experiment, better analyses were obtained in terms of the TC's central sea level pressure (CSLP, warm-core structure and cloud distribution. Substantial (>20 % error reduction in track and CSLP forecasts was achieved from both clear-sky and all-sky AMSR2 assimilation experiments, and this improvement was consistent from the analysis time to 72-h forecasts. Moreover, the all-sky assimilation experiment consistently yielded better track and CSLP forecasts than the clear-sky did for all forecast lead times, due to a better analysis in the TC core areas. Positive forecast impact from assimilating AMSR2 radiances is also seen when verified against the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF analysis and the Stage IV precipitation analysis, with an overall larger positive impact from the all-sky assimilation experiment.

  6. Thermal striping heat transfer measurements in sodium AKB experiments

    Sheriff, N.; Sephton, K.P.; Gleave, C.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations are produced in the sodium flow of fast reactors where hot and cold flow streams mix. A sodium experiment mounted on the Interatom facility AKB has been used to measure the heat transfer conditions in a flow stream with typical temperature fluctuations. The measurements were made at locations near to the leading edge of a plate, where in practice the most severe conditions are expected. With tests carried out over a wide range of flows good correlations of the heat transfer data with flow have been obtained. A simple theoretical model is proposed to explain the magnitude of the measured heat transfer coefficients, and the use of reasonable assumptions in the model produce good agreement with the experimental measurements

  7. Experience from using plastic film in radon measurement

    Joensson, G.

    1999-01-01

    Plastic film is a useful detector of radon gas. The method of detection of the gas is used for several decades to measure radon concentrations both indoors and in soil. Experiences from radon measurements in Sweden indoors, in soil and in water using the plastic film Kodak LR 115-II are discussed in this report. Some examples are given from various projects. One example is taken from a large scale mapping of indoor radon levels in houses, where the building material is the main source of radon. In another example the measurements from a large scale soil radon mapping are discussed. The use of the plastic film for measurements of radon levels in water is also discussed. All the investigations are made in order to give the authorities concerned information of the radon situation and to study the connection between high indoor radon levels and various types of cancers

  8. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide isotopomers during incubation experiments

    Winther, Malte Nordmann; Balslev-Harder, David; Christensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    relevant for studies of atmospheric chemistry. We present results from continuous incubation experiments with denitrifying bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens (producing and reducing N2O) and P. chlororaphis (only producing N2O). The continuous position dependent measurements reveal the transient pattern....... fluorescens, the calculations results in SP values of −5.7 ‰ ± 5.6 during production of N2O and 2.3 ‰ ± 3.2 during reduction of N2O. In summary, we implemented continuous measurements of N2O isotopomers during incubation of denitrifying bacteria and believe that similar experiments will lead to a better...... understanding of denitrifying bacteria and N2O turnover in soils and sediments and ultimately hands-on knowledge on the biotic mechanisms behind greenhouse gas exchange of the Globe....

  9. arXiv Top quark measurements in the CMS experiment

    INSPIRE-00102167

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results on top-quark physics obtained at the CMS experiment are reported based on the data recorded at centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV. Inclusive and differential cross sections for both top-quark pair and single top-quark production are presented, as well as measurements of top-quark properties in production and decay, and searches for anomalous couplings. The presented measurements test theoretical predictions, including recent perturbative QCD calculations, provide constraints of fundamental standard model parameters, and set limits on physics beyond the standard model.

  10. The spiritual experience index: A measure of spiritual maturity.

    Genia, V

    1991-12-01

    The Spiritual Experience Index was developed to measure spiritual maturity in persons of diverse religious and spiritual beliefs. The scale was constructed from a developmental rather than a multidimensional conceptualization of faith. Initial findings from a religiously heterogeneous college sample indicated good reliability for the SEI and supported its use as a unidimensional measure. Higher scores on the SEI were significantly related to lower dogmatism and intolerance of ambiguity. The SEI was also moderately related to higher religious participation and positively correlated with intrinsicness and quest. However, compared with the intrinsic and quest scales, the SEI emerged as the strongest indicator of adaptive spiritual functioning. Directions for future research are suggested.

  11. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bronner, J.; Hartet, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, Freiburg (Germany); Franz, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO{sub 2} will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  12. Online radiation dose measurement system for ATLAS experiment

    Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuz, M.; Bronner, J.; Hartet, J.; Franz, S.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments at Large Hadron Collider, detectors and electronics will be exposed to high fluxes of photons, charged particles and neutrons. Damage caused by the radiation will influence performance of detectors. It will therefore be important to continuously monitor the radiation dose in order to follow the level of degradation of detectors and electronics and to correctly predict future radiation damage. A system for online radiation monitoring using semiconductor radiation sensors at large number of locations has been installed in the ATLAS experiment. Ionizing dose in SiO 2 will be measured with RadFETs, displacement damage in silicon in units of 1-MeV(Si) equivalent neutron fluence with p-i-n diodes. At 14 monitoring locations where highest radiation levels are expected the fluence of thermal neutrons will be measured from current gain degradation in dedicated bipolar transistors. The design of the system and tests of its performance in mixed radiation field is described in this paper. First results from this test campaign confirm that doses can be measured with sufficient sensitivity (mGy for total ionizing dose measurements, 10 9 n/cm 2 for NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) measurements, 10 12 n/cm 2 for thermal neutrons) and accuracy (about 20%) for usage in the ATLAS detector

  13. Comparing the lived experience to objective measures of Accessibility

    Angela Curl; John Nelson; Jillian Anable

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents work undertaken to date as part of PhD research into the process of Accessibility Planning in the UK and how existing objective measures of accessibility relate to individual perceptions or the "lived experience" of accessibility. Since 1997, Accessibility has been framed in the social exclusion context within UK transport planning and policy, focusing on the ability of people to participate fully in society, which is seen as being limited by poor accessibility. This appro...

  14. Selected Measurements of Rare Decays at the LHCb Experiment

    Pikies, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results of rare decays B$^0$$\\to K*^0\\mu\\mu$, B$^0 \\to K*^0$ee, $\\Lambda_b\\to\\Lambda\\mu\\mu$ and B$^0_s$ governed by Flavour Changing Neutral Current transitions are discussed in this paper. The angular distributions and differential branching fractions measurements were performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3:0 fb$^{-1}$ collected at the LHCb experiment.

  15. Use of INSAT-3D sounder and imager radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation system and its implications in the analyses and forecasts

    Indira Rani, S.; Taylor, Ruth; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    INSAT-3D, the first Indian geostationary satellite with sounding capability, provides valuable information over India and the surrounding oceanic regions which are pivotal to Numerical Weather Prediction. In collaboration with UK Met Office, NCMRWF developed the assimilation capability of INSAT-3D Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSBT), both from the sounder and imager, in the 4D-Var assimilation system being used at NCMRWF. Out of the 18 sounder channels, radiances from 9 channels are selected for assimilation depending on relevance of the information in each channel. The first three high peaking channels, the CO2 absorption channels and the three water vapor channels (channel no. 10, 11, and 12) are assimilated both over land and Ocean, whereas the window channels (channel no. 6, 7, and 8) are assimilated only over the Ocean. Measured satellite radiances are compared with that from short range forecasts to monitor the data quality. This is based on the assumption that the observed satellite radiances are free from calibration errors and the short range forecast provided by NWP model is free from systematic errors. Innovations (Observation - Forecast) before and after the bias correction are indicative of how well the bias correction works. Since the biases vary with air-masses, time, scan angle and also due to instrument degradation, an accurate bias correction algorithm for the assimilation of INSAT-3D sounder radiance is important. This paper discusses the bias correction methods and other quality controls used for the selected INSAT-3D sounder channels and the impact of bias corrected radiance in the data assimilation system particularly over India and surrounding oceanic regions.

  16. Real-time measurement and control at Jet. Experiment Control

    Felton, R.; Zabeo, L.; Sartori, F.; Piccolo, F.; Farthing, J.; Budd, T.; Dorling, S.; McCullen, P.; Harling, J.; Dalley, S.; Goodyear, A.; Stephen, A.; Card, P.; Bright, M.; Lucock, R.; Jones, E.; Griph, S.; Hogben, C.; Beldishevski, M.; Buckley, M.; Davis, J.; Young, I.; Hemming, O.; Wheatley, M.; Heesterman, P.; Lloyd, G.; Walters, M.; Bridge, R.; Leggate, H.; Howell, D.; Zastrow, K.D.; Giroud, C.; Coffey, I.; Hawkes, N.; Stamp, M.; Barnsley, R.; Edlington, T.; Guenther, K.; Gowers, C.; Popovichef, S.; Huber, A.; Ingesson, C.; Joffrin, E.; Mazon, D.; Moreau, D.; Murari, A.; Riva, M.; Barana, O.; Bolzonella, T.; Valisa, M.; Innocente, P.; Zerbini, M.; Bosak, K.; Blum, J.; Vitale, E.; Crisanti, F.; La Luna, E. de; Sanchez, J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past few ears, the preparation of ITER-relevant plasma scenarios has been the main focus experimental activity on tokamaks. The development of integrated, simultaneous, real-time controls of plasma shape, current, pressure, temperature, radiation, neutron profiles, and also impurities, ELMs (edge localized modes) and MHD are now seen to be essential for further development of quasi-steady state conditions with feedback, or the stabilisation of transient phenomena with event-driven actions. For this thrust, the EFDA JET Real Time Project has developed a set of real-time plasma measurements, experiment control, and communication facilities. The Plasma Diagnostics used for real-time experiments are Far Infra Red interferometry, polarimetry, visible, UV and X-ray spectroscopy, LIDAR, bolometry, neutron and magnetics. Further analysis systems produce integrated results such as temperature profiles on geometry derived from MHD equilibrium solutions. The Actuators include toroidal, poloidal and divertor coils, gas and pellet fuelling, neutral beam injection, radiofrequency (ICRH) waves and microwaves (LH). The Heating/Fuelling Operators can either define a power or gas request waveform or select the real-time instantaneous power/gas request from the Real Time Experiment Central Control (RTCC) system. The Real Time Experiment Control system provides both a high-level, control-programming environment and interlocks with the actuators. A MATLAB facility is being developed for the development of more complex controllers. The plasma measurement, controller and plant control systems communicate in ATM network. The EFDA Real Time project is essential groundwork for future reactors such as ITER. It involves many staff from several institutions. The facility is now frequently used in experiments. (authors)

  17. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the ν μ oscillate to ν τ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ν e . This thesis presents a measurement of the ν e appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ν e appearance.

  18. Construction and Initial Validation of the Multiracial Experiences Measure (MEM)

    Yoo, Hyung Chol; Jackson, Kelly; Guevarra, Rudy P.; Miller, Matthew J.; Harrington, Blair

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Multiracial Experiences Measure (MEM): a new measure that assesses uniquely racialized risks and resiliencies experienced by individuals of mixed racial heritage. Across two studies, there was evidence for the validation of the 25-item MEM with 5 subscales including Shifting Expressions, Perceived Racial Ambiguity, Creating Third Space, Multicultural Engagement, and Multiracial Discrimination. The 5-subscale structure of the MEM was supported by a combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Evidence of criterion-related validity was partially supported with MEM subscales correlating with measures of racial diversity in one’s social network, color-blind racial attitude, psychological distress, and identity conflict. Evidence of discriminant validity was supported with MEM subscales not correlating with impression management. Implications for future research and suggestions for utilization of the MEM in clinical practice with multiracial adults are discussed. PMID:26460977

  19. Methodology for measurement in schools and kindergartens: experiences

    Fotjikova, I.; Navratilova Rovenska, K.

    2015-01-01

    In more than 1500 schools and preschool facilities, long-term radon measurement was carried out in the last 3 y. The negative effect of thermal retrofitting on the resulting long-term radon averages is evident. In some of the facilities, low ventilation rates and correspondingly high radon levels were found, so it was recommended to change ventilation habits. However, some of the facilities had high radon levels due to its ingress from soil gas. Technical measures should be undertaken to reduce radon exposure in this case. The paper presents the long-term experiences with the two-stage measurement methodology for investigation of radon levels in school and preschool facilities and its possible improvements. (authors)

  20. Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment - Abstract of Issues 9907W

    Papadopoulos, N.; Pitta, A. T.; Markopoulos, N.; Limniou, M.; Lemos, M. A. N. D. A.; Lemos, F.; Freire, F. G.

    1999-11-01

    Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment simulates a series of viscosity experiments. Viscosity is an important subject in chemistry and chemical engineering. It is important when dealing with intermolecular forces in liquids and gases and it has enormous relevance in all technological aspects of equipment dealing with liquids or gases. Most university-level chemistry courses include viscosity to some extent. Viscosity Measurement includes three virtual experiments: an Ostwald viscometer simulator, a falling-ball viscometer simulator, and a balance simulator for a simple determination of the density of a liquid. The Ostwald viscometer simulator and the balance simulator allow the student to find out how composition and temperature influence the density and viscosity of an ethanol-water mixture. The falling-ball viscometer simulator allows the student to determine experimentally the size and density of the ball required to measure viscosity of various liquids. Each virtual experiment includes a corresponding theoretical section. Support from the program is sufficient to enable the students to carry out a virtual experiment sensibly and on their own. Preparation is not essential. Students can use the program unsupervised, thus saving staff time and allowing flexibility in students' time. The design of the program interface plays a key role in the success of a simulated experiment. Direct manipulation has greater intuitive appeal than alternative interface forms such as menus and has been observed to provide performance and learning advantages (1). We tried to design an interface that is visually attractive, is user friendly with simple and intuitive navigation, and provides appropriate schematic animations to clarify the principles of the laboratory procedures. The opening screen presents the virtual experiments that can be selected. Clicking an icon takes the student to the appropriate section. Viscosity Measurement allows the student to concentrate on the

  1. Spectral emission measurements of lithium on the lithium tokamak experiment

    Gray, T. K.; Biewer, T. M.; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Granstedt, E. M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    There has been a long-standing collaboration between ORNL and PPPL on edge and boundary layer physics. As part of this collaboration, ORNL has a large role in the instrumentation and interpretation of edge physics in the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). In particular, a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic is being designed and undergoing staged testing on LTX. Here we present results of passively measured lithium emission at 5166.89 A in LTX in anticipation of active spectroscopy measurements, which will be enabled by the installation of a neutral beam in 2013. Preliminary measurements are made in transient LTX plasmas with plasma current, I{sub p} < 70 kA, ohmic heating power, P{sub oh}{approx} 0.3 MW and discharge lifetimes of 10-15 ms. Measurements are made with a short focal length spectrometer and optics similar to the CHERS diagnostics on NSTX [R. E. Bell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68(2), 1273-1280 (1997)]. These preliminary measurements suggest that even without the neutral beam for active spectroscopy, there is sufficient passive lithium emission to allow for line-of-sight profile measurements of ion temperature, T{sub i}; toroidal velocity and v{sub t}. Results show peak T{sub i} = 70 eV and peak v{sub t} = 45 km/s were reached 10 ms into the discharge.

  2. Nuclear abundance measurements inside MIR and ISS with Sileye experiments

    Casolino, M.

    In this work we present measurements of cosmic ray nuclear abundances above 150 MeV/n performed inside Mir space station between 1998 and 2000. Data have been obtained with SilEye-2 detector, a 6 plane silicon strip detector telescope designed to measure environmental radiation and investigate on the Light Flash phenomenon. In standalone mode, SilEye-2 is capable to measure LET distribution spectra and identify nuclear species with energy above 100 MeV/n: a total of 100 sessions comprising more than 1000 hours of observation were perfomed in the years 1998-2000, recording also several Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. Cosmic ray abundances inside a spacecraft can differ from the primary component due to interaction with the interposed material of the hull and the instruments. We report on LET measurements and relative abundances from Boron to Iron measured in different regions and at different geomagnetic cutoffs, in solar quiet conditions and during SEP events, showing how the composition varies in these different situations. We also report on preliminary results on cosmic ray measurements inside ISS (27/4/2002 - 4/5/2002) obtained with Sileye-3/Alteino experiment.

  3. Chained Bell Inequality Experiment with High-Efficiency Measurements

    Tan, T. R.; Wan, Y.; Erickson, S.; Bierhorst, P.; Kienzler, D.; Glancy, S.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2017-03-01

    We report correlation measurements on two 9Be+ ions that violate a chained Bell inequality obeyed by any local-realistic theory. The correlations can be modeled as derived from a mixture of a local-realistic probabilistic distribution and a distribution that violates the inequality. A statistical framework is formulated to quantify the local-realistic fraction allowable in the observed distribution without the fair-sampling or independent-and-identical-distributions assumptions. We exclude models of our experiment whose local-realistic fraction is above 0.327 at the 95% confidence level. This bound is significantly lower than 0.586, the minimum fraction derived from a perfect Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality experiment. Furthermore, our data provide a device-independent certification of the deterministically created Bell states.

  4. Time of flight measurement on the SOFIA experiment

    Bail, A.; Taieb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Belier, G.; Laurent, B.; Pellereau, E.

    2011-01-01

    The SOFIA experiment, which will be held at GSI (Darmstadt (Germany)) will allow to completely determine the mass and charge numbers of fragments produced in the fission reaction of radioactive actinides in reverse kinematics. Therefore, a dedicated setup has been developed for the Time of Flight measurement of relativistic heavy ions. The studies, which led to the choice of the adequate plastic scintillators and photomultipliers, are presented. Tests have been undertaken with the ELSA laser and electron beam facility. They shown that a suitable choice would be EJ-232 plastic scintillator for the ToF wall and EJ-232Q for the start detector and Hamamatsu H6533 and H10580 photomultipliers. This was confirmed by two test experiments realized at GSI with relativistic heavy ion beam ( 56 Fe and 238 U), where a time of flight resolution better than 20 ps FWHM was reached. (authors)

  5. Time of flight measurement on the SOFIA experiment

    Bail, A.; Taieb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Belier, G.; Laurent, B.; Pellereau, E. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    The SOFIA experiment, which will be held at GSI (Darmstadt (Germany)) will allow to completely determine the mass and charge numbers of fragments produced in the fission reaction of radioactive actinides in reverse kinematics. Therefore, a dedicated setup has been developed for the Time of Flight measurement of relativistic heavy ions. The studies, which led to the choice of the adequate plastic scintillators and photomultipliers, are presented. Tests have been undertaken with the ELSA laser and electron beam facility. They shown that a suitable choice would be EJ-232 plastic scintillator for the ToF wall and EJ-232Q for the start detector and Hamamatsu H6533 and H10580 photomultipliers. This was confirmed by two test experiments realized at GSI with relativistic heavy ion beam ({sup 56}Fe and {sup 238}U), where a time of flight resolution better than 20 ps FWHM was reached. (authors)

  6. Measuring mixing efficiency in experiments of strongly stratified turbulence

    Augier, P.; Campagne, A.; Valran, T.; Calpe Linares, M.; Mohanan, A. V.; Micard, D.; Viboud, S.; Segalini, A.; Mordant, N.; Sommeria, J.; Lindborg, E.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic and atmospheric models need better parameterization of the mixing efficiency. Therefore, we need to measure this quantity for flows representative of geophysical flows, both in terms of types of flows (with vortices and/or waves) and of dynamical regimes. In order to reach sufficiently large Reynolds number for strongly stratified flows, experiments for which salt is used to produce the stratification have to be carried out in a large rotating platform of at least 10-meter diameter.We present new experiments done in summer 2017 to study experimentally strongly stratified turbulence and mixing efficiency in the Coriolis platform. The flow is forced by a slow periodic movement of an array of large vertical or horizontal cylinders. The velocity field is measured by 3D-2C scanned horizontal particles image velocimetry (PIV) and 2D vertical PIV. Six density-temperature probes are used to measure vertical and horizontal profiles and signals at fixed positions.We will show how we rely heavily on open-science methods for this study. Our new results on the mixing efficiency will be presented and discussed in terms of mixing parameterization.

  7. A unique experiment. Measurement of radiation doses at Vinca

    NONE

    1960-07-15

    For the first time in the history of the peaceful applications of atomic energy, an experiment was conducted to determine the exact levels of radiation exposure resulting from a reactor incident. The experiment was made at Vinca, Yugoslavia, wherein October 1958 six persons had been subjected to high doses of neutron and gamma radiation during a brief uncontrolled run of a zero-power reactor. One of them died but the other five were successfully treated at the Curie Hospital in Paris. In the case of four of them, the treatment involved the grafting of healthy bone marrow to counteract the effects of radiation on blood-forming tissues. It was recognized that if the effects produced on the irradiated persons could be related to the exact doses of radiation they had received, it would be possible to gain immensely valuable knowledge about the biological consequences of acute and high level radiation exposure on a quantitative basis. It was suggested to the Yugoslav authorities that a dosimetry experiment be conducted at Vinca. The most accurate modern techniques of dosimetry developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were employed during the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the neutron and gamma doses were made at points where the people had been located. At these points the effects of the radiation on the salt solution in the phantoms were studied. In particular, the energy distribution of the radiation was investigated.It was the ratio between the various components of the radiation that was of special interest in these measurements because this ratio itself would help in determining the exact doses. The dose of one of the components, viz. slow neutrons, had already been determined during the treatment of the patients. If the ratio of the components could be ascertained, the doses of the fast neutrons and gamma rays could also be established because the ratio would not be affected by the power level at which the reactor was operated

  8. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment

    Eriksson, S.

    2018-03-01

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10-10. This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10-4. The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  9. Construction of a Matched Global Cloud and Radiance Product from LEO/GEO and EPIC Observations to Estimate Daytime Earth Radiation Budget from DSCOVR

    Duda, D. P.; Khlopenkov, K. V.; Palikonda, R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Minnis, P.; Su, W.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2016-12-01

    With the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), new estimates of the daytime Earth radiation budget can computed from a combination of measurements from the two Earth-observing sensors onboard the spacecraft, the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). Although these instruments can provide accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance measurements, they lack sufficient resolution to provide details on small-scale surface and cloud properties. Previous studies have shown that these properties have a strong influence on the anisotropy of the radiation at the TOA, and ignoring such effects can result in large TOA-flux errors. To overcome these effects, high-resolution scene identification is needed for accurate Earth radiation budget estimation. Selected radiance and cloud property data measured and derived from several low earth orbit (LEO, including NASA Terra and Aqua MODIS, NOAA AVHRR) and geosynchronous (GEO, including GOES (east and west), METEOSAT, INSAT-3D, MTSAT-2, and HIMAWARI-8) satellite imagers were collected to create hourly 5-km resolution global composites of data necessary to compute angular distribution models (ADM) for reflected shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation. The satellite data provide an independent source of radiance measurements and scene identification information necessary to construct ADMs that are used to determine the daytime Earth radiation budget. To optimize spatial matching between EPIC measurements and the high-resolution composite cloud properties, LEO/GEO retrievals within the EPIC fields of view (FOV) are convolved to the EPIC point spread function (PSF) in a similar manner to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) product. Examples of the merged LEO/GEO/EPIC product will be presented, describing the chosen radiance and cloud properties and

  10. Construction of a Matched Global Cloud and Radiance Product from LEO/GEO and EPIC Observations to Estimate Daytime Earth Radiation Budget from DSCOVR

    Duda, David P.; Khlopenkov, Konstantin V.; Thiemann, Mandana; Palikonda, Rabindra; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Su, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    With the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), new estimates of the daytime Earth radiation budget can be computed from a combination of measurements from the two Earth-observing sensors onboard the spacecraft, the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). Although these instruments can provide accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance measurements, they lack sufficient resolution to provide details on small-scale surface and cloud properties. Previous studies have shown that these properties have a strong influence on the anisotropy of the radiation at the TOA, and ignoring such effects can result in large TOA-flux errors. To overcome these effects, high-resolution scene identification is needed for accurate Earth radiation budget estimation. Selected radiance and cloud property data measured and derived from several low earth orbit (LEO, including NASA Terra and Aqua MODIS, NOAA AVHRR) and geosynchronous (GEO, including GOES (east and west), METEOSAT, INSAT-3D, MTSAT-2, and HIMAWARI-8) satellite imagers were collected to create hourly 5-km resolution global composites of data necessary to compute angular distribution models (ADM) for reflected shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation. The satellite data provide an independent source of radiance measurements and scene identification information necessary to construct ADMs that are used to determine the daytime Earth radiation budget. To optimize spatial matching between EPIC measurements and the high-resolution composite cloud properties, LEO/GEO retrievals within the EPIC fields of view (FOV) are convolved to the EPIC point spread function (PSF) in a similar manner to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) product. Examples of the merged LEO/GEO/EPIC product will be presented, describing the chosen radiance and cloud properties and

  11. Impact of shading on daylight quality. Simulations with radiance

    Dubois, M.C.

    2001-07-01

    The impact of six exterior shading devices on daylight quality and on the potential for daylight utilisation in a standard, south-oriented office room was investigated through computer simulations with Radiance. The daylight quality was evaluated by considering four performance indicators: the absolute work plane illuminance, the illuminance uniformity on the work plane, the absolute luminance in the visual field and the luminance ratios between the work plane, VDT screen and surrounding surfaces. The results indicate that the overhang, white awning and horizontal venetian blind generated work plane illuminance levels that are more suitable for offices where traditional tasks are carried out. However, these devices did not prevent high luminance values at the window. On the other hand, the grey specular screen produced unacceptably low work plane illuminance, poor illuminance uniformity and unacceptably low luminance levels which resulted in unsuitable luminance ratios between the VDT screen, work plane and surroundings. The 45 deg venetian blind, white screen and blue awning provided work plane illuminance levels suitable for offices where a combination of paper and computer work is carried out. They also provided acceptable illuminance uniformity on the work plane, suitable luminance ratios between the work plane, VDT screen and surroundings and they significantly reduced the luminance of the window. However, the blue awning had a poorer performance in December than in June and the white screen resulted in high luminance values at the window, which indicates that the best device among the ones studied was the 45 deg venetian blind.

  12. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km V005

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS Level 1B data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 36 discrete bands located in the 0.4 to 14.4 micron region of...

  13. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km - NRT

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS Level 1B Near Real Time (NRT) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 36 discrete bands located in the 0.4 to 14.4 micron...

  14. Nimbus-4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) Level 1 Radiance Data V001

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-4 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) Level 1 Radiance Data contain thermal emissions of the Earth's atmosphere at wave numbers between 400 and...

  15. Market analysis, energy savings potential, and future development requirements for Radiance. Final report

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), Building Equipment Division has funded the development of a sophisticated computer rendering program called Radiance at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The project review study included: (1) Surveys of the lighting profession to determine how designers would use an improved, user-friendly Radiance, (2) Elucidation of features, including how Radiance could be used to save energy, which could be incorporated into Radiance to facilitate its more widespread use, (3) Outline of a development plan and determination of what costs the DOE might incur if it were to proceed with the development of an improved version, and (4) Weighing the anticipated development costs against anticipated energy-saving benefits.

  16. NOAA GOES-R Series Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) Level 1b Radiances

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument samples the radiance of the Earth in sixteen spectral bands using several arrays of detectors in the instrument’s...

  17. ASTER Expedited L1B Registered Radiance at the Sensor V003

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Expedited ASTER Level-1B Registered Radiance at the Sensor data set is produced with the express purpose of providing ASTER Science Team members data of their...

  18. MODIS/Aqua Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath V006

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath (MYD01) product contains reformatted and packaged raw instrument data. MODIS instrument data, in packetized...

  19. NUCAPS: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System Cloud-Cleared Radiances (CCR)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Cloud-Cleared Radiances (CCRs) from the NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS). NUCAPS was developed by the NOAA/NESDIS...

  20. AIRS/Aqua Level 1C Infrared (IR) resampled and corrected radiances V006

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AIRS Infrared (IR) level 1C data set contains AIRS infrared calibrated and geolocated radiances in W/m2/micron/ster. This data set is generated from AIRS level...

  1. Modeling Top of Atmosphere Radiance over Heterogeneous Non-Lambertian Rugged Terrain

    Alijafar Mousivand

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Topography affects the fraction of direct and diffuse radiation received on a pixel and changes the sun–target–sensor geometry, resulting in variations in the observed radiance. Retrieval of surface–atmosphere properties from top of atmosphere radiance may need to account for topographic effects. This study investigates how such effects can be taken into account for top of atmosphere radiance modeling. In this paper, a system for top of atmosphere radiance modeling over heterogeneous non-Lambertian rugged terrain through radiative transfer modeling is presented. The paper proposes an extension of “the four-stream radiative transfer theory” (Verhoef and Bach 2003, 2007 and 2012 mainly aimed at representing topography-induced contributions to the top of atmosphere radiance modeling. A detailed account for BRDF effects, adjacency effects and topography effects on the radiance modeling is given, in which sky-view factor and non-Lambertian reflected radiance from adjacent slopes are modeled precisely. The paper also provides a new formulation to derive the atmospheric coefficients from MODTRAN with only two model runs, to make it more computationally efficient and also avoiding the use of zero surface albedo as used in the four-stream radiative transfer theory. The modeling begins with four surface reflectance factors calculated by the Soil–Leaf–Canopy radiative transfer model SLC at the top of canopy and propagates them through the effects of the atmosphere, which is explained by six atmospheric coefficients, derived from MODTRAN radiative transfer code. The top of the atmosphere radiance is then convolved with the sensor characteristics to generate sensor-like radiance. Using a composite dataset, it has been shown that neglecting sky view factor and/or terrain reflected radiance can cause uncertainty in the forward TOA radiance modeling up to 5 (mW/m2·sr·nm. It has also been shown that this level of uncertainty can be translated

  2. FNR demonstration experiments Part II: Subcadmium neutron flux measurements

    Wehe, D.K.; King, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The FNR HEU-LEU Demonstration Experiments include a comprehensive set of experiments to identify and quantify significant operational differences between two nuclear fuel enrichments. One aspect of these measurements, the subcadmium flux profiling, is the subject of this paper. The flux profiling effort has been accomplished through foil and wire activations, and by rhodium self-powered neutron detector (SPND) mappings. Within the experimental limitations discussed, the program to measure subcadmium flux profiles, lead to the following conclusions: (1) Replacement of a single fresh HEU element by a fresh LEU element at the center of an equilibrium HEU core produces a local flux depression. The ratio of HEU to LEU local flux is 1.19 ± .036, which is, well within experimental uncertainty, equal to the inverse of the U-235 masses for the two elements. (2) Whole core replacement of a large 38 element equilibrium HEU core by a fresh or nearly unburned LEU core reduces the core flux and raises the flux in both D 2 O and H 2 O reflectors. The reduction in the central core region is 40% to 10.0% for the small fresh 29 element LEU core, and 16% to 18% for a 31 element LEU core 482) with low average burnup 2 O reflector fluxes relative to core fluxes as measured by SPND with a fixed value of sensitivity, are in gross disagreement with the same flux ratios measured by Fe and Rh wire activations. Space dependent refinements of S are calculated to give some improvement in the discrepancy but the major part of the correction remains to be resolved

  3. Designing an experiment to measure cellular interaction forces

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain R.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in Life Science research and is becoming common place in many microscopy laboratories and facilities. The force applied by the laser beam on the trapped object can be accurately determined allowing any external forces acting on the trapped object to be deduced. We aim to design a series of experiments that use an optical trap to measure and quantify the interaction force between immune cells. In order to cause minimum perturbation to the sample we plan to directly trap T cells and remove the need to introduce exogenous beads to the sample. This poses a series of challenges and raises questions that need to be answered in order to design a set of effect end-point experiments. A typical cell is large compared to the beads normally trapped and highly non-uniform - can we reliably trap such objects and prevent them from rolling and re-orientating? In this paper we show how a spatial light modulator can produce a triple-spot trap, as opposed to a single-spot trap, giving complete control over the object's orientation and preventing it from rolling due, for example, to Brownian motion. To use an optical trap as a force transducer to measure an external force you must first have a reliably calibrated system. The optical trapping force is typically measured using either the theory of equipartition and observing the Brownian motion of the trapped object or using an escape force method, e.g. the viscous drag force method. In this paper we examine the relationship between force and displacement, as well as measuring the maximum displacement from equilibrium position before an object falls out of the trap, hence determining the conditions under which the different calibration methods should be applied.

