WorldWideScience

Sample records for radial transport characterization

  1. Formulas for Radial Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Estrada, Paul R.; Kalyaan, Anusha; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2017-05-01

    The quantification of the radial transport of gaseous species and solid particles is important to many applications in protoplanetary disk evolution. An especially important example is determining the location of the water snow lines in a disk, which requires computing the rates of outward radial diffusion of water vapor and the inward radial drift of icy particles; however, the application is generalized to evaporation fronts of all volatiles. We review the relevant formulas using a uniform formalism. This uniform treatment is necessary because the literature currently contains at least six mutually exclusive treatments of radial diffusion of gas, only one of which is correct. We derive the radial diffusion equations from first principles using Fick's law. For completeness, we also present the equations for radial transport of particles. These equations may be applied to studies of diffusion of gases and particles in protoplanetary and other accretion disks.

  2. Radial plasma transport in Saturn's magnetosphere (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    Radial plasma transport in the magnetosphere of Saturn, like that of Jupiter, is driven by the centrifugal force of (partial) corotation acting on internally generated plasma. A significant difference is that the internal plasma source is evidently broadly distributed throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn (4 CAPS and MAG), and reproduced in numerical simulations (RCM) that contain a distributed plasma source, although it has not, to my knowledge, been explained by an analytical theory containing an active plasma source. Both planets exhibit strong magnetospheric modulations near the planetary spin period, probably indicating a persistent longitudinal asymmetry of the radial plasma transport process. At Jupiter such an asymmetry is readily understood as a consequence of the dramatic asymmetry of the intrinsic planetary magnetic field. This is not so at Saturn, where any such field asymmetry is known to be very modest at best. In neither case has the precise nature of the asymmetry been identified either observationally or theoretically.

  3. Radial transport of dust in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations which detect dust at large galactocentric distances in the disks of spiral galaxies, we propose a mechanism of outward radial transport of dust by spiral stellar density waves. We consider spiral galaxies in which most of dust formation is localized inside the corotation radius. We show that in the disks of such spiral galaxies, the dust grains can travel over radial distances that exceed the corotation radius by roughly 25%. A fraction of the dust grains can be trapped on kidney-shaped stable orbits between the stellar spiral arms and thus can escape the destructive effect of supernova explosions. These grains form diffuse dusty spiral arms, which stretch 4-5 kpc from the sites of active star formation. About 10% of dust by mass injected inside corotation, can be transported over radial distances 3-4 kpc during approximately 1.0 Gyr. This is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than can be provided by the turbulent motions.

  4. Characterization of Single Phase and Two Phase Heat and Momentum Transport in a Spiraling Radial Inow Microchannel Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maritza

    Thermal management of systems under high heat fluxes on the order of hundreds of W/cm2 is important for the safety, performance and lifetime of devices, with innovative cooling technologies leading to improved performance of electronics or concentrating solar photovoltaics. A novel, spiraling radial inflow microchannel heat sink for high flux cooling applications, using a single phase or vaporizing coolant, has demonstrated enhanced heat transfer capabilities. The design of the heat sink provides an inward swirl flow between parallel, coaxial disks that form a microchannel of 1 cm radius and 300 micron channel height with a single inlet and a single outlet. The channel is heated on one side through a conducting copper surface, and is essentially adiabatic on the opposite side to simulate a heat sink scenario for electronics or concentrated photovoltaics cooling. Experimental results on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in the heat sink, using single phase water as a working fluid, revealed heat transfer enhancements due to flow acceleration and induced secondary flows when compared to unidirectional laminar fully developed flow between parallel plates. Additionally, thermal gradients on the surface are small relative to the bulk fluid temperature gain, a beneficial feature for high heat flux cooling applications. Heat flux levels of 113 W/cm2 at a surface temperature of 77 deg C were reached with a ratio of pumping power to heat rate of 0.03%. Analytical models on single phase flow are used to explore the parametric trends of the flow rate and passage geometry on the streamlines and pressure drop through the device. Flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics were obtained for this heat sink using water at near atmospheric pressure as the working fluid for inlet subcooling levels ranging from 20 to 80 deg C and mean mass flux levels ranging from 184-716 kg/m. 2s. Flow enhancements similar to singlephase flow were expected, as well

  5. Continuous Time Random Walks for Non-Local Radial Solute Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Borgne, Tanguy le

    2016-01-01

    This paper derives and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneou...

  6. Transport in Silicon Nanowires: Role of Radial Dopant Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, Riccardo; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    distributions of P dopant impurities. We find that the radial distribution of the dopants influences the conductance properties significantly: surface doped wires have longer mean-free paths and smaller sample-to-sample fluctuations in the cross-over from ballistic to diffusive transport. These findings can...

  7. Radial Transport and Meridional Circulation in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Radial transport of particles, elements and fluid driven by internal stresses in three-dimensional (3D) astrophysical accretion disks is an important phenomenon, potentially relevant for the outward dust transport in protoplanetary disks, origin of the refractory particles in comets, isotopic equilibration in the Earth–Moon system, etc. To gain better insight into these processes, we explore the dependence of meridional circulation in 3D disks with shear viscosity on their thermal stratification, and demonstrate a strong effect of the latter on the radial flow. Previous locally isothermal studies have normally found a pattern of the radial outflow near the midplane, switching to inflow higher up. Here we show, both analytically and numerically, that a flow that is inward at all altitudes is possible in disks with entropy and temperature steeply increasing with height. Such thermodynamic conditions may be typical in the optically thin, viscously heated accretion disks. Disks in which these conditions do not hold should feature radial outflow near the midplane, as long as their internal stress is provided by the shear viscosity. Our results can also be used for designing hydrodynamical disk simulations with a prescribed pattern of the meridional circulation.

  8. ULF Waves and Diffusive Radial Transport of Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashar Fawad

    The Van Allen radiation belts contain highly energetic particles which interact with a variety of plasma and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Waves in the ultra low-frequency (ULF) range play an important role in the loss and acceleration of energetic particles. Considering the geometry of the geomagnetic field, charged particles trapped in the inner magnetosphere undergo three distinct types of periodic motions; an adiabatic invariant is associated with each type of motion. The evolution of the phase space density of charged particles in the magnetosphere in the coordinate space of the three adiabatic invariants is modeled by the Fokker-Planck equation. If we assume that the first two adiabatic invariants are conserved while the third invariant is violated, then the general Fokker-Planck equation reduces to a radial diffusion equation with the radial diffusion coefficient quantifying the rate of the radial diffusion of charged particles, including contributions from perturbations in both the magnetic and the electric fields. This thesis investigates two unanswered questions about ULF wave-driven radial transport of charged particles. First, how important are the ULF fluctuations in the magnetic field compared with the ULF fluctuations in the electric field in driving the radial diffusion of charged particles in the Earth's inner magnetosphere? It has generally been accepted that magnetic field perturbations dominate over electric field perturbations, but several recently published studies suggest otherwise. Second, what is the distribution of ULF wave power in azimuth, and how does ULF wave power depend upon radial distance and the level of geomagnetic activity? Analytic treatments of the diffusion coefficients generally assume uniform distribution of power in azimuth, but in situ measurements suggest that this may not be the case. We used the magnetic field data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and the electric and the magnetic

  9. Radial transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The radial flux of toroidal angular momentum is needed to determine tokamak intrinsic rotation profiles. Its computation requires knowledge of the gyrokinetic distribution functions and turbulent electrostatic potential to second-order in $\\epsilon = \\rho/L$, where $\\rho$ is the ion Larmor radius and $L$ is the variation length of the magnetic field. In this article, a complete set of equations to calculate the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum in any tokamak is presented. In particular, the $O(\\epsilon^2)$ equations for the turbulent components of the distribution functions and electrostatic potential are given for the first time without assuming that the poloidal magnetic field over the magnetic field strength is small.

  10. Effect of radial plasma transport at the magnetic throat on axial ion beam formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Correlation between radial plasma transport and formation of an axial ion beam has been investigated in a helicon plasma reactor implemented with a convergent-divergent magnetic nozzle. The plasma discharge is sustained under a high magnetic field mode and a low magnetic field mode for which the electron energy probability function, the plasma density, the plasma potential, and the electron temperature are measured at the magnetic throat, and the two field modes show different radial parametric behaviors. Although an axial potential drop occurs in the plasma source for both field modes, an ion beam is only observed in the high field mode while not in the low field mode. The transport of energetic ions is characterized downstream of the plasma source using the delimited ion current and nonlocal ion current. A decay of ion beam strength is also observed in the diffusion chamber.

  11. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  12. Radial transport of poloidal momentum in ASDEX Upgrade in L-mode and H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlmann, F.; Schrittwieser, R.; Naulin, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocating probe was used for localized measurements of the radial transport of poloidal momentum in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). The probe measured poloidal and radial electric field components and density. We concentrate on three components of the momentum transport: ......: Reynolds stress, convective momentum flux and triple product of the fluctuating components of density, radial and poloidal electric field. For the evaluation we draw mainly on the probability density functions (PDFs)....

  13. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  14. Radial heat transport in packed beds at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Values were measured for the effective radial heat conductivity λeff, r and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall αw in a packed bed. This was done for superficial velocities of 5 – 70 cm s−1 and at pressures from 1 – 10 bar. Values for λeff, r and αw were obtained by simultaneous fitting of

  15. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-05-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities.

  16. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  17. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Berionni, V.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Kosuga, Y.; Vermare, L.

    2013-02-01

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  18. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States); Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kosuga, Y. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  19. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  20. Core Radial Electric Field and Transport in Wendelstein 7-X Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablant, Novimir

    2016-10-01

    Results from the investigation of core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (Er) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the Er profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Neoclassical particle fluxes are not intrinsically ambipolar, which leads to the formation of a radial electric field that enforces ambipolarity. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric field to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu⊥ 5km /s (ΔEr 12kV / m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW . These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between, heating power, response of the temperature and density profiles and the response of the radial electric field. Estimations of the core transport are based on power balance and utilize electron temperature (Te) profiles from the ECE and Thomson scattering, electron density profiles (ne) from interferometry and Thomson scattering, ion temperature (Ti) profiles from XICS, along with measurements of the total stored energy and radiated power. Also described are a set core impurity confinement experiments and results. Impurity confinement has been investigated through the injection of trace amount of argon impurity gas at the plasma edge in conjunction with measurements of the density of various ionization states of argon from the XICS and High Efficiency eXtreme-UV Overview Spectrometer (HEXOS) diagnostics. Finally the inferred Er and heat flux profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations using measured

  1. Dependence of radiation belt simulations to assumed radial diffusion rates tested for two empirical models of radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Shprits, Yuri; Aseev, Nikita; Kellerman, Adam; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2017-04-01

    Radial diffusion is one of the dominant physical mechanisms that drives acceleration and loss of the radiation belt electrons, which makes it very important for nowcasting and forecasting space weather models. We investigate the sensitivity of the two parameterizations of the radial diffusion of Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] on long-term radiation belt modeling using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB). Following Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014], we first perform 1-D radial diffusion simulations. Comparison of the simulation results with observations shows that the difference between simulations with either radial diffusion parameterization is small. To take into account effects of local acceleration and loss, we perform 3-D simulations, including pitch-angle, energy and mixed diffusion. We found that the results of 3-D simulations are even less sensitive to the choice of parameterization of radial diffusion rates than the results of 1-D simulations at various energies (from 0.59 to 1.80 MeV). This result demonstrates that the inclusion of local acceleration and pitch-angle diffusion can provide a negative feedback effect, such that the result is largely indistinguishable simulations conducted with different radial diffusion parameterizations. We also perform a number of sensitivity tests by multiplying radial diffusion rates by constant factors and show that such an approach leads to unrealistic predictions of radiation belt dynamics. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999ja900344. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. Jonathan Rae, and D. K. Milling (2014), Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res. [Space Phys.], 119(3), 1587-1605, doi:10.1002/2013JA019204.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  3. Radial transport dynamics studies of SMBI with a newly developed TPSMBI code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Hui; Guo, Wen-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Hui; Ren, Qi-Long; Sun, Ai-Ping; Xu, Min; Wang, Ai-Ke; Xiang, Nong

    2016-10-01

    In tokamak plasma fueling, supersonic molecule beam injection (SMBI) with a higher fueling efficiency and a deeper penetration depth than the traditional gas puffing method has been developed and widely applied to many tokamak devices. It is crucial to study the transport dynamics of SMBI to improve its fueling efficiency, especially in the high confinement regime. A new one-dimensional (1D) code of TPSMBI has also been developed recently based on a six-field SMBI model in cylindrical coordinate. It couples plasma density and heat radial transport equations together with neutral density transport equations for both molecules and atoms and momentum radial transport equations for molecules. The dominant particle collisional interactions between plasmas and neutrals, such as molecule dissociation, atom ionization and charge-exchange effects, are included in the model. The code is verified to be correct with analytical solutions and also benchmarked well with the trans-neut module of BOUT++ code. Time-dependent radial transport dynamics and mean profile evolution are studied during SMBI with the TPSMBI code in both slab and cylindrical coordinates. Along the SMBI path, plasma density increases due to particle fuelling, while plasma temperature decreases due to heat cooling. Being different from slab coordinate, the curvature effect leads to larger front densities of molecule and atom during SMBI in cylindrical coordinate simulation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11575055, 11375053, and 11475219) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB111005, 2014GB108004, and 2015GB110001).

  4. Axial and radial water transport and internal water storage in tropical forest canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Shelley A; Meinzer, Frederick C; Goldstein, Guillermo; Woodruff, David; Jones, Timothy; Restom, Teresa; Mejia, Monica; Clearwater, Michael; Campanello, Paula

    2003-01-01

    Heat and stable isotope tracers were used to study axial and radial water transport in relation to sapwood anatomical characteristics and internal water storage in four canopy tree species of a seasonally dry tropical forest in Panama. Anatomical characteristics of the wood and radial profiles of sap flow were measured at the base, upper trunk, and crown of a single individual of Anacardium excelsum, Ficus insipida, Schefflera morototoni, and Cordia alliodora during two consecutive dry seasons. Vessel lumen diameter and vessel density did not exhibit a consistent trend axially from the base of the stem to the base of the crown. However, lumen diameter decreased sharply from the base of the crown to the terminal branches. The ratio of vessel lumen area to sapwood cross-sectional area was consistently higher at the base of the crown than at the base of the trunk in A. excelsum, F. insipida and C. alliodora, but no axial trend was apparent in S. morototoni. Radial profiles of the preceding wood anatomical characteristics varied according to species and the height at which the wood samples were obtained. Radial profiles of sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation sensors of variable length near the base of the crown were highly correlated with radial profiles of specific hydraulic conductivity (k(s)) calculated from xylem anatomical characteristics. The relationship between sap flux density and k(s) was species-independent. Deuterium oxide (D(2)O) injected into the base of the trunk of the four study trees was detected in the water transpired from the upper crown after only 1 day in the 26-m-tall C. alliodora tree, 2 days in the 28-m-tall F. insipida tree, 3 days in the 38-m-tall A. excelsum tree, and 5 days in the 22-m-tall S. morototoni tree. Radial transport of injected D(2)O was detected in A. excelsum, F. insipida and S. morototoni, but not C. alliodora. The rate of axial D(2)O transport, a surrogate for maximum sap velocity, was positively correlated

  5. Rate of radial transport of plasma in Saturn’s inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, T. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) frequently observe longitudinally localized injection and drift dispersion of hot plasma in Saturn’s magnetosphere. These signatures provide direct evidence for the major convective process in the inner magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating planet, in which the radial transport of plasma comprises hot, tenuous plasma moving inward and cooler, denser plasma moving outward. These injection events have been found to occupy only a small fraction of the total available longitudinal space, indicating that the inflow speed is probably much larger than the outflow speed. We set the local corotation speed as the upper limit of inflow velocities, and deduce the corresponding radial velocities of the outflowing flux tubes by analyzing the width of injection structures and assuming that the total potential drop around a given L-shell is zero. We then estimate an upper limit to the plasma outward mass transport rate, which turns out to be somewhat larger than previous estimates of the Enceladus source rate (e.g., Pontius and Hill, 2006). An important assumption in this study is that the plasma is largely confined to a thin equatorial sheet, and we have applied a centrifugal scale height model developed by Hill and Michel [1976].

  6. Root cortical senescence decreases root respiration, nutrient content, and radial water and nutrient transport in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Hannah M; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Postma, Johannes A; Brown, Kathleen M; Lücke, Andreas; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2017-02-06

    The functional implications of root cortical senescence (RCS) are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that RCS in barley: (1) reduces the respiration and nutrient content of root tissue; (2) decreases radial water and nutrient transport; (3) is accompanied by increased suberization to protect the stele. Genetic variation for RCS exists between modern germplasm and landraces. Nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency increased the rate of RCS. Maximal RCS, defined as the disappearance of the entire root cortex, reduced root nitrogen content by 66%, phosphorus content by 63%, and respiration by 87% compared to root segments with no RCS. Roots with maximal RCS had 90%, 92%, and 84% less radial water, nitrate, and phosphorus transport, respectively compared to segments with no RCS. The onset of RCS coincided with 30% greater aliphatic suberin in the endodermis. These results support the hypothesis that RCS reduces root carbon and nutrient costs and may therefore have adaptive significance for soil resource acquisition. By reducing root respiration and nutrient content, RCS could permit greater root growth, soil resource acquisition, and resource allocation to other plant processes. RCS merits investigation as a trait for improving the performance of barley, wheat, triticale, and rye under edaphic stress.

  7. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  8. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    between the magnetosphere and Saturn's faint rings that may drive such radial transport processes may also exist in previously reported measurements of plasma density by Cassini. Alternative explanations that do not involve enhanced plasma transport near the rings require the presence of a transient absorbing medium, such as E-ring clumps. Such clumps may form at the L-shell range where microsignatures have been observed due to resonances between charged dust and corotating magnetospheric structures, but remote imaging observations of the E-ring are not consistent with such a scenario.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Glucosinolate Transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang

    of plant defence, and the distribution pattern reflects the individual contributions from biosynthesis, transport and turnover. However, little is known about how and to what extent transport processes contribute to establishing these distribution patterns. With the recent identification of AtGTR1 and At......GTR2, two high-affinity glucosinolate transporters, a new molecular tool was provided to study glucosinlate transport in A. thaliana. This thesis contains 6 papers where transporter proteins are identified and characterized biochemically and genetically....

  10. Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, R.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Okamoto, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of finite-{beta} and radial electric fields on the neoclassical transport in the Large Helical Device are investigated with the DKES (Drift Kinetic Equation Solver) code. In the finite-{beta} configuration, even orbits of deeply trapped particles deviate significantly from magnetic flux surfaces. Thus, neoclassical ripple transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration are several times larger than those in the vacuum configuration under the same condition of temperatures and radial electric fields. When the plasma temperature is several keV, a bifurcation of the electric fields appears under the ambipolarity condition, and sufficient large radial electric fields can be generated. As a result, the ExB drift rectifies orbits of particles and improves significantly the transport coefficients in the finite-{beta} configuration. (author)

  11. Characterization of radial turbulent fluxes in the Santander linear plasma machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, J. A.; Sánchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Castellanos, O. F.; Anabitarte, E.; Sentíes, J. M.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2014-05-01

    It is shown that the statistical and correlation properties of the local turbulent flux measured at different radial locations of the cold, weakly ionized plasmas inside the Santander Linear Plasma Machine [Castellanos et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, 2067 (2005)] are consistent with diffusive-like transport dynamics. This is in contrast to the dynamical behavior inferred from similar measurements taken in hotter, fully ionized tokamak and stellarator edge plasmas, in which long-term correlations and other features characteristic of complex, non-diffusive transport dynamics have been reported in the past. These results may shed some light on a recent controversy regarding the possible universality of the dynamics of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas.

  12. Characterization of radial turbulent fluxes in the Santander linear plasma machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mier, J. A., E-mail: mierja@unican.es; Anabitarte, E.; Sentíes, J. M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Sánchez, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Newman, D. E. [Department of Physics, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5920 (United States); Castellanos, O. F. [Instituto de Hidráulica Ambiental, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Milligen, B. Ph. van [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Asociación EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    It is shown that the statistical and correlation properties of the local turbulent flux measured at different radial locations of the cold, weakly ionized plasmas inside the Santander Linear Plasma Machine [Castellanos et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, 2067 (2005)] are consistent with diffusive-like transport dynamics. This is in contrast to the dynamical behavior inferred from similar measurements taken in hotter, fully ionized tokamak and stellarator edge plasmas, in which long-term correlations and other features characteristic of complex, non-diffusive transport dynamics have been reported in the past. These results may shed some light on a recent controversy regarding the possible universality of the dynamics of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas.

  13. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt I: Radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Elkington, Scot R.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Subbotin, Dmitriy A.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on the modeling of radial transport in the Earth's outer radiation belt. A historical overview of the first observations of the radiation belts is presented, followed by a brief description of radial diffusion. We describe how resonant interactions with poloidal and toroidal components of the ULF waves can change the electron's energy and provide radial displacements. We also present radial diffusion and guiding center simulations that show the importance of radial transport in redistributing relativistic electron fluxes and also in accelerating and decelerating radiation belt electrons. We conclude by presenting guiding center simulations of the coupled particle tracing and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes and by discussing the origin of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit. Local acceleration and losses and 3D simulations of the dynamics of the radiation belt fluxes are discussed in the companion paper [Shprits, Y.Y., Subbotin, D.A., Meredith, N.P., Elkington, S.R., 2008. Review of modeling of losses and sources of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt II: Local acceleration and loss. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue. doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.06.014].

  14. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  15. Evidence for the importance of radial transport in plasma detachment in the Nagoya University Divertor Simulator (NAGDIS-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Nishijima, D.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Ezumi, N.

    2001-07-01

    Measurements of ion and electron temperatures have been performed in detaching helium--hydrogen plasmas in a linear divertor simulator experiment using spectroscopy, a Langmuir probe, and an omegatron mass spectrometer. Detachment in these plasmas is characterized by a significant ({approx}20 x) reduction in the central plasma flux at the target plate as the target region neutral pressure is increased from 2 to 12 mTorr. The data indicate that partially detached gas-target plasmas consist of a hot (T{sub e}{approx}5 eV) core region along the axis of the plasma column, surrounded by a cold (T{sub e}{approx}0.1 eV) halo region of recombining plasma. At T{sub e}=5 eV, plasma recombination is negligible compared with ionization; these experiments therefore provide evidence that detachment is primarily caused by radial transport and by a gradual drop in the ionization source as the temperature of the core region drops below 5 eV.

  16. Characterization of placental cholesterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie L; Wassif, Christopher A; Vaisman, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) are born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal cholesterol supplementation is provided; however, it cannot correct developmental malformations due to in utero cholesterol deficit. Increased transport of cholesterol from maternal to fetal...... circulation might attenuate congenital malformations. The cholesterol transporters Abca1, Abcg1, and Sr-b1 are present in placenta; however, their potential role in placental transport remains undetermined. In mice, expression analyses showed that Abca1 and Abcg1 transcripts increased 2-3-fold between...... embryonic days 13.5 and 18.5 in placental tissue; whereas, Sr-b1 expression decreased. To examine the functional role of Abca1, Abcg1 and Sr-b1 we measured the maternal-fetal transfer of (14)C-cholesterol in corresponding mutant embryos. Disruption of either Abca1 or Sr-b1 decreased cholesterol transfer...

  17. JIP3 regulates neuronal radial migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huixian; Yu, Hui; Li, Ting; Zhao, Yan; Hou, Ming; Chen, Zheyu; Wang, Yue; Sun, Tao

    2017-04-15

    Radial migration is essential for the precise lamination and the coordinated function of the cerebral cortex. However, the molecular mechanisms for neuronal radial migration are not clear. Here, we report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein-3 (JIP3) is highly expressed in the brain of embryonic mice and essential for radial migration. Knocking down JIP3 by in utero electroporation specifically perturbs the radial migration of cortical neurons but has no effect on neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we illustrate that JIP3 knockdown delays but does not block the migration of cortical neurons by investigating the distribution of neurons with JIP3 knocked down in the embryo and postnatal mouse. Finally, we find that JIP3 regulates cortical neuronal migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport during brain development. These findings deepen our understanding of the regulation of neuronal development by JIP3 and provide us a novel view on the regulating mechanisms of neuronal radial migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Classification of transporters using efficient radial basis function networks with position-specific scoring matrices and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yu-Yen; Chen, Shu-An; Gromiha, M Michael

    2010-05-15

    Transporters are proteins that are involved in the movement of ions or molecules across biological membranes. Transporters are generally classified into channels/pores, electrochemical transporters, and active transporters. Discriminating the specific class of transporters and their subfamilies are essential tasks in computational biology for the advancement of structural and functional genomics. We have systematically analyzed the amino acid composition, residue pair preference and amino acid properties in six different families of transporters. Utilizing the information, we have developed a radial basis function (RBF) network method based on profiles obtained with position specific scoring matrices for discriminating transporters belonging to three different classes and six families. Our method showed a fivefold cross validation accuracy of 76%, 73%, and 69% for discriminating transporters and nontransporters, three different classes and six different families of transporters, respectively. Further, the method was tested with independent datasets, which showed similar level of accuracy. A web server has been developed for discriminating transporters based on three classes and six families, and it is available at http://rbf.bioinfo.tw/ approximately sachen/tcrbf.html. We suggest that our method could be effectively used to identify transporters and discriminating them into different classes and families.

  19. Gated Graphene Electrical Transport Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Náhlík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is a very interesting new material, and promises attractive applications in future nanodevices. It is a 2D carbon structure with very interesting physical behavior. Graphene is an almost transparent material that has higher carrier mobility than any other material at room temperature. Graphene can therefore be used in applications such as ultrahigh-speed transistors and transparent electrodes. In this paper, we present our preliminary experiments on the transport behavior of graphene at room temperature. We measured the resistivity of Hall-bar samples depending on gate voltage (backgated graphene. Hysteresis between the forward and backward sweep direction was observed.

  20. Noble internal transport barriers and radial subdiffusion of toroidal magnetic lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H.; Reuss, J.D. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, CEA/DSM/DRFC, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Constantinescu, D.; Steinbrecher, G. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., Dept. of Physics, University of Craiova (Romania); Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F. [Association Euratom-N.A.S.T.I., National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Weyssow, B.; Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge sur la Fusion, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2002-02-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITB's) observed in tokamaks are described by a purely magnetic approach. Magnetic line motion in toroidal geometry with broken magnetic surfaces is studied from a previously derived Hamiltonian map in situation of incomplete chaos. This appears to reproduce in a realistic way the main features of a tokamak, for a given safety factor profile and in terms of a single parameter L representing the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation. New results are given concerning the Shafranov shift as function of L. For small values of L, closed magnetic surfaces exist (KAM tori) and island chains begin to appear on rational surfaces for higher values of L, with chaotic zones around hyperbolic points, as expected. Single trajectories of magnetic line motion indicate the persistence of a central protected plasma core, surrounded by a chaotic shell enclosed in a double-sided transport barrier. Magnetic lines which succeed to escape across this barrier begin to wander in a wide chaotic sea extending up to a very robust barrier (as long as L{<=}1). For values of L{>=}1, above the escape threshold, most magnetic lines succeed to escape out of the external barrier which has become a permeable Cantorus. Statistical analysis of a large number of trajectories, representing the evolution of a bunch of magnetic lines, indicate that the flux variable {psi} asymptotically grows in a diffuse manner as (L{sup 2}t) with a L{sup 2} scaling as expected, but that the average radial position r{sub m}(t) asymptotically grows as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/4} while the mean square displacement around this average radius asymptotically grows in a sub-diffusive manner as (L{sup 2}t){sup 1/2}. This result shows the slower dispersion in the present incomplete chaotic regime, which is different from the usual quasilinear diffusion in completely chaotic situations. For physical times t{sub {phi}} of the order of the escape time defined by x{sub m}(t{sub {phi}}) {approx}1, the motion

  1. Classification of the Group Invariant Solutions for Contaminant Transport in Saturated Soils under Radial Uniform Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Potsane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of chemicals through soils to the groundwater or precipitation at the soils surfaces leads to degradation of these resources. Serious consequences may be suffered in the long run. In this paper, we consider macroscopic deterministic models describing contaminant transport in saturated soils under uniform radial water flow backgrounds. The arising convection-dispersion equation given in terms of the stream functions is analyzed using classical Lie point symmetries. A number of exotic Lie point symmetries are admitted. Group invariant solutions are classified according to the elements of the one-dimensional optimal systems. We analyzed the group invariant solutions which satisfy the physical boundary conditions.

  2. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  3. Intermittency of the density fluctuations and its influence on the radial transport in the boundary of J-TEXT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Meng-Zhou; Zhuang Ge; Wang Zhi-Jiang; Pan Yuan

    2011-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the turbulence intermittency, a detailed investigation of the intermittency of the density fluctuations has been performed in the boundary of J-TEXT. The intermittency of the density fluctuations and its influence on the radial transport are reported. The probability distribution functions of the density fluctuations are not scale-invariant, being inconsistent with the self-organized criticality hypothesis. The underlying dynamics of the intermittency are detected using the quiet-time statistical method. The probability distribution function of the quiet times shows double-power-law regions, indicating the existence of correlations between the successive burst events.

  4. Characterization of the radial velocity signal induced by rotation in late-type dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Mascareño, A.; Rebolo, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; Esposito, M.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the activity-induced signals related to rotation and magnetic cycles in late-type stars (FGKM) and analyse the Ca II H&K, the H α and the radial velocity time series of 55 stars using the spectra from the HARPS public data base and the light curves provided by the All Sky Automated Survey. We search for short-term and long-term periodic signals in the time series of activity indicators as well as in the photometric light curves. Radial velocity data sets are then analysed to determine the presence of activity-induced signals. We measure a radial velocity signal induced by rotational modulation of stellar surface features in 37 stars, from late-F-type to mid-M-type stars. We report an empirical relationship, with some degree of spectral type dependency, between the mean level of chromospheric emission measured by the log _{10}(R^' }_{HK}) and the measured radial velocity semi-amplitude. We also report a relationship between the semi-amplitude of the chromospheric measured signal and the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity-induced signal, which strongly depends on the spectral type. We find that for a given strength of chromospheric activity (i.e. a given rotation period), M-type stars tend to induce larger rotation-related radial velocity signals than G- and K-type stars.

  5. Water-vortex-stabilized electric arc: III. Radial energy transport, determination of water-vapour-boundary and arc performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenista, Jirí

    2003-12-01

    This paper is concerned with numerical modelling of an electric arc stabilized by a water vortex. The two-dimensional axisymmetric model presented includes the arc discharge area between the cathode and the outlet nozzle of the water plasma torch. The aims of the numerical simulations are: (1) to assess the influence of radial position of the water-vapour-boundary in the discharge chamber on arc performance and overall radial energy transport within the arc; (2) to determine the most probable mass flow rates and radii of the water-vapour-boundary in the discharge chamber for a prescribed current; (3) to demonstrate arc performance for two radiation models involved; and (4) to estimate validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions within the arc column. The rate of evaporation of water is calculated from the conduction and radiation heat fluxes at the water vapour surface for the specified mass flow rate. The behaviour of such an arc has been studied for a range of current 300-600 A. It is shown that changes of bulk magnitudes of different terms in the momentum and energy equations within the arc column as a function of arc radius enable us to reveal transitions of temperature and velocity fields from one steady state to a qualitatively different one. The best fit between experiment and numerical simulation for all currents exists for the mean arc radius ~3.3 mm. Deviations from LTE within the arc column are estimated with the criteria for kinetic equilibrium and spatial temperature gradients.

  6. Soret and Dufour effects on peristaltic transport in curved channel with radial magnetic field and convective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Quratulain; Rafiq, M.; Alsaadi, Fuad; Ayub, M.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses the impact of convective heat and mass conditions in the peristaltic transport of fluid in a complaint wall curved channel. Formulation for flow of third grade fluid is made. Soret and Dufour effects are considered. Fluid is conducting through applied magnetic field in radial direction. Lubrication approach is employed. Solutions for stream function, temperature and concentration fields are derived. The effects of pertinent parameters in the solutions are analyzed graphically. It is found that the velocity profile is not symmetric about the central line in curved channel. The velocity and temperature are reduced by increasing magnetic field strength. The number and size of streamlines are decreased in the presence of magnetic field effect.

  7. Theoretical study on effect of radial and axial deformation on electron transport properties in a semiconducting Si–C nanotube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhanshu Choudhary; S Qureshi

    2012-10-01

    We investigate electron transport properties in a deformed (8, 0) silicon carbide nanotube by applying self consistent non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism in combination with the density-functional theory to a two-probe molecular junction constructed from deformed nanotube. The results suggest significant reduction in threshold voltage in the case of both radially compressed and axially elongated (8, 0) SiCNTs, a large difference in current–voltage characteristics was observed. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) and transmission spectrum show bandgap reduction in deformed nanotubes. Deformation introduces electronic states near the Fermi level, enhancing the conduction properties of (8, 0) SiCNT. The FMOs and the orbitals corresponding to peaks in () around Fermi level obviously has some major contributions from the deformed site. However, localization of the electronic state near the Fermi level is weak in (8, 0) SiCNT, possibly because of its large bandgap.

  8. Functional characterization of a eukaryotic melibiose transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Sode, Björn; Deising, Holger B; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-07-01

    Pathogenic fungi drastically affect plant health and cause significant losses in crop yield and quality. In spite of their impact, little is known about the carbon sources used by these fungi in planta and about the fungal transporters importing sugars from the plant-fungus interface. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of MELIBIOSE TRANSPORTER1 (MBT1) from the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola), the causal agent of leaf anthracnose and stalk rot disease in maize (Zea mays). Functional characterization of the MBT1 protein in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the MBT1 cDNA revealed that α-D-galactopyranosyl compounds such as melibiose, galactinol, and raffinose are substrates of MBT1, with melibiose most likely being the preferred substrate. α-D-glucopyranosyl disaccharides like trehalose, isomaltose, or maltose are also accepted by MBT1, although with lower affinities. The MBT1 gene shows low and comparable expression levels in axenically grown C. graminicola and upon infection of maize leaves both during the initial biotrophic development of the fungus and during the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Despite these low levels of MBT1 expression, the MBT1 protein allows efficient growth of C. graminicola on melibiose as sole carbon source in axenic cultures. Although Δmbt1 mutants are unable to grow on melibiose, they do not show virulence defects on maize.

  9. Effect of External Photoevaporation on the Radial Transport of Volatiles and the Water Snowline in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyaan, Anusha; Desch, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Sun was likely born in a high mass star forming region [1]. Such a birth environment with a proximity to a nearby O or B star would photoevaporate the sun’s protoplanetary disk and cause an outward mass flow from the outer edge, as well as truncation of the disk, as seen in the Orion proplyds (although not as intensely)[2]. Photoevaporation likely explains the currently observed ~47 AU edge of the Kuiper Belt in our solar system [3], and more compellingly, the origin of certain short-lived radionuclides (such as Fe60), which cannot be successfully explained by a nebular origin [4][5]. Such a mass loss mechanism should affect the radial transport processes in the snowline region and along with temperature, has the potential to alter the location of the snowline.In this context, and in the light of recent ALMA observational results indicative of non-traditional behavior of snowlines and volatile transport in disks [6][7], this work studies what effect a photoevaporative mass loss from the outer disk may have on the volatile transport around the snowline region between ~1-10 AU in the disk. We build on the model of [8] and explore the effects of a steep photoevaporated non-uniform $\\alpha$ disk on radial transport of volatiles and small icy solids by incorporating the advection-diffusion equations as in [9] and condensation/evaporation of volatiles. We present results of these simulations, including volatile mass fluxes, ice/rock ratios, and snow line locations, in protoplanetary disks like the solar nebula.References: [1] Adams, F.C., 2010, ARAA 48,47 [2] Henney, W.J., & O’Dell, C.R., 1999, AJ, 118, 2350 [3] Trujillo,C.A. & Brown,M.E., 2001, ApJL,554,L95 [4] Hester, J.J., & Desch, S.J., 2005,ASPC, 341,107 [5] Wadhwa, M. et al. , 2007, Protostars & Planets V, 835 [5 [6] Cieza, L.A., et al., 2016, Nature,535,258 [7] Huang, J, et al. et al., 2016, ApJL, 823, L18 [8] Kalyaan, A., et al., 2015, ApJ, 815, 112 [9] Desch, S.J., et al., (in review).

  10. Transport and Deposition of Nanoparticles in the Pore Network of a Reservoir Rock: Effects of Pore Surface Heterogeneity and Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    In this study, transport behavior of nanoparticles under different pore surface conditions of consolidated Berea sandstone is numerically investigated. Micro-CT scanning technique is applied to obtain 3D grayscale images of the rock sample geometry. Quantitative characterization, which is based on image analysis is done to obtain physical properties of the pore network, such as the pore size distribution and the type of each pore (dead-end, isolated, and fully connected pore). Transport of water through the rock is simulated by employing a 3D lattice Boltzmann method. The trajectories of nanopaticles moving under convection in the simulated flow field and due to molecular diffusion are monitored in the Lagrangian framework. It is assumed in the model that the particle adsorption on the pore surface, which is modeled as a pseudo-first order adsorption, is the only factor hindering particle propagation. The effect of pore surface heterogeneity to the particle breakthrough is considered, and the role of particle radial diffusion is also addressed in details. The financial support of the Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC BEG08-022) and the computational support of XSEDE (CTS090017) are acknowledged.

  11. Water-vortex-stabilized electric arc: III. Radial energy transport, determination of water-vapour-boundary and arc performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenista, Jiri [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, Prague 8, 182 21 (Czech Republic)

    2003-12-07

    This paper is concerned with numerical modelling of an electric arc stabilized by a water vortex. The two-dimensional axisymmetric model presented includes the arc discharge area between the cathode and the outlet nozzle of the water plasma torch. The aims of the numerical simulations are: (1) to assess the influence of radial position of the water-vapour-boundary in the discharge chamber on arc performance and overall radial energy transport within the arc; (2) to determine the most probable mass flow rates and radii of the water-vapour-boundary in the discharge chamber for a prescribed current; (3) to demonstrate arc performance for two radiation models involved; and (4) to estimate validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions within the arc column. The rate of evaporation of water is calculated from the conduction and radiation heat fluxes at the water vapour surface for the specified mass flow rate. The behaviour of such an arc has been studied for a range of current 300-600 A. It is shown that changes of bulk magnitudes of different terms in the momentum and energy equations within the arc column as a function of arc radius enable us to reveal transitions of temperature and velocity fields from one steady state to a qualitatively different one. The best fit between experiment and numerical simulation for all currents exists for the mean arc radius {approx} 3.3 mm. Deviations from LTE within the arc column are estimated with the criteria for kinetic equilibrium and spatial temperature gradients.

  12. The gamma-ray sky points to radial gradients in cosmic-ray transport

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Valli, Mauro; Ullio, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The standard approach to cosmic-ray (CR) propagation in the Galaxy is based on the assumption that local transport properties can be extrapolated to the whole CR confining volume. Such models tend to underestimate the gamma-ray flux above few GeV measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope towards the inner Galactic plane. We consider here for the first time a phenomenological scenario allowing for both the rigidity scaling of the diffusion coefficient and convective effects to be position-dependent. We show that within this approach we can reproduce the observed gamma-ray spectra at both low and mid Galactic latitudes - including the Galactic center - without spoiling any local CR observable.

  13. Electric field and radial transport during ICRF heating in the edge plasma of JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagle, J.A.; Brinkschulte, H.; Bures, M.; De Kock, L. (Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (UK). JET Joint Undertaking); Laux, M. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik (United Kingdom)); Clement, S. (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)); Erents, S.K. (UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom))

    1990-04-01

    The plasma boundary in front of and outside the JET ICRF antenna Faraday screen has been studied using Langmuir probes. Plasma densities of n{sub e} {approx equal}10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures Tc {approx equal} 20-80 eV have been measured at the Faraday screen. Both n{sub e} and T{sub e} scale almost linearly with total input power (P{sub RF} up to 12 MW). DC electric fields up to 20 V/cm, with a large poloidal component perpendicular to the magnetic field lines were generated during ICRF heating. The total electric field intensity depends on the minority gas (H or {sup 3}He) and is also linearly dependent on the applied RF power. Spatially resolved measurements of the plasma space potential up to 50-100 V at the limiter flux surface were measured. The relevance of these fields to the transport in the scrape off layer (SOL), to the local particle balance at the boundary and to the impurity production during RF heating is discussed. (orig.).

  14. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in low-Reynolds number flows

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Jannis; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rod-like microrotor rotating about its center in a non-axisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo \\textit{et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006)]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transpor...

  15. A study on characteristics of radial transport of relativistic electrons by ULF Pc5 waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC and RB models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; Saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Keika, K.; Miyashita, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanism to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding problems of the magnetospheric researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves in Pc5 frequency range has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, it is pointed out that the radial transport of relativistic electrons by ULF waves is not necessarily reach the radial diffusion limit and collective motion of the outer belt electrons can exhibit large deviations from the radial diffusion [Ukhorskiy et al., JATSP, 2008]. Thus it is important to understand the form of radial transport of electrons under realistic ULF distribution in the inner magnetosphere. We have developed a physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations [Amano et al., JGR, 2011]. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF Pc5 waves. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. It is also shown that the existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. In order to investigate the characteristics of radial transport of relativistic electrons, we then use the global magnetic and electric fields variation obtained by the GEMNIS-RC model as input field models for the test particle simulations of radiation belt electrons (GEMSIS-RB) [Saito et al., JGR, 2010]. The combination of GEMSIS-RC and RB models reproduced

  16. An expert system with radial basis function neural network based on decision trees for predicting sediment transport in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebtehaj, Isa; Bonakdari, Hossein; Zaji, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an expert system with a radial basis function neural network (RBF-NN) based on decision trees (DT) is designed to predict sediment transport in sewer pipes at the limit of deposition. First, sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the effect of each parameter on predicting the densimetric Froude number (Fr). The results indicate that utilizing the ratio of the median particle diameter to pipe diameter (d/D), ratio of median particle diameter to hydraulic radius (d/R) and volumetric sediment concentration (C(V)) as the input combination leads to the best Fr prediction. Subsequently, the new hybrid DT-RBF method is presented. The results of DT-RBF are compared with RBF and RBF-particle swarm optimization (PSO), which uses PSO for RBF training. It appears that DT-RBF is more accurate (R(2) = 0.934, MARE = 0.103, RMSE = 0.527, SI = 0.13, BIAS = -0.071) than the two other RBF methods. Moreover, the proposed DT-RBF model offers explicit expressions for use by practicing engineers.

  17. Transport barrier for the radial diffusion due to the ExB drift motion of guiding centers in cylindrical confinement geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier; Chandre, Cristel; Ciraolo, Guido; Vittot, Michel; Ghendrih, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We consider the radial transport of test particles due to the ExB drift motion in the guiding center approximation. In a configuration where the magnetic field is constant and uniform in linear devices or with neglecting toroidal effects in tokamaks, the ExB instability is one of the main sources of deconfinement of magnetized plasmas. Using an explicit expression to modify the electrostatic potential, we show that it is possible to construct a transport barrier which suppresses the radial transport. We propose an algorithm and a simulation of test particles for the implementation of this local modification computed from an electrostatic potential known on a spatio-temporal grid. The number of particles which escape the inner region defined by the barrier measures the efficiency of the control.

  18. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South...in mathematical methods for detecting key Lagrangian transport structures in velocity field data sets for spatially complex, time- dependent, ocean...surface flows. Such transport structures are typically not inherently obvious in snapshots of the Eulerian velocity field and require analysis

  19. Characterization of a Twin-Entry Radial Turbine under Pulsatile Flow Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfoudh Cerdoun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In automotive applications radial gas turbines are commonly fitted with a twin-entry volute connected to a divided exhaust manifold, ensuring a better scavenge process owing to less interference between engines’ cylinders. This paper is concerned with the study of the unsteady performances related to the pulsating flows of a twin-entry radial turbine in engine-like conditions and the hysteresis-like behaviour during the pulses period. The results show that the aerodynamic performances deviate noticeably from the steady state and depend mainly on the time shifting between the actual output power and the isentropic power, which is distantly related to the apparent length. The maximum of efficiency and output shaft power are accompanied by low entropy generation through the shroud entry side, and their instantaneous behaviours tend to follow mainly the inlet total pressure curve. As revealed a billow is created by the interaction between the main flow and the infiltrated flow, affecting the flow incidence at rotor entry and producing high losses.

  20. Eclipsing binaries and fast rotators in the Kepler sample. Characterization via radial velocity analysis from Calar Alto

    CERN Document Server

    Lillo-Box, J; Mancini, L; Henning, Th; Figueira, P; Ciceri, S; Santos, N

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler mission has provided high-accurate photometric data in a long time span for more than two hundred thousands stars, looking for planetary transits. Among the detected candidates, the planetary nature of around 15% has been established or validated by different techniques. But additional data is needed to characterize the rest of the candidates and reject other possible configurations. We started a follow-up program to validate, confirm, and characterize some of the planet candidates. In this paper we present the radial velocity analysis (RV) of those presenting large variations, compatible with being eclipsing binaries. We also study those showing large rotational velocities, which prevents us from obtaining the necessary precision to detect planetary-like objects. We present new RV results for 13 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the Calar Alto Observatory, and analyze their high-spatial resolution images and the Kepler light curves of some interesting cases. ...

  1. A Quick Study of the Characterization of Radial Velocity Giant Planets in Reflected Light by Forward and Inverse Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, Mark; Lewis, Nikole; Line, Michael; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We explored two aspects of the problem of characterizing cool extrasolar giant planets in scattered optical light with a space based coronagraph. First, for a number of the known radial velocity (RV) giants we computed traditional forward models of their atmospheric structure and clouds, given various input assumptions, and computed model albedo spectra. Such models have been computed before, but mostly for generic planets. Our new models demonstrate that there is likely interesting spectral diversity among those planets that are most favorable for direct detection. Second, we applied a powerful Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) retrieval technique to synthetic noisy data of cool giants to better understand how well various atmospheric parameters--particularly molecular abundances and cloud properties--could be constrained. This is the first time such techniques have been applied to this problem. The process is time consuming, so only a dozen or so cases could be completed in the limited time available. Neverth...

  2. Riser simulation and radial porosity distribution characterization for gas-fluidized bed of cork particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Ouyang, Jie; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for gas-solid fluidized bed of cork particles, using discrete element method. Results exhibit the existence of a so-called anti core-annular porosity profile with lower porosity in the core and higher porosity near the wall for non-slugging fluidization. The tendency to form this unfamiliar anti core-annular porosity profile is stronger when the solid flux is higher. There exist multiple inflection points in the simulated axial solid volume fraction profile for non-slugging fluidization. Results also show that the familiar core-annular porosity profile still appears for slugging fluidization. In addition, the classical choking phenomenon can be captured at the superficial gas velocity slightly lower than the correlated transport velocity.

  3. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 2): Iron transport tests and modeling in radial geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Gastone, Francesca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    In the present work column transport tests were performed in order to study the mobility of guar-gum suspensions of microscale zero-valent iron particles (MZVI) in porous media. The results were analyzed with the purpose of implementing a radial model for the design of full scale interventions. The transport tests were performed using several concentrations of shear thinning guar gum solutions as stabilizer (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) and applying different flow rates (Darcy velocity in the range 1 · 10- 4 to 2 · 10- 3 m/s), representative of different distances from the injection point in the radial domain. Empirical relationships, expressing the dependence of the deposition and release parameters on the flow velocity, were derived by inverse fitting of the column transport tests using a modified version of E-MNM1D (Tosco and Sethi, 2010) and the user interface MNMs (www.polito.it/groundwater/software). They were used to develop a comprehensive transport model of MZVI suspensions in radial coordinates, called E-MNM1R, which takes into account the non Newtonian (shear thinning) rheological properties of the dispersant fluid and the porous medium clogging associated with filtration and sedimentation in the porous medium of both MZVI and guar gum residual undissolved particles. The radial model was run in forward mode to simulate the injection of MZVI dispersed in guar gum in conditions similar to those applied in the column transport tests. In a second stage, we demonstrated how the model can be used as a valid tool for the design and the optimization of a full scale intervention. The simulation results indicated that several concurrent aspects are to be taken into account for the design of a successful delivery of MZVI/guar gum slurries via permeation injection, and a compromise is necessary between maximizing the radius of influence of the injection and minimizing the injection pressure, to guarantee a sufficiently homogeneous distribution of the particles around the

  4. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  5. The radial distribution of radiation belt protons Approximate solution of the steady state transport equation at arbitrary pitch angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, V.

    1984-03-01

    The steady state proton flux in the earth's radiation belt is analyzed in detail based on a first-order partial differential equation which is equivalent to the radial diffusion equation with charge exchange and energy degradation included. It is found that for the most part of invariant space, the diffusion flux is directed inward. However, it is directed outward in a narrow L range centered on L about two, when charge exchange and energy loss are of comparable importance. Radial diffusion and losses strongly modify the proton flux's spectral shape, with the spectra exponentially decreasing at the outer boundary, becoming flat around L = 3.5, and assuming large positive gradients further downward. Proton fluxes gain anisotropy in the course of diffusion; the diffusion coefficient governs both the magnitude and the shape of the proton flux. External effects are important in the diffusion-dominated zone, but are relatively unimportant in the loss-dominated region.

  6. Characterization of fluid transport in microscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    A new tool for imaging both scalar transport and velocity fields in liquid flows through microscale structures is described. The technique employs an ultraviolet laser pulse to write a pattern into the flow by uncaging a fluorescent dye. This is followed, at selected time delays, by flood illumination with a pulse of visible light which excites the uncaged dye. The resulting fluorescence image collected onto a sensitive CCD camera. The instrument is designed as an oil immersion microscope to minimize the beam steering effects. The caged fluorescent dye is seeded in trace quantities throughout the active fluid, thus images with high contrast and minimal distortion due to any molecular diffusion history can be obtained at any point within the microchannel by selectivity activating the dye in the immediate region of interest. The author reports images of pressure- and electrokinetically-driven steady flow within round cross section capillaries having micron scale inner diameters. The author also demonstrates the ability to recover the velocity profile from a time sequence of these scalar images by direct inversion of the conserved scalar advection-convection equation.

  7. Multicomponent Transport through Realistic Zeolite Membranes: Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Conner

    2007-08-02

    These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

  8. PlanetPack: a radial-velocity time-series analysis tool facilitating exoplanets detection, characterization, and dynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baluev, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    We present PlanetPack, a new software tool that we developed to facilitate and standardize the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical $N$-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter, that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation. Its major abilities include: (i) Advanced RV curve fitting with the proper maximum-likelihood treatment of unknown RV jitter; (ii) User-friendly multi-Keplerian as well as Newtonian $N$-body RV fits; (iii) Use of more efficient maximum-likelihood periodograms that involve the full multi-planet fitting (sometimes called as ``residual'' or ``recursive'' periodograms); (iv) Easily calculatable parametric 2D likelihood function level contours, reflecting the asymptotic confidence regions; (v) Fitting under some useful functional constraints is user-friendly; (vi) Basic tasks of short- and long-term planetary dynamical simulation using a fas...

  9. Characterization of Microbial Transport in Cylindrical Pores%微生物在毛细圆孔中运移的模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刚洪泽; 刘梅堂; 牟伯中

    2006-01-01

    The mathematical model to characterize the transport of microorganisms in a finite-length cylindrical pore with the inside surface rich in microbial nutrients is developed, and the transport behavior of microorganisms in such a pore is discussed. Incorporated with key parameters such as microbial chemotaxis, diffusion, in-situ propagation and water flooding, this model is focused on the concentration profile of microorganisms in both radial and axial directions in the cylindrical pore during microbial transport under these parameters. Prediction by simulation based on the model shows that higher concentration of microorganism at and near the pore inside surface occurred during water flooding, and the radial concentration gradient in the cylindrical pore was consequently formed mainly due to microbial chemotaxis. Prediction also provides better understanding on the transport mechanism of microorganism in cylindrical pores, which is believed to be significant in the process of microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  10. Status of the Development of an Embedded Transport Treatment of Control Rods and of Radial Flux Expansion in Cylindrical Nodal Diffusion Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick N. Gleicher II; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-09-01

    A new diffusion-transport hybrid nodal method in R-Z is presented that can effectively treat non-multiplying zones in pebble bed reactors. The new method seamlessly combines the analytic coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) diffusion formulation and a transport theory based response matrix formulation while retaining the properties and structure of the CMFD diffusion solver. The resulting combined formulation is utilized in selected non-multiplying nodes to capture angular effects on the flux. Test results indicate that the method has been implemented correctly into the CYNOD reactor kinetics code. This document also presents a status report on the development of a better source approximation for the Green’s function nodal solution in the radial direction of cylindrical geometry. The basic theory has been developed, including obtaining polynomials that are orthonormal over the domain of integration and the derivation of approximately half of the required matrix elements (single and double integrals in the source expansions).

  11. MzPIP2;1: An Aquaporin Involved in Radial Water Movement in Both Water Uptake and Transportation, Altered the Drought and Salt Tolerance of Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available Plants are unavoidably subjected to various abiotic stressors, including high salinity, drought and low temperature, which results in water deficit and even death. Water uptake and transportation play a critical role in response to these stresses. Many aquaporin proteins, localized at different tissues, function in various transmembrane water movements. We targeted at the key aquaporin in charge of both water uptake in roots and radial water transportation from vascular tissues through the whole plant.The MzPIP2;1 gene encoding a plasma membrane intrinsic protein was cloned from salt-tolerant apple rootstock Malus zumi Mats. The GUS gene was driven by MzPIP2;1 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis. It indicated that MzPIP2;1 might function in the epidermal and vascular cells of roots, parenchyma cells around vessels through the stems and vascular tissues of leaves. The ectopically expressed MzPIP2;1 conferred the transgenic Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance to slight salt and drought stresses, but sensitive to moderate salt stress, which was indicated by root length, lateral root number, fresh weight and K+/Na+ ratio. In addition, the possible key cis-elements in response to salt, drought and cold stresses were isolated by the promoter deletion experiment.The MzPIP2;1 protein, as a PIP2 aquaporins subgroup member, involved in radial water movement, controls water absorption and usage efficiency and alters transgenic plants drought and salt tolerance.

  12. Design for limit stresses of orange fruits (Citrus sinensis under axial and radial compression as related to transportation and storage design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chukwutoo Ihueze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article employed the Hertz contact stress theory and the finite element method to evaluate the maximum contact pressure and the limit stresses of orange fruit under transportation and storage. The elastic properties of orange fruits subjected to axial and axial contact were measured such that elastic limit force, elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio and bioyield stress were obtained as 18 N, 0.691 MPa, 0.367, 0.009 MPa for axial compression and for radial loading were 15.69 N, 0.645 MPa, 0.123, 0.010 MPa. The Hertz maximum contact pressure was estimated for axial and radial contacts as 0.036 MPa. The estimated limiting yield stress estimated as von Mises stresses for the induced surface stresses of the orange topologies varied from 0.005 MPa–0.03 MPa. Based on the distortion energy theory (DET the yield strength of orange fruit is recommended as 0.03 MPa while based on the maximum shear stress theory (MSST is 0.01 MPa for the design of orange transportation and storage system.

  13. Development of Nanoscale Graphitic Devices and The Transport Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, Venugopal

    2011-02-15

    This dissertation describes the development of graphitic based nanoscale devices with its fabrication and transport characterization results. It covers graphite nano-scale stacked-junctions fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) 3-D etching technique, a single layer graphite layer (graphene) preparation and its electrical transport characterization results and the synthesis and investigation of electrical transport behavior of graphene oxide based thin film devices. The first chapter describes the basic information about the carbon family in detail in which the electronic properties and structure of graphite, graphene and graphene oxide are discussed. In addition, the necessity of developing nanoscale graphitic devices is given. The second chapter explains the experimental techniques used in this research for fabricating nanoscale devices which includes focused ion beam 3-D fabrication procedures, mechanical exfoliation technique and photolithographic methods. In third chapter, we have reported the results on temperature dependence of graphite planar-type structures fabricated along ab-plane. In the fourth and fifth chapters, the fabrication and electrical transport characteristics of large in-plane area graphite planar-type structures (fabricated along ab-plane and c-axis) were discussed and their transport anisotropy properties were investigated briefly. In the sixth chapter, we focused the fabrication of the submicron sized graphite stacked junctions and their electrical transport characterization studies. In which, FIB was used to fabricated the submicron junctions with various in-plane area (with same stack height) are and their transport characteristics were compared. The seventh chapter reports investigation of electrical transport results of nanoscale graphite stacked-junctions in which the temperature dependent transport (R-T) studies, current-voltage measurements for the various in-plane areas and for various stack height samples were analyzed. The

  14. Phloem as capacitor: radial transfer of water into xylem of tree stems occurs via symplastic transport in ray parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfautsch, Sebastian; Renard, Justine; Tjoelker, Mark G; Salih, Anya

    2015-03-01

    The transfer of water from phloem into xylem is thought to mitigate increasing hydraulic tension in the vascular system of trees during the diel cycle of transpiration. Although a putative plant function, to date there is no direct evidence of such water transfer or the contributing pathways. Here, we trace the radial flow of water from the phloem into the xylem and investigate its diel variation. Introducing a fluorescent dye (0.1% [w/w] fluorescein) into the phloem water of the tree species Eucalyptus saligna allowed localization of the dye in phloem and xylem tissues using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results show that the majority of water transferred between the two tissues is facilitated via the symplast of horizontal ray parenchyma cells. The method also permitted assessment of the radial transfer of water during the diel cycle, where changes in water potential gradients between phloem and xylem determine the extent and direction of radial transfer. When injected during the morning, when xylem water potential rapidly declined, fluorescein was translocated, on average, farther into mature xylem (447 ± 188 µm) compared with nighttime, when xylem water potential was close to zero (155 ± 42 µm). These findings provide empirical evidence to support theoretical predictions of the role of phloem-xylem water transfer in the hydraulic functioning of plants. This method enables investigation of the role of phloem tissue as a dynamic capacitor for water storage and transfer and its contribution toward the maintenance of the functional integrity of xylem in trees. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Effect of Radial and Axial Deformation on Electron Transport Properties in a Semiconducting Si-C Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Choudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the bias voltage dependent current characteristic in a deformed (8, 0 silicon carbide nanotube by applying self consistent non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism in combination with the density-functional theory to a two probe molecular junction constructed from deformed nanotube. The transmission spectra and electron density of states at zero bias shows a significant reduction in threshold in the case of both radially compressed and axially elongated nanotube. However, semiconductor to metal transition was not observed, though the results show large differences in current characteristic compared to a perfect nanotube.

  16. Characterization of Anomalous Contaminant Transport via Push-Pull Tracer Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Push-pull (single-well-injection-withdrawal) tracer tests are widely used as an economical means of characterizing field-scale solute transport properties such as sorption and dispersion. Typically, these are analyzed by means of analytic solutions that assume transport obeys the radial advection-dispersion equation. We revisit this approach as: (1) Recognition of the ubiquity of anomalous transport and its impact on contaminant remediation necessitates the use of new methods to characterize it, and (2) Improved computational power and numerical methods have rendered reliance on analytical solutions obsolete. Here, we present a technique for characterizing diffusion-driven anomalous transport (i.e., anomalous transport driven by a "trapping" process whose trapping and release statistics are independent of the groundwater flow velocity). Examples include diffusion into low permeability zones, kinetic sorption, and matrix diffusion. Using field observations, we simultaneously calibrate an exponential probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the mobile domain and a truncated power law probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the immobile domain via a stochastic global optimization technique. The calibrated distributions, being independent of the flow regime, are applicable to the same domain under any flow conditions, including linear flow. In the context of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), one may simply define a transition to represent a single trap-and-release cycle, and directly compute the spatiotemporal transition distribution that defines the CTRW from the two calibrated distributions and the local seepage velocity (so that existing CTRW transport theory applies). A test of our methodology against a push-pull test from the MADE site demonstrated fitting performance comparable to that of a 3-D MODFLOW/MT3DMS model with a variety of hydraulic conductivity zones and explicit treatment of mobile-immobile mass

  17. Characterization of a carbohydrate transporter from symbiotic glomeromycotan fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, Arthur; Martin, Holger; Cohen, David; Fitz, Michael; Wipf, Daniel

    2006-12-14

    The symbiotic relationships between mycorrhizal fungi and plants have an enormous impact on terrestrial ecosystems. Most common are the arbuscular mycorrhizas, formed by fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the uptake of soil nutrients by plants and in exchange obtain carbohydrates, thus representing a large sink for atmospheric plant-fixed CO(2). However, how carbohydrates are transported through the symbiotic interface is still unknown. Here we report the characterization of the first known glomeromycotan monosaccharide transporter, GpMST1, by exploiting the unique symbiosis of a glomeromycotan fungus (Geosiphon pyriformis) with cyanobacteria. The GpMST1 gene has a very low GC content and contains six introns with unusual boundaries. GpMST1 possesses twelve predicted transmembrane domains and functions as a proton co-transporter with highest affinity for glucose, then mannose, galactose and fructose. It belongs to an as yet uncharacterized phylogenetic monosaccharide transporter clade. This initial characterization of a new transporter family involved in fungal symbiosis will lead to a better understanding of carbon flows in terrestrial environments.

  18. Transport characterization in nanowires using an electrical nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talin, A. A.; Léonard, F.; Katzenmeyer, A. M.; Swartzentruber, B. S.; Picraux, S. T.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Cederberg, J. G.; Wang, X.; Hersee, S. D.; Rishinaramangalum, A.

    2010-02-01

    Electrical transport in semiconductor nanowires is commonly measured in a field effect transistor configuration, with lithographically defined source, drain and in some cases, top gate electrodes. This approach is labor intensive, requires high-end fabrication equipment, exposes the nanowires to extensive processing chemistry and places practical limitations on minimum nanowire length. Here we describe an alternative, simple method for characterizing electrical transport in nanowires directly on the growth substrate, without any need for post growth processing. Our technique is based on contacting nanowires using a nano-manipulator probe retrofitted inside of a scanning electron microscope. Using this approach, we characterize electrical transport in GaN nanowires grown by catalyst-free selective epitaxy, as well as InAs and Ge nanowires grown by a Au-catalyzed vapor solid liquid technique. We find that in situations where contacts are not limiting carrier injection (GaN and InAs nanowires), electrical transport transitions from Ohmic conduction at low bias to space-charge-limited conduction at higher bias. Using this transition and a theory of space-charge-limited transport which accounts for the high aspect ratio nanowires, we extract the mobility and the free carrier concentration. For Ge nanowires, we find that the Au catalyst forms a Schottky contact resulting in rectifying current-voltage characteristics, which are strongly dependent on the nanowire diameter. This dependence arises due to an increase in depletion width at decreased nanowire diameter and carrier recombination at the nanowire surface.

  19. Functional characterization of a novel disaccharide transporter in lobster hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Olivia; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2017-02-08

    In animals, the accepted model of carbohydrate digestion and absorption involves reduction of disaccharides into the monosaccharides glucose, fructose, and galactose followed by their individual transmembrane transport into cells. In 2011, a gene for a distinct disaccharide sucrose transporter (SCRT) was found in Drosophila melanogaster and characterized in a yeast expression system. The purpose of the present investigation was to functionally identify and characterize a putative disaccharide transporter analog in the hepatopancreas of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. Purified hepatopancreatic brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used in transport experiments using (14)C-sucrose and a Millipore filter isolation technique. In the absence of sodium, an external pH of 4 significantly stimulated the uptake of (14)C-sucrose compared to that occurring at pH 5, 6, or 7. At pH 7, increasing external concentrations of sodium increased (14)C-sucrose uptake by BBMV in a hyperbolic fashion and this stimulation was significantly reduced when the pH was changed to 4, suggesting that both protons and sodium ions were each capable of driving the uptake of the sugar. In experiments with a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides, used as potential inhibitors of (14)C-sucrose uptake, only maltose and trehalose inhibited carrier-mediated (14)C-sucrose transport. An additional experiment showed that 20 mM maltose was a competitive inhibitor of (14)C-sucrose uptake. The use of a putative lobster SCRT by both maltose and trehalose is nutritionally appropriate for lobsters as they commonly digest glycogen and chitin, polymers of maltose and trehalose, respectively. These findings suggest there is a brush-border proton- or sodium-dependent, hepatopancreatic carrier process, shared by sucrose, maltose, and trehalose, that may function to absorb disaccharides that are produced from digestion of naturally occurring dietary constituents.

  20. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas.

  1. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kensaku; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.; JT-60 Team

    2016-10-01

    Non-uniformity effects of the edge radial electric field (Er) on the edge transport barriers (ETBs) formation have been identified with high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature (2nd derivative of Er) on ETB formation during ELM-free H-mode phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear (1st derivative of Er) value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient in the pedestal region. Observation of a uniform toroidal MHD oscillation (i.e. Geodesic Acoustic Mode having toroidal mode number n = 0) during the ETBs formation can also support the hypothesis of turbulence suppression in association with Zonal-flow (and/or Er-curvature). Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. Authors acknowledge the partial support by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (15K06657, 15H02155, 16H02442) and collaboration programmes between QST and universities and of the RIAM of Kyushu University, and by Asada Science Foundation.

  2. Multimodel framework for characterization of transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Edery, Yaniv; Guadagnini, Alberto; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We consider modeling approaches to characterize solute transport in porous media, integrating them into a unique theoretical and experimental framework for model evaluation and data interpretation. To date, development of (conservative and reactive chemical) transport models and formulation of model calibration methods grounded on sensitivity-based collection of measurements have been pursued in parallel. Key questions that remain include: For a given set of measurements, which conceptual picture of the transport processes, as embodied in a mathematical model or models, is most appropriate? What are the most valuable space-time locations for solute concentration measurements, depending on the model selected? How is model parameter uncertainty propagated to model output, and how does this propagation affect model calibration? We address these questions by merging parallel streams of research—model formulation, reduction, calibration, sensitivity analysis, and discrimination—offering our view on an emerging framework that guides (i) selection of an appropriate number and location of time-dependent concentration measurements given a transport model and (ii) assessment (through discrimination criteria) of the relative benefit of applying any particular model from a set of several models. Our strategy is to employ metrics to quantify the relative contribution of each uncertain model parameter to the variability of the model output. We evaluate these metrics through construction of a surrogate (or "meta") transport model that has the additional benefit of enabling sensitivity analysis and model calibration at a highly reduced computational cost. We demonstrate the applicability of this framework, focusing on transport of reactive chemicals in laboratory-scale porous media.

  3. The riboflavin transporter RibU in Lactococcus lactis : Molecular characterization of gene expression and the transport mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, CM; Slotboom, DJ; Geertsma, ER; Duurkens, Hinderika; Poolman, B; van Sinderen, D

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the characterization of the riboflavin transport protein RibU in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000. RibU is predicted to contain five membrane-spanning segments and is a member of a novel transport protein family, not described in the Transport

  4. Functional Characterization of a Eukaryotic Melibiose Transporter1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Sode, Björn; Deising, Holger B.; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi drastically affect plant health and cause significant losses in crop yield and quality. In spite of their impact, little is known about the carbon sources used by these fungi in planta and about the fungal transporters importing sugars from the plant-fungus interface. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of MELIBIOSE TRANSPORTER1 (MBT1) from the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola), the causal agent of leaf anthracnose and stalk rot disease in maize (Zea mays). Functional characterization of the MBT1 protein in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the MBT1 cDNA revealed that α-d-galactopyranosyl compounds such as melibiose, galactinol, and raffinose are substrates of MBT1, with melibiose most likely being the preferred substrate. α-d-Glucopyranosyl disaccharides like trehalose, isomaltose, or maltose are also accepted by MBT1, although with lower affinities. The MBT1 gene shows low and comparable expression levels in axenically grown C. graminicola and upon infection of maize leaves both during the initial biotrophic development of the fungus and during the subsequent necrotrophic phase. Despite these low levels of MBT1 expression, the MBT1 protein allows efficient growth of C. graminicola on melibiose as sole carbon source in axenic cultures. Although Δmbt1 mutants are unable to grow on melibiose, they do not show virulence defects on maize. PMID:21593216

  5. Conjunction of radial basis function interpolator and artificial intelligence models for time-space modeling of contaminant transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourani, Vahid; Mousavi, Shahram; Dabrowska, Dominika; Sadikoglu, Fahreddin

    2017-05-01

    As an innovation, both black box and physical-based models were incorporated into simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Time series of groundwater level (GL) and chloride concentration (CC) observed at different piezometers of study plain were firstly de-noised by the wavelet-based de-noising approach. The effect of de-noised data on the performance of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was evaluated. Wavelet transform coherence was employed for spatial clustering of piezometers. Then for each cluster, ANN and ANFIS models were trained to predict GL and CC values. Finally, considering the predicted water heads of piezometers as interior conditions, the radial basis function as a meshless method which solves partial differential equations of GFCT, was used to estimate GL and CC values at any point within the plain where there is not any piezometer. Results indicated that efficiency of ANFIS based spatiotemporal model was more than ANN based model up to 13%.

  6. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  7. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Muto, Takayuki, E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  8. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1-D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eKarabacak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT and norepinephrine (NET by modafinil was tested. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1-5-10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM, a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken six hours following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1-D3-CC were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50=11.11; SERT 1547; NET 182. From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight modafinil was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1-D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action.

  9. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1–D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J.; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1–5–10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1–3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1–D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1–D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1–3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  10. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  11. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  12. The ARCS radial collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  13. The ARCS radial collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  14. Radial transport in the far scrape-off layer of ASDEX upgrade during L-mode and ELMy H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionita, C.; Naulin, Volker; Mehlmann, F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial turbulent particle flux and the Reynolds stress in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade were investigated for two limited L-mode (low confinement) and one ELMy H-mode (high confinement) discharge. A fast reciprocating probe was used with a probe head containing five Langmuir...... potentials of two probes on the same poloidal meridian. In both cases, equal electron temperatures on all probe pins had to be assumed. Of the other pins one was biased to ion saturation (-70 V), whereas one was swept to record the current-voltage characteristic. A detailed statistical analysis of the plasma...... probes. One of the probe pins was protruding radially above the other pins. The radial electric field component was derived from the difference of the floating potentials of the protruding pin and another pin nearby. The poloidal electric field component was derived from the difference of the floating...

  15. Characterization and transport of aerosols over equatorial eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Helas, G.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S. J.

    2001-09-01

    Measurements of the composition of aerosol partitioned into two size fractions, fine (particle aerodynamic equivalent diameter, dp ≤ 2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5 6000 km. So-called pristine marine air from the central Indian Ocean is shown to contain aged and recirculated Si that could only have been derived from land areas after transport over long distances. The nature of the aerosols measured on Mount Kenya depends critically on regional patterns of aerosol transport. Interregional transfers seem to be a feature of the transport climatology. Likewise, interhemispheric transport across the equator in east Africa is observed.

  16. Advances in methods for identification and characterization of plant transporter function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo; Xu, Deyang; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-01-01

    Transport proteins are crucial for cellular function at all levels. Numerous importers and exporters facilitate transport of a diverse array of metabolites and ions intra- and intercellularly. Identification of transporter function is essential for understanding biological processes at both...... the cellular and organismal level. Assignment of a functional role to individual transporter proteins or to identify a transporter with a given substrate specificity has notoriously been challenging. Recently, major advances have been achieved in function-driven screens, phenotype-driven screens, and in silico......-based approaches. In this review, we highlight examples that illustrate how new technology and tools have advanced identification and characterization of plant transporter functions....

  17. Functional expression and characterization of plant ABC transporters in Xenopus laevis oocytes for transport engineering purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Deyang; Veres, Dorottya; Belew, Zeinu Mussa

    2016-01-01

    Transport engineering in bioengineering is aimed at efficient export of the final product to reduce toxicity and feedback inhibition and to increase yield. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with their highly diverse substrate specificity and role in cellular efflux are potentially suita...... provided will hopefully contribute to more successful transport engineering in synthetic biology.......Transport engineering in bioengineering is aimed at efficient export of the final product to reduce toxicity and feedback inhibition and to increase yield. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with their highly diverse substrate specificity and role in cellular efflux are potentially...... suitable in transport engineering approaches, although their size and high number of introns make them notoriously difficult to clone. Here, we report a novel in planta “exon engineering” strategy for cloning of full-length coding sequence of ABC transporters followed by methods for biochemical...

  18. Phloem as Capacitor: Radial Transfer of Water into Xylem of Tree Stems Occurs via Symplastic Transport in Ray Parenchyma[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Justine; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Salih, Anya

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of water from phloem into xylem is thought to mitigate increasing hydraulic tension in the vascular system of trees during the diel cycle of transpiration. Although a putative plant function, to date there is no direct evidence of such water transfer or the contributing pathways. Here, we trace the radial flow of water from the phloem into the xylem and investigate its diel variation. Introducing a fluorescent dye (0.1% [w/w] fluorescein) into the phloem water of the tree species Eucalyptus saligna allowed localization of the dye in phloem and xylem tissues using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results show that the majority of water transferred between the two tissues is facilitated via the symplast of horizontal ray parenchyma cells. The method also permitted assessment of the radial transfer of water during the diel cycle, where changes in water potential gradients between phloem and xylem determine the extent and direction of radial transfer. When injected during the morning, when xylem water potential rapidly declined, fluorescein was translocated, on average, farther into mature xylem (447 ± 188 µm) compared with nighttime, when xylem water potential was close to zero (155 ± 42 µm). These findings provide empirical evidence to support theoretical predictions of the role of phloem-xylem water transfer in the hydraulic functioning of plants. This method enables investigation of the role of phloem tissue as a dynamic capacitor for water storage and transfer and its contribution toward the maintenance of the functional integrity of xylem in trees. PMID:25588734

  19. Characterization of cytokinin and adenine transport in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedzich, Anna; Stransky, Harald; Schulz, Burkhard; Frommer, Wolf B

    2008-12-01

    Cytokinins are distributed through the vascular system and trigger responses of target cells via receptor-mediated signal transduction. Perception and transduction of the signal can occur at the plasma membrane or in the cytosol. The signal is terminated by the action of extra- or intracellular cytokinin oxidases. While radiotracer studies have been used to study transport and metabolism of cytokinins in plants, little is known about the kinetic properties of cytokinin transport. To provide a reference dataset, radiolabeled trans-zeatin (tZ) was used for uptake studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell culture. Uptake kinetics of tZ are multiphasic, indicating the presence of both low- and high-affinity transport systems. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone is an effective inhibitor of cytokinin uptake, consistent with H(+)-mediated uptake. Other physiological cytokinins, such as isopentenyl adenine and benzylaminopurine, are effective competitors of tZ uptake, whereas allantoin has no inhibitory effect. Adenine competes for zeatin uptake, indicating that the degradation product of cytokinin oxidases is transported by the same systems. Comparison of adenine and tZ uptake in Arabidopsis seedlings reveals similar uptake kinetics. Kinetic properties, as well as substrate specificity determined in cell cultures, are compatible with the hypothesis that members of the plant-specific purine permease family play a role in adenine transport for scavenging extracellular adenine and may, in addition, be involved in low-affinity cytokinin uptake.

  20. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    The high confinement regime (H-mode) in a tokamak plasma displays a remarkable edge region. On a small spatial scale of 1-2 cm the properties of the plasma change significantly. Certain parameters vary 1-2 orders of magnitude in this region, called the pedestal. Currently, there is no complete understanding of how the pedestal forms or how it is sustained. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to the theoretical understanding of the pedestal and provide scalings towards larger machines, like ITER and DEMO. A pedestal database was built with data from different tokamaks: ASDEX Upgrade, DIIID and JET. The pedestal was characterized with the same method for all three machines. This gives the maximum value, gradient and width of the pedestal in n{sub e}, T{sub e} and T{sub i}. These quantities were analysed along with quantities derived from them, such as the pressure or the confinement time. For this purpose two parameter sets were used: normalized parameters (pressure {beta}, time {nu}{sub *}, length {rho}{sub *}, shape f{sub q}) and machine parameters (size a, magnetic field B{sub t}, plasma current I{sub p}, heating P). All results are dependent on the choice of the coordinate system: normalized poloidal flux {Psi}{sub N} and real space r/a. The most significant result, which was obtained with both parameter sets, shows a different scaling of the pedestal width for the electron temperature and the electron density. The presented scalings predict that in ITER and DEMO the temperature pedestal will be appreciably wider than the density pedestal. The pedestal top scaling for the pressure reveals differences between the electron and the ion pressure. In extrapolations this results in values for T{sub e,ped} of 4 keV (ITER) and 10 keV (DEMO), but significantly lower values for the ion temperature. A two-term method was applied to use the pedestal pressure to determine the pedestal contribution to the global confinement time {tau}{sub E}. The dependencies in the

  1. Characterization of transport phenomena in small polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In small fuel cell systems, energy consumption and size of auxiliary devices should be minimized. One option is to use passive controlling methods that rely on material and structural solutions. Therefore it is important to understand transport phenomena occurring in the cells. In this thesis, charge, mass, and heat transport phenomena related to small PEMFCs were studied experimentally and by modeling. A new method was developed for the characterization of water transport properties of p...

  2. Toeplitz Operators with Essentially Radial Symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto C. Raimondo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For Topelitz operators with radial symbols on the disk, there are important results that characterize boundedness, compactness, and its relation to the Berezin transform. The notion of essentially radial symbol is a natural extension, in the context of multiply-connected domains, of the notion of radial symbol on the disk. In this paper we analyze the relationship between the boundary behavior of the Berezin transform and the compactness of when ∈2(Ω is essentially radial and Ω is multiply-connected domains.

  3. Functional characterization of the Escherichia coli K-12 yiaMNO transport protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, TH; van der Does, C; Badia, J; Aguilar, J; Konings, WN; Driessen, AJM; Plantinga, Titia H.

    2004-01-01

    The yiaMNO genes of Escherichia coli K-12 encode a binding protein-dependent secondary, or tri-partite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP), transporter. Since only a few members of this family have been functionally characterized to date, we aimed to identify the substrate for this transporter. Cells

  4. Characterization of transport phenomena in porous transport layers using X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, S.; Hoorfar, M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Among different methods available for estimating the transport properties of porous transport layers (PTLs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, X-ray micro computed tomography (X-μCT) imaging in combination with image-based numerical simulation has been recognized as a viable tool. In this study, four commercially-available single-layer and dual-layer PTLs are analyzed using this method in order to compare and contrast transport properties between different PTLs, as well as the variability within a single sheet. Complete transport property datasets are created for each PTL. The simulation predictions indicate that PTLs with high porosity show considerable variability in permeability and effective diffusivity, while PTLs with low porosity do not. Furthermore, it is seen that the Tomadakis-Sotirchos (TS) analytical expressions for porous media match the image-based simulations when porosity is relatively low but predict higher permeability and effective diffusivity for porosity values greater than 80%. Finally, the simulations show that cracks within MPL of dual-layer PTLs have a significant effect on the overall permeability and effective diffusivity of the PTLs. This must be considered when estimating the transport properties of dual-layer PTLs. These findings can be used to improve macro-scale models of product and reactant transport within fuel cells, and ultimately, fuel cell efficiency.

  5. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    CERN Document Server

    Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix, and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e. areas internally well mixed, but with lit...

  6. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Lou Geurinot; David Eide

    2002-04-29

    Metal ions are critical nutrients, yet overaccumulation of these same metals can also be toxic. To maintain appropriate intracellular levels, cells require specific metal uptake systems that are subject to precise homeostatic regulation. The long-range goal of our research is to define the molecular mechanism(s) and regulation of metal ion uptake in eukaryotic cells. Integrating genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches, we have examined these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both are proven model systems for studying fundamental cellular processes. Our work has focused on the ZIP family of metal transporters which we identified; this family has representatives in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. IRT, one of the founding members of the ZIP family, is an essential cation transporter that is expressed in the epidermal cells of iron deficient plant roots and is responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. We now know that there are 15 ZIP genes in the Arabidopsis and the similarities among their encoded gene products. The ZIP family members display different substrate specificities for metals and different tissue distributions in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the family members respond differentially to metal deficiencies. For example, IRT1, ZIP6 and ZIP9 mRNA are expressed mainly in the roots of iron deficient plants whereas ZIP4 responds to both iron and zinc deficiency. Work in both yeast and Arabidopsis has addressed substrate specificity as well as how these transporters are regulated in response to metal availability

  7. Advanced testing and characterization of transportation soils and bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research study was intended to develop laboratory test procedures for advance testing and characterization of fine-grained cohesive soils and oil sand materials. The test procedures are based on typical field loading conditions and the loading...

  8. Molecular characterization of a proline transporter from Chilo suppressalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Huang; Shun-Fan Wu; Gong-Yin Ye

    2011-01-01

    Proline plays an important role in regulating synaptic neurotransmission in both mammalian and insect nervous systems. The full-length complementary DNA sequences encoding the proline transporter gene (CsProT) and its alternative spliced transcript (CsProT-ST) were cloned from the striped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis,one of the most important rice pests in Asia. The comparison of amino acid sequences showed that CsProT is highly similar to the proline transporter isolated from Manduca sexta (MasProT). The developmental changes of the relative messenger RNA expression levels of CsProT and CsProT-ST genes were examined in SSB. The expression level of CsProT-ST is much higher than that of CsProT in all developmental periods, suggesting that the 3′-end spliced variant is the major transcript instead of CsProT. The highest expression level of both genes in the pupal stage means that proline may be involved in some unclear functions in the metamorphosis from pupa to adulthood.

  9. Characterization of current transport in ferroelectric polymer devices

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, Amir

    2014-01-01

    We report the charge injection characteristics in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE), as a function of electrode material in metal/ferroelectric/metal device structures. Symmetric and asymmetric devices with Al, Ag, Au and Pt electrodes were fabricated to determine the dominant carrier type, injection current density, and to propose transport mechanisms in the ferroelectric polymer. Higher work function metals such as Pt are found to inject less charges compared to lower work function metals, implying n-type conduction behavior for P(VDF-TrFE) with electrons as the dominant injected carrier. Two distinct charge transport regimes were identified in the P(VDF-TrFE) devices; a Schottky-limited conduction regime for low to intermediate fields (E < 20 MV/m), and a space-charge limited conduction (SCLC) regime for high fields (20 < E < 120 MV/m). Implication of these results for degradation in P(VDF-TrFE) memory performance are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae [and others

    1994-10-01

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs.

  11. Transient Characterization of Type B Particles in a Transport Riser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadle, L.J.; Monazam, E.R. (REM Engineering Services, Morgantown, WV); Mei, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Simple and rapid dynamic tests were used to evaluate fluid dynamic behavior of granular materials in the transport regime. Particles with densities ranging from 189 to 2,500 kg/m3 and Sauter mean size from 61 to 812 μm were tested in a 0.305 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser. The transient tests involved the abrupt stoppage of solids flow for each granular material over a wide range gas flow rates. The riser emptying time was linearly related to the Froude number in each of three different operating regimes. The flow structure along the height of the riser followed a distinct pattern as tracked through incremental pressures. These results are discussed to better understand the transformations that take place when operating over various regimes. During the transients the particle size distribution was measured. The effects of pressure, particle size, and density on test performance are also presented.

  12. Market Assessment and Commercialization Strategy for the Radial Sandia Cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Shandross, Richard [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Weintraub, Daniel [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Young, Jim [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This market assessment and commercialization report characterizes and assesses the market potential of the rotating heat exchanger technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), known as the Radial Sandia Cooler. The RSC is a novel, motor-driven, rotating, finned heat exchanger technology. The RSC was evaluated for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation markets. Recommendations for commercialization were made based on assessments of the prototype RSC and the Sandia Cooler technology in general, as well as an in-depth analysis of the six most promising products for initial RSC commercialization.

  13. Characterization of loxoprofen transport in Caco-2 cells: the involvement of a proton-dependent transport system in the intestinal transport of loxoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kondo, Ayuko; Furugen, Ayako; Yamada, Takehiro; Takahashi, Natsuko; Iseki, Ken

    2016-11-01

    Loxoprofen, a propionate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is used widely in East Asian countries. However, little is known about the transport mechanisms contributing to its intestinal absorption. The objectives of this study were to characterize the intestinal transport of loxoprofen using the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. The transport of loxoprofen was investigated in cellular uptake studies. The uptake of loxoprofen into Caco-2 cells was pH- and concentration-dependent, and was described by a Michaelis-Menten equation with passive diffusion (Km : 4.8 mm, Vmax : 142 nmol/mg protein/30 s, and Kd : 2.2 μl/mg protein/30 s). Moreover, the uptake of loxoprofen was inhibited by a typical monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibitor as well as by various monocarboxylates. The uptake of [(14) C] l-lactic acid, a typical MCT substrate, in Caco-2 cells was saturable with relatively high affinity for MCT. Because loxoprofen inhibited the uptake of [(14) C] l-lactic acid in a noncompetitive manner, it was unlikely that loxoprofen uptake was mediated by high-affinity MCT(s). Our results suggest that transport of loxoprofen in Caco-2 cells is, at least in part, mediated by a proton-dependent transport system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Radial velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the radial velocity distribution in dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis. We determine the properties of ten massive haloes in the simulation box approximating their density distribution by the NFW formula characterized by the virial mass and concentration. We also calculate the velocity anisotropy parameter of the haloes and find it mildly radial and increasing with distance from the halo centre. The radial velocity dispersion of the haloes shows a characteristic profile with a maximum, while the radial kurtosis profile decreases with distance starting from a value close to Gaussian near the centre. We therefore confirm that dark matter haloes possess intrinsically non-Gaussian, flat-topped velocity distributions. We find that the radial velocity moments of the simulated haloes are very well reproduced by the solutions of the Jeans equations obtained for the halo parameters with the anisotropy measured in the simu...

  15. Enhanced subsurface characterization for prediction of contaminant transport using co-kriging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H.; Rashad, S.M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Groundwater flow and advective transport were simulated in a heterogeneous synthetic aquifer. These simulations were conducted when the aquifer was fully defined and when it was characterized using a limited amount of hard and soft data (hydraulic conductivity data and soil classifications). Co-kriging was used to combine the data types when estimating the hydraulic conductivity field throughout the aquifer. Results of the flow and transport simulations showed that soil classifications were useful in characterizing the hydraulic conductivity field and reducing errors in statistics describing the plume.

  16. An Inverse Analysis Approach to the Characterization of Chemical Transport in Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Matthew P.; Stevenson, Shawn M.; Pearl, Thomas P.; Mantooth, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX. PMID:25226346

  17. Characterization of precursor-based ZnO transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Andriessen, R.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of characterization techniques are used to study spin-coated films of zinc oxide (ZnO) obtained from thermal decomposition of zinc acetylacetonate hydrate. Inverted organic solar cells with ZnO transport layers were prepared. Deposition conditions of the solution onto the substrate (e.g

  18. Characterization of precursor-based ZnO transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Andriessen, R.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of characterization techniques are used to study spin-coated films of zinc oxide (ZnO) obtained from thermal decomposition of zinc acetylacetonate hydrate. Inverted organic solar cells with ZnO transport layers were prepared. Deposition conditions of the solution onto the substrate

  19. Electronic transport characterization of silicon wafers by spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@ioe.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Spatially resolved steady-state photocarrier radiometric (PCR) imaging technique is developed to characterize the electronic transport properties of silicon wafers. Based on a nonlinear PCR theory, simulations are performed to investigate the effects of electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) on the steady-state PCR intensity profiles. The electronic transport parameters of an n-type silicon wafer are simultaneously determined by fitting the measured steady-state PCR intensity profiles to the three-dimensional nonlinear PCR model. The determined transport parameters are in good agreement with the results obtained by the conventional modulated PCR technique with multiple pump beam radii.

  20. Satellite Perspective of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport: From Qualitative Tracking to Quantitative Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT, beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. After an overview of these advances, we review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  1. Satellite perspective of aerosol intercontinental transport: From qualitative tracking to quantitative characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2013-04-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers the opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. We review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  2. Copper homeostasis in grapevine: functional characterization of the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Viviana; Bassil, Elias; Hanana, Mohsen; Blumwald, Eduardo; Gerós, Hernâni

    2014-07-01

    The Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 is capable of self-interaction and mediates intracellular copper transport. An understanding of copper homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is particularly relevant to viticulture in which copper-based fungicides are intensively used. In the present study, the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 (VvCTr1), belonging to the Ctr family of copper transporters, was cloned and functionally characterized. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that VvCTr1 monomers are small peptides composed of 148 amino acids with 3 transmembrane domains and several amino acid residues typical of Ctr transporters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that Ctr monomers are self-interacting and subcellular localization studies revealed that VvCTr1 is mobilized via the trans-Golgi network, through the pre-vacuolar compartment and located to the vacuolar membrane. The heterologous expression of VvCTr1 in a yeast strain lacking all Ctr transporters fully rescued the phenotype, while a deficient complementation was observed in a strain lacking only plasma membrane-bound Ctrs. Given the common subcellular localization of VvCTr1 and AtCOPT5 and the highest amino acid sequence similarity in comparison to the remaining AtCOPT proteins, Arabidopsis copt5 plants were stably transformed with VvCTr1. The impairment in root growth observed in copt5 seedlings in copper-deficient conditions was fully rescued by VvCTr1, further supporting its involvement in intracellular copper transport. Expression studies in V. vinifera showed that VvCTr1 is mostly expressed in the root system, but transcripts were also present in leaves and stems. The functional characterization of VvCTr-mediated copper transport provides the first step towards understanding the physiological and molecular responses of grapevines to copper-based fungicides.

  3. Springtime trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollutants characterized by the Western Pacific (WP) pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Noh, Young Min; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-12-01

    Springtime trans-Pacific transport of Asian air pollutants has been investigated in many ways to figure out its mechanism. Based on the Western Pacific (WP) pattern, one of climate variabilities in the Northern Hemisphere known to be associated with the pattern of atmospheric circulation over the North Pacific Ocean, in this study, we characterize the pattern of springtime trans-Pacific transport using long-term satellite measurements and reanalysis datasets. A positive WP pattern is characterized by intensification of the dipole structure between the northern Aleutian Low and the southern Pacific High over the North Pacific. The TOMS/OMI Aerosol Index (AI) and MOPITT CO show the enhancement of Asian pollutant transport across the Pacific during periods of positive WP pattern, particularly between 40 and 50°N. This enhancement is confirmed by high correlations of WP index with AI and CO between 40 and 50°N. To evaluate the influence of the WP pattern, we examine several cases of trans-Pacific transport reported in previous research. Interestingly, most trans-Pacific transport cases are associated with the positive WP pattern. During the period of negative WP pattern, reinforced cyclonic wave breaking is consistently found over the western North Pacific, which obstructs zonal advection across the North Pacific. However, some cases show the trans-Pacific transport of CO in the period of negative WP pattern, implying that the WP pattern is more influential on the transport of particles mostly emitted near ∼40°N. This study reveals that the WP pattern can be utilized to diagnose the strength of air pollutant transport from East Asia to North America.

  4. Radial heat flux transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  5. Detection and characterization of uranium-humic complexes during 1D transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesher, Emily K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Honeyman, Bruce D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Ranville, James F. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Geochemistry

    2013-05-01

    The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U-SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

  6. Functional characterization of water transport and cellular localization of three aquaporin paralogs in the salmonid intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steffen S; Olesen, Jesper H; Bedal, Konstanze

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal water absorption is greatly enhanced in salmonids upon acclimation from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW); however, the molecular mechanism for water transport is unknown. We conducted a pharmacological characterization of water absorption in the rainbow trout intestine along with an in......Intestinal water absorption is greatly enhanced in salmonids upon acclimation from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW); however, the molecular mechanism for water transport is unknown. We conducted a pharmacological characterization of water absorption in the rainbow trout intestine along...... with an investigation of the distribution and cellular localization of three aquaporins (Aqp1aa, -1ab, and -8ab) in pyloric caeca, middle (M), and posterior (P) intestine of the Atlantic salmon. In vitro iso-osmotic water absorption (J(v)) was higher in SW than FW-trout and was inhibited by (mmol L(-1)): 0.1 KCN (41......%), 0.1 ouabain (72%), and 0.1 bumetanide (82%) suggesting that active transport, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Na(+), K(+), 2Cl(-)-co-transport are involved in establishing the driving gradient for water transport. J(v) was also inhibited by 1 mmol L(-1) HgCl(2), serosally (23% in M and 44% in P), mucosally...

  7. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    reduces the radial velocity of isolated filaments. The results are discussed in the context of convective transport in scrape-off layer plasmas, comprising both blob-like structures in low confinement modes and edge localized mode filaments in unstable high confinement regimes. (c) 2006 American Institute...

  8. Cloning and functional characterization of the pig (Sus scrofa) organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yejin; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zheren; Xiao, Yunpeng; Hong, Mei

    2013-08-01

    1. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are a family of transporter proteins that have been extensively recognized as key determinants of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of various drugs. Human OATP1A2 has been demonstrated to transport wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Study on OATP1A2 orthologues of other species, however, is still limited. 2. Here, we described the cloning and functional characterization of a member of the OATP/Oatp family member obtained from pig (Sus scrofa) liver. Sequence analysis suggested that it has a high homology with human OATP1A2 and bovine Oatp1a2. Prototypic substrates estrone-3-sulfate (E-3-S) and taurocholic acid were transported by the protein. The transport of these two substrates is pH-dependent, with lower pH showing higher uptake function. Kinetic study showed the transport of these two substrates have a Km of 42.5 ± 12.1 and 33.1 ± 8.7 µM, respectively. Pig Slco1a2 has the highest expression level in the liver, and to a less extend in the brain and small intestine. 3. In conclusion, an OATP member was cloned from pig liver. Sequence analysis and phylogenic study revealed it as an orthologue of human OATP1A2. Its kinetic characteristic for prototypic substrates and organ distribution are similar with that of OATP1A2.