  4. Measuring CMB polarization from ISS: the SPOrt experiment

    Colombo, L.P.L.

    2004-01-01

    The SPOrt (Sky Polarization Observatory) experiment aims to measure CMBP (cosmic microwave background polarization) on about 80% of the sky from space. Selected by ESA to fly on board the ISS in 2006, it is funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). As shown also by the recent WMAP release, CMBP data, besides of removing various degeneracies among cosmological parameters, provided new and important information on the cosmic opacity τ and, therefore, on very early cosmic objects which reionized the world at z ∼ 15. Most such information is obtained from low-l spectral components, that SPOrt, with its HPBW resolution of 7 degrees will explore with a high level of sensitivity. The 4 polarimeters of SPOrt work at 22, 32 and (2x) 90 GHz. At lower frequencies they will provide a (nearly) all-sky survey of Galactic synchrotron polarized emission, while data at the higher frequency will measure the CMBP signal. Correlating SPOrt with anisotropy data, by other experiments, shall therefore provide significant cosmological information. We performed a number of simulations of SPOrt performance, aimed to determine how far τ and/or other parameter(s) concerning reionization are constrained by the expected data. We also considered a possible interplay between reionization histories and Dark Energy nature. Besides of information on technological developments for systematics reduction, long term stability and observing time efficiency, we report here recent outputs on the expected SPOrt performance in constraining cosmological models

  5. Calculation of the angular radiance distribution for a coupled atmosphere and canopy

    Liang, Shunlin; Strahler, Alan H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative transfer equations for a coupled atmosphere and canopy are solved numerically by an improved Gauss-Seidel iteration algorithm. The radiation field is decomposed into three components: unscattered sunlight, single scattering, and multiple scattering radiance for which the corresponding equations and boundary conditions are set up and their analytical or iterational solutions are explicitly derived. The classic Gauss-Seidel algorithm has been widely applied in atmospheric research. This is its first application for calculating the multiple scattering radiance of a coupled atmosphere and canopy. This algorithm enables us to obtain the internal radiation field as well as radiances at boundaries. Any form of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) as a boundary condition can be easily incorporated into the iteration procedure. The hotspot effect of the canopy is accommodated by means of the modification of the extinction coefficients of upward single scattering radiation and unscattered sunlight using the formulation of Nilson and Kuusk. To reduce the computation for the case of large optical thickness, an improved iteration formula is derived to speed convergence. The upwelling radiances have been evaluated for different atmospheric conditions, leaf area index (LAI), leaf angle distribution (LAD), leaf size and so on. The formulation presented in this paper is also well suited to analyze the relative magnitude of multiple scattering radiance and single scattering radiance in both the visible and near infrared regions.

  6. Background Radiance Estimation for Gas Plume Quantification for Airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Imaging

    Ramzi Idoughi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging in the long-wave infrared (LWIR is a mean that is proving its worth in the characterization of gaseous effluent. Indeed the spectral and spatial resolution of acquisition instruments is steadily decreasing, making the gases characterization increasingly easy in the LWIR domain. The majority of literature algorithms exploit the plume contribution to the radiance corresponding to the difference of radiance between the plume-present and plume-absent pixels. Nevertheless, the off-plume radiance is unobservable using a single image. In this paper, we propose a new method to retrieve trace gas concentration from airborne infrared hyperspectral data. More particularly the outlined method improves the existing background radiance estimation approach to deal with heterogeneous scenes corresponding to industrial scenes. It consists in performing a classification of the scene and then applying a principal components analysis based method to estimate the background radiance on each cluster stemming from the classification. In order to determine the contribution of the classification to the background radiance estimation, we compared the two approaches on synthetic data and Telops Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS Imaging Hyper-Cam LW airborne acquisition above ethylene release. We finally show ethylene retrieved concentration map and estimate flow rate of the ethylene release.

  7. The Cross-Calibration of Spectral Radiances and Cross-Validation of CO2 Estimates from GOSAT and OCO-2

    Fumie Kataoka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT launched in January 2009 has provided radiance spectra with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer for more than eight years. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2 launched in July 2014, collects radiance spectra using an imaging grating spectrometer. Both sensors observe sunlight reflected from Earth’s surface and retrieve atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations, but use different spectrometer technologies, observing geometries, and ground track repeat cycles. To demonstrate the effectiveness of satellite remote sensing for CO2 monitoring, the GOSAT and OCO-2 teams have worked together pre- and post-launch to cross-calibrate the instruments and cross-validate their retrieval algorithms and products. In this work, we first compare observed radiance spectra within three narrow bands centered at 0.76, 1.60 and 2.06 µm, at temporally coincident and spatially collocated points from September 2014 to March 2017. We reconciled the differences in observation footprints size, viewing geometry and associated differences in surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF. We conclude that the spectral radiances measured by the two instruments agree within 5% for all bands. Second, we estimated mean bias and standard deviation of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2 retrieved from GOSAT and OCO-2 from September 2014 to May 2016. GOSAT retrievals used Build 7.3 (V7.3 of the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS algorithm while OCO-2 retrievals used Version 7 of the OCO-2 retrieval algorithm. The mean biases and standard deviations are −0.57 ± 3.33 ppm over land with high gain, −0.17 ± 1.48 ppm over ocean with high gain and −0.19 ± 2.79 ppm over land with medium gain. Finally, our study is complemented with an analysis of error sources: retrieved surface pressure (Psurf, aerosol optical depth (AOD, BRDF and surface albedo inhomogeneity. We found no change in XCO2

  8. Comparison of full-sky polarization and radiance observations to radiative transfer simulations which employ AERONET products.

    Pust, Nathan J; Dahlberg, Andrew R; Thomas, Michael J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2011-09-12

    Visible-band and near infrared polarization and radiance images measured with a ground-based full-sky polarimeter are compared against a successive orders of scattering (SOS) radiative transfer model for 2009 summer cloud-free days in Bozeman, Montana, USA. The polarimeter measures radiance and polarization in 10-nm bands centered at 450 nm, 490 nm, 530 nm, 630 nm, and 700 nm. AERONET products are used to represent aerosols in the SOS model, while MISR satellite BRF products are used for the surface reflectance. While model results generally agree well with observation, the simulated degree of polarization is typically higher than observed data. Potential sources of this difference may include cloud contamination and/or underestimation of the AERONET-retrieved aerosol real refractive index. Problems with the retrieved parameters are not unexpected given the low aerosol optical depth range (0.025 to 0.17 at 500 nm) during the study and the corresponding difficulties that these conditions pose to the AERONET inversion algorithm.

  9. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago; Rogers, Chris [Rutherford; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  10. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  11. Ionospheric measurements for the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    The detection of explosions using ionospheric techniques relies on measuring perturbations induced in radio propagation by acoustics waves which disturb the electron density of the ionosphere. Such techniques have been applied to the detection of atmospheric explosions, underground nuclear tests, earthquakes, and surface mining explosions. The nighttime ionosphere presents a difficulty for the detection of explosions because in the absence of solar ionization radiation the electron density in the altitude range of 90 to 200 km decays after sunset and perturbation effects are correspondingly reduced. On the other hand, acoustic waves produced by weak sources reach a maximum amplitude in the altitude range of 100 to 150 km and are highly attenuated at altitudes above 200 km. For safety reasons, most planned explosions are conducted during daylight which has limited the experimental measurements during nighttime. However a recent opportunity for a nighttime measurement occurred in connection with the Non-Proliferation Experiment which consisted of the detonation of a large chemical charge underground at the Nevada Test Site near midnight local time. the results, based on a new technique of using medium frequency radio transmissions provided by commercial broadcasts to detect explosion effects, were negative. The most likely explanation for the negative result is that the radio transmissions did not reflect at a low enough altitude to sense the perturbations produced by the acoustic waves

  12. Effects of Nighttime Light Radiance on the Sleep of the General Population

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to verify if the exposure to greater nighttime radiance is associated with changes in the sleep/wake schedule and with greater sleep disturbances. Methods: The target population was the adults (18 years and older) living in California, USA. This represents 24 million of inhabitants. A total of 3,104 subjects participated in the survey (participation rate 85.6%). The participants were interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. The interviews covered several topics including sleeping habits, sleep quality, sleep disturbances, physical symptoms related to menopause. Chronic insomnia was defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep for at least 3 months. Global nighttime light emissions have been collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) sensors. We extracted the radiance calibrated nighttime lights corresponding to the date of the interviews for a three by three window centered on each coordinate corresponding to an interview address. Results: Dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and/or quality was associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p=0.02). Similarly, excessive sleepiness accompanied with impaired functioning was significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). The association remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Confusional arousals were also significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Bedtime hour was linearly increasing with the intensity of nighttime radiance: the later the bedtime, the greater the nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Similarly, wakeup time became progressively later as the nighttime radiance increased (p (is) less than 0.0001). Both associations remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Circadian Rhythm Disorders were the

  13. TeV electron measurement with CREST experiment

    Park, Nahee; Anderson, T.; Bower, C.; Coutu, S.; Gennaro, J.; Geske, M.; Muller, D.; Musser, J.; Nutter, S.

    CREST, the Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope is a balloon-borne experiment de-signed to measure the spectrum of multi-TeV electrons by the detection of the x-ray synchrotron photons generated in the magnetic field of the Earth. Electrons in the TeV range are expected to reflect the properties of local sources because fluxes from remote locations are suppressed by radiative losses during propagation. Since CREST needs to intersect only a portion of the kilometers-long trail of photons generated by the high-energy electron, the method yields a larger effective area than the physical size of the detector, boosting detection areas. The in-strument is composed of an array of 1024 BaF2 crystals and a set of scintillating veto counters. A long duration balloon flight in Antarctica is currently planned for the 2010-11 season.

  14. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  15. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide isotopomers during incubation experiments

    Winther, Malte; Balslev-Harder, David; Christensen, Søren; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Crosson, Eric; Blunier, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important and strong greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. It is produced by microbes during nitrification and denitrification in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The main sinks for N2O are turnover by denitrification and photolysis and photo-oxidation in the stratosphere. In the linear N = N = O molecule 15N substitution is possible in two distinct positions: central and terminal. The respective molecules, 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O, are called isotopomers. It has been demonstrated that N2O produced by nitrifying or denitrifying microbes exhibits a different relative abundance of the isotopomers. Therefore, measurements of the site preference (difference in the abundance of the two isotopomers) in N2O can be used to determine the source of N2O, i.e., nitrification or denitrification. Recent instrument development allows for continuous position-dependent δ15N measurements at N2O concentrations relevant for studies of atmospheric chemistry. We present results from continuous incubation experiments with denitrifying bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens (producing and reducing N2O) and Pseudomonas chlororaphis (only producing N2O). The continuous measurements of N2O isotopomers reveals the transient isotope exchange among KNO3, N2O, and N2. We find bulk isotopic fractionation of -5.01 ‰ ± 1.20 for P. chlororaphis, in line with previous results for production from denitrification. For P. fluorescens, the bulk isotopic fractionation during production of N2O is -52.21 ‰ ± 9.28 and 8.77 ‰ ± 4.49 during N2O reduction.The site preference (SP) isotopic fractionation for P. chlororaphis is -3.42 ‰ ± 1.69. For P. fluorescens, the calculations result in SP isotopic fractionation values of 5.73 ‰ ± 5.26 during production of N2O and 2.41 ‰ ± 3.04 during reduction of N2O. In summary, we implemented continuous measurements of N2O isotopomers during incubation of denitrifying bacteria and believe that similar experiments will lead to a better

  16. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE

    E. Dupuy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents extensive {bias determination} analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO instrument. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from nearly 20 satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the average values of the mean relative differences are nearly all within +1 to +8%. At higher altitudes (45–60 km, the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments, with mean relative differences of up to +40% (about +20% on average. For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, mean relative differences are within ±10% (average values within ±6% between 18 and 40 km for both the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes (~35–55 km, systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (with mean relative differences down to −10%, the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS, indicating a large positive bias (mean relative differences within +10 to +30% in the 45–55 km altitude range. In contrast, there is no significant systematic difference in bias found for the ACE-FTS sunrise and sunset measurements.

  17. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements.

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Bieri, Andrej; Sauter, Nora; Roizard, Sophie; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Goldie, Kenneth N; Enimanev, Kaloyan; Stahlberg, Henning; Rinn, Bernd; Braun, Thomas

    2014-03-26

    New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. We have developed openBEB (open Biological Experiment Browser), a software framework for data acquisition, coordination, annotation and synchronization with database solutions such as openBIS. OpenBEB consists of two main parts: A core program and a plug-in manager. Whereas the data-type independent core of openBEB maintains a local container of raw-data and metadata and provides annotation and data management tools, all data-specific tasks are performed by plug-ins. The open architecture of openBEB enables the fast integration of plug-ins, e.g., for data acquisition or visualization. A macro-interpreter allows the automation and coordination of the different modules. An update and deployment mechanism keeps the core program, the plug-ins and the metadata definition files in sync with a central repository. The versatility, the simple deployment and update mechanism, and the scalability in terms of module integration offered by openBEB make this software interesting for a large scientific community. OpenBEB targets three types of researcher, ideally working closely together: (i) Engineers and scientists developing new methods and instruments, e.g., for systems-biology, (ii) scientists performing biological experiments, (iii) theoreticians and mathematicians analyzing data. The design of openBEB enables the rapid development of plug-ins, which will inherently benefit from the "house keeping" abilities of the core program. We report the use of openBEB to combine live cell microscopy, microfluidic control and visual

  18. Pion Production Measurement in NA61/SHINE Experiment for High Precision Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    Palczewski, Tomasz Jan

    2009-01-01

    One of physics goals of the NA61/SHINE experiment is a measurement of hadron production cross sections from proton-Carbon interactions at 31GeV/c for the T2K experiment at J-PARC. A precise knowledge of differential cross sections for pion and kaon production is of importance for improving the accuracy of neutrino flux simulations. The NA61 detector has a large angular acceptance, full coverage of the T2K phase space region, and good particle identification. In this work the analyses of negatively charged pion production are presented. Two different methods of negative pion selection and corrections for detector effects are discussed. Finally, preliminary dn/dp distributions of negatively charged pion in p+C interactions at 31 GeV/c are presented.

  19. Spectral radiance of strong lines in positive column mercury discharges with argon carrier gas

    Sansonetti, Craig J; Reader, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The spectral radiance of the 185 and 254 nm lines in two positive column mercury discharge lamps was measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The lamps had internal diameters of 5 and 23 mm. Argon was used as a carrier gas. The lamps were operated with cold spot temperatures of 20, 40 and 60 0 C. At each of these temperatures, results were obtained for five currents ranging from 20 to 100 mA for the 5 mm lamp and from 200 to 1000 mA for the 23 mm lamp. For each current studied, results were determined for argon pressures ranging from 66.6 to 666 Pa (0.5 to 5.0 Torr) in the 5 mm lamp and 26.6 to 666 Pa (0.2 to 5.0 Torr) in the 23 mm lamp. An argon miniarc was used as the radiometric standard. By calibrating the spectral response of the optical system with a well-characterized mercury pencil lamp, results were obtained for 12 additional Hg lines from 289 to 579 nm. For the 23 mm lamp the electric field in the positive column was measured. For this lamp the radiated power as a percentage of input power was also determined. The results provide an experimental basis for validating computer models of Hg fluorescent lamp discharges

  20. Comparison of CERES Cloud Properties Derived from Aqua and Terra MODIS Data and TRMM VIRS Radiances

    Minnis, P.; Young, D. F.; Sun-Mack, S.; Trepte, Q. Z.; Chen, Y.; Heck, P. W.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project is obtaining Earth radiation budget measurements of unprecedented accuracy as a result of improved instruments and an analysis system that combines simultaneous, high-resolution cloud property retrievals with the broadband radiance data. The cloud properties are derived from three different satellite imagers: the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) on the Aqua and Terra satellites. A single set of consistent algorithms using the 0.65, 1.6 or 2.1, 3.7, 10.8, and 12.0-æm channels are applied to all three imagers. The cloud properties include, cloud coverage, height, thickness, temperature, optical depth, phase, effective particle size, and liquid or ice water path. Because each satellite is in a different orbit, the results provide information on the diurnal cycle of cloud properties. Initial intercalibrations show excellent consistency between the three images except for some differences of ~ 1K between the 3.7-æm channel on Terra and those on VIRS and Aqua. The derived cloud properties are consistent with the known diurnal characteristics of clouds in different areas. These datasets should be valuable for exploring the role of clouds in the radiation budget and hydrological cycle.

  1. Autonomous celestial navigation based on Earth ultraviolet radiance and fast gradient statistic feature extraction

    Lu, Shan; Zhang, Hanmo

    2016-01-01

    To meet the requirement of autonomous orbit determination, this paper proposes a fast curve fitting method based on earth ultraviolet features to obtain accurate earth vector direction, in order to achieve the high precision autonomous navigation. Firstly, combining the stable characters of earth ultraviolet radiance and the use of transmission model software of atmospheric radiation, the paper simulates earth ultraviolet radiation model on different time and chooses the proper observation band. Then the fast improved edge extracting method combined Sobel operator and local binary pattern (LBP) is utilized, which can both eliminate noises efficiently and extract earth ultraviolet limb features accurately. And earth's centroid locations on simulated images are estimated via the least square fitting method using part of the limb edges. Taken advantage of the estimated earth vector direction and earth distance, Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is applied to realize the autonomous navigation finally. Experiment results indicate the proposed method can achieve a sub-pixel earth centroid location estimation and extremely enhance autonomous celestial navigation precision.

  2. PAMELA: A Satellite Experiment for Antiparticles Measurement in Cosmic Rays

    Bongi, M.; Adriani, O.; Ambriola, M.; Bakaldin, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Basili, A.; Bazilevskaja, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bencardino, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongiorno, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Boscherini, M.; Cafagna, F. S.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C. N.; De Pascale, M. P.; Furano, G.; Galper, A. M.; Giglietto, N.; Grigorjeva, A.; Koldashov, S. V.; Korotkov, M. G.; Krut'kov, S. Y.; Lund, J.; Lundquist, J.; Menicucci, A.; Menn, W.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Minori, M.; Mirizzi, N.; Mitchell, J. W.; Mocchiutti, E.; Morselli, A.; Mukhametshin, R.; Orsi, S.; Osteria, G.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Romita, M.; Rossi, G.; Russo, S.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Spinelli, P.; Stochaj, S. J.; Stozhkov, Y.; Straulino, S.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Taccetti, F.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Wischnewski, R.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2004-06-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will study the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays in a wide range of energy (from 80 MeV up to 190 GeV for antiprotons and from 50 MeV up to 270 GeV for positrons) and with high statistics, and that will measure the antihelium/helium ratio with a sensitivity of the order of 10/sup -8/. The detector will fly on-board a polar orbiting Resurs DK1 satellite, which will be launched into space by a Soyuz rocket in 2004 from Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, for a 3-year-long mission. Particle identification and energy measurements are performed in the PAMELA apparatus using the following subdetectors: a magnetic spectrometer made up of a permanent magnet equipped with double-sided microstrip silicon detectors, an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter composed of layers of tungsten absorber and silicon detectors planes, a transition radiation detector made of straw tubes interleaved with carbon fiber radiators, a plastic scintillator time-of-flight and trigger system, a set of anticounter plastic scintillator detectors, and a neutron detector. The features of the detectors and the main results obtained in beam test sessions are presented.

  3. Measuring the Magnetic Birefringence of Vacuum: the Pvlas Experiment

    Zavattini, G.; Gastaldi, U.; Pengo, R.; Ruoso, G.; Della Valle, F.; Milotti, E.

    2012-06-01

    We describe the principle and the status of the PVLAS experiment which is presently running at the INFN section of Ferrara, Italy, to detect the magnetic birefringence of vacuum. This is related to the QED vacuum structure and can be detected by measuring the ellipticity acquired by a linearly polarized light beam propagating through a strong magnetic field. Such an effect is predicted by the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. The method is also sensitive to other hypothetical physical effects such as axion-like particles and in general to any fermion/boson millicharged particle. Here we report on the construction of our apparatus based on a high finesse (> 2·105) Fabry-Perot cavity and two 0.9 m long 2.5 T permanent dipole rotating magnets, and on the measurements performed on a scaled down test setup. With the test setup we have improved by about a factor 2 the limit on the parameter Ae describing nonlinear electrodynamic effects in vacuum: Ae < 2.9 · 10-21 T-2 @ 95% C.L.

  4. High-radiance LDP source for mask inspection and beam line applications (Conference Presentation)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Yamatani, Daiki; Shirai, Takahiro; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2017-04-01

    High-throughput actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. One of the key technologies to realize such inspection tools is a high-radiance EUV source of which radiance is supposed to be as high as 100 W/mm2/sr. Ushio is developing laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) sources. Ushio's LDP source is able to provide sufficient radiance as well as cleanliness, stability and reliability. Radiance behind the debris mitigation system was confirmed to be 120 W/mm2/sr at 9 kHz and peak radiance at the plasma was increased to over 200 W/mm2/sr in the recent development which supports high-throughput, high-precision mask inspection in the current and future technology nodes. One of the unique features of Ushio's LDP source is cleanliness. Cleanliness evaluation using both grazing-incidence Ru mirrors and normal-incidence Mo/Si mirrors showed no considerable damage to the mirrors other than smooth sputtering of the surface at the pace of a few nm per Gpulse. In order to prove the system reliability, several long-term tests were performed. Data recorded during the tests was analyzed to assess two-dimensional radiance stability. In addition, several operating parameters were monitored to figure out which contributes to the radiance stability. The latest model that features a large opening angle was recently developed so that the tool can utilize a large number of debris-free photons behind the debris shield. The model was designed both for beam line application and high-throughput mask inspection application. At the time of publication, the first product is supposed to be in use at the customer site.

  5. Sandbox experiments on Uraninite Ore: ERT and SP measurments.

    Singh, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear energy, considering its own intrinsic merits, would be a leading source for meeting the energy requirement in present and future scenario. Concealed Uranium deposits under sedimentary cover, with poor surface indications calls for reorientation of survey with large inputs involving integrated geophysical approach. Sand Box experiments have been carried out over Uraninite ore. The tank is a glass fish tank (height 39 cm, length 75 cm, width 30 cm). It was filled with sand up to 35 cm high. The sand was saturated from below to minimize the entrapment of the gas bubbles. The average size for sand grains is ~ 0.295mm. The formation factor of the sand is 3.5, with a negligible surface conductivity because of the coarse nature of the sand grains. The dimension of considered Uraninite ore sample is 4cm x 4cm x 4cm. The depth of top of the ore sample is kept at 3cm. In this paper both resistivity and self-potential measurements were carried out for possible detection of Uraninite. The resistivity measurements were made with 64 non-polarizable electrodes using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) equipment of FlashRes Universal developed by ZZ Resistivity Imaging Pty. Ltd. We have used screws of length 3cm as electrodes. The separation between these electrodes are ~ 1cm. The resistivity tomography results clearly outlines the target Uraninite body. The resistivity tomography results also detects small heterogeneities associated with air bubbles possibly due to unsaturated pore spaces. SP measurements were made using two non-polarizing Pb/PbCl2 electrodes and a Fluke 289 voltmeter (sensitivity 0.001 mV, internal impedance 100 MOhm). The reference electrode was located on the corner of the sandbox. The other electrode was used to scan the electrical potential at the surface of the sand. SP measurements were made with a spacing of 3 cm over the same ERT profile. The SP results also shows a dip (or a low SP anomaly) over the target ore body sample. Thus, both SP and

  6. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  7. Understanding the polarization signal of spherical particles for microwave limb radiances

    Teichmann, C.; Buehler, S.A.; Emde, C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a simple conceptual model to explain that even spherical scatterers lead to a polarization difference signal for microwave limb radiances. The conceptual model relates the polarization difference measured by a limb-looking sensor situated inside a cloud with the anisotropy of the radiation. In the simulations, it was assumed that the cloud consists of spherical ice particles with a radius of 68.5μm which were situated between 10.6 and 12.3km altitude. The frequencies 318 and 500GHz were considered. The results of the conceptual model were compared to the results of the fully polarized scattering model ARTS-1-1. The comparison showed a good qualitative agreement. The polarization difference decreases inside the cloud with increasing height and changes sign. This behavior can be related to a different amount of radiation coming from the atmosphere above and below the cloud, compared to the amount of radiation coming from the sides. The sign of polarization difference of the scattered radiation is opposite for these two radiation sources

  8. Lessons learned from operating experience, maintenance procedures and training measures

    Guttner, K.; Gronau, D.

    2003-01-01

    Training programmes for nuclear facility personnel as a result of the developing phase of SAT have to be approved in the subsequent implementation and evaluation phases with the consequence of several feedback activities in the whole training process. The effectiveness of this procedure has to be evaluated especially with respect to an improvement of safety culture, shorter outage times or better plant performance, resulting in a smaller number of incidents due to human failures. The first two arguments are directly connected with all types of maintenance work in a nuclear power plant and the related preparatory training measures. The reduction of incidents due to human failures is the result of different influences, i.e. training of the operational as well as of the maintenance personnel together with changes of the operating procedures or system design. Though an evaluation of the training process should always be based on a clear definition of criteria by which the fulfilment of the learning objectives can be measured directly, the real effectiveness of training is proven by the behaviour and attitude of the personnel which can only be taken from indirect indicators. This is discussed in more detail for some examples being partly related to the above mentioned arguments. An excellent plant performance, representing a general objective of all activities, can be analysed by the changed number and reasons of incidents in a plant during its operation time. Two further examples are taken from the reactor service field where there is a tendency to reduce the individual dose rates by changed devices and/or procedures as an output from training experience with mockups. Finally the rationalisation of refresher training for operational personnel by the use of interactive teaching programs (Computer Based Training - CBT) is presented which integrate learning objectives together with a test module. (author)

  9. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 1. Temporal dynamics of nighttime water-leaving radiance

    Moline, Mark A.; Oliver, Matthew J.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Sundman, Lydia; Bensky, Thomas; Bergmann, Trisha; Bissett, W. Paul; Case, James; Raymond, Erika H.; Schofield, Oscar M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Nighttime water-leaving radiance is a function of the depth-dependent distribution of both the in situ bioluminescence emissions and the absorption and scattering properties of the water. The vertical distributions of these parameters were used as inputs for a modified one-dimensional radiative transfer model to solve for spectral bioluminescence water-leaving radiance from prescribed depths of the water column. Variation in the water-leaving radiance was consistent with local episodic physical forcing events, with tidal forcing, terrestrial runoff, particulate accumulation, and biological responses influencing the shorter timescale dynamics. There was a >90 nm shift in the peak water-leaving radiance from blue (˜474 nm) to green as light propagated to the surface. In addition to clues in ecosystem responses to physical forcing, the temporal dynamics in intensity and spectral quality of water-leaving radiance provide suitable ranges for assessing detection. This may provide the information needed to estimate the depth of internal light sources in the ocean, which is discussed in part 2 of this paper.

  10. Iterative discrete ordinates solution of the equation for surface-reflected radiance

    Radkevich, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of numerical solution of the integral equation for the radiance reflected from an anisotropic surface. The equation relates the radiance at the surface level with BRDF and solutions of the standard radiative transfer problems for a slab with no reflection on its surfaces. It is also shown that the kernel of the equation satisfies the condition of the existence of a unique solution and the convergence of the successive approximations to that solution. The developed method features two basic steps: discretization on a 2D quadrature, and solving the resulting system of algebraic equations with successive over-relaxation method based on the Gauss-Seidel iterative process. Presented numerical examples show good coincidence between the surface-reflected radiance obtained with DISORT and the proposed method. Analysis of contributions of the direct and diffuse (but not yet reflected) parts of the downward radiance to the total solution is performed. Together, they represent a very good initial guess for the iterative process. This fact ensures fast convergence. The numerical evidence is given that the fastest convergence occurs with the relaxation parameter of 1 (no relaxation). An integral equation for BRDF is derived as inversion of the original equation. The potential of this new equation for BRDF retrievals is analyzed. The approach is found not viable as the BRDF equation appears to be an ill-posed problem, and it requires knowledge the surface-reflected radiance on the entire domain of both Sun and viewing zenith angles.

  11. Lifetime measurements of beauty hadrons at the LHCb experiment

    Dordei, Francesca

    2015-05-19

    This thesis presents several lifetime measurements of b-flavoured hadrons at the LHCb experiment. They represent an important test of the theoretical approach to b-hadron observables known as Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE). This analysis uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV. For the decays B{sup +}→J/ψK{sup +}, B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup *0}, B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup 0}{sub S}, Λ{sup 0}{sub b}→J/ψΛ and B{sup 0}{sub s}→J/ψφ the lifetimes are measured to be τ{sub B{sup +}→J/ψK{sup +}}=1.637±0.004±0.003 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}→J/ψK}{sup {sub *}{sub 0}}=1.524±0.006±0.004 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup 0}{sub S}}=1.499±0.013±0.005 ps, τ{sub Λ{sup 0}{sub b}} {sub →} {sub J/ψΛ}=1.415±0.027±0.006 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}{sub s}} {sub →} {sub J/ψφ}=1.480±0.011±0.005 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These are the most precise lifetime measurements in these decay modes to date. Ratios of these lifetimes also are reported in this thesis, as they are well-defined quantities where many theoretical or experimental uncertainties cancel. The ratio of the decay width difference, ΔΓ{sub d}, to the average width, Γ{sub d}, in the B{sup 0} system is found to be ΔΓ{sub d}/Γ{sub d}=-0.044±0.025±0.011. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb{sup -1} collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, the measurements of the decay width difference, ΔΓ{sub s}, and the average width, Γ{sub s}, in the B{sup 0}{sub s} system are performed. Using the decay B{sup 0}{sub s}→J/ψφ, they are measured to be ΔΓ{sub s}=0.0805±0.0091±0.0033 ps{sup -1}, Γ{sub s}=0.6603±0.0027±0.0015 ps{sup -1}. These are the most precise determinations of these observables ot date. All measurements are consistent with HQE predictions.

  12. Measuring the Economic Value of Pre-MBA Work Experience

    Yeaple, Ronald N.; Johnston, Mark W.; Whittingham, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-MBA work experience is required for admission to many graduate schools of business. In the present study, MBA graduates with a wide range of pre-MBA work experience were surveyed to assess the economic value of such work experience. No evidence was found of a systematic financial advantage to students from working for several years before…

  13. Measuring Gen-Y Customer Experience in the Banking Sector

    Kyguolienė Asta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses customer experience as the subject of marketing research and presents methods for assessing customer experience. The results of empirical research revealing the Gen-Y customer experience in using the Lithuanian commercial banks’ services are presented.

  14. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    Baldini, A.M.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Baracchini, E. [University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D' Onofrio, A.; Nicolo, D.; Tenchini, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Pisa Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa (Italy); Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Genova Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); Boca, G.; De Bari, A. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Pavia Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Cattaneo, P.W.; Rossella, M. [Pavia Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Cavoto, G.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C. [Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Chiarello, G.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A. [INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Univ. del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Tassielli, G.F. [Univ. del Salento (Italy); INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); De Gerone, M. [Genova Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K. [University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); Graziosi, A.; Ripiccini, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Univ. ' ' Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Grigoriev, D.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ieki, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Tokyo, ICEPP, Tokyo (Japan); Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kang, T.I.; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Venturini, M. [Pisa Univ. (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Collaboration: The MEG Collaboration

    2016-04-15

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ. We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P{sub μ} = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P{sub μ} =.0.86 ± 0.02 (stat){sub -0.06}{sup +0.05} (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our μ{sup +} → e{sup +}γ search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ{sup +} → e{sup +} anti ν{sub μ}ν{sub e}γ. (orig.)

  15. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  16. One Year of FOS Measurements in CMS Experiment at CERN

    Szillási, Zoltán; Buontempo, Salvatore; Béni, Noémi; Breglio, Giovanni; Cusano, Andrea; Laudati, Armando; Giordano, Michele; Saccomanno, Andrea; Druzhkin, Dmitry; Tsirou, Andromachi

    Results are presented on the activity carried out by our research group, in collaboration with the SME Optosmart s.r.l. (an Italian spin-off company), on the application of Fiber Optic Sensor (FOS) techniques to monitor high-energy physics (HEP) detectors. Assuming that Fiber Bragg Grating sensors (FBGs) radiation hardness has been deeply studied for other field of application, we have applied the FBG technology to the HEP research domain. We present here the experimental evidences of the solid possibility to use such a class of sensors also in HEP detector very complex environmental side conditions. In particular we present more than one year data results of FBG measurements in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment set up at the CERN, where we have monitored temperatures (within CMS core) and strains in different locations by using FBG sensors during the detector operation with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collisions and high magnetic field. FOS data and FOS readout system stability and reliability is demonstrated, with continuous 24/24 h 7/7d data taking under severe and complex side conditions.