  9. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  10. Hydrogeological characterization of the South Oyster bacterial transport site using geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Susan S.; Chen, Jinsong; Peterson, John; Majer, Ernest L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Swift, Donald J.; Mailloux, Brian; Rubin, Yoram

    2001-10-01

    A multidisciplinary research team has conducted a field-scale bacterial transport study within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Oyster, Virginia. The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the importance of heterogeneities in controlling the field-scale transport of bacteria that are injected into the ground for remediation purposes. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to conducting chemical and bacterial injection experiments. In this paper we focus on results of a hydrogeological characterization effort using geophysical data collected across a range of spatial scales. The geophysical data employed include surface ground-penetrating radar, radar cross-hole tomography, seismic cross-hole tomography, cone penetrometer, and borehole electromagnetic flowmeter. These data were used to interpret the subregional and local stratigraphy, to provide high-resolution hydraulic conductivity estimates, and to provide information about the log conductivity spatial correlation function. The information from geophysical data was used to guide and assist the field operations and to constrain the numerical bacterial transport model. Although more field work of this nature is necessary to validate the usefulness and cost-effectiveness of including geophysical data in the characterization effort, qualitative and quantitative comparisons between tomographically obtained flow and transport parameter estimates with hydraulic well bore and bromide breakthrough measurements suggest that geophysical data can provide valuable, high-resolution information. This information, traditionally only partially obtainable by performing extensive and intrusive well bore sampling, may help to reduce the ambiguity associated with hydrogeological heterogeneity that is often encountered when interpreting field-scale bacterial transport data.

  11. Automated fabrication, characterization and transport of ICF pellets. Final report, March 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, D W; Boyd, B A; Lilienkamp, R H

    1980-12-01

    The near-term objectives of the contract were threefold: (1) evaluate techniques for the production of frozen hydrogen microspheres and demonstrate concepts for coating them; (2) develop and demonstrate an optical characterization system which could lead to automated pellet inspection; and (3) develop and demonstrate a preliminary electrostatic pellet transport control system. This report describes the equipment assembled for these experiments and the results obtained.

  12. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  13. Characterization of vacuolar amino acid transporter from Fusarium oxysporum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunprom, Siriporn; Pongcharoen, Pongsanat; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Akiyama, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum causes wilt disease in many plant families, and many genes are involved in its development or growth in host plants. A recent study revealed that vacuolar amino acid transporters play an important role in spore formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the role of vacuolar amino acid transporters of this phytopathogenic fungus, the FOXG_11334 (FoAVT3) gene from F. oxysporum was isolated and its function was characterized. Transcription of FoAVT3 was upregulated after rapamycin treatment. A green fluorescent protein fusion of FoAvt3p was localized to vacuolar membranes in both S. cerevisiae and F. oxysporum. Analysis of the amino acid content of the vacuolar fraction and amino acid transport activities using vacuolar membrane vesicles from S. cerevisiae cells heterologously expressing FoAVT3 revealed that FoAvt3p functions as a vacuolar amino acid transporter, exporting neutral amino acids. We conclude that the FoAVT3 gene encodes a vacuolar neutral amino acid transporter.

  14. Functional characterization of Citrus macrophylla BOR1 as a boron transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañon, Paola; Aquea, Felipe; Rodríguez-Hoces de la Guardia, Amparo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2013-11-01

    Plants have evolved to develop an efficient system of boron uptake and transport using a range of efflux carriers named BOR proteins. In this work we isolated and characterized a boron transporter of citrus (Citrus macrophylla), which was named CmBOR1 for its high homology to AtBOR1. CmBOR1 has 4403 bp and 12 exons. Its coding region has 2145 bp and encodes for a protein of 714 amino acids. CmBOR1 possesses the molecular features of BORs such as an anion exchanger domain and the presence of 10 transmembrane domains. Functional analysis in yeast indicated that CmBOR1 has an efflux boron transporter activity, and transformants have increased tolerance to excess boron. CmBOR1 is expressed in leaves, stem and flowers and shows the greatest accumulation in roots. The transcript accumulation was significantly increased under boron deficiency conditions in shoots. In contrast, the accumulation of the transcript did not change in boron toxicity conditions. Finally, we observed that constitutive expression of CmBOR1 was able to increase tolerance to boron deficiency conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that CmBOR1 is a xylem loading boron transporter. Based on these results, it was determined that CmBOR1 encodes a boric acid/borate transporter involved in tolerance to boron deficiency in plants.

  15. Functional characterization of a Na(+)-coupled dicarboxylate transporter from Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Melodie A; Hall, Jason A; Gaiko, Olga; Pajor, Ana M

    2009-12-01

    The Na(+)-coupled dicarboxylate transporter, SdcL, from Bacillus licheniformis is a member of the divalent anion/Na(+) symporter (DASS) family that includes the bacterial Na(+)/dicarboxylate cotransporter SdcS (from Staphyloccocus aureus) and the mammalian Na(+)/dicarboxylate cotransporters, NaDC1 and NaDC3. The transport properties of SdcL produced in Escherichia coli are similar to those of its prokaryotic and eukaryotic counterparts, involving the Na(+)-dependent transport of dicarboxylates such as succinate or malate across the cytoplasmic membrane with a K(m) of approximately 6 microM. SdcL may also transport aspartate, alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate with low affinity. The cotransport of Na(+) and dicarboxylate by SdcL has an apparent stoichiometry of 2:1, and a K(0.5) for Na(+) of 0.9 mM. Our findings represent the characterization of another prokaryotic protein of the DASS family with transport properties similar to its eukaryotic counterparts, but with a broader substrate specificity than other prokaryotic DASS family members. The broader range of substrates carried by SdcL may provide insight into domains of the protein that allow a more flexible or larger substrate binding pocket.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans riboflavin transporters rft-1 and rft-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Biswas

    Full Text Available Two potential orthologs of the human riboflavin transporter 3 (hRFVT3 were identified in the C. elegans genome, Y47D7A.16 and Y47D7A.14, which share 33.7 and 30.5% identity, respectively, with hRFVT3. The genes are tandemly arranged, and we assign them the names rft-1 (for Y47D7A.16 and rft-2 (for Y47D7A.14. Functional characterization of the coding sequences in a heterologous expression system demonstrated that both were specific riboflavin transporters, although the rft-1 encoded protein had greater transport activity. A more detailed examination of rft-1 showed its transport of riboflavin to have an acidic pH dependence, saturability (apparent Km = 1.4 ± 0.5 µM, inhibition by riboflavin analogues, and Na(+ independence. The expression of rft-1 mRNA was relatively higher in young larvae than in adults, and mRNA expression dropped in response to RF supplementation. Knocking down the two transporters individually via RNA interference resulted in a severe loss of fertility that was compounded in a double knockdown. Transcriptional fusions constructed with two fluorophores (rft-1::GFP, and rft-2::mCherry indicated that rft-1 is expressed in the intestine and a small subset of neuronal support cells along the entire length of the animal. Expression of rft-2 is localized mainly to the intestine and pharynx. We also observed a drop in the expression of the two reporters in animals that were maintained in high riboflavin levels. These results report for the first time the identification of two riboflavin transporters in C. elegans and demonstrate their expression and importance to metabolic function in worms. Absence of transporter function renders worms sterile, making them useful in understanding human disease associated with mutations in hRFVT3.

  17. Systematic characterization of porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Gu, Weiyong; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Huang, C-Y Charles

    2017-01-01

    One of the key challenges in porous scaffold design is to create a porous structure with desired mechanical function and mass transport properties which support delivery of biofactors and development of function tissue substitute. In recent years, polyurethane (PU) has become one of the most popular biomaterials in various tissue engineering fields. However, there are no studies fully investigating the relations between porosity and both mass transport and mechanical properties of PU porous scaffolds. In this paper, we fabricated PU scaffolds by combining phase inversion and salt (sodium chloride) leaching methods. The tensile and compressive moduli were examined on PU scaffolds fabricated with different PU concentrations (25%, 20% and 15% w/v) and salt/PU weight ratios (9/1, 6/1, 3/1 and 0/1). The mass transport properties of PU scaffolds including hydraulic permeability and glucose diffusivity were also measured. Furthermore, the relationships between the porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold were systemically investigated. The results demonstrated that porosity is a key parameter which governs both mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffolds. With similar pore sizes, the mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold can be described as single functions of porosity regardless of initial PU concentration. The relationships between scaffold porosity and properties can be utilized to facilitate porous PU scaffold fabrication with specific mass transport and mechanical properties. The systematic approach established in this study can be applied to characterization of other biomaterials for scaffold design and fabrication.

  18. Radial wedge flange clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  19. Characterization of copper transport in gill cells of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá, M.G. [Biosciences Institute, Department of Physiology, University of São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, 101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Zanotto, F.P., E-mail: fzanotto@usp.br [Biosciences Institute, Department of Physiology, University of São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, 101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Department of Biophysics, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Três de Maio 100, Sao Paulo 04044-020 (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Copper transport in gill cells of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is dependent of calcium. •Copper transport mechanism is ATP-dependent. •Transport was monitored second by second during 300 s. -- Abstract: The branchial epithelium of crustaceans is exposed to the environment and is the first site affected by metal pollution. The aim of this work was to characterize copper (Cu) transport using a fluorescent dye, Phen Green, in gill cells of a hypo-hyper-regulator mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. The results showed that added extracellular CuCl{sub 2} (0, 0.025, 0.150, 0.275, 0.550 and 1.110 μM) showed typical Michaelis–Menten transport for Cu in anterior and posterior gill cells (V{sub max} for anterior and posterior gills: 0.41 ± 0.12 and 1.76 ± 0.27 intracellular Cu in μM × 22.10{sup 4} cells{sup −1} × 300 s{sup −1} respectively and K{sub m} values: 0.44 ± 0.04 and 0.32 ± 0.13 μM, respectively). Intracellular Cu was significantly higher for posterior gill cells compared to anterior gill cells, suggesting differential accumulation for each gill type. Extracellular Ca at 20 mM decreased cellular Cu transport for both anterior and posterior gill cells. Nifedipine and verapamil, calcium channel inhibitors from plasma membrane, decreased Cu transport and affected K{sub m} for both gills. These results could be due to a competition between Cu and Ca. Amiloride, a Na/Ca exchanger inhibitor, as well as bafilomycin, a proton pump inhibitor, caused a decrease of intracellular Cu compared to control. Ouabain and KB-R 7943, acting on Na homeostasis, similarly decreased intracellular Cu in both gill cells. Besides that, gill cells exposed to ATP and Cu simultaneously, showed an increase in intracellular copper, which was inhibited by vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPase. These results suggest either the presence of a Cu-ATPase in crab gill cells, responsible for Cu influx, or the effect of a change in electrochemical membrane potential that

  20. Production and biophysical characterization of the CorA transporter from Methanosarcina mazei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesler, David; Blangy, Stéphanie; Siponen, Marina; Vincentelli, Renaud; Cambillau, Christian; Sciara, Giuliano

    2009-05-01

    We report here a general strategy to overproduce and characterize membrane transporters. To illustrate our approach, we selected one member of the CorA transporter family among four tested that belonged to different species. This approach is transposable to other membrane proteins and involves the following steps: (i) cloning by homologous recombination, (ii) high-throughput expression screening, (iii) fermenter-based large-scale production, (iv) high-throughput detergent solubilization screening, (v) protein purification, (vi) multiangle static light scattering/refractometry characterization of purified proteins, (vii) circular dichroism spectroscopy, and (viii) detergent concentration measurements by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Methanosarcina mazei CorA was expressed in milligram quantities and purified (> 95% pure). n-Dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside (DDM) retained the pentameric native structure of this transporter; thus, we selected it as working detergent. Furthermore, we measured the detergent concentration in our purified and concentrated protein sample by FT-IR to maintain it as low as possible. Our strategy can be adapted to many structural biology approaches as well as for study of single membrane proteins in a variety of conditions.

  1. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the gentisate transporter GenK in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate is a key ring-cleavage substrate involved in various aromatic compounds degradation. Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 is capable of growing on gentisate and genK was proposed to encode a transporter involved in this utilization by its disruption in the restriction-deficient mutant RES167. Its biochemical characterization by uptake assay using [(14C]-labeled gentisate has not been previously reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, biochemical characterization of GenK by uptake assays with [(14C]-labeled substrates demonstrated that it specifically transported gentisate into the cells with V(max and K(m of 3.06 ± 0.16 nmol/min/mg of dry weight and 10.71 ± 0.11 µM respectively, and no activity was detected for either benzoate or 3-hydoxybenzoate. When GenK was absent in strain RES167 ΔgenK, it retained 85% of its original transport activity at pH 6.5 compared to that of strain RES167. However, it lost 79% and 88% activity at pH 7.5 and 8.0, respectively. A number of competing substrates, including 3-hydroxybenzoate, benzoate, protocatechuate and catechol, significantly inhibited gentisate uptake by more than 40%. Through site-directed mutagenesis, eight amino acid residues of GenK, Asp-54, Asp-57 and Arg-386 in the hydrophobic transmembrane regions and Arg-103, Trp-309, Asp-312, Arg-313 and Ile-317 in the hydrophilic cytoplasmic loops were shown to be important for gentisate transport. When conserved residues Asp-54 and Asp-57 respectively were changed to glutamate, both mutants retained approximately 50% activity and were able to partially complement the ability of strain RES167 ΔgenK to grow on gentisate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that GenK is an active gentisate transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032. The GenK-mediated gentisate transport was also shown to be a limiting step for the gentisate utilization by this strain. This enhances our

  2. Design and Characterization of a Neutralized-Transport Experiment for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E; Eylon, S; Roy, P; Yu, S S; Anders, A; Bieniosek, F M; Greenway, W G; Logan, B G; MacGill, R A; Shuman, D B; Vanecek, D L; Waldron, W L; Sharp, W M; Houck, T L; Davidson, R C; Efthimion, P C; Gilson, E P; Sefkow, A B; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2004-05-24

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, a converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present the first results from the experiment.

  3. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Shuman, D.B.; Vanecek, D.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Houck, T.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2004-03-14

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  4. Characterization of solute transport parameters in leach ore:inverse modeling based on column experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng PENG

    2009-01-01

    Heap leaching is essentially a process in which metals are extracted from mine ores with lixiant. For a better understanding and modeling of this process, solute transport parameters are required to characterize the solute transport system of the leach heap. For porous media like leach ores, which contain substantial gravelly particles and have a broad range of particle size distributions, traditional small-scale laboratory experimental apparatus is not appropriate. In this paper, a 2.44m long, 0.3 m inner diameter column was used for tracer test with boron as the tracer. Tracer tests were conducted for 2 bulk densities (1.92 and 1.62g/cm3) and 2 irrigation rates (2 and 5 L/(mE. h-i)). Inverse modeling with two-region transport model using computer code CXTFIT was conducted based on the measured breakthrough curves to estimate the transport parameters. Fitting was focused on three parameters: dispersion coefficient D, partition coefficient r, and mass transfer coefficient ω. The results turned out to fall within reasonable ranges. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for the three parameters and showed that the order of sensitivity is β > ω > D. In addition, scaling of these parameters was discussed and applied to a real scale heap leach to predict the tracer breakthrough.

  5. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging and dipole tests with conservative tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4C and 4D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-05-01

    The `Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes` is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4C and 4D is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the radially converging tracer tests and dipole tracer tests performed within the TRUE-1 tests using non-sorbing tracers. The tests were performed between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). These tests are to a great extent preparatory steps for the subsequent tests with sorbing radioactive tracers. In Tasks 4E and 4F of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force predictive modelling of the sorbing tracer tests is performed. Eight modelling teams representing seven organisations have performed predictive modelling using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation and data on the experimental set-up of the tracer tests. Based on this information model predictions were performed of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. The performed predictions shows that the concept of Feature A as a singular well-connected feature with limited connectivity to its surroundings is quite adequate for predictions of drawdown in boreholes and conservative tracer breakthrough. Reasonable estimates were obtained using relatively simple models. However, more elaborate models with calibration or conditioning of transmissivities and transport apertures are required for more accurate predictions. The general flow and transport processes are well understood, but the methodology to derive the

  6. Geological characterization and solute transport model investigations of contaminated sites in urban areas (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Theis Raaschou; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Thomsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . Remediation is time consuming and expensive and it is often difficult to identify the original source of the contamination that would otherwise give indications to its extent and composition. Moreover, as cities grew, many contaminations are now located in urban areas where data compilation and remediation...... efforts are often challenged by logistics. The general lack of knowledge about theses contaminations introduces significant uncertainties in the projections on the fate of the contaminant. We carry out a geological characterization of two contaminated sites situated in urban areas. The existing data from...... of the two sites were constructed. The 3D geological models serve as a basis for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the field sites. The study demonstrates how detailed information about the geological setting in conjunction with contaminant transport modelling, can minimize...

  7. Theoretical characterization of charge transport in one-dimensional collinear arrays of organic conjugated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Lucas; Olivier, Yoann; Athanasopoulos, Stavros; da Silva Filho, Demetrio A; Hulliger, Jürg; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Gierschner, Johannes; Cornil, Jérôme

    2010-04-06

    A great deal of interest has recently focused on host-guest systems consisting of one-dimensional collinear arrays of conjugated molecules encapsulated in the channels of organic or inorganic matrices. Such architectures allow for controlled charge and energy migration processes between the interacting guest molecules and are thus attractive in the field of organic electronics. In this context, we characterize here at a quantum-chemical level the molecular parameters governing charge transport in the hopping regime in 1D arrays built with different types of molecules. We investigate the influence of several parameters (such as the symmetry of the molecule, the presence of terminal substituents, and the molecular size) and define on that basis the molecular features required to maximize the charge carrier mobility within the channels. In particular, we demonstrate that a strong localization of the molecular orbitals in push-pull compounds is generally detrimental to the charge transport properties.

  8. Characterization of Particulate Matter Transport across the Lung-Surfactant Barrier using Langmuir Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Jeremy; Dennin, Michael; Levine, Alex; George, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the transport of particulate matter acros the lung using a monolayer of bovine lung surfactant tagged with NBD in conjunction with alveolar lung cells below the air-water interface. The monolaye dynamically compressed and expanded to induce phase transitions as well as buckling and folding. Polystyrene spheres ranging from 20 to 500 nm in diameter were tagged with fluorescent molecules and deposited on the monolayer. We will present results of preliminary studies of the transport of beads from the air-water surface to the lung cells through the monolayer. Characterization of the transfer will focus on differential fluorescence microscopy to distinguish uncoated beads from beads from beads coated with surfactant monolayers. The presence or absence of surfactant associated with the beads provides insight into potential transfer mechanisms and will serve as an input into models of the bead transfer. We gladly acknowledge the support of NSF grant DMR-1309402.

  9. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  10. Characterization of cadmium plasma membrane transport in gills of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, P.; Custódio, M.R. [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Zanotto, F.P., E-mail: fzanotto@usp.br [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Três de Maio 100, São Paulo 04044-020 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd{sup 2+} gill cell transport, a non-essential toxic metal, was characterized in a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. • Cd{sup 2+} enter gill cells through Ca{sup 2+} channels and is dependent of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. • Route of entry in gill cells also involves a Cd{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} (2Na) exchanger. • Cd transport depends on Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and gill cell electrochemical gradient. • Vanadate inhibits gill Cd{sup 2+} transport and ouabain increase gill Cd{sup 2+} transport. - Abstract: Membrane pathway for intracellular cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) accumulation is not fully elucidated in many organisms and has not been studied in crab gill cells. To characterize membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport of anterior and posterior gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a hypo-hyper-regulating crab, a change in intracellular Cd{sup 2+} concentration under various experimental conditions was examined by using FluoZin, a fluorescent probe. The membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport was estimated by the augmentation of FluoZin fluorescence induced by extracellular application of CdCl{sub 2} and different inhibitors. Addition of extracellular calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) to the cells affected little the fluorescence of FluoZin, confirming that Cd{sup 2+} was the main ion increasing intracellular fluorescence. Ca{sup 2+} channels blockers (nimodipine and verapamil) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx as well as vanadate, a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase blocker. Chelating intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (BAPTA) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx in gill cells, while increasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (caffeine) augmented Cd influx. Cd{sup 2+} and ATP added at different temporal conditions were not effective at increasing intracellular Cd{sup 2+} accumulation. Ouabain (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor) increased Cd{sup 2+} influx probably through a change in intracellular Na and/or a change in cell membrane potential. Routes of Cd{sup 2+} influx, a non-essential metal, through the

  11. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  12. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Brower, Richard C; Fleming, George T

    2014-01-01

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  13. Characterization and Evaluation of TCP and UDP-based Transport on Real Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, L.

    2005-01-25

    Standard TCP (Reno TCP) does not perform well on fast long distance networks, due to its AIMD congestion control algorithm. In this paper we consider the effectiveness of various alternatives, in particular with respect to their applicability to a production environment. We then characterize and evaluate the achievable throughput, stability and intra-protocol fairness of different TCP stacks (Scalable, HSTCP, HTCP, Fast TCP, Reno, BICTCP, HSTCP-LP and LTCP) and a UDP based application level transport protocol (UDTv2) on both production and testbed networks. The characterization is made with respect to both the transient traffic (entry and exit of different streams) and the steady state traffic on production Academic and Research networks, using paths with RTTs differing by a factor of 10. We also report on measurements made with 10Gbits/sec NICs with and without TCP Offload Engines, on 10Gbits/s dedicated paths set up for SC2004.

  14. The ARCS radial collimator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone M.B.; Niedziela J.L.; Overbay M.A.; Abernathy D.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. W...

  15. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation percepti

  16. Functional characterization of water transport and cellular localization of three aquaporin paralogs in the salmonid intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen S Madsen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal water absorption is greatly enhanced in salmonids upon acclimation from freshwater (FW to seawater (SW; however, the molecular mechanism for water transport is unknown. We conducted a pharmacological characterization of water absorption in the rainbow trout intestine along with an investigation of the distribution and cellular localization of 3 aquaporins (Aqp1aa, -1ab and -8ab in pyloric caeca, middle (M and posterior (P intestine of the Atlantic salmon. In vitro iso-osmotic water absorption (Jv was higher in SW than FW-trout and was inhibited by (mmol L-1: 0.1 KCN (41%, 0.1 ouabain (72% and 0.1 bumetanide (82% suggesting that active transport, Na+,K+-ATPase and Na+,K+,2Cl--cotransport are involved in establishing the driving gradient for water transport. Jv was also inhibited by 1 mmol L-1 HgCl2, serosally (23% in M and 44% in P, mucosally (27% in M or both (61% in M and 58% in P, suggesting involvement of both apical and basolateral aquaporins in water transport. The inhibition was antagonized by 5 mmol L-1 mercaptoethanol. By comparison, 10 mmol L-1 mucosal tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of certain aquaporins, inhibited Jv by 20%. In the presence of glucose, mucosal addition of phloridzin inhibited water transport by 20%, suggesting that water transport is partially linked to the Na+-glucose cotransporter. Using polyclonal antibodies against salmon Aqp1aa, -1ab and -8ab, we detected Aqp1aa, and -1ab immunoreactivity in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes in all intestinal segments. The Aqp8ab antibody showed a particularly strong immunoreaction in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes throughout the intestine and also stained lateral membranes and peri-nuclear regions though at lower intensity. The present localization of 3 aquaporins in both apical and lateral membranes of salmonid enterocytes facilitates a model for transcellular water transport in the intestine of SW-acclimated salmonids.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polymer layers for control of fluid transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fehime

    The level of wetting of fiber surface with liquids is an important characteristic of fibrous materials. It is related to fiber surface energy and the structure of the material. Surface energy can be changed by surface modification via the grafting methodologies that have been reported for introducing new and stable functionality to fibrous substrates without changing bulk properties. Present work is dedicated to synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to fiber surface in order to achieve directional liquid transport for the modified fabric. Modification technique used here is based on formation of stable polymer layer on fabric surface using "grafting to" technique. Specifically, modification of fabric with wettability gradient for facilitated one way-liquid transport, and pointed modification of yarn-based channels on textile microfluidic device for directional liquid transport are reported here. First, fabric was activated with alkali (NaOH) solution. Second, poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) was deposited on fabric as an anchoring layer. Finally, polymers of interest were grafted to surface through the epoxy functionality of PGMA. Effect of polymer grafting on the wicking property of the fabric has been evaluated by vertical wicking technique at the each step of surface modification. The results shows that wicking performance of fabric can be altered by grafting of a thin nanoscale polymeric film. For the facilitated liquid transport, the gradient polymer coating was created using "grafting to" technique and its dependence on the grafting temperature. Wettability gradient from hydrophilic to hydrophobic (change in water contact angle from 0 to 140 degrees on fabric) was achieved by grafting of polystyrene (PS) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) sequentially with concentration gradient. This study proposes that fabric with wettability gradient property can be used to transfer sweat from skin and support moisture management when it is used in a

  18. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  19. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  20. Characterization of Al-responsive citrate excretion and citrate-transporting MATEs in Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Yoshiharu; Kihara-Doi, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Kawazu, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Many plant species excrete organic acids into the rhizosphere in response to aluminum stress to protect sensitive cells from aluminum rhizotoxicity. When the roots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis, a major source of pulp production, were incubated in aluminum-toxic medium, citrate released into the solution increased as a function of time. Citrate excretion was inducible by aluminum, but not by copper or sodium chloride stresses. This indicated that citrate is the major responsive organic acid released from the roots of this plant species to protect the root tips from aluminum damage. Four genes highly homologs to known citrate-transporting multidrugs and toxic compounds exclusion proteins, named EcMATE1-4, were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-based cloning techniques. Their predicted proteins included 12 membrane spanning domains, a common structural feature of citrate-transporting MATE proteins, and consisted of 502-579 amino acids with >60 % homology to orthologous genes in other plant species. One of the homologs, designated EcMATE1, was expressed in the roots more abundantly than in the shoots and in response to both Al and low pH stresses. Ectopic expression of EcMATE1 and 3 in tobacco hairy roots enhanced Al-responsive citrate excretion. Pharmacological characterization indicated that Al-responsive citrate excretion involved a protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process. These results indicate that citrate excretion through citrate-transporting multidrugs and toxic compounds exclusion proteins is one of the important aluminum-tolerance mechanisms in Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

  1. High-Throughput Phenotypic Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Membrane Transport Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Phillippy, Katherine; Chen, Joan; Ren, Qinghu; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    The deluge of data generated by genome sequencing has led to an increasing reliance on bioinformatic predictions, since the traditional experimental approach of characterizing gene function one at a time cannot possibly keep pace with the sequence-based discovery of novel genes. We have utilized Biolog phenotype MicroArrays to identify phenotypes of gene knockout mutants in the opportunistic pathogen and versatile soil bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a relatively high-throughput fashion. Seventy-eight P. aeruginosa mutants defective in predicted sugar and amino acid membrane transporter genes were screened and clear phenotypes were identified for 27 of these. In all cases, these phenotypes were confirmed by independent growth assays on minimal media. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrate that the expression levels of 11 of these transporter genes were induced from 4- to 90-fold by their substrates identified via phenotype analysis. Overall, the experimental data showed the bioinformatic predictions to be largely correct in 22 out of 27 cases, and led to the identification of novel transporter genes and a potentially new histamine catabolic pathway. Thus, rapid phenotype identification assays are an invaluable tool for confirming and extending bioinformatic predictions. PMID:18833300

  2. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium–barium phosphate composite membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin,, E-mail: rafi_amu@rediffmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Calcium–barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. Highlights: • Transport properties of composite membrane are evaluated. • The composite membrane was found to be stable in all media. • TMS method is used for electrochemical characterization. • The membrane was found to be cation selective. • The order of surface charge density was found to be LiCl < NaCl < KCl.

  3. Synopsis of hydrologic data collected by waste management for characterization of unsaturated transport at Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E.

    1998-03-01

    Data which have been collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory waste management for the hydrologic characterization of the subsurface at the low level radioactive waste disposal facility, Area G, are reported and discussed briefly. The data includes Unsaturated Flow Apparatus measurements of the unsaturated conductivity in samples from borehole G-5. Analysis compares these values to the predictions from van Genuchten estimates, and the implications for transport and data matching are discussed, especially at the location of the Vapor Phase Notch (VPN). There, evaporation drives a significant vapor flux and the liquid flux cannot be measured accurately by the UFA device. Data also include hydrologic characterization of samples from borehole G-5, Area G surface soils, Los Alamos (Cerros de Rio) basalt, Tsankawi and Cerro-Toledo layers, the Vapor Phase Notch (VPN), and additional new samples from the uppermost tuff layer at Area G. Hydraulic properties from these sample groups can be used to supplement the existing data base. The data in this report can be used to improve the accuracy and reduce the uncertainty in future computational modeling of the unsaturated transport at Area G. This report supports the maintenance plan for the Area G Performance Assessment.

  4. Combining geoelectrical and advanced lysimeter methods to characterize heterogeneous flow and transport under unsaturated transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, M.; Skowronski, J.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous - or preferential - flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we applied systematically varied input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We simultaneously measured the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct ground-truthing of soil moisture and pore fluid resistivity changes estimated noninvasively using ERT. We were able to image both the advancing infiltration front and the advancing tracer front using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long term displacement of the solute front was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential flow fraction was observed to be independent of precipitation rate. This suggests the presence of a fingering process

  5. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  6. Isolation and characterization of rice cesium transporter genes from a rice-transporter-enriched yeast expression library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Tomohiro; Otani, Masahiro; Ono, Kohei; Mimura, Takuro; Oda, Koshiro; Minamii, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Matsuo, Yuzy; Kawamukai, Makoto; Akihiro, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    A considerable portion of agricultural land in central-east Japan has been contaminated by radioactive material, particularly radioactive Cs, due to the industrial accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Understanding the mechanism of absorption, translocation and accumulation of Cs(+) in plants will greatly assist in developing approaches to help reduce the radioactive contamination of agricultural products. At present, however, little is known regarding the Cs(+) transporters in rice. A transporter-enriched yeast expression library was constructed and the library was screened for Cs(+) transporter genes. The 1452 full length cDNAs encoding transporter genes were obtained from the Rice Genome Resource Center and 1358 clones of these transporter genes were successively subcloned into yeast expression vectors; which were then transferred into yeast. Using this library, both positive and negative selection screens can be performed, which have not been previously possible. The constructed library is an excellent tool for the isolation of novel transporter genes. This library was screened for clones that were sensitive to Cs(+) using a SD-Gal medium containing either 30 or 70 mM CsCl; resulting in the isolation of 13 Cs(+) sensitive clones. (137) Cs absorption experiments were conducted and confirmed that all of the identified clones were able to absorb (137) Cs. A total of 3 potassium transporters, 2 ABC transporters and 1 NRAMP transporter were among the 13 identified clones. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Impact of Geological Characterization Uncertainties on Subsurface Flow & Transport Using a Stochastic Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principal pathways for transport of water and contaminants in groundwater systems, enhanced geothermal system fluids, migration of oil and gas, carbon dioxide leakage from carbon sequestration sites, and of radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples, among other techniques. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as a stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture density, orientation, aperture and size on the flow and transport using topological measures such as fracture connectivity, physical characteristics such as effective hydraulic conductivity tensors, and

  8. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); David, N.A. [Environmental Res., Inst. of Michigan, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Irvine, J.M. [Environmental Res. Inst. of Michigan, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  9. Isolation and functional characterization of CsLsi1, a silicon transporter gene in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Guo, Jia; Duan, Yaoke; Zhang, Tiantian; Huo, Heqiang; Gong, Haijun

    2017-02-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is a widely grown cucurbitaceous vegetable that exhibits a relatively high capacity for silicon (Si) accumulation, but the molecular mechanism for silicon uptake remains to be clarified. Here we isolated and characterized CsLsi1, a gene encoding a silicon transporter in cucumber (cv. Mch-4). CsLsi1 shares 55.70 and 90.63% homology with the Lsi1s of a monocot and dicot, rice (Oryza sativa) and pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), respectively. CsLsi1 was predominantly expressed in the roots, and application of exogenous silicon suppressed its expression. Transient expression in cucumber protoplasts showed that CsLsi1 was localized in the plasma membrane. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that CsLsi1 evidenced influx transport activity for silicon but not urea or glycerol. Expression of cucumber CsLsi1-mGFP under its own promoter showed that CsLsi1 was localized at the distal side of the endodermis and the cortical cells in the root tips as well as in the root hairs near the root tips. Heterologous expression of CsLsi1 in a rice mutant defective in silicon uptake and the over-expression of this gene in cucumber further confirmed the role of CsLsi1 in silicon uptake. Our results suggest that CsLsi1 is a silicon influx transporter in cucumber. The cellular localization of CsLsi1 in cucumber roots is different from that in other plants, implying the possible effect of transporter localization on silicon uptake capability.

  10. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  11. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  12. Transport Effects on Capacitance-Frequency Analysis for Defect Characterization in Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Jian; Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Using capacitance-frequency (C -f ) analysis to characterize the density-of-states (DOS) distribution of defects has been well established for inorganic thin-film photovoltaic devices. While C -f analysis has also been applied to bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, we show that the low carrier mobility in the BHJ material can severely alter the C -f behaviors and lead to misinterpretations. Because of the complicated nature of disorders in organic materials, artifacts from an erroneous C -f analysis are difficult to identify. Here we compare drift-diffusion simulations with experiments to reveal situations when the validity of C -f analysis for defect characterization breaks down. When a flat-band region is present in the low-mobility active layer, the capacitive response cannot follow the electrical modulation and behaves as if the active layer is a dielectric at frequencies higher than the characteristic frequency determined by carrier mobility and thickness. The transition produces a fictitious shallow defect when defect analysis is applied. Even in fully depleted devices, the defect distributions derived from C -f analysis can appear at spuriously deeper energies if the mobility is too low. Through simulations, we determine the ranges of mobility and thickness for which the C -f analysis can effectively yield credible defect DOS information. Insight from this study also sheds light on transport limitation when using capacitance spectroscopy for defect characterization in general.

  13. Quantification of the cellular dose and characterization of nanoparticle transport during in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischitor, Grigore; Parracino, Mariantonietta; La Spina, Rita; Urbán, Patricia; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Bellido, Elena; Valsesia, Andrea; Gioria, Sabrina; Capomaccio, Robin; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2016-08-24

    The constant increase of the use of nanomaterials in consumer products is making increasingly urgent that standardized and reliable in vitro test methods for toxicity screening be made available to the scientific community. For this purpose, the determination of the cellular dose, i.e. the amount of nanomaterials effectively in contact with the cells is fundamental for a trustworthy determination of nanomaterial dose responses. This has often been overlooked in the literature making it difficult to undertake a comparison of datasets from different studies. Characterization of the mechanisms involved in nanomaterial transport and the determination of the cellular dose is essential for the development of predictive numerical models and reliable in vitro screening methods. This work aims to relate key physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) to the kinetics of their deposition on the cellular monolayer. Firstly, an extensive characterization of NPs in complete culture cell medium was performed to determine the diameter and the apparent mass density of the formed NP-serum protein complexes. Subsequently, the kinetics of deposition were studied by UV-vis absorbance measurements in the presence or absence of cells. The fraction of NPs deposited on the cellular layer was found to be highly dependent on NP size and apparent density because these two parameters influence the NP transport. The NP deposition occurred in two phases: phase 1, which consists of cellular uptake driven by the NP-cell affinity, and phase 2 consisting mainly of NP deposition onto the cellular membrane. The fraction of deposited NPs is very different from the initial concentration applied in the in vitro assay, and is highly dependent of the size and density of the NPs, on the associated transport rate and on the exposure duration. This study shows that an accurate characterization is needed and suitable experimental conditions such as initial concentration of NPs and liquid height in

  14. Synthesis and characterization of ion transport behavior in Cu2+-conducting nano composite polymer electrolyte membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Sahu, Tripti; Sahu, Manju; Karan, Shrabani; Mahipal, Y. K.; Sahu, D. K.; Agrawal, R. C.

    2017-07-01

    Synthesis and characterization of ion transport behavior in Cu2+-conducting nano composite polymer electrolyte (NCPE) films: [90PEO: 10Cu(CF3SO3)2]  +  x CuO have been reported. NCPE films have been formed by hot-press casting technique using solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film composition: [90PEO: 10Cu(CF3SO3)2] as 1st-phase host and nanoparticles of CuO in varying wt.(%) as 2nd-phase active filler. SPE: [90PEO: 10Cu(CF3SO3)2] was identified earlier as highest conducting film with room temperature conductivity (σ rt) ~ 3.0 x 10-6 S cm-1, which is three orders of magnitude higher than that of pure polymer host PEO with σ rt ~ 3.2  ×  10-9 S cm-1. Filler particle concentration dependent conductivity study revealed NCPE film: [90PEO: 10Cu(CF3SO3)2]  +  3%CuO as optimum conducting composition (OCC) exhibiting σ rt ~ 1.14  ×  10-5 S cm-1. Hence, by the fractional dispersal of 2nd-phase active filler into 1st-phase SPE host, σ-enhancement of approximately an order of magnitude has further been obtained. Ion transport behavior in NCPE OCC film has been characterized in terms of basic ionic parameters viz. ionic conductivity (σ), total ionic transference (t ion)/cationic (t +) numbers. Temperature dependent conductivity measurement has also been done to explain the mechanism of ion transport and to compute activation energy (E a). Materials characterization and hence, confirmation of complexation of salt in polymeric host and/or dispersal of filler particles in SPE host have been done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). All-solid-state battery in the cell configuration: Cu (Anode) || SPE host/NCPE OCC film || C  +  I2  +  Electrolyte) (Cathode) has been fabricated and cell performance has been studied under two load resistances viz

  15. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS: applications to climatology and transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Manney

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates thus emphasizes different aspects of the circulation compared to an EqL-coordinate framework: the jet coordinate reorders the data geometrically, thus highlighting the strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet, whereas EqL is a dynamical coordinate that may blur these spatial relationships but provides information on irreversible transport. The jet coordinate view identifies the concentration of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause in the region poleward of and below the jet core, as well as other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. Using the jet information in EqL coordinates allows us to study trace gas distributions in regions of weak versus strong jets, and demonstrates weaker transport barriers in regions with less jet influence. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas

  16. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  17. Quantitative Characterization of the Microstructure and Transport Properties of Biopolymer Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Biopolymer networks are of fundamental importance to many biological processes in normal and tumorous tissues. In this paper, we employ the panoply of theoretical and simulation techniques developed for characterizing heterogeneous materials to quantify the microstructure and effective diffusive transport properties (diffusion coefficient $D_e$ and mean survival time $\\tau$) of collagen type I networks at various collagen concentrations. In particular, we compute the pore-size probability density function $P(\\delta)$ for the networks and present a variety of analytical estimates of the effective diffusion coefficient $D_e$ for finite-sized diffusing particles. The Hashin-Strikman upper bound on the effective diffusion coefficient $D_e$ and the pore-size lower bound on the mean survival time $\\tau$ are used as benchmarks to test our analytical approximations and numerical results. Moreover, we generalize the efficient first-passage-time techniques for Brownian-motion simulations in suspensions of spheres to th...

  18. AB-stacked multilayer graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition: a characterization by hot carrier transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pinto, Carlos; De, Debtanu; Hadjiev, Viktor G; Peng, Haibing

    2012-02-28

    We report the synthesis of AB-stacked multilayer graphene via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu foils and demonstrate a method to construct suspended multilayer graphene devices. In four-terminal geometry, such devices were characterized by hot carrier transport at temperatures down to 240 mK and in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The differential conductance (dI/dV) shows a characteristic dip at longitudinal voltage bias V = 0 at low temperatures, indicating the presence of hot electron effect due to a weak electron-phonon coupling. Under magnetic fields, the magnitude of the dI/dV dip diminishes through the enhanced intra-Landau level cyclotron phonon scattering. Our results provide new perspectives in obtaining and understanding AB-stacked multilayer graphene, important for future graphene-based applications.

  19. Genome-wide identification and expression characterization of ABCC-MRP transporters in hexaploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kumar Bhati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ABCC multidrug resistance associated proteins (ABCC-MRP, a subclass of ABC transporters are involved in multiple physiological processes that include cellular homeostasis, metal detoxification and transport of glutathione-conjugates. Although they are well studied in humans, yeast and Arabidopsis, limited efforts have been made to address their possible role in crop like wheat. In the present work, eighteen wheat ABCC-MRP proteins were identified that showed the uniform distribution with families of rice and Arabidopsis. Organ specific quantitative expression analysis of wheat ABCC genes indicated significantly higher accumulation in roots (TaABCC2, TaABCC3, and TaABCC11 and TaABCC12, stem (TaABCC1, leaves (TaABCC16 and TaABCC17, flag leaf (TaABCC14 and TaABCC15 and seeds (TaABCC6, TaABCC8, TaABCC12, TaABCC13 and TaABCC17 implicating their role in the respective tissues. Differential transcript expression patterns were observed for TaABCC genes during grain maturation speculating their role during seed development. Hormone treatment experiments indicated that some of the ABCC genes could be transcriptionally regulated during seed development. In the presence of Cd or hydrogen peroxide, distinct molecular expression of wheat ABCC genes was observed in the wheat seedlings, suggesting their possible role during heavy metal generated oxidative stress. Functional characterization of the wheat transporter, TaABCC13 a homolog of maize LPA1 confirms its role in glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway and is able to utilize adenine biosynthetic intermediates as a substrate. This is the first comprehensive inventory of wheat ABCC-MRP gene subfamily.

  20. Characterization of electrogenic bromosulfophthalein transport in carnation petal microsomes and its inhibition by antibodies against bilitranslocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Sabina; Cocolo, Alessandra; Braidot, Enrico; Petrussa, Elisa; Peresson, Carlo; Medic, Nevenka; Macri, Francesco; Vianello, Angelo

    2005-07-01

    Bilitranslocase is a rat liver plasma membrane carrier, displaying a high-affinity binding site for bilirubin. It is competitively inhibited by grape anthocyanins, including aglycones and their mono- and di-glycosylated derivatives. In plant cells, anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and then translocated into the central vacuole, by mechanisms yet to be fully characterized. The aim of this work was to determine whether a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase is expressed in carnation petals, where it might play a role in the membrane transport of anthocyanins. The bromosulfophthalein-based assay of rat liver bilitranslocase transport activity was implemented in subcellular membrane fractions, leading to the identification of a bromosulfophthalein carrier (K(M) = 5.3 microm), which is competitively inhibited by cyanidine 3-glucoside (Ki = 51.6 microm) and mainly noncompetitively by cyanidin (Ki = 88.3 microm). Two antisequence antibodies against bilitranslocase inhibited this carrier. In analogy to liver bilitranslocase, one antibody identified a bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 1.7 nm) in the carnation carrier. The other antibody identified a high-affinity binding site for cyanidine 3-glucoside (Kd = 1.7 microm) on the carnation carrier only, and a high-affinity bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 0.33 nm) on the liver carrier only. Immunoblots showed a putative homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase in both plasma membrane and tonoplast fractions, isolated from carnation petals. Furthermore, only epidermal cells were immunolabeled in petal sections examined by microscopy. In conclusion, carnation petals express a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase, with a putative function in the membrane transport of secondary metabolites.

  1. Genome-wide identification and expression characterization of ABCC-MRP transporters in hexaploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Kaushal K; Sharma, Shivani; Aggarwal, Sipla; Kaur, Mandeep; Shukla, Vishnu; Kaur, Jagdeep; Mantri, Shrikant; Pandey, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    The ABCC multidrug resistance associated proteins (ABCC-MRP), a subclass of ABC transporters are involved in multiple physiological processes that include cellular homeostasis, metal detoxification, and transport of glutathione-conjugates. Although they are well-studied in humans, yeast, and Arabidopsis, limited efforts have been made to address their possible role in crop like wheat. In the present work, 18 wheat ABCC-MRP proteins were identified that showed the uniform distribution with sub-families from rice and Arabidopsis. Organ-specific quantitative expression analysis of wheat ABCC genes indicated significantly higher accumulation in roots (TaABCC2, TaABCC3, and TaABCC11 and TaABCC12), stem (TaABCC1), leaves (TaABCC16 and TaABCC17), flag leaf (TaABCC14 and TaABCC15), and seeds (TaABCC6, TaABCC8, TaABCC12, TaABCC13, and TaABCC17) implicating their role in the respective tissues. Differential transcript expression patterns were observed for TaABCC genes during grain maturation speculating their role during seed development. Hormone treatment experiments indicated that some of the ABCC genes could be transcriptionally regulated during seed development. In the presence of Cd or hydrogen peroxide, distinct molecular expression of wheat ABCC genes was observed in the wheat seedlings, suggesting their possible role during heavy metal generated oxidative stress. Functional characterization of the wheat transporter, TaABCC13 a homolog of maize LPA1 confirms its role in glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway and is able to utilize adenine biosynthetic intermediates as a substrate. This is the first comprehensive inventory of wheat ABCC-MRP gene subfamily.

  2. Characterization of Gene Candidates for Vacuolar Sodium Transport from Hordeum Vulgare

    KAUST Repository

    Scheu, Arne Hagen August

    2017-05-01

    Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress for land plants, and multiple mechanisms of salt tolerance have evolved. Tissue tolerance is one of these mechanisms, which involves the sequestration of sodium into the vacuole to retain low cytosolic sodium concentrations. This enables the plant to maintain cellular functions, and ultimately maintain growth and yield. However, the molecular components involved in tissue tolerance remain elusive. Several candidate genes for vacuolar sodium sequestration have recently been identified by proteome analysis of vacuolar membranes purified from the salt-tolerant cereal Hordeum vulgare (barley). In this study, I aimed to characterize these candidates in more detail. I successfully cloned coding sequences for the majority of candidate genes with primers designed based on the barley reference genome sequence. During the course of this study a newer genome sequence with improved annotations was published, to which I also compared my observations. To study the candidate genes, I used the heterologous expression system Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). I used several salt sensitive yeast strains (deficient in intrinsic sodium transporters) to test whether the candidate genes would affect their salt tolerance by mediating the sequestration of sodium into the yeast vacuole. I observed a reduction in growth upon expression for several of the gene candidate under salt-stress conditions. However, confocal microscopy suggests that most gene products are subject to degradation, and did not localize to the vacuolar membrane (tonoplast). Therefore, growth effects cannot be linked to protein function without further evidence. Various potential causes are discussed, including inaccuracies in the genome resource used as reference for primer design and issues inherent to the model system. Finally, I make suggestions on how to proceed to further characterize the candidate genes and hopefully identify novel sodium transporters from barley.

  3. Characterizing the Role of Nanoparticle Design on Tumor Transport and Stability in the Extracellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Alexandre

    Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting strategy for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents into established tumors. Advancements in nanomaterial synthesis have generated an extensive number of nanoparticle designs made from different materials. Unfortunately, it remains impossible to predict a design's effectiveness for in vivo tumor accumulation. Little is known about how a nanoparticle's morphology and surface chemistry affect its interactions with cells and proteins inside the tumor tissue. This thesis focuses on the development of in vitro experimental tools to evaluate how nanoparticle design affects transport in a three-dimensional tumor tissue and stability in the tumor microenvironment. Nanoparticle transport was evaluated using a novel 'tumor-on-a-chip' system where multicellular tumor spheroids were immobilized in a microfluidic channel. This setup created a three-dimensional tumor environment displaying physiological cell density, extracellular matrix organization, and interstitial flow rates. The tumor-on-a-chip demonstrated that accumulation of nanoparticles was limited to diameters below 110 nm and was improved by receptor targeting. Nanoparticle stability in the tumor microenvironment was evaluated using media isolated from different tumor cell lines. Nanoparticle diameter and surface chemistry were important determinants of stability in cancer cell-conditioned media. Small nanoparticles with unstable surface chemistries adsorbed cellular proteins on their surface and were prone to aggregation. Nanoparticle aggregation altered cellular interactions leading to changes in cell uptake. Using a novel technique to generate different aggregate sizes possessing a uniform surface composition, it was determined that aggregation can change receptor affinity, cell internalization mechanisms and sub-cellular sequestration patterns. Data from this thesis characterize the behavior of nanoparticles within modeled tumor environments and provide some

  4. Characterization of a genetically reconstituted high-affinity system for serotonin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.S.S.; Lam, D.M.K. (Baylor College of Medicine, Woodlands, TX (USA) Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Frnka, J.V.; Chen, D. (Baylor College of Medicine, Woodlands, TX (USA))

    1989-12-01

    By transfecting mouse fibroblast L-M cells with human genomic DNA, the authors have established and identified several clonal cell lines that stably express a high-affinity serotonin (5-HT)-uptake mechanism absent in untransfected host cells. One such cell line, L-S1, possesses features of 5-({sup 3}H)HT uptake similar to those previously characterized in the central nervous system and blood platelets: (i) specificity for 5-HT; (ii) antagonism by imipramine, a known inhibitor of high-affinity 5-HT uptake; (iii) both Na{sup +} and temperature dependence; (iv) kinetic saturability; and (v) high affinity for 5-HT. This cell line can be used to compare the relative efficacies of known blockers of 5-HT uptake and thereby offers a rapid and reliable assay system for testing novel inhibitors of this system. Since L-S1 contains stably integrated human DNA in its genome, they postulate that the observed 5-HT-uptake system resulted from the expression of human gene(s) coding for the 5-HT transporter. Thus, cell lines such as L-S1 may represent novel means for screening and developing therapeutic agents specific for neutrotransmitter-uptake systems as well as substrate for the cloning and elucidation of the genes encoding the various neurotransmitter transporters.