  17. Fast pressure measurements for the TMX-U fusion experiment

    Hunt, A.L.; Coffield, F.E.; Pickles, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The pressure on the boundary of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) tandem mirror (TMX-U) plasma experiment is difficult to trace for several reasons: (1) the TMX-U boundary is in the high vacuum range (10 -5 to 10 -6 Pa) and requires an ionization gauge; (2) the boundary includes high-energy neutral particles and radiation, so the gauge must be optically baffled from the plasma; (3) the gauge must be shielded from the magnetic flux density of 0.03 T; (4) maximum conductance to the gauge must be preserved so that the time response remains about 1 ms; (5) a fast electrical circuit is required to measure the small ion-current changes at a rate consistent with the geometrical and experimental time constant of 1 ms. We have developed solutions to these limitations, including fast ionization gauge (FIG) circuitry for the remote gauge operation and the CAMAC system for recording the pressure-time history in the TMX-U computer data base. We also give some examples of actual fast pressure histories during plasma operation

  18. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    Baldini, A.M.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Bao, Y.; Hildebrandt, M.; Kettle, P.R.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Papa, A.; Ritt, S.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; D'Onofrio, A.; Nicolo, D.; Tenchini, F.; Berg, F.; Hodge, Z.; Rutar, G.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Pizzigoni, G.; Boca, G.; De Bari, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Rossella, M.; Cavoto, G.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Chiarello, G.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Chiri, C.; Grancagnolo, F.; Tassielli, G.F.; De Gerone, M.; Fujii, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Mori, Toshinori; Nakaura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Graziosi, A.; Ripiccini, E.; Grigoriev, D.N.; Haruyama, T.; Mihara, S.; Nishiguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Khazin, B.I.; Popov, A.; Yudin, Yu.V.; Kang, T.I.; Lim, G.M.A.; Molzon, W.; You, Z.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Venturini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ + → e + γ. We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P μ = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P μ =.0.86 ± 0.02 (stat) -0.06 +0.05 (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our μ + → e + γ search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ + → e + anti ν μ ν e γ. (orig.)

  19. Measuring stroke patients’ exercise preferences using a discrete choice experiment

    Wolfgang Geidl

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity post stroke improves health, yet physical inactivity is highly prevalent. Tailored exercise programs considering physical activity preferences are a promising approach to promote physical activity. Therefore, this study seeks to measure exercise preferences of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors conducted a discrete choice experiment (DCE. DCE was presented in a face-to-face interview where patients had to choose eight times between two different exercise programs. Exercise programs differed by characteristics, with the six attributes under consideration being social situation, location, type of exercise, intensity, frequency, and duration. Utilities of the exercise attributes were estimated with a logit choice model. Stroke survivors (n=103, mean age: 67, SD=13.0; 60% male show significant differences in the rated utilities of the exercise attributes (P<0.001. Participants had strong preferences for light and moderate intense physical activity and favored shorter exercise sessions. Stroke survivors have remarkable exercise preferences especially for intensity and duration of exercise. Results contribute to the tailoring of physical activity programs after stroke thereby facilitating maintenance of physical activity.

  20. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Keiter, Paul; Butler, Hannah; Trantham, Matt; Mussack, Katie; Colgan, James; Fontes, Chris; Guzik, Joyce; Kilcrease, David; Perry, Ted; Orban, Chris; Ducret, Jean-Eric; La Pennec, Maelle; Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine; Mancini, Roberto; Heeter, Robert

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al., 2015]. Repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for low-Z elements [Colgan, 2013, Armstrong 2014], however no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDLP, Grant Number DE-NA0002956, and the NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002719, and through the LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under No. DE-NA0001944.

  1. Snow Radiance Data Assimilation over High Mountain Asia Using the NASA Land Information System and a Well-Trained Support Vector Machine

    Kwon, Y.; Forman, B. A.; Yoon, Y.; Kumar, S.

    2017-12-01

    High Mountain Asia (HMA) has been progressively losing ice and snow in recent decades, which could negatively impact regional water supply and native ecosystems. One goal of this study is to characterize the spatiotemporal variability of snow (and ice) across the HMA region. In addition, modeled snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates will be enhanced through the assimilation of passive microwave brightness temperatures (TB) collected by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) as part of a radiance assimilation system. The radiance assimilation framework includes the NASA Land Information System (LIS) in conjunction with a well-trained support vector machine (SVM) that acts as the observation operator. The Noah Land Surface Model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) is used as the prior model for simulating snow dynamics. Noah-MP is forced by meteorological fields from the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2) atmospheric reanalysis for the periods 01 Sep. 2002 to 01 Sep. 2011. The radiance assimilation system requires two separate phases: 1) training and 2) assimilation. During the training phase, a nonlinear SVM is generated for three different AMSR-E frequencies - 10.65, 18.7, and 36.5 GHz - at both vertical and horizontal polarization. The trained SVM is then used to predict TB during the assimilation phase. An ensemble Kalman filter will be used to condition the model on AMSR-E brightness temperatures not used during SVM training. The performance of the Noah-MP (with and without radiance assimilation) will be assessed via comparison to in-situ measurements, remotely-sensing geophysical retrievals, and other reanalysis products.

  2. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Assessment of a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Correction of Above-Water and Satellite Water-Leaving Radiance in Coastal Waters

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Harmal, Tristan; Tonizzo, Alberto; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances, retrieved from in situ or satellite measurements, need to be corrected for the bidirectional properties of the measured light in order to standardize the data and make them comparable with each other. The current operational algorithm for the correction of bidirectional effects from the satellite ocean color data is optimized for typical oceanic waters. However, versions of bidirectional reflectance correction algorithms specifically tuned for typical coastal waters and other case 2 conditions are particularly needed to improve the overall quality of those data. In order to analyze the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of case 2 waters, a dataset of typical remote sensing reflectances was generated through radiative transfer simulations for a large range of viewing and illumination geometries. Based on this simulated dataset, a case 2 water focused remote sensing reflectance model is proposed to correct above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance data for bidirectional effects. The proposed model is first validated with a one year time series of in situ above-water measurements acquired by collocated multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers, which have different viewing geometries installed at the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO). Match-ups and intercomparisons performed on these concurrent measurements show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the algorithm currently in use at all wavelengths, with average improvement of 2.4% over the spectral range. LISCO's time series data have also been used to evaluate improvements in match-up comparisons of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data when the proposed BRDF correction is used in lieu of the current algorithm. It is shown that the discrepancies between coincident in-situ sea-based and satellite data decreased by 3.15% with the use of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Measuring experience of hospitality : scale development and validation

    Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Groen, Brenda H.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.

    This paper describes the development of the Experience of Hospitality Scale (EH-Scale) for assessing hospitality in service environments from a guest point of view. In contrast to other scales, which focus specifically on staff behaviour, the present scale focuses on the experience of hospitality

  5. Experiments to measure the gluon helicity distribution in protons

    Spinka, H.; Beddo, M.E.; Underwood, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Several experiments are described that could obtain information about the gluon helicity distribution in protons. These experiments include inclusive direct-γ, direct-γ + jet, jet, and jet + jet production with colliding beams of longitudinally-polarized protons. Some rates and kinematics are also discussed

  6. Infrasonic measurements of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    Whitaker, R.W.; Noel, S.; Meadows, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two infrasonic arrays were operated for the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). The arrays were located at the Nevada Test Site and at St. George, UT. The results were consistent with experience on underground tests, and therefore close to underground nuclear tests of similar size.

  7. The Bolund experiment - design of measurement campaign using CFD

    Bechmann, Andreas; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    the upcoming measurement campaign. The simulation results are used for estimating rational positions of measuring masts and instrumentation. A total of ten measuring masts are proposed consisting of two 16 m masts, six 9 m masts and two 5 m masts. The masts are instrumented with 12 cup anemometers for mean...

  8. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  9. Estimating Snow Water Storage in North America Using CLM4, DART, and Snow Radiance Data Assimilation

    Kwon, Yonghwan; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhao, Long; Hoar, Timothy J.; Toure, Ally M.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses continental-scale snow estimates in North America using a recently developed snow radiance assimilation (RA) system. A series of RA experiments with the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter are conducted by assimilating the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) brightness temperature T(sub B) at 18.7- and 36.5-GHz vertical polarization channels. The overall RA performance in estimating snow depth for North America is improved by simultaneously updating the Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4), snow/soil states and radiative transfer model (RTM) parameters involved in predicting T(sub B) based on their correlations with the prior T(sub B) (i.e., rule-based RA), although degradations are also observed. The RA system exhibits a more mixed performance for snow cover fraction estimates. Compared to the open-loop run (0.171m RMSE), the overall snow depth estimates are improved by 1.6% (0.168m RMSE) in the rule-based RA whereas the default RA (without a rule) results in a degradation of 3.6% (0.177mRMSE). Significant improvement of the snow depth estimates in the rule-based RA as observed for tundra snow class (11.5%, p < 0.05) and bare soil land-cover type (13.5%, p < 0.05). However, the overall improvement is not significant (p = 0.135) because snow estimates are degraded or marginally improved for other snow classes and land covers, especially the taiga snow class and forest land cover (7.1% and 7.3% degradations, respectively). The current RA system needs to be further refined to enhance snow estimates for various snow types and forested regions.

  10. The Functional Measurement Experiment Builder suite: two Java-based programs to generate and run functional measurement experiments.

    Mairesse, Olivier; Hofmans, Joeri; Theuns, Peter

    2008-05-01

    We propose a free, easy-to-use computer program that does not requires prior knowledge of computer programming to generate and run experiments using textual or pictorial stimuli. Although the FM Experiment Builder suite was initially programmed for building and conducting FM experiments, it can also be applied for non-FM experiments that necessitate randomized, single, or multifactorial designs. The program is highly configurable, allowing multilingual use and a wide range of different response formats. The outputs of the experiments are Microsoft Excel compatible .xls files that allow easy copy-paste of the results into Weiss's FM CalSTAT program (2006) or any other statistical package. Its Java-based structure is compatible with both Windows and Macintosh operating systems, and its compactness (< 1 MB) makes it easily distributable over the Internet.

  11. TRMM Visible and Infrared Scanner Calibrated Radiances L1B 1.5 hours V7 (TRMM_1B01) at GES DISC

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This TRMM Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) Level 1B Calibrated Radiance Product (1B01) contains calibrated radiances and auxiliary geolocation information from...

  12. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  13. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 500m V005

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 500 meter MODIS Level 1B data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 7 discrete bands located in the 0.45 to 2.20 micron region of the...

  14. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m V005

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 250 meter MODIS Level 1B data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 2 discrete bands located in the 0.62 to 0.88 micron region of the...

  15. MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m - NRT

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 250 meter MODIS Level 1B Near Real Time (NRT) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 2 discrete bands located in the 0.62 to 0.88...

  16. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal ...

    Satellite level at-sensor radiance corresponding to all four infrared channels of. INSAT-3D Imager payload is .... its heritage traces back to LOWTRAN. MOD-. TRAN includes all ... over tropical region (SeeBor dataset) are car- ried out with the ...

  17. Vacuum Radiance-Temperature Standard Facility for Infrared Remote Sensing at NIM

    Hao, X. P.; Song, J.; Xu, M.; Sun, J. P.; Gong, L. Y.; Yuan, Z. D.; Lu, X. F.

    2018-06-01

    As infrared remote sensors are very important parts of Earth observation satellites, they must be calibrated based on the radiance temperature of a blackbody in a vacuum chamber prior to launch. The uncertainty of such temperature is thus an essential component of the sensors' uncertainty. This paper describes the vacuum radiance-temperature standard facility (VRTSF) at the National Institute of Metrology of China, which will serve to calibrate infrared remote sensors on Chinese meteorological satellites. The VRTSF can be used to calibrate vacuum blackbody radiance temperature, including those used to calibrate infrared remote sensors. The components of the VRTSF are described in this paper, including the VMTBB, the LNBB, the FTIR spectrometer, the reduced-background optical system, the vacuum chamber used to calibrate customers' blackbody, the vacuum-pumping system and the liquid-nitrogen-support system. The experimental methods and results are expounded. The uncertainty of the radiance temperature of VMTBB is 0.026 °C at 30 °C over 10 μm.

  18. Hyperspectral material identification on radiance data using single-atmosphere or multiple-atmosphere modeling

    Mariano, Adrian V.; Grossmann, John M.

    2010-11-01

    Reflectance-domain methods convert hyperspectral data from radiance to reflectance using an atmospheric compensation model. Material detection and identification are performed by comparing the compensated data to target reflectance spectra. We introduce two radiance-domain approaches, Single atmosphere Adaptive Cosine Estimator (SACE) and Multiple atmosphere ACE (MACE) in which the target reflectance spectra are instead converted into sensor-reaching radiance using physics-based models. For SACE, known illumination and atmospheric conditions are incorporated in a single atmospheric model. For MACE the conditions are unknown so the algorithm uses many atmospheric models to cover the range of environmental variability, and it approximates the result using a subspace model. This approach is sometimes called the invariant method, and requires the choice of a subspace dimension for the model. We compare these two radiance-domain approaches to a Reflectance-domain ACE (RACE) approach on a HYDICE image featuring concealed materials. All three algorithms use the ACE detector, and all three techniques are able to detect most of the hidden materials in the imagery. For MACE we observe a strong dependence on the choice of the material subspace dimension. Increasing this value can lead to a decline in performance.

  19. Measurement of the W boson mass in the Delphi experiment

    Simard, L.

    2000-01-01

    After the Z 0 study during the first phase of LEP, the properties of the W boson, in particular its mass, are precisely measured at LEP2. After the implications of that measurement on the Higgs mass being explained, the analysis of the WW semileptonic events, where the two W decay into two quarks, a charged lepton and a neutrino, is described. It was carried out with the data sample collected at DELPHI in 1997 and 1998, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 211.1 pb -1 . The measurement, based upon a likelihood fit applied both to simulation and data requires that all variables of simulation reproduce well the data. Comparisons between Monte Carlo and data are set out, as well as the selection of WW events and the kinematical fit used to improve the mass resolution. The method used to estimate the systematic errors on the measurement and the result of the measurement are presented. When combining these measurements with the measurements done in the hadronic channel, the mass and the width are measured. (author)

  20. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone measurementsexperience of ...

    Background. Surgery is the treatment of choice for symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. The majority of research concerning intra-operative parathyroid hormone (ioPTH) measurements is conducted in university hospitals. Whether ioPTH measurements are feasible and useful in predicting the presence of remaining ...

  1. Experience with confirmatory measurements at the Savannah River Plant

    Deason, P.T.; Cadieux, J.R.; Denard, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Confirmatory measurements are performed on all category I and II plutonium shipments to the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The primary technique employed has been neutron coincidence counting using three instruments; two slab counters, and a well counter. These measurements have provided the required safeguards features to support the physical security measures already in place for inter-site shipments of special nuclear material (SNM). Similar confirmatory measurements have also been performed on a variety of scrap mixed-oxide materials stored at SRP for later processing. The data handling and results for several categories of material will be examined in addition to planned uses of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP)/SRP Confirmatory Measurements Counter (CMC). 2 refs., 4 figs

  2. Measuring the Quality of the Website User Experience

    Sauro, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Consumers spend an increasing amount of time and money online finding information, completing tasks, or making purchases. The quality of the website experience has become a key differentiator for organizations--affecting whether they purchase and their likelihood to return and recommend a website to friends. Two instruments were created to more…

  3. Fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis: from patient experience to measurement

    Nikolaus, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complain about fatigue. In-depths interviews with patients showed that fatigue is experienced as an annoying symptom that can have far-reaching consequences for daily life. However, not each patient has the same experience of fatigue: emotions,

  4. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  5. Measuring Customer Experience in Bancassurance: An Empirical Study

    Mousumi Choudhury

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This study attempts to investigate customer experience with respect to the bancassurance channel. Design/Methodology/Approach – The study is based on primary data collected using a structured questionnaire from customers buying life insurance policies from SBI Life through different branches of State Bank of India in the city of Guwahati in the state of Assam, India. Cronbach’s alpha was used to test the reliability of the questionnaire. Statistical tools, such as mean, standard deviation, and factor analysis were used to attain the objective of the study. Findings and implications – The study found that customers have favorable experiences when buying life insurance through the bancassurance channel. There are seven core factors that affect customer experience in bancassurance: ease of buying, whether maturity benefit is received, reliability of the channel, responsiveness of the channel, after-sale services, stock market-related information, and accuracy of the channel. Banks should devise a strategy to sustain favorable experiences of their customers, as this enables banks to retain their existing customers while also attracting new ones. Limitation – The study is restricted to customers buying life insurance policy from various branches of State Bank of India in Guwahati, India. Therefore, longitudinal and cross-sectional research is needed to generalize the findings. Originality – The study is first of its kind and hence original in nature.

  6. Predicting Top-of-Atmosphere Thermal Radiance Using MERRA-2 Atmospheric Data with Deep Learning

    Tania Kleynhans

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Image data from space-borne thermal infrared (IR sensors are used for a variety of applications, however they are often limited by their temporal resolution (i.e., repeat coverage. To potentially increase the temporal availability of thermal image data, a study was performed to determine the extent to which thermal image data can be simulated from available atmospheric and surface data. The work conducted here explored the use of Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2 developed by The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA to predict top-of-atmosphere (TOA thermal IR radiance globally at time scales finer than available satellite data. For this case study, TOA radiance data was derived for band 31 (10.97 μ m of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor. Two approaches have been followed, namely an atmospheric radiative transfer forward modeling approach and a supervised learning approach. The first approach uses forward modeling to predict TOA radiance from the available surface and atmospheric data. The second approach applied four different supervised learning algorithms to the atmospheric data. The algorithms included a linear least squares regression model, a non-linear support vector regression (SVR model, a multi-layer perceptron (MLP, and a convolutional neural network (CNN. This research found that the multi-layer perceptron model produced the lowest overall error rates with an root mean square error (RMSE of 1.36 W/m 2 ·sr· μ m when compared to actual Terra/MODIS band 31 image data. These studies found that for radiances above 6 W/m 2 ·sr· μ m, the forward modeling approach could predict TOA radiance to within 12 percent, and the best supervised learning approach can predict TOA to within 11 percent.

  7. Direct photon measurements by the D OE experiment

    Abachi, S.

    1996-07-01

    We report a measurement of the cross section for production of isolated photons with transverse energy E T > 12 GeV in the central (absolute value of η -1 . The cross section is compared with a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculation. We also present preliminary measurements of the center of mass scattering angle distribution and of the correlations between the rapidity of the photon and that of the leading jet in the event

  8. Experience of precision measuring distances by invar wires at accelerators

    Porubaj, N.I.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to determining the deformations and displacements of the ring foundation of the ITEP accelerator, the method of very accurate distance measurements by means of invar wires and strips is described. Measurement errors are analyzed. This method has allowed to measure distances up to 40 m with a mean-square error of less than 40 μm. The calibration accuracy of 3 and 25-m measuring wires has been determined to be +- 27 μm. Time instability of the wires is +- 16 μm. It is shown that strips are more stable in time than wires. Elongation of 6, 19, 25 and 38 m invar wires has been measured as function of the tension time. The error due to tension of a 38-m wire may be tangible. Data on thermal coefficient variation in time has been obtained for invar wires and strips. The multiannual measurements of the ring foundation deformations show that variations of the mean radius are caused by increases of concrete temperature. Temperature increase by only 1 deg caused mean radius increase of 0.3 mm

  9. How Good is Your User Experience? Measuring and Designing Interactions

    Wildner Raimund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Form and function are important dimensions of consumer choice, but there is more in our increasingly digital world. It is not only products per se that need to be designed but the whole interaction between consumers and brands. The whole UX or user experience is more important than ever before. Digitalism nowadays is everywhere, and even mundane products are becoming more digital (e.g. ovens, while others evolve that are purely digital (e.g. PayPal.

  10. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Fat’yanov, O. V., E-mail: fatyan1@gps.caltech.edu; Asimow, P. D., E-mail: asimow@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences 252-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  11. LDV-measurements in pipe-flow problems and experiences

    Els, H.; Rouve, G.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements with LDV-technique in circular cross-sections cause optical problems. When not using an index matching fluid, the index differences between air, wall and fluid cause a poor definition. Horizontal beams and vertical beams do not intersect in the same point. This makes two-component measurements impossible and gives a very bad signal quality even at forward-scatter one-component measurements. Besides the index matching, supplementary lenses can solve this problem. Lenses, which perfectly adjust the difference between horizontal and vertical beams, and difficult to calculate and - even more - to manufacture in an average equipped workshop. IWW developed a number of single-curvature lenses, which do not give perfect accordance of the beams, but increase the signal quality distinctively and thus noticeably decrease the needed time to measure a whole grid in the circular cross-section. Besides that, they are easy to produce. These lenses are described and the needed correction formula given in this paper. Other correction techniques are discussed, some measurement results with the used equipment are shown

  12. Broadband Laser Ranging for Position Measurements in Shock Physics Experiments

    Rhodes, Michelle; Bennett, Corey; Daykin, Edward; Younk, Patrick; Lalone, Brandon; Kostinski, Natalie

    2017-06-01

    Broadband laser ranging (BLR) is a recently developed measurement system that provides an attractive option for determining the position of shock-driven surfaces. This system uses broadband, picosecond (or femtosecond) laser pulses and a fiber interferometer to measure relative travel time to a target and to a reference mirror. The difference in travel time produces a delay difference between pulse replicas that creates a spectral beat frequency. The spectral beating is recorded in real time using a dispersive Fourier transform and an oscilloscope. BLR systems have been designed that measure position at 12.5-40 MHz with better than 100 micron accuracy over ranges greater than 10 cm. We will give an overview of the basic operating principles of these systems. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and by NSTec Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946.

  13. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Thoms, L-J; Girwidz, R

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net. (paper)

  14. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net.

  15. Valuing Informal Care Experience: Does Choice of Measure Matter?

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; McNamee, Paul; Ryan, Mandy; Sutton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Well-being equations are often estimated to generate monetary values for non-marketed activities. In such studies, utility is often approximated by either life satisfaction or General Health Questionnaire scores. We estimate and compare monetary valuations of informal care for the first time in the UK employing both measures, using longitudinal…

  16. Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

    2005-08-01

    With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

  17. Experience of the use of radiation measuring instruments for Russia

    Matsubara, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kawaguti, H.

    1994-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, among a series of international cooperations, also from our company T.OHSHIMA visited Russia in October, 1991 as a member of the USSR and Japan Joint Specialist Meeting on Environmental Radiation and Shelter Structure of Chernobyl-4 Nuclear Power Plant, and a few members including H.KAWAGUTI visited there in December, 1991 for the handling instructions of the apparatus delivered to Sasagawa Memorial Health Cooperation Foundation. During these visits to Russia they carried electronic personal dosimeters and pocketsize dose ratemeters, measured the doses and dose rate of some areas including the actual polluted areas and gained interesting data. Especially T.OHSHIMA entered the turbine structure of Chernobyl No.4 Reactor and experienced 7m Sv/h. I introduce these measurement data and the instruments used for the measurement. Also H.KAWAGUTI and others explained the maintenance and handling of the whole body counter loaded into the medical examination car offered to Russia for Chernobyl Sasagawa Medical Care Cooperation Project of Sasagawa Memorial Health Cooperation Foundation. I introduce the outline of this medical examination car laying stress on the whole body counter and present a part of the data by the whole body counter measured during the medical care cooperation. (author)

  18. Velocity measurement accuracy in optical microhemodynamics: experiment and simulation

    Chayer, Boris; Cloutier, Guy; L Pitts, Katie; Fenech, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Micro particle image velocimetry (µPIV) is a common method to assess flow behavior in blood microvessels in vitro as well as in vivo. The use of red blood cells (RBCs) as tracer particles, as generally considered in vivo, creates a large depth of correlation (DOC), even as large as the vessel itself, which decreases the accuracy of the method. The limitations of µPIV for blood flow measurements based on RBC tracking still have to be evaluated. In this study, in vitro and in silico models were used to understand the effect of the DOC on blood flow measurements using µPIV RBC tracer particles. We therefore employed a µPIV technique to assess blood flow in a 15 µm radius glass tube with a high-speed CMOS camera. The tube was perfused with a sample of 40% hematocrit blood. The flow measured by a cross-correlating speckle tracking technique was compared to the flow rate of the pump. In addition, a three-dimensional mechanical RBC-flow model was used to simulate optical moving speckle at 20% and 40% hematocrits, in 15 and 20 µm radius circular tubes, at different focus planes, flow rates and for various velocity profile shapes. The velocity profiles extracted from the simulated pictures were compared with good agreement with the corresponding velocity profiles implemented in the mechanical model. The flow rates from both the in vitro flow phantom and the mathematical model were accurately measured with less than 10% errors. Simulation results demonstrated that the hematocrit (paired t tests, p = 0.5) and the tube radius (p = 0.1) do not influence the precision of the measured flow rate, whereas the shape of the velocity profile (p < 0.001) and the location of the focus plane (p < 0.001) do, as indicated by measured errors ranging from 3% to 97%. In conclusion, the use of RBCs as tracer particles makes a large DOC and affects the image processing required to estimate the flow velocities. We found that the current µPIV method is acceptable to estimate the flow rate

  19. Dijets in diffractive photoproduction measured with the ZEUS experiment

    Renner, R.

    2006-10-01

    The diffractive photoproduction of dijets in electron-proton scattering has been studied using 77.1 pb -1 of data taken with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The measurements have been made at a centre-of- mass energy √s=318 GeV in the kinematic range 0.2 P P is the fraction of the proton momentum taken by the diffractive exchange. The jets have been reconstructed using the k T algorithm. The two jets with the highest transversal energy have been required to satisfy E T >7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to be in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<η<1.5. Differential cross sections have been measured and been confronted with the predictions from leading order Monte Carlo simulations and next-to-leading order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  20. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Bieri, Andrej; Sauter, Nora; Roizard, Sophie; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Goldie, Kenneth N; Enimanev, Kaloyan; Stahlberg, Henning; Rinn, Bernd; Braun, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. Results: We have developed openBE...

  1. Angiographic Guidewire with Measuring Markers: Design and Clinical Experience

    Kamei, Seiji; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Murata, Katsuhito; Matsuda, Joe; Ohno, Ryota; Kimura, Junko; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ohno, Kazuko; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ikeda, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. We have developed an angiographic guidewire with measuring markers to determine accurately how far a guidewire is inserted within a catheter. We investigated whether use of this guidewire reduces the risk of vascular injury and the fluoroscopic time during guidewire manipulations. Methods. Four markers were put on the surface of the guidewire at 80, 100, 110, and 120 cm from the tip. The actual lengths of 54 catheters from seven manufacturers were measured and compared with the nominal lengths. Sixty consecutive patients who underwent angiography were randomized into two groups: in one group guidewires with surface markers were used (marker group) and in the other group, conventional guidewires (control group). For each guidewire insertion, the fluoroscopic time before the guidewire was pushed forward into the vessel lumen was recorded. The number of occasions on which unintentionally the guidewire had already been pushed out of the catheter at the start of fluoroscopy was also evaluated. Results. The actual lengths of all catheters were greater than the nominal lengths by 1.0-11.0 cm. Mean fluoroscopic time for each guidewire insertion was 3.3 sec in the marker group and 5.7 sec in the control group (p < 0.05). Guidewires were unintentionally pushed out of the catheters without fluoroscopy three times (3.6%), in each case in the control group. Conclusion. The guidewire with measuring markers is effective for enhancing safety and in reducing fluoroscopic radiation during angiographic procedures. It is recommended that operators be aware that actual lengths of catheters may vary significantly from the nominal lengths listed; they should be aware of this with any guidewire, but particularly with the angiographic measuring guidewire

  2. An Experiment in Radiation Measurement Using the Depron Instrument

    Benghin, Victor V.; Nechaev, Oleg Y.; Zolotarev, Ivan A.; Amelyushkin, Alexander M.; Petrov, Vasiliy L.; Panasyuk, Milhail I.; Yashin, Ivan V.

    2018-02-01

    Most of the radiation measurements have been made onboard spacecraft flying along orbits with an inclination of up to 51.6 degrees. Due to the prospect of manned missions at orbits with larger inclinations, it is advisable to conduct preliminary detailed dosimetry measurements at a high-inclination orbit; due to its polar orbit, the Lomonosov satellite provides good opportunities for such study. We chose a method of cosmic radiation dosimetry based on semiconductor detectors. This method is widely used onboard spacecraft, including full-time radiation monitoring onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It should be noted that not only did the charged particles contribute significantly in the dose equivalent, but also did the neutrons. Semiconductor detectors have low sensitivity to neutron radiation and are not sufficient for detecting the expected flux of neutrons. We add a thermal neutron counter to the proposed device in order to provide an opportunity for estimation of neutron flux variations along the satellite trajectory. Thus, the design of the instrument DEPRON (Dosimeter of Electrons, PROtons and Neutrons) was determined. DEPRON is intended for registration of the absorbed doses and linear energy transfer spectra for high-energy electrons, protons and nuclei of space radiation, as well as registration of thermal neutrons. The present paper provides a brief description of the DEPRON instrument. Its calibration results and the first mission results of background radiation measurements are also presented.

  3. Localized damage in soft rock: experiments with field measurement techniques

    Nguyen, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis concerns, firstly, an experimental study on the process of fracture in uniaxial compression of rock samples containing narrow, rectilinear notches inclined with respect to the axis of loading. Secondly, we study the evolution of shear strain localisation towards fracturing and failure in specimens of the same materials with a particular geometry, involving two rounded notches. This geometry, inspired by the work of Meuwissen et al. (1998) for tension tests on metals, promotes the localisation of shear strain in simple compression before fracture. Two different materials were studied: a natural rock of volcanic origin (Neapolitan Tuff) and an artificial 'roc' (CPIR09). In the studies presented, three full-field measurement techniques have been employed in combination: (i) the Digital Image Correlation (DIC), for measurement of kinematic fields at a sample's surface; (ii)acoustic Emission measurements (AE) and AE source location, to follow the evolution of damage in samples during loading; (iii) X-ray tomography (pre-and post-mortem studies), to characterise preexisting defects and discontinuities in the specimens and to better understand the fracturing in 3D. (author)

  4. Qualification testing and electrical measurement experience: A manufacturer's view

    Arnett, J. C.; Cooley, J. E.; Wingert, T. L.

    1983-11-01

    ARCO Solar's experiences as a participant in an industry-utility-government environmental qualification team examining photovoltaic devices are discussed. Included is an assessment of the applicability, completeness and appropriateness of the testing procedures and of the acceptance criteria for megawatt-sized procurements for utilities. Like the stand-alone users, the utility industry is interested in obtaining low costs, but additional concerns exist related to reliability and durability, safety, grounding and overall system criteria including performance prediction (related to output power acceptance testing), power quality and dispatchability. For purposes of this first major purchase of photovoltaic modules and panels by the utility industry, there was a carry-over of the JPL specifications. The need exists for futher development, assessement, and selection of qualification and testing standards and evaluation criteria specifically addressing these additional concerns for utility-connected PV power-plant applications.