  5. Functional characterization of liver enhancers that regulate drug-associated transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Skewes-Cox, P; Fukushima, H; Hesselson, S; Yee, S W; Ramsey, L B; Nguyen, L; Eshragh, J L; Castro, R A; Wen, C C; Stryke, D; Johns, S J; Ferrin, T E; Kwok, P-Y; Relling, M V; Giacomini, K M; Kroetz, D L; Ahituv, N

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about how genetic variations in enhancers influence drug response. In this study, we investigated whether nucleotide variations in enhancers that regulate drug transporters can alter their expression levels. Using comparative genomics and liver-specific transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analyses, we identified evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) surrounding nine liver membrane transporters that interact with commonly used pharmaceuticals. The top 50 ECRs were screened for enhancer activity in vivo, of which five--located around ABCB11, SLC10A1, SLCO1B1, SLCO1A2, and SLC47A1--exhibited significant enhancer activity. Common variants identified in a large ethnically diverse cohort (n = 272) were assayed for differential enhancer activity, and three variants were found to have significant effects on reporter activity as compared with the reference allele. In addition, one variant was associated with reduced SLCO1A2 mRNA expression levels in human liver tissues, and another was associated with increased methotrexate (MTX) clearance in patients. This work provides a general model for the rapid characterization of liver enhancers and identifies associations between enhancer variants and drug response.

  6. Chemical vapor transport and characterization of MnBi2Se4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowka, Christian; Gellesch, Markus; Enrique Hamann Borrero, Jorge; Partzsch, Sven; Wuttke, Christoph; Steckel, Frank; Hess, Christian; Wolter, Anja U. B.; Teresa Corredor Bohorquez, Laura; Büchner, Bernd; Hampel, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Layered metal chalcogenides such as MnBi2Se4 are interesting candidates for a wide field of applications such as for thermo- and photoelectrics. High-quality single crystals are necessary in order to investigate their properties which can be prepared by chemical vapor transport (CVT). The CVT of MnBi2Se4 has not been investigated until this point and is subject of the presented paper. We obtained needle-like MnBi2Se4 single crystals with a length up to 15 mm. The magnetic characterization has shown an antiferromagnetic transition around 14 K. Additionally, electrical transport described MnBi2Se4 as a narrow band-gap semiconductor (EGap=0.15 eV). Thermodynamic data for MnBi2Se4 at room temperature were determined to H ° = - 305 KJ ·mol-1 , S=321 J K-1·mol-1 and Cp = 167.568 + 25.979 ·10-3 · TJ ·K-1 ·mol-1 , respectively. Our results on CVT-grown single crystals confirm reported data from literature and complete the data set for MnBi2Se4.

  7. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  8. Characterization of Organic Anion Transporter 2 (SLC22A7): A Highly Efficient Transporter for Creatinine and Species-Dependent Renal Tubular Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong; Liu, Tongtong; Morse, Bridget L; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yueping; Qiu, Xi; Chen, Cliff; Lewin, Anne C; Wang, Xi-Tao; Liu, Guowen; Christopher, Lisa J; Marathe, Punit; Lai, Yurong

    2015-07-01

    The contribution of organic anion transporter OAT2 (SLC22A7) to the renal tubular secretion of creatinine and its exact localization in the kidney are reportedly controversial. In the present investigation, the transport of creatinine was assessed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells that stably expressed human OAT2 (OAT2-HEK) and isolated human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTCs). The tubular localization of OAT2 in human, monkey, and rat kidney was characterized. The overexpression of OAT2 significantly enhanced the uptake of creatinine in OAT2-HEK cells. Under physiologic conditions (creatinine concentrations of 41.2 and 123.5 µM), the initial rate of OAT2-mediated creatinine transport was approximately 11-, 80-, and 80-fold higher than OCT2, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein (MATE)1, and MATE2K, respectively, resulting in approximately 37-, 1850-, and 80-fold increase of the intrinsic transport clearance when normalized to the transporter protein concentrations. Creatinine intracellular uptake and transcellular transport in HRPTCs were decreased in the presence of 50 µM bromosulfophthalein and 100 µM indomethacin, which inhibited OAT2 more potently than other known creatinine transporters, OCT2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins MATE1 and MATE2K (IC50: 1.3 µM vs. > 100 µM and 2.1 µM vs. > 200 µM for bromosulfophthalein and indomethacin, respectively) Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that OAT2 protein was localized to both basolateral and apical membranes of human and cynomolgus monkey renal proximal tubules, but appeared only on the apical membrane of rat proximal tubules. Collectively, the findings revealed the important role of OAT2 in renal secretion and possible reabsorption of creatinine and suggested a molecular basis for potential species difference in the transporter handling of creatinine.

  9. Radial Reflection Diffraction Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K; Norton, S J

    2003-10-10

    We develop a wave-based tomographic imaging algorithm based upon a single rotating radially outward oriented transducer. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, the transducer launches a primary field and collects the backscattered field in a ''pitch/catch'' operation. The hardware configuration, operating mode, and data collection method is identical to that of most medical intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) systems. IVUS systems form images of the medium surrounding the probe based upon ultrasonic B-scans, using a straight-ray model of sound propagation. Our goal is to develop a wave-based imaging algorithm using diffraction tomography techniques. Given the hardware configuration and the imaging method, we refer to this system as ''radial reflection diffraction tomography.'' We consider two hardware configurations: a multimonostatic mode using a single transducer as described above, and a multistatic mode consisting of a single transmitter and an aperture formed by multiple receivers. In this latter case, the entire source/receiver aperture rotates about the fixed radius. Practically, such a probe is mounted at the end of a catheter or snaking tube that can be inserted into a part or medium with the goal of forming images of the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. We derive an analytic expression for the multimonostatic inverse but ultimately use the new Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm to construct images using both operating modes. Applications include improved IVUS imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts with existing access holes.

  10. Forty years of 90Sr in situ migration: importance of soil characterization in modeling transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J M; Piault, E; Macouillard, D; Juncos, C

    2006-01-01

    In 1960 experiments were carried out on the transfer of (90)Sr between soil, grapes and wine. The experiments were conducted in situ on a piece of land limited by two control strips. The (90)Sr migration over the last 40 years was studied by performing radiological and physico-chemical characterizations of the soil on eight 70 cm deep cores. The vertical migration modeling of (90)Sr required the definition of a triple layer conceptual model integrating the rainwater infiltration at constant flux as the only external factor of influence. Afterwards the importance of a detailed soil characterization for modeling was discussed and satisfactory simulation of the (90)Sr vertical transport was obtained and showed a calculated migration rate of about 1.0 cm year(-1) in full agreement with the in situ measured values. The discussion was regarding some of the key parameters such as granulometry, organic matter content (in the Van Genuchten parameter determination), Kd and the efficient rainwater infiltration. Besides the experimental data, simplifying assumptions in modeling such as water-soil redistribution calculation and factual discontinuities in conceptual model were examined.

  11. Functional characterization of a transition metal ion transporter, OsZIP6 from rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    P G, Kavitha; Kuruvilla, Sam; Mathew, M K

    2015-12-01

    Micronutrients are important for the growth and development of plants, which deploy families of transporters for their uptake and distribution. We have functionally characterized a novel transition metal ion transporter from rice, OsZIP6 (Oryza sativa zinc regulated transporter, iron regulated transporter-like protein 6). The transporter was found to be transcriptionally activated in shoot and root tissues in response to deficiency in Fe(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+). OsZIP6 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, where currents were observed on addition of Co(2+), Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) but not Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). This substrate range for OsZIP6, identified using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ion transport by OsZIP6 was found to be pH dependent and enhanced transport was observed at acidic pH. Radioisotope uptake suggested that Co(2+) competitively inhibits Fe(2+) uptake by OsZIP6. Identification and characterization of ZIP family members from crop plants will contribute to an understanding of nutrient mineral homeostasis in these plants.

  12. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  13. One-Dimensional Perovskite Manganite Oxide Nanostructures: Recent Developments in Synthesis, Characterization, Transport Properties, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liang, Lizhi; Wu, Heng; Zhu, Xinhua

    2016-12-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures, including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanofibers, and nanobelts, have promising applications in mesoscopic physics and nanoscale devices. In contrast to other nanostructures, one-dimensional nanostructures can provide unique advantages in investigating the size and dimensionality dependence of the materials' physical properties, such as electrical, thermal, and mechanical performances, and in constructing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among the one-dimensional nanostructures, one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures have been received much attention due to their unusual electron transport and magnetic properties, which are indispensable for the applications in microelectronic, magnetic, and spintronic devices. In the past two decades, much effort has been made to synthesize and characterize one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in the forms of nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanobelts. Various physical and chemical deposition techniques and growth mechanisms are explored and developed to control the morphology, identical shape, uniform size, crystalline structure, defects, and homogenous stoichiometry of the one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on the rational synthesis, structural characterization, fundamental properties, and unique applications of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in nanotechnology. It begins with the rational synthesis of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures and then summarizes their structural characterizations. Fundamental physical properties of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures are also highlighted, and a range of unique applications in information storages, field-effect transistors, and spintronic devices are discussed. Finally, we conclude this review with some perspectives/outlook and future

  14. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS: applications to climatology and transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Manney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates highlights important advantages in comparison to an EqL-coordinate view: strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet are washed out in the latter and clearly highlighted in the former. The jet coordinate view emphasizes the presence of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause, especially poleward of and below the jet core, and highlights other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the jet, and evidence of intrusions of stratospheric air below the tropopause below and poleward of the subtropical jet; these features are consistent between instruments and among multiple trace gases. Our characterization of the jets is facilitating studies that will improve our understanding of upper tropospheric trace gas evolution.

  15. Functional characterization and Me2+ ion specificity of a Ca2+-citrate transporter from Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blancato, Victor S.; Magni, Christian; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary transporters of the bacterial CitMHS family transport citrate in complex with a metal ion. Different members of the family are specific for the metal ion in the complex and have been shown to transport Mg2+-citrate, Ca2+-citrate or Fe3+-citrate. The Fe3+-citrate transporter of Streptococcu

  16. Characterization and quantification of bioaerosols in Saharan dust transported across the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Ditas, Florian; Klimach, Thomas; Prass, Maria; Hrabe de Angelis, Isabella; Blades, Edmund; Holanda, Bruna; Pöhlker, Mira; Maurus, Isabel; Kopper, Gila; Farrell, David; Stevens, Bjorn; Prospero, Joseph M.; Ulrich, Pöschl; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Pöhlker, Christopher; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Primary biological aerosols (bioaerosols), forming a subset of atmospheric particles, are directly released from the biosphere into the atmosphere. They comprise living and dead organisms (e.g., algae, bacteria, archaea), reproduction units (e.g., pollen, seeds, spores) as well as organism fragments and excretions. They play a key role in the dispersal of otherwise mostly sessile organisms (e.g. plants), but also in the spread of pathogens and diseases. Recently, also soil dust has been described to frequently occur in a close connection with biological particles (Conen et al., 2011). Bioaerosols can serve as nuclei for cloud droplets and ice crystals and may influence the radiative properties of the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrological cycle and climate (Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2016). It has been well described that dust masses are transported across the Atlantic comprising a large variety of bacteria and fungi, but the origin of the biological material remained largely unknown (Prospero et al., 2005). In the present study we aim to accomplish three major tasks, i.e., 1) Thorough identification and quantification of bioaerosol particles, 2) Characterization of ice nucleating (IN) properties of bioaerosols, and 3) Evaluation of similarities between bioaerosols and biological material in source regions of dust. For our field work we utilized filter techniques to collect aerosol samples of transatlantically transported dust at the easternmost site (Ragged Point) on the Caribbean island Barbados. Sampling took place from July to August 2016, when dust transport volumes were expected to reach peak amounts. Total suspended particles were collected ˜30 m above sea level using a high volume sampler (˜ 500 L min-1) and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI™) to obtain size-resolved samples. Directly after sampling at different time intervals (i.e. 24-hour, 48-hour, and 7-day samples) the filters were frozen until further analyses. In a

  17. Characterization of reactive transport by 3-D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) under unsaturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee D.

    2016-10-01

    The leaching of nitrate from intensively used arable soil is of major concern in many countries. In this study, we show how time lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used to characterize spatially heterogeneous processes of ion production, consumption, and transport in soils. A controlled release fertilizer was introduced into an undisturbed soil core in a laboratory lysimeter and subjected to infiltration events. The production of ions resulting from processes associated with nitrification and their transport through the soil core was observed by time lapse ERT and analysis of seepage water samples from a multicompartment sampler. ERT images show development and propagation of a high-conductivity plume from the fertilizer source zone. Molar amounts of nitrate produced in and exported from the soil core could be well reproduced by time lapse ERT using a spatial moment analysis. Furthermore, we observed that several shape measures of local breakthrough-curves (BTCs) of seepage water conductivity and nitrate derived by effluent analyses and BTCs of bulk conductivity derived by ERT are highly correlated, indicating the preservation of spatial differences of the plume breakthrough in the ERT data. Also differences between nitrate breakthrough and a conservative tracer breakthrough can be observed by ERT. However, the estimation of target ion concentrations by ERT is error bound and the smoothing algorithm of the inversion masks spatial conductivity differences. This results in difficulties reproducing spatial differences of ion source functions and variances of travel times. Despite the observed limitations, we conclude that time lapse ERT can be qualitatively and quantitatively informative with respect to processes affecting the fate of nitrate in arable soils.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the microstructure and transport properties of biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Biopolymer networks are of fundamental importance to many biological processes in normal and tumorous tissues. In this paper, we employ the panoply of theoretical and simulation techniques developed for characterizing heterogeneous materials to quantify the microstructure and effective diffusive transport properties (diffusion coefficient De and mean survival time τ) of collagen type I networks at various collagen concentrations. In particular, we compute the pore-size probability density function P(δ) for the networks and present a variety of analytical estimates of the effective diffusion coefficient De for finite-sized diffusing particles, including the low-density approximation, the Ogston approximation and the Torquato approximation. The Hashin-Strikman upper bound on the effective diffusion coefficient De and the pore-size lower bound on the mean survival time τ are used as benchmarks to test our analytical approximations and numerical results. Moreover, we generalize the efficient first-passage-time techniques for Brownian-motion simulations in suspensions of spheres to the case of fiber networks and compute the associated effective diffusion coefficient De as well as the mean survival time τ, which is related to nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times. Our numerical results for De are in excellent agreement with analytical results for simple network microstructures, such as periodic arrays of parallel cylinders. Specifically, the Torquato approximation provides the most accurate estimates of De for all collagen concentrations among all of the analytical approximations we consider. We formulate a universal curve for τ for the networks at different collagen concentrations, extending the work of Torquato and Yeong (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 106 8814). We apply rigorous cross-property relations to estimate the effective bulk modulus of collagen networks from a knowledge of the effective diffusion coefficient computed here. The use of cross-property relations

  19. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT......-2 and mouse GAT3, and in accordance with the nomenclature for rat GABA transporters, we therefore refer to the transporter as human GAT-2. We used electrophysiological and cell-based methods to demonstrate that this protein is a functional transporter of GABA. The transport was saturable...

  20. Turbine with radial acting seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  1. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport Through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Sasha Norien

    Land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers. Although nutrient rich, biosolids have been found to contain high concentrations of unregulated and/or unrecognized emerging contaminants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, personal care products) while containing a significant fraction of inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of these nano-sized colloidal materials through the soil column and into our surface and groundwater bodies. Transport of emerging pollutants of concern through the soil column, at minimum, is impacted by colloidal properties (e.g., chemical composition, shape, aggregation kinetics), solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter), and water flow velocity. The purpose of this current research was to characterize the long-term transport behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al 2O3) through a natural porous media with changes in pH, aqueous-phase concentration, pore-water velocity and electrolyte valence. Additionally, deposition rates during the initial stages of deposition were compared to several models developed based on colloid filtration theory and DLVO stability theory. Benchtop column laboratory experiments showed that, under environmentally relevant groundwater conditions, Al2O3 nanoparticles are mobile through saturated porous media. Mobility increased under conditions in which the nanoparticles and porous media were of like charge (pH 9). Changes in linear pore water velocity, under these same high pH conditions, showed similar transport behavior with little mass retained in the system. Deposition is believed to be kinetically controlled at pH 9, as evidenced by the slightly earlier breakthrough as flow rate increased and was further supported by observed concentration effects on the arrival wave

  2. Characterization of ferric and ferrous iron transport systems in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Mey, Alexandra R; Leimbach, Andreas; Fisher, Carolyn F; Payne, Shelley M

    2006-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae has multiple iron acquisition systems, including TonB-dependent transport of heme and of the catechol siderophore vibriobactin. Strains defective in both of these systems grow well in laboratory media and in the infant mouse intestine, indicating the presence of additional iron acquisition systems. Previously uncharacterized potential iron transport systems, including a homologue of the ferrous transporter Feo and a periplasmic binding protein-dependent ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport system, termed Fbp, were identified in the V. cholerae genome sequence. Clones encoding either the Feo or the Fbp system exhibited characteristics of iron transporters: both repressed the expression of lacZ cloned under the control of a Fur-regulated promoter in Escherichia coli and also conferred growth on a Shigella flexneri mutant that has a severe defect in iron transport. Two other ABC transporters were also evaluated but were negative by these assays. Transport of radioactive iron by the Feo system into the S. flexneri iron transport mutant was stimulated by the reducing agent ascorbate, consistent with Feo functioning as a ferrous transporter. Conversely, ascorbate inhibited transport by the Fbp system, suggesting that it transports ferric iron. The growth of V. cholerae strains carrying mutations in one or more of the potential iron transport genes indicated that both Feo and Fbp contribute to iron acquisition. However, a mutant defective in the vibriobactin, Fbp, and Feo systems was not attenuated in a suckling mouse model, suggesting that at least one other iron transport system can be used in vivo.

  3. Molecular Characterization of CTR-type Copper Transporters in an Oceanic Diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica 1005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L.; Price, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for phytoplankton growth because of its role as a redox cofactor in electron transfer proteins in photosynthesis and respiration, and a potentially limiting resource in parts of the open sea. Thalassiosira oceanica 1005 can grow at inorganic copper concentrations varying from 10 fmol/L to 10 nmol/L by regulating copper uptake across plasma membrane. Four putative CTR-type copper transporter genes (ToCTR1, ToCTR2, ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2) were identified by BLASTP search against the T. oceanica genome. Predicted gene models were revised by assembled mRNA sequencing transcripts and updated gene models contained all conserved features of characterized CTR-type copper transporters. ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 may arise from one another by gene duplication as they shared a sequence similarity of 97.6% with a peptide insertion of 5 amino acids at N-terminus of ToCTR3.1. The expression of ToCTR1, ToCTR2 and ToCTR3.1/3.2 was upregulated in low copper concentrations, but only ToCTR3.1/3.2 showed a significant increase (2.5 fold) in copper-starved cells. Both ToCTR3.1 and ToCTR3.2 restored growth of a yeast double mutant, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ctr1Δctr3Δ, in copper deficient medium. GFP-fused ToCTR expression showed that some ToCTR3.1 localized to the plasma membrane but a large portion was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Inefficient targeting of ToCTR3.1 to the yeast outer membrane may explain poorer growth compared to the Saccharomyces native ScCTR1 transformant. Thus, diatom CTR genes encoding CTR-type copper transporters show high-affinity copper uptake and their regulation may enable diatoms to survive in ocean environments containing a wide range of copper concentrations.

  4. Characterization of H+ and HCO3- transporters in CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zoltán Rakonczay Jr; Amy Fearn; Péter Hegyi; Imre Boros; Michael A Gray; Barry E Argent

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize H+ and HCO3- transporters in polarized CFPAC-1 human pancreatic duct cells, which were derived from a cystic fibrosis patient with the AF508 CFTR mutation.METHODS: CFPAC-1 cells were seeded at high density onto permeable supports and grown to confluence. The cells were loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and mounted into a perfusion chamber, which allowed the simultaneous perfusion of the basolateral and apical membranes. Transmembrane base flux was calculated from the changes in intracellular pH and the buffering capacity of the cells.RESULTS: Our results showed differential permeability to HCO3-/CO2 at the apical and basolateral membranes of CFPAC-1 cells. Na+/HCO3- co-transporters (NBCs)and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers (Aes) were present on the basolateral membrane, and Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) on both the apical and basolateral membranes of the cells. Basolateral HCO3- uptake was sensitive to variations of extracellular K+ concentration, the membrane permeable carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors acetazolamide (100 μmol/L) and ethoxyzolamide (100μmol/L), and was partially inhibited by H2-DIDS (600μmol/L). The membrane-impermeable CA inhibitor 1-N-(4-sulfamoylphenylethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine perchlorate did not have any effect on HCO3- uptake.The basolateral AE had a much higher activity than that in the apical membrane, whereas there was no such difference with the NHE under resting conditions.Also, 10 μmol/L forskolin did not significantly influence Cl-/HCO3- exchange on the apical and basolateral membranes. The administration of 250 μmol/L H2-DIDS significantly inhibited the basolateral AE. Amiloride (300μmol/L) completely inhibited NHEs on both membranes of the cells. RT-PCR revealed the expression of pNBC1,AE2, and NHE1 mRNA.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that apart from the lack of CFTR and apical Cf/HCO3- exchanger activity,CFPAC-1 cells express similar H+ and HCO3- transporters to those observed in native animal

  5. Radial gas turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausche, S.; Ohlsson, Johan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a program dealing with design point calculations of radial turbine machinery, including both compressor and turbine, with as few input data as possible. Some simple stress calculations and turbine metal blade temperatures were also included. This program was then implanted in a German thermodynamics program, Gasturb, a program calculating design and off-design performance of gas turbines. The calculations proceed with a lot of assumptions, necessary to finish the task, concerning pressure losses, velocity distribution, blockage, etc., and have been correlated with empirical data from VAT. Most of these values could have been input data, but to prevent the user of the program from drowning in input values, they are set as default values in the program code. The output data consist of geometry, Mach numbers, predicted component efficiency etc., and a number of graphical plots of geometry and velocity triangles. For the cases examined, the error in predicted efficiency level was within {+-} 1-2% points, and quite satisfactory errors in geometrical and thermodynamic conditions were obtained Examination paper. 18 refs, 36 figs

  6. Characterizing the Occurrence and Transport of Brackish Groundwater in Southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    worland, S.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Bangladesh is host to the largest and the most active delta system in the world. The morphology of the southern part of the country is characterized by low lying deltaic plains partitioned by the distributary networks of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna river systems. Much of the tidal mangrove forest ecosystem of the lower delta has been converted into poldered islands that sustain shrimp farming and rice production. The polder inhabitants depend on shallow groundwater as a primary source for drinking water and sanitation. Understanding the origin and hydrologic controls on the distribution of the brackish water and freshwater on the polder is a necessary step to ensuring a sustainable and potable freshwater source for drinking and irrigation. Preliminary sampling from shallow tube wells on Polder 32 in southwest Bangladesh suggests sporadic lateral apportioning of fresh water in the primarily brackish aquifer. This research characterizes the occurrence, transport and fate of the brackish groundwater through a combination of 3H and 14C dating, geochemical signatures, subsurface mapping using inversions from electromagnetic induction, and a 1D finite difference model and a 2D finite element model. The geochemical analysis and radiometric dating suggest that the salt water originates from paleo-brackish estuarine water deposited ~5000 years ago along with the sediments that compose the shallow aquifer. Inversions of electromagnetic survey data show potential freshwater recharge areas where the clay cap pinches out. The finite difference model demonstrates that recharge from the distributary channels is unlikely due to the low transmissivity of the clay channel beds. The finite element model gives reasonable estimates of the flushing rates of the connate brackish water beneath the polder. Inversion of electromagnetic data from a two hundred meter transect taken on Polder 32 Head gradient and groundwater flow vectors for fixed head boundary conditions across Polder

  7. [(11)C]MADAM, a new serotonin transporter radioligand characterized in the monkey brain by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldin, Christer; Lundberg, Johan; Sóvágó, Judit; Gulyás, Balázs; Guilloteau, Denis; Vercouillie, Johnny; Emond, Patrick; Chalon, Sylvie; Tarkiainen, Jari; Hiltunen, Jukka; Farde, Lars

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potential of a new selective serotonin transporter (5-HTT) inhibitor, N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylphenylthio)benzylamine (MADAM, K(i)=1.65 nM), as a PET radioligand for examination of 5-HTT in the nonhuman primate brain. MADAM was radiolabeled by an N-methylation reaction using [(11)C]methyl triflate and the binding was characterized by PET in four cynomolgus monkeys. Metabolite levels in plasma were measured by gradient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The radiochemical incorporation yield of [(11)C]MADAM was 75-80% and the specific radioactivity at the time of administration was 34-652 GBq/micromol (n=8). The highest uptake of radioactivity was observed in striatum, thalamus, mesencephalon, and the lower brainstem. Lower binding was detected in neocortex and the lowest radioactive uptake was found in the cerebellum. This distribution is in accordance with the known expression of 5-HTT in vitro. The fraction of the total radioactivity in monkey plasma representing unchanged [(11)C]MADAM was 20% at 45 min after injection, as measured by gradient HPLC. Pretreatment measurements, using unlabeled citalopram, GBR 12909, and maprotiline, as well as a displacement measurement, using unlabeled MADAM, confirmed that [(11)C]MADAM binds selectively and reversibly to 5-HTT, and support the use of the cerebellum as reference region. The present characterization of binding in the monkey brain suggests that [(11)C]MADAM is a potential PET radioligand for quantitative studies of 5-HTT binding in the human brain.

  8. Characterization of storm runoff from selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Kevin J.; Reinhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect sufficient stormwater water-quality and flow data to document the type, concentration, and event load of selected constituents transported from South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) maintenance yards by stormwater runoff.

  9. Characterization of cross-linked cellulosic ion-exchange adsorbents: 2. Protein sorption and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, James M; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-03-18

    Adsorption behavior in the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) was characterized using methods to assess, quantitatively and qualitatively, the dynamics of protein uptake as well as static adsorption as a function of ionic strength and protein concentration using several model proteins. The three exchangers studied all presented relatively high adsorptive capacities under low ionic strength conditions, comparable to commercially available resins containing polymer functionalization aimed at increasing that particular characteristic. The strong cation- and anion-exchange moieties showed higher sensitivity to increasing salt concentrations, but protein affinity on the salt-tolerant STAR AX HyperCel exchanger remained strong at ionic strengths normally used in downstream processing to elute material fully during ion-exchange chromatography. Very high uptake rates were observed in both batch kinetics experiments and time-series confocal laser scanning microscopy, suggesting low intraparticle transport resistances relative to external film resistance, even at higher bulk protein concentrations where the opposite is typically observed. Electron microscopy imaging of protein adsorbed phases provided additional insight into particle structure that could not be resolved in previous work on the bare resins.

  10. Radial heat transfer behavior of impinging submerged circular jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.W.; Ma, C.F. [Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, The Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education (China)

    2006-05-15

    Experiments were performed to investigate the radial heat transfer behaviors of impinging submerged circular jets. Local heat transfer rate at several fixed radial locations and different nozzle-to-plate spacings were correlated and compared. Results reveal that with the jet being far from the stagnation point, the coefficient in the correlation NuRe decreases while the exponent characterizing the flow pattern of the working liquid increases. (author)

  11. Characterizing demographics, injury severity, and intubation status for patients transported by air or ground ambulance to a rural burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Van Heukelom, Paul; Harland, Karisa; Denning, Gerene; Liao, Junlin; Born, Janelle; Latenser, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Our study was designed to characterize intubation status among patients transported by air or ground ambulance to a rural burn center. A retrospective chart review of patients arriving at our burn center from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2009 was completed. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed. During the study period, 259 air and 590 ground ambulance patients met inclusion criteria. Air ambulance patients were older and had higher total body surface area burned, lower Glasgow Coma scores, longer lengths of stay, and more frequent inhalation injuries. Approximately 10% of patients arriving by air were intubated after burn center admission, and 49% of intubated patients were extubated within 24 hours of admission. These values were 2% and 40%, respectively, for patients transported by ground. Increasing age and air ambulance transport increased the overall likelihood of change in intubation status. The likelihood of intubation by burn center providers increased with age, with suspicion of inhalation injury, and for patients transported by air. The likelihood of extubation within 24 hours of burn center admission increased with age, decreased with suspected inhalation injury, and was independent of transport mode. Among our patient population, more severely injured patients were being transported by air ambulance. However, age, suspicion of inhalation injury, and mode of transport showed a complex pattern of associations with changes in intubation status, and illustrate the need to develop better prehospital guidelines for intubation in burn patients.

  12. Glycine receptors influence radial migration in the embryonic mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmervoll, Birgit; Denter, Denise G; Sava, Irina; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2011-07-13

    To investigate whether glycine receptors influence radial migration in the neocortex, we analyzed the effect of glycine and the glycinergic antagonist strychnine, on the distribution of 5-bromo-2'deoxyuridine-labeled neurons in organotypic slice cultures from embryonic mice cortices. Application of glycine impeded radial migration only in the presence of the glycine-transport blockers, ALX-5407 and ALX-1393. This effect was blocked by the specific glycine receptor antagonist strychnine, whereas application of strychnine in the absence of glycine was without effect. We conclude from these observations that an activation of glycine receptors can impede radial migration, but that the glycinergic system is not directly implicated in the regulation of radial migration in organotypic slice cultures.

  13. Characterization of Modern and Fossil Mineral Dust Transported to High Altitude in the Western Alps: Saharan Sources and Transport Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Thevenon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust aerosols recently collected at the high-altitude Jungfraujoch research station (N, E; 3580 m a.s.l. were compared to mineral dust deposited at the Colle Gnifetti glacier (N, E; 4455 m a.s.l. over the last millennium. Radiogenic isotope signatures and backward trajectories analyses indicate that major dust sources are situated in the north-central to north-western part of the Saharan desert. Less radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions of PM10 aerosols and of mineral particles deposited during periods of low dust transfer likely result from the enhancement of the background chemically-weathered Saharan source. Saharan dust mobilization and transport were relatively reduced during the second part of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1690–1870 except within the greatest Saharan dust event deposited around 1770. After ca. 1870, sustained dust deposition suggests that increased mineral dust transport over the Alps during the last century could be due to stronger spring/summer North Atlantic southwesterlies and drier winters in North Africa. On the other hand, increasing carbonaceous particle emissions from fossil fuel combustion combined to a higher lead enrichment factor point to concomitant anthropogenic sources of particulate pollutants reaching high-altitude European glaciers during the last century.

  14. The Medicago truncatula Sucrose Transporter Family: Characterization and Implication of Key Members in Carbon Partitioning towards Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joan Doidy; Diederik van Tuinen; Olivier Lamotte; Marion Corneillat; Gérard Alcaraz; Daniel Wipf

    2012-01-01

    We identified de novo sucrose transporter (SUT) genes involved in long-distance transport of sucrose from photosynthetic source leaves towards sink organs in the model leguminous species Medicago truncatula.The identification and functional analysis of sugar transporters provide key information on mechanisms that underlie carbon partitioning in plant-microorganism interactions.In that way,full-length sequences of the M.truncatula SUT (MtSUT)family were retrieved and biochemical characterization of MtSUT members was performed by heterologous expression in yeast.The MtSUT family now comprises six genes which distribute among Dicotyledonous clades.MtSUT1-1 and MtSUT4-1 are key members in regard to their expression profiles in source leaves and sink roots and were characterized as functional H+/sucrose transporters.Physiological and molecular responses to phosphorus supply and inoculation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices was studied by gene expression and sugar quantification analyses.Sucrose represents the main sugar transport form in M.truncatula and the expression profiles of MtSUT1-1,MtSUT2,and MtSUT4-1 highlight a fine-tuning regulation for beneficial sugar fluxes towards the fungal symbiont.Taken together,these results suggest distinct functions for proteins from the SUT1,SUT2,and SUT4 clades in plant and in biotrophic interactions.

  15. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  16. A human hepatoma cell line FLC4 cultured on the radial flow bioreactor as a model for human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYW; BabuE

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocytes play central roles in the metabolism and excretion of drugs and xenobiovics.For this purpose,hepatocytes were endowed with high levels of enzyme activity for the phase I and phase Ⅱ metabolism as well as high levels of transmembrane transport activity which enables the entrance and the exit of drugs and xenobiotics and their metabolites through the plasma membrane of the hepatocytes.They include the transporters in the canalicular and sinusoidal membrane.Although a lot of cell lines were established from hepatoma cells or normal hepatocytes,none of them are fully satisfactory in the expression of the enzymes and transportens.We have established and characterized a hepatoma cell line designated FLC4 and found that this cell line exhibits properties quite similar to those of the normal hepatocytes in the light of enzymes and transporters for drug metabolism and transkport when they are cultured on the radial flow bioreactors.Using FLC4 cells cultured on the radial flow bioreactors,we are developing in vitro systems to evaluate the interaction of drugs with liver transporters and drug-drug interaction through the hepa tocyte transporters.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes with controlled ion transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui

    2011-12-01

    Ion-containing block copolymers hold promise as next-generation polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) materials due to their capability to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures facilitating proton transport over a wide range of conditions. Ion-containing block copolymers, sulfonated poly(styrene- b-vinylidene fluoride-b-styrene), with varied degrees of sulfonation were synthesized. The synthetic strategy involved a new approach to chain-end functionalized poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a macro-initiator followed by atom transfer polymerization of styrene and sulfonation. Characterization of the polymers were extensively carried out by 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance and Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry analysis. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to study the phase separation and self-assembled morphology. Strong dependence of ion exchange capacity, water absorption, morphology and proton conductivity on the degree of sulfonation has been found. It has been observed that the conductivities of the block copolymers are considerably higher than the random copolymers of polystyrene and sulfonated polystyrene possessing similar ion exchange capacities. Copolymers of vinylidene fluoride and perfluoro(4-methyl-3,6-dioxane-7-ene) sulfonyl fluoride containing amino end-groups were synthesized for the first time. The prepared aminoterminated polymers underwent cross-linking reactions with 1,3,5-benzene triisocyanate to form proton conductive networks. The chain-end crosslinked fluoropolymer membranes exhibited excellent thermal, hydrolytic and oxidative stabilities. The ion exchange capacity, water uptake, the state of absorbed water, and transport properties of the membranes were found to be highly dependent upon the chemical composition of the copolymers. The cross-linked membranes showed extremely low methanol permeability, while maintaining high proton

  18. Lattice radial quantization by cubature

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Basic aspects of a program to put field theories quantized in radial coordinates on the lattice are presented. Only scalar fields are discussed. Simple examples are solved to illustrate the strategy when applied to the 3D Ising model.

  19. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  20. Virus in Groundwater: Characterization of transport mechanisms and impacts on an agricultural area in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, P. A.; Colina, R.; Victoria, M.; Alvareda, E.; Burutaran, L.; Ramos, J.; Lopez, F.; Soler, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, due to the "natural filter" that occurs in porous media, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. In this area water is pumped from the "Salto Aquifer", a free sedimentary aquifer. Below this sedimentary deposit is the "Arapey" basaltic formation, which is also exploited for water productions on its fractured zones. A screening campaign has been performed searching for bacterial and viral contamination. Total and fecal coliforms have been found on several wells and Rotavirus and Adenovirus have been detected. A subgroup of the screening wells has been selected for an annual survey. On this subgroup, besides bacteria and viruses analysis, a standard physical and chemical characterization was performed. Results show a significant seasonal variation on microbiological contamination. In addition to field studies, rotavirus circulation experiments on columns are being performed. The objective of this experiments is to determinate the parameters that control virus transport in porous media. The results of the study are expected to provide an insight into the impacts of groundwater on Salto's viral gastroenterocolitis outbreaks.

  1. Characterization of fluorescent iron nanoparticles—candidates for multimodal tracking of neuronal transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina R. Kyrtsos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles were coated with either dextran or polyacrylic acid (PAA, and compared as potential traceable carriers for targeted intraneuronal therapeutics. Nanoparticles were fabricated using a chemical reduction method and their number mean diameter, aggregation, surface chemistry, crystal structure and magnetic properties were characterized. The crystalline core of the dextran-coated nanoparticles was Fe3O4, while the PAA-coated sample had an iron core. The dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONs and PAA-coated iron nanoparticles (PAINs were both stable and had a similar mean diameter of less than 10 nm. However, morphologically, the PAINs were well dispersed, while the DIONs aggregated. DIONs exhibited the presence of hysteresis and ferromagnetic properties due to aggregation, while PAINs displayed superparamagnetic behavior. Surface chemistry analysis after 2 weeks of being exposed to air indicated that DIONs oxidized to Fe2O3, while PAINs were composed of a metallic Fe core and a mixed oxidation state shell. Based on these analyses, we concluded that PAINs are stronger candidates for examining axonal transport, since they were less prone to aggregation, offered a stronger magnetic signal, and were less oxidized. Neurotoxicity analysis of PAINs revealed that no significant toxicity was observed compared to negative controls for concentrations up to 1 mg/ml, thus further indicating their potential utility for biological applications. Finally, we successfully conjugated PAINs to a fluorophore, rhodamine 110 chloride, through a simple two-step reaction, demonstrating the feasibility of functionalizing PAINs. This study suggests that PAINs should be further evaluated as a candidate technology for intraneuronal diagnostics and therapy.

  2. Contaminant Attenuation and Transport Characterization of 200-DV-1 Operable Unit Sediment Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M.V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gartman, Brandy N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nims, Megan K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Horner, Jacob A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baum, Steven R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Christiansen, Beren B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clayton, Ray E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McElroy, Erin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Appriou, Delphine [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tyrrell, Kimberly J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Striluk, Miranda L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    A laboratory study was conducted to quantify contaminant attenuation processes and associated contaminant transport parameters that are needed to evaluate transport of contaminants through the vadose zone to the groundwater. The laboratory study information, in conjunction with transport analyses, can be used as input to evaluate the feasibility of Monitored Natural Attenuation and other remedies for the 200-DV-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site.

  3. Subsurface Access, Characterization, Acquisition, Transport, Storage and Delivery in Microgravity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop geotechnical measurements, sample extraction and transport equipment for subsurface regolith on NEOs, asteroids, moons and planets,...

  4. A mountain-scale model for characterizing unsaturated flow and transport in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-07-18

    This paper presents a large-scale modeling study characterizing fluid flow and tracer transport in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling study is conducted using a three-dimensional numerical model, which incorporates a wide variety of field data and takes into account the coupled processes of flow and transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated, fractured porous rock. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation. Using different conceptual models of unsaturated flow, various scenarios of current and future climate conditions and their effects on the unsaturated zone are evaluated to aid in the assessment of the repository's system performance. These models are calibrated against field-measured data. Model-predicted flow and transport processes under current and future climates are discussed.

  5. A multiple-point geostatistical method for characterizing uncertainty of subsurface alluvial units and its effects on flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, C.; Phelps, G.A.; Boucher, A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a proof-of-concept to demonstrate the potential application of multiple-point geostatistics for characterizing geologic heterogeneity and its effect on flow and transport simulation. The study presented in this report is the result of collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Stanford University. This collaboration focused on improving the characterization of alluvial deposits by incorporating prior knowledge of geologic structure and estimating the uncertainty of the modeled geologic units. In this study, geologic heterogeneity of alluvial units is characterized as a set of stochastic realizations, and uncertainty is indicated by variability in the results of flow and transport simulations for this set of realizations. This approach is tested on a hypothetical geologic scenario developed using data from the alluvial deposits in Yucca Flat, Nevada. Yucca Flat was chosen as a data source for this test case because it includes both complex geologic and hydrologic characteristics and also contains a substantial amount of both surface and subsurface geologic data. Multiple-point geostatistics is used to model geologic heterogeneity in the subsurface. A three-dimensional (3D) model of spatial variability is developed by integrating alluvial units mapped at the surface with vertical drill-hole data. The SNESIM (Single Normal Equation Simulation) algorithm is used to represent geologic heterogeneity stochastically by generating 20 realizations, each of which represents an equally probable geologic scenario. A 3D numerical model is used to simulate groundwater flow and contaminant transport for each realization, producing a distribution of flow and transport responses to the geologic heterogeneity. From this distribution of flow and transport responses, the frequency of exceeding a given contaminant concentration threshold can be used as an indicator of uncertainty about the location of the contaminant plume boundary.

  6. Cytochemical characterization of gill and hepatopancreatic cells of the crab Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura validated by cell metal transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ortega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763 is a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab possessing gills for respiratory and osmoregulatory processes, separated in anterior and posterior sections. They also have hepatopancreas, which is responsible for digestion and absorption of nutrients and detoxification of toxic metals. Each of these organs has specific cells that are important for in vitro studies in cell biology, ion and toxic metals transport. In order to study and characterize cells from gills and hepatopancreas, both were separated using a Sucrose Gradient (SG from 10 to 40% and cells in each gradient were characterized using the vital mitochondrial dye DASPEI (2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl-N- ethylpyridinium iodide and Trichrome Mallory's stain. Both in 20 and 40% SG for gill cells and 30% SG for hepatopancreatic cells, a greater number of cells were colored with DASPEI, indicating a larger number of mitochondria in these cells. It is concluded that the gill cells present in 20% and 40% SG are Thin cells, responsible for respiratory processes and Ionocytes responsible for ion transport, respectively. For hepatopancreatic cells, the 30% SG is composed of Fibrillar cells that possess larger number of membrane ion and nutrient transporters. Moreover, the transport of toxic metal cadmium (Cd by isolated hepatopancreatic cells was performed as a way of following cell physiological integrity after cell separation and to study differences in transport among the cells. All hepatopancreatic cells were able to transport Cd. These findings are the first step for further work on isolated cells of these important exchange epithelia of crabs, using a simple separation method and to further develop successful in vitro cell culture in crabs.

  7. Hazard identification and characterization of welfare aspects during transport of farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reenen, van C.G.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Gerritzen, M.A.; Leenstra, F.R.; Lambooij, E.

    2008-01-01

    Within the EU, free movement of animals from one Member State to another and more uniformity among production animals and production systems has resulted in more long distance transport from farm to farm or from farm to slaughterhouse. Since there is a lot of discussion about transport of farm anima

  8. Biochemical Characterization of the C-4-Dicarboxylate Transporter DctA from Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Detert Oude Weme, Ruud; Duurkens, Ria H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    Bacterial secondary transporters of the DctA family mediate ion-coupled uptake of C-4-dicarboxylates. Here, we have expressed the DctA homologue from Bacillus subtilis in the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. Transport of dicarboxylates in vitro in isolated membrane vesicles was assayed.

  9. Biochemical Characterization of the C-4-Dicarboxylate Transporter DctA from Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Detert Oude Weme, Ruud; Duurkens, Ria H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial secondary transporters of the DctA family mediate ion-coupled uptake of C-4-dicarboxylates. Here, we have expressed the DctA homologue from Bacillus subtilis in the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. Transport of dicarboxylates in vitro in isolated membrane vesicles was assayed. W

  10. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  11. Composition and origin of PM10 in Cape Verde: Characterization of long-range transport episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, P.; Almeida, S. M.; Cardoso, J.; Almeida-Silva, M.; Nunes, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Alves, C.; Reis, M. A.; Chaves, P. C.; Artíñano, B.; Pio, C.

    2016-02-01

    A receptor modelling study was performed to identify source categories and their contributions to the PM10 total mass at the Cape Verde archipelago. Trajectory statistical methods were also used to characterize the main atmospheric circulation patterns causing the transport of air masses and to geographically identify the main potential source areas of each PM10 source category. Our findings point out that the variability of the PM10 levels at Cape Verde was prompted by the advections of African mineral dust. The mineral dust load was mainly composed by clay-silicates mineral derived elements (22% of the PM10 total mass on average) with lower amounts of carbonates (9%). A clear northward gradient was observed in carbonates concentration that illustrates the differences in the composition according to the source regions of mineral dust. Mineral dust was frequently linked to industrial emissions from crude oil refineries, fertilizer industries as well as oil and coal power plants, located in the northern and north-western coast of the African continent (29%). Sea salt was also registered in the PM10 mass during most part of the sampling period, with a lower impact in the PM10 levels than the mineral dust one (26%). Combustion aerosols (6%) reached the highest mean values in summer as a consequence of the emissions from local-regional sources. Biomass burning aerosols produced from October to November in sub-sahelian latitudes, had a clear influence in the content of elemental carbon (EC) recorded at Cape Verde but a small impact in the PM10 total mass levels. A minor contribution to the PM10 mass has been associated to secondary inorganic compounds-SIC. Namely, ammonium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 1-5%) and calcium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 2-3%). The main origin of SIC 1 was attributed to emissions of SO2 and NOx from industrial sources located in the northern and north-western African coast and from wildfires produced in the continent. SIC 2 had a clear regional origin

  12. Radial head dislocation during proximal radial shaft osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Antony; Bindra, Randy R

    2014-03-01

    The following case report describes a 48-year-old female patient with a longstanding both-bone forearm malunion, who underwent osteotomies of both the radius and ulna to improve symptoms of pain and lack of rotation at the wrist. The osteotomies were templated preoperatively. During surgery, after performing the planned radial shaft osteotomy, the authors recognized that the radial head was subluxated. The osteotomy was then revised from an opening wedge to a closing wedge with improvement of alignment and rotation. The case report discusses the details of the operation, as well as ways in which to avoid similar shortcomings in the future.