  5. Measuring microbial fitness in a field reciprocal transplant experiment.

    Boynton, Primrose J; Stelkens, Rike; Kowallik, Vienna; Greig, Duncan

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fitness is easy to measure in the laboratory, but difficult to measure in the field. Laboratory fitness assays make use of controlled conditions and genetically modified organisms, neither of which are available in the field. Among other applications, fitness assays can help researchers detect adaptation to different habitats or locations. We designed a competitive fitness assay to detect adaptation of Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates to the habitat they were isolated from (oak or larch leaf litter). The assay accurately measures relative fitness by tracking genotype frequency changes in the field using digital droplet PCR (DDPCR). We expected locally adapted S. paradoxus strains to increase in frequency over time when growing on the leaf litter type from which they were isolated. The DDPCR assay successfully detected fitness differences among S. paradoxus strains, but did not find a tendency for strains to be adapted to the habitat they were isolated from. Instead, we found that the natural alleles of the hexose transport gene we used to distinguish S. paradoxus strains had significant effects on fitness. The origin of a strain also affected its fitness: strains isolated from oak litter were generally fitter than strains from larch litter. Our results suggest that dispersal limitation and genetic drift shape S. paradoxus populations in the forest more than local selection does, although further research is needed to confirm this. Tracking genotype frequency changes using DDPCR is a practical and accurate microbial fitness assay for natural environments. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Prediction of tropical cyclone over North Indian Ocean using WRF model: sensitivity to scatterometer winds, ATOVS and ATMS radiances

    Dodla, Venkata B.

    2016-05-03

    Tropical cyclone prediction, in terms of intensification and movement, is important for disaster management and mitigation. Hitherto, research studies were focused on this issue that lead to improvement in numerical models, initial data with data assimilation, physical parameterizations and application of ensemble prediction. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is the state-of-art model for cyclone prediction. In the present study, prediction of tropical cyclone (Phailin, 2013) that formed in the North Indian Ocean (NIO) with and without data assimilation using WRF model has been made to assess impacts of data assimilation. WRF model was designed to have nested two domains of 15 and 5 km resolutions. In the present study, numerical experiments are made without and with the assimilation of scatterometer winds, and radiances from ATOVS and ATMS. The model performance was assessed in respect to the movement and intensification of cyclone. ATOVS data assimilation experiment had produced the best prediction with least errors less than 100 km up to 60 hours and producing pre-deepening and deepening periods accurately. The Control and SCAT wind assimilation experiments have shown good track but the errors were 150-200 km and gradual deepening from the beginning itself instead of sudden deepening.

  7. Dijets in diffractive photoproduction measured with the ZEUS experiment

    Renner, R.

    2006-10-15

    The diffractive photoproduction of dijets in electron-proton scattering has been studied using 77.1 pb{sup -1} of data taken with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The measurements have been made at a centre-of- mass energy {radical}s=318 GeV in the kinematic range 0.27.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to be in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}<1.5. Differential cross sections have been measured and been confronted with the predictions from leading order Monte Carlo simulations and next-to-leading order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  8. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. II. Experiment

    Chan, H.A.; Moody, M.V.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer has been constructed and tested. Coupling to gravity signals is obtained by having two superconducting proof masses modulate magnetic fields produced by persistent currents. The induced electrical currents are differenced by a passive superconducting circuit coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device. The experimental behavior of this device has been shown to follow the theoretical model closely in both signal transfer and noise characteristics. While its intrinsic noise level is shown to be 0.07 E Hz/sup -1/2/ (1 Eequivalent10/sup -9/ sec/sup -2/), the actual performance of the gravity gradiometer on a passive platform has been limited to 0.3--0.7 E Hz/sup -1/2/ due to its coupling to the environmental noise. The detailed structure of this excess noise is understood in terms of an analytical error model of the instrument. The calibration of the gradiometer has been obtained by two independent methods: by applying a linear acceleration and a gravity signal in two different operational modes of the instrument. This device has been successfully operated as a detector in a new null experiment for the gravitational inverse-square law. In this paper we report the design, fabrication, and detailed test results of the superconducting gravity gradiometer. We also present additional theoretical analyses which predict the specific dynamic behavior of the gradiometer and of the test

  9. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  10. Design and interpretation of experiments to measure the effective removal section.

    Desdin, L

    2001-01-01

    Paper is devoted to develop a single analytical instrument to design and interpret experiment to measure the neutron removal cross sections. There were analyzed the influence of the geometrical and nuclear parameters into the neutron removal cross sections values measured

  11. When Seeing Isn't Believing: How Math Can Guide Our Interpretation of Measurements and Experiments.

    Macklin, Paul

    2017-08-23

    Mathematical thought experiments probe the meaning and pitfalls of experimental measurements and demonstrate that caution is in order when measuring heterogeneity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent results from the ICARUS experiment - Measurements concerning neutrino velocity

    Cieslik, K.

    2014-01-01

    The ICARUS T600 detector at the LNGS Gran Sasso underground Laboratory is the first large mass Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) designed to study the ν μ → ν τ oscillation for neutrinos from the CERN-CNGS beam, the atmospheric neutrinos and matter stability. In stable conditions the detector has been collecting data since October 2010. The results, presented here, of the search for analogue to the Cherenkov radiation at superluminal speeds and the measurement of the neutrino time of flight are incompatible with the OPERA collaboration claiming that CNGS muon neutrinos arrive to Gran Sasso, after covering a distance of about 732 km, earlier than expected from the luminal speed. (author)

  13. Luminosity measurements for the R scan experiment at BESIII

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    By analyzing the large-angle Bhabha scattering events e+e- → (γ)e+e- and diphoton events e+e- → (γ)γγ for the data sets collected at center-of-mass (c.m.) energies between 2.2324 and 4.5900 GeV (131 energy points in total) with the upgraded Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII), the integrated luminosities have been measured at the different c.m. energies, individually. The results are important inputs for the R value and J/ψ resonance parameter measurements. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008, 11375170, 11275189, 11079030, 11475164, 11475169, 11005109, 10979095, 11275211), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program; Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1532102). (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45). 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  14. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  15. Measuring and processing measured data in the MAW and HTR fuel element storage experiment. Pt. 2

    Henze, R.

    1987-01-01

    The central data collection plant for the MAW experimental storage in the Asse salt mine consists of 3 components: a) Front end computers assigned to the experiment for data collection, with few and simple components for the difficult ambient conditions underground. b) An overground central computer, which carries out the tasks of intermediate data storage, display at site, monitoring of the experiment, alarms and remote data transmission for final evaluation. c) A local network connects the front end computers to the central computer. It should take over network tasks (data transmission reports) from the front end computers and should make a flexible implementation of new experiments possible. (orig./RB) [de

  16. Potential for the use of reconstructed IASI radiances in the detection of atmospheric trace gases

    N. C. Atkinson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Principal component (PC analysis has received considerable attention as a technique for the extraction of meteorological signals from hyperspectral infra-red sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. In addition to achieving substantial bit-volume reductions for dissemination purposes, the technique can also be used to generate reconstructed radiances in which random instrument noise has been reduced. Studies on PC analysis of hyperspectral infrared sounder data have been undertaken in the context of numerical weather prediction, instrument monitoring and geophysical variable retrieval, as well as data compression. This study examines the potential of PC analysis for chemistry applications.

    A major concern in the use of PC analysis for chemistry is that the spectral features associated with trace gases may not be well represented in the reconstructed spectra, either due to deficiencies in the training set or due to the limited number of PC scores used in the radiance reconstruction. In this paper we show examples of reconstructed IASI radiances for several trace gases: ammonia, sulphur dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide. It is shown that care must be taken in the selection of spectra for the initial training set: an iterative technique, in which outlier spectra are added to a base training set, gives the best results. For the four trace gases examined, key features of the chemical signatures are retained in the reconstructed radiances, whilst achieving a substantial reduction in instrument noise.

    A new regional re-transmission service for IASI is scheduled to start in 2010, as part of the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS. For this EARS-IASI service it is intended to include PC scores as part of the data stream. The paper describes the generation of the reference eigenvectors for this new service.

  17. Study of microstrip gas chambers for CMS experiment and measurement of the W boson mass in the DELPHI experiment

    Ripp-Baudot, I.

    2004-06-01

    In this document the author describes 3 fields of his research activities: first, the development and validation tests of micro-strip gas chambers for the CMS experiment; secondly, the measurements of the W boson mass and width by analysing the events: e + e - → W + W - → qq-bar qq-bar whose data have been collected in the DELPHI experiment (at the LEP-2 accelerator); and thirdly, the tagging of b-jets that is an essential tool for the study of the top quark. The last chapter is dedicated to what is expected from LHC experiments concerning the properties of the quark top: mass, spin, production and decay channels

  18. The Impact of AMSU-A Radiance Assimilation in the U.S. Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS)

    Baker, Nancy L; Hogan, T. F; Campbell, W. F; Pauley, R. L; Swadley, S. D

    2005-01-01

    ...) sensor suite onboard NOAA 15 and 16 for NOGAPS. The direct assimilation of AMSU-A radiances replaced the assimilation of ATOVS temperature retrievals produced by NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS...

  19. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  20. CloudSat-Constrained Cloud Ice Water Path and Cloud Top Height Retrievals from MHS 157 and 183.3 GHz Radiances

    Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ice water path (IWP) and cloud top height (ht) are two of the key variables in determining cloud radiative and thermodynamical properties in climate models. Large uncertainty remains among IWP measurements from satellite sensors, in large part due to the assumptions made for cloud microphysics in these retrievals. In this study, we develop a fast algorithm to retrieve IWP from the 157, 183.3+/-3 and 190.3 GHz radiances of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) such that the MHS cloud ice retrieval is consistent with CloudSat IWP measurements. This retrieval is obtained by constraining the empirical forward models between collocated and coincident measurements of CloudSat IWP and MHS cloud-induced radiance depression (Tcir) at these channels. The empirical forward model is represented by a lookup table (LUT) of Tcir-IWP relationships as a function of ht and the frequency channel.With ht simultaneously retrieved, the IWP is found to be more accurate. The useful range of the MHS IWP retrieval is between 0.5 and 10 kg/sq m, and agrees well with CloudSat in terms of the normalized probability density function (PDF). Compared to the empirical model, current operational radiative transfer models (RTMs) still have significant uncertainties in characterizing the observed Tcir-IWP relationships. Therefore, the empirical LUT method developed here remains an effective approach to retrieving ice cloud properties from the MHS-like microwave channels.

  1. HYTHIRM Radiance Modeling and Image Analyses in Support of STS-119, STS-125 and STS-128 Space Shuttle Hypersonic Re-entries

    Gibson, David M.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the first geometrically accurate (i.e., 3-D) temperature maps of the entire windward surface of the Space Shuttle during hypersonic reentry. To accomplish this task we began with estimated surface temperatures derived from CFD models at integral high Mach numbers and used them, the Shuttle's surface properties and reasonable estimates of the sensor-to-target geometry to predict the emitted spectral radiance from the surface (in units of W sr-1 m-2 nm-1). These data were converted to sensor counts using properties of the sensor (e.g. aperture, spectral band, and various efficiencies), the expected background, and the atmosphere transmission to inform the optimal settings for the near-infrared and midwave IR cameras on the Cast Glance aircraft. Once these data were collected, calibrated, edited, registered and co-added we formed both 2-D maps of the scene in the above units and 3-D maps of the bottom surface in temperature that could be compared with not only the initial inputs but also thermocouple data from the Shuttle itself. The 3-D temperature mapping process was based on the initial radiance modeling process. Here temperatures were guessed for each node in a well-resolved 3-D framework, a radiance model was produced and compared to the processed imagery, and corrections to the temperature were estimated until the iterative process converged. This process did very well in characterizing the temperature structure of the large asymmetric boundary layer transition the covered much of the starboard bottom surface of STS-119 Discovery. Both internally estimated accuracies and differences with CFD models and thermocouple measurements are at most a few percent. The technique did less well characterizing the temperature structure of the turbulent wedge behind the trip due to limitations in understanding the true sensor resolution. (Note: Those less inclined to read the entire paper are encouraged to read an Executive Summary provided at the end.)

  2. The effects of downwelling radiance on MER surface spectra: the evil that atmospheres do

    Wolff, M.; Ghosh, A.; Arvidson, R.; Christensen, P.; Guinness, E.; Ruff, S.; Seelos, F.; Smith, M.; Athena Science

    2004-11-01

    While it may not be surprising to some that downwelling radiation in the martian atmosphere may contribute a non-negligible fraction of the radiance for a given surface scene, others remain shocked and surprised (and often dismayed) to discover this fact; particularly with regard to mini-TES observations. Naturally, the relative amplitude of this sky ``contamination'' is often a complicated function of meteorological conditions, viewing geometry, surface properties, and (for the IR) surface temperature. Ideally, one would use a specialized observations to mimic the actual hemispherical-directional nature of the problem. Despite repeated attempts to obtain Pancam complete sky observations and mini-TES sky octants, such observations are not available in the MER observational database. As a result, one is left with the less-enviable, though certainly more computationally intensive, task of connecting point observations (radiance and derived meteorological parameters) to a hemispherical integral of downwelling radiance. Naturally, one must turn to a radiative transfer analysis, despite oft-repeated attempts to assert otherwise. In our presentation, we offer insight into the conditions under which one must worry about atmospheric removal, as well as semi-empirical approaches (based upon said radiative transfer efforts) for producing the correction factors from the available MER atmospheric observations. This work is proudly supported by the MER program through NASA/JPL Contract No. 1242889 (MJW), as well as the contracts for the co-authors.

  3. Estimating top-of-atmosphere thermal infrared radiance using MERRA-2 atmospheric data

    Kleynhans, Tania; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron; Kanan, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Thermal infrared satellite images have been widely used in environmental studies. However, satellites have limited temporal resolution, e.g., 16 day Landsat or 1 to 2 day Terra MODIS. This paper investigates the use of the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data product, produced by NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to predict global topof-atmosphere (TOA) thermal infrared radiance. The high temporal resolution of the MERRA-2 data product presents opportunities for novel research and applications. Various methods were applied to estimate TOA radiance from MERRA-2 variables namely (1) a parameterized physics based method, (2) Linear regression models and (3) non-linear Support Vector Regression. Model prediction accuracy was evaluated using temporally and spatially coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal infrared data as reference data. This research found that Support Vector Regression with a radial basis function kernel produced the lowest error rates. Sources of errors are discussed and defined. Further research is currently being conducted to train deep learning models to predict TOA thermal radiance

  4. The delta-Sobolev approach for modeling solar spectral irradiance and radiance

    Xiang, Xuwu.

    1990-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a solar radiation model is reported, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 microns. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone, and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolov method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximation methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiation transfer problem by the spherical harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer

  5. Analytically derived conversion of spectral band radiance to brightness temperature

    Berk, Alexander [Spectral Sciences, Inc., 44th Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States)], E-mail: lex@spectral.com

    2008-05-15

    Simple analytic expressions for brightness temperature have been derived in terms of band response function spectral moments. Accuracy measures are also derived. Application of these formulas to GOES-12 Sounder thermal infrared bands produces brightness temperature residuals between -5.0 and 2.5 mK for a 150-400 K temperature range. The magnitude of residuals for the five ASTER Radiometer thermal infrared bands over the same temperature range is less than 0.22 mK.

  6. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  7. Comparing airborne and satellite retrievals of cloud optical thickness and particle effective radius using a spectral radiance ratio technique: two case studies for cirrus and deep convective clouds

    Krisna, Trismono C.; Wendisch, Manfred; Ehrlich, André; Jäkel, Evelyn; Werner, Frank; Weigel, Ralf; Borrmann, Stephan; Mahnke, Christoph; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Voigt, Christiane; Machado, Luiz A. T.

    2018-04-01

    Solar radiation reflected by cirrus and deep convective clouds (DCCs) was measured by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation Measurement System (SMART) installed on the German High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO) during the Mid-Latitude Cirrus (ML-CIRRUS) and the Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interaction and Dynamic of Convective Clouds System - Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud Resolving Modelling and to the Global Precipitation Measurement (ACRIDICON-CHUVA) campaigns. On particular flights, HALO performed measurements closely collocated with overpasses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite. A cirrus cloud located above liquid water clouds and a DCC topped by an anvil cirrus are analyzed in this paper. Based on the nadir spectral upward radiance measured above the two clouds, the optical thickness τ and particle effective radius reff of the cirrus and DCC are retrieved using a radiance ratio technique, which considers the cloud thermodynamic phase, the vertical profile of cloud microphysical properties, the presence of multilayer clouds, and the heterogeneity of the surface albedo. For the cirrus case, the comparison of τ and reff retrieved on the basis of SMART and MODIS measurements yields a normalized mean absolute deviation of up to 1.2 % for τ and 2.1 % for reff. For the DCC case, deviations of up to 3.6 % for τ and 6.2 % for reff are obtained. The larger deviations in the DCC case are mainly attributed to the fast cloud evolution and three-dimensional (3-D) radiative effects. Measurements of spectral upward radiance at near-infrared wavelengths are employed to investigate the vertical profile of reff in the cirrus. The retrieved values of reff are compared with corresponding in situ measurements using a vertical weighting method. Compared to the MODIS observations, measurements of SMART provide more information on the

  8. High temperature measurements in severe accident experiments on the PLINIUS Platform

    Bouyer, V.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Fouquart, P.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Parga, C.

    2013-06-01

    Severe accident experiments are conducted on the PLINIUS platform in Cadarache, using prototypic corium. During these experiments, it is essential to measure the temperature to know the thermo-physical state of the corium in static and dynamic conditions or to monitor the concrete ablation phenomenology. Temperature in the corium can reach about 2000 to 3000 K. Such aggressive conditions restrict the type of diagnostics that can be employed to do high temperature measurements during the experiments. We employ both non-intrusive (pyrometers) and intrusive (K-type and C-type thermocouples) diagnostics. In this paper, we present the different high temperature measurements techniques and the results that can be obtained in severe accident experiments as corium heating tests and molten core concrete interaction experiments. (authors)

  9. Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B mesons system at the LHCb experiment

    Cardinale, R

    2016-01-01

    Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B meson system provide information for testing the CKM picture of CP violation in the Standard Model. A review of recent results from the LHCb experiment is presented.

  10. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    , from GEISA. Its content, will be described, as well. This work is ongoing, with the purpose of assessing the IASI measurements capabilities and the spectroscopic information quality, within the ISSWG (IASI Sounding Science Working Group), in the frame of the CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, France)/EUMETSAT (EUropean organization for the exploitation of METeorological SATellites) Polar System (EPS) project, by simulating high resolution radiances and/or using experimental data. EUMETSAT will implement GEISA/IASI into the EPS ground segment. The IASI soundings spectroscopic data archive requirements will be discussed in the context of comparisons between recorded and calculated experimental spectra, using the ARA/4A forward line-by-line radiative transfer modelling code in its latest version.

  11. Improvement of the photon flux measurement at the BGO-OD experiment

    Kohl, Katrin [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator facility at Bonn investigates the internal reaction mechanisms of the nucleon, using an energy tagged bremsstrahlung photon beam. Absolute normalisation of the beam flux is required for cross section determination. In this talk the measurement principle is presented, and an improved method of the photon flux monitoring of the experiment is introduced.

  12. Transgender Individuals' Workplace Experiences: The Applicability of Sexual Minority Measures and Models

    Brewster, Melanie E.; Velez, Brandon; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Moradi, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored whether 3 existing measures of workplace constructs germane to the experiences of sexual minority people could be modified to improve their applicability with transgender individuals. To this end, the Workplace Heterosexist Experiences Questionnaire (WHEQ; C. R. Waldo, 1999); the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered…

  13. Optimized collection, storage and measurement of radon and radon decay products - school experiments

    Philipsborn, H. von; Geipel, R.; Just, G.

    1998-01-01

    Schools are expected more than ever to teach in physics and chemistry an understanding of radioactivity in its many aspects. Simple experiments on the occurrence, the measurement and the properties of radionuclides are necessary for true understanding. Such experiments are now possible with novel methods of collection and storage of ubiquitous radon and radon decay products from air, water and solids. (orig.) [de

  14. Measurements of loop antenna loading in RF heating experiments on the KT-5C tokamak

    Zhai Kan; Deng Bihe; Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Yu Wen; Yu Changxun

    1997-01-01

    A new method to measure the loop antenna loadings in the RF wave heating experiments (IBWH at reasonable RF power with relatively low frequency) on the KT-5C device is presented. The method is characterized by determining the RF current ratio only, so it eases the needs of instruments and simplifies the requirements for calibration and data processing in the experiments

  15. An interactive RADIANCE toolkit for customizable CT dose monitoring and reporting.

    Cook, Tessa S; Sundaram, Anand; Boonn, William W; Kim, Woojin

    2013-08-01

    The need for tools to monitor imaging-related radiation has grown dramatically in recent years. RADIANCE, a freely available open-source dose-monitoring tool, was developed in response to the need for an informatics solution in this realm. A number of open-source as well as commercial solutions have since been developed to enable radiology practices to monitor radiation dose parameters for modalities ranging from computed tomography to radiography to fluoroscopy. However, it is not sufficient to simply collect this data; it is equally important to be able to review it in the appropriate context. Most of the currently available dose-monitoring solutions have some type of reporting capability, such as a real-time dashboard or a static report. Previous versions of RADIANCE have included a real-time dashboard with pre-set screens that plot effective dose estimates according to different criteria, as well as monthly scorecards to summarize dose estimates for individuals within a radiology practice. In this work, we present the RADIANCE toolkit, a customizable reporting solution that allows users to generate reports of interest to them, summarizing a variety of metrics that can be grouped according to useful parameters. The output of the toolkit can be used for real-time dose monitoring or scheduled reporting, such as to a quality assurance committee. Making dose parameter data more accessible and more meaningful to the user promotes dose reduction efforts such as regular protocol review and optimization, and ultimately improves patient care by decreasing unnecessary radiation exposure.

  16. Quantitative impact of aerosols on numerical weather prediction. Part II: Impacts to IR radiance assimilation

    Marquis, J. W.; Campbell, J. R.; Oyola, M. I.; Ruston, B. C.; Zhang, J.

    2017-12-01

    This is part II of a two-part series examining the impacts of aerosol particles on weather forecasts. In this study, the aerosol indirect effects on weather forecasts are explored by examining the temperature and moisture analysis associated with assimilating dust contaminated hyperspectral infrared radiances. The dust induced temperature and moisture biases are quantified for different aerosol vertical distribution and loading scenarios. The overall impacts of dust contamination on temperature and moisture forecasts are quantified over the west coast of Africa, with the assistance of aerosol retrievals from AERONET, MPL, and CALIOP. At last, methods for improving hyperspectral infrared data assimilation in dust contaminated regions are proposed.

  17. Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions within Radiance

    Ward, Gregory; Mistrick, Ph.D., Richard; Lee, Eleanor; McNeil, Andrew; Jonsson, Ph.D., Jacob

    2011-01-21

    We describe two methods which rely on bidirectional scattering distribution functions (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater flexibility and accuracy in evaluating arbitrary assemblies of glazing, shading, and other optically-complex coplanar window systems. Two tools within Radiance enable a) efficient annual performance evaluations of CFS, and b) accurate renderings of CFS despite the loss of spatial resolution associated with low-resolution BSDF datasets for inhomogeneous systems. Validation, accuracy, and limitations of the methods are discussed.

  18. Assimilating All-Sky Himawari-8 Satellite Infrared Radiances: A Case of Typhoon Soudelor (2015)

    Honda, Takumi; Miyoshi, Takemasa; Lien, Guo-Yuan; Nishizawa, Seiya; Yoshida, Ryuji; Adachi, Sachiho A.; Terasaki, Koji; Okamoto, Kozo; Tomita, Hirofumi; Bessho, Kotaro

    2018-01-01

    Japan’s new geostationary satellite Himawari-8, the first of a series of the third-generation geostationary meteorological satellites includingGOES-16, has been operational since July 2015. Himawari-8 produces highresolution observations with 16 frequency bands every 10 min for full disk, and every 2.5 min for local regions. This study aims to assimilate all-sky every-10-min infrared (IR) radiances from Himawari-8 with a regional numerical weather prediction model and to investigate its impac...

  19. Some experience with measurements of stack releases and their correlation with environmental measurements

    Czarnecki, J.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear power plants (NPP) in Switzerland were built during the late 1960s and the early 1970s (PWR-Beznau and BWR-Muhleberg). A new generation of NPPs were built ten years later (PWR-Goesgen and BWR-Leibstadt). In all these NPP special attention was given to the sampling and measurements of the releases of radioactive materials, in particular long lived aerosols and J-131. The sampling systems at the Swiss NPP were originally installed on the basis of the American National Standard Guide to sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities, (ANSI NI3, 1 - 1969) or equivalent standards such as ISO 2889 and DIN 25423. Unfortunately, the sampling systems described in these guides cover only that fraction of radioactive aerosols, which is preferentially retained in various portions of the respiratory tract (0.3 to 10 Μm). In a NPP one can expect during an accident a very wide range of particles with diameters as large as 100 and more Μm, which can be transported away by the stack effluent and may not be properly sampled and measured. It should be taken into account that there are some non filtered rooms and that filters can fail or even break. Such particles when released cause a ground contamination in the vicinity of the plant. Such an event occurred in September 1986 in the NPP-Muhleberg

  20. Laser-heating and Radiance Spectrometry for the Study of Nuclear Materials in Conditions Simulating a Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Manara, Dario; Soldi, Luca; Mastromarino, Sara; Boboridis, Kostantinos; Robba, Davide; Vlahovic, Luka; Konings, Rudy

    2017-12-14

    Major and severe accidents have occurred three times in nuclear power plants (NPPs), at Three Mile Island (USA, 1979), Chernobyl (former USSR, 1986) and Fukushima (Japan, 2011). Research on the causes, dynamics, and consequences of these mishaps has been performed in a few laboratories worldwide in the last three decades. Common goals of such research activities are: the prevention of these kinds of accidents, both in existing and potential new nuclear power plants; the minimization of their eventual consequences; and ultimately, a full understanding of the real risks connected with NPPs. At the European Commission Joint Research Centre's Institute for Transuranium Elements, a laser-heating and fast radiance spectro-pyrometry facility is used for the laboratory simulation, on a small scale, of NPP core meltdown, the most common type of severe accident (SA) that can occur in a nuclear reactor as a consequence of a failure of the cooling system. This simulation tool permits fast and effective high-temperature measurements on real nuclear materials, such as plutonium and minor actinide-containing fission fuel samples. In this respect, and in its capability to produce large amount of data concerning materials under extreme conditions, the current experimental approach is certainly unique. For current and future concepts of NPP, example results are presented on the melting behavior of some different types of nuclear fuels: uranium-plutonium oxides, carbides, and nitrides. Results on the high-temperature interaction of oxide fuels with containment materials are also briefly shown.

  1. AVIRIS Inflight Calibration Experiments, Analysis, and Results in 2000

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures spectra from 370 to 2500 nm with nominally 10-nm sampling and resolution. The spectra are acquired as images with an 11 km width and up to 800 km length from the ER-2 platform or 2.1 km width and 160 km length from the Twin Otter platform. AVIRIS measurements are used for a range of Earth science research and application objectives. The molecular absorption and particle scattering properties expressed in the calibrated AVIRIS measurements are used. For both science research and application objectives, calibration of the AVIRIS spectra is required to produce useful results. Each year prior to the flight season AVIRIS is calibrated in the laboratory. However, the temperature, pressure, vibration, and observational geometry, as well as mechanical, electrical, and operational interfaces of the laboratory are different than the environment on board the airborne platform. To validate the calibration of AVIRIS in the flight environment, an inflight calibration experiment is orchestrated at the beginning of each flight season. In most years additional inflight calibration experiments occur towards the middle and end of the flight season as well. For an inflight calibration experiment, AVIRIS acquires airborne data over a designated calibration target. In concert with the airborne data acquisition, surface and atmospheric properties at the calibration target are measured in situ. These in situ measurements are used to constrain a radiative transfer code and predict the radiance incident at the AVIRIS instrument from the calibration target. This prediction is compared with the AVIRIS-measured radiance to validate the calibration of AVIRIS in the flight environment. Additional properties (such as the AVIRIS inflight measurement precision) are determined as well. This paper presents measurements, analyses, and results from the inflight calibration experiment held on the dry lake bed surface of Rogers Dry

  2. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  3. Measurement of 3-Axis Magnetic Fields Induced by Current Wires Using a Smartphone in Magnetostatics Experiments

    Setiawan, B.; Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an inexpensive smartphone's magnetic sensor to measure magnetic field components (B[subscript x], B[subscript y] and B[subscript z]) induced by current wires in magnetostatic experiments. The variable parameters used to measure the magnetic sensor's capabilities were: the geometrical shapes of the wire, current…

  4. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  5. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  6. Experiences with automatic N and P measurements of an activated sludge process in a research environment

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Temmink, H.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the advantages of on-line automatic measurement of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate for studying activated sludge systems are pointed out with the help of examples of batch experiments. Sample taking is performed by cross-flow filtration and measurement of all three analytes is performed by...

  7. Remote Determination of Cloud Temperature and Transmittance from Spectral Radiance Measurements: Method and Results

    1996-10-01

    atmospherics temperatura and humidity profiles. Validation tests performed on experimental spectra demonstrate the occuracy of the method with typical...indicated as with the title.) Passive Remota Sensing Infrared Spectra Cloud Temperatura Cloud Transmittance FTIR Spectrometer Icing Hazard Detection (DCD03E.IFO - 95.02.22) UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF FORM

  8. Numerical Study of the influence of a ribbon geometry of experiment on measuring particle angular distributions

    Artemov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The values and nature of systematic errors in small-angle particle scattering experiments using ribbon-like beams are investigated by numerical simulation. As shown, the extent of the influence of a ribbon geometry of experiment on the result of measurement is significantly dependent on the shape of the measured angular distribution in an elementary act of interaction. The algorithm of experimental material treatment, obtained in measuring the widths at half maximum of the angular differential cross sections of secondary particles, is presented using an example of specific distributions and certain experimental setup. (author). 12 refs., 7 figs

  9. Optical radiation measurements II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27, 28, 1989

    Palmer, James M.

    1989-09-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the characterization of imaging radiometers, laboratory instrumentation, field and spacecraft instrumentation, and quantum and thermal standard detectors. Attention is given to UV radiometric imaging, dual-color radiometer imagery, a novel diode-array radiometer, a novel reference spectrophotometer, radiance calibration of spherical integrators, instrumentation for measurement of spectral goniometric reflectance, and a real-time IR background discrimination radiometer. Also discussed are a multichannel radiometer for atmosphere optical property measurements, the UV spectroradiometric output of a turbojet, characterizations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometers, total-radiation thermometry, future directions in Si photodiode self-calibration, and radiometric quality Ge photodiodes.

  10. Neural networks for the dimensionality reduction of GOME measurement vector in the estimation of ozone profiles

    Del Frate, F.; Iapaolo, M.; Casadio, S.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Petitdidier, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction can be of crucial importance in the application of inversion schemes to atmospheric remote sensing data. In this study the problem of dimensionality reduction in the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from the radiance measurements provided by the instrument Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on board of ESA satellite ERS-2 is considered. By means of radiative transfer modelling, neural networks and pruning algorithms, a complete procedure has been designed to extract the GOME spectral ranges most crucial for the inversion. The quality of the resulting retrieval algorithm has been evaluated by comparing its performance to that yielded by other schemes and co-located profiles obtained with lidar measurements

  11. Image analysis to measure sorting and stratification applied to sand-gravel experiments

    Orrú, C.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop new measuring techniques for providing detailed data on sediment sorting suitable for sand-gravel laboratory experiments. Such data will be of aid in obtaining new insights on sorting mechanisms and improving prediction capabilities of morphodynamic models. Two measuring techniques have been developed. The first technique is aimed at measuring the size stratification of a sand-gravel deposit through combining image analysis and a sediment remov...

  12. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    Morrison, Kyle A.; Paul, Stephen F.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion

  13. Characterization of the Caliban and Prospero Critical Assemblies Neutron Spectra for Integral Measurements Experiments

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Jacquet, X.; Cartier, J.

    2014-04-01

    Caliban and Prospero are two highly enriched uranium metallic core reactors operated on the CEA Center of Valduc. These critical assemblies are suitable for integral experiments, such as fission yields measurements or perturbation measurements, which have been carried out recently on the Caliban reactor. Different unfolding methods, based on activation foils and fission chambers measurements, are used to characterize the reactor spectra and especially the Caliban spectrum, which is very close to a pure fission spectrum.