  13. Organic compounds as indicators for transport in an urban characterized complex karst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, R.; Licha, T.; Nödler, K.; Geyer, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    In northern Hesse (Germany), sediments of the Upper Permian (Zechstein-Formations) are outcropping in a coastal facies along the western rim of the Rhenish Massif. The geologic section is characterized by a sequence of carbonate rocks (carbonates of the Werra-, Staßfurt- and Leine-Formations) and predominantly fine clastic sediments. The carbonate aquifers of the Werra-Formation and the Leine-Formation are used for drinking water abstraction of a provincial town and surrounding communities. Concurrently, the urban area is characterized by industrial and commercial uses. The groundwater flow system is composed of three potential karst aquifers, aquitards and aquicludes within a complex tectonically faulted area. The study area is divided into three spring catchment areas. However, the locations of the subsurface water divides are unknown. Traditional methods to determine the catchment areas (e.g. artificial tracer tests) are difficult to apply, due to a lack of adequate injection points. The presented work deals with the use of organic compounds as indicators for subsurface flow paths. Medical drugs, pesticides, corrosion inhibitors and such typical waste water compounds as caffeine (NÖDLER ET AL. 2010) are observed in approximately fifty groundwater observation points by regular sampling. The seasonal variability of the distribution pattern of organic compounds is low. The most common compounds are atrazine and its metabolites desethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine, as well as the corrosion inhibitor 1H-benzotriazole. Since these substances are applied in different regions different input functions can be assumed. However, the highest concentrations are detected along a North-orientated axis, which also exhibits the greatest compound variety. This distribution pattern indicates preferential flow and transport pathways in the subsurface. The absence of organic compounds in other parts of the investigation area implies the existence of a water divide between

  14. Radial lean direct injection burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  15. Identification and characterization of high and low affinity transport systems for reduced glutathione in liver cell canalicular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatori, N; Dutczak, W J

    1994-08-05

    Driving forces and substrate specificity for transport of reduced glutathione (GSH) across rat liver cell canalicular membrane were examined in vesicles isolated from this plasma membrane domain. In contrast to previous studies indicating a single saturable component of canalicular GSH transport, the present results demonstrate the presence of both high and low affinity components with apparent Km values of 0.24 +/- 0.04 and 17.4 +/- 2.1 mM and Vmax values of 0.09 +/- 0.01 and 2.3 +/- 0.3 nmol.mg-1.20 s-1, respectively. The Km values in two previously published reports are discordant, 0.33 versus 16 mM, but are comparable with the two transport components identified in the present study. To further characterize these GSH transport mechanisms, [3H]GSH uptake by canalicular vesicles was measured at concentrations of 50 microM, where transport is expected to occur largely on the high affinity component, and at 5 mM, where the low affinity system should predominate. Neither component of GSH transport was affected by ATP or a Na+ gradient, but both were stimulated by a valinomycin-induced membrane potential, indicating electrogenic transport pathways. The high affinity component was cis-inhibited by glutathione S-conjugates (1 mM), other gamma-glutamyl compounds (5 mM), and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (0.1 mM), whereas these agents had no effect on the low affinity component at similar inhibitor concentrations. Sulfobromophthalein (BSP, 0.1 mM) inhibited both GSH transport components. However, neither component was affected by taurocholate (0.5 mM) or L-glutamate (10 mM). The inhibition by S-butylglutathione, the GSH analogue ophthalmic acid, and by BSP was competitive in nature, although BSP also produced a slight decrease in Vmax, suggesting a mixed type of inhibition. Ophthalmic acid and some glutathione S-conjugates were also able to trans-stimulate high affinity GSH uptake. These results indicate the presence of at least two ATP

  16. ITE CHARACTERIZATION TO SUPPORT CONCEPTUAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUBSURFACE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of radionuclide contaminants in ground water often begins with the development of conceptual and analytical models that guide our understanding of the processes controlling radionuclide transport. The reliability of these models is often predicated on the collection o...

  17. Lagrangian Flow networks: a new way to characterize transport and connectivity in geophysical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Lopez, Cristobal; Rossi, Vincent; Vasile, Ruggero

    2015-04-01

    Water and air transport are among the basic processes shaping the climate of our planet. Heat and salinity fluxes change sea water density, and thus drive the global thermohaline circulation. Atmospheric winds force the ocean motion, and also transport moisture, heat or chemicals, impacting the regional climate. We describe transport among different regions of the ocean or the atmosphere by flow networks, giving a discrete and robust representation of the fluid advection dynamics. We use network-theory tools to gain insights into transport problem. Local and global features of the networks are extracted from many numerical experiments to give a time averaged description of the system. Classical concepts like dispersion, mixing and connectivity are finally related to a set of network-like objects contributing to build a "dictionary" between network measures and physical quantities in geophysical flows.

  18. Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandlikar, Satish G. [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Lu, Zijie [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Rao, Navalgund [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Sergi, Jacqueline [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Rath, Cody [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); McDade, Christopher [Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States); Trabold, Thomas [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Owejan, Jon [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Gagliardo, Jeffrey [General Motors, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States); Allen, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Yassar, Reza S. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Medici, Ezequiel [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Herescu, Alexandru [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2010-05-30

    In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions.

  19. Permafrost in Qinghai Province:Characterization and impact on transportation construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianHong Fang; AnHua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Through a long-term summary of highway construction in the permafrost regions of Qinghai Province, the formation conditions and distribution characteristics of permafrost and their impact on transportation construction are analyzed. Research achievements on the stability of highways and urgent technical problems in the transportation construction in permafrost regions are discussed, and new development directions of highway construction in permafrost regions of Qinghai Province are introduced to provide cold regions engineering researchers with valuable references.

  20. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  1. Generation of Radial Electric Field with Electrode Biasing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; PAN Ge-Sheng; WEN Yi-Zhi; YU Chang-Xuan; WAN Shu-De; LIU Wan-Dong; WANG Zhi-Jiang; SUN Xuan

    2001-01-01

    Time and space resolved measurements of the radial electric field (Er) have been conducted during the electrode biasing experiments on the KT-5C tokamak. The suppression of the turbulent transport with the change of Er induced by the biased electrode is observed. It is found that the poloidal flow contributes to the main part of the Er, and the change of the poloidal flow has a lead of about 20μs to the formation of Er. These observations suggest that a radialcurrent, responding to an induced voltage on the electrode, drives a poloidal flow which in turn drives the radial electric field.

  2. Transport of energetic electrons in solids computer simulation with applications to materials analysis and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This new edition describes all the mechanisms of elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons with the atoms of the target as simple as possible. The use of techniques of quantum mechanics is described in detail for the investigation of interaction processes of electrons with matter. It presents the strategies of the Monte Carlo method, as well as numerous comparisons among the results of the simulations and the experimental data available in the literature. New in this edition is the description of the Mermin theory, a comparison between Mermin theory and Drude theory, a discussion about the dispersion laws, and details about the calculation of the phase shifts that are used in the relativistic partial wave expansion method. The role of secondary electrons in proton cancer therapy is discussed in the chapter devoted to applications. In this context, Monte Carlo results about the radial distribution of the energy deposited in PMMA by secondary electrons generated by energetic proton beams are presented.

  3. Impact of carbonation on the durability of cementitious materials: water transport properties characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste geological disposal, reinforced concrete would be used. In service life conditions, the concrete structures would be subjected to drying and carbonation. Carbonation relates to the reaction between carbon dioxide (CO2 and the main hydrates of the cement paste (portlandite and C-S-H. Beyond the fall of the pore solution pH, indicative of steel depassivation, carbonation induces mineralogical and microstructural changes (due to portlandite and C-S-H dissolution and calcium carbonate precipitation. This results in the modification of the transport properties, which can impact the structure durability. Because concrete durability depends on water transport, this study focuses on the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. In fact, the transport properties of sound materials are known but they still remain to be assessed for carbonated ones. An experimental program has been designed to investigate the transport properties in carbonated materials. Four hardened cement pastes, differing in mineralogy, are carbonated in an accelerated carbonation device (in controlled environmental conditions at CO2 partial pressure of about 3%. Once fully carbonated, all the data needed to describe water transport, using a simplified approach, will be evaluated.

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Golgi-Localized UDP-Xylose Transporter Family from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Xiong, Guangyan; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Herter, Thomas; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J; Pauly, Markus; Willats, William G T; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2015-04-01

    Most glycosylation reactions require activated glycosyl donors in the form of nucleotide sugars to drive processes such as posttranslational modifications and polysaccharide biosynthesis. Most plant cell wall polysaccharides are biosynthesized in the Golgi apparatus from cytosolic-derived nucleotide sugars, which are actively transferred into the Golgi lumen by nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs). An exception is UDP-xylose, which is biosynthesized in both the cytosol and the Golgi lumen by a family of UDP-xylose synthases. The NST-based transport of UDP-xylose into the Golgi lumen would appear to be redundant. However, employing a recently developed approach, we identified three UDP-xylose transporters in the Arabidopsis thaliana NST family and designated them UDP-XYLOSE TRANSPORTER1 (UXT1) to UXT3. All three transporters localize to the Golgi apparatus, and UXT1 also localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutants in UXT1 exhibit ∼30% reduction in xylose in stem cell walls. These findings support the importance of the cytosolic UDP-xylose pool and UDP-xylose transporters in cell wall biosynthesis.

  5. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  6. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  7. CONGENITAL RADIAL DYSPLASIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatram Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital radial dysplasia, also referred to as radial club hand , means deficiency along the preaxial or radial side of the extremity. It ranges from hypoplasia of the thumb to variou s degrees of radial hypoplasia. We present one such rare case of type 4 congenital unilateral isolated radial dysplasia with carpel anomaly , reported to our department in SVS medical C ollege, Mahabubanagar, Telangana state

  8. Analysis of pedestal plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, J. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Groebner, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Canik, John [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Pankin, A. Y. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Rafiq, T. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    An H-mode edge pedestal plasma transport benchmarking exercise was undertaken for a single DIII-D pedestal. Transport modelling codes used include 1.5D interpretive (ONETWO, GTEDGE), 1.5D predictive (ASTRA) and 2D ones (SOLPS, UEDGE). The particular DIII-D discharge considered is 98889, which has a typical low density pedestal. Profiles for the edge plasma are obtained from Thomson and charge-exchange recombination data averaged over the last 20% of the average 33.53 ms repetition time between type I edge localized modes. The modelled density of recycled neutrals is largest in the divertor X-point region and causes the edge plasma source rate to vary by a factor similar to 10(2) on the separatrix. Modelled poloidal variations in the densities and temperatures on flux surfaces are small on all flux surfaces up to within about 2.6 mm (rho(N) > 0.99) of the mid-plane separatrix. For the assumed Fick's-diffusion-type laws, the radial heat and density fluxes vary poloidally by factors of 2-3 in the pedestal region; they are largest on the outboard mid-plane where flux surfaces are compressed and local radial gradients are largest. Convective heat flows are found to be small fractions of the electron (less than or similar to 10%) and ion (less than or similar to 25%) heat flows in this pedestal. Appropriately averaging the transport fluxes yields interpretive 1.5D effective diffusivities that are smallest near the mid-point of the pedestal. Their 'transport barrier' minima are about 0.3 (electron heat), 0.15 (ion heat) and 0.035 (density) m(2) s(-1). Electron heat transport is found to be best characterized by electron-temperature-gradient-induced transport at the pedestal top and paleoclassical transport throughout the pedestal. The effective ion heat diffusivity in the pedestal has a different profile from the neoclassical prediction and may be smaller than it. The very small effective density diffusivity may be the result of an inward pinch flow nearly

  9. Precise Radial Velocity First Light Observations With iSHELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cale, Bryson Lee; Plavchan, Peter; Nishimoto, America; Tanner, Angelle M.; Gagne, Jonathan; Gao, Peter; Furlan, Elise; White, Russel J.; Walp, Bernie; von Braun, Kaspar; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John A.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Henry, Todd J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Kane, Stephen R.; Beichman, Charles; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    We present our first light observations with the new iSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope facility. iShell replaces the 25 year old CSHELL with improvements in spectral grasp (~40x), resolution (70,000 versus 46,000), throughput, optics, and detector characteristics. With CSHELL, we obtained a radial velocity precision of 3 m/s on a bright red giant and we identified several radial velocity variable M dwarfs for future follow up. Our goal with iSHELL is to characterize the precise radial velocity performance of the methane isotopologue absorption gas cell in the calibration unit. We observe bright nearby radial velocity standards to better understand the instrument and data reduction techniques. We have updated our CSHELL analysis code to handle multiple orders and the increased number of pixels. It is feasible that we will obtain a radial velocity precision of < 3 m/s, sufficient to detect terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of nearby M dwarfs. We will also follow up radial velocity variables we have discovered, along with transiting exoplanets orbiting M dwarfs identified with the K2 and TESS missions.

  10. Channeling of protons through radial deformed carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka Jovanović, V., E-mail: vborka@vinca.rs [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Borka, D. [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Galijaš, S.M.D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • For the first time we presented theoretically obtained distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. • Our findings indicate that influence of the radial deformation is very strong and it should not be omitted in simulations. • We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. • Our obtained results can be compared with measured distributions to reveal the presence of various types of defects in SWNT. - Abstract: In this paper we have presented a theoretical investigation of the channeling of 1 GeV protons with the radial deformed (10, 0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have calculated channeling potential within the deformed nanotubes. For the first time we presented theoretically obtained spatial and angular distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. We used a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. These results may be useful for nanotube characterization and production and guiding of nanosized ion beams.

  11. Combining 3D Hydraulic Tomography with Tracer Tests for Improved Transport Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-León, E; Leven, C; Haslauer, C P; Cirpka, O A

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a method for resolving the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters to some extent, but many details important for solute transport usually remain unresolved. We present a methodology to improve solute transport predictions by combining data from HT with the breakthrough curve (BTC) of a single forced-gradient tracer test. We estimated the three dimensional (3D) hydraulic-conductivity field in an alluvial aquifer by inverting tomographic pumping tests performed at the Hydrogeological Research Site Lauswiesen close to Tübingen, Germany, using a regularized pilot-point method. We compared the estimated parameter field to available profiles of hydraulic-conductivity variations from direct-push injection logging (DPIL), and validated the hydraulic-conductivity field with hydraulic-head measurements of tests not used in the inversion. After validation, spatially uniform parameters for dual-domain transport were estimated by fitting tracer data collected during a forced-gradient tracer test. The dual-domain assumption was used to parameterize effects of the unresolved heterogeneity of the aquifer and deemed necessary to fit the shape of the BTC using reasonable parameter values. The estimated hydraulic-conductivity field and transport parameters were subsequently used to successfully predict a second independent tracer test. Our work provides an efficient and practical approach to predict solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers without performing elaborate field tracer tests with a tomographic layout.

  12. Salt adaptation in Acinetobacter baylyi: identification and characterization of a secondary glycine betaine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Miriam; de Berardinis, Veronique; Mingote, Ana; Santos, Helena; Göttig, Stephan; Müller, Volker; Averhoff, Beate

    2011-10-01

    Members of the genus Acinetobacter are well known for their metabolic versatility that allows them to adapt to different ecological niches. Here, we have addressed how the model strain Acinetobacter baylyi copes with different salinities and low water activities. A. baylyi tolerates up to 900 mM sodium salts and even higher concentrations of potassium chloride. Growth at high salinities was better in complex than in mineral medium and addition of glycine betaine stimulated growth at high salinities in mineral medium. Cells grown at high salinities took up glycine betaine from the medium. Uptake of glycine betaine was energy dependent and dependent on a salinity gradient across the membrane. Inspection of the genome sequence revealed two potential candidates for glycine betaine transport, both encoding potential secondary transporters, one of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class (ACIAD2280) and one of the betaine/choline/carnitine transporter (BCCT) family (ACIAD3460). The latter is essential for glycine betaine transport in A. baylyi. The broad distribution of ACIAD3460 homologues indicates the essential role of secondary transporters in the adaptation of Acinetobacter species to osmotic stress.

  13. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  14. Characterization of rhodamine-123 as a tracer dye for use in in vitro drug transport assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Forster

    Full Text Available Fluorescent tracer dyes represent an important class of sub-cellular probes and allow the examination of cellular processes in real-time with minimal impact upon these processes. Such tracer dyes are becoming increasingly used for the examination of membrane transport processes, as they are easy-to-use, cost effective probe substrates for a number of membrane protein transporters. Rhodamine 123, a member of the rhodamine family of flurone dyes, has been used to examine membrane transport by the ABCB1 gene product, MDR1. MDR1 is viewed as the archetypal drug transport protein, and is able to efflux a large number of clinically relevant drugs. In addition, ectopic activity of MDR1 has been associated with the development of multiple drug resistance phenotype, which results in a poor patient response to therapeutic intervention. It is thus important to be able to examine the potential for novel compounds to be MDR1 substrates. Given the increasing use rhodamine 123 as a tracer dye for MDR1, a full characterisation of its spectral properties in a range of in vitro assay-relevant media is warranted. Herein, we determine λmax for excitation and emission or rhodamine 123 and its metabolite rhodamine 110 in commonly used solvents and extraction buffers, demonstrating that fluorescence is highly dependent on the chemical environment: Optimal parameters are 1% (v/v methanol in HBSS, with λex = 505 nm, λem = 525 nm. We characterise the uptake of rhodamine 123 into cells, via both passive and active processes, and demonstrate that this occurs primarily through OATP1A2-mediated facilitated transport at concentrations below 2 µM, and via micelle-mediated passive diffusion above this. Finally, we quantify the intracellular sequestration and metabolism of rhodamine 123, demonstrating that these are both cell line-dependent factors that may influence the interpretation of transport assays.

  15. Characterization of transmembrane auxin transport in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifertová, Daniela; Skůpa, Petr; Rychtář, Jan; Laňková, Martina; Pařezová, Markéta; Dobrev, Petre I; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Polar auxin transport is a crucial process for control and coordination of plant development. Studies of auxin transport through plant tissues and organs showed that auxin is transported by a combination of phloem flow and the active, carrier-mediated cell-to-cell transport. Since plant organs and even tissues are too complex for determination of the kinetics of carrier-mediated auxin uptake and efflux on the cellular level, simplified models of cell suspension cultures are often used, and several tobacco cell lines have been established for auxin transport assays. However, there are very few data available on the specificity and kinetics of auxin transport across the plasma membrane for Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells. In this report, the characteristics of carrier-mediated uptake (influx) and efflux for the native auxin indole-3-acetic acid and synthetic auxins, naphthalene-1-acetic and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acids (NAA and 2,4-D, respectively) in A. thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta suspension-cultured cells (LE line) are provided. By auxin competition assays and inhibitor treatments, we show that, similarly to tobacco cells, uptake carriers have high affinity towards 2,4-D and that NAA is a good tool for studies of auxin efflux in LE cells. In contrast to tobacco cells, metabolic profiling showed that only a small proportion of NAA is metabolized in LE cells. These results show that the LE cell line is a useful experimental system for measurements of kinetics of auxin carriers on the cellular level that is complementary to tobacco cells.

  16. Uptake of sialic acid by human erythrocyte. Characterization of a transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulai, Tatiana; Bratosin, Daniela; Artenie, Vlad; Montreuil, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Upon incubation of human red blood cells (RBC) with [4-9-14C] N-acetylneuraminic acid, the cells incorporated this sugar, as demonstrated by the identification of labelled N-acetylmannosamine in the cytosol, as a result of the action of the sialic acid pyruvate-lyase we discovered previously (Biochimie 84 (2002) 655). The mechanism is saturable and indicates the presence of a limited number of transporter molecules in the RBC membrane. This transport process may have relevance to the desialylation of membrane glycoconjugates which occurs during ageing of erythrocytes.

  17. Growth and characterization of Bi2Se3 crystals by chemical vapor transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Jiao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly-shaped high-quality Bi2Se3 crystals were grown by a chemical vapor transport using iodine as the transport agent. In addition to exhibiting a characteristic Dirac cone for a topological insulator, the Bi2Se3 crystals show some outstanding properties including additional crystallographic surfaces, large residual resistance ratio (∼10, and high mobility (∼8000 cm2·V−1·s−1. The low-temperature resistivity abnormally increases with applying pressures up to 1.7 GPa, and no superconductivity was observed down to 0.4 K.

  18. Functional characterization of the human multidrug transporter, ABCG2, expressed in insect cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozvegy, C; Litman, Thomas; Szakács, G

    2001-01-01

    ABCG2 (also called MXR (3), BCRP (4), or ABCP (5) is a recently-identified ABC half-transporter, which causes multidrug resistance in cancer. Here we report that the expression of the ABCG2 protein in Sf9 insect cells resulted in a high-capacity, vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in isolated...... transporter, probably working as a homodimer. We suggest that the Sf9 cell membrane ATPase system is an efficient tool for examining the interactions of ABCG2 with pharmacological agents....

  19. Dynamic length-scale characterization and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of transport in open-cell foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosten, Tyler R; Codd, Sarah L; Maier, Robert S; Seymour, Joseph D

    2009-11-20

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of scale dependent dynamics in a random solid open-cell foam reveal a characteristic length scale for transport processes in this novel type of porous medium. These measurements and lattice Boltzmann simulations for a model foam structure indicate dynamical behavior analogous to lower porosity consolidated granular porous media, despite extremely high porosity in solid cellular foams. Scaling by the measured characteristic length collapses data for different foam structures as well as consolidated granular media. The nonequilibrium statistical mechanics theory of preasymptotic dispersion, developed for hierarchical porous media, is shown to model the hydrodynamic dispersive transport in a foam structure.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of germanium monosulphide (GeS) single crystals grown using different transporting agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G K Solanki; Dipika B Patel; Sandip Unadkat; M K Agarwal

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports the growth of germanium monosulphide (GeS) single crystals by vapour phase technique using different transporting agents. The single crystallinity and composition of the grown crystals have been verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) respectively. Resistivity measurements have been carried out in different temperature ranges. Transport parameters, e.g. resistivity, Hall coefficient, carrier concentration and mobility have been measured at varying magnetic fields. All the experimental results have been explained.

  1. Tachoastrometry: astrometry with radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, L; Lombardi, M; Monaco, L; Leão, I C; Delabre, B

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of composite systems (e.g., spectroscopic binaries) contain spatial information that can be retrieved by measuring the radial velocities (i.e., Doppler shifts) of the components in four observations with the slit rotated by 90 degrees in the sky. By using basic concepts of slit spectroscopy we show that the geometry of composite systems can be reliably retrieved by measuring only radial velocity differences taken with different slit angles. The spatial resolution is determined by the precision with which differential radial velocities can be measured. We use the UVES spectrograph at the VLT to observe the known spectroscopic binary star HD 188088 (HIP 97944), which has a maximum expected separation of 23 milli-arcseconds. We measure an astrometric signal in radial velocity of 276 \\ms, which corresponds to a separation between the two components at the time of the observations of 18 $\\pm2$ milli-arcseconds. The stars were aligned east-west. We describe a simple optical device to simultaneously record p...

  2. Phenotypic, Proteomic, and Genomic Characterization of a Putative ABC-Transporter Permease Involved in Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Liu, Weibing; Lametsch, René

    2011-01-01

    enhanced ability for biofilm formation as the LM-49 strain using a crystal violet staining assay. DNA microarrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 49 and 11 differentially expressed (twofold or more) genes or proteins in Δ1771, respectively. The transcriptomics study indicated that lm......The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to form biofilms in food processing environments. Previously, we have reported that an lm.G_1771 gene (encoding a putative ABC-transporter permease) was involved in negative regulation of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation using LM-49, a biofilm......-enhanced mutant isolated on Tn917 mutagenesis (AEM 2008 p.7675–7683). Here, the possible action of this ABC-transporter permease in L. monocytogenes biofilm formation was characterized by phenotypic, proteomic, and genomic analyses using an lm.G_1771 gene deletant (Δ1771). The Δ1771 mutant exhibited the same...

  3. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ION TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HOT-PRESSED SOLID POLYMER ELECTROLYTES (1-x) PEO:x KI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angesh Chandra; Archana Chandra; K.Thakur

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis and ion transport properties of hot-pressed solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs),(1-x) PEO:x KI,where x is the content of KI in wt%,are reported.A hot-press technique has been used for the formation of the polymeric membranes in place of the usual solution cast method.The composition (80 PEO:20 KI) was identified as the highest conducting polymer electrolyte on the basis of compositional dependent conductivity studies of PEO:KI films.A conductivity enhancement of more than two orders of magnitude from that of the pure PEO was achieved.Materials characterization and ion transport mechanism were explained by using various experimental techniques.

  4. Characterizing rates and mechanisms of soil transport using tephra as a tracer: Charwell River, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roering, J. J.; Almond, P.; Tonkin, P.; McKean, J.

    2001-12-01

    Downslope transport of soil in the absence of overland flow has been attributed to numerous mechanisms, including particle-by-particle rheologic creep and disturbances associated with biological activity. Process stochasticity and difficulties associated with field measurement have obscured the characterization of long-term soil transport rates and mechanisms. Most modeling studies represent soil transport as a slope and/or soil depth-dependent process, although field evidence is sparse. At our study site along incised fluvial terraces of the Charwell River, South Island, New Zealand, we documented vertical profiles of tephra concentration along a hillslope transect to quantify soil transport. Near the relatively undissected hilltop, we observed a 10 cm thick primary tephra layer (ca 22.6 kyr) within loess deposits approximately 80 cm below the landscape surface. In the downslope direction, the depth to the highly concentrated tephra layer decreases, coincident with an increase in hillslope convexity (which is proportional to erosion rate if soil flux varies linearly with hillslope gradient). Exhumation of the spike in tephra concentration results from landscape lowering due to soil transport processes as evidence for overland flow erosion is lacking. Approximately 20 m downslope of the hilltop, where the depth to the tephra spike declines to 40-50 cm, peak concentrations decrease by a factor of 4 and tephra is distributed uniformly within the upper 40 cm of soil. Further downslope near the valley margin, we observed low and relatively uniform tephra concentrations in the upper soil. The transition from a thin, highly concentrated tephra layer at depth to sparse, widely distributed tephra within the upper soil column may result from soil mixing and transport by tree and plant root activity. The depth of this transition is approximately 50 cm along our transect, coincident with the rooting depth of Podocarpus trees that populated the area through much of the

  5. Stokesian swimming of a sphere by radial helical surface wave

    CERN Document Server

    Felderhof, B U

    2016-01-01

    The swimming of a sphere by means of radial helical surface waves is studied on the basis of the Stokes equations. Explicit expressions are derived for the matrices characterizing the mean translational and rotational swimming velocities and the mean rate of dissipation to second order in the wave amplitude.

  6. Characterization of TCE DNAPL and Dissolved Phase Transport in Karst Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, M.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated sites are a threat to the environment and human health. Of particular concerns is the contamination of karst groundwater systems (KGWSs). Their heterogeneous character, rapid flow through conduits, high permeability zones, and strong storage capacity in the rock porous-matrix pose a high risk of exposure over large areas and temporal scales. To achieve effective remedial actions for TCE removal, it is important to understand and quantify the fate and transport process of trichloroethylene in these systems. This research studies the fate, transport, and distribution of TCE Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) and associated dissolved species in KGWSs. Experiments are conducted in a karstified limestone physical model, a limestone rock mimicking a saturated confined karst aquifer. After injecting TCE solvent into a steady groundwater flow field, samples are taken spatially and temporally and analyzed for TCE NAPL and dissolved phases. Data analysis shows the rapid detection of TCE NAPL and high aqueous concentrations along preferential pathway, even at distances far away from the injection point. Temporal distribution curves exhibit spatial variations related to the limestone rock heterogeneity. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response with long tailing indicates rate-limited diffusive transport in the rock matrix. Overall, results indicate that karstified limestone has a high capacity to rapidly transport pure and dissolved TCE along preferential flow paths, and to store and slowly release TCE over long periods of time.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF A BINDING PROTEIN-DEPENDENT GLUTAMATE TRANSPORT-SYSTEM OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (K-t of 1.2 mu M), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein wa

  8. Characterization of a Binding Protein-Dependent Glutamate Transport System of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (Kt of 1.2 µM), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein was i

  9. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  10. How to characterize thermal transport capability of 2D materials fairly? - Sheet thermal conductance and the choice of thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Pang, Yunsong; Roy, Ajit K.; Luo, Tengfei

    2017-02-01

    Thermal transport capability of monolayer 2D materials has been under constant spotlight. However, different definitions of thickness in literature have led to ambiguity towards predicting thermal conductivity values and thus in understanding the heat transfer capability of different monolayer 2D materials. We argue that the same thickness should be used and a 'sheet thermal conductance' should be defined as an intensive 2D material property when characterizing the heat transfer capability of 2D materials. When converting literature thermal conductivity values of monolayer materials to this new property, some new features that were not displayed when using different thicknesses show up.

  11. Characterization of asymmetric electron and hole transport in a high-mobility semiconducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Wang, Xinliang; Liu, Mengli; Cheng, Lingfei

    2017-01-01

    The electron and hole transport properties in a high-mobility n-type copolymer poly{[ N, N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diy1]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-dithiophene)}[P(NDI2OD-T2), PolyeraActivInk™ N2200] are investigated. The electron mobility is observed to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than the hole mobility. The thickness-dependent current density versus voltage ( J- V) characteristics of N2200 electron-only and hole-only devices cannot be well described using the conventional mobility model. However, the thickness-dependent and temperature-dependent J- V characteristics of N2200 electron-only and hole-only devices can be accurately described using our recently introduced improved mobility model only with a single set of parameters. Within the improved model, the mobility depends on three important physical quantities: the temperature, carrier density, and electric field. For the semiconducting polymer studied, we find the width of the Gaussian density of states σ = 0.082 eV and the lattice constant a = 0.8 nm for electron transport, while the width of the Gaussian density of states σ = 0.11 eV and the lattice constant a = 0.8 nm for hole transport. It is clear that hole transport exhibits a significantly stronger disorder than electron transport. This is also reflected in the lower hole mobility, as compared to the electron mobility.

  12. Characterization of Thi9, a novel thiamine (Vitamin B1) transporter from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Christian; Klein, Cornelia M; Batke, Angelika F; Schweingruber, M Ernst; Stolz, Jürgen

    2008-03-21

    Thiamine is an essential component of the human diet and thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes play an important role in carbohydrate metabolism in all living cells. Although the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe can derive thiamine from biosynthesis, both are also able to take up thiamine from external sources, leading to the down-regulation of the enzymes involved in its formation. We have isolated the S. pombe thiamine transporter Thi9 by genetic complementation of mutants defective in thiamine biosynthesis and transport. Thi9 localizes to the S. pombe cell surface and works as a high-affinity proton/thiamine symporter. The uptake of thiamine was reduced in the presence of pyrithiamine, oxythiamine, amprolium, and the thiazole part of thiamine, indicating that these compounds are substrates of Thi9. In pyrithiamine-resistant mutants, a conserved glutamate residue close to the first of the 12 transmembrane domains is exchanged by a lysine and this causes aberrant localization of the protein. Thiamine uptake is significantly increased in thiamine-deficient medium and this is associated with an increase in thi9(+) mRNA and protein levels. Upon addition of thiamine, the thi9(+) mRNA becomes undetectable within minutes, whereas the Thi9 protein appears to be stable. The protein is distantly related to transporters for amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid and polyamines, and not to any of the known thiamine transporters. We also found that the pyridoxine transporter Bsu1 has a marked contribution to the thiamine uptake activity of S. pombe cells.

  13. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Deschuyteneer

    Full Text Available Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt, a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  14. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschuyteneer, Aude; Boeckstaens, Mélanie; De Mees, Christelle; Van Vooren, Pascale; Wintjens, René; Marini, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S) associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt), a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C) may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  15. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  16. Molecular characterization of zebrafish Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1), a novel organic anion-transporting polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2013-11-22

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily includes a group of polyspecific transporters that mediate transport of large amphipathic, mostly anionic molecules across cell membranes of eukaryotes. OATPs/Oatps are involved in the disposition and elimination of numerous physiological and foreign compounds. However, in non-mammalian species, the functional properties of Oatps remain unknown. We aimed to elucidate the role of Oatp1d1 in zebrafish to gain insights into the functional and structural evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 superfamily. We show that diversification of the OATP1/Oatp1 family occurs after the emergence of jawed fish and that the OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b subfamilies appeared at the root of tetrapods. The Oatp1d subfamily emerged in teleosts and is absent in tetrapods. The zebrafish Oatp1d1 is similar to mammalian OATP1A/Oatp1a and OATP1B/Oatp1b members, with the main physiological role in transport and balance of steroid hormones. Oatp1d1 activity is dependent upon pH gradient, which could indicate bicarbonate exchange as a mode of transport. Our analysis of evolutionary conservation and structural properties revealed that (i) His-79 in intracellular loop 3 is conserved within OATP1/Oatp1 family and is crucial for the transport activity; (ii) N-glycosylation impacts membrane targeting and is conserved within the OATP1/Oatp1 family with Asn-122, Asn-133, Asn-499, and Asn-512 residues involved; (iii) the evolutionarily conserved cholesterol recognition interaction amino acid consensus motif is important for membrane localization; and (iv) Oatp1d1 is present in dimeric and possibly oligomeric form in the cell membrane. In conclusion, we describe the first detailed characterization of a new Oatp transporter in zebrafish, offering important insights into the functional evolution of the OATP1/Oatp1 family and the physiological role of Oatp1d1.

  17. In depth characterization of electron transport in 14 nm FD-SOI CMOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minju; Shi, Ming; Mouis, Mireille; Cros, Antoine; Josse, Emmanuel; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Ghibaudo, Gérard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, carrier transport properties in highly scaled (down to 14 nm-node) FDSOI CMOS devices are presented from 77 K to 300 K. At first, we analyzed electron transport characteristics in terms of different gate-oxide stack in NMOS long devices. So, we found that SOP and RCS can be the dominant contribution of additional mobility scatterings in different temperature regions. Then, electron mobility degradation in short channel devices was deeply investigated. It can be stemmed from additional scattering mechanisms, which were attributed to process-induced defects near source and drain. Finally, we found that mobility enhancement by replacing Si to SiGe channel in PMOS devices was validated and this feature was not effective anymore in sub-100 nm devices. The critical lengths were around 50 nm and 100 nm for NMOS and PMOS devices, respectively.

  18. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka, A. M.; Kim, Y.; Maltseva, N; Nichiporuk, R; Fan, Y; Joachimiak, A; Raymond, KN (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of California)

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB{sup {nu}}) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB{sup {nu}} with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich domains connected by a long {alpha}-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  19. Characterizing the Transport of a Novel, Engineered Nanoparticle for Use in Remediation of Hydrophobic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J. E.; Miller, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (MSCKs) were originally engineered to aid in the cleanup of oil spills. These polymeric particles are spherical and approximately 70 nm in diameter. MSCKs have a hydrophobic shell and hydrophilic core which encapsulates suspended iron oxide nanoparticles, rendering them magnetic. MSCKs operate like discrete surfactant packets: increasing the mobility and apparent solubility of hydrophobic species, but do so within the confines of discrete particles which can then be recovered by filtration or magnetic removal. MSCKs accomplish this via sequestration of hydrophobic species from through the hydrophilic shell and into the hydrophobic core where hydrocarbon contaminants are entropically stabilized. In batch reactor testing, MSCKs have been shown to sequester crude oil up to ten times their mass (1000 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). This study examines the transport characteristics and contaminant sequestration capabilities of MSCKs in saturated porous media, in order to establish their potential for use in groundwater remediation. Baseline MSCK transport parameters were determined via one dimensional impulse column experiments. MSCKs were readily transported in saturated sand, with an average recovery rate of 99%. In the presence of 10% clay particles, recovery was reduced to 68%. MSCKs were able to completely sequester an aqueous phase pollutant (8.7 mg/L m-xylene), although it further reduced their recovery rate to 61% in sand and 53% in clay. The presence of a free phase contaminant (5% of pore space occupied by mineral oil) reduced MSCKs recovery in sand to 53%. The MSCKs recovered in the effluent had sequestered the mineral at ratios far below their capability (3-10 mg of oil per 100 mg of MSCKs). Overall, this study indicated that MSCKs show a number of promising attributes for use in remediation. However, further manipulation of their chemical and morphological properties is needed, with the objective of

  20. Characterization of an electrochemical industrial size filterpress reactor by hydrodynamic and mass transport studies

    OpenAIRE

    Frías Ferrer, Ángel; González García, José; Conesa Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Gadea Ramos, Enrique; Expósito Rodríguez, Eduardo; García García, Vicente; Montiel Leguey, Vicente; Aldaz Riera, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en Tracers and Tracing Methods 2001, Nancy, May 2001. This work deals with the study of the influence of turbulence promoters in hydrodynamic and mass transport behaviour of a filter-press type electrolyser with 3250 cm2 of electrode area (model REIM 3300 supplied by “I.D. Electroquímica”) in undivided configuration. A simple experimental arrangement was used to generate data from electrolytic conductivity measurements in a series of impulse-response exp...

  1. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzka, Anna M; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Nichiporuk, Rita; Fan, Yao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB(nu)) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB(nu) with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-A crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two alpha/beta/alpha sandwich domains connected by a long alpha-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  2. Characterization of the Hanford 300 area burial grounds. Task IV. Biological transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.; Rickard, W.H.; Rogers, L.E.

    1979-10-01

    The characteristics of radioactive waste burial sites at the 300 area burial grounds on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, southeastern Washington were studied. The potential vectors of radionuclide transport studied were vegetation and animals. The overall results showed a low potential for uptake and transport of radionuclides from the 300 area sites. However, additional methods to control physical and biological mechanisms may contribute to the effectiveness of waste burial practices. From the results, the Biological Transport task recommended field studies which include reduction of soil erosion and addition of biobarriers to plants and animals. Vegetation plays a major role in reducing soil erosion, and thereby maintaining the backfill over the burial sites. Of the several species found on the 300 area sites, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) appears to be the most desirable as a cover. Besides retarding erosion, it has a shallow root system (does not easily penetrate buried material); it has a low affinity for radionuclide uptake; and its tissues are not easily blown away. Small mammals (specifically, mice) appear to have the most potential for radionuclide exposure and uptake. Small mammals were live-trapped within 10 x 10-meter trap grids. Each animal trapped was surgically implanted with a thermoluminescent dosimeter. When the animal was recaptured, the dosimeter was removed and read for exposure. Exposures were reported in milli-Roentgens. The most consistently trapped small mammals were the Great Basin pocket mouse (Perognathus parvus) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Results from the dosimeter readings showed that some of those animals had higher than background exposures. Biobarriers to animals could be considered as a mechanism to reduce the potential for radionuclide transport.

  3. Characterization of bromine-76-labelled 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine for PET studies of the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Camilla E-mail: Lundkvis@shfj.cea.fr; Loc' h, Christian; Halldin, Christer; Bottlaender, Michel; Ottaviani, Michele; Coulon, Christine; Fuseau, Chantal; Mathis, Chester; Farde, Lars; Maziere, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    The development of suitable radioligands for brain imaging of the serotonin transporter is of great importance for the study of depression and other affective disorders. The potent and selective serotonin transporter ligand, 5-iodo-6-nitro-2-piperazinylquinoline, has been labelled with iodine-123 and used as a radioligand for single photon emission computerized tomography. To evaluate the potential of the bromine-76-labelled analogue, 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine, as a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET), its brain distribution and binding characteristics were examined in rats. In vivo brain distribution and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine enters the brain rapidly. The regional brain distribution of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine was consistent with the known distribution of serotonin transporters in the midbrain, pons, thalamus, striatum, and neocortex. Specific binding was inhibited by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. The peripheral metabolism in plasma was rapid, but more than 90% of the radioactivity in brain represented unchanged radioligand 2 h postinjection (p.i.). A preliminary PET study was also performed in a baboon. Following the intravenous injection of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine in a baboon, there was a conspicuous accumulation of radioactivity in thalamus, striatum, and pons. The radioactivity in these brain regions was 1.5 times higher than in the cerebellum at 3 h and 2.5-4 times higher at 24 h. A rapid metabolism of the radioligand in plasma was observed (38% unchanged after 5 min). The results indicate that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine has potential for PET imaging of the serotonin transporter.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of the Colletotrichum acutatum ABC Transporter CaABC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyoung Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi tolerate exposure to various abiotic stresses, including cytotoxic compounds and fungicides, via their ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. To clarify the molecular basis of interaction between the fungus and various abiotic stresses including fungicides, we constructed a cDNA library from germinated conidia of Colletotrichum acutatum, a major anthracnose pathogen of pepper (Capsicum annum L.. Over 1,000 cDNA clones were sequenced, of which single clone exhibited significant nucleotide sequence homology to ABC transporter genes. We isolated three fosmid clones containing the C. acutatum ABC1 (CaABC1 gene in full-length from genomic DNA library screening. The CaABC1 gene consists of 4,059 bp transcript, predicting a 1,353-aa protein. The gene contains the typical ABC signature and Walker A and B motifs. The 5′-flanking region contains a CAAT motif, a TATA box, and a Kozak region. Phylogenetic and structural analysis suggested that the CaABC1 is a typical ABC transporter gene highly conserved in various fungal species, as well as in Chromista, Metazoans, and Viridiplantae. We also found that CaABC1 was up-regulated during conidiation and a minimal medium condition. Moreover, CaABC1 was induced in iprobenfos, kresoxim-methyl, thiophanate-methyl, and hygromycin B. These results demonstrate that CaABC1 is necessary for conidiation, abiotic stress, and various fungicide resistances. These results will provide the basis for further study on the function of ABC transporter genes in C. acutatum.

  5. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S. F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three gen...

  6. Characterization of the putative cholesterol transport protein metastatic lymph node 64 in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S R; Smith, A G A; Alpy, F; Tomasetto, C; Ginsberg, S D; Lamb, D J

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular management of cholesterol is a critical process in the brain. Deficits with cholesterol transport and storage are linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Neimann-Pick disease type C and Alzheimer's disease. One protein putatively involved in cholesterol transport is metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64). MLN64 localizes to late endosomes which are part of the cholesterol internalization pathway. However, a detailed pattern of MLN64 expression in the brain is unclear. Using immunocytochemical and immunoblot analyses, we demonstrated the presence of MLN64 in several tissue types and various regions within the brain. MLN64 immunostaining in the CNS was heterogeneous, indicating selective expression in discrete specific cell populations and regions. MLN64 immunoreactivity was detected in glia and neurons, which displayed intracellular labeling consistent with an endosomal localization. Although previous studies suggested that MLN64 may promote steroid production in the brain, MLN64 immunoreactivity did not colocalize with steroidogenic cells in the CNS. These results demonstrate that MLN64 is produced in the mouse and human CNS in a restricted pattern of expression, suggesting that MLN64 serves a cell-specific function in cholesterol transport.

  7. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter.

  8. Error characterization of CO2 vertical mixing in the atmospheric transport model WRF-VPRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Karstens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the dominant uncertainties in inverse estimates of regional CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes is related to model errors in vertical transport within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. In this study we present the results from a synthetic experiment using the atmospheric model WRF-VPRM to realistically simulate transport of CO2 for large parts of the European continent at 10 km spatial resolution. To elucidate the impact of vertical mixing error on modeled CO2 mixing ratios we simulated a month during the growing season (August 2006 with different commonly used parameterizations of the PBL (Mellor-Yamada-Janjić (MYJ and Yonsei-University (YSU scheme. To isolate the effect of transport errors we prescribed the same CO2 surface fluxes for both simulations. Differences in simulated CO2 mixing ratios (model bias were on the order of 3 ppm during daytime with larger values at night. We present a simple method to reduce this bias by 70–80% when the true height of the mixed layer is known.

  9. Vertical mixing in atmospheric tracer transport models: error characterization and propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gerbig

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Imperfect representation of vertical mixing near the surface in atmospheric transport models leads to uncertainties in modelled tracer mixing ratios. When using the atmosphere as an integrator to derive surface-atmosphere exchange from mixing ratio observations made in the atmospheric boundary layer, this uncertainty has to be quantified and taken into account. A comparison between radiosonde-derived mixing heights and mixing heights derived from ECMWF meteorological data during May–June 2005 in Europe revealed random discrepancies of about 40% for the daytime with insignificant bias errors, and much larger values approaching 100% for nocturnal mixing layers with bias errors also exceeding 50%. The Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT model was used to propagate this uncertainty into CO2 mixing ratio uncertainties, accounting for spatial and temporal error covariance. Average values of 3 ppm were found for the 2 month period, indicating that this represents a large fraction of the overall uncertainty. A pseudo data experiment shows that the error propagation with STILT avoids biases in flux retrievals when applied in inversions. The results indicate that flux inversions employing transport models based on current generation meteorological products have misrepresented an important part of the model error structure likely leading to biases in the estimated mean and uncertainties. We strongly recommend including the solution presented in this work: better, higher resolution atmospheric models, a proper description of correlated random errors, and a modification of the overall sampling strategy.

  10. Weighted Radial Variation for Node Feature Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Andris, C

    2011-01-01

    Connections created from a node-edge matrix have been traditionally difficult to visualize and analyze because of the number of flows to be rendered in a limited feature or cartographic space. Because analyzing connectivity patterns is useful for understanding the complex dynamics of human and information flow that connect non-adjacent space, techniques that allow for visual data mining or static representations of system dynamics are a growing field of research. Here, we create a Weighted Radial Variation (WRV) technique to classify a set of nodes based on the configuration of their radially-emanating vector flows. Each entity's vector is syncopated in terms of cardinality, direction, length, and flow magnitude. The WRV process unravels each star-like entity's individual flow vectors on a 0-360{\\deg} spectrum, to form a unique signal whose distribution depends on the flow presence at each step around the entity, and is further characterized by flow distance and magnitude. The signals are processed with an un...

  11. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Svensson, Haakan [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  12. Characterization of heterologously expressed transporter genes by patch- and voltage-clamp methods: Application to cyclic nucleotide-dependent responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad

    2013-09-03

    The application of patch- and voltage-clamp methods to study ion transport can be limited by many hurdles: the size of the cells to be patched and/or stabbed, the subcellular localization of the molecule of interest, and its density of expression that could be too low even in their own native environment. Functional expression of genes using recombinant DNA technology not only overcomes those hurdles but also affords additional and elegant investigations such as single-point mutation studies and subunit associations/regulations. In this chapter, we give a step-by-step description of two electrophysiological methods, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC), that are routinely used in combination with heterologous gene expression to assist researchers interested in the identification and characterization of ion transporters. We describe how to (1) obtain and maintain the cells suitable for the use with each of the above-mentioned methods (i.e., HEK-293 cells and yeast spheroplasts to use with the patch-clamp methodology and Xenopus laevis oocytes with TEVC), (2) transfect/inject them with the gene of interest, and (3) record ion transport activities. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  13. Preparation, characterization, and transport of dexamethasone-loaded polymeric nanoparticles across a human placental in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hazem; Kalashnikova, Irina; White, Mark Andrew; Sherman, Michael; Rytting, Erik

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare dexamethasone-loaded polymeric nanoparticles and evaluate their potential for transport across human placenta. Statistical modeling and factorial design was applied to investigate the influence of process parameters on the following nanoparticle characteristics: particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and drug encapsulation efficiency. Dexamethasone and nanoparticle transport was subsequently investigated using the BeWo b30 cell line, an in vitro model of human placental trophoblast cells, which represent the rate-limiting barrier for maternal-fetal transfer. Encapsulation efficiency and drug transport were determined using a validated high performance liquid chromatography method. Nanoparticle morphology and drug encapsulation were further characterized by cryo-transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Nanoparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) were spherical, with particle sizes ranging from 140 to 298 nm, and encapsulation efficiency ranging from 52 to 89%. Nanoencapsulation enhanced the apparent permeability of dexamethasone from the maternal compartment to the fetal compartment more than 10-fold in this model. Particle size was shown to be inversely correlated with drug and nanoparticle permeability, as confirmed with fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. These results highlight the feasibility of designing nanoparticles capable of delivering medication to the fetus, in particular, potential dexamethasone therapy for the prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

  14. Functional characterization of folic acid transport in the intestine of the laying hen using the everted intestinal sac model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Karmin, O; House, J D

    2011-01-01

    Absorption at the level of the intestine is likely a primary regulatory mechanism for the deposition of dietary supplemented folic acid into the chicken egg. Therefore, factors affecting the intestinal transport of folic acid in the laying hen may influence the level of egg folate concentrations. To this end, a series of experiments using intestinal everted sacs were conducted to characterize intestinal folic acid absorption processes in laying hens. Effects of naturally occurring folate derivatives (5-methyl and 10-formyltetrahydrofolate) as well as heme on folic acid absorption were also investigated. Folic acid absorption was measured based on the rate of uptake of (3)H-labeled folic acid in the everted sac from various segments of the small and large intestines. Folic acid concentration, incubation length, and pH condition were optimized before the performance of uptake experiments. The distribution profile of folic acid transport along the intestine was highest in the upper half of the small intestine. Maximum uptake rate (nmol·100 g tissue(-1)·min(-1)) was observed in the duodenum (20.6 ± 1.9) and jejunum (22.3 ± 2.0) and decreased significantly in the ileum (15.3 ± 1.1) and cecum (9.3 ± 0.9). Transport increased proportionately (P laying hen. Uptake of folic acid in the cecum raises the likelihood of absorption of bacterial-derived folate.

  15. Severity grading in radial dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkki, S K

    2014-11-01

    A functional scoring method to grade the usefulness and quality of the upper limbs in congenital radial dysplasia is presented. It is based on the author's examinations of 44 arms with congenital deficiency of the radius. The hand (H), wrist (W) and proximal parts (P) of the extremity are each scored from 0 to 10 points for severity. The scoring is expressed similarly to the TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) tumour classification, for example as H5W4P2. The maximum severity index is 30 points. A severity grade of mild is between 1 and 8 points, moderate between 9 and 16 points and severe 17 points and over. In the author's series, the grades were mild in eight, moderate in 21 and severe in 15 cases. The functional severity grading should allow better comparison of radially deficient limbs and the results of treatment between groups of patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Functional characterization of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum modA and modB genes involved in molybdenum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María J; Tresierra-Ayala, Alvaro; Talbi, Chouhra; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2006-01-01

    A modABC gene cluster that encodes an ABC-type, high-affinity molybdate transporter from Bradyrhizobium japonicum has been isolated and characterized. B. japonicum modA and modB mutant strains were unable to grow aerobically or anaerobically with nitrate as nitrogen source or as respiratory substrate, respectively, and lacked nitrate reductase activity. The nitrogen-fixing ability of the mod mutants in symbiotic association with soybean plants grown in a Mo-deficient mineral solution was severely impaired. Addition of molybdate to the bacterial growth medium or to the plant mineral solution fully restored the wild-type phenotype. Because the amount of molybdate required for suppression of the mutant phenotype either under free-living or under symbiotic conditions was dependent on sulphate concentration, it is likely that a sulphate transporter is also involved in Mo uptake in B. japonicum. The promoter region of the modABC genes has been characterized by primer extension. Reverse transcription and expression of a transcriptional fusion, P(modA)-lacZ, was detected only in a B. japonicum modA mutant grown in a medium without molybdate supplementation. These findings indicate that transcription of the B. japonicum modABC genes is repressed by molybdate.

  17. Characterization of nonOhmic electrical transport in double perovskite compounds through bias scale and nonlinearity exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, D.; Nandi, U. N.; Jana, D.; Dasgupta, P.; Poddar, A.

    2017-01-01

    Scaling analysis of nonOhmic electrical transport in double perovskite (DP) compounds like La2NiMnO6 and Sr2Fe0.3Mn0.7MoO6 is presented over a wide range of electric bias and temperatures. It is shown that the voltage V0(T) at which conductance deviates from its Ohmic value Σ0(T) scales with Σ0(T) as V0(T) ∼Σ0(T) xT , xT being the onset exponent characterizing the onset of nonOhmic conduction. Interestingly, it was found that xT is negative and insensitive to the nature of conduction mechanism in DPs but is related to the characteristic temperature T0 and the mean hopping length Hm. We provide a scaling formalism in terms of the parameters V0(T) and xT in DPs for deeper understanding of the spintronic application and the electrode functioning in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Inelastic multi-step tunneling is found to be the suitable mechanism of electronic transport characterized completely by these two parameters.

  18. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential...... presently available is limited, and that almost all of these are characterized by low potency and a low degree of subtype selectivity, future screening of compound libraries at the EAAT-cell lines in the FMP assay could help identify structurally and pharmacologically novel ligands for the transporters....... of the cell lines in the FMP assay were in good agreement with previous findings in electrophysiology studies of the transporters. The FMP assay was capable of distinguishing between substrates and non-substrate inhibitors and to discriminate between "full" and "partial" substrates at the transporters. Taking...

  19. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  20. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an ATP-binding cassette transporter OtrC from Streptomyces rimosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The otrC gene of Streptomyces rimosus was previously annotated as an oxytetracycline (OTC resistance protein. However, the amino acid sequence analysis of OtrC shows that it is a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function. To our knowledge, none of the ABC transporters in S. rimosus have yet been characterized. In this study, we aimed to characterize the multidrug exporter function of OtrC and evaluate its relevancy to OTC production. Results In order to investigate OtrC’s function, otrC is cloned and expressed in E. coli The exporter function of OtrC was identified by ATPase activity determination and ethidium bromide efflux assays. Also, the susceptibilities of OtrC-overexpressing cells to several structurally unrelated drugs were compared with those of OtrC-non-expressing cells by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assays, indicating that OtrC functions as a drug exporter with a broad range of drug specificities. The OTC production was enhanced by 1.6-fold in M4018 (P = 0.000877 and 1.4-fold in SR16 (P = 0.00973 duplication mutants, while it decreased to 80% in disruption mutants (P = 0.0182 and 0.0124 in M4018 and SR16, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that OtrC is an ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function, and plays an important role in self-protection by drug efflux mechanisms. This is the first report of such a protein in S. rimosus, and otrC could be a valuable target for genetic manipulation to improve the production of industrial antibiotics.

  1. Quantitative characterization of solute transport processes in the laboratory using electrical resistivity tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteland, S.

    2013-01-01

    The shallow subsurface is an important zone from a social, economical, and environmental point of view. The increased use of the shallow subsurface together with the call for its protection and sustainable exploitation have increased the need for tools to monitor and characterize the subsurface, as

  2. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S.F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K+ acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but it did not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K+ transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K+ transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:23848378

  3. Identification and functional characterization of K(+) transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Roy, Craig R; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the Escherichia coli K(+) transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K(+) acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but itdid not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K(+) transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K(+) transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions.

  4. Characterization of the Temporal-Spatial Variability of Trans-Atlantic Dust Transport Based on CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Atlantic dust transport has important implications for human and ecosystem health, the terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycle, weather systems, and climate. A reliable assessment of these influences requires the characterization of dust distributions in three dimensions and over long time periods. We provide an observation-based multiyear estimate of trans-Atlantic dust transport by using a 7-year (2007 - 2013) lidar record from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. We estimate that on a basis of the 7-year average and integration over 10S - 30N, 182 Tg a-1 dust leaves the coast of North Africa at 15W, of which 132 Tg a-1 and 43 Tg a-1 reaches 35W and 75W, respectively. These flux estimates have an overall known uncertainty of (45 - 70). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 - 48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8 - 50) kg ha-1 a-1. This imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006 - 0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 - 39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest, which is comparable to the loss of phosphorus to rainfall. Significant seasonal variations are observed in both the magnitude of total dust transport and its meridional and vertical distributions. The observed large interannual variability of annual dust transport is highly anti-correlated with the prior-year Sahel Precipitation Index. Comparisons of CALIPSO measurements with surface-based observations and model simulations will also be discussed.

  5. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Further characterization of the intracellular processing and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M

    1984-01-01

    The effect of tunicamycin on synthesis and intracellular transport of pig small intestinal aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10) and maltase-glucoamylase (EC 3.2.1.20) was studied by labelling of mucosal explants with [35S]methionine. The expression of the microvilla...... in the presence of tunicamycin. The complex forms were also sensitive to endo F but did not coincide with the high mannose forms after treatment, indicating that the size difference cannot alone be ascribed to processing of N-linked carbohydrate....

  6. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    /dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...... the identity of specific phosphorylated residues. To elucidate SERT phosphorylation sites, we have generated peptides corresponding to the entire intracellular region of human SERT and performed in vitro phosphorylation assays with a panel of kinases suggested to be involved in SERT regulation or for which...

  7. Design and development of the HELL user station: beam transport, characterization, and shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grittani, Gabriele Maria; Levato, Tadzio; Krus, Miroslav; Fasso, Alberto; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Hyung Taek; Margarone, Daniele; Mocek, Tomáś; Precek, Martin; Versaci, Roberto; Korn, Georg

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the ELI-Beamlines project, the HELL (High energy ELectron by Laser) platform will host an electron beamline with a dual aim: to explore innovative concepts of laser driven electron acceleration and to deliver a stable and reliable electron beam to external users, according to their specific needs. Because of this, it is crucial to identify the possible applications and their respective range of parameters. In order to accomplish this goal, Monte Carlo simulations of electron radiography and radiotherapy are performed and discussed. Once identified those parameter spaces, a beam transport line is studied and presented for each energy range. Finally, beam diagnostics are discussed.

  8. Characterization of single crystalline ZnTe and ZnSe grown by vapor phase transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigubo, A B; Di Stefano, M C [FRBA-UTN, (1179) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aguirre, M H [Dpto de Quim Inorg, Fac de Cs Quim, Univ Complutense, (28040) Madrid (Spain); Martinez, A M; D' Elia, R; Canepa, H; Heredia, E, E-mail: atrigubo@citefa.gov.a [CINSO-CITEFA: (1603) Villa Martelli, Pcia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    Tubular furnaces were designed and built to obtain single crystalline ZnTe and ZnSe ingots using respectively physical and chemical transport methods. Different temperature profiles and growth rates were analyzed in order to optimize the necessary crystalline quality for device development. Optical and scanning electron micrographs of the corrosion figures produced by chemical etching were used to obtain the dislocation density and the misorientation between adjacent subgrains in ZnTe and ZnSe wafers. Structural quality of the single crystalline material was determined by transmission electronic microscopy. Optical transmittance was measured by infrared transmission spectrometry and the resulting values were compared to commercial samples.

  9. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ˜10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ˜2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ˜2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ˜17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ˜7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ˜4 × 109 neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ˜2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  10. Functional characterization of a potassium transporter geneNrHAK1 in Nicotiana rustica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-kui GUO; Qian YANG; Xiu-qing WAN; Pei-qiang YAN

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the function of a novel potassium transporter gene(NrHAK1) isolated from Nicotiana rustica roots using yeast complement and real-time PCR technique. The complementary DNA (cDNA) of NrHAK1, 2 488 bp long, contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 2334 bp encoding a protein of 777 amino acids (87.6 kDa) with 12 predicted transmembrane domains. The NrHAK1 protein shows a high sequence similarity to those of high-affinity potassium transporters in Mesembryanthemum, Phytolacca acinosa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and so on. We found that the NrHAK1 gene could complement the yeast-mutant defect in K+ uptake. Among several tissues surveyed, the expression level of NrHAK1 was most abundant in the root tip and was up-regulated when exposed to potassium starvation. Moreover, the transcript accumulation was significantly reduced by adding 5 mmol/L NH4 to the solution. These results suggest that NrHAK1 plays an important role in potassium absorption in N. Rustica.

  11. Characterization of the charge transport and electrical properties in solution-processed semiconducting polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LiGuo; ZHANG HuaiWu; TANG XiaoLi; LI YuanXun; ZHONG ZhiYong

    2012-01-01

    The conventional charge transport models based on density- and field-dependent mobility,only having a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence,cannot give good current-voltage characteristics of poly (2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) hole-only devices.In this paper,we demonstrate that the current-voltage characteristics can give a good unified description of the temperature,carrier density and electric field dependence of mobility based on both the Arrhenius temperature dependence and the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence.Furthermore,we perform a systematic study of charge transport and electrical properties for MEH-PPV.It is shown that the boundary carrier density has an important effect on the current-voltage characteristics.Too large or too small values of boundary carder density will lead to incorrect current-voltage characteristics.The numerically calculated carrier density is a decreasing function of the distance to the interface,and the numerically calculated electric field is an increasing function of the distance.Both the maximum of carrier density and the minimum of electric field appear near the interface.

  12. Characterization of human OCT1-mediated transport of DAPI as a fluorescent probe substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Ohta, Kinya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2011-09-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the functional characteristics of human organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1) for the transport of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol (DAPI), a fluorescent compound that may be used as a probe substrate for rapid assays of its functionality. The specific uptake of DAPI by hOCT1 heterologously introduced into Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells by stable transfection was found to be, when assessed by DAPI-derived fluorescence intensity, rapid and saturable with a Michaelis constant of 8.94 µM, indicating that DAPI is a good substrate of hOCT1. The specific uptake of DAPI was insensitive to the membrane potential and extracellular pH, indicating a mode of operation different from that for typical cationic substrates such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), for which hOCT1 has been suggested to be driven by an inside-negative membrane potential and favor higher pH for optimal operation. However, many organic cations were found to inhibit the specific DAPI uptake with extents well correlated with those of inhibition of the specific uptake of [(14) C]TEA, indicating comparable performances of both substrates as probes in identifying inhibitors. Thus, DAPI can be an alternative probe substrate that enables fluorometric rapid assays of the functionality of hOCT1.

  13. Characterization of thermal, optical and carrier transport properties of porous silicon using the photoacoustic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Chan Kok [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mahmood Mat Yunus, W. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: mahmood@science.upm.edu.my; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Abidin Talib, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Kassim, Anuar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia)

    2008-08-01

    In this work, the porous silicon layer was prepared by the electrochemical anodization etching process on n-type and p-type silicon wafers. The formation of the porous layer has been identified by photoluminescence and SEM measurements. The optical absorption, energy gap, carrier transport and thermal properties of n-type and p-type porous silicon layers were investigated by analyzing the experimental data from photoacoustic measurements. The values of thermal diffusivity, energy gap and carrier transport properties have been found to be porosity-dependent. The energy band gap of n-type and p-type porous silicon layers was higher than the energy band gap obtained for silicon substrate (1.11 eV). In the range of porosity (50-76%) of the studies, our results found that the optical band-gap energy of p-type porous silicon (1.80-2.00 eV) was higher than that of the n-type porous silicon layer (1.70-1.86 eV). The thermal diffusivity value of the n-type porous layer was found to be higher than that of the p-type and both were observed to increase linearly with increasing layer porosity.

  14. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), which belongs to a family of       sodium/chloride-dependent transporters, is the major pharmacological       target in the treatment of several clinical disorders, including       depression and anxiety. In the present study we show that the dissociation......       rate, of [3H]S-citalopram from human SERT, is retarded by the presence of       serotonin, as well as by several antidepressants, when present in the       dissociation buffer. Dissociation of [3H]S-citalopram from SERT is most       potently inhibited by S-citalopram followed by R......-citalopram, sertraline,       serotonin and paroxetine. EC50 values for S- and R-citalopram are 3.6 +/-       0.4 microm and 19.4 +/- 2.3 microm, respectively. Fluoxetine, venlafaxine       and duloxetine have no significant effect on the dissociation of       [3H]S-citalopram. Allosteric modulation of dissociation...

  15. Characterization of zebrafish Abcc4 as an efflux transporter of organochlorine pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xing; Long, Yong; Lin, Li; Sun, Rongze; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Zongbin

    2014-01-01

    DDT and lindane are highly toxic organochlorine pesticides and posing adverse effects on the environment and public health due to their frequent usage in developing countries. ABCC4/MRP4 is an organic anion transporter that mediates cellular efflux of a wide range of exogenous and endogenous compounds such as cyclic nucleotides and anti-cancer drugs; however, it remains unclear whether ABCC4 and its orthologs function in the detoxification of organochlorine pesticides. Here, we demonstrated the roles of zebrafish Abcc4 in cellular efflux of DDT and lindane. Zebrafish abcc4 was maternally expressed in the oocytes and its transcripts were detected in the lens, pancreas, gills, liver, intestine and bladder of developing embryos and in adult tissues examined. DDT and lindane were able to induce the expression of abcc4 gene and overexpression of Abcc4 significantly decreased the cytotoxicity and accumulation of DDT and lindane in LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos. In contrast, overexpression of an Abcc4-G1188D mutant abolished its transporter function without effects on its substrate binding activity, and sensitized LLC-PK1 cells and developing embryos to toxic pesticides. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) was involved in the efflux of cellular pesticides and ATPase activity in developing embryos can be induced by DDT or lindane. Thus, zebrafish Abcc4 plays crucial roles in cellular efflux of organochlorine pesticides and can be used a potential molecular marker for the monitor of DDT and lindane contamination in the aquatic environment.

  16. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangran; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  17. Discovery and characterization of novel inhibitors of the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT or SLC13A5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Kim; Brown, Janice; Jones, Jessica C; Cabral, Shawn; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Gorgoglione, Matthew; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B; Zhu, Yimin; Yan, Qingyun; Zhou, Yingjiang; Vernochet, Cecile; Riccardi, Keith; Wolford, Angela; Pirman, David; Niosi, Mark; Aspnes, Gary; Herr, Michael; Genung, Nathan E; Magee, Thomas V; Uccello, Daniel P; Loria, Paula; Di, Li; Gosset, James R; Hepworth, David; Rolph, Timothy; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Erion, Derek M

    2015-12-01

    Citrate is a key regulatory metabolic intermediate as it facilitates the integration of the glycolysis and lipid synthesis pathways. Inhibition of hepatic extracellular citrate uptake, by blocking the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT or SLC13A5), has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach to treat metabolic disorders. NaCT transports citrate from the blood into the cell coupled to the transport of sodium ions. The studies herein report the identification and characterization of a novel small dicarboxylate molecule (compound 2) capable of selectively and potently inhibiting citrate transport through NaCT, both in vitro and in vivo. Binding and transport experiments indicate that 2 specifically binds NaCT in a competitive and stereosensitive manner, and is recognized as a substrate for transport by NaCT. The favorable pharmacokinetic properties of 2 permitted in vivo experiments to evaluate the effect of inhibiting hepatic citrate uptake on metabolic endpoints.

  18. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 1, Research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Transportation Research Center

    1991-05-31

    In this study, rail and highway routes which may be used for shipments of high-level nuclear waste to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are characterized. This characterization facilitates three types of impact analysis: comparative study, limited worst-case assessment, and more sophisticated probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Data for relative and absolute impact measures are provided to support comparisons of routes based on selected characteristics. A worst-case scenario assessment is included to determine potentially critical and most likely places for accidents or incidents to occur. The assessment facilitated by the data in this study is limited because impact measures are restricted to the identification of potential areas or persons affected. No attempt is made to quantify the magnitude of these impacts. Most likely locations for accidents to occur are determined relative to other locations within the scope of this study. Independent factors and historical trends used to identify these likely locations are only proxies for accident probability.

  19. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 1, Research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Transportation Research Center

    1991-05-31

    In this study, rail and highway routes which may be used for shipments of high-level nuclear waste to a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are characterized. This characterization facilitates three types of impact analysis: comparative study, limited worst-case assessment, and more sophisticated probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Data for relative and absolute impact measures are provided to support comparisons of routes based on selected characteristics. A worst-case scenario assessment is included to determine potentially critical and most likely places for accidents or incidents to occur. The assessment facilitated by the data in this study is limited because impact measures are restricted to the identification of potential areas or persons affected. No attempt is made to quantify the magnitude of these impacts. Most likely locations for accidents to occur are determined relative to other locations within the scope of this study. Independent factors and historical trends used to identify these likely locations are only proxies for accident probability.

  20. Experimental study of the plasma structure and characterization of the transport behaviour in the laminar zone of a stochastized plasma edge; Experimentelle Untersuchung der Plasmastruktur und Charakterisierung des Transportverhaltens in der laminaren Zone einer stochastisierten Plasmarandschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, O.

    2006-07-15

    For a detailed study of the plasma structure and the transport characteristics of a stochastized plasma edge at the tokamak TEXTOR the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) was constructed, by which differently shaped external disturbing fields are statically and dynamically generated. Aim of this thgesis is to study experimentally the radial and poloidal structure of the plasma edge stochastized by the DED disturbing field and to analyze its transport characteristics. For this spatially highly resolved radial profiles of the electron density and temperature were measured by means of radiation-emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at the high- and low-field side of TEXTOR. These experimental results yield a good stating base for the validation and further development of three-dimensional transport codes.

  1. Characterization of Uranium Contamination, Transport, and Remediation at Rocky Flats - Across Remediation into Post-Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecky, D. R.; Boylan, J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Rocky Flats Site is a former nuclear weapons production facility approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Built in 1952 and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission and then Department of Energy, the Site was remediated and closed in 2005, and is currently undergoing long-term surveillance and monitoring by the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Areas of contamination resulted from roughly fifty years of operation. Of greatest interest, surface soils were contaminated with plutonium, americium, and uranium; groundwater was contaminated with chlorinated solvents, uranium, and nitrates; and surface waters, as recipients of runoff and shallow groundwater discharge, have been contaminated by transport from both regimes. A region of economic mineralization that has been referred to as the Colorado Mineral Belt is nearby, and the Schwartzwalder uranium mine is approximately five miles upgradient of the Site. Background uranium concentrations are therefore elevated in many areas. Weapons-related activities included work with enriched and depleted uranium, contributing anthropogenic content to the environment. Using high-resolution isotopic analyses, Site-related contamination can be distinguished from natural uranium in water samples. This has been instrumental in defining remedy components, and long-term monitoring and surveillance strategies. Rocky Flats hydrology interlinks surface waters and shallow groundwater (which is very limited in volume and vertical and horizontal extent). Surface water transport pathways include several streams, constructed ponds, and facility surfaces. Shallow groundwater has no demonstrated connection to deep aquifers, and includes natural preferential pathways resulting primarily from porosity in the Rocky Flats alluvium, weathered bedrock, and discontinuous sandstones. In addition, building footings, drains, trenches, and remedial systems provide pathways for transport at the site. Removal of impermeable surfaces (buildings

  2. Characterization of the role of heterogeneous advection and diffusion on transport in weathered and fractured granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Marechal, J.; Nigon, B.; Wajiddudin, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of transport in weathered and fractured rocks is critical as it represents the primary control of contaminant transfer from the subsurface in many parts of the world. This is the case in Southern India, where the subsurface is composed mainly of weathered and fractured granite and where the overexploitation of the groundwater resource since the 70's has led to high water table depletion and strong groundwater quality deterioration. One key issue for modelling transport in such systems is to quantify the respective role of advective heterogeneities and matrix diffusion, which can both lead to strongly non Fickian transport properties. We investigate this question by analysing tracer test experiments performed under different flow configurations at a fractured granite experimental site located in Andhra Pradesh (India). We performed both convergent and push-pull tracer tests within the same fracture and at different scales. Three convergent tracer tests were performed with a solution of fluorescein for different pumping rate and for different distances between injection and pumping boreholes: 6, 30 and 41 meters. To evaluate diffusive process, we performed two long-duration push-pull tests (push time of 3 hours) with a solution of two conservative tracers of different diffusion coefficient (fluorescein and sodium chloride). We performed also six others push-pull tests with only fluorescein but for a variable push times of 14 min and 55 min with or without resting time of about 60 min. The late-time behaviour on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained for all convergent tracer tests showed a power-law slope of -2. Two of them showed an inflexion in the BTCs suggesting the existence of two independent flow paths and thus a highly channelized flow. The long-duration push-pull tests showed similar late-time behaviour with a power-law slope of -2.2 for both tracers. The six others push-pull tests showed a variation of power-law exponent from -3 to -2

  3. Multi-path transportation futures study : vehicle characterization and scenario analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering; ORNL

    2009-12-03

    Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance - and uncertainty - of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). This Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of 'what if' questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  4. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangran Li

    Full Text Available The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2, which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999 from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05. Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05. These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  5. Characterization of acquired paclitaxel resistance of breast cancer cells and involvement of ABC transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kopperová, Dana; Balušíková, Kamila; Ehrlichová, Marie; Brynychová, Veronika; Václavíková, Radka; Daniel, Petr; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Development of taxane resistance has become clinically very important issue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance are still unclear. To address this issue, we established paclitaxel-resistant sublines of the SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines that are capable of long-term proliferation in 100nM and 300nM paclitaxel, respectively. Application of these concentrations leads to cell death in the original counterpart cells. Both sublines are cross-resistant to doxorubicin, indicating the presence of the MDR phenotype. Interestingly, resistance in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines is circumvented by the second-generation taxane SB-T-1216. Moreover, we demonstrated that it was not possible to establish sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells resistant to this taxane. It means that at least the tested breast cancer cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. Employing mRNA expression profiling of all known human ABC transporters and subsequent Western blot analysis of the expression of selected transporters, we demonstrated that only the ABCB1/PgP and ABCC3/MRP3 proteins were up-regulated in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines. We found up-regulation of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCC4 proteins only in paclitaxel-resistant SK-BR-3 cells. In paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells, ABCB4/MDR3 and ABCC2/MRP2 proteins were up-regulated. Silencing of ABCB1 expression using specific siRNA increased significantly, but did not completely restore full sensitivity to both paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Thus we showed a key, but not exclusive, role for ABCB1 in mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance. It suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in paclitaxel resistance in tested breast cancer cells.

  6. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E; Hresko, Richard C; Hruz, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 is of fundamental importance for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite intensive effort, the ability to express and purify sufficient quantities of structurally and functionally intact protein for biophysical analysis has previously been exceedingly difficult. We report here the development of novel methods to express, purify, and functionally reconstitute GLUT4 into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes. Rat GLUT4 containing FLAG and His tags at the amino and carboxy termini, respectively, was engineered and stably transfected into HEK-293 cells. Overexpression in suspension culture yielded over 1.5 mg of protein per liter of culture. Systematic screening of detergent solubilized GLUT4-GFP fusion protein via fluorescent-detection size exclusion chromatography identified lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) as highly effective for isolating monomeric GLUT4 micelles. Preservation of structural integrity and ligand binding was demonstrated via quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and competition of ATB-BMPA photolabeling by cytochalasin B. GLUT4 was reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs and proper folding was confirmed. Reconstitution of purified GLUT4 with amphipol A8-35 stabilized the transporter at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. Functional activity of purified GLUT4 was confirmed by reconstitution of LMNG-purified GLUT4 into proteoliposomes and measurement of saturable uptake of D-glucose over L-glucose. Taken together, these data validate the development of an efficient means to generate milligram quantities of stable and functionally intact GLUT4 that is suitable for a wide array of biochemical and biophysical analyses.

  7. Characterization of Asian Summer Monsoon Transport from the Boundary Layer to Lower Stratosphere: Recent Progress from Model Studies and New Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Laura; Honomichl, Shawn; Kinnison, Doug; Bian, Jianchun

    2016-04-01

    The Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) system is a significant driver for transport between the boundary layer and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Satellite observations, although provide clear evidence of its global impact on seasonal scales, are unable to resolve the details of the transport process. This work summarizes recent progress in characterizing the transport behavior using global chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and in situ observations. NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model run in specified dynamics mode (WACCM-SD) is used to characterize the sub-seasonal scale dynamical variability of the monsoon system and the impact on transport of boundary layer tracers into lower stratosphere. The analysis focuses on three elements of the transport: uplifting from the boundary layer, transport to the regions outside of ASM at the UTLS level, and transport into stratosphere in association with the Brewer-Dobson circulation. In situ measurements from six years of sounding studies over the Tibetan plateau are analyzed to complement the model analyses. The profiles of ozone, water vapor, cirrus clouds, together with temperature from the soundings provide important insight into the ASM transport behaviors.

  8. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Romanczukiewicz, T; Wereszczynski, A

    2016-01-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric skyrmions in the BPS Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearised field equations for small fluctuations in a skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the BPS Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance.

  9. Countercurrent aortography via radial artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hyung Kuk; Lee, Young Chun; Lee, Seung Chul; Jeon, Seok Chol; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Seung Ro; Kim, Soon Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Countercurrent aortography via radial artery was performed for detection of aortic arch anomalies in 4 infants with congenital heart disease. Author's cases of aortic arch anomalies were 3 cases of PDA, 1 case of coarctation of aorta, and 1 case of occlusion of anastomosis site on subclavian artery B-T shunt. And aberrant origin of the right SCA, interrupted aortic arch, hypoplastic aorta, anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta can be demonstrated by this method. Countercurrent aortography affords an safe and simple method for detection of aortic arch anomalies without retrograde arterial catheterization, especially in small infants or premature babies.

  10. Turbulence spectra and transport barriers in gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Angelino, P.; Casati, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Gürcan, O.; Hennequin, P.; Sabot, R.

    2008-11-01

    The energy spectra of the Ion Temperature Gradient driven fluctuations are investigated with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA. For monotonous q profile, the poloidal spectrum can equally be fitted with two power laws or with a unique exponential. When prescribing an additional sheared radial electric field in view of triggering a transport barrier, the system is found to promptly polarize and screen this field, likely in a transient evolution towards a canonical equilibrium. For a reversed q profile, the negative shear region exhibits larger fluctuations, possibly due to the slab branch of ITG, characterized by a flatter spectrum. No clear transport barrier signature is observed in the vicinity of s = 0 when the radial extent of the gap without resonant modes is smaller than the turbulence correlation length.

  11. Characterization of the 222Rn family turbulent transport in the convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of turbulent transport and radioactive decay on the distribution of 222Rn and its progeny in convective atmospheric boundary layers (CBL is investigated. Large eddy simulation is used to simulate their dispersion in steady state CBL and in unsteady conditions represented by the growth of a CBL within a pre-existing reservoir layer. The exact decomposition of the concentration and flux budget equations under steady state conditions allowed us to determine which processes are responsible for the vertical distribution of 222Rn and its progeny. Their mean concentrations are directly correlated with their half-life, e.g. 222Rn and 210Pb are the most abundant whereas 218Po show the lowest concentrations. 222Rn flux decreases linearly with height and its flux budget is similar to the one of inert emitted scalar, i.e., a balance between on the one hand the gradient and the buoyancy production terms, and on the other hand the pressure and dissipation at smaller scales which tends to destroy the fluxes. While 222Rn exhibits the typical bottom-up behavior, the maximum flux location of the daughters is moving upwards while their rank in the 222Rn progeny is increasing leading to a typical top-down behavior for 210Pb. We also found that the relevant radioactive decaying contributions of 222Rn short-lived daughters (218Po and 214Pb act as flux sources leading to deviations from the linear flux shape. In addition, while analyzing the vertical distribution of the radioactive decay contributions to the concentrations, e.g. the decaying zone, we found a variation in height of 222Rn daughters' radioactive transformations. Under unsteady conditions, the same behaviors reported under steady state conditions are found: deviation of the fluxes from the linear shape for 218Po, enhanced discrepancy in height of the radioactive transformation contributions for all the daughters. In addition, 222Rn and its progeny concentrations decrease due to the

  12. Wax and cutin mutants of Arabidopsis: Quantitative characterization of the cuticular transport barrier in relation to chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Christina; Schroll, Bettina; Zeisler, Viktoria; Waßmann, Friedrich; Franke, Rochus; Schreiber, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Using (14)C-labeled epoxiconazole as a tracer, cuticular permeability of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was quantitatively measured in order to compare different wax and cutin mutants (wax2, cut1, cer5, att1, bdg, shn3 and shn1) to the corresponding wild types (Col-0 and Ws). Mutants were characterized by decreases or increases in wax and/or cutin amounts. Permeances [ms(-1)] of Arabidopsis cuticles either increased in the mutants compared to wild type or were not affected. Thus, genetic changes in wax and cutin biosynthesis in some of the investigated Arabidopsis mutants obviously impaired the coordinated cutin and wax deposition at the outer leaf epidermal cell wall. As a consequence, barrier properties of cuticles were significantly decreased. However, increasing cutin and wax amounts by genetic modifications, did not automatically lead to improved cuticular barrier properties. As an alternative approach to the radioactive transport assay, changes in chlorophyll fluorescence were monitored after foliar application of metribuzine, an herbicide inhibiting electron transport in chloroplasts. Since both, half-times of photosynthesis inhibition as well as times of complete inhibition, in fact correlated with (14)C-epoxiconazole permeances, different rates of decline of photosynthetic yield between mutants and wild type must be a function of foliar uptake of the herbicide across the cuticle. Thus, monitoring changes in chlorophyll fluorescence, instead of conducting radioactive transport assays, represents an easy-to-handle and fast alternative evaluating cuticular barrier properties of different genotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  13. Testing Shelter Index and a Simple Wind Speed Parameter to Characterize Vegetation Control of Sand Transport Threshold and Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, John; Nield, Joanna; Nickling, William; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2013-04-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in the Chihuahuan Desert surrounding Las Cruces NM from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. One important aspect of research is to develop a relationship between a descriptor of the surface roughness that can be used to provide an indication of how susceptible the sediment transport system is to activation by wind. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height), as originally proposed by Okin (2008), and particle threshold expressed as a ratio of wind measured at 0.45 times the plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m, and saltation flux (g cm-2 s-1). Saltation flux was measured using sediment traps positioned 15 cm above the surface and nearby optical gate sensors (Wenglor® model YH03PCT8)measuring saltation activity also placed at a height of 15 cm. The results are used to evaluate shelter index as a parameter to characterize the local winds as influenced by the vegetation and sediment transport conditions (threshold and transport). Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in three vegetation communities: mature mesquite covered nebkha dunes, incipient nebkha dunes dominated by low mesquite plants, and a mature creosote bush area. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each approximately 10 degree wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning.

  14. Characterization, localization, and seasonal changes of the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 in the phloem of Fraxinus excelsior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öner-Sieben, Soner; Rappl, Christine; Sauer, Norbert; Stadler, Ruth; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2015-08-01

    Trees are generally assumed to be symplastic phloem loaders. A typical feature for most wooden species is an open minor vein structure with symplastic connections between mesophyll cells and phloem cells, which allow sucrose to move cell-to-cell through the plasmodesmata into the phloem. Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) also translocates raffinose family oligosaccharides in addition to sucrose. Sucrose concentration was recently shown to be higher in the phloem sap than in the mesophyll cells. This suggests the involvement of apoplastic steps and the activity of sucrose transporters in addition to symplastic phloem-loading processes. In this study, the sucrose transporter FeSUT1 from F. excelsior was analysed. Heterologous expression in baker's yeast showed that FeSUT1 mediates the uptake of sucrose. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that FeSUT1 was exclusively located in phloem cells of minor veins and in the transport phloem of F. excelsior. Further characterization identified these cells as sieve elements and possibly ordinary companion cells but not as intermediary cells. The localization and expression pattern point towards functions of FeSUT1 in phloem loading of sucrose as well as in sucrose retrieval. FeSUT1 is most likely responsible for the observed sucrose gradient between mesophyll and phloem. The elevated expression level of FeSUT1 indicated an increased apoplastic carbon export activity from the leaves during spring and late autumn. It is hypothesized that the importance of apoplastic loading is high under low-sucrose conditions and that the availability of two different phloem-loading mechanisms confers advantages for temperate woody species like F. excelsior.

  15. Reactive Flow Experiments to Characterize Porosity and Permeability Evolution during CO2 Transport in Weyburn-Midale Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. M.; Sholokhova, Y.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the relative effects of CO2-induced disequilibrium and pre-existing mineralogy and void space heterogeneity on permeability development in carbonate core samples from the Weyburn-Midale hydrocarbon reservoir (Canada). The aim of our work was to use detailed pre- and post-experimental x-ray computed tomography (XCMT) imaging, as well as geochemical data, to constrain reactive transport models that predict the evolution of pore space and permeability for geologic storage of CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fields. A total of nine core-flooding experiments were completed, using three distinct rock types (tight limestone, porous dolostone, and evaporite caprock) to represent the range of natural reservoir physical and chemical heterogeneity. Experiments were conducted under 25 MPa confining pressure, 60C temperature, and elevated salinity conditions, with pCO2 levels from 0.5-3 MPa. The coupling of intensive characterization with pressure/permeability and solution chemistry measurements provided powerful tools for interpreting and correlating mineral reactions and stability with pre-existing features and heterogeneities. We observed increased carbonate mass transfer rates, stable dissolution fronts, and greater volumes of dissolved minerals for cores with relatively homogeneous pore networks. Samples with more heterogeneous pore size distributions responded with variable mass transfer rates and development of fast transport pathways in regions with preexisting fractures. We infer that the breakthrough of these preferential fluid pathways leads to reductions in available reactive surface area, allowing undersaturated fluids to be transported through the cores despite relatively fast carbonate dissolution kinetics.

  16. Towards a Fully Distributed Characterization of Water Residence and Transit Time by Coupled Hydrology-Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondi, F.; Fatichi, S.; Burlando, P.

    2015-12-01

    Water residence and transit time are crucial elements in flow pathways and catchment response characterization. The temporal distribution of catchment transit times has been generally studied and modelled with lumped parameter approaches. However, understanding the dominant controls in a more holistic manner requires attention to the spatially distributed catchment properties also in relation to their control on the basin response to different type of precipitation events. A tool that looks both at the time and space distribution of water residence and transport can be useful for predicting water and solute fluxes and ultimately for better understanding the dependence of catchment transit and residence times on geomorphological and climatic factors. To this purpose we couple a fully distributed, yet essential, process-based watershed model with a component to simulate solute transport. Key features of the developed tool include: (a) reduced complexity spatially-distributed hydrological model; (b) spatially-distributed water age and conservative tracer concentration; (c) possibility to explicitly compute transit time distributions for different precipitation events and locations. The presented framework is tested on the Plynlimon watershed (UK), where long-term records of hydrological variables are available. Among them, discharge and chloride concentration are used to investigate the model behavior. We present the integrated model concept, the underlying methodologies, the results from the case study application, as well as preliminary virtual experiments that allow exploring the full statistical space of travel and residence times.

  17. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.; Murdoch, L.; Falta, R.; Looney, B.; Riha, B.

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2 m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  18. Electrical characterization of non-Fickian transport in groundwater and hyporheic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Pidlisecky, Adam; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Gooseff, Michael N.

    2008-04-01

    Recent work indicates that processes controlling solute mass transfer between mobile and less mobile domains in porous media may be quantified by combining electrical geophysical methods and electrically conductive tracers. Whereas direct geochemical measurements of solute preferentially sample the mobile domain, electrical geophysical methods are sensitive to changes in bulk electrical conductivity (bulk EC) and therefore sample EC in both the mobile and immobile domains. Consequently, the conductivity difference between direct geochemical samples and remotely sensed electrical geophysical measurements may provide an indication of mass transfer rates and mobile and immobile porosities in situ. Here we present (1) an overview of a theoretical framework for determining parameters controlling mass transfer with electrical resistivity in situ; (2) a review of a case study estimating mass transfer processes in a pilot-scale aquifer storage recovery test; and (3) an example application of this method for estimating mass transfer in watershed settings between streams and the hyporheic corridor. We demonstrate that numerical simulations of electrical resistivity studies of the stream/hyporheic boundary can help constrain volumes and rates of mobile-immobile mass transfer. We conclude with directions for future research applying electrical geophysics to understand field-scale transport in aquifer and fluvial systems subject to rate-limited mass transfer.

  19. Electrical characterization of non-Fickian transport in groundwater and hyporheic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K.; Pidlisecky, A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Gooseff, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work indicates that processes controlling solute mass transfer between mobile and less mobile domains in porous media may be quantified by combining electrical geophysical methods and electrically conductive tracers. Whereas direct geochemical measurements of solute preferentially sample the mobile domain, electrical geophysical methods are sensitive to changes in bulk electrical conductivity (bulk EC) and therefore sample EC in both the mobile and immobile domains. Consequently, the conductivity difference between direct geochemical samples and remotely sensed electrical geophysical measurements may provide an indication of mass transfer rates and mobile and immobile porosities in situ. Here we present (1) an overview of a theoretical framework for determining parameters controlling mass transfer with electrical resistivity in situ; (2) a review of a case study estimating mass transfer processes in a pilot-scale aquifer storage recovery test; and (3) an example application of this method for estimating mass transfer in watershed settings between streams and the hyporheic corridor. We demonstrate that numerical simulations of electrical resistivity studies of the stream/hyporheic boundary can help constrain volumes and rates of mobile-immobile mass transfer. We conclude with directions for future research applying electrical geophysics to understand field-scale transport in aquifer and fluvial systems subject to rate-limited mass transfer.

  20. Characterization of the Hole Transport and Electrical Properties in the Small-Molecule Organic Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. G.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, X. L.; Cheng, L. F.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the hole transport and electrical properties in a small-molecule organic material N, N'-bis(1-naphthyl)- N, N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB), which is frequently used in organic light-emitting diodes. It is shown that the thickness-dependent current density versus voltage ( J- V) characteristics of sandwich-type NPB-based hole-only devices cannot be described well using the conventional mobility model without carrier density or electric field dependence. However, a consistent and excellent description of the thickness-dependent and temperature-dependent J- V characteristics of NPB hole-only devices can be obtained with a single set of parameters by using our recently introduced improved model that take into account the temperature, carrier density, and electric field dependence of the mobility. For the small-molecule organic semiconductor studied, we find that the width of the Gaussian distribution of density of states σ and the lattice constant a are similar to the values reported for conjugated polymers. Furthermore, we show that the boundary carrier density has an important effect on the J- V characteristics. Both the maximum of carrier density and the minimum of electric field appear near the interface of NPB hole-only devices.

  1. Walkability and walking for transport: characterizing the built environment using space syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Owen, Neville; Cerin, Ester; Giles-Corti, Billie; Sugiyama, Takemi

    2016-11-24

    Neighborhood walkability has been shown to be associated with walking behavior. However, the availability of geographical data necessary to construct it remains a limitation. Building on the concept of space syntax, we propose an alternative walkability index, space syntax walkability (SSW). This study examined associations of the full walkability index and SSW with walking for transport (WT). Data were collected in 2003-2004 from 2544 adults living in 154 Census Collection Districts (CCD) in Adelaide, Australia. Participants reported past week WT frequency. Full walkability (consisting of net residential density, intersection density, land use mix, and net retail area ratio) and SSW (consisting of gross population density and a space syntax measure of street integration) were calculated for each CCD using geographic information systems and space syntax software. Generalized linear models with negative binomial variance and logarithmic link functions were employed to examine the associations of each walkability index with WT frequency, adjusting for socio-demographic variables. Two walkability indices were closely correlated (ρ = 0.76, p space syntax provide a novel approach to further understanding how urban design influences walking behaviors.

  2. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Ting, Yen-Peng; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M

    2010-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed.

  3. Functional Characterization of a Putative Nitrate Transporter Gene Promoter from Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Zhang HU; Kai-Ming CAO; Mian XIA; Xi-Ping WANG

    2006-01-01

    Drought is one of the most significant abiotic stresses that influence plant growth and development. Expression analysis revealed that OsNRT1.3, a putative nitrate transporter gene in rice, was induced by drought. To confirm if the OsNRT1.3 promoter can respond to drought stress, a 2019 bp upstream sequence of OsNRT1.3 was cloned. Three OsNRT1.3 promoter fragments were generated by 5'-deletion, and fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. The chimeric genes were introduced into rice plants. NRT2019::GUS, NRT1196: :GUS and NRT719::GUS showed similar expression patterns in seeds,roots, leaves and flowers in all transgenic rice, and GUS activity conferred by different OsNRT1.3 promoter fragments was significantly upregulated by drought stress, indicating that OsNRT1.3 promoter responds to drought stress and the 719 bp upstream sequence of OsNRT1.3 contains the drought response elements.

  4. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Tonoplast Dicarboxylate Transporter in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiling; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Zhang, Zhanquan; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Acidity plays an important role in flavor and overall organoleptic quality of fruit and is mainly due to the presence of organic acids. Understanding the molecular basis of organic acid metabolism is thus of primary importance for fruit quality improvement. Here, we cloned a putative tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter gene (SlTDT) from tomato, and submitted it to the NCBI database (GenBank accession number: KC733165). SlTDT protein contained 13 putative transmembrane domains in silico analysis. Confocal microscopic study using green fluorescent fusion proteins revealed that SlTDT was localized on tonoplast. The expression patterns of SlTDT in tomato were analyzed by RT-qPCR. The results indicated that SlTDT expressed in leaves, roots, flowers and fruits at different ripening stages, suggesting SlTDT may be associated with the development of different tissues. To further explore the function of SlTDT, we constructed both overexpression and RNAi vectors and obtained transgenic tomato plants by agrobacterium-mediated method. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis showed that overexpression of SlTDT significantly increased malate content, and reduced citrate content in tomato fruit. By contrast, repression of SlTDT in tomato reduced malate content of and increased citrate content. These results indicated that SlTDT played an important role in remobilization of malate and citrate in fruit vacuoles. PMID:28261242

  5. Identification and characterization of an iron ABC transporter operon in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Lucia Soto; Vázquez-Candanedo, Ada P; Sánchez-Espíndola, Adriana; Ramírez, Carlos Ávila; Baca, Beatriz E

    2013-06-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium and endophyte of sugarcane. We have cloned and sequenced the genes coding for the components of the iron ABC-type acquisition system of G. diazotrophicus. Sequence analysis revealed three ORFs, (feuA, feuB, and feuC) organized as an operon and encoding polypeptides of 346 (38 kDa), 342 (34.2 kDa), and 240 (26 kDa) amino acids, respectively. The deduced translation products of the feu operon showed similarity with a periplasmic solute-binding protein (FeuA), permease (FeuB), and ATPase (FeuC) involved in Fe transport. The role of FeuB in the survival of G. diazotrophicus under iron depletion was evaluated by comparing the ability of wild-type and FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strains in a medium without iron supplementation and in a medium containing 2, 2'-dipyridyl (DP). Growth of the mutant was affected in the medium containing DP. The operon was expressed at higher levels in cells depleted for iron than in those that contained the metal. A decrease in nitrogenase activity was observed with the FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strain that with the wild-type under iron deficiency conditions, suggesting that the Feu operon play role in Fe nutrition of G. diazotrophicus.

  6. UV-vis and Transport Characterization of Degradation in Polymer Blend Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Emilee; Peel, Justin; Nathan, Shreya; Wesenberg, Devin; Wallis, Marianne; Adalsteinsson, Thorsteinn; McNelis, Brian; Barber, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells are prepared using an active layer containing a functionalized C60 molecule, [6-6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid octadecyl ester (PCBOD); and a conjugated polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). PCBOD functions as an electron acceptor in conjunction with P3HT, the electron donor. Both current-voltage (IV) transport data of solar cells and spectroscopic absorption data of the corresponding active layer are collected at regular time intervals for periods up to several days. IV data show changes in power conversion efficiency which are strongly dependent on device preparation (stoichiometry, annealing, etc.). Ultraviolet and visible light absorption exhibits similar time dependence. Recent results show that annealing the active layer up to 200rC substantially improves device performance. Further spectroscopic studies, such as Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy, are ongoing. Supported by a Santa Clara University Science, Technology and Society Grant, a grant from IntelliVision and the SCU BIN-REU: funded in part by the UC Santa Cruz BIN-RDI, NASA Grant NNX09AQ44A.