  14. Flow Experience as a Quality Measure in Evaluating Physically Activating Collaborative Serious Games

    Kristian J. M. Kiili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the subjective playing experience is important part of the game development process. The enjoyment level that a serious game offers is a key factor in determining whether a player will be engaged in the gameplay and achieve the objectives of the game. In this paper we report the results of a game design process in which two prototypes of a collaborative exergame were studied. The main aim of the paper is to explore to what extend the measurement of flow experience can facilitate the game evaluation and design process. Alltogether 102 junior high school students participated in two user experience studies and played collaborative exergames designed to teach soft skills. Playing experience was measured with a flow questionnaire, playing behavior was observed and some of the players were interviewed. The results showed that flow experience can be used to evaluate the overall quality of the gameplay and it provides a structured approach to consider the quality of the game. However, flow does not provide detailed information about the shortages of the game and thus complementary methods is needed to identify the causes. The results also indicated that flow experience was independent of gender that supports its use in quality measurement.

  15. Precise measurement in elastic electron scattering: HAPPEX and E-158 experiments

    Vacheret, A.

    2004-12-01

    Parity Violation asymmetry measurements in elastic electron scattering are in one hand an interesting way of retrieving new informations about the sea quarks of the nucleon and in the other hand a powerful test of the Standard Model electroweak sector at low energy. This thesis describes the HAPPEX experiment at JLab and the E-158 experiment at SLAC (USA) which measure de parity violation asymmetries in elastic scattering of polarized electron on nuclei like Hydrogen or Helium and on atomic electrons. With the measurements on hadronic targets one can extract the strange quarks contribution to the charge and current density of the nucleon. With the electron-electron scattering one can test the standard model at the loop level and far from the Z pole by extracting sin 2 θ W . In this thesis we describe the formalism associated with the electroweak probe. We present in detail the experimental methods used to make such precise measurements of parity violation asymmetry. Then, we describe the experimental set-up of each experiment and in particular the electron detector and the feedback loop on the beam current for the HAPPEX experiment and the analysis of E-158 run III with a dedicated systematic study on the beam sub-pulse fluctuations. We present the preliminary results for each experiment with a comparison with the other existing results and the future experiments. (author)

  16. An ultrafast line-by-line algorithm for calculating spectral transmittance and radiance

    Tan, X.

    2013-01-01

    An ultrafast line-by-line algorithm for calculating spectral transmittance and radiance of gases is presented. The algorithm is based on fast convolution of the Voigt line profile using Fourier transform and a binning technique. The algorithm breaks a radiative transfer calculation into two steps: a one-time pre-computation step in which a set of pressure independent coefficients are computed using the spectral line information; a normal calculation step in which the Fourier transform coefficients of the optical depth are calculated using the line of sight information and the coefficients pre-computed in the first step, the optical depth is then calculated using an inverse Fourier transform and the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated. The algorithm is significantly faster than line-by-line algorithms that do not employ special speedup techniques by a factor of 10 3 –10 6 . A case study of the 2.7 μm band of H 2 O vapor is presented. -- Highlights: •An ultrafast line-by-line model based on FFT and a binning technique is presented. •Computationally expensive calculations are factored out into a pre-computation step. •It is 10 3 –10 8 times faster than LBL algorithms that do not employ speedup techniques. •Good agreement with experimental data for the 2.7 μm band of H 2 O

  17. Modeling forest defoliation using simulated BRDF and assessing its effect on reflectance and sensor reaching radiance

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as change detection are widely used for mapping and monitoring forest cover to detect the declining health and vigor of forests. These techniques rely on the assumption that the biophysical variation in the forest introduces a corresponding variation in its reflectance. The biophysical variations are assessed by foresters, but these assessment techniques are expensive and cannot be performed frequently to identify a specific level of change in the forest, for example, infection due to gypsy moths that results in forest defoliation. Further, the interaction of atmosphere, sensor characteristics, and phenology that are inherent in the remotely sensed images makes it difficult to separate biophysical changes from observational effects. We have addressed these limitations by developing a method to model the spectral reflectance properties of forests with varying degrees of defoliation using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. This paper discusses the in-canopy radiative approach and the impact of defoliation on the reflectance and radiance observed by sensors such as Landsat. The results indicate that the relative variation in forest reflectance between a non-defoliated and a 30% defoliated deciduous forest can be as high as 10% in the NIR spectral band. A function can be fit to predict the level of defoliation from the relative variation in radiance. The modeling and analysis techniques can be extended to assess the impact of atmospheric factors and sensor characteristics relative to the biophysical changes as well as for assessing other biophysical variables in forests.

  18. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Performance of main in situ experiment and results from water phase measurements

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Nilsson, Kersti; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik; Kronberg, Magnus

    2010-12-01

    sorption to colloids in the aqueous phase was of minor importance. Furthermore, the measurements performed after a general colloid filtration showed no significant concentrations of inorganic colloids. The natural redox conditions were difficult to maintain during the experiment. Therefore the experiment was performed under the oxidizing conditions (E h ∼470 mV) that was obtained during the circulation of the groundwater. Sorption occurred on equipment during the experiment, in particular for some surface complexation sorbing tracers, possibly due to iron-oxy-hydroxides formed on equipment surfaces. Quantification was made of the amount of sorption on the equipment in order to enable corrections in the evaluation procedures. The sorption occurring for ion-exchange sorbing tracers was concluded to predominately be an effect of interaction with the geologic material since the sorbed amount on the equipment was found to be insignificant. Natural pressure conditions were maintained throughout the experiment time and consequently penetration into the rock matrix must be considered as a result only of diffusion since no advection could have been involved. Modelling in order to determine sorption coefficients (K a , K d ) was performed using a homogeneous porosity sorption-diffusion model using fixed data for porosity and matrix diffusivity from laboratory investigations on LTDE-SD core materials. For the ion-exchange sorbing tracers, the in situ evaluated K d was in the range of the batch sorption results or near the highest values (fracture material) from the batch sorption results. This indicates that a sorption-diffusion model can describe the concentration losses reasonably well for the ion-exchange sorbing tracers. However, due to the sorption on equipment, one should treat these results with care and consider the analysis of the sampled rock material before any definitive conclusions can be made based on the actual penetration profiles of the rock

  19. Long Term Sorption Diffusion Experiment (LTDE-SD). Performance of main in situ experiment and results from water phase measurements

    Widestrand, Henrik; Byegaard, Johan; Nilsson, Kersti; Hoeglund, Susanne; Gustafsson, Erik (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Kronberg, Magnus (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    radionuclide sorption to colloids in the aqueous phase was of minor importance. Furthermore, the measurements performed after a general colloid filtration showed no significant concentrations of inorganic colloids. The natural redox conditions were difficult to maintain during the experiment. Therefore the experiment was performed under the oxidizing conditions (E{sub h} approx470 mV) that was obtained during the circulation of the groundwater. Sorption occurred on equipment during the experiment, in particular for some surface complexation sorbing tracers, possibly due to iron-oxy-hydroxides formed on equipment surfaces. Quantification was made of the amount of sorption on the equipment in order to enable corrections in the evaluation procedures. The sorption occurring for ion-exchange sorbing tracers was concluded to predominately be an effect of interaction with the geologic material since the sorbed amount on the equipment was found to be insignificant. Natural pressure conditions were maintained throughout the experiment time and consequently penetration into the rock matrix must be considered as a result only of diffusion since no advection could have been involved. Modelling in order to determine sorption coefficients (K{sub a}, K{sub d}) was performed using a homogeneous porosity sorption-diffusion model using fixed data for porosity and matrix diffusivity from laboratory investigations on LTDE-SD core materials. For the ion-exchange sorbing tracers, the in situ evaluated K{sub d} was in the range of the batch sorption results or near the highest values (fracture material) from the batch sorption results. This indicates that a sorption-diffusion model can describe the concentration losses reasonably well for the ion-exchange sorbing tracers. However, due to the sorption on equipment, one should treat these results with care and consider the analysis of the sampled rock material before any definitive conclusions can be made based on the actual penetration profiles of

  20. A brief review of measurements of electroweak bosons at the LHCb experiment in LHC Run 1

    INSPIRE-00340962

    2016-09-15

    The LHCb experiment is one of four major experiments at the LHC. Despite being designed for the study of beauty and charm particles, it has made important contributions in other areas, such as the production and decay of $W$ and $Z$ bosons. Such measurements can be used to study and constrain parton distribution functions, as well as to test perturbative quantum chromodynamics in hard scattering processes. The angular structure of $Z$ boson decays to leptons can also be studied and used to measure the weak mixing angle. The phase space probed by LHCb is particularly sensitive to this quantity, and the LHCb measurement using the dimuon final state is currently the most precise determination of $\\sin^2\\theta^\\text{lept.}_\\text{eff.}$ at the LHC. LHCb measurements made using data collected during the first period of LHC operations (LHC Run 1) are discussed in this review. The article also considers the potential impact of related future measurements.

  1. Ultrasonic thermometry system for measuring very high temperatures in reactor safety experiments

    Carlson, G.A.; Sullivan, W.H.; Plein, H.G.; Kerley, T.M.

    1979-06-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry has many potential applications in reactor safety experiments, where extremely high temperatures and lack of visual access may preclude the use of conventional diagnostics. This report details ultrasonic thermometry requirements for one such experiment, the molten fuel pool experiment. Sensors, transducers, and signal processing electronics are described in detail. Axial heat transfer in the sensors is modelled and found acceptably small. Measurement errors, calculations of their effect, and ways to minimize them are given. A rotating sensor concept is discussed which holds promise of alleviating sticking problems at high temperature. Applications of ultrasonic thermometry to three in-core experiments are described. In them, five 10-mm-length sensor elements were used to measure axial temperatures in a UO 2 or UO 2 -steel system fission-heated to about 2860 0 C

  2. ESCOMPTE experiment: intercomparison of four aircraft dynamical, thermodynamical, radiation and chemical measurements

    Saïd, F.; Corsmeier, U.; Kalthoff, N.; Kottmeier, C.; Lothon, M.; Wieser, A.; Hofherr, T.; Perros, P.

    2005-03-01

    Among seven airplanes involved in the Experience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emission (ESCOMPTE) experiment in 2001, four measured classical meteorological parameters, radiation fluxes, trace gases and turbulence (for three among four): the Dornier 128 from the Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, the Fokker 27 ARAT from the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers, the Merlin 4 and Piper Aztec 23 from Météo France. This paper presents the results of intercomparison flights between three pairs of aircraft. The results are very similar for mean parameters except for the horizontal wind measurements provided by the Merlin that showed a problem that is probably linked to the measurement of the aircraft velocity. Further investigation is required to know whether corrections are possible or not for these wind measurements. Turbulence is studied along two legs over a flat and homogeneous area: in spite of the heterogeneity of the measured functions (one leg is close to the top of the boundary layer), the comparison is rather good. The relative accuracy of the data provided to the data base is given. It easily allows to use the huge amount of aircraft data collected during the experiment with very few restrictions. We underline some points where efforts should be borne for future experiments: wind coupling between Inertial Navigation System data and Global Positioning System (GPS) data, CO and NO x measurements.

  3. Some notes on experiments measuring diffusion of sorbed nuclides through porous media

    Lever, D.A.

    1986-11-01

    Various experimental techniques for measuring the important parameters governing diffusion of sorbed nuclides through water-saturated porous media are described, and the particular parameters obtained from each technique are discussed. Recent experiments in which diffusive transport takes place more rapidly than expected are reviewed. The author recommends that through-transport diffusion experiments are the most satisfactory method of determining whether this arises from surface diffusion of sorbed nuclides. (author)

  4. First high-voltage measurements using Ca{sup +} ions at the ALIVE experiment

    König, K., E-mail: kkoenig@ikp.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Kernphysik (Germany); Geppert, Ch. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Kernchemie (Germany); Krämer, J.; Maaß, B. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Kernphysik (Germany); Otten, E. W. [Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany); Ratajczyk, T.; Nörtershäuser, W. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Kernphysik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Many physics experiments depend on accurate high-voltage measurements to determine for example the exact retardation potential of an electron spectrometer as in the KATRIN experiment or the acceleration voltage of the ions at ISOL facilities. Until now only precision high-voltage dividers can be used to measure voltages up to 65 kV with an accuracy of 1 ppm. However, these dividers need frequent calibration and cross-checking and the direct traceability is not given. In this article we will describe the status of an experiment which aims to measure high voltages using collinear laser spectroscopy and which has the potential to provide a high-voltage standard and hence, a calibration source for precision high-voltage dividers on the 1 ppm level.

  5. Measuring Patient Preferences: An Overview of Methods with a Focus on Discrete Choice Experiments.

    Hazlewood, Glen S

    2018-05-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of patient preferences and methodologies to measure them. In this article, methods to quantify patient preferences are reviewed, with a focus on discrete choice experiments. In a discrete choice experiment, patients are asked to choose between 2 or more treatments. The results can be used to quantify the relative importance of treatment outcomes and/or other considerations relevant to medical decision making. Conducting and interpreting a discrete choice experiment requires multiple steps and an understanding of the potential biases that can arise, which we review in this article with examples in rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An experiment for Shuttle aerodynamic force coefficient determination from inflight dynamical and atmospheric measurements

    Compton, H. R.; Blanchard, R. C.; Walberg, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    A two-phase experiment is proposed which utilizes the Shuttle Orbiter and its unique series of repeated entries into the earth's atmosphere as an airborne in situ aerodynamic testing laboratory. The objective of the experiment is to determine static aerodynamic force coefficients, first of the orbiter, and later of various entry configurations throughout the high speed flight regime, including the transition from free molecule to continuum fluid flow. The objective will be accomplished through analysis of inflight measurements from both shuttle-borne and shuttle-launched instrumented packages. Results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment.

  7. Measurements of very forward particles production spectra at LHC: the LHCf experiment

    Berti, Eugenio; Bonechi, Lorenzo; Bongi, Massimo; Castellini, Guido; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Haguenauer, Maurice; Itow, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Taiki; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Makino, Yuya; Masuda, Kimiaki; Matsubayashi, Eri; Menjo, Hiroaki; Muraki, Yasushi; Papini, Paolo; Ricciarini, Sergio; Sako, Takashi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tamura, Tadahisa; Tiberio, Alessio; Torii, Shoji; Tricomi, Alessia; Turner, W C; Ueno, Mana; Zhou, Qi Dong

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to two small sampling calorimeters installed in the LHC tunnel at ±140 m from IP1, the LHC forward (LHCf) experiment is able to detect neutral particles produced by high energy proton-ion collisions in the very forward region (pseudo-rapidity η > 8.4). The main aim of LHCf is to provide precise measurements of the production spectra relative to these particles, in order to tune hadronic interaction models used by ground-based cosmic rays experiments. In this paper we will present the current status of the LHCf experiment, regarding in particular collected data and analysis results, as well as future prospects

  8. On the possibility of measuring the Earth's gravitomagnetic force in a new laboratory experiment

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    In this letter we propose, in a preliminary way, a new Earth-based laboratory experiment aimed at the detection of the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth. It consists of the measurement of the difference between the circular frequencies of two rotators moving along identical circular paths, but in opposite directions, on a horizontal friction-free plane in a vacuum chamber placed at the South Pole. The accuracy to our knowledge of the Earth's rotation from VLBI and the possibility of measuring the rotators' periods over many revolutions should allow for the feasibility of the proposed experiment. (letter to the editor)

  9. Strategic B2B customer experience management: the importance of outcomes-based measures

    Zolkiewski, Judy; Story, Victoria; Burton, Jamie; Chan, Paul; Gomes, Andre; Hunter-Jones, Philippa; O’Malley, Lisa; Peters, Linda D.; Raddats, Chris; Robinson, William

    2017-01-01

    Purpose\\ud \\ud The purpose of this paper is to critique the adequacy of efforts to capture the complexities of customer experience in a business-to-business (B2B) context using input–output measures. The paper introduces a strategic customer experience management framework to capture the complexity of B2B service interactions and discusses the value of outcomes-based measurement.\\ud Design/methodology/approach\\ud \\ud This is a theoretical paper that reviews extant literature related to B2B cu...

  10. On-site underground background measurements for the KASKA reactor-neutrino experiment

    Furuta, H.; Sakuma, K.; Aoki, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Funaki, Y.; Hara, T.; Haruna, T.; Ishihara, N.; Katsumata, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Matsubara, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Miyata, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Nakajima, N.; Nitta, K.; Sakai, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Suekane, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, H.; Tamura, N.; Tsuchiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    On-site underground background measurements were performed for the planned reactor-neutrino oscillation experiment KASKA at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station in Niigata, Japan. A small-diameter boring hole was excavated down to 70m underground level, and a detector unit for γ-ray and cosmic-muon measurements was placed at various depths to take data. The data were analyzed to obtain abundance of natural radioactive elements in the surrounding soil and rates of cosmic muons that penetrate the overburden. The results will be reflected in the design of the KASKA experiment

  11. Experience acquired with the realisation of a geotechnical measurement campaign in a deep clay formation

    Manfroy, P.; Neerdael, B.; Buyens, M.

    1985-01-01

    Belgium has selected clay as a possible disposal medium for conditioned radioactive waste. CEN/SCK has launched an important research and development programme to evaluate the disposal potential of the Boom clay formation present under the nuclear site Mol-Dessel. An underground facility has been built at 220 m. depth in order to proceed to geomechanical, corrosion, migration and heat transfer experiments. During its construction numerous geotechnical measuring instruments were emplaced on the lining and in the clay medium. Successful realization of such measurement campaigns was hampered by the very difficult underground working conditions. This paper describes what can be learned from the experience gained so far. 5 refs.; 5 figs

  12. Liner velocity, current, and symmetry measurements on the 32 MA flux compression generator experiment ALT-1

    Clark, D A; Rodríguez, G; Tabaka, L J

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. A flux compression generator based pulse power system, designed, built, and fielded by a Russian team at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), was used to successfully drive an aluminum liner to velocities greater than 10 km/sec. The experiment objective was to demonstrate performance of a precision liner implosion at Atlas current of 30 MA or greater. Diagnostics to measure liner performance were an essential part of the experiment. An experimental team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided a suite of diagnostics to measure liner performance. Three diagnostics were fielded. 1. a velocity interferometer (VISAR) to continuously measure the liner inner surface velocity from throughout the entire range of travel. 2. Two Faraday rotation devices to measure liner current during the implosion. 3. Sixteen fiber optic impact pins to record liner impact time and provide axial and azimuthal symmetry information. All diagnostics...

  13. Using High-Fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics to Help Design a Wind Turbine Wake Measurement Experiment

    Churchfield, M; Wang, Q; Scholbrock, A; Herges, T; Mikkelsen, T; Sjöholm, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe the process of using large-eddy simulations of wind turbine wake flow to help design a wake measurement campaign. The main goal of the experiment is to measure wakes and wake deflection that result from intentional yaw misalignment under a variety of atmospheric conditions at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Lubbock, Texas. Prior simulation studies have shown that wake deflection may be used for wind-plant control that maximizes plant power output. In this study, simulations are performed to characterize wake deflection and general behavior before the experiment is performed to ensure better upfront planning. Beyond characterizing the expected wake behavior, we also use the large-eddy simulation to test a virtual version of the lidar we plan to use to measure the wake and better understand our lidar scan strategy options. This work is an excellent example of a “simulation-in-the-loop” measurement campaign. (paper)

  14. Bone mineral measurement, experiment M078. [space flight effects on human bone composition

    Rambaut, P. C.; Vogel, J. M.; Ullmann, J.; Brown, S.; Kolb, F., III

    1973-01-01

    Measurement tests revealed few deviations from baseline bone mineral measurements after 56 days in a Skylab-type environment. No mineral change was observed in the right radius. One individual, however, showed a possible mineral loss in the left os calcis and another gained mineral in the right ulna. The cause of the gain is unclear but may be attributable to the heavy exercise routines engaged in by the crewmember in question. Equipment problems were identified during the experiment and rectified.

  15. Single particle measurements and two particle interferometry results from CERN experiment NA44

    Simon-Gillo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CERN experiment NA44 is optimized for the study of identified single and multiple particle distributions to p T = 0 near mid-rapidity. We measure π +- , K +- , p, bar p, d and bar d, in p + A and A + A collisions at 450 and 20OGeV/u, respectively. Two-particle intensity interferometry results from π + π + , K + K + , and K - K - measurements and single particle distributions are presented

  16. Poloidal magnetic field profile measurements on the microwave tokamak experiment using far-infrared polarimetry

    Rice, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The measurement of plasma poloidal magnetic field (B) profiles in tokamaks with good temporal and spatial resolution has proven to be a difficult but important measurement. A large range of toroidal confinement phenomena is expected to depend sensitively on the radial variation of B including the tearing instability, sawtooth oscillations, disruptions, and transport. Experimental confirmation of theoretical models describing these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of detailed B measurements. A fifteen chord far-infrared (FIR) polarimeter has been developed to measure B in the Microwave Tokamak, Experiment (MTX). Polarimetry utilizes the well known Faraday rotation effect, which causes a rotation of the polarization of an FIR beam propagating in the poloidal plane. The rotation angle is proportional to the component of B parallel to the beam. A new technique for determining the Faraday rotation angle is introduced, based on phase measurements of a rotating polarization ellipse. This instrument has been used successfully to measure B profiles for a wide range of experiments on MTX. For ohmic discharges, measurements of the safety factor on axis give q 0 ∼ 0.75 during sawteeth and q 0 > 1 without sawteeth. Large perturbations to the polarimeter signals correlated with the sawtooth crash are observed during some discharges. Measurements in discharges with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) show a transition from a hollow to peaked J profile that is triggered by the ECH pulse. Current-ramp experiments were done to perturb the J profile from the nominal Spitzer conductivity profile. Profiles for initial current ramps and ramps starting from a stable equilibrium have been measured and are compared with a cylindrical diffusion model. Finally, the tearing mode stability equation is solved using measured J profiles. Stability predictions are in good agreement with the existence of oscillations observed on the magnetic loops

  17. Neutrino velocity measurement with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam

    Brunetti, G.

    2011-05-01

    The thesis concerns the measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam. There are different theoretical models that allow for Lorentz violating effects which can be investigated with measurements on terrestrial neutrino beams. The MINOS experiment published in 2007 a measure on the muon neutrinos over a distance of 730 km finding a deviation with respect to the expected time of flight of 126 ns with a statistical error of 32 ns and a systematic error of 64 ns. The OPERA experiment observes as well muon neutrinos 730 km away from the source, with a sensitivity significantly better than MINOS thanks to the higher number of interactions in the detector due to the higher energy beam and the much more sophisticated timing system explicitly upgraded in view of the neutrino velocity measurement. This system is composed by atomic cesium clocks and GPS receivers operating in 'common view mode'. Thanks to this system a time-transfer between the two sites with a precision at the level of 1 ns is possible. Moreover, a Fast Waveform Digitizer was installed along the proton beam line at CERN in order to measure the internal time structure of the proton pulses that are sent to the CNGS target. The result on the neutrino velocity is the most precise measurement so far with terrestrial neutrino beams: the neutrino time of flight was determined with a statistical uncertainty of about 10 ns and a systematic uncertainty smaller than 20 nano-seconds. (author)

  18. The error model and experiment of measuring angular position error based on laser collimation

    Cai, Yangyang; Yang, Jing; Li, Jiakun; Feng, Qibo

    2018-01-01

    Rotary axis is the reference component of rotation motion. Angular position error is the most critical factor which impair the machining precision among the six degree-of-freedom (DOF) geometric errors of rotary axis. In this paper, the measuring method of angular position error of rotary axis based on laser collimation is thoroughly researched, the error model is established and 360 ° full range measurement is realized by using the high precision servo turntable. The change of space attitude of each moving part is described accurately by the 3×3 transformation matrices and the influences of various factors on the measurement results is analyzed in detail. Experiments results show that the measurement method can achieve high measurement accuracy and large measurement range.

  19. Theoretical considerations and preparatory experiments for poloidal field measurements in tokamaks by far-infrared polarimetry

    Kunz, W; Dodel, G [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1978-12-01

    Numerical calculations give an optimum wavelength and show the precision requirements for determining poloidal field profiles in tokamaks on the basis of the Faraday effect. The required precision of the polarimetric measurements can be achieved in the far-infrared as is verified in a model experiment using a ferrite modulated HCN laser beam.

  20. Image analysis to measure sorting and stratification applied to sand-gravel experiments

    Orrú, C.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to develop new measuring techniques for providing detailed data on sediment sorting suitable for sand-gravel laboratory experiments. Such data will be of aid in obtaining new insights on sorting mechanisms and improving prediction capabilities of morphodynamic

  1. Danish Experiences with Deposit Probe Measurements in Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Several measuring campaigns with focus on deposition behavior have been conducted at full-scale power plants firing biomass in Denmark. These campaigns have been reviewed in this work. The focus is the obtained experiences on deposit formation, shedding and chemistry. When comparing results from...

  2. Moisture Distribution in Broccoli: Measurements by MRI Hot Air Drying Experiments

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Gerkema, E.; Vergeldt, F.J.; As, van H.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The internal moisture distribution that arise in food products during drying, is a key factor for the retention of quality attributes. To reveal the course of moisture content in a product, internal moisture profiles in broccoli florets are measured by MRI imaging during drying experiments

  3. Moisture distribution in broccoli: measurements by MRI hot air drying experiments

    Jin, X.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Gerkema, E.; Vergeldt, F.J.; As, van H.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    The internal moisture distribution that arise in food products during drying, is a key factor for the retention of quality attributes. To reveal the course of moisture content in a product, internal moisture profiles in broccoli florets are measured by MRI imaging during drying experiments with

  4. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  5. A note on acoustic measurements of turbulence, suspended sediment, and bed forms in mobile bed experiments

    One of the challenges of hydraulic experimentation is designing experiments that are complex enough to capture relevant processes while retaining the simplicity necessary for useful, accurate measurements. The intricacy of the interactions between turbulent flows and mobile beds in rivers and stream...

  6. Report on RUNE’s coastal experiment and first inter-comparisons between measurements systems

    Floors, Rogier Ralph; Lea, Guillaume; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    Accurate description of the wind energy resource in the coastal zone is crucial for countries developing near-shore wind farms. The RUNE experiment aims to use lidar measurements and mesoscale modelling to study the behaviour of the flow in the coastal zone and find the most effective way...

  7. Assessing Women's Negative Sanitation Experiences and Concerns: The Development of a Novel Sanitation Insecurity Measure.

    Caruso, Bethany A; Clasen, Thomas; Yount, Kathryn M; Cooper, Hannah L F; Hadley, Craig; Haardörfer, Regine

    2017-07-11

    Lack of access to acceptable sanitation facilities can expose individuals, particularly women, to physical, social, and mental health risks. While some of the challenges have been documented, standard metrics are needed to determine the extent to which women have urination- and defecation-related concerns and negative experiences. Such metrics also are needed to assess the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate them. We developed a sanitation insecurity measure to capture the range and frequency of women's sanitation-related concerns and negative experiences. Research was conducted in rural Odisha, India with women across various life course stages to reflect a range of perspectives. This paper documents the mixed data collection methods and the exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses we employed to arrive at a final measure. The final sanitation insecurity measure includes 50 items across seven factors that reflect the physical environment, the social environment, and individual-level constraints. Most factor scores were significantly higher for unmarried women and for women who lacked access to functional latrines, indicating social and environmental influence on experiences. This measure will enable researchers to evaluate how sanitation insecurity affects health and to determine if and how sanitation interventions ameliorate women's concerns and negative experiences associated with sanitation.

  8. An Undergraduate Experiment for the Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air: Phenomena and Discussion

    Yang, Hujiang; Zhao, Xiaohong; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Jinghua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss some phenomena in an undergraduate experiment for the measurement of the speed of sound in air. A square wave distorts when connected to a piezoelectric transducer. Moreover, the amplitude of the receiving signal varies with the driving frequency. Comparing with the Gibbs phenomenon, these phenomena can be…

  9. Recent updates on the Standard Model Higgs boson measurements from the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    Wang, Song-Ming

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the latest results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on the measurements of the Standard Model Higgs boson by using the proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider during the first two years of Run 2 data taking.

  10. An experiment to measure the one-way velocity of propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    Kolen, P.; Torr, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment involving commercially available instrumentation to measure the velocity of the earth with respect to absolute space is described. The experiment involves the measurement of the one-way propagation velocity of electromagnetic radiation down a high-quality coaxial cable. It is demonstrated that the experiment is both physically meaningful and exceedingly simple in concept and in implementation. It is shown that with currently available commercial equipment one might expect to detect a threshold value for the component of velocity of the earth's motion with respect to absolute space in the equatorial plane of approximately 10 km/s, which greatly exceeds the velocity resolution required to detect the motion of the solar system with respect to the center of the galaxy.

  11. Measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 with the Double Chooz experiment

    Ostrovskiy, Igor

    2009-10-01

    The neutrino mixing angle θ13 is last one which value is still unknown. Measuring the θ13 is important for completing our understanding of three flavor neutrino oscillations. Moreover, leptonic CP violation could only be measured in case the value of θ13 is not zero. The current best limit (^2(2θ13)Ardennes. Described in this talk, is another experiment, Double Chooz, that is being prepared at the same site. The Double Chooz experiment offers several fundamental improvements and is aiming to surpass the current limit by an order of magnitude (^2(2θ13) < 0.03). Details of the detector design, overview of systematic errors and expected sensitivity, as well as current status of the experiment are presented.

  12. Examining Dense Data Usage near the Regions with Severe Storms in All-Sky Microwave Radiance Data Assimilation and Impacts on GEOS Hurricane Analyses

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Jin, Jianjun; McCarty, Will; El Akkraoui, Amal; Todling, Ricardo; Gelaro, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Many numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers assimilate radiances affected by clouds and precipitation from microwave sensors, with the expectation that these data can provide critical constraints on meteorological parameters in dynamically sensitive regions to make significant impacts on forecast accuracy for precipitation. The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center assimilates all-sky microwave radiance data from various microwave sensors such as all-sky GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) radiance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS), which includes the GEOS atmospheric model, the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) atmospheric analysis system, and the Goddard Aerosol Assimilation System (GAAS). So far, most of NWP centers apply same large data thinning distances, that are used in clear-sky radiance data to avoid correlated observation errors, to all-sky microwave radiance data. For example, NASA GMAO is applying 145 km thinning distances for most of satellite radiance data including microwave radiance data in which all-sky approach is implemented. Even with these coarse observation data usage in all-sky assimilation approach, noticeable positive impacts from all-sky microwave data on hurricane track forecasts were identified in GEOS-5 system. The motivation of this study is based on the dynamic thinning distance method developed in our all-sky framework to use of denser data in cloudy and precipitating regions due to relatively small spatial correlations of observation errors. To investigate the benefits of all-sky microwave radiance on hurricane forecasts, several hurricane cases selected between 2016-2017 are examined. The dynamic thinning distance method is utilized in our all-sky approach to understand the sources and mechanisms to explain the benefits of all-sky microwave radiance data from various microwave radiance sensors like Advanced Microwave Sounder Unit

  13. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008

    B. H. Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008. A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model.

    Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements.

    The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  14. Burning and radiance properties of red phosphorus in Magnesium/PTFE/Viton (MTV)-based compositions

    Li, Jie; Chen, Xian; Wang, Yanli; Shi, Yuanliang; Shang, Junteng

    2017-09-01

    Red phosphorus (RP) a highly efficient smoke-producing agent. In this study different contents of RP are added into the Magnesium/PTFE/Viton (MTV)-based composition, with the aim of investigating the influence of RP on the burning and radiance properties of MTV-based composition by using a high-temperature differential thermobalance method, a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) remote-sensing spectrometer, a FTIR Spectrometer and a far-infrared thermal imager. The results show that RP improves the initial reaction temperature and reduces the mass burning rate by 0.1-0.17 g·s-1 (34-59%). The addition of RP has no obvious effect on the burning temperature and far-infrared radiation brightness, but the radiating area raises substantially (by 141%), and thus improves the radiation intensity (by 155%).

  15. Super-radiance and the widths of neutron resonances in the compound nucleus

    Auerbach, N

    2012-01-01

    In the 1950s the possibility of forming a 'super-radiant' (SR) state in a gas of atoms confined to a volume of a size smaller than the wave length of radiation was suggested by Dicke. During the years this mechanism was applied to many phenomena in many different fields. Here it is used in the discussion of the statistics of resonance widths in a many-body system with open decay channels. Depending on the strength of the coupling to the continuum such systems show deviations from the Porter-Thomas distribution. In the limit of very strong coupling this leads to super-radiance. The results presented are important for the understanding of recent experimental data concerning the widths distribution of neutron resonances in nuclei.