  7. Interband characterization and electronic transport control of nanoscaled GeTe/Sb 2Te3 superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Di Pietro, Paola; Perucchi, Andrea; Lupi, Stefano; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella; Lange, Felix Rolf Lutz; Wuttig, Matthias; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Malvestuto, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The extraordinary electronic and optical properties of the crystal-to-amorphous transition in phase-change materials have led to important developments in memory applications. A promising outlook is offered by nanoscaling such phase-change structures. Following this research line, we study the interband optical transmission spectra of nanoscaled GeTe/Sb2Te3 chalcogenide superlattice films. We determine, for films with varying stacking sequence and growth methods, the density and scattering time of the free carriers, and the characteristics of the valence-to-conduction transition. It is found that the free carrier density decreases with increasing GeTe content, for sublayer thicknesses below ˜3 nm. A simple band model analysis suggests that GeTe and Sb2Te3 layers mix, forming a standard GeSbTe alloy buffer layer. We show that it is possible to control the electronic transport properties of the films by properly choosing the deposition layer thickness, and we derive a model for arbitrary film stacks.

  8. Ammonium across a Selective Polymer Inclusion Membrane: Characterization, Transport, and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadellà, Anna; Schaetzle, Olivier; Loos, Katja

    2016-05-01

    The recovery of ammonium from urine requires distinguishing and excluding sodium and potassium. A polymer inclusion membrane selective for ammonium is developed using an ionophore based on pyrazole substituted benzene. The interactions of the components are studied, as well as their effect on transport and selectivity. Spectroscopic and thermogravimetric measurements show no extensive physical interactions of the components, and that the plasticizer reduces the intermolecular forces (rigidity) of the membrane. The ionophore turns the membrane more rigid, although it increases its swelling degree and therefore the affinity of cations. A ratio of plasticizer (DEHP) and polymer (PVC) of 1:3 in mass gives the highest ammonium flux. Tested contents of ionophore (2 and 5 wt%) show that the higher the content of the ionophore, the fastest the flux is (7.5 × 10(-3) mmol cm(-2) h(-1) ). Selectivity of NH4 (+) over Na(+) and over K(+) is reduced from 13.07 to 9.33 and from 14.15 to 9.57 correspondingly.

  9. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan [Sourashtra Coll., Madurai (India). Dept. of Biotechnology; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Biocorrosion Group; Rahman, Pattanathu K.S.M. [Teesside Univ., Tees Valley (United Kingdom). Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering Group

    2010-01-15

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed. (orig.)

  10. A fully relativistic radial fall

    CERN Document Server

    Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2014-01-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) ...

  11. Experimental characterization of the transport phenomena, adsorption, and elution in a protein A affinity monolithic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herigstad, M Omon; Dimartino, Simone; Boi, Cristiana; Sarti, Giulio C

    2015-08-14

    A commercially available convective interaction media (CIM) Protein A monolithic column was fully characterized in view of its application for the affinity capture of IgG in monoclonal antibody production processes. By means of moment analysis, the interstitial porosity and axial dispersion coefficient were determined. The frontal analysis method of characteristic points was employed, for the first time with monolithic media, to determine the dynamic binding capacity. The effects of the flow rate and pH on the total recovery of polyclonal IgG and elution profile were evaluated. A comparison with literature data for Protein A chromatography beads demonstrate the superior bed utilization of monolithic media, which gave better performance at lower residence times.

  12. Ionic Transport and Structural Characterization of the Lithium-Rich Anti-Perovskite Li3OCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Daemen, Luke; Hartl, Monika; Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Zhao, Yusheng

    2013-03-01

    We will discuss the structural and electrochemical characterization of the newly synthesized lithium-rich anti-perovskite, Li3OCl. The crystal structure of this compound was solved using x-ray diffraction techniques, and the electronic and ionic conductivities were measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This material has an ionic conductivity ranging approximately from 10-4 S/cm to 10-1 S/cm over the temperature range 25°C to 270°C (room temperature to just below the melting point). The high ionic conductivity of this lithium-rich electrolyte demonstates strong promise that this material is an ideal candidate for solid state battery applications.

  13. Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Noriega, Rodrigo

    2009-08-18

    The use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand their electrical and optical properties. Aluminum- and gallium-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a low-temperature solution-based process, achieving dopant densities of the order of 1020 cm-3. A non-contact optical technique, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, is used to characterize ensembles of ZnO nanowires. By modeling the free charge carrier absorption as a Drude metal, we are able to calculate the free carrier density and mobility. Determining the location of the dopant atoms in the ZnO lattice is important to determine the doping mechanisms of the ZnO nanowires. Solid-state NMR is used to distinguish between coordination environments of the dopant atoms.

  14. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  15. Coupling of NAD+ biosynthesis and nicotinamide ribosyl transport: characterization of NadR ribonucleotide kinase mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Sauer, Elizabeta; Reidl, Joachim

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we characterized a pathway necessary for the processing of NAD+ and for uptake of nicotinamide riboside (NR) in Haemophilus influenzae. Here we report on the role of NadR, which is essential for NAD+ utilization in this organism. Different NadR variants with a deleted ribonucleotide kinase domain or with a single amino acid change were characterized in vitro and in vivo with respect to cell viability, ribonucleotide kinase activity, and NR transport. The ribonucleotide kinase mutants were viable only in a nadV+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) background, indicating that the ribonucleotide kinase domain is essential for cell viability in H. influenzae. Mutations located in the Walker A and B motifs and the LID region resulted in deficiencies in both NR phosphorylation and NR uptake. The ribonucleotide kinase function of NadR was found to be feedback controlled by NAD+ under in vitro conditions and by NAD+ utilization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the NR phosphorylation step is essential for both NR uptake across the inner membrane and NAD+ synthesis and is also involved in controlling the NAD+ biosynthesis rate.

  16. Forty years of {sup 9}Sr in situ migration: importance of soil characterization in modeling transport phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.M. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/SMTM/LMTE, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)]. E-mail: jean-michel.fernandez@noumea.ird.nc; Piault, E. [CEA-Cadarache, DTN/SMTM/LMTE, BP 1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Macouillard, D. [ENSIL, 16 rue d' Atlantis, Technopole BP 6804, 87068 Limoges (France); Juncos, C. [Universite de Savoie, BP 1104, 73011 Chambery (France)

    2006-07-01

    In 1960 experiments were carried out on the transfer of {sup 9}Sr between soil, grapes and wine. The experiments were conducted in situ on a piece of land limited by two control strips. The {sup 9}Sr migration over the last 40 years was studied by performing radiological and physico-chemical characterizations of the soil on eight 70 cm deep cores. The vertical migration modeling of {sup 9}Sr required the definition of a triple layer conceptual model integrating the rainwater infiltration at constant flux as the only external factor of influence. Afterwards the importance of a detailed soil characterization for modeling was discussed and satisfactory simulation of the {sup 9}Sr vertical transport was obtained and showed a calculated migration rate of about 1.0 cm year{sup -1} in full agreement with the in situ measured values. The discussion was regarding some of the key parameters such as granulometry, organic matter content (in the Van Genuchten parameter determination), Kd and the efficient rainwater infiltration. Besides the experimental data, simplifying assumptions in modeling such as water-soil redistribution calculation and factual discontinuities in conceptual model were examined.

  17. High-performance inverted polymer solar cells: device characterization, optical modeling, and hole-transporting modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jingyu; Yip, Hin-Lap; Zhang, Yong; Chien, Shang-Chieh; Chueh, Chu-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Gao, Yan; Chen, Hongzheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); O' Malley, Kevin; Jen, Alex K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-10

    Although high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) have already been demonstrated in conventional structure polymer solar cells (PSCs), the development of high performance inverted structure polymer solar cells is still lagging behind despite their demonstrated superior stability and feasibility for roll-to-roll processing. To address this challenge, a detailed study of solution-processed, inverted-structure PSCs based on the blends of a low bandgap polymer, poly(indacenodithiophene-co-phananthrene-quinoxaline) (PIDT-PhanQ) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 71}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of device geometry on photovoltaic performance. Excellent device performance can be achieved by optimizing the optical field distribution and spatial profiles of excitons generation within the active layer in different device configurations. In the inverted structure, because the peak of the excitons generation is located farther away from the electron-collecting electrode, a higher blending ratio of fullerene is required to provide higher electron mobility in the BHJ for achieving good device performance. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Metrology and characterization of impurity transport during cleaning of micro and nano structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun

    A major challenge in the manufacturing of micro and nano devices is the cleaning, rinsing, and drying of very small structures. Without a technology for in situ and real-time monitoring and controlling, the rinse processes that account for a significant fraction of the total processing steps use a large amount of water and energy perhaps unnecessarily. This "blind" processing approach leads to waste that can have significant economic and environmental impacts. An electrochemical residue sensor (ECRS) has been developed and is aimed at in situ and real-time measurement of residual contamination inside the micro and nano structures. Using this technology, the mechanisms and bottlenecks of cleaning, rinsing, and drying can be investigated and the processes can be monitored and controlled. An equivalent circuit model was developed to assist the design of the sensor; its validity was proved by the first prototype. The simulation results and the experimental data predicted a good sensitivity in a wide range of operational frequency. To use the sensor in a practical rinse tank setup, the sensor-on-wafer prototype was designed and fabricated. Both the fab-scale and the lab-scale tests were performed and results illustrated many successes. The sensor is the first and the only available technology that provides the in situ and real-time cleanness information in the microstructures during the rinse processes. The sensor results distinguished four different types of rinse processes and showed high sensitivity to the ionic concentration change in the microstructures. The impacts of cleaning and rinsing parameters such as flow rate, temperature, cleaning solution concentrations, and process time on the sulfuric acid rinsing efficiency were investigated by using the sensor. The investigation discovered that sulfuric acid rinsing is a two-stage process: a flow-control stage and a desorption-control stage. A comprehensive rinse model was developed to correlate the transport process

  19. Pharmacological characterization of a dopamine transporter ligand that functions as a cocaine antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rajeev I; Grandy, David K; Lupica, Carl R; Katz, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    An N-butyl analog of benztropine, JHW007 [N-(n-butyl)-3α-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane], binds to dopamine transporters (DAT) but has reduced cocaine-like behavioral effects and antagonizes various effects of cocaine. The present study further examined mechanisms underlying these effects. Cocaine dose-dependently increased locomotion, whereas JHW007 was minimally effective but increased activity 24 hours after injection. JHW007 (3-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently and fully antagonized the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine (5-60 mg/kg), whereas N-methyl and N-allyl analogs and the dopamine (DA) uptake inhibitor GBR12909 [1-(2-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy]ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride] stimulated activity and failed to antagonize effects of cocaine. JHW007 also blocked the locomotor-stimulant effects of the DAT inhibitor GBR12909 but not stimulation produced by the δ-opioid agonist SNC 80 [4-[(R)-[(2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethylpiperazin-1-yl](3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide], which increases activity through nondopaminergic mechanisms. JHW007 blocked locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine in both DA D2- and CB1-receptor knockout and wild-type mice, indicating a lack of involvement of these targets. Furthermore, JHW007 blocked effects of cocaine on stereotyped rearing but enhanced stereotyped sniffing, suggesting that interference with locomotion by enhanced stereotypies is not responsible for the cocaine-antagonist effects of JHW007. Time-course data indicate that administration of JHW007 antagonized the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine within 10 minutes of injection, whereas occupancy at the DAT, as determined in vivo, did not reach a maximum until 4.5 hours after injection. The σ1-receptor antagonist BD 1008 [N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide] blocked the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine. Overall, these findings suggest that JHW007 has cocaine-antagonist effects

  20. Characterization of the low affinity transport system for NO(3)(-) uptake by Citrus roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, M; Flors, V; Legaz, F; García-Agustín, P

    2000-12-07

    Three-month old citrange Troyer (hybrid of Citrus sinensis x Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were grown hydroponically and, after a period of NO(3)(-) starvation, plants were transferred to solutions enriched with K(15)NO(3) (96% atoms 15N excess) to measure 15NO(3)(-) uptake rates as a function of external 15NO(3)(-) concentrations. Two different NO(3)(-) uptake systems were found. Between 1 and 50 mM 15NO(3)(-) in the uptake solution medium, the uptake rate increased linearly due to the low affinity transport system (LATS). Nitrate reductase activity showed the same response to external [NO(3)(-)], and also appears to be regulated by the rate of nitrate uptake. Nitrate pre-treatments had a represive effect on NO(3)(-) uptake rate measured at 5 or 30 mM external [15NO(3)(-)]. The extent of the inhibition depended on the [NO(3)(-)] during the pre-treatment and in the uptake solution. These results suggest that the LATS of Citrus seedlings is under feedback control by the N status of the plant. Accordingly, addition of amino acids (Glu, Asp, Asn, Gln) to the uptake solution resulted in a decrease in 15NO(3)(-) uptake rate. However, the inactivation of nitrate reductase activity after treatment of the seedlings with either 100 or 500 µM WO(4)(2-) did not affect the activity of the LATS. Metabolic uncouplers, 2,4-DNP and KCN, reduced the uptake rate by 43.3% and 41.4% respectively at 5mM external [15NO(3)(-)]. However, these compounds had little effect when 15NO(3)(-) uptake was assayed at 30 mM external concentration. The ATPase inhibitors DCCD and DES reduced 15NO(3)(-) uptake by 68.8%-35.6%, at both external [15NO(3)(-)]. Nitrate uptake by the LATS declined with the increase of the solution pH beyond pH 4. The data presented are discussed in the context of the kinetics, energy dependence and regulation of NO(3)(-) uptake.

  1. Characterization of a PDR type ABC transporter gene from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yi; XIAO Jin; MA LuLin; WANG HaiYan; QI ZengJun; CHEN PeiDu; LIU DaJun; WANG XiuE

    2009-01-01

    DON,as a virulence factor,plays an important role in the infection of Fusarium graminearum in wheat.The infection ability of F. graminearum depends on its capacity of producing DON. The production of DON by F. graminearum is significantly decreased in the wheat varieties with scab resistance. In this study,GeneChip analysis indicated that an EST encoding an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was up-regulated by 45 times in a wheat landrace Wangshuibai,which is resistant to DON accumulation.A pair of EST-derived primers were designed based on the EST sequence,and a clone was then isolated from a wheat genomic DNA TAC library. The TAC clone was sequenced using chromosome walking and gene prediction was conducted using Softberry. A cDNA clone of this gene was subsequently isolated from Wangshuibai induced by DON using gene-specific primers designed according to the untranslated sequence of the gene. The genome size of the gene is 7377 bp,consisting of 19 exons with coding sequences of 4308 bp. It encodes a protein with 1435 amino acid residues and the calculated molecular weight is about 161 kD. BLAST analysis indicated that the gene may belong to pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) sub-family,and hence designated as TaPDR1 (Triticum aestivum pleiotropic drug resistance). TaPDR1 was located on chromosome 5A of wheat using nulliaomic-tetrasomic lines of Chinese Spring. TaPDR1 was up-regulated by induction of both DON and F. graminearum. Expression patterns of TaPDR1 were different in wild-type Wangshuibai and the fast-neutron induced Wangshuibai mutant lacking FHB1,a major QTL of FHB resistance and DON resistance in chromosome arm 3BS. These results suggested that TaPDR1 might be a candidate gene responsible for DON accumulation resistance. The expression profile showed that TaPDR1 expression was neither induced by hormones typically involved in biotic stress,such as JA and SA,nor by abiotic stresses,such as heat,cold,wounding and NaCI. However,TaPDR1 expression was

  2. Turbulence in tokamak plasmas. Effect of a radial electric field shear; Turbulence dans les plasmas de tokamaks. Effet d`un cisaillement de champ electrique radial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payan, J.

    1994-05-01

    After a review of turbulence and transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas and the radial electric field shear effect in various tokamaks, experimental measurements obtained at Tore Supra by the means of the ALTAIR plasma diagnostic technique, are presented. Electronic drift waves destabilization mechanisms, which are the main features that could describe the experimentally observed microturbulence, are then examined. The effect of a radial electric field shear on electronic drift waves is then introduced, and results with ohmic heating are studied together with relations between turbulence and transport. The possible existence of ionic waves is rejected, and a spectral frequency modelization is presented, based on the existence of an electric field sheared radial profile. The position of the inversion point of this field is calculated for different values of the mean density and the plasma current, and the modelization is applied to the TEXT tokamak. The radial electric field at Tore Supra is then estimated. The effect of the ergodic divertor on turbulence and abnormal transport is then described and the density fluctuation radial profile in presence of the ergodic divertor is modelled. 80 figs., 120 refs.

  3. de secador de flujo radial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Durango

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la investigación realizada para establecer la influencia e importancia de las variables cantidad de yuca, relación superficie a volumen del material de los pedazos de yuca, velocidad del ventilador y temperatura del aire de recirculación, en el proceso de secado de yuca en un modelo de secador de flujo radial. La metodología experimental utilizada fue el diseño de experimentos factoriales, la cual, mediante una serie de análisis estadísticos, posibilitó la caracterización del proceso para un tiempo de secado de tres horas y la obtención de un modelo matemático que describe su comportamiento.

  4. A novel method for analytically solving a radial advection-dispersion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Sie, Bing-Ruei

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution for solute transport in a radial flow field has a variety of practical applications in the study of the transport in push-pull/divergent/convergent flow tracer tests, aquifer remediation by pumping and aquifer storage and recovery. However, an analytical solution for radial advective-dispersive transport has been proven very difficult to develop and relatively few in subsurface hydrology have made efforts to do so, because variable coefficients in the governing partial differential equations. Most of the solutions for radial advective-dispersive transport presented in the literature have generally been solved semi-analytically with the final concentration values being obtained with the help of a numerical Laplace inversion. This study presents a novel solution strategy for analytically solving the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. A Laplace transform with respect to the time variable and a generalized integral transform technique with respect to the spatial variable are first performed to convert the transient governing partial differential equations into an algebraic equation. Subsequently, the algebraic equation is solved using simple algebraic manipulations, easily yielding the solution in the transformed domain. The solution in the original domain is ultimately obtained by successive applications of the Laplace and corresponding generalized integral transform inversions. A convergent flow tracer test is used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method for deriving an exact analytical solution to the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. The developed analytical solution is verified against a semi-analytical solution taken from the literature. The results show perfect agreement between our exact analytical solution and the semi-analytical solution. The solution method presented in this study can be applied to create more comprehensive analytical models for a great variety of radial advective

  5. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshirfar M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Majid Moshirfar, Andrew Ollerton, Rodmehr T Semnani, Maylon HsuJohn A Moran Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAPurpose: To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration.Methods: Retrospective case series were used.Results: Thirteen eyes (seven patients were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38–72 years, averaging 18.7 years (range: 11–33 years after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch’s Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK in the other eye.Conclusions: RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch’s dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration.Keywords: radial keratotomy, RK, Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty, DSAEK, guttata, endothelial degeneration, Fuch’s dystrophy

  6. A CONSERVATIVE VIEW OF RADIAL KERATOTOMY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven; Olkowski; Walter; J.; Stark; John; D.; Gottsch; Gerri; Goodman; Daniel; Goodman; A.E.; Maumenee; Ivan; Esente

    1991-01-01

    It has been known for almost a century that radial keratotomy (RK) will flatten the cornea and reduce myopia. Since the introduction of radial keratotomy (RK) in the United States by Bores in 1978, there have been many published studies documenting the effects of this procedure. The questions. about radial keratotomy today are not only quantitative but also qualitative in nature. We know this technique can flatten the cornea, but how reliably can the results be predicted? Does the patient benefit suffic...

  7. On radial geodesic forcing of zonal modes

    OpenAIRE

    Kendl, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The elementary local and global influence of geodesic field line curvature on radial dispersion of zonal modes in magnetised plasmas is analysed with a primitive drift wave turbulence model. A net radial geodesic forcing of zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes can not be expected in any closed toroidal magnetic confinement configuration, since the flux surface average of geodesic curvature identically vanishes. Radial motion of poloidally elongated zonal jets may occur in the presence of g...

  8. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  9. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  10. Transporte de frangos: caracterização do microclima na carga durante o inverno Poultry transport: microclimate characterization of the truck during the winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Delfino Barbosa Filho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de caracterizar o perfil microclimático da carga de caminhões de transporte de frangos de corte sob condições comerciais durante o inverno, por meio do monitoramento constante das variáveis ambientais (temperatura e umidade relativa do ar e das perdas na chegada na linha de abate. Foram monitorados três carregamentos, da saída das aves da granja até a chegada ao abatedouro, considerando fatores como a distância (perto, média e longa e os turnos (manhã, tarde e noite. Para obtenção do perfil das variáveis ambientais durante a carga dos caminhões, foram instaladas miniestações meteorológicas (Loggers que permitiram determinar o microclima a que as aves foram submetidas e visualizar o perfil do índice entalpia de conforto, que possibilitou a classificação das regiões da carga de acordo com os limites de conforto térmico para frangos de corte na sexta semana. Os dados de temperatura, umidade relativa do ar e do índice entalpia de conforto na carga foram analisados utilizando-se a geoestatística pelo método de krigagem ordinária. O turno da tarde foi o mais crítico do ponto de vista ambiental, e as partes central e traseira da carga do caminhão foram as mais problemáticas para as aves, do ponto de vista microclimático, portanto, as mais propícias à ocorrência de perdas.The objective of this study was to characterize the the microclimatic profile of broiler chicken transport trucks under commercial conditions, in the winter by continuous monitoring of environmental variables (temperature and relative air humidity and deaths on arrival (DOA's. Three loads were monitored, from farm to slaughterhouse, considering factors such as distance (short, medium and long and periods of the day (morning, afternoon and night. To obtain the environmental variables profile in the trucks during the journey, data loggers were installed in the trucks that determined the microclimate to which the

  11. A radial TPC for heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Garabatos, C

    2000-01-01

    The CERES experiment at the CERN SPS has been recently upgraded with a TPC with radial drift field, the first one of its sort. Constructed during 1998, it has been successfully operated in commissioning and physics runs, with muon, proton, and heavy-ion beams. A high voltage electrode of about 0.5 m radius is surrounded by sixteen 2 m long readout chambers, placed at a radius of 1.3 m, with chevron-shaped readout pads. The field cage is enclosed by two low-mass voltage degraders at each end of the cylindrical structure. A Ne-CO/sub 2/ [80-20] gas mixture allows for a safe operation and good transport properties under drift fields ranging from 200 to 600 V/cm. A spatial resolution better than 700 microns and 350 microns in r and rdelta (phi), respectively, has been achieved in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Details of its construction as well as results of the operation and performance in a high multiplicity environment are presented. (0 refs).

  12. Transition of radial electric field in helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Sanuki, Heiji; Toda, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Masayuki [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2001-06-01

    Transition of radial electric field is investigated in helical plasmas for the given plasma fluxes. The density and temperature gradients are simultaneously determined together with radial electric field. The electric field shows a nature of bifurcation, if an anomalous particle transport exist in addition to the neoclassical particle flux. Based on the Maxwell's construction with respect to the work-done, the critical condition for the bifurcation is obtained. The existence of bifurcation is not affected by the anomalous energy flux. The gradients are found to be subject to bifurcation at high plasma fluxes regime. The transition to a better confinement is predicted. The presence of hard transition of the gradient and electric field indicates the existence of the electric domain interface, across which the discontinuous change of gradient takes place. (author)

  13. On radial geodesic forcing of zonal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The elementary local and global influence of geodesic field line curvature on radial dispersion of zonal modes in magnetised plasmas is analysed with a primitive drift wave turbulence model. A net radial geodesic forcing of zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes can not be expected in any closed toroidal magnetic confinement configuration, since the flux surface average of geodesic curvature identically vanishes. Radial motion of poloidally elongated zonal jets may occur in the presence of geodesic acoustic mode activity. Phenomenologically a radial propagation of zonal modes shows some characteristics of a classical analogon to second sound in quantum condensates.

  14. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    ) (Mahadevan et al. 2010), and forms the core of my dissertation. I have investigated and quantified several aspects of making precision radial velocity measurements in the NIR using Pathfinder. Between 2006 and 2008, I made precise measurements of the Earth's rotational velocity with respect to the solar spectrum, with which we were able to achieve precisions of less than 10 m/s. In late 2008 and 2009, I worked on optimizing the spectrograph and reduction code in preparation for our first on-sky tests. I also began characterizing a new calibration source for the NIR, the emission spectrum of a uranium-neon hollow-cathode lamp. During 2010, Pathfinder saw first light at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (hereafter, HET), where we observed almost a dozen radial velocity standard stars and bright planet-hosting stars. Using uraniumneon as a calibration source, we were able to achieve a precision of 20 m/s in the Y band. In collaboration with Colorado University and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), we fed Pathfinder with a laser frequency comb, and were able to achieve precisions of less than 5 m/s in the H band. These are some of the highestprecision radial velocity measurements in the Y and H bands to date, and represent an enormous advancement in our ability to make precision measurements in the NIR.

  15. Radial orbital anisotropy and the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Ciotti, Luca

    2002-01-01

    The existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) imposes strong constraints on the structure and dynamics of elliptical galaxies, and thus contains important information on the processes of their formation and evolution. Here we focus on the relations between the FP thinness and tilt and the amount of radial orbital anisotropy. By using N-body simulations of galaxy models characterized by observationally motivated density profiles, and also allowing for the presence of live, massive dark matter halos, we explore the impact of radial orbital anisotropy and instability on the FP properties. The numerical results confirm a previous semi--analytical finding: the requirement of stability matches almost exactly the thinness of the FP. In other words, galaxy models that are radially anisotropic enough to be found outside the observed FP (with their isotropic parent models lying on the FP) are unstable, and their end--products fall back on the FP itself. We also find that a systematic increase of radial orbit anisotropy w...

  16. Microphysical characterization of long-range transported biomass burning particles from North America at three EARLINET stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Benavent-Oltra, José Antonio; Böckmann, Christine; Samaras, Stefanos; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Janicka, Łucja; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-05-01

    Strong events of long-range transported biomass burning aerosol were detected during July 2013 at three EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) stations, namely Granada (Spain), Leipzig (Germany) and Warsaw (Poland). Satellite observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instruments, as well as modeling tools such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System), have been used to estimate the sources and transport paths of those North American forest fire smoke particles. A multiwavelength Raman lidar technique was applied to obtain vertically resolved particle optical properties, and further inversion of those properties with a regularization algorithm allowed for retrieving microphysical information on the studied particles. The results highlight the presence of smoke layers of 1-2 km thickness, located at about 5 km a.s.l. altitude over Granada and Leipzig and around 2.5 km a.s.l. at Warsaw. These layers were intense, as they accounted for more than 30 % of the total AOD (aerosol optical depth) in all cases, and presented optical and microphysical features typical for different aging degrees: color ratio of lidar ratios (LR532 / LR355) around 2, α-related ångström exponents of less than 1, effective radii of 0.3 µm and large values of single scattering albedos (SSA), nearly spectrally independent. The intensive microphysical properties were compared with columnar retrievals form co-located AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations. The intensity of the layers was also characterized in terms of particle volume concentration, and then an experimental relationship between this magnitude and the particle extinction coefficient was established.

  17. Characterization of Saharan dust properties transported towards Europe in the frame of the FENNEC project: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnas, F.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, C.; Royer, P.; Sodemman, H.; Derimian, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the FENNEC experiment (6 to 30 June 2011) an effort has been dedicated to characterize Saharan dust plumes transported towards southern Europe. Hence, a multi instrumented field campaign has been conducted. Ground based nitrogen Raman LIDAR (GBNRL) has been deployed in southern Spain close to Marbella, simultaneously with airborne lidar (AL) performing measurements over both the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the western Africa (from 2 to 23 June). The GBNRL was equipped with co-polar and cross-polar channels to perform continuous measurements of the dust aerosols trapped in the troposphere. It was developed by LSCE with the support of the LEOSPHERE Company. The French FALCON 20 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE (Service des Avions Francais Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) carried the AL Leandre Nouvelle Generation (LNG) as well as a dropsonde releasing system and radiometers. A major, one week long, dust event has been sampled over Spain from 25 June to 1 July with high optical depth (>0.5 at 355nm) and particular depolarization ratios (15 to 25%). Backtrajectory studies suggest that the dust particles observed were from dust uplifts that occurred in Southern Morocco and Northern Mauritania. The event has been also documented 3 days before by the AL flying over Mauritania. AERONET sunphotometer measurements of aerosol properties, along the dust plume transport path appear to be coherent with both the lidar and the backtrajectory analysis. These analysis exhibit a likely major contribution from the Western Sahara sources to the Southern Europe. Such a contribution may impact the visibility and then the airtrafic, modify the tropospheric chemistry, and add nutrients to both the Mediterranean Sea and the continental surfaces. It can also affect the health of European populations. We will present strategy of the experiment and the case study built from measurements performed at the end of June.

  18. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kee Jeong [Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ''Buttonholing'' of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. (orig.)

  19. Characterization of the P4-ATPase ATP8A2: Critical Roles of Key Residues in the Fourth Transmembrane Segment in Aminophospholipid Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Molday, Robert S.;

    intermediate at the conserved aspartate (Asp416) in the P-type ATPase signature sequence and exists in E1P and E2P forms, similar to Na+,K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. The mechanism of ATP8A2 resembles that of the well-characterized cation transporting P-type ATPases, as transported aminophospholipids activate...... the dephosphorylation directly, similar to K+ activation of dephosphorylation in Na+,K+-ATPase. By sequence alignment with well-characterized P-type ATPases, we have identified and mutated a series of strategically placed residues in the membrane domain of ATP8A2, which could be speculated to be involved...... in phospholipid binding. We have used the properties of mutant phosphoenzymes to examine the partial transport cycle reaction steps to elucidate the roles of these conserved residues, focusing on the fourth transmembrane segment M4. Here, Ile364 of ATP8A2 is a conserved hydrophobic flippase residue that aligns...

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of the human membrane transporter protein OATP2B1 from Sf9 insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschantz, William R; Pfeifer, Nathan D; Meade, Caryl Lane; Wang, Leyu; Lanzetti, Anthony; Kamath, Ajith V; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Hashim, Muhammed F

    2008-02-01

    OATP2B1 is an important member of the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) family and is implicated in the intestinal and hepatic disposition of endo- and xenobiotics. The purpose of this work was to produce a highly purified protein for use as a reference standard for quantification of OATP2B1 in human tissue and in vitro assay systems. Here, we report the successful expression, purification and characterization of OATP2B1 in a heterologous expression system. Protein expressed by the Sf9-baculovirus expression system is functionally active as demonstrated by saturable uptake kinetics with a K(m) of 5.9+/-0.76 microM for estrone-3-sulfate. OATP2B1 was extracted from Sf9-membranes with ABS-14-4 detergent and purified using a one-step FLAG-tag purification method. Yield of OATP2B1 from Sf9 cells was 1.1mg per liter of culture, for a final recovery of 1.8%. SDS-PAGE resolution and Western blot of purified protein displayed multiple banding of OATP2B1-specific protein, which was thoroughly investigated to confirm homogeneity of the sample. C-terminal FLAG-tag purification and immunoblot detection, together with N-terminal sequencing, confirmed the presence of only full-length protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases had little effect on the migration pattern in SDS-PAGE, suggesting that multiple banding was not due to different glycosylation states of the protein. Amino acid analysis further confirmed the homogeneity of the protein with a calculated extinction coefficient of 80,387 cm(-1) M(-1). Physical, biochemical and functional characterization show that purified human OATP2B1 is pure, homogeneous and appropriate for use as a standard to quantitate expression of OATP2B1 in in vitro systems and tissue samples.

  1. Three-Dimensional Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Surface Antigen-Manganese Transporter MntC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Green, Bruce A.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Matsuka, Yury V. [Pfizer; (UCSD)

    2013-08-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn2 +-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn2 +-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn2 +-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium–hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn2 +.

  2. Functional characterization of the vertebrate primary ureter: Structure and ion transport mechanisms of the pronephric duct in axolotl larvae (Amphibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prehn Lea R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three kidney systems appear during vertebrate development: the pronephroi, mesonephroi and metanephroi. The pronephric duct is the first or primary ureter of these kidney systems. Its role as a key player in the induction of nephrogenic mesenchyme is well established. Here we investigate whether the duct is involved in urine modification using larvae of the freshwater amphibian Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl as model. Results We investigated structural as well as physiological properties of the pronephric duct. The key elements of our methodology were: using histology, light and transmission electron microscopy as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy on fixed tissue and applying the microperfusion technique on isolated pronephric ducts in combination with single cell microelectrode impalements. Our data show that the fully differentiated pronephric duct is composed of a single layered epithelium consisting of one cell type comparable to the principal cell of the renal collecting duct system. The cells are characterized by a prominent basolateral labyrinth and a relatively smooth apical surface with one central cilium. Cellular impalements demonstrate the presence of apical Na+ and K+ conductances, as well as a large K+ conductance in the basolateral cell membrane. Immunolabeling experiments indicate heavy expression of Na+/K+-ATPase in the basolateral labyrinth. Conclusions We propose that the pronephric duct is important for the subsequent modification of urine produced by the pronephros. Our results indicate that it reabsorbs sodium and secretes potassium via channels present in the apical cell membrane with the driving force for ion movement provided by the Na+/K+ pump. This is to our knowledge the first characterization of the pronephric duct, the precursor of the collecting duct system, which provides a model of cell structure and basic mechanisms for ion transport. Such information may be important in understanding

  3. Three-dimensional structure and biophysical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus cell surface antigen-manganese transporter MntC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Virgil L; Jansen, Kathrin U; Green, Bruce A; Anderson, Annaliesa S; Matsuka, Yury V

    2013-09-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn²⁺-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn²⁺-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn²⁺-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium-hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn²⁺.

  4. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a solute carrier transport protein with non-classical function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sebastian

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20 and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2. A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration.

  5. Radial Velocity Fitting Challenge. I. Simulating the data set including realistic stellar radial-velocity signals

    CERN Document Server

    Dumusque, X

    2016-01-01

    Stellar signals are the main limitation for precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements. These signals arise from the photosphere of the stars. The m/s perturbation created by these signals prevents the detection and mass characterization of small-mass planetary candidates such as Earth-twins. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate stellar signals in RV measurements. However, without precisely knowing the stellar and planetary signals in real observations, it is extremely difficult to test the efficiency of these methods. The goal of the RV fitting challenge is to generate simulated RV data including stellar and planetary signals and to perform a blind test within the community to test the efficiency of the different methods proposed to recover planetary signals despite stellar signals. In this first paper, we describe the simulation used to model the measurements of the RV fitting challenge. Each simulated planetary system includes the signals from instrumental noise, stellar oscillations, granulation,...

  6. THE OCCURRENCE OF THE RADIAL CLUB HAND IN CHILDREN WITH DIFFERENT SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Иванович Голяна

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Radial club hand is a developmental anomaly of the upper extremity, being characterized as a longitudinal underdevelopment of a forearm and a hand on the radial surface, consisting in a hypo-/ aplazy radial bone and the thumb of various degree of expressiveness. Characteristic symptoms of this developmental anomaly are: shortening and bow-shaped curvature of a forearm, palmar and radial deviation of a hand, underdevelopment of the thumb from its proximal departments and structures, anomaly of development of three-phalanx fingers of a hand (is more often than the 2-4th, violation of a cosmetic condition and functionality of the affected segment. From 2000 for 2012 in FSI SRICO n.a. H.Turner examination and treatment of 23 children with various syndromes at which the radial club hand was revealed are conducted. The main syndromes at which it is revealed radial club hand - Holt-Orama syndrome, TAR- syndrome and VACTERL syndrome. Tactics and techniques of surgical treatment of a radial club hand it various syndromes most often don’t differ from treatment of other types of a radial club hand though demand an individual approach depending on severity and a type of deformation of the upper extremity.

  7. Dynamical interplay between fluctuations, electric fields and transport in fusion plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Hidalgo; B Gonçalves; M A Pedrosa

    2003-12-01

    A view of recent experimental results and progress in the characterization of the statistical properties of electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined devices is given. An empirical similarity in the scaling properties of the probability distribution function (PDF) of turbulent transport has been observed in the plasma edge region in fusion plasmas. The investigation of the dynamical interplay between fluctuation in gradients, turbulent transport and radial electric fields has shown that these parameters are strongly coupled both in tokamak and stellarator plasmas. The bursty behaviour of turbulent transport is linked with a departure from the most probable radial gradient. The dynamical relation between fluctuations in gradients and transport is strongly affected by the presence of sheared poloidal flows which organized themselves near marginal stability. These results emphasize the importance of the statistical description of transport processes in fusion plasmas as an alternative approach to the traditional way to characterize transport based on the computation of effective transport coefficients.

  8. Electrical transport characterization of PEDOT:PSS/n-Si Schottky diodes and their applications in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurelbaatar, Zagarzusem; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Gil-Sung; Park, No-Won; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate locally contacted PEDOT:PSS Schottky diodes with excellent rectifying behavior, fabricated on n-type Si substrates using a spin-coating process and a reactive-ion etching process. Electrical transport characterizations of these Schottky diodes were investigated by both current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. We found that these devices exhibit excellent modulation in the current with an on/off ratio of - 10(6). Schottky junction solar cells composed of PEDOT:PSS and n-Si structures were also examined. From the current density-voltage (J-V) measurement of a solar cell under illumination, the short circuit current (I(sc)), open circuit voltage (V(oc)), and conversion efficiency (eta) were - 19.7 mA/cm2, - 578.5 mV, and - 6.5%, respectively. The simple and low-cost fabrication process of the PEDOT:PSS/n-Si Schottky junctions makes them a promising candidate for further high performance solar cell applications.

  9. Boundary-artifact-free phase retrieval with the transport of intensity equation II: applications to microlens characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Li, Hongru; Qu, Weijuan; Asundi, Anand

    2014-07-28

    Boundary conditions play a crucial role in the solution of the transport of intensity equation (TIE). If not appropriately handled, they can create significant boundary artifacts across the reconstruction result. In a previous paper [Opt. Express 22, 9220 (2014)], we presented a new boundary-artifact-free TIE phase retrieval method with use of discrete cosine transform (DCT). Here we report its experimental investigations with applications to the micro-optics characterization. The experimental setup is based on a tunable lens based 4f system attached to a non-modified inverted bright-field microscope. We establish inhomogeneous Neumann boundary values by placing a rectangular aperture in the intermediate image plane of the microscope. Then the boundary values are applied to solve the TIE with our DCT-based TIE solver. Experimental results on microlenses highlight the importance of boundary conditions that often overlooked in simplified models, and confirm that our approach effectively avoid the boundary error even when objects are located at the image borders. It is further demonstrated that our technique is non-interferometric, accurate, fast, full-field, and flexible, rendering it a promising metrological tool for the micro-optics inspection.

  10. Characterization of a putative grapevine Zn transporter, VvZIP3, suggests its involvement in early reproductive development in Vitis vinifera L

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Zinc (Zn) deficiency is one of the most widespread mineral nutritional problems that affect normal development in plants. Because Zn cannot passively diffuse across cell membranes, it must be transported into intracellular compartments for all biological processes where Zn is required. Several members of the Zinc-regulated transporters, Iron-regulated transporter-like Protein (ZIP) gene family have been characterized in plants, and have shown to be involved in metal uptake and transport. This study describes the first putative Zn transporter in grapevine. Unravelling its function may explain an important symptom of Zn deficiency in grapevines, which is the production of clusters with fewer and usually smaller berries than normal. Results We identified and characterized a putative Zn transporter from berries of Vitis vinifera L., named VvZIP3. Compared to other members of the ZIP family identified in the Vitis vinifera L. genome, VvZIP3 is mainly expressed in reproductive tissue - specifically in developing flowers - which correlates with the high Zn accumulation in these organs. Contrary to this, the low expression of VvZIP3 in parthenocarpic berries shows a relationship with the lower Zn accumulation in this tissue than in normal seeded berries where its expression is induced by Zn. The predicted protein sequence indicates strong similarity with several members of the ZIP family from Arabidopsis thaliana and other species. Moreover, VvZIP3 complemented the growth defect of a yeast Zn-uptake mutant, ZHY3, and is localized in the plasma membrane of plant cells, suggesting that VvZIP3 has the function of a Zn uptake transporter. Conclusions Our results suggest that VvZIP3 encodes a putative plasma membrane Zn transporter protein member of the ZIP gene family that might play a role in Zn uptake and distribution during the early reproductive development in Vitis vinifera L., indicating that the availability of this micronutrient may be relevant for

  11. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, Majid; Ollerton, Andrew; Semnani, Rodmehr T; Hsu, Maylon

    2012-01-01

    To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK) and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration. Retrospective case series were used. Thirteen eyes (seven patients) were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38-72 years), averaging 18.7 years (range: 11-33 years) after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch's Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the other eye. RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch's dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration.

  12. Computer Simulation of Radial Immunodiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, Rodes

    1972-01-01

    Theories of diffusion with chemical reaction are reviewed as to their contributions toward developing an algorithm needed for computer simulation of immunodiffusion. The Spiers-Augustin moving sink and the Engelberg stationary sink theories show how the antibody-antigen reaction can be incorporated into boundary conditions of the free diffusion differential equations. For this, a stoichiometric precipitate was assumed and the location of precipitin lines could be predicted. The Hill simultaneous linear adsorption theory provides a mathematical device for including another special type of antibody-antigen reaction in antigen excess regions of the gel. It permits an explanation for the lowered antigen diffusion coefficient, observed in the Oudin arrangement of single linear diffusion, but does not enable prediction of the location of precipitin lines. The most promising mathematical approach for a general solution is implied in the Augustin alternating cycle theory. This assumes the immunodiffusion process can be evaluated by alternating computation cycles: free diffusion without chemical reaction and chemical reaction without diffusion. The algorithm for the free diffusion update cycle, extended to both linear and radial geometries, is given in detail since it was based on gross flow rather than more conventional expressions in terms of net flow. Limitations on the numerical integration process using this algorithm are illustrated for free diffusion from a cylindrical well. PMID:4629869

  13. Biochemical Characterization of ThiT from Lactococcus lactis : A Thiamin Transporter with Picomolar Substrate Binding Affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-01-01

    The putative thiamin transporter ThiT from Lactococeus lactis was overproduced in the membrane of lactococcal cells. In vivo transport assays using radiolabeled thiamin demonstrated that ThiT indeed was involved in thiamin transport. The protein was solubilized from the membranes and purified in det

  14. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  15. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Hemendra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively, leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks. In our case, we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate. The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal. On the second postoperative day, following the suction drain removal and dressing, patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop. We reviewed theliterature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure. Key words: Radial nerve; Humeral fractures; Paralysis; Diaphyses

  16. Hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwaters and porewaters beneath the Bruce nuclear site: evidence for diffusion-dominated transport in the Ordovician

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, I. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Al, T. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Jensen, M.; Kennell, L. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Raven, K. [Geofirma Engineering Limited, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Investigations of the controls on solute transport in porewater and groundwater below the Bruce nuclear site involved laboratory-scale diffusion measurements, as well as measurements of natural tracer (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, Cl and Br) distributions and isotopic compositions of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and helium ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) in the porewaters and groundwaters. The analyses were performed on samples collected from drilled boreholes, DGR-1 through DGR-6, during site characterization activities and the results are summarized below. With the exception of just a few samples from the Upper Silurian, the effective diffusion coefficient (D {sub e}) values measured from DGR cores are all less than 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s, which is approximately one order of magnitude lower than measured De values from international programs in sedimentary rock. The majority of the data are in the range 10{sup -13} < D{sub e} < 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s, with Lower Silurian and Upper Ordovician shale samples representing the higher end of this range because of their relatively high porosity (7 to 9%). The low porosity of the Middle Ordovician limestone (< 2%) results in low D{sub e} values, clustering in the range 10{sup -13} < D{sub e} < 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s. The δ{sup 18}O, Cl, and Br profiles in the Middle Ordovician carbonates define trends of decreasing δ{sup 18}O values and tracer concentrations with depth, and are interpreted to result from an extremely long period of diffusion-dominated transport (~300 Ma). Near the base of the Middle Ordovician carbonates the δ{sup 2}H data display a slight enrichment, which could represent upward diffusion of deuterium-enriched water originating in the underlying Precambrian shield. A Precambrian shield influence on the Ordovician porewater chemistry is inferred from the measured {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the Middle Ordovician carbonates, which are elevated above values expected for porewater in equilibrium

  17. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Quantum Condensed Matter Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  18. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  19. Characterization of 6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose: A potential new tool to assess glucose transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Christelle; Tanti, Jean-Francois; Gremeaux, Thierry; Morin, Christophe; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Comet, Michel; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick

    1997-01-01

    6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIG) was rapidly taken up by adipocytes. Insulin increased 6-DIG transport in adipocytes isolated from both rats and mice. This stimulation was more important in rat than in mouse adipocytes, in agreement with their respective amount of Glut 4 transporters. In two insulin-resistant states, the biological behavior of 6-DIG and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose was similar. These results indicated that 6-DIG, which was transported into the cells via the glucose transporters, could be potentially useful to measure modifications of glucose transport.

  20. Dynamic control of auxin distribution imposes a bilateral-to-radial symmetry switch during gynoecium development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubayidin, Laila; Ostergaard, Lars

    2014-11-17

    Symmetry formation is a remarkable feature of biological life forms associated with evolutionary advantages and often with great beauty. Several examples exist in which organisms undergo a transition in symmetry during development. Such transitions are almost exclusively in the direction from radial to bilateral symmetry. Here, we describe the dynamics of symmetry establishment during development of the Arabidopsis gynoecium. We show that the apical style region undergoes an unusual transition from a bilaterally symmetric stage ingrained in the gynoecium due to its evolutionary origin to a radially symmetric structure. We also identify two transcription factors, INDEHISCENT and SPATULA, that are both necessary and sufficient for the radialization process. Our work furthermore shows that these two transcription factors control style symmetry by directly regulating auxin distribution. Establishment of specific auxin-signaling foci and the subsequent development of a radially symmetric auxin ring at the style are required for the transition to radial symmetry, because genetic manipulations of auxin transport can either cause loss of radialization in a wild-type background or rescue mutants with radialization defects. Whereas many examples have described how auxin provides polarity and specific identity to cells in a range of developmental contexts, our data presented here demonstrate that auxin can also be recruited to impose uniform identity to a group of cells that are otherwise differentially programmed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: Characterization of Radionuclide Transport and Retention in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, Acacia J.; Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    A vital component of the U.S. reactor licensing process is an integrated safety analysis in which a source term representing the release of radionuclides during normal operation and accident sequences is analyzed. Historically, source term analyses have utilized bounding, deterministic assumptions regarding radionuclide release. However, advancements in technical capabilities and the knowledge state have enabled the development of more realistic and best-estimate retention and release models such that a mechanistic source term assessment can be expected to be a required component of future licensing of advanced reactors. Recently, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan effort for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory has investigated the current state of knowledge of potential source terms in an SFR via an extensive review of previous domestic experiments, accidents, and operation. As part of this work, the significant sources and transport processes of radionuclides in an SFR have been identified and characterized. This effort examines all stages of release and source term evolution, beginning with release from the fuel pin and ending with retention in containment. Radionuclide sources considered in this effort include releases originating both in-vessel (e.g. in-core fuel, primary sodium, cover gas cleanup system, etc.) and ex-vessel (e.g. spent fuel storage, handling, and movement). Releases resulting from a primary sodium fire are also considered as a potential source. For each release group, dominant transport phenomena are identified and qualitatively discussed. The key product of this effort was the development of concise, inclusive diagrams that illustrate the release and retention mechanisms at a high level, where unique schematics have been developed for in-vessel, ex-vessel and sodium fire releases. This review effort has also found that despite the substantial range of phenomena affecting radionuclide release, the

  2. Relativistic neoclassical radial fluxes in the 1/nu regime

    CERN Document Server

    Marushchenko, I; Marushchenko, N B

    2013-01-01

    The radial neoclassical fluxes of electrons in the 1/nu-regime are calculated with relativistic effects taken into account and compared with those in the non-relativistic approach. The treatment is based on the relativistic drift-kinetic equation with the thermodynamic equilibrium given by the relativistic J\\"uttner-Maxwellian distribution function. It is found that for the range of fusion temperatures, T_e < 100 keV, the relativistic effects produce a reduction of the radial fluxes which does not exceed 10%. This rather small effect is a consequence of the non-monotonic temperature dependence of the relativistic correction caused by two counteracting factors: a reduction of the contribution from the bulk and a significant broadening with the temperature growth of the energy range of electrons contributing to transport. The relativistic formulation for the radial fluxes given in this paper is expressed in terms a set of relativistic thermodynamic forces which is not identical to the canonical set since it ...