  16. Experiences of mental illness stigma, prejudice and discrimination: a review of measures

    Clement Sarah

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a substantial increase in research on mental illness related stigma over the past 10 years, with many measures in use. This study aims to review current practice in the survey measurement of mental illness stigma, prejudice and discrimination experienced by people who have personal experience of mental illness. We will identify measures used, their characteristics and psychometric properties. Method A narrative literature review of survey measures of mental illness stigma was conducted. The databases Medline, PsychInfo and the British Nursing Index were searched for the period 1990-2009. Results 57 studies were included in the review. 14 survey measures of mental illness stigma were identified. Seven of the located measures addressed aspects of perceived stigma, 10 aspects of experienced stigma and 5 aspects of self-stigma. Of the identified studies, 79% used one of the measures of perceived stigma, 46% one of the measures of experienced stigma and 33% one of the measures of self-stigma. All measures presented some information on psychometric properties. Conclusions The review was structured by considering perceived, experienced and self stigma as separate but related constructs. It provides a resource to aid researchers in selecting the measure of mental illness stigma which is most appropriate to their purpose.

  17. Application of a spectral sky in Radiance for daylighting calculations including non-image-forming light effects

    Khademagha, P.; Aries, M.B.C.; Rosemann, A.L.P.; van Loenen, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Daylight is dynamic and rich in the blue part of the spectrum. To date, the spectral composition of daylight is ignored in sky models used in Radiance. Spectral sky composition is particularly important when non-image-forming (NIF) light effects are concerned, since the action spectrum for these

  18. Photon detector for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer (Fermilab experiment E781)

    Goncharenko, Yu.M.; Grachov, O.A.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Nurushev, S.B.; Vasil'ev, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A possibility to use one- or two-photon lead glass detectors for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer with E γ up to 500 GeV is studied. It is shown that a single photon detector equipped with radiation-resistant lead glass counters is applicable for the experiment discussed. It is concluded that for the best energy resolution in the case of Primakoff effect like π - = γ * → π - + γ the combined method would be used with weighted combination of direct E γ measurement in the Photon-3 detector and the π - beam energy precise measurement. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs

  19. Organizational and market influences on physician performance on patient experience measures.

    Rodriguez, Hector P; von Glahn, Ted; Rogers, William H; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2009-06-01

    To examine the extent to which medical group and market factors are related to individual primary care physician (PCP) performance on patient experience measures. This study employs Clinician and Group CAHPS survey data (n=105,663) from 2,099 adult PCPs belonging to 34 diverse medical groups across California. Medical group directors were interviewed to assess the magnitude and nature of financial incentives directed at individual physicians and the adoption of patient experience improvement strategies. Primary care services area (PCSA) data were used to characterize the market environment of physician practices. We used multilevel models to estimate the relationship between medical group and market factors and physician performance on each Clinician and Group CAHPS measure. Models statistically controlled for respondent characteristics and accounted for the clustering of respondents within physicians, physicians within medical groups, and medical groups within PCSAs using random effects. Compared with physicians belonging to independent practice associations, physicians belonging to integrated medical groups had better performance on the communication ( p=.007) and care coordination ( p=.03) measures. Physicians belonging to medical groups with greater numbers of PCPs had better performance on all measures. The use of patient experience improvement strategies was not associated with performance. Greater emphasis on productivity and efficiency criteria in individual physician financial incentive formulae was associated with worse access to care ( p=.04). Physicians located in PCSAs with higher area-level deprivation had worse performance on the access to care ( p=.04) and care coordination ( pintegrated medical groups and groups with greater numbers of PCPs performed better on several patient experience measures, suggesting that organized care processes adopted by these groups may enhance patients' experiences. Physicians practicing in markets with high

  20. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review.

    Katusiime, Barbra; Corlett, Sarah; Reeve, Joanne; Krska, Janet

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients' experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients' experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients' experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID ® , and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine-related quality of life. None of the identified questionnaires covered all domains. Instruments varied in the extent of patient involvement in both their development and validation. There is a scarcity of psychometrically sound, comprehensive, and generic measures of experiences

  1. Measuring Patients' Experience of Rehabilitation Services Across the Care Continuum. Part II: Key Dimensions.

    McMurray, Josephine; McNeil, Heather; Lafortune, Claire; Black, Samantha; Prorok, Jeanette; Stolee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To identify key dimensions of patients' experience across the rehabilitative care system and to recommend a framework to develop survey items that measure the rehabilitative care experience. Data were sourced from a literature review that searched MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL (Ebsco), and PsycINFO (APA PsycNET) databases from 2004 to 2014, the reference lists of the final accepted articles, and hand searches of relevant journals. Four reviewers performed the screening process on 2472 articles; 33 were included for analysis. Interrater reliability was confirmed through 2 rounds of title review and 1 round of abstract review, with an average κ score of .69. The final sample of 33 accepted articles was imported into a qualitative data analysis software application. Multiple levels of coding and a constant comparative methodology generated 6 themes. There were 502 discreet survey questions measuring patient experience that were categorized using the following dimensions: rehabilitative care ecosystem, client and informal caregiver engagement, patient and health care provider relation, pain and functional status, group and individual identity, and open ended. The most common survey questions examine the care delivery ecosystem (37%), the engagement of clients and their informal caregivers (24.9%), and the quality of relations between providers and patients (21.7%). Examination of patient's functional status and management of pain yielded (15.3%) of the instruments' questions. Currently available instruments and questions that measure patients' experience in rehabilitative care are unable to assess the performance of rehabilitative delivery systems that aspire to integrate care across the continuum. However, question panels derived from our 6 key themes may measure the key concepts that define rehabilitative care and facilitate measurement of patient experience at the system level. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Evaluating the Addition of a Dinoflagellate Phytoplankton Functional Type Using Radiance Anomalies for Monterey Bay, CA

    Houskeeper, H. F.; Kudela, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean color sensors have enabled daily, global monitoring of phytoplankton productivity in the world's oceans. However, to observe key structures such as food webs, or to identify regime shifts of dominant species, tools capable of distinguishing between phytoplankton functional types using satellite remote sensing reflectance are necessary. One such tool developed by Alvain et al. (2005), PHYSAT, successfully linked four phytoplankton functional types to chlorophyll-normalized remote sensing spectra, or radiance anomalies, in case-1 waters. Yet this tool was unable to characterize dinoflagellates because of their ubiquitous background presence in the open ocean. We employ a radiance anomaly technique based on PHYSAT to target phytoplankton functional types in Monterey Bay, a region where dinoflagellate populations are larger and more variable than in open ocean waters, and thus where they may be viable targets for satellite remote sensing characterization. We compare with an existing Santa Cruz Wharf photo-pigment time series spanning from 2006 to the present to regionally ground-truth the method's predictions, and we assess its accuracy in characterizing dinoflagellates, a phytoplankton group that impacts the region's fish stocks and water quality. For example, an increase in dinoflagellate abundance beginning in 2005 led to declines in commercially important fish stocks that persisted throughout the following year. Certain species of dinoflagellates in Monterey Bay are also responsible for some of the harmful algal bloom events that negatively impact the shellfish industry. Moving toward better tools to characterize phytoplankton blooms is important for understanding ecosystem shifts, as well as protecting human health in the surrounding areas.

  3. Physical Mechanism, Spectral Detection, and Potential Mitigation of 3D Cloud Effects on OCO-2 Radiances and Retrievals

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Massie, S. T.; Iwabuchi, H.; Chen, H.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of multiple partially cloudy scenes as observed by OCO-2 in nadir and target mode (published previously and reviewed here) revealed that XCO2 retrievals are systematically biased in presence of scattered clouds. The bias can only partially be removed by applying more stringent filtering, and it depends on the degree of scene inhomogeneity as quantified with collocated MODIS/Aqua imagery. The physical reason behind this effect was so far not well understood because in contrast to cloud-mediated biases in imagery-derived aerosol retrievals, passive gas absorption spectroscopy products do not depend on the absolute radiance level and should therefore be less sensitive to 3D cloud effects and surface albedo variability. However, preliminary evidence from 3D radiative transfer calculations suggested that clouds in the vicinity of an OCO-2 footprint not only offset the reflected radiance spectrum, but introduce a spectrally dependent perturbation that affects absorbing channels disproportionately, and therefore bias the spectroscopy products. To understand the nature of this effect for a variety of scenes, we developed the OCO-2 radiance simulator, which uses the available information on a scene (e.g., MODIS-derived surface albedo, cloud distribution, and other parameters) as the basis for 3D radiative transfer calculations that can predict the radiances observed by OCO-2. We present this new tool and show examples of its utility for a few specific scenes. More importantly, we draw conclusions about the physical mechanism behind this 3D cloud effect on radiances and ultimately OCO-2 retrievals, which involves not only the clouds themselves but also the surface. Harnessed with this understanding, we can now detect cloud vicinity effects in the OCO-2 spectra directly, without actually running the 3D radiance simulator. Potentially, it is even possible to mitigate these effects and thus increase data harvest in regions with ubiquitous cloud cover such as the Amazon

  4. SQUIDs as detectors in a new experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-01-01

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4x10 -28 ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large (∼100 cm 2 ) pick-up coils to measure the precision frequency of the spin-polarized 3 He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the 3 He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of ∼2x10 -16 Tm 2 (0.1 Φ 0 ) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of dΦ SQ = 2x10 -6 Φ 0 /√Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application the authors designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and they developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. They present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. The authors also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID readout technique

  5. Carotid atherosclerosis progression in familial hypercholesterolemia patients: a pooled analysis of the ASAP, ENHANCE, RADIANCE 1, and CAPTIVATE studies.

    Vergeer, Menno; Zhou, Rong; Bots, Michiel L; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Koglin, Joerg; Akdim, Fatima; Mitchel, Yale B; Huijgen, Roeland; Sapre, Aditi; de Groot, Eric; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Pasternak, Richard C; Gagné, Claude; Marais, A David; Ballantyne, Christie M; Isaacsohn, Jonathan L; Stalenhoef, Anton F; Kastelein, John J P

    2010-07-01

    Until recently, patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) were considered the best subjects for the assessment of changes in carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in randomized intervention trials. Our aims were to investigate whether contemporary statin-treated HeFH patients still show accelerated cIMT increase and to assess the impact of statin treatment, before and after random assignment, on atherosclerosis progression. We retrospectively evaluated cIMT change, and prior statin treatment and postbaseline LDL-C change as predictors of cIMT change, in 1513 HeFH patients who were randomly assigned to the statin arms of the early ASAP and more recent RADIANCE 1, CAPTIVATE, and ENHANCE studies. In the 3 recent studies combined, mean cIMT increased at only 33%of the rate of the simvastatin-treated patients in the ASAP study (0.014 mm/2 years [95% confidence interval, -0.0003-0.028] versus 0.041 mm/2 years [95% confidence interval, 0.020-0.061]; P<0.05). Patients whose statin therapy could be intensified, as evidenced by an LDL-C decrease after the initiation of on-trial statin therapy, showed cIMT decrease in the first 6 to 12 months and a much lower cIMT increase measured over the full 2 years. In line with this, previously statin-naive HeFH patients showed a lower overall cIMT increase. Over the years, intensification of statin therapy in HeFH patients has resulted in an impressive decrease in carotid atherosclerosis progression. In studies that assess other antiatherosclerotic modalities, statin therapy may still induce rapid changes in cIMT. For future cIMT studies, our analyses suggest that patient populations other than intensively pretreated HeFH patients should be selected and that the statin regimen should not be changed on study initiation.

  6. Estimating nocturnal opaque ice cloud optical depth from MODIS multispectral infrared radiances using a neural network method

    Minnis, Patrick; Hong, Gang; Sun-Mack, Szedung; Smith, William L.; Chen, Yan; Miller, Steven D.

    2016-05-01

    Retrieval of ice cloud properties using IR measurements has a distinct advantage over the visible and near-IR techniques by providing consistent monitoring regardless of solar illumination conditions. Historically, the IR bands at 3.7, 6.7, 11.0, and 12.0 µm have been used to infer ice cloud parameters by various methods, but the reliable retrieval of ice cloud optical depth τ is limited to nonopaque cirrus with τ < 8. The Ice Cloud Optical Depth from Infrared using a Neural network (ICODIN) method is developed in this paper by training Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiances at 3.7, 6.7, 11.0, and 12.0 µm against CloudSat-estimated τ during the nighttime using 2 months of matched global data from 2007. An independent data set comprising observations from the same 2 months of 2008 was used to validate the ICODIN. One 4-channel and three 3-channel versions of the ICODIN were tested. The training and validation results show that IR channels can be used to estimate ice cloud τ up to 150 with correlations above 78% and 69% for all clouds and only opaque ice clouds, respectively. However, τ for the deepest clouds is still underestimated in many instances. The corresponding RMS differences relative to CloudSat are ~100 and ~72%. If the opaque clouds are properly identified with the IR methods, the RMS differences in the retrieved optical depths are ~62%. The 3.7 µm channel appears to be most sensitive to optical depth changes but is constrained by poor precision at low temperatures. A method for estimating total optical depth is explored for estimation of cloud water path in the future. Factors affecting the uncertainties and potential improvements are discussed. With improved techniques for discriminating between opaque and semitransparent ice clouds, the method can ultimately improve cloud property monitoring over the entire diurnal cycle.

  7. Accuracy optimization of high-speed AFM measurements using Design of Experiments

    Tosello, Guido; Marinello, F.; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is being increasingly employed in industrial micro/nano manufacturing applications and integrated into production lines. In order to achieve reliable process and product control at high measuring speed, instrument optimization is needed. Quantitative AFM measurement...... results are influenced by a number of scan settings parameters, defining topography sampling and measurement time: resolution (number of profiles and points per profile), scan range and direction, scanning force and speed. Such parameters are influencing lateral and vertical accuracy and, eventually......, the estimated dimensions of measured features. The definition of scan settings is based on a comprehensive optimization that targets maximization of information from collected data and minimization of measurement uncertainty and scan time. The Design of Experiments (DOE) technique is proposed and applied...

  8. An assessment of radiance in Landsat TM middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the detection of tropical forest regeneration

    Boyd, D.S.; Foody, G.M.; Curran, P.J.; Lucas, R.M.; Honzak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been postulated that tropical forests regenerating after deforestation constitute an unmeasured terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon, and that the strength of this sink is a function of regeneration stage. Such regeneration stages can be characterized by biophysical properties, such as leaf and wood biomass, which influence the radiance emitted and/or reflected from the forest canopy. Remotely sensed data can therefore be used to estimate these biophysical properties and thereby determine the forest regenerative stage. Studies conducted on temperate forests have related biophysical properties successfully with red and near-infrared radiance, particularly within the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, only weak correlations have generally been observed for tropical forests and it is suggested here that the relationship between forest biophysical properties and middle and thermal infrared radiance may be stronger than that between those properties and visible and near-infrared radiance.An assessment of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data revealed that radiance acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands contained significant information for the detection of regeneration stages in Amazonian tropical forests. It was demonstrated that tropical forest regeneration stages were most separable using middle infrared and thermal infrared wavebands and that the correlation with regeneration stage was stronger with middle infrared, thermal infrared or combinations of these wavebands than they were with visible, near infrared or combinations of these wavebands. For example, correlation coefficients increased from — 0·26 (insignificant at 95 per cent confidence level) when using the NDVI, to up to 0·93 (significant at 99 per cent confidence level) for a vegetation index containing data acquired in the middle and thermal infrared wavebands. These results point to the value of using data acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the

  9. LH2 Target Design & Position Survey Techniques for the MUSE experiment for Precise Proton Radius Measurement

    Le Pottier, Luc; Roy, Pryiashee; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Raymond, Richard; Steinberg, Noah; Rossi de La Fuente, Erick; MUSE (MUon proton Scattering Experiment) Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The proton radius puzzle is a currently unresolved problem which has intrigued the scientific community, dealing with a 7 σ discrepancy between the proton radii determined from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron scattering measurements. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) aims to resolve this puzzle by performing the first simultaneous elastic scattering measurements of both electrons and muons on the proton, which will allow the comparison of the radii from the two interactions with reduced systematic uncertainties. The data from this experiment is expected to provide the best test of lepton universality to date. The experiment will take place at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland in 2018. An essential component of the experiment is a liquid hydrogen (LH2) cryotarget system. Our group at the University of Michigan is responsible for the design, fabrication and installation of this system. Here we present our LH2 target cell design and fabrication techniques for successful operation at 20 K and 1 atm, and our computer vision-based target position survey system which will determine the position of the target, installed inside a vacuum chamber, with 0.01 mm or better precision at the height of the liquid hydrogen target and along the beam direction during the experiment.

  10. Metronome LKM: An open source virtual keyboard driver to measure experiment software latencies.

    Garaizar, Pablo; Vadillo, Miguel A

    2017-10-01

    Experiment software is often used to measure reaction times gathered with keyboards or other input devices. In previous studies, the accuracy and precision of time stamps has been assessed through several means: (a) generating accurate square wave signals from an external device connected to the parallel port of the computer running the experiment software, (b) triggering the typematic repeat feature of some keyboards to get an evenly separated series of keypress events, or (c) using a solenoid handled by a microcontroller to press the input device (keyboard, mouse button, touch screen) that will be used in the experimental setup. Despite the advantages of these approaches in some contexts, none of them can isolate the measurement error caused by the experiment software itself. Metronome LKM provides a virtual keyboard to assess an experiment's software. Using this open source driver, researchers can generate keypress events using high-resolution timers and compare the time stamps collected by the experiment software with those gathered by Metronome LKM (with nanosecond resolution). Our software is highly configurable (in terms of keys pressed, intervals, SysRq activation) and runs on 2.6-4.8 Linux kernels.

  11. Experiment designed to measure the RBE of tritium for the induction of myeloid leukaemia in animals

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Gragtmans, N J

    1986-01-01

    The range in RBE vales measured for tritium can be attributed to differences in the biological endpoints measured, the reference radiation to which the effects of tritium were compared, and the tritium dosimetry of the particular study. Since the principal risk of low-level irradiation is the induction of cancers, it would be desirable to utilise this endpoint in tritium RBE experiments if these experiments are to be used to evaluate the quality factor for tritium. Furthermore, it would be desirable to use 200 k Vp X rays as the reference radiation since this radiation was suggested by ICRP as the standard reference to be used in the calculation of dose equivalents. Acute myeloid leukaemia is one of the earliest recognised examples of radiogenic cancer in humans and this endpoint has also been the subject of animal studies. A brief review is given of these animal studies to see if this endpoint is suitable for an experiment to measure the tritium RBE relative to 200 k Vp X rays. It was concluded that the male CBA/H mouse would be a suitable species and an experiment involving 5000 animals in four to five year study would be required to provide a useful estimate of the RBE for tritium.

  12. Measuring Starlight Deflection during the 2017 Eclipse: Repeating the Experiment that made Einstein Famous

    Bruns, Donald

    2016-05-01

    In 1919, astronomers performed an experiment during a solar eclipse, attempting to measure the deflection of stars near the sun, in order to verify Einstein's theory of general relativity. The experiment was very difficult and the results were marginal, but the success made Albert Einstein famous around the world. Astronomers last repeated the experiment in 1973, achieving an error of 11%. In 2017, using amateur equipment and modern technology, I plan to repeat the experiment and achieve a 1% error. The best available star catalog will be used for star positions. Corrections for optical distortion and atmospheric refraction are better than 0.01 arcsec. During totality, I expect 7 or 8 measurable stars down to magnitude 9.5, based on analysis of previous eclipse measurements taken by amateurs. Reference images, taken near the sun during totality, will be used for precise calibration. Preliminary test runs performed during twilight in April 2016 and April 2017 can accurately simulate the sky conditions during totality, providing an accurate estimate of the final uncertainty.

  13. The final measurements of the muon decay parameters from the TWIST experiment

    Bayes, R

    2013-01-01

    The TWIST (TRIUMF Weak Interaction Symmetry Test) experiment probes the Lorentz structure of the weak interaction using muon decay. This structure has a very well defined form under the Standard Model (SM) which makes precise predictions for the shape of the decay positron spectrum with respect to momentum and angle. The shape of the spectrum may be described under some rather general assumptions using a set of decay parameters whose values according to the SM are ρ = δ = 3/4, η = 0, and ξ = 1. TWIST uses a large sample of muon decays in a large acceptance spectrometer to measure the decay parameters to an order of magnitude greater precision than previous measurements. This experiment saw its last year of data collection in 2007. As TWIST is a systematics dominated experiment, much effort has been spent on refinements of the estimates of the systematic uncertainties over previous TWIST results. These proceedings will discuss the measures taken to achieve the precision goal of parts in 10 4 , and the physics implications of the experiment.

  14. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  15. The road to patient experience of care measurement: lessons from the United States.

    Zimlichman, Eyal; Rozenblum, Ronen; Millenson, Michael L

    2013-09-17

    Patient-centered care has become an increasing priority in the United States and plays a prominent role in recent healthcare reforms. One way the country has managed to advance patient-centered care is through establishment of a family of national patient experience surveys (the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Plans (CAHPS). CAHPS is publicly reported for several types of providers and was recently tied to hospital reimbursement. This is part of a trend over the last two decades that has shifted provider-patient relationships from a traditional paternal approach to customer service and then to clinical partnership. The health care system in Israel, however, is still struggling to overcome barriers to change in this area. While community based biannual patient experience surveys are conducted by the Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, there is no comprehensive national approach to measuring the patient experience across a broad range of settings. Only recently did the Israeli Ministry of Health take its first steps to include patient experience as a dimension of health care quality.In its current position, Israel should learn from the U.S. experience with policies promoting patient-centered care, and specifically the impact on clinical services of measuring the patient experience. Looking at what has happened in the United States, we suggest three main lessons. First, there is a need for a set of national patient experience surveys that would be publicly reported and eventually tied to provider reimbursement. Secondly, the national survey tools should be customized to the unique characteristics of Israeli society and draw from recent research on patient-centeredness to include new and important domains such as patient activation and shared decision-making. Finally, newer technological approaches should be explored with the aim of increasing response rates and the timeliness and usefulness of the surveys.

  16. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  17. Revisiting an open access monograph experiment: measuring citations and tweets 5 years later.

    Snijder, Ronald

    An experiment run in 2009 could not assess whether making monographs available in open access enhanced scholarly impact. This paper revisits the experiment, drawing on additional citation data and tweets. It attempts to answer the following research question: does open access have a positive influence on the number of citations and tweets a monograph receives, taking into account the influence of scholarly field and language? The correlation between monograph citations and tweets is also investigated. The number of citations and tweets measured in 2014 reveal a slight open access advantage, but the influence of language or subject should also be taken into account. However, Twitter usage and citation behaviour hardly overlap.

  18. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  19. Evaluation of void fraction measurements from DADINE experience using RELAP4/MOD5 code

    Borges, R.C.; Freitas, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The DADINE experiment measures the axial evolution of the void fraction by neutronic diffusion in two-phase flow in the wet regions of a pressurized water reactor in accident conditions. Since the theoretical/experimental confrontation is important for code evaluation, this paper presents the simulation with the RELAP4/MOD5 Code of the void fractions results obtained in the DADINE Experiment, that showed some deviation probably associated with the existing models in Code, special attention in the way of stablishing the two-phase flow and the no characterization of the differents flow regimes related with the void fractions. (author) [pt

  20. Measurement techniques of local parameters in the downcomer boiling experiment of APR1400

    Lee, Eu Hwak

    2004-02-01

    In order to investigate boiling phenomena experimentally in the downcomer during LBLOCA with Direct Vessel Injection (DVI), which is a new Safety Injection System (SIS) of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MW (APR1400), several parameters should be measured through the verification of their applicability. In this study, measurement techniques of the parameters are developed for the downcomer boiling experiment; local phase velocities, local void fraction and heat flux from the heated wall. The experiment has been performed with the heated wall, which has a thickness of 8.2 cm and a height of 32.5 cm and made of the same material as the prototype (APR1400) with chrome coating against rusting. The newly developed pitot tube is applied to the measurement of local liquid velocity and its calibration curve is obtained experimentally with the consideration of the effect according to water temperature and hole size changes. The developed pitot tube measures the local liquid velocity with 0.69 % deviation and it is confirmed that the water temperature and geometrical change does not affect the calibration curve. The high-speed camera and commercial software are used to measure the local vapor velocity with the accuracy of 0.06 m/sec per pixel and the procedure is confirmed in the present study. It turns out that the vapor velocity is insensitive to void size. High-speed camera and image processing are used to measure the local void fraction with the determined intensity criterion for distinguishing each phase and the results are compared with the bulk void fraction by differential pressure transmitters. In the actual experiment, the developed method is applied successfully and the results show that the criterion of intensity has little effect on local void fraction. And, it is observed that the tendency between the measured local and bulk void faction is maintained with time. In order to measure heat flux from the heated wall, two heat flux measurement techniques are developed

  1. The Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS): a useful tool in workplace health promotion.

    Nilsson, Petra; Andersson, H Ingemar; Ejlertsson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    To present validity data for the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS), an instrument measuring multifaceted work experience from a salutogenic health resource perspective as a contrast to the more common pathogenic risk perspective, by exploring WEMS relationship to established measurements that are positively related to health and work. A salutogenic perspective focuses on finding conditions and resources in life, for example at work, that can enhance the individual's health and strength, instead of those causing illness and weakness. This study was carried out in 2009 at a Swedish hospital with a web-based survey (WEMS) to 770 employees. Different occupational groups at the hospital participated. Additional questionnaires used at the same time were the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS), the General Self-Efficacy scale (GSE), and three questions about self-rated health, general well-being, and quality of life. Cronbach's Alpha of WEMS sub-indices were in the interval of 0.85-0.96. Convergent validity and discriminant validity of WEMS and its sub-indices were shown to be satisfying by correlations. In addition, WEMS demonstrated the ability to discriminate between groups. WEMS sub-indices discriminated even better between groups than the total index. The WEMS proved to be a workplace health promotion questionnaire that was able to measure experiences of work from a salutogenic perspective. The WEMS has a potential of being a useful tool in workplace health promotion to enhance positive human capabilities and resources to improve work performance.

  2. An experiment for the precision measurement of the radiative decay mode of the neutron

    Cooper, R.L., E-mail: cooperrl@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bass, C.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Byrne, J. [University of Sussex, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Chupp, T.E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Coakley, K.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Dewey, M.S.; Fisher, B.M.; Fu, C.; Gentile, T.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); McGonagle, M. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mumm, H.P.; Nico, J.S.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Wietfeldt, F.E. [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The familiar neutron decay into a proton, electron, and antineutrino can be accompanied by photons with sufficient energy to be detected. We recently reported the first observation of the radiative beta decay branch for the free neutron with photons of energy 15-340 keV. We performed the experiment in the bore of a superconducting magnet where electron, proton, and photon signals were measured. A bar of bismuth germanate scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode served as the photon detector that operated in the cryogenic, high magnetic field environment. The branching ratio for this energy region was measured and is consistent with the theoretical calculation. An experiment is under way to measure the branching ratio with an improved precision of 1% relative standard uncertainty and to measure the photon energy spectrum. In this paper, the apparatus modifications to reduce the systematic uncertainties will be described. Central to these improvements is the development of a 12-element detector based on the original photon detector design that will improve the statistical sensitivity. During data acquisition, a detailed calibration program will be performed to improve the systematic uncertainties. The development of these modifications is currently under way, and the second run of the experiment commenced in July 2008.

  3. A Platform for X-Ray Thomson Scattering Measurements of Radiation Hydrodynamics Experiments on the NIF

    Lefevre, Heath; Ma, Kevin; Belancourt, Patrick; MacDonald, Michael; Doeppner, Tilo; Keiter, Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn

    2017-10-01

    A recent experiment on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) radiographed the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability under high and low drive cases. This experiment showed that under a high drive the growth rate of the RT instability is reduced relative to the low drive case. The high drive launches a radiative shock, increases the temperature of the post-shock region, and ablates the spikes, which reduces the RT growth rate. The plasma parameters must be measured to validate this claim. We present a target design for making X-Ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) measurements on radiation hydrodynamics experiments on NIF to measure the electron temperature of the shocked region in the above cases. Specifically, we show that a previously fielded NIF radiation hydrodynamics platform can be modified to allow sufficient signal and temperature resolution for XRTS measurements. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956 and the National Science Foundation through the Basic Plasma Science and Engineering program.

  4. Process measures or patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for comparing performance across providers? A study of measures related to access and continuity in Swedish primary care.

    Glenngård, Anna H; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Aim To study (a) the covariation between patient reported experience measures (PREMs) and registered process measures of access and continuity when ranking providers in a primary care setting, and (b) whether registered process measures or PREMs provided more or less information about potential linkages between levels of access and continuity and explaining variables. Access and continuity are important objectives in primary care. They can be measured through registered process measures or PREMs. These measures do not necessarily converge in terms of outcomes. Patient views are affected by factors not necessarily reflecting quality of services. Results from surveys are often uncertain due to low response rates, particularly in vulnerable groups. The quality of process measures, on the other hand, may be influenced by registration practices and are often more easy to manipulate. With increased transparency and use of quality measures for management and governance purposes, knowledge about the pros and cons of using different measures to assess the performance across providers are important. Four regression models were developed with registered process measures and PREMs of access and continuity as dependent variables. Independent variables were characteristics of providers as well as geographical location and degree of competition facing providers. Data were taken from two large Swedish county councils. Findings Although ranking of providers is sensitive to the measure used, the results suggest that providers performing well with respect to one measure also tended to perform well with respect to the other. As process measures are easier and quicker to collect they may be looked upon as the preferred option. PREMs were better than process measures when exploring factors that contributed to variation in performance across providers in our study; however, if the purpose of comparison is continuous learning and development of services, a combination of PREMs and

  5. Detecting annual and seasonal variations of CO2, CO and N2O from a multi-year collocated satellite-radiosonde data-set using the new Rapid Radiance Reconstruction (3R-N) model

    Chedin, A.; Serrar, S.; Hollingsworth, A.; Armante, R.; Scott, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    The NOAA polar meteorological satellites have embarked the TIROS-N operational vertical sounder (TOVS) since 1979. Using radiosondes and NOAA-10 TOVS measurements which are collocated within a narrow space and time window, we have studied the differences between the TOVS measurements and simulated measurements from a new fast, Rapid Radiance Reconstruction Network (3R-N), non-linear radiative transfer model with up to date spectroscopy. Simulations use radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements as the prime input. The radiative transfer model also uses fixed greenhouse gas absorber amounts (CO 2 ,CO,N 2 O) and reasonable estimates of O 3 and of surface temperature. The 3R-N model is first presented and validated. Then, a study of the differences between the simulated and measured radiances shows annual trends and seasonal variations consistent with independent measurements of variations in CO 2 and other greenhouse gases atmospheric concentrations. The improved accuracy of 3R-N and a better handling of its deviations with respect to observations allow most of difficulties met in a previous study (J. Climate 15 (2002) 95) to be resolved

  6. Detecting annual and seasonal variations of CO{sub 2}, CO and N{sub 2}O from a multi-year collocated satellite-radiosonde data-set using the new Rapid Radiance Reconstruction (3R-N) model

    Chedin, A.; Serrar, S.; Hollingsworth, A.; Armante, R.; Scott, N.A

    2003-03-15

    The NOAA polar meteorological satellites have embarked the TIROS-N operational vertical sounder (TOVS) since 1979. Using radiosondes and NOAA-10 TOVS measurements which are collocated within a narrow space and time window, we have studied the differences between the TOVS measurements and simulated measurements from a new fast, Rapid Radiance Reconstruction Network (3R-N), non-linear radiative transfer model with up to date spectroscopy. Simulations use radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements as the prime input. The radiative transfer model also uses fixed greenhouse gas absorber amounts (CO{sub 2},CO,N{sub 2}O) and reasonable estimates of O{sub 3} and of surface temperature. The 3R-N model is first presented and validated. Then, a study of the differences between the simulated and measured radiances shows annual trends and seasonal variations consistent with independent measurements of variations in CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases atmospheric concentrations. The improved accuracy of 3R-N and a better handling of its deviations with respect to observations allow most of difficulties met in a previous study (J. Climate 15 (2002) 95) to be resolved.

  7. A Study on Relationships between Functional Performance and Task Performance Measure through Experiments in NPP MCR

    Jang, In Seok; Seong, Poong Hyun; Park, Jin Kyun

    2011-01-01

    Further improvements in levels of organization, management, man-machine interfaces, education, training, etc. are required, if high operating reliability of operators in huge and complex plants such as chemical plants and electrical power generating plants is to be maintained. Improvement requires good understanding of operators' behavior, including defining what is good performance for operators, especially in emergency situations. Human performance measures, therefore, are important to enhance performance and to reduce the probability of incidents and accidents in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Operators' performance measures are used for multi-objectives such as control room design, human system interface evaluation, training, procedure and so on. There are two kinds of representative methods to measure operators' performance. These methods are now known as the functional performance measure and task performance measure. Functional performance measures are basically based on the plant process parameters. Functional performance measures indicate how well the operators controlled selected critical parameters. The parameters selected in this paper are derived from the four Critical Safety Functions (CSFs) identified in the emergency operating procedures such as achievement of subcriticality, maintenance of core cooling, maintenance of heat sink and maintenance of containment integrity. Task performance measures are based on the task analysis. Task analysis is to determine the tasks required and how operators are performed. In this paper, task analysis is done with ideal path for an accident completed by experts and Emergency Operation Procedure (EOP). However, most literatures related to operators' performance have been using one of these measures and there is no research to find out the relationships between two measures. In this paper, the relationships between functional performance measure and task performance measure are investigated using experiments. Shortly

  8. Measurement of direct CP-violation with the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS

    Blümer, H

    1999-01-01

    The NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS uses simultaneous, nearly collinear beams of long-lived and short-lived neutral kaons to measure the direct CP-violation parameter epsilon '/ epsilon using the double ratio method to an overall accuracy of 2.10/sup -4/, three times better than previous results. The detector has been installed and commissioned in 1995 and 1996. First physics data were recorded during 42 days in fall 1997 yielding more events than the previous experiment NA31. The talk presents the apparatus performance, data quality, the current status of the physics analysis and ongoing activities. The experiment has performed another data run from May to September 1998, which has given a substantial increase in statistics. (11 refs).

  9. Measurements of atmospheric and gamma rays-balloon experiments at subantartic region

    Jayanthi, U.B.; Correa, R.V.; Blanco, F.G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of two stratospheric balloon experiments conducted to measure the atmospheric X and gamma rays are presented. These experiments, conducted at Comandante Ferraz base in subantarctic region, have provided the spectrum of ground radioactivity in gamma rays (0.2 to 2.9 MeV) and atmospheric X-ray spectra at different altitudes. We specifically chose to discuss the observed ceiling spectrum of X-rays in the 28 to 180KeV region observed at 7.0 g. cm -2 . We have utilized the data of other experiments with different telescope geometries, to evaluate the builup effects due to cosmic ray secondaries in atmosphere. This behaviour, previoulsy studied for atmospheric gamma rays, permitted to compare the up/down flux rations to explain the observed atmospheric X-ray spectrum. (Author) [pt

  10. Discrete choice experiments to measure consumer preferences for health and healthcare.

    Viney, Rosalie; Lancsar, Emily; Louviere, Jordan

    2002-08-01

    To investigate the impact of health policies on individual well-being, estimate the value to society of new interventions or policies, or predict demand for healthcare, we need information about individuals' preferences. Economists usually use market-based data to analyze preferences, but such data are limited in the healthcare context. Discrete choice experiments are a potentially valuable tool for elicitation and analysis of preferences and thus, for economic analysis of health and health programs. This paper reviews the use of discrete choice experiments to measure consumers' preferences for health and healthcare. The paper provides an overview of the approach and discusses issues that arise when using discrete choice experiments to assess individuals' preferences for health and healthcare.

  11. Validation of the Child HCAHPS survey to measure pediatric inpatient experience of care in Flanders.

    Bruyneel, Luk; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; Buyse, Gunnar; Casteels, Kristina; Lommers, Barbara; Vandersmissen, Jo; Van Eldere, Johan; Van Geet, Chris; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2017-07-01

    The recently developed Child HCAHPS provides a standard to measure US hospitals' performance on pediatric inpatient experiences of care. We field-tested Child HCAHPS in Belgium to instigate international comparison. In the development stage, forward/backward translation was conducted and patients assessed content validity index as excellent. The draft Flemish Child HCAHPS included 63 items: 38 items for five topics hypothesized to be similar to those proposed in the US (communication with parent, communication with child, attention to safety and comfort, hospital environment, and global rating), 10 screeners, a 14-item demographic and descriptive section, and one open-ended item. A 6-week pilot test was subsequently performed in three pediatric wards (general ward, hematology and oncology ward, infant and toddler ward) at a JCI-accredited university hospital. An overall response rate of 90.99% (303/333) was achieved and was consistent across wards. Confirmatory factor analysis largely confirmed the configuration of the proposed composites. Composite and single-item measures related well to patients' global rating of the hospital. Interpretation of different patient experiences across types of wards merits further investigation. Child HCAHPS provides an opportunity for systematic and cross-national assessment of pediatric inpatient experiences. Sharing and implementing international best practices are the next logical step. What is Known: • Patient experience surveys are increasingly used to reflect on the quality, safety, and centeredness of patient care. • While adult inpatient experience surveys are routinely used across countries around the world, the measurement of pediatric inpatient experiences is a young field of research that is essential to reflect on family-centered care. What is New: • We demonstrate that the US-developed Child HCAHPS provides an opportunity for international benchmarking of pediatric inpatient experiences with care through parents

  12. An indirect measurement of the width of the w boson at the D0 experiment

    Telford, Paul; Manchester U.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents an indirect measurement of the width of the W boson using data collected at the D0 experiment, a multipurpose particle detector utilizing the Fermilab Tevatron. The W width was determined from the ratio of W → μν to Z → μ + μ - cross sections to be Γ W = 2168 ± 22(stat) ± 62(syst) -16 +24 (pdf) ± 4(other) MeV, in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction and other experimental measurements. In addition there is a description of how work made towards this measurement has been used to improve the parameterized detector simulation, a vital tool in the obtention of physics results from signals observed in the detector, and in estimating the uncertainty due to choice of PDF, which is of interest for all measurements made at hadron colliders

  13. Analysis of void reactivity measurements in full MOX BWR physics experiments

    Ando, Yoshihira; Yamamoto, Toru; Umano, Takuya

    2008-01-01

    In the full MOX BWR physics experiments, FUBILA, four 9x9 test assemblies simulating BWR full MOX assemblies were located in the center of the core. Changing the in-channel moderator condition of the four assemblies from 0% void to 40% and 70% void mock-up, void reactivity was measured using Amplified Source Method (ASM) technique in the subcritical cores, in which three fission chambers were located. ASM correction factors necessary to express the consistency of the detector efficiency between measured core configurations were calculated using collision probability cell calculation and 3D-transport core calculation with the nuclear data library, JENDL-3.3. Measured reactivity worth with ASM correction factor was compared with the calculated results obtained through a diffusion, transport and continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation respectively. It was confirmed that the measured void reactivity worth was reproduced well by calculations. (author)

  14. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review

    Katusiime B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbra Katusiime,1 Sarah Corlett,1 Joanne Reeve,2 Janet Krska1 1Medway School of Pharmacy, The Universities of Kent and Greenwich, Chatham, Maritime, Kent, UK; 2Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Background: There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients’ experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients’ experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients’ experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Methods: Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID®, and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Results: Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine

  15. A novel method for measuring health care system performance: experience from QIDS in the Philippines.

    Solon, Orville; Woo, Kimberly; Quimbo, Stella A; Shimkhada, Riti; Florentino, Jhiedon; Peabody, John W

    2009-05-01

    Measuring and monitoring health system performance is important albeit controversial. Technical, logistic and financial challenges are formidable. We introduced a system of measurement, which we call Q, to measure the quality of hospital clinical performance across a range of facilities. This paper describes how Q was developed, implemented in hospitals in the Philippines and how it compares with typical measures. Q consists of measures of clinical performance, patient satisfaction and volume of physician services. We evaluate Q using experimental data from the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), a randomized policy experiment. We determined its responsiveness over time and to changes in structural measures such as staffing and supplies. We also examined the operational costs of implementing Q. Q was sustainable, minimally disruptive and readily grafted into existing routines in 30 hospitals in 10 provinces semi-annually for a period of 2(1/2) years. We found Q to be more responsive to immediate impacts of policy change than standard structural measures. The operational costs totalled USD2133 or USD305 per assessment per site. Q appears to be an achievable assessment tool that is a comprehensive and responsive measure of system level quality at a limited cost in resource-poor settings.

  16. Measurements of Discrete Symmetries in the Neutral Kaon System with the CPLEAR (PS195) Experiment

    Ruf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The antiproton storage ring LEAR offered unique opportunities to study the symmetries which exist between matter and antimatter. At variance with other approaches at this facility, CPLEAR was an experiment devoted to the study of T, CPT and CP symmetries in the neutral kaon system. It measured with high precision the time evolution of initially strangeness-tagged $K^0$ and $\\bar{K}^0$ states to determine the size of violations with respect to these symmetries in the context of a systematic study. In parallel, limits concerning quantum-mechanical predictions (EPR paradox, coherence of the wave function) or the equivalence principle of general relativity have been obtained. This article will first discuss briefly the unique low energy antiproton storage ring LEAR followed by a description of the CPLEAR experiment, including the basic formalism necessary to understand the time evolution of a neutral kaon state and the main results related to measurements of discrete symmetries in the neutral kaon system. An exce...

  17. Psychometric testing of an instrument to measure the experience of home.

    Molony, Sheila L; McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Palmisano-Mills, Christine

    2007-10-01

    Research related to quality of life in long-term care has been hampered by a paucity of measurement tools sensitive to environmental interventions. The primary aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of a new instrument, the Experience of Home (EOH) Scale, designed to measure the strength of the experience of meaningful person-environment transaction. The instrument was administered to 200 older adults in diverse dwelling types. Principal components analysis provided support for construct validity, eliciting a three-factor solution accounting for 63.18% of variance in scores. Internal consistency reliability was supported with Cronbach's alpha of .96 for the entire scale. The EOH Scale is a unique research tool to evaluate interventions to improve quality of living in residential environments.

  18. A study of microwave interferometers for electron density measurements in REB-plasma experiments

    Saxena, A.C.; Paithankar, A.S.; Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1981-01-01

    In order to select a suitable microwave interferometer for electron density measurements in Relativistic Electron Beam (REB)-Plasma Experiments, a study has been carried out of four types of interferometers, viz. simple interferometer, standing-wave interferometer, frequency and phase modulated interferometers. Various direct reading interferometers which give a voltage proportional to the phase shift, are also discussed. Systems have been analysed in terms of time resolution, phase sensitivity, system stability, ease of measurement etc. Theoretical and experimental limitations of various systems have been indicated. Summary of the various systems is presented in a table to aid the experimentalist to select the most appropriate system for the prevailina experimental conditions. Finally, an attempt has been made to find out the interferometer system best suited for REB-Plasma Experiments. (author)

  19. Neutral Pion Transition Form Factor Measurement and Run Control at the NA62 experiment

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082375; Goudzovski, Evgueni

    The measurement of the 0 electromagnetic transition form factor (TFF) slope a is performed in the time-like region of momentum transfer using a sample of 1.1 $10^6$ $\\pi^0 \\to e^+ e^- \\gamma$ Dalitz decays collected at the NA62-RK experiment in 2007. The event selection, the fit procedure and the study of the systematic ffects are presented. The final result obtained $a = (3.68 \\pm 0.51stat \\pm 0.25syst) \\times 10^{-2} $ is the most precise to date and represents the first evidence of a non-zero $\\pi^0$ TFF slope with more than 3 $\\sigma$ significance. The NA62 experiment based at the CERN SPS is currently taking data and aims at measuring the branching fraction of the $K \\to \\pi \

  20. Reconstruction of Huygens' gedanken experiment and measurements based on video analysis tools

    Malgieri, Massimiliano; Onorato, Pasquale; Mascheretti, Paolo; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe the practical realization and the analysis of a thought experiment devised by Christiaan Huygens, which was pivotal in his derivation of the formula for the radius of gyration of a compound pendulum. Measurements are realized by recording the experiment with a digital camera, and using a video analysis and modelling software tool to process and extract information from the acquired videos. Using this setup, detailed quantitative comparisons between measurements and theoretical predictions can be carried out, focusing on many relevant topics in the undergraduate physics curriculum, such as the ‘radius of gyration’, conservation of energy, moment of inertia, constraint and reaction forces, and the behaviour of the centre of mass. (paper)

  1. Design of channel experiment equipment for measuring coolant velocity of innovative research reactor

    Muhammad Subekti; Endiah Puji Hastuti; Dedi Heriyanto

    2014-01-01

    The design of innovative high flux research reactor (RRI) requires high power so that the capability core cooling requires to be improved by designing the faster core coolant velocity near to the critical velocity limit. Hence, the critical coolant velocity as the one of the important parameter of the reactor safety shall be measured by special equipment to the velocity limit that may induce fuel element degradation. The research aims is to calculate theoretically the critical coolant velocity and to design the special experiment equipment namely EXNal for measuring the critical coolant velocity in fuel element subchannel of the RRI. EXNal design considers the critical velocity calculation result of 20.52 m/s to determine the variation of flow rate of 4.5-29.2 m 3 /h, in which the experiment could simulate the 1-4X standard coolant velocity of RSG-GAS as well as destructive test of RRI's fuel plate. (author)

  2. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Ion Spin-Up, Temperature, and Flow Measurements in the TCSU Experiment

    Deards, C. L.; Grossnickle, J. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Melnik, P. A.; Milroy, R. D.

    2009-11-01

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment employs a bakeable ultra-high vacuum chamber to reduce impurities and overall recycling. In recent experiments with Ti gettering applied to the plasma tube, radiation from impurities was dramatically reduced and recycling was almost eliminated. Ion temperature and azimuthal rotation velocities data from the resulting lower density, higher temperature FRC will be presented. The data comes from Doppler-broadening and Doppler-shifted measurements of Si III, C III, and O III, the dominant impurities in the TCSU plasma. Additionally, plans and initial data will be presented on azimuthal and poloidal velocity shear. Velocity shear is thought to improve stability and transport. All data measurements are made using an Acton Research SpectraPro 500i Czerny-Turney type spectrograph.

  4. A comparison of predictions and measurements for the Stripa simulated drift experiment

    Hodgkinson, D.

    1991-02-01

    This paper presents a comparison of measurements and predictions for the simulated drift experiment based on groundwater flow to the D-holes at the SCV site. The comparison was carried out on behalf of the Stripa task force on fracture flow modelling, as a learning exercise for the validation exercise to be based on flow to the validation drift. The paper summarises the characterisation data and their preliminary interpretation, and reviews the fracture flow modelling predictions made by teams from AEA Harwell, Golder Associates and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The predictions are compared with each other and with the D-hole inflow measurements, and this experience is used to provide detailed feedback to future experimental and modelling work. (35 refs.)

  5. The PVLAS experiment: measuring vacuum magnetic birefringence and dichroism with a birefringent Fabry-Perot cavity

    Della Valle, Federico; Milotti, Edoardo [INFN, Trieste (Italy); Universita di Trieste, Dipt. di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Ejlli, Aldo; Messineo, Giuseppe; Zavattini, Guido [INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Universita di Ferrara, Dipt. di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); Gastaldi, Ugo [INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Pengo, Ruggero; Ruoso, Giuseppe [INFN, Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Vacuum magnetic birefringence was predicted long time ago and is still lacking a direct experimental confirmation. Several experimental efforts are striving to reach this goal, and the sequence of results promises a success in the next few years. This measurement generally is accompanied by the search for hypothetical light particles that couple to two photons. The PVLAS experiment employs a sensitive polarimeter based on a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. In this paper we report on the latest experimental results of this experiment. The data are analysed taking into account the intrinsic birefringence of the dielectric mirrors of the cavity. Besides a new limit on the vacuum magnetic birefringence, the measurements also allow the model-independent exclusion of new regions in the parameter space of axion-like and milli-charged particles. In particular, these last limits hold also for all types of neutrinos, resulting in a laboratory limit on their charge. (orig.)

  6. Using particle tracking to measure flow instabilities in an undergraduate laboratory experiment

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2011-03-01

    Much of the drama and complexity of fluid flow occurs because its governing equations lack unique solutions. The observed behavior depends on the stability of the multitude of solutions, which can change with the experimental parameters. Instabilities cause sudden global shifts in behavior. We have developed a low-cost experiment to study a classical fluid instability. By using an electromagnetic technique, students drive Kolmogorov flow in a thin fluid layer and measure it quantitatively with a webcam. They extract positions and velocities from movies of the flow using Lagrangian particle tracking and compare their measurements to several theoretical predictions, including the effect of the drive current, the spatial structure of the flow, and the parameters at which instability occurs. The experiment can be tailored to undergraduates at any level or to graduate students by appropriate emphasis on the physical phenomena and the sophisticated mathematics that govern them.

  7. Measurement of short transverse relaxation times by pseudo-echo nutation experiments

    Ferrari, Maude; Moyne, Christian; Canet, Daniel

    2018-07-01

    Very short NMR transverse relaxation times may be difficult to measure by conventional methods. Nutation experiments constitute an alternative approach. Nutation is, in the rotating frame, the equivalent of precession in the laboratory frame. It consists in monitoring the rotation of magnetization around the radio-frequency (rf) field when on-resonance conditions are fulfilled. Depending on the amplitude of the rf field, nutation may be sensitive to the two relaxation rates R1 and R2. A full theoretical development has been worked out for demonstrating how these two relaxation rates could be deduced from a simple nutation experiment, noticing however that inhomogeneity of the rf field may lead to erroneous results. This has led us to devise new experiments which are the equivalent of echo techniques in the rotating frame (pseudo spin-echo nutation experiment and pseudo gradient-echo experiment). Full equations of motion have been derived. Although complicated, they indicate that the sum of the two relaxation rates can be obtained very accurately and not altered by rf field inhomogeneity. This implies however an appropriate data processing accounting for the oscillations which are superposed to the echo decays and, anyway, theoretically predicted. A series of experiments has been carried out for different values of the rf field amplitude on samples of water doped with a paramagnetic compound at different concentrations. Pragmatically, as R1 can be easily measured by conventional methods, its value is entered in the data processing algorithm which then returns exclusively the value of the transverse relaxation time. Very consistent results are obtained that way.

  8. Design features and operating experiences of neutron measurement system for HANARO

    Kim, Young Ki; Choi, Young San

    1999-02-01

    This paper discusses unique mechanical and electrical design features of neutron measurement system for HANARO and its operating experiences. Some unexpected problems and misbehaviors during installation and commissioning are briefly introduced. Engineering approaches and procedures in order to solve the problems we are described in priority. It has been proved, through years of operation that the wide range neutron measurement system for HANARO has a good capability of providing the stable and reliable neutron flux signal for reactor control and reactor protection. I hopefully expect that the engineering solutions suggested in this report could be a good reference to the other applications. (Author). 12 refs., 6 tabs., 23 figs

  9. Tandem-Mirror Experiment-Upgrade neutral pressure measurement diagnostic systems

    Pickles, W.L.; Allen, S.L.; Hill, D.N.; Hunt, A.L.; Simonen, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Tandem-Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) has a large and complex system of Bayard--Alpert, magnetron, and Penning gauges, in addition to mass spectrometers (RGA), all of which measure neutral pressures in the many internal regions of TMX-U. These pressure measurements are used as part of the confinement physics data base as well as for management of the TMX-U vacuum system. Dynamic pressures are modeled by a coupled-volumes simulation code, which includes wall reflux, getter pumping, and plasma pumping

  10. Measurements of the Top-Higgs Coupling with the CMS Experiment

    Mildner, Hannes

    The top-Higgs coupling is constrained using data measured with the CMS experiment in LHC Run 1 and 2. Constraints on anomalous top-Higgs couplings are derived by re-analyzing CMS Run 1 measurements. Furthermore, a search for Higgs production in association with a top-quark pair and Higgs-boson decays into b-quarks in Run 2 data is presented. Upper limits on ttH production are calculated and it is demonstrated that the analysis can also be used to constrain anomalous top-Higgs couplings.

  11. Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high β/sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R 0 + a indicate the presence of a non-μ-conserving acceleration mechanism

  12. Final scientific and technical report: New experiments to measure the neutrino mass scale

    Monreal, Benjamin [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2016-11-19

    In this work, we made material progress towards future measurements of the mass of the neutrino. The neutrino is a fundamental particle, first observed in the 1950s and subjected to particularly intense study over the past 20 years. It is now known to have some, non-zero mass, but we are in an unusual situation of knowing the mass exists but not knowing what value it takes. The mass may be determined by precise measurements of certain radioactive decay distributions, particularly the beta decay of tritium. The KATRIN experiment is an international project which is nearing the beginning of a tritium measurement campaign using a large electrostatic spectrumeter. This research included participation in KATRIN, including construction and delivery of a key calibration subsystem, the ``Rear Section''. To obtain sensitivity beyond KATRIN's, new techniques are required; this work included R&D on a new technique we call CRES (Cyclotron Resonance Electron Spectroscopy) which has promise to enable even more sensitive tritium decay measurements. We successfully carried out CRES spectroscopy in a model system in 2014, making an important step towards the design of a next-generation tritium experiment with new neutrino mass measurement abilities.

  13. Double slit experiment with quantum detectors: mysteries, meanings, misinterpretations and measurement

    Rameez-ul-Islam; Ikram, Manzoor; Hasan Mujtaba, Abid; Abbas, Tasawar

    2018-01-01

    We propose an idea for symmetric measurements through the famous double slit experiment (DSE) in a new detection scenario. The interferometric setup is complemented here with quantum detectors that switch to an arbitrary superposition after interaction with the arms of the DSE. The envisioned schematics cover the full measurement range, i.e. from the weak to the strong projective situation with selectivity being a smoothly tunable open option, and suggests an alternative methodology for weak measurements based on information overlap from DSE paths. The results, though generally in agreement with the quantum paradigm, raise many questions over the nature of probabilities, the absurdity of the common language for phenomena’s description in the theory and the boundary separating the projective/non-projective measurements, and the related misconceived interpretations. Further, the results impose certain constraints over the hidden variable theories as well as on the repercussions of the weak measurements. Although described as a thought experiment, the proposal can equally be implemented experimentally under a prevailing research scenario.

  14. Measures to overcome consequences of agricultural land fragmentation: European experience and Ukrainian realities

    Andriy Popov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the land reform implementation results in Ukraine is the distribution of the state-owned agricultural land to the rural population in the form of physical land parcels. As a consequence, however, the land was subdivided into many small units. This land fragmentation has led to fundamental changes in the formation of the new agricultural enterprises and brought some negative consequences in their functioning. The problem of the land fragmentation in Ukraine is quite new and uninvestigated. The aim of the article is to analyze the existing measures (instruments in European countries for reducing the effects of agricultural land fragmentation and to determine the possibility of «transplantability» of Western experience to Ukraine. The principal measures to decrease the agricultural land fragmentation in European countries are: voluntary parcel exchange, land banking and land consolidation. The article presents the characteristics and comparative analysis of these measures. One of the four types of land fragmentation is a main problem of Ukraine, namely the discrepancy between the landownership and the land use. The Western European countries have been used the three instruments for reducing only two types of land fragmentation: the land use fragmentation and the internal fragmentation. Consequently, the using of Western European measures to decrease agricultural land fragmentation is impossible without their adaptation to the Ukrainian realities. Therefore, the actual problem in Ukraine today is to find the own measures to overcome the problem of agricultural land fragmentation based on the Western European experience.

  15. Space Flight Experiments to Measure Polymer Erosion and Contamination on Spacecraft

    Lillis, Maura C.; Youngstrom, Erica E.; Marx, Laura M.; Hammerstrom, Anne M.; Finefrock, Katherine D.; Youngstrom, Christiane A.; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth S.; Hunt, Patricia K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic oxygen erosion and silicone contamination are serious issues that could damage or destroy spacecraft components after orbiting for an extended period of time, such as on a space station or satellite. An experiment, the Polymer Erosion And Contamination Experiment (PEACE) will be conducted to study the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) erosion and silicone contamination, and it will provide information and contribute to a solution for these problems. PEACE will fly 43 different polymer materials that will be analyzed for AO erosion effects through two techniques: mass loss measurement and recession depth measurement. Pinhole cameras will provide information about the arrival direction of AO, and silicone contamination pinhole cameras will identify the source of silicone contamination on a spacecraft. All experimental hardware will be passively exposed to AO for up to two weeks in the actual space environment when it flies in the bay of a space shuttle. A second set of the PEACE Polymers is being exposed to the space environment for erosion yield determination as part of a second experiment, Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). MISSE is a collaboration between several federal agencies and aerospace companies. During a space walk on August 16, 2001, MISSE was attached to the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) during an extravehicular activity (EVA), where it began its exposure to AO for approximately 1.5 years. The PEACE polymers, therefore, will be analyzed after both short-term and long-term AO exposures for a more complete study of AO effects.

  16. Measurements of Prompt and MHD-Induced Fast Ion Loss from National Spherical Torus Experiment Plasmas

    D.S. Darrow; S.S. Medley; A.L. Roquemore; W.W. Heidbrink; A. Alekseyev; F.E. Cecil; J. Egedal; V.Ya. Goloborod' ko; N.N. Gorelenkov; M. Isobe; S. Kaye; M. Miah; F. Paoletti; M.H. Redi; S.N. Reznik; A. Rosenberg; R. White; D. Wyatt; V.A. Yavorskij

    2002-10-15

    A range of effects may make fast ion confinement in spherical tokamaks worse than in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Data from neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer, and a fast ion loss diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) indicate that neutral beam ion confinement is consistent with classical expectations in quiescent plasmas, within the {approx}25% errors of measurement. However, fast ion confinement in NSTX is frequently affected by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, and the effect of MHD can be quite strong.

  17. Thermal shock experiment analysis, the use of crack arrest toughness measurements

    Miannay, D.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Chavaillard, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    The main purpose of thermal shock experiment is to assess the procedure codified in the ASME XI appendix 1 or RCC-M-B appendix ZG, and allow comparisons with numerical simulations. The analysis of the integrity of the PWR vessel belt line under accidental transients is based on reference curves. The test-piece is a cylinder of SA 508 cl.3 steel. Arrest toughness measured agrees with reference curve

  18. Meteorological measurements and simulations by the LORAN model performed during the ETEX experiments

    Schneiter, D.; Berger, H.; Galmarini, S.

    1997-01-01

    A SODAR (SOnic Detection and Ranging) installed by the SMA at the tracer release site (Monterfil near Rennes, France) was operating continuously during the two ETEX experiments (from 22nd to 25th Oct. and from 13th to 17th Nov. 1994). Vertical profiles of the horizontal and vertical components of the wind were measured every 20 m, from 20 m above ground up to 600 m, depending on the strength of the returned echoes. Samplings were averaged over 30 minutes

  19. Direct measurement of macroscopic electric fields produced by collective effects in electron-impact experiments

    Velotta, R.; Avaldi, L.; Camilloni, R.; Giammanco, F.; Spinelli, N.; Stefani, G.

    1996-01-01

    The macroscopic electric field resulting from the space charge produced in electron-impact experiments has been characterized by using secondary electrons of well-defined energy (e.g., Auger or autoionizing electrons) as a probe. It is shown that the measurement of the kinetic-energy shifts suffered by secondary electrons is a suitable tool for the analysis of the self-generated electric field in a low-density plasma. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Benchmark experiment on vanadium assembly with D-T neutrons. Leakage neutron spectrum measurement

    Kokooo; Murata, I.; Nakano, D.; Takahashi, A. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Maekawa, F.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The fusion neutronics benchmark experiments have been done for vanadium and vanadium alloy by using the slab assembly and time-of-flight (TOF) method. The leakage neutron spectra were measured from 50 keV to 15 MeV and comparison were done with MCNP-4A calculations which was made by using evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-3.2, JENDL-Fusion File and FENDL/E-1.0. (author)

  1. FE-study for lithostatic pressure measurement in the 600 m borehole experiment

    Hamilton, L.F.M.; Benneker, P.B.J.M.

    1990-05-01

    In the Asse-2 salt mine an experiment is set up by ECN in the 600 m borehole to perform in-situ convergence measurements which can be used to validate or to determine the constitutive relations between stresses and deformations of the rocksalt. An experiment is planned in which the convergence of the borehole can be measured with different pressures created in the borehole. For this experiment a device has been developed at ECN which also will be used to measure the in-situ elasticity of the salt. This measuring device is designed in such a way that a pressure can be realized in the borehole and the deformation of the hole can be measured at the same time. In this report analyses are presented that are used to adjust the design of the pressure unit to the specific needs induced by the fact that the depth of the borehole is only 300 m due to drilling problems instead of the intended 600 m. Since the lithostatic pressure at this depth is smaller the convergence rate of the borehole is reduced. From the results presented in this report it can be concluded that it is not necessary to change the basic concept of the measurement as it was planned in the 600 m deep borehole. After the device has been placed into the borehole at a distance of 3 m from the bottom the empty space must be filled up with salt concrete up to 3 m above the pressure unit. In this way the interaction with the borehole bottom and the transition between the open and the filled borehole can be neglected. Some changes in the design are necessary to be able to measure the deformations of the borehole with enough accuracy. Based on these changes a measuring program has been defined in such a way that the experimental period is optimally used and the expected evolution of the volume change and pressure can be measured with enough accuracy. For three different constitutive models a prediction is made for the evolution of the pressure and the volume change resulting from the defined measuring program

  2. Measurements of Discrete Symmetries in the Neutral Kaon System with the CPLEAR (PS195) Experiment

    Ruf, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The antiproton storage ring LEAR offered unique opportunities to study the symmetries which exist between matter and antimatter. At variance with other approaches at this facility, CPLEAR was an experiment devoted to the study of T, \\{CPT} and \\{CP} symmetries in the neutral kaon system. It measured with high precision the time evolution of initially strangeness-tagged K0 and overline K ^0 states to determine the size of violations with respect to these symmetries in the context of a systematic study. In parallel, limits concerning quantum-mechanical predictions (EPR paradox, coherence of the wave function) or the equivalence principle of general relativity have been obtained. This article will first discuss briefly the unique low energy antiproton storage ring LEAR followed by a description of the CPLEAR experiment, including the basic formalism necessary to understand the time evolution of a neutral kaon state and the main results related to measurements of discrete symmetries in the neutral kaon system. An excellent and exhaustive review of the CPLEAR experiment and all its measurements is given in Ref. 1.

  3. On performance experience and measurements with Ningyo Waste Assay System (NWAS). 3

    Zaima, Naoki; Nakashima, Shin'ichi; Nakatsuka, Yoshiaki; Kado, Kazumi; Fujiki, Naoki

    2014-03-01

    A uranium mass assay system, NWAS (Ningyo Waste Assay System), for 200-litter wastes drums applied by NDA method was developed and accumulated the data of the actual uranium bearing wastes drums. The system consists of the 16 pieces of Helium-3 proportional counters for neutron detection generated from U-234(α,n) reaction or U-238 spontaneous fissions with polyethylene moderation and a Germanium solid state detector (Ge-SSD) for gamma ray detection as to determine uranium enrichment. In previous report, some measurement experiences had been introduced briefly. After that the measurements campaigns against the actual wastes drums stored in URCP had been carried out successfully, the uranium determination data of 850 drums had been accumulated approximately. Those characteristics were rich in variety including various kinds of matrices, uranium chemical compositions and range of uranium mass and so on. These works have contributed the decrease of the MUF in URCP, for which was the first purpose of introduction of NWAS. On the other hand several considerable problems on the system or methodology had been revealed technically or analytically through the measurements experiences. Such experiences are to be described precisely, in addition newly gained knowledge will be marshaled. Furthermore as the next improvement plans, the active neutrons assay for uranium bearing wastes drums are now progressing. The results of complications will lead us to the progressive next steps. (author)

  4. Reactivity worth measurements on the CALIBAN reactor: interpretation of integral experiments for the nuclear data validation

    Richard, B.