  3. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  4. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  5. A novel radioligand for glycine transporter 1: characterization and use in autoradiographic and in vivo brain occupancy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)], E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; O' Brien, Julie A. [Sleep and Psychiatric Disorders, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lemaire, Wei [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); O' Malley, Stacey S.; Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Zhao Zhijian [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Wallace, Michael A. [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065 (United States); Raab, Conrad [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lindsley, Craig W. [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Departments of Pharmacology and Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Sur, Cyrille; Williams, David L. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: In an effort to develop agents to test the NMDA hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, benchmark compounds from a program to discover potent, selective, competitive glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) inhibitors were radiolabeled in order to further study the detailed pharmacology of these inhibitors and the distribution of GlyT1 in brain. We here report the in vitro characterization of [{sup 35}S](S)-2-amino-4-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl) ethyl)benzamide ([{sup 35}S]ACPPB), a radiotracer developed from a potent and selective non-sarcosine-derived GlyT1 inhibitor, its use in autoradiographic studies to localize (S)-2-amino-6-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl)ethyl) benzamide (ACPPB) binding sites in rat and rhesus brain and for in vivo occupancy assays of competitive GlyT1 inhibitors. Methods: Functional potencies of unlabeled compounds were characterized by [{sup 14}C]glycine uptake into JAR (human placental choriocarcinoma) cells and synaptosomes. Radioligand binding studies were performed with tissue homogenates. Autoradiographic studies were performed on tissue slices. Results: ACPPB is a potent (K{sub d}=1.9 nM), selective, GlyT1 inhibitor that, when radiolabeled with [{sup 35}S], is a well-behaved radioligand with low nondisplaceable binding. Autoradiographic studies of rat and rhesus brain slices with this ligand showed that specific binding sites were plentiful and nonhomogeneously distributed, with high levels of binding in the brainstem, cerebellar white matter, thalamus, cortical white matter and spinal cord gray matter. In vivo studies demonstrate displaceable binding of [{sup 35}S]ACPPB in rat brain tissues following iv administration of this radioligand. Conclusions: This is the first report of detailed anatomical localization of GlyT1 using direct radioligand binding, and the first demonstration that an in vivo occupancy assay is feasible, suggesting that it may also be feasible to develop

  6. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, F A; Fuhr, G; Monnier, A; Benkadda, S

    2014-01-01

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code (EMEDGE3D) with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindr...

  7. Shelter Index and a simple wind speed parameter to characterize vegetation control of sand transport threshold and Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nield, J. M.; Nickling, W. G.; Furtak-Cole, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in many dryland environments from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (SI=distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height) and particle threshold expressed as the ratio of wind speed measured at 0.45 times the mean plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m when saltation commences, and saltation flux. The results are used to evaluate SI as a parameter to characterize the influence of vegetation on local winds and sediment transport conditions. Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in two vegetation communities: mature streets of mesquite covered nebkhas and incipient nebkhas dominated by low mesquite plants. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each 10° wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. SI can show the susceptibility to wind erosion at different time scales, i.e., event, seasonal, or annual, but in a supply-limited system it can fail to define actual flux amounts due to a lack of knowledge of the distribution of sediment across the surface of interest with respect to the patterns of SI.

  8. Functional characterization of the Bombyx mori fatty acid transport protein (BmFATP) within the silkmoth pheromone gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kana; Imai, Kiyohiro; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2009-02-20

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) is an evolutionarily conserved membrane-bound protein that facilitates the uptake of extracellular long chain fatty acids. In humans and mice, six FATP isoforms have been identified and their tissue-specific distributions suggest that each plays a discrete role in lipid metabolism in association with fatty acid uptake. While the presence of FATP homologs in insects has been demonstrated, their functional role remains to be characterized. Pheromonogenesis is defined as the dynamic period in which all machinery required for sex pheromone biosynthesis is generated and organized within the pheromone gland (PG) cells. By exploiting this unique system in the PG of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, we found that BmFATP is predominantly expressed in the PG and undergoes up-regulation 1 day prior to eclosion. Before eclosion, B. mori PG cells accumulate cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs), which play a role in storing the pheromone (bombykol) precursor fatty acid in the form of triacylglycerol. RNAi-mediated gene silencing of BmFATP in vivo significantly suppressed LD accumulation by preventing the synthesis of triacylglycerols and resulted in a significant reduction in bombykol production. These results, in conjunction with the findings that BmFATP stimulates the uptake of extracellular long-chain fatty acids and BmFATP knockdown reduces cellular long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity, suggest that BmFATP plays an essential role in bombykol biosynthesis by stimulating both LD accumulation and triacylglycerol synthesis via a process called vectorial acylation that couples the uptake of extracellular fatty acids with activation to CoA thioesters during pheromonogenesis.

  9. Combined Monte Carlo and Fluid Sputter Transport Model in an Ionized PVD System with Experimental Plasma Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, David N.; Juliano, Daniel R.; Hayden, Douglas B.; Allain, Monica M. C.

    1998-10-01

    A code has been developed to model the transport of sputtered material in a modified industrial-scale magnetron. The device has a target diameter of 355 mm and was designed for 200 mm substrates. The chamber has been retrofitted with an auxilliary RF inductive plasma source located between the target and substrate. The source consists of a water-cooled copper coil immersed in the plasma, but with a diameter large enough to prevent shadowing of the substrate. The RF plasma, target sputter flux distribution, background gas conditions, and geometry are all inputs to the code. The plasma is characterized via a combination of a Langmuir probe apparatus and the results of a simple analytic model of the ICP system. The source of sputtered atoms from the target is found through measurements of the depth of the sputter track in an eroded target and the distribution of the sputter flux is calculated via VFTRIM. A Monte Carlo routine tracks high energy atoms emerging from the target as they move through the chamber and undergo collisions with the electrons and background gas. The sputtered atoms are tracked by this routine whatever their electronic state (neutral, excited, or ion). If the energy of a sputtered atom decreases to near-thermal levels, then it exits the Monte Carlo routine as is tracked with a simple diffusion model. In this way, all sputtered atoms are followed until they hit and stick to a surface, and the velocity distribution of the sputtered atom population (including electronic state information) at each surface is calculated, especially the substrate. Through the use of this simulation the coil parameters and geometry can be tailored to maximize deposition rate and sputter flux uniformity.

  10. Roughening dynamics of spontaneous radial imbibition

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We performed an experimental observation on the spontaneous imbibition of water in a porous media in a radial Hele-Shaw cell and confirmed Washburn's law, where r is distance and t is time. Spontaneous imbibition with a radial interface window followed scaling dynamics when the front invaded into the porous media. We found a growth exponent (\\b{eta}=0.6) that was independent of the pressure applied at the liquid inlet. The roughness exponent decreased with an increase in pressure. The roughening dynamics of two dimensional spontaneous radial imbibition obey Family-Vicsek scaling, which is different from that with a one-dimensional planar interface window.

  11. Spectral Distortion in a Radially Inhomogeneous Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R

    2013-01-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous spacetime, designed to exactly reproduce a LambdaCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3000. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous Big Bang.

  12. Spectral distortion in a radially inhomogeneous cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Maksimova, N. A.

    2013-11-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous space-time, designed to exactly reproduce a ΛCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3700. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous big bang.

  13. Discontinuity effects on radial cavity transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, D.B.

    1979-04-01

    Pulse propagation in radial cavity transmission lines such as those found on a radial line accelerator is considered. Specifically, the effects of discontinuities along the line are examined in detail. It is found that previous analyses of such effects have been incorrect, and here two alternate solution techniques are presented. Depending upon the parameters of such a radial line, the discontinuity effects considered here may or may not be significant; however, if they are significant, it is recommended that the alternate solution techniques presented here be used.

  14. Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test: Fiscal Year 1998 Status Report Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program Deliverable SPU85M4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussod, G.Y.; Turin, H.J.; Lowry, W.E.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes the status of the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) and documents the progress of construction activities and site and laboratory characterization activities undertaken in fiscal year 1998. Also presented are predictive flow-and-transport simulations for Test Phases 1 and 2 of testing and the preliminary results and status of these test phases. Future anticipated results obtained from unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport testing in the Calico Hills Formation at Busted Butte are also discussed in view of their importance to performance assessment (PA) needs to build confidence in and reduce the uncertainty of site-scale flow-and-transport models and their abstractions for performance for license application. The principal objectives of the test are to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain, as identified by the PA working group in February 1997. These include but are not restricted to: (1) The effect of heterogeneities on flow and transport in unsaturated and partially saturated conditions in the Calico Hills Formation. In particular, the test aims to address issues relevant to fracture-matrix interactions and permeability contrast boundaries; (2) The migration behavior of colloids in fractured and unfractured Calico Hills rocks; (3) The validation through field testing of laboratory sorption experiments in unsaturated Calico Hills rocks; (4) The evaluation of the 3-D site-scale flow-and-transport process model (i.e., equivalent-continuum/dual-permeability/discrete-fracture-fault representations of flow and transport) used in the PA abstractions for license application; and (5) The effect of scaling from lab scale to field scale and site scale.

  15. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in Ile-de-France: Local contribution and Long range transport; Caracteisation des aeosols atmospheiques en Ile-de-France: contribution locale et transport a longues distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, J.E

    2006-06-15

    Atmospheric aerosols interact directly in a great number of processes related to climate change and public health, modifying the energy budget and partly determining the quality of the air we breathe. In my PhD, I chose to study the perturbation, if not the aggravation, of the living conditions in Ile-de-France associated to aerosol transport episodes in the free troposphere. This situation is rather frequent and still badly known. To achieve my study, I developed the observation platform 'TReSS' Transportable Remote Sensing Station, whose instruments were developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorology Dynamique by the LiMAG team. 'TReSS' consists of a new high-performance 'Mini-Lidar' and of two standard radiometers: a sun photometer and a thermal infrared radiometer. The principle of my experimental approach is the synergy of the vertical Lidar profiles and the particle size distributions over the column, obtained by the 'Almucantar' inversion of sun photometer data. The new 'Lidar and Almucantar' method characterizes the vertical distribution by layer and the optical micro-physical properties of the local and transported aerosols. Firstly, I undertook the characterization of the Paris aerosol, mainly of anthropogenic origin. Their radiative properties were analyzed in the daily and yearly scales. Then, I conducted a statistical multi-year study of transport episodes and a two-week study case, representative of a succession of desert dust intrusion in Ile-de-France. My PhD work concludes by a study on the impact of biomass burning aerosols during the heat wave on August 2003. I study the impact of the transported aerosols into the local radiative budget and the possible consequences on the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. (author)

  16. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  17. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hemendra Kumar Agrawal; Vipin Khatkar; Mohit Garg; Balvinder Singh; Ashish Jaiman; Vinod Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively,leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks.In our case,we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate.The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal.On the second postoperative day,following the suction drain removal and dressing,patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop.We reviewed the literature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure.

  18. How to distinguish Hybrids from Radial Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Close, Francis Edwin; Close, Frank E; Page, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    We present arguments that reinforce the hybrid interpretation of pi(1800) and we establish that the rho(1450) and the omega(1420) can be interpreted as radial-hybrid mixtures. Some questions for future experiments are raised.

  19. Radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Laudari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The radial artery access has gained popularity as a method of diagnostic coronary catheterization compared to femoral artery puncture in terms of vascular complications and early ambulation. However, very rare complication like radial artery pseudoaneurysm may occur following cardiac catheterization which may give rise to serious consequences. Here, we report a patient with radial pseudoaneurysm following diagnostic coronary angiography. Adequate and correct methodology of compression of radial artery following puncture for maintaining hemostasis is the key to prevention.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12776 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 48-50

  20. Solutions of relativistic radial quasipotential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, V.X.; Kadyshevskii, V.G.; Zhidkov, E.P.

    1985-11-01

    A systematic approach to the investigation of relativistic radial quasipotential equations is developed. The quasipotential equations can be interpreted either as linear equations in finite differences of fourth and second orders, respectively, or as differential equations of infinite order.

  1. Convection in rotating flows with simultaneous imposition of radial and vertical temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ayan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments, with a rotating cylindrical annulus and thermal gradient in both radial and vertical directions (so that radial temperature difference decreases with the elevation), were conducted to study the convection dynamics and heat transport. Temperature data captured using thermocouples, combined with ANSYS Fluent simulation hinted at the co-existence of thermal plume and baroclinicity (inclined isotherms). Presence of columnar plume structure parallel to the rotation axis was found, which had a phase velocity and aided in vertical heat transport. Nusselt number (Nu) plotted as a function of Taylor number (Ta) showed the effect of rotation on heat transport in such systems, where the interplay of plumes and baroclinic waves control the scalar transport. Laser based PIV imaging at a single vertical plane also showed evidence of such flow structures.

  2. 24Na and 99mTc Tracers Applied to the Characterization of Liquid-Solid Fluidized Bed and Hydraulic Transport Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fauquex, P.-F.; Flaschel, E.; Do, H. P.; Friedli, C.; Lerch, P.; Renken, A.

    1983-01-01

    For the characterization of fluidized bed- and hydraulic transport reactors, two radiotracer techniques have been developed permitting the study of mixing phenomena in flowing liquids as well as in beds of fluidized particulate solids. For labelling the aqueous phase, a 99mTc containing solution obtained by means of a 99Mo isotopic generator has been used. The silica gel employed for fluidization has been activated by thermal neutrons to yield a 24Na tracer derived from its natural sodium con...

  3. Guidance cue for cortical radial migration discovered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The regulatory mechanism for neuronal migration in the developing cortex is a major unsolved problem in developmental neurobiology. It is generally accepted that the migration of newborn pyramidal neurons from the ventricular zone toward upper cortical layers is guided by radial glial fibers in the developing cortex, and that the laminar structure of the cortex is formed through regulated attachment and detachment of migrating neurons with radial glial fibers.

  4. Electromechanical properties of radial active magnetic bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Antila, Matti

    1998-01-01

    Nonideal properties of the electromagnetic actuators in radial active magnetic bearings are studied. The two dimensional nonlinear stationary finite element method is used to determine the linearised parameters of a radial active magnetic bearing. The method is verified on two test machines. The accuracy is 10-15 % in the magnetic saturation region. The effect of magnetic saturation on the bearing dynamics is studied based on the root locus diagrams of the closed loop system. These diagrams s...

  5. Isolation and functional characterization of an influx silicon transporter in two pumpkin cultivars contrasting in silicon accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Namiki; Yamaji, Naoki; Ago, Yukiko; Iwasaki, Kozo; Ma, Jian Feng

    2011-04-01

    A high accumulation of silicon (Si) is required for overcoming abiotic and biotic stresses, but the molecular mechanisms of Si uptake, especially in dicotyledonous species, is poorly understood. Herein, we report the identification of an influx transporter of Si in two Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin) cultivars greatly differing in Si accumulation, which are used for the rootstocks of bloom and bloomless Cucumis sativus (cucumber), respectively. Heterogeneous expression in both Xenopus oocytes and rice mutant defective in Si uptake showed that the influx transporter from the bloom pumpkin rootstock can transport Si, whereas that from the bloomless rootstock cannot. Analysis with site-directed mutagenesis showed that, among the two amino acid residues differing between the two types of rootstocks, only changing a proline to a leucine at position 242 results in the loss of Si transport activity. Furthermore, all pumpkin cultivars for bloomless rootstocks tested have this mutation. The transporter is localized in all cells of the roots, and investigation of the subcellular localization with different approaches consistently showed that the influx Si transporter from the bloom pumpkin rootstock was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas the one from the bloomless rootstock was localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results indicate that the difference in Si uptake between two pumpkin cultivars is probably the result of allelic variation in one amino acid residue of the Si influx transporter, which affects the subcellular localization and subsequent transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells.

  6. Bloom syndrome radials are predominantly non-homologous and are suppressed by phosphorylated BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Nichole; Hejna, James; Rennie, Scott; Mitchell, Asia; Hanlon Newell, Amy; Ziaie, Navid; Moses, Robb E; Olson, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in BLM cause Bloom syndrome (BS), a genome instability disorder characterized by growth retardation, sun sensitivity and a predisposition to cancer. As evidence of decreased genome stability, BS cells demonstrate not only elevated levels of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), but also exhibit chromosomal radial formation. The molecular nature and mechanism of radial formation is not known, but radials have been thought to be DNA recombination intermediates between homologs that failed to resolve. However, we find that radials in BS cells occur over 95% between non-homologous chromosomes, and occur non-randomly throughout the genome. BLM must be phosphorylated at T99 and T122 for certain cell cycle checkpoints, but it is not known whether these modifications are necessary to suppress radial formation. We find that exogenous BLM constructs preventing phosphorylation at T99 and T122 are not able to suppress radial formation in BS cells, but are able to inhibit SCE formation. These findings indicate that BLM functions in 2 distinct pathways requiring different modifications. In one pathway, for which the phosphorylation marks appear dispensable, BLM functions to suppress SCE formation. In a second pathway, T99 and T122 phosphorylations are essential for suppression of chromosomal radial formation, both those formed spontaneously and those formed following interstrand crosslink damage.

  7. Phase diagram of structure of radial electric field in helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.

    2002-01-01

    A set of transport equations in toroidal helical plasmas is analyzed, including the bifurcation of the radial electric field. Multiple solutions of E{sub r} for the ambipolar condition induces domains of different electric polarities. A structure of the domain interface is analyzed and a phase diagram is obtained in the space of the external control parameters. The region of the reduction of the anomalous transport is identified. (author)

  8. Direct Comparison of Manganese Detoxification/Efflux Proteins and Molecular Characterization of ZnT10 Protein as a Manganese Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishito, Yukina; Tsuji, Natsuko; Fujishiro, Hitomi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Fumie; Okazaki, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Ayu; Tuschl, Karin; Rao, Rajini; Kono, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Narita, Hiroshi; Himeno, Seiichiro; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-08

    Manganese homeostasis involves coordinated regulation of specific proteins involved in manganese influx and efflux. However, the proteins that are involved in detoxification/efflux have not been completely resolved nor has the basis by which they select their metal substrate. Here, we compared six proteins, which were reported to be involved in manganese detoxification/efflux, by evaluating their ability to reduce manganese toxicity in chicken DT40 cells, finding that human ZnT10 (hZnT10) was the most significant contributor. A domain swapping and substitution analysis between hZnT10 and the zinc-specific transporter hZnT1 showed that residue Asn(43), which corresponds to the His residue constituting the potential intramembranous zinc coordination site in other ZnT transporters, is necessary to impart hZnT10's unique manganese mobilization activity; residues Cys(52) and Leu(242) in transmembrane domains II and V play a subtler role in controlling the metal specificity of hZnT10. Interestingly, the His → Asn reversion mutant in hZnT1 conferred manganese transport activity and loss of zinc transport activity. These results provide important information about manganese detoxification/efflux mechanisms in vertebrate cells as well as the molecular characterization of hZnT10 as a manganese transporter.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of perovskite based solar cells using phthalocyanine and naphthalocyanine as hole-transporting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yuki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Oku, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid heterojunction solar cells containing CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite compound were fabricated using TiO2 as an electronic transporting layer and spirobifluorence as a hole-transporting layer. The purpose of the present study is to investigate a role of the hole-transporting layer on the photovoltaic properties and microstructures of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells. The X-ray diffraction identified crystal structures of the perovskite layer in the solar cells. Optical microscopy showed different surface morphologies, and the perovskite structures on the TiO2 mesoporous structure depended on addition of phthalocyanine into the hole-transporting layer. The photovoltaic properties and hole-transporting behavior was depending on carrier mobility, electron structures of the perovskite crystal and band gaps related with the photovoltaic parameters. Energy diagram and photovoltaic mechanism of the perovskite solar cells using hole-transporting layers were discussed by experimental results. Perovskite based solar cells using phthalocyanines as hole-transporting layers have advantages to provide a high photovoltaic performance with a wide region of optical absorption.

  10. Application of radial correlation doppler reflectometry on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzon, J.R.; Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, TUM, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Happel, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennequin, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique (France); Collaboration: The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Doppler Reflectometry (DR) is a diagnostic used for the characterization of plasma density turbulence in magnetic confinement devices. It allows to measure the perpendicular propagation velocity of density fluctuations and their perpendicular wavenumber spectrum with good spatial resolution. By studying the correlation between signals of two reflectometers probing at different radial positions (Radial Correlation DR), it is possible to evaluate the radial correlation length L{sub r} of the plasma turbulence by scanning the radial separation Δr. However, results from analytical calculations and two-dimensional full-wave simulations indicate that the L{sub r} measurement by RCDR is not straightforward and might depend on factors such as plasma velocity, fluctuation amplitudes and probing beam angle. Experimental data from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are studied. An assessment of the viability of the use of different signals and analysis methods, including an evaluation of potential caveats, is given.

  11. Characterizing the transplanar and in-plane water transport of textiles with gravimetric and image analysis technique: Spontaneous Uptake Water Transport Tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K P M; Wu, Y S; Chau, K H; Kan, C W; Fan, J T

    2015-04-15

    Water absorption and transport property of textiles is important since it affects wear comfort, efficiency of treatment and functionality of product. This paper introduces an accurate and reliable measurement tester, which is based on gravimetric and image analysis technique, for characterising the transplanar and in-plane wicking property of fabrics. The uniqueness of this instrument is that it is able to directly measure the water absorption amount in real-time, monitor the direction of water transport and estimate the amount of water left on skin when sweating. Throughout the experiment, water supply is continuous which simulates profuse sweating. Testing automation could even minimise variation caused by subjective manipulation, thus enhancing testing accuracy. This instrument is versatile in terms of the fabrics could be tested. A series of shirting fabrics made by different fabric structure and yarn were investigated and the results show that the proposed method has high sensitivity in differentiating fabrics with varying geometrical differences. Fabrics with known hydrophobicity were additionally tested to examine the sensitivity of the instrument. This instrument also demonstrates the flexibility to test on high performance moisture management fabrics and these fabrics were found to have excellent transplanar and in-plane wicking properties.

  12. Landau-Squire jet in a radially diverging electrical current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarevich, V.V.; Shilova, E.I.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of a precise solution to the classical Landau-Squire problem in a radially diverging electrical current. The formulated problem was shown to be described by two parameters one of which characterizes the electromagnetic effect, and the other - the hydrodynamic impulse. Determinations were made of the regions of permissible parameter values at which the solution remains limited. Flow pictures are presented in relation to the input ratio of electromagnetic forces and the hydrodynamic impulse. 10 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Heat transport at the boundary of ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, C.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Herrmann, A.; Murmann, H.; Reimerdes, H.; Schweinzer, J.; Suttrop, W.; Salzmann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). EURATOM-IPP Association; ASDEX Upgrade Team; NBI Group

    1997-01-17

    The flow of heat in the scrape-off layer region of ASDEX Upgrade is investigated and compared with simple modelling. Parallel heat transport is found to be consistent with electron heat conduction based on Spitzer-Haerm conductivity. Cross-field heat transport is characterized using radial e-folding distances for power, temperature and plasma pressure, which are all found to vary weakly over a wide range of discharge conditions. Type I ELMs, also characterized, introduce a discreteness to the power flow into the SOL and carry approximately half of the power exhaust from the discharge. The divertor plates are effectively screened from the ELM energy, even in low radiation discharges, suggesting enhanced radiation rates during ELMs. (orig.)

  14. Heat transport at the boundary of ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, C.S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hermann, A.; Murmann, H. [IPP-EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The flow of heat in the scrape-off layer (SOL) region of ASDEX Upgrade is investigated and compared with simple modelling. Parallel heat transport is found to be consistent with electron heat conduction based on Spitzer-Harm conductivity. Cross-field heat transport is characterized using radial e-folding distances for power, temperature and plasma pressure, which are all found to vary weakly over a wide range of discharge conditions. Type I ELMs, also characterized, introduce a discreteness to the power flow into the SOL and carry approximately half of the power exhaust from the discharge. The divertor plates are effectively screened from the ELM energy, even in low-radiation discharges, suggesting enhanced radiation rates during ELMs. (Author).

  15. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Potential Discharge Areas for Radionuclide Transport by Groundwater from a Nuclear Waste Repository in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, Sten [HydroResearch AB, Taeby (Sweden)], E-mail: sten.berglund@hydroresearch.se; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sassner, Mona [DHI Sverige AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  17. Characterization of the P4-ATPase ATP8A2: Identification of Key Residues Involved in Catalysis and Lipid Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, Jonathan Allan; Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Molday, Robert S.;

    ATP8A2 is a P4-ATPase ("lipid flippase") highly expressed in the retina, brain, and testes. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that ATP8A2 exists as a complex with its β-subunit CDC50A in retinal rod and cone photoreceptor cells and this complex preferentially transports phosphatidylse......ATP8A2 is a P4-ATPase ("lipid flippase") highly expressed in the retina, brain, and testes. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that ATP8A2 exists as a complex with its β-subunit CDC50A in retinal rod and cone photoreceptor cells and this complex preferentially transports...... are likely the only species which are transported by P4-ATPases. These studies form a basis for further understanding lipid transport by this critical yet poorly understood class of P-type ATPases....

  18. Characterization of hexose transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals new groups of Sugar Porters involved in yeast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Rossignol, Tristan; Devillers, Hugo; Morin, Nicolas; Robak, Małgorzata; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Crutz-Le Coq, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-01

    Sugar assimilation has been intensively studied in the model yeast S. cerevisiae, and for two decades, it has been clear that the homologous HXT genes, which encode a set of hexose transporters, play a central role in this process. However, in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which is well-known for its biotechnological applications, sugar assimilation is only poorly understood, even though this yeast exhibits peculiar intra-strain differences in fructose uptake: some strains (e.g., W29) are known to be slow-growing in fructose while others (e.g., H222) grow rapidly under the same conditions. Here, we retrieved 24 proteins of the Sugar Porter family from these two strains, and determined that at least six of these proteins can function as hexose transporters in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000. Transcriptional studies and deletion analysis in Y. lipolytica indicated that two genes, YHT1 and YHT4, are probably the main players in both strains, with a similar role in the uptake of glucose, fructose, and mannose at various concentrations. The other four genes appear to constitute a set of 'reservoir' hexose transporters with an as-yet unclear physiological role. Furthermore, through examining Sugar Porters of the entire Yarrowia clade, we show that they constitute a dynamic family, within which hexose transport genes have been duplicated and lost several times. Our phylogenetic analyses support the existence of at least three distinct evolutionary groups of transporters which allow yeasts to grow on hexoses. In addition to the well-known and widespread Hxt-type transporters (which are not essential in Y. lipolytica), we highlight a second group of transporters, represented by Yht1, which are phylogenetically related to sensors that play a regulatory role in S. cerevisiae, and a third group, represented by Yht4, previously thought to contain only high-affinity glucose transporters related to Hgt1of Kluyveromyces lactis.

  19. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, April Z. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Golgi-Localized UDP-Xylose Transporter Family from Arabidopsis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Xiong, Guangyan; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Herter, Thomas; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Pauly, Markus; Willats, William G.T.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2015-01-01

    Most glycosylation reactions require activated glycosyl donors in the form of nucleotide sugars to drive processes such as posttranslational modifications and polysaccharide biosynthesis. Most plant cell wall polysaccharides are biosynthesized in the Golgi apparatus from cytosolic-derived nucleotide sugars, which are actively transferred into the Golgi lumen by nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs). An exception is UDP-xylose, which is biosynthesized in both the cytosol and the Golgi lumen by a family of UDP-xylose synthases. The NST-based transport of UDP-xylose into the Golgi lumen would appear to be redundant. However, employing a recently developed approach, we identified three UDP-xylose transporters in the Arabidopsis thaliana NST family and designated them UDP-XYLOSE TRANSPORTER1 (UXT1) to UXT3. All three transporters localize to the Golgi apparatus, and UXT1 also localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutants in UXT1 exhibit ∼30% reduction in xylose in stem cell walls. These findings support the importance of the cytosolic UDP-xylose pool and UDP-xylose transporters in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:25804536

  1. Single channel atmospheric pressure transporting plasma and plasma stream demultiplexing: physical characterization and application to E. coli bacteria inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinataj Omran, A.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Siadati, S. N.; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, A.; Akishev, Y.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we developed transporting plasma sources that operate at atmospheric pressure. The effect of electrode configuration on plasma transporting was investigated. In order to increase the transporting plasma cross-section, we converted a plasma stream into four plasma channels by a cylindrical housing. Electron excitation and rotational temperatures were estimated using optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electrical and temporal characteristics of the plasma, discharge power and charge deposition on the target were investigated. The propagation characteristics of single and multi-channel transporting plasma were compared with the same cross-sectional area. Two configurations for multi-channels were designed for this purpose. Escherichia coli bacteria were exposed to the single and multi-channel transporting discharge for different time durations. After exposure, the results indicated that the inactivation zones were significantly increased by a multi-channel transporting plasma. Finally, E. coli inactivation by those plasma apparatuses was compared with that of several standard antimicrobial test discs such as Gentamicin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin and Cefixime.

  2. Late radial head dislocation with radial head fracture and ulnar plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrich, Stephen D.; Butler, R. Allen

    Type 11 Monteggia lesion equivalents produced by plastic deformation of the ulna are rare. Radial head fractures in skeletally immature patients are also uncommon. We report a late presentation of a Type 11 Monteggia equivalent injury with a fracture of the radial head and neck and plastic

  3. In silico identification and characterization of the ion transport specificity for P-type ATPases in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoa-Aponte Lorena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P-type ATPases hydrolyze ATP and release energy that is used in the transport of ions against electrochemical gradients across plasma membranes, making these proteins essential for cell viability. Currently, the distribution and function of these ion transporters in mycobacteria are poorly understood. Results In this study, probabilistic profiles were constructed based on hidden Markov models to identify and classify P-type ATPases in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC according to the type of ion transported across the plasma membrane. Topology, hydrophobicity profiles and conserved motifs were analyzed to correlate amino acid sequences of P-type ATPases and ion transport specificity. Twelve candidate P-type ATPases annotated in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteome were identified in all members of the MTBC, and probabilistic profiles classified them into one of the following three groups: heavy metal cation transporters, alkaline and alkaline earth metal cation transporters, and the beta subunit of a prokaryotic potassium pump. Interestingly, counterparts of the non-catalytic beta subunits of Hydrogen/Potassium and Sodium/Potassium P-type ATPases were not found. Conclusions The high content of heavy metal transporters found in the MTBC suggests that they could play an important role in the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive inside macrophages, where tubercle bacilli face high levels of toxic metals. Finally, the results obtained in this work provide a starting point for experimental studies that may elucidate the ion specificity of the MTBC P-type ATPases and their role in mycobacterial infections.

  4. Characterization of the high affinity Zn transporter from Noccaea caerulescens, NcZNT1, and dissection of its promoter for its role in Zn uptake and hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Matthew J; Craft, Eric; Yamaji, Naoki; Koyama, Emi; Ma, Jian Feng; Kochian, Leon V

    2012-07-01

    • In this paper, we conducted a detailed analysis of the ZIP family transporter, NcZNT1, in the zinc (Zn)/cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulating plant species, Noccaea caerulescens, formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens. NcZNT1 was previously suggested to be the primary root Zn/Cd uptake transporter. Both a characterization of NcZNT1 transport function in planta and in heterologous systems, and an analysis of NcZNT1 gene expression and NcZNT1 protein localization were carried out. • We show that NcZNT1 is not only expressed in the root epidermis, but also is highly expressed in the root and shoot vasculature, suggesting a role in long-distance metal transport. Also, NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma membrane transporter that mediates Zn but not Cd, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) or copper (Cu) uptake into plant cells. • Two novel regions of the NcZNT1 promoter were identified which may be involved in both the hyperexpression of NcZNT1 and its ability to be regulated by plant Zn status. • In conclusion, we demonstrate here that NcZNT1 plays a role in Zn and not Cd uptake from the soil, and based on its strong expression in the root and shoot vasculature, could be involved in long-distance transport of Zn from the root to the shoot via the xylem. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Pharmacological and behavioral characterization of D-473, an orally active triple reuptake inhibitor targeting dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloke K Dutta

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule.

  6. Characterization of the avian GLUT1 glucose transporter: differential regulation of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, P; Kang, H Y; Mylott, D; Robbins, P J; White, M K

    1995-01-01

    Vertebrate cells that are transformed by oncogenes such as v-src or are stimulated by mitogens have increased rates of glucose uptake. In rodent cells, the mechanisms whereby glucose transport is up-regulated are well understood. Stimulation of glucose transport involves an elevation in mRNA encoding the GLUT1 glucose transporter that is controlled at the levels of both transcription and mRNA stability. Cloning and sequencing of chicken GLUT1 cDNA showed that it shares 95% amino acid sequence similarity to mammalian GLUT1s. Nevertheless, unlike mammalian GLUT1 mRNA, it was not induced by v-src, serum addition, or treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Rather, the induction of glucose transport in chicken embryo fibroblasts by v-src, serum, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate was associated with induction of GLUT3 mRNA level and GLUT3 transcription. Rat fibroblasts were also found to express both GLUT1 and GLUT3 isoforms, but v-src induced GLUT1 and not GLUT3. This suggests that animal cells require both a basal and an upregulatable glucose transporter and that these functions have been subsumed by different GLUT isoforms in avian and mammalian cells. Images PMID:8589457

  7. Fsy1, the sole hexose-proton transporter characterized in Saccharomyces yeasts, exhibits a variable fructose:H(+) stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Jorge; Rodrigues de Sousa, Helena; Roca, Christophe; Cássio, Fernanda; Luttik, Marijke; Pronk, Jack T; Salema-Oom, Madalena; Gonçalves, Paula

    2013-02-01

    In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, hexose uptake is mediated exclusively by a family of facilitators (Hxt, hexose transporters). Some other Saccharomyces species (e.g. Saccharomyces bayanus and Saccharomyces pastorianus) possess, in addition, a specific fructose transporter (Fsy1, fructose symporter) that has been previously described to function as a proton symporter. In the present work, we compared growth of a yeast strain in which FSY1 occurs naturally in anaerobic, fructose- and glucose-limited chemostat cultures. Especially at low specific growth rates, fructose-proton symport was shown to have a strong impact on the biomass yield on sugar. We subsequently employed energized hybrid plasma membrane vesicles to confirm previous observations concerning the mode of operation and specificity of Fsy1 mediated transport. Surprisingly, these experiments suggested that the carrier exhibits an unusual fructose:H(+) stoichiometry of 1:2. This energetically expensive mode of operation was also found consistently in vivo, in shake flask and in chemostat cultures, and both when Fsy1 is the sole transporter and when the Hxt carriers are present. However, it is observed only when Fsy1 is operating at higher glycolytic fluxes, a situation that is normally prevented by downregulation of the gene. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that fructose symport with more than one proton may constitute an energetically unfavorable mode of operation of the Fsy1 transporter that, in growing cultures, is prevented by transcriptional regulation.

  8. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  9. Non radial motions in a CDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Gambera, M

    1998-01-01

    We show how non-radial motions, originating in the outskirts of clusters of galaxies, may reduce the discrepancy between the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) predicted X-ray temperature distribution function of clusters of galaxies and the observed one and also the discrepancy between the CDM predicted two-point correlation function of clusters of galaxies and that observed. We compare Edge et al. (1990) and Henry & Arnaud (1991) data with the distribution function of X-ray temperature, calculated using Press- Schechter's (1974 - hereafter PS) theory and Evrard's (1990) prescriptions for the mass-temperature relation and taking account of the non-radial motions originating from the gravitational interaction of the quadrupole moment of the protocluster with the tidal field of the matter of the neighboring protostructures. We find that the model produces a reasonable clusters temperature distribution. We compare the two-point cluster correlation function which takes account of the non-radial motions both with that ob...

  10. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  11. Cloaking and Magnifying Using Radial Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the electrostatic responses of a polarly radially anisotropic cylinder and a spherically radially anisotropic sphere. For both geometries, the permittivity components differ from each other in the radial and tangential directions. We show that choosing the ratio between these components in a certain way, these rather simple structures can be used in cloaking dielectric inclusions with arbitrary permittivity and shape in the quasi-static limit. For an ideal cloak, the contrast between the permittivity components has to tend to infinity. However, only positive permittivity values are required and a notable cloaking effect can already be observed with relatively moderate permittivity contrasts. Furthermore, we show that the polarly anisotropic cylindrical shell has a complementary capability of magnifying the response of an inner cylinder.

  12. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  13. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  14. Expression, purification and functional characterization of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1 (hENT1) protein from Sf9 insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) is the major plasma membrane transporter involved in transportation of natural nucleosides as well as nucleoside analog drugs, used in anti-cancer and anti-viral therapies. Despite extensive biochemical and pharmacological studies, little is known about the structure-function relationship of this protein. The major obstacles to purification include a low endogenous expression level, the lack of an efficient expression and purification protocol, and the hydrophobic nature of the protein. Here, we report protein expression, purification and functional characterization of hENT1 from Sf9 insect cells. hENT1 expressed by Sf9 cells is functionally active as demonstrated by saturation binding with a Kd of 1.2±0.2nM and Bmax of 110±5pmol/mg for [(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR). We also demonstrate purification of hENT1 using FLAG antibody affinity resin in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol detergent with a Kd of 4.3±0.7nM. The yield of hENT1 from Sf9 cells was ∼0.5mg active transporter per liter of culture. The purified protein is functionally active, stable, homogenous and appropriate for further biophysical and structural studies.

  15. Determination of S-methyl-L-methionine (SMM) from Brassicaceae Family Vegetables and Characterization of the Intestinal Transport of SMM by Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Hae-Rim; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were to determine S-methyl-L-methionine (SMM) from various Brassicaceae family vegetables by using validated analytical method and to characterize the intestinal transport mechanism of SMM by the Caco-2 cells. The SMM is well known to provide therapeutic activity in peptic ulcers. The amount of SMM from various Brassicaceae family vegetables ranged from 89.08 ± 1.68 μg/g to 535.98 ± 4.85 μg/g of dry weight by using validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry method. For elucidating intestinal transport mechanism, the cells were incubated with or without transport inhibitors, energy source, or a metabolic inhibitor. Phloridzin and verapamil as inhibitors of sodium glucose transport protein (SGLT1) and P-glycoprotein, respectively, were not responsible for cellular uptake of SMM. Glucose and sodium azide were not affected by the cellular accumulation of SMM. The efflux ratio of SMM was 0.26, implying that it is not effluxed through Caco-2 cells. The apparent coefficient permeability (Papp ) of SMM was 4.69 × 10(-5) cm/s, indicating that it will show good oral absorption in in vivo.

  16. Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

  17. Polymeric foam characterization for packing use for radioactive wastes transportation; Caracterizacao de espuma polimerica para uso em embalagens para transporte de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)] E-mail: mouraor@urano.cdtn.br; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)] E-mail: mmattar@net.ipen.br

    2002-07-01

    Impact limiters are sacrificial components widely used to protect radioactive waste packages against damage arising from falls, fires and collisions with protruding objects. Several materials have been used as impact limiter filling: wood, expanded cement and polymeric foams. One of the most popular materials among package designers is the petroleum rigid polyurethane foam, owing to its toughness, workability, low specific weight, low costs and commercial availability. In Brazil, a new foam was developed using the polymer extracted from the castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis), a renewable source. Besides, no greenhouse gases are used during its manufacture. For a better performance, a detailed knowledge of the foam physical and mechanical properties is essential. A relatively vast amount of data about regular polymeric foams can be found in the literature and in several manufacturers' brochures, but no data has been published so far about the properties of the castor-oil foam. This paper presents the testing program carried out as part of ongoing research program aimed at developing a packaging for the transport of radioactive wastes. The results obtained reveal that the castor-oil foam has a mechanical behavior similar to that of regular foams, with good property reproducibility and homogeneity. (author)

  18. Molecular characterization of a membrane transporter for lactate, pyruvate, and other monocarboxylates: implications for the Cori cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C K; Goldstein, J L; Pathak, R K; Anderson, R G; Brown, M S

    1994-03-11

    Lactate and pyruvate cross cell membranes via a monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) with well-defined properties but undefined molecular structure. We report the cloning of a cDNA encoding MCT1, a monocarboxylate transporter whose properties resemble those of the erythrocyte MCT, including proton symport, trans acceleration, and sensitivity to alpha-cyanocinnammates. A Phe to Cys substitution in MCT1 converts it to Mev, a mevalonate transporter. MCT1 is abundant in erythrocytes, cardiac muscle, and basolateral intestinal epithelium. In skeletal muscle it is restricted to mitochondria-rich myocytes. As sperm traverse the epididymis, MCT1 switches from sperm to epithelial cells. MCT1 is present at low levels in liver, suggesting another MCT in this tissue. By exporting lactate from intestine and erythrocytes, MCT1 participates in the Cori cycle. It also participates in novel pathways of monocarboxylate metabolism in muscle and sperm.

  19. Immuno-detection of OCTN1 (SLC22A4) in HeLa cells and characterization of transport function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochini, Lorena; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-11-01

    OCTN1 was immuno-detected in the cervical cancer cell HeLa, in which the complete pattern of acetylcholine metabolizing enzymes is expressed. Comparison of immuno-staining intensity of HeLa OCTN1 with the purified recombinant human OCTN1 allowed measuring the specific OCTN1 concentration in the HeLa cell extract and, hence calculating the HeLa OCTN1 specific transport activity that was about 10 nmol×min(-1)×mg protein(-1), measured as uptake of [(3)H]acetylcholine in proteoliposomes reconstituted with HeLa extract. This value was very similar to the specific activity of the recombinant protein. Acetylcholine transport was suppressed by incubation of the protein or proteoliposomes with the anti-OCTN1 antibody and was strongly inhibited by PLP and MTSEA, known inhibitors of OCTN1. The absence of ATP in the internal side of proteoliposomes strongly impaired transport function of both the HeLa and, as expected, the recombinant OCTN1. HeLa OCTN1 was inhibited by spermine, NaCl (Na(+)), TEA, γ-butyrobetaine, choline, acetylcarnitine and ipratropium but not by neostigmine. Besides acetylcholine, choline was taken up by HeLa OCTN1 proteoliposomes. The transporter catalyzed also acetylcholine and choline efflux which, differently from uptake, was not inhibited by MTSEA. Time course of [(3)H]acetylcholine uptake in intact HeLa cells was measured. As in proteoliposomes, acetylcholine transport in intact cells was inhibited by TEA and NaCl. Efflux of [(3)H]acetylcholine occurred in intact cells, as well. The experimental data concur in demonstrating a role of OCTN1 in transporting acetylcholine and choline in HeLa cells.

  20. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-05

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  1. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantiti...... in the two pictures, containing different physical information, but the relation between them is well defined. We discuss this relation and illustrate its nature by examples referring to a free particle and to a ground-state hydrogen atom....

  2. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 micron near-infrared radial velocity surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility, combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m/s on our survey targets.

  3. Radial excitations of current-carrying vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Betti; Michel, Florent; Peter, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    We report on the existence of a new type of cosmic string solutions in the Witten model with U (1) × U (1) symmetry. These solutions are superconducting with radially excited condensates that exist for both gauged and ungauged currents. Our results suggest that these new configurations can be macroscopically stable, but microscopically unstable to radial perturbations. Nevertheless, they might have important consequences for the network evolution and particle emission. We discuss these effects and their possible signatures. We also comment on analogies with non-relativistic condensed matter systems where these solutions may be observable.

  4. Radial Acceleration Relation in Rotationally Supported Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a correlation between the radial acceleration traced by rotation curves and that predicted by the observed distribution of baryons. The same relation is followed by 2693 points in 153 galaxies with very different morphologies, masses, sizes, and gas fractions. The correlation persists even when dark matter dominates. Consequently, the dark matter contribution is fully specified by that of the baryons. The observed scatter is small and largely dominated by observational uncertainties. This radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a natural law for rotating galaxies.

  5. Five Lectures on Radial Basis Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, Mike J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM.......Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM....

  6. Characterization of temperature-dependent carrier transport in disordered indium-tin-oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/polyfluorene/Ca/Al polymer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Joe-Air [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jen-Cheng; Fang, Chia-Hui [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ya-Fen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, No. 84, Gongzhuan Road, Taishan Dist., New Taipei City 243, Taiwan (China); Teng, Jen-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Fan, Ping-Lin [Department of Digital Technology Design and Graduate School of Toy and Game Design, National Taipei University of Education, No. 134, Sec. 2, Heping E. Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nee, Tzer-En, E-mail: neete@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-29

    The temperature-dependent electrical characteristics of polyfluorene-based polymer structures over a temperature range from 200 to 300 K are systematically investigated in this study. Initially, using the definitions of the Berthelot-type model, it is found that the sample exhibits a higher Berthelot-type temperature T{sub B} with high driving voltage, indicating that carrier transport in a disordered system manifests Berthelot-type behaviors. The ideal current density-voltage curve for the polymer structures given the carrier transmit mechanism is further elucidated by taking into account the ohmic conduction, trap charge limited current, and Mott and Gurney model of space charge limited current. The proposed procedure is simple and can be used to characterize the material with reasonable accuracy. We also study the density of the traps H{sub t}, and the characteristic energy of the distribution E{sub t} to better understand the carrier-transport process in organic materials and structures.

  7. Characterization of materials for a reactive transport model validation experiment: Interim report on the caisson experiment. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.D.; Cheng, W.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1995-08-01

    Models used in performance assessment and site characterization activities related to nuclear waste disposal rely on simplified representations of solute/rock interactions, hydrologic flow field and the material properties of the rock layers surrounding the repository. A crucial element in the design of these models is the validity of these simplifying assumptions. An intermediate-scale experiment is being carried out at the Experimental Engineered Test Facility at Los Alamos Laboratory by the Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories to develop a strategy to validate key geochemical and hydrological assumptions in performance assessment models used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  8. Transport simulation for EBT reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T.; Uckan, N.A.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    Transport simulation and modeling studies for the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor are carried out by using zero-dimensional (0-D) and one-and-one-half-dimensional (1 1/2-D) transport calculations. The time-dependent 0-D model is used for global analysis, whereas the 1 1/2-D radial transport code is used for accurate determination of density, temperature, and ambipolar potential profiles and of the role of these profiles in reactor plasma performance. Analysis