    2012-01-01

    The good knowledge of nuclear data, input parameters for the neutron transport calculation codes, is necessary to support the advances of the nuclear industry. The purpose of this work is to bring pertinent information regarding the nuclear data integral validation process. Reactivity worth measurements have been performed on the Caliban reactor, they concern four materials of interest for the nuclear industry: gold, lutetium, plutonium and uranium 238. Experiments which have been conducted in order to improve the characterization of the core are also described and discussed, the latter are necessary to the good interpretation of reactivity worth measurements. The experimental procedures are described with their associated uncertainties, measurements are then compared to numerical results. The methods used in numerical calculations are reported, especially the multigroup cross sections generation for deterministic codes. The modeling of the experiments is presented along with the associated uncertainties. This comparison led to an interpretation concerning the qualification of nuclear data libraries. Discrepancies are reported, discussed and justify the need of such experiments. (author) [fr

  5. Moisture measurement in the iron and steel industry: experience with nuclear moisture measurements in coke, and studies of infrared moisture measurement of iron ore mixtures

    Beumer, J.A.; Wouters, M.

    1976-01-01

    In the heavy iron-making industry there are several processes for which it is necessary to measure on-line the moisture content of certain process materials, especially in the field of iron ore preparation and blast furnace practice. Two examples are given. (1) Experience with nuclear moisture-measurements in coke covers a period of ten years in which eight measuring systems have been installed in the weighing hoppers of blast furnaces. The standard deviation is about 0.7% moisture in the range 0 to 15% moisture. The way the method is used, the safety measures and the difficulties encountered, especially the effect on recalibration of neutron-absorbing materials in photomultipliers are described. (2) The application of infrared absorption to the study of moisture measurment or iron ore mixtures is described. With an ore mixture for pellets manufacture, a rather dark ore mixture, problems have arisen concerning the sensitivity. The reference and measuring wavelengths now in use are 2.51 and 2.95 μm. In this case the absorption of the energy is rather high. The results may be improved by using quartz optics instead of the normal Pyrex ones, as the cut-off wavelength of Pyrex is about 3 μm. Variations due to colour and specific surface have been studied. As the accuracy required is +- 0.1% moisture in the range 8 to 12% moisture, these variations need to be eliminated. (author)

  6. ELABORATING A MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENT FOR THE FLOW EXPERIENCE DURING ONLINE INFORMATION SEARCH

    Caraivan Luiza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow is a construct imported in marketing research from social sciences in order to examine consumer behavior in the online medium. The construct describes a state of deep involvement in a challenging activity, most frequently characterized by high levels of enjoyment, control and concentration. Researchers found that the degree to which online experience is challenging can be defined, measured, and related well to important marketing variables. As shown by our extensive literature review, flow measurements include antecedents, dimensions and consequences of flow. The present paper represents a detailed description of the construct`s operationalization in the context of online information search. In this respect, our main goal is to produce a basic instrument to evaluate the flow experience of online search, in order to capitalize on the premises of an interactive, complex informational medium – the World Wide Web – and on the consequence of an exploratory informational behavior of users. The instrument is conceived to offer a primal possibility to collect data. The composition, source and significance of the 11 scales used to measure the multiple factors of the flow experience during online search are detailed in this study with the aim to ensure the compliance with scientific rigors and to facilitate correct reports of data related to the reliability and validity of measurements. For further research, we propose factor analysis to test the resulted instrument and to ensure that the measures employed are psychometrically sound. Factor analysis refers to a wide range of statistic techniques used to represent a set of variables in concordance with a reduced number of hypothetical variables called factors. Factorial analysis is used to solve two types of problems: reducing the number of variables to increase data processing speed and identifying hidden patterns in the existent data relations. However, we expect our scales to perform

  7. SFINX: Soviet-French integral experiment on measuring the capture and fission at Masurca and BFS

    Doulin, V.A.; Mikhailov, J.M.; Mozhaev, V.K.

    1990-01-01

    The SFINX experiment was aimed at the comparison of experimental procedures used at the MASURCA and the BFS critical assemblies for measuring the ratio of the 238 U and 239 Pu average fission cross-sections to the 235 U average cross-section (F8/F5, F9/F5) and of the 238 U average capture cross-section to the 239 Pu average fission cross section (C8/F9). As part of the calibration of the measurements F8/F5 and F9/F5 were also measured in a thermal column. To obtain C8/F9, absolute measurements of capture rates in 238 U and fission rates in 239 Pu and 235 U were carried out. The measurements were made in September 1987 at the MASURCA facility (FRANCE) in the BALZAC 1 critical assembly and in the thermal column of the HARMONIE facility. In April 1989 these measurements were complemented by joint measurements of the 239 Pu absolute fission rate at the BFS 55-1 critical assembly (USSR)

  8. Kerr Reservoir LANDSAT experiment analysis for March 1981

    Lecroy, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    LANDSAT radiance data were used in an experiment conducted on the waters of Kerr Reservoir to determine if reliable algorithms could be developed that relate water quality parameters to remotely sensed data. A mix of different types of algorithms using the LANDSAT bands was generated to provide a thorough understanding of the relationships among the data involved. Except for secchi depth, the study demonstrated that for the ranges measured, the algorithms that satisfactorily represented the data encompass a mix of linear and nonlinear forms using only one LANDSAT band. Ratioing techniques did not improve the results since the initial design of the experiment minimized the errors against which this procedure is effective. Good correlations were found for total suspended solids, iron, turbidity, and secchi depth. Marginal correlations were discovered for nitrate and tannin + lignin. Quantification maps of Kerr Reservoir are presented for many of the water quality parameters using the developed algorithms.

  9. The impact of different background errors in the assimilation of satellite radiances and in-situ observational data using WRFDA for three rainfall events over Iran

    Zakeri, Zeinab; Azadi, Majid; Ghader, Sarmad

    2018-01-01

    Satellite radiances and in-situ observations are assimilated through Weather Research and Forecasting Data Assimilation (WRFDA) system into Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model over Iran and its neighboring area. Domain specific background error based on x and y components of wind speed (UV) control variables is calculated for WRFDA system and some sensitivity experiments are carried out to compare the impact of global background error and the domain specific background errors, both on the precipitation and 2-m temperature forecasts over Iran. Three precipitation events that occurred over the country during January, September and October 2014 are simulated in three different experiments and the results for precipitation and 2-m temperature are verified against the verifying surface observations. Results show that using domain specific background error improves 2-m temperature and 24-h accumulated precipitation forecasts consistently, while global background error may even degrade the forecasts compared to the experiments without data assimilation. The improvement in 2-m temperature is more evident during the first forecast hours and decreases significantly as the forecast length increases.

  10. TRitium Activity Measurements with a PhotomultipliEr in Liquids–The TRAMPEL experiment

    Priester, Florian; Klein, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We have set up a new test device for measuring of tritiated water samples. • The device is very compact and easy and reliable in operation. • Easy integration in flow-through systems is possible. • The device has been operated at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe for several months. • The lower detection limit has been improved with regard to predecessors experiments. - Abstract: A common technique for the determination of the activity of tritiated water (HTO) is liquid scintillation counting (LSC). This implies sample taking, sample preparation and radioactive waste processing afterwards. When handling highly tritiated water special care has to be taken because of possible harmfulness of the sample. Furthermore, LSC devices are mostly large, heavy and expensive. The TRAMPEL experiment aims at measuring the activity of tritiated water in-line without sample taking. The device is intended to be easy to use and operate, quite inexpensive and compact. The measurement principle is based on electrons from β-decay which induce light in commercially available scintillation fibres. The light is detected by a small photomultiplier tube (PMT). A proof-of-principle was set up for static measurements using standard stainless steel parts. The complete device has a volume of less than 0.5 l.

  11. Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

    Reed, G; Reed, D H

    1999-05-01

    When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data.

  12. Measurement of Drug Craving in Persian Speaking Subjects; a Review on Current Experiences and Future Perspectives

    Masoomeh Maarefvand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug craving is considered as one of the main cores of drug dependency and addiction. Multidimensionality of drug craving, its cultural-bounded features and its intra individual rapidly changing nature makes it difficult to be measured. Nowadays, regarding different psychometric approaches, there are various instruments available for measurement of different aspects of drug craving but mainly for Latin-based languages in North America and European countries. High prevalence and special conditions, and unique subcultures in substance abuse and addiction in many countries, like Iran, make the design of culturally validated instruments for drug craving assessment priority. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive review on drug craving measurement instruments for Persian speaking subjects have been performed by searching in databases (ELSEVIER, Science Direct and Scientific Information Database (SID and investigating of related documents on regional experiences. Results: In this article seven main categories of drug craving instruments have been reviewed focusing on validated versions in Persian language including: self-reports, reinforcement “proxies”, drug self administration, psycho physiological responding, neurobiological responding, cognitive processing and expressive methods. Conclusion: Reviewing on weak and strength points of each instrument group and national and regional experiences shows that designing and validating a new series of ecologically-validated instruments for multidimensional measurement of drug craving in different addiction subcultures should be prioritized to cover current methodological gaps in substance abuse studies in Iran.

  13. TRitium Activity Measurements with a PhotomultipliEr in Liquids–The TRAMPEL experiment

    Priester, Florian, E-mail: florian.priester@kit.edu; Klein, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have set up a new test device for measuring of tritiated water samples. • The device is very compact and easy and reliable in operation. • Easy integration in flow-through systems is possible. • The device has been operated at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe for several months. • The lower detection limit has been improved with regard to predecessors experiments. - Abstract: A common technique for the determination of the activity of tritiated water (HTO) is liquid scintillation counting (LSC). This implies sample taking, sample preparation and radioactive waste processing afterwards. When handling highly tritiated water special care has to be taken because of possible harmfulness of the sample. Furthermore, LSC devices are mostly large, heavy and expensive. The TRAMPEL experiment aims at measuring the activity of tritiated water in-line without sample taking. The device is intended to be easy to use and operate, quite inexpensive and compact. The measurement principle is based on electrons from β-decay which induce light in commercially available scintillation fibres. The light is detected by a small photomultiplier tube (PMT). A proof-of-principle was set up for static measurements using standard stainless steel parts. The complete device has a volume of less than 0.5 l.

  14. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Cianchi, A.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC-LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 10 16 –10 17  cm −3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  15. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  16. Experiences on current national income measures with reference to environmental and natural resources

    Franzese, R.; Gaudioso, D.

    1995-06-01

    The environment provides both a source of goods and services and a 'sink' for residues of the production and consumption processes. This is not reflected into conventional estimate of GDP (gross domestic product), the most commonly used measure of aggregate income. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether environmentally-adjusted national income measure can be derived. In the first part, the authors discuss both the shortcomings of the current national income measures, with reference to environmental and natural resources, and the debate on this issues; then they analyse the existing experiences to provide environmentally-adjusted indicators of national accounts. In the second part, the authors present an evaluation of the costs of environmental degradation in Italy in the period 1988-1990, based on the methodologies adopted in a pilot study carried out by UNSO (United Nations Statistical Office) and the World Bank for Mexico

  17. Measurement of the luminosity in the ZEUS experiment at HERA II

    Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland); Andruszkow, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Nuclear Physics] [and others

    2013-06-15

    The luminosity in the ZEUS detector was measured using photons from electron bremsstrahlung. In 2001 the HERA collider was upgraded for operation at higher luminosity. At the same time the luminosity-measuring system of the ZEUS experiment was modified to tackle the expected higher photon rate and synchrotron radiation. The existing lead-scintillator calorimeter was equipped with radiation hard scintillator tiles and shielded against synchrotron radiation. In addition, a magnetic spectrometer was installed to measure the luminosity independently using photons converted in the beam-pipe exit window. The redundancy provided a reliable and robust luminosity determination with a systematic uncertainty of 1.7%. The experimental setup, the techniques used for luminosity determination and the estimate of the systematic uncertainty are reported.

  18. Energy spectra and charge composition of galactic cosmic rays measured in ATIC-2 experiment

    Zatsepin, V.I.; Bat'kov, K.E.; Bashindzhagyan, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon experiment is intended for measuring the energy spectra of the galactic cosmic rays with the individual resolution by the charge from protons to iron within the energy range from 50 GeV up to 100 TeV. The silicon detector matrix, making it possible to solve on the inverse current by means of the detector charge high segmentation, was applied for the first time in the high-energy cosmic rays for the charge measurement. The ATIC completed two successful flights in the Antarctica since 28.12.2000 up to 13.01.2001 (the ATIC-1 test flight) and since 29.12.2002 up to 18.01.2003 (the ATIC-2 scientific flight). The current state of the analysis of the spectra, measured in the ATIC-2 scientific flight, are presented in this work and the obtained results are compared with the model forecasts results [ru

  19. Measuring the Change in Water Table with Gravity Methods - a Controlled Experiment

    Lund, S; Christiansen, Lars; Andersen, O. B.

    2009-01-01

    Gravity changes linearly with the change in soil water content. With the GRACE satellite mission the interest for ground-based gravity methods in hydrology has gained new attention. Time-lapse gravity data have the potential to constrain hydrological model parameters in a calibration scheme....... The greatest potential is seen for specific yield. The gravity signal from hydrology is small (10^-8 m/s^2 level) and the application of ground-based methods is mainly limited by the sensitivity of available instruments. In order to demonstrate the ability of the Scintrex CG-5 gravity meter to detect a change...... in water content, a controlled experiment was set up in 30 m by 20 m basin. The water table was lowered 0.69 m within 1½ hours and the corresponding gravity signal measured using two different approaches: a time series measurements at one location and a gravity network measurement including four points...

  20. A survey of blockage measurement methods used in PWR multi-rod experiments

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S. (AEA Reactor Services, Springfield (UK))

    1986-05-01

    The deformation characteristics of Zircaloy multi-rod arrays are being investigated in laboratory and in-reactor tests, and heat transfer experiments are being carried out on pre-deformed arrays. The primary objective is to demonstrate that cladding distension occurring under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions will not impede the PWR emergency coolant flow during the reflood stage to the extent that unacceptably high cladding temperatures are reached, i.e. that a coolable geometry is maintained. This Report critically reviews the current methods for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed even though it still has drawbacks in the case of overall blockage measurement. A method for automatically measuring the individual rod strain, general cluster blockage sub-channel blockage and sub-channel perimeter changes is described and the results from a deformed array presented. (author).

  1. A survey of blockage measurement methods used in PWR multi-rod experiments

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S.

    1986-05-01

    The deformation characteristics of Zircaloy multi-rod arrays are being investigated in laboratory and in-reactor tests, and heat transfer experiments are being carried out on pre-deformed arrays. The primary objective is to demonstrate that cladding distension occurring under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions will not impede the PWR emergency coolant flow during the reflood stage to the extent that unacceptably high cladding temperatures are reached, i.e. that a coolable geometry is maintained. This Report critically reviews the current methods for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed even though it still has drawbacks in the case of overall blockage measurement. A method for automatically measuring the individual rod strain, general cluster blockage sub-channel blockage and sub-channel perimeter changes is described and the results from a deformed array presented. (author)

  2. Non-destructive measurements of nuclear wastes. Validation and industrial operating experience

    Saas, A.; Tchemitciieff, E.

    1993-01-01

    After a short survey of the means employed for the non-destructive measurement of specific activities (γ and X-ray) in waste packages and raw waste, the performances of the device and the ANDRA requirements are presented. The validation of the γ and X-ray measurements on packages is obtained through determining, by destructive means, the same activity on coring samples. The same procedure is used for validating the homogeneity measurements on packages (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Different operating experiences are then exposed for several kinds of packages and waste. Up to now, about twenty different types of packages have been examined and more than 200 packages have allowed the calibration, validation, and control

  3. Vibrational-rotational temperature measurement of N2 in the lower thermosphere by the rocket experiment

    Kurihara, J.; Oyama, K.; Suzuki, K.; Iwagami, N.

    The vibrational temperature (Tv), the rotational temperature (Tr) and the density of atmospheric N2 between 100 - 150 km were measured in situ by a sounding rocket S310-30, over Kagoshima, Japan at 10:30 UT on February 6, 2002. The main purpose of this rocket experiment is to study the dynamics and the thermal energy budget in the lower thermosphere. N2 was ionized using an electron gun and the emission of the 1st negative bands of N2+ was measured by a sensitive spectrometer. Tv and Tr were determined by fitting the observed spectrum for the simulated spectrum, and the number density was deduced from the intensities of the spectrum. We will report preliminary results of our measurement and discuss the observed thermal structure that indicates the effect of tides and gravity waves.

  4. The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX: A test-bed for developing urban greenhouse gas emission measurements

    Kenneth J. Davis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX is to develop, evaluate and improve methods for measuring greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from cities. INFLUX’s scientific objectives are to quantify CO2 and CH4 emission rates at 1 km2 resolution with a 10% or better accuracy and precision, to determine whole-city emissions with similar skill, and to achieve high (weekly or finer temporal resolution at both spatial resolutions. The experiment employs atmospheric GHG measurements from both towers and aircraft, atmospheric transport observations and models, and activity-based inventory products to quantify urban GHG emissions. Multiple, independent methods for estimating urban emissions are a central facet of our experimental design. INFLUX was initiated in 2010 and measurements and analyses are ongoing. To date we have quantified urban atmospheric GHG enhancements using aircraft and towers with measurements collected over multiple years, and have estimated whole-city CO2 and CH4 emissions using aircraft and tower GHG measurements, and inventory methods. Significant differences exist across methods; these differences have not yet been resolved; research to reduce uncertainties and reconcile these differences is underway. Sectorally- and spatially-resolved flux estimates, and detection of changes of fluxes over time, are also active research topics. Major challenges include developing methods for distinguishing anthropogenic from biogenic CO2 fluxes, improving our ability to interpret atmospheric GHG measurements close to urban GHG sources and across a broader range of atmospheric stability conditions, and quantifying uncertainties in inventory data products. INFLUX data and tools are intended to serve as an open resource and test bed for future investigations. Well-documented, public archival of data and methods is under development in support of this objective.

  5. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10 12 cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs

  7. FIREX (Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environments Experiment): Measurements of Nitrogen Containing Volatile Organic Compounds

    Warneke, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Yokelson, R. J.; Roberts, J. M.; Koss, A.; Coggon, M.; Yuan, B.; Sekimoto, K.

    2017-12-01

    A combination of a warmer, drier climate with fire-control practices over the last century have produced a situation in which we can expect more frequent fires and fires of larger magnitude in the Western U.S. and Canada. There are urgent needs to better understand the impacts of wildfire and biomass burning (BB) on the atmosphere and climate system, and for policy-relevant science to aid in the process of managing fires. The FIREX (Fire Influence on Regional and Global Environment Experiment) research effort is a multi-year, multi-agency measurement campaign focused on the impact of BB on climate and air quality from western North American wild fires, where research takes place on scales ranging from the flame-front to the global atmosphere. FIREX includes methods development and small- and large-scale laboratory and field experiments. FIREX will include: emission factor measurements from typical North American fuels in the fire science laboratory in Missoula, Montana; mobile laboratory deployments; ground site measurements at sites influenced by BB from several western states. The main FIREX effort will be a large field study with multiple aircraft and mobile labs in the fire season of 2019. One of the main advances of FIREX is the availability of various new measurement techniques that allows for smoke evaluation in unprecedented detail. The first major effort of FIREX was the fire science laboratory measurements in October 2016, where a large number of previously understudied Nitrogen containing volatile organic compounds (NVOCs) were measured using H3O+CIMS and I-CIMS instruments. The contribution of NVOCs to the total reactive Nitrogen budget and the relationship to the Nitrogen content of the fuel are investigated.

  8. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the tandem mirror experiment

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). This analyzer indicates an increase in ion temperature from ∼20 eV before ICRH to ∼150 eV during ICRH, with ∼60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial integral of n i T i as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma potential is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat, as the plasma conditions varied over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U

  9. Case-mix adjustment and the comparison of community health center performance on patient experience measures.

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007-2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately.

  10. Comparison of Finite Element Predictions to Measurements from the Sandia Microslip Experiment

    LOBITZ,DONALD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; SMALLWOOD,DAVID O.

    2000-11-09

    When embarking on an experimental program for purposes of discovery and understanding, it is only prudent to use appropriate analysis tools to aid in the discovery process. Due to the limited scope of experimental measurement analytical results can significantly complement the data after a reasonable validation process has occurred. In this manner the analytical results can help to explain certain measurements, suggest other measurements to take and point to possible modifications to the experimental apparatus. For these reasons it was decided to create a detailed nonlinear finite element model of the Sandia Microslip Experiment. This experiment was designed to investigate energy dissipation due to microslip in bolted joints and to identify the critical parameters involved. In an attempt to limit the microslip to a single interface a complicated system of rollers and cables was devised to clamp the two slipping members together with a prescribed normal load without using a bolt. An oscillatory tangential load is supplied via a shaker. The finite element model includes the clamping device in addition to the sequence of steps taken in setting up the experiment. The interface is modeled using Coulomb friction requiring a modest validation procedure for estimating the coefficient of friction. Analysis results have indicated misalignment problems in the experimental procedure, identified transducer locations for more accurate measurements, predicted complex interface motions including the potential for galling, identified regions where microslip occurs and during which parts of the loading cycle it occurs, all this in addition to the energy dissipated per cycle. A number of these predictions have been experimentally corroborated in varying degrees and are presented in the paper along with the details of the finite element model.

  11. Analysis of measurements for a uranium-free core experiment at the BFS-2 critical assembly

    Hunter, Stuart [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    This document describes a series of calculations that were carried out to model various measurements from the BFS-58-1-I1 experiment. BFS-58-1-I1 was a mock-up of a uranium-free, Pu burning core at BFS-2, a Russian critical assembly operated by IPPE. The experiment measured values of Keff, Na void reactivity worth, material sample reactivity worths and reaction rate ratios. The experiments were modelled using a number of different methods. Basic nuclear data was taken from JENDL-3.2, in either 70 or 18 groups. Cross-section data for the various material regions of the assembly were calculated by either SLAROM or CASUP; the heterogeneous structure of the core regions was modelled in these calculations, with 3 different options considered for representing the (essentially 2D) geometry of the assembly components in a 1D cell model. Whole reactor calculations of flux and Keff were done using both a diffusion model (CITATION) and a transport model (TWOTRAN2), both using an RZ geometry. Reactivity worths were calculated both directly from differences in Keff values and by using the exact perturbation calculations of PERKY and SN-PERT (for CITATION and TWOTRAN2, respectively). Initial calculations included a number of inaccuracies in the assembly representation, a result of communication difficulties between JNC and IPPE; these errors were removed for the final calculations that are presented. Calculations for the experiments have also been carried out in Russia (IPPE) and France (CEA) as part of an international comparison exercise, some of those results are also presented here. The calculated value of Keff was 1.1%{delta}k/k higher than the measured value, Na void worth C/E values were {approx}1.06; these results were considered to be reasonable. (Discrepancies in certain Na void values were probably due to experimental causes , though the effect should be investigated in any future experiments.) Several sample worth values were small compared with calculational

  12. Experience with novel technologies for direct measurement of atmospheric NO2

    Hueglin, Christoph; Hundt, Morten; Mueller, Michael; Schwarzenbach, Beat; Tuzson, Bela; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an air pollutant that has a large impact on human health and ecosystems, and it plays a key role in the formation of ozone and secondary particulate matter. Consequently, legal limit values for NO2 are set in the EU and elsewhere, and atmospheric observation networks typically include NO2 in their measurement programmes. Atmospheric NO2 is principally measured by chemiluminescence detection, an indirect measurement technique that requires conversion of NO2 into nitrogen monoxide (NO) and finally calculation of NO2 from the difference between total nitrogen oxides (NOx) and NO. Consequently, NO2 measurements with the chemiluminescence method have a relatively high measurement uncertainty and can be biased depending on the selectivity of the applied NO2 conversion method. In the past years, technologies for direct and selective measurement of NO2 have become available, e.g. cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy (CAPS), cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy and quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometry (QCLAS). These technologies offer clear advantages over the indirect chemiluminescence method. We tested the above mentioned direct measurement techniques for NO2 over extended time periods at atmospheric measurement stations and report on our experience including comparisons with co-located chemiluminescence instruments equipped with molybdenum as well as photolytic NO2 converters. A still open issue related to the direct measurement of NO2 is instrument calibration. Accurate and traceable reference standards and NO2 calibration gases are needed. We present results from the application of different calibration strategies based on the use of static NO2 calibration gases as well as dynamic NO2 calibration gases produced by permeation and by gas-phase titration (GPT).

  13. Baryon stopping contribution in net-proton fluctuations measured by STAR experiment

    Thakur, Dhananjaya; Jakhar, Sunil; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of Beam Energy Scan program by RHIC is to scan the QCD phase diagram i.e temperature (T) versus baryon chemical potential (μB) diagram for strong interaction. At large B existence of QCD critical point (CP) and a first order phase boundary between QGP and hadronic phase is expected. The non-monotonous behavior of higher moment of the distributions of conserved quantity like net-baryon number with √s_N_N are believed to be a good signature of phase transition and CP. A non-monotonous behavior of ĸσ"2 is found around √s_N_N = 19.6 GeV by STAR experiment, which hints for the possible existence of critical point around √s_N_N=19.6 GeV. The proton distributions measured by STAR experiment have the contribution from both production as well as stopping. There may be a significant contribution of stopped protons at RHIC and lower energies which also relate to the softening of the equation of state. In the present work we have estimated the contribution of stopped protons in the protons multiplicity distributions measured by STAR experiment to calculate the higher order fluctuations

  14. Modeling and design of radiative hydrodynamic experiments with X-ray Thomson Scattering measurements on NIF

    Ma, K. H.; Lefevre, H. J.; Belancourt, P. X.; MacDonald, M. J.; Doeppner, T.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility studied the effect of radiation on shock-driven hydrodynamic instability growth. X-ray radiography images from these experiments indicate that perturbation growth is lower in highly radiative shocks compared to shocks with negligible radiation flux. The reduction in instability growth is attributed to ablation from higher temperatures in the foam for highly radiative shocks. The proposed design implements the X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) technique in the radiative shock tube platform to measure electron temperatures and densities in the shocked foam. We model these experiments with CRASH, an Eulerian radiation hydrodynamics code with block-adaptive mesh refinement, multi-group radiation transport and electron heat conduction. Simulations are presented with SiO2 and carbon foams for both the high temperature, radiative shock and the low-temperature, hydrodynamic shock cases. Calculations from CRASH give estimations for shock speed, electron temperature, effective ionization, and other quantities necessary for designing the XRTS diagnostic measurement. This work is funded by the LLNL under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Image quality of the cat eye measured during retinal ganglion cell experiments.

    Bonds, A B; Enroth-Cugell, C; Pinto, L H

    1972-01-01

    1. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the dioptrics of fifteen cat eyes was determined. The aerial image, formed by the eye of a standard object (a 0.5-1.0 degrees annulus), was photographed. The transmission of the film negative was measured with a scanning microdensitometer to yield the light distribution within the aerial image. Correcting for the double passage, this experimentally determined light distribution and the known object light distribution were used to obtain the MTF, applying Fourier methods. Each MTF was used to calculate the light distribution within the retinal image of stimuli of various geometry used in experiments on retinal ganglion cells in the same eye.2. When the eye was equipped with an artificial pupil of the same size as that used in the neurophysiological experiments (4.0-4.8 mm diam.) the MTF had fallen to 0.5 at 2.43 c/deg. When the pupil was removed the MTF had fallen to 0.5 at a much lower spatial frequency (1.0 c/deg). This shows that even when one uses an artificial pupil too large to provide optimal image quality there is a vast improvement over using no pupil.3. These image quality measurements were prompted by the need to know the actual stimulus image in experiments on the functional organization of the receptive field, a need exemplified in this paper by a few specific physiological results. The full neurophysiological results appear in the next two papers.

  16. The QMAP and MAT/TOCO Experiments for Measuring Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Miller, A.; Beach, J.; Bradley, S.; Caldwell, R.; Chapman, H.; Devlin, M. J.; Dorwart, W. B.; Herbig, T.; Jones, D.; Monnelly, G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nolta, M.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J.; Robertson, T.; Torbet, E.; Tran, H. T.; Vinje, W. E.

    2002-06-01

    We describe two related experiments that measured the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). QMAP was a balloon-borne telescope that flew twice in 1996, collecting data on degree angular scales with an array of six high electron mobility transistor-based amplifiers (HEMTs). QMAP used an interlocking scan strategy to directly produce high signal-to-noise ratio CMB maps over a limited region of sky. The QMAP gondola was then refitted for ground-based work as the MAT/TOCO experiment. Observations were made from 5200 m on Cerro Toco in Northern Chile in 1997 and 1998 using time domain beam synthesis. MAT/TOCO measured the rise and fall of the CMB angular spectrum, thereby localizing the position of the first peak to lpeak=216+/-14. In addition to describing the instruments, we discuss the data selection methods, check for systematic errors, and compare the MAT/TOCO results to those from recent experiments. The previously reported data are updated to account for a small calibration shift and corrected to account for a small contribution from known sources of foreground emission. The resulting amplitude of the first peak for 160

  17. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  18. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. (bar P)), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g. ).

  19. AEgIS experiment: Towards antihydrogen beam production for antimatter gravity measurements

    Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Amsler, Claude; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Belov, Alexandre S; Bonomi, Germano; Bräunig, Philippe; Brusa, Roberto S; Bremer, Johan; Cabaret, Louis; Canali, Carlo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Cialdi, Simone; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Dassa, Luca; Derking, Jan Hendrik; Di Domizio, Sergio; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Dudarev, Alexey; Ereditato, Antonio; Ferragut, Rafael; Fontana, Andrea; Genova, Pablo; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Gninenko, Sergei N; Hogan, Stephen D; Haider, Stefan; Jordan, Elena; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kawada, Jiro; Kellerbauer, Alban; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Knecht, Andreas; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lehner, Sebastian; Malbrunot, Chloe; Matveev, Viktor A; Merkt, Frederic; Moia, Fabio; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nédélec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus K; Pacifico, Nicola; Petráček, Vojtech; Pistillo, Ciro; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Regenfus, Christian; Riccardi, Cristina; Røhne, Ole; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Scampoli, Paola; Storey, James; Subieta Vasquez, Martin A.; Spaček, Michal; Czech Technical U. in Prague - FNSPE - B\\oehova 7 - 11519 - Praha 1 - Czech Aff25 Testera, Gemma; Vaccarone, Renzo; Villa, Fabio; Widmann, Eberhard; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an experiment that aims to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen in the Earth’s field. A cold antihydrogen beam will be produced by charge exchange reaction between cold antiprotons and positronium excited in Rydberg states. Rydberg positronium (with quantum number n between 20 and 30) will be produced by a two steps laser excitation. The antihydrogen beam, after being accelerated by Stark effect, will fly through the gratings of a moir ́ e deflectometer. The deflection of the horizontal beam due to its free fall will be measured by a position sensitive detector. It is estimated that the detection of about 10 3 antihydrogen atoms is required to determine the gravitational acceleration with a precision of 1%. In this report an overview of the AEgIS experiment is presented and its current status is described. Details on the production of slow positronium and its excitation with lasers ar...

  20. Measurements of $B \\to \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ decays using the LHCb experiment

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00400160

    This dissertation documents a study of very rare $B$-meson decays at the LHCb experiment, using data taken during the first experiment run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and during the second experiment run until September 2016. The LHCb experiment was designed to test the Standard Model of particle physics and to search for New Physics effects that go beyond the scope of the Standard Model through the decay of $b$ hadrons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The measurements described in this dissertation are made using data samples of proton-proton collisions with integrated luminosities of 1.0, 2.0 and 1.4 fb$^{-1}$, collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV, respectively. The branching fractions of the very rare $B^{0} \\to \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0} \\to \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ decays and the effective lifetime of $B_{s}^{0} \\to \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ decays are precisely predicted by the Standard Model and are sensitive to effects from New Physics. New Physics processes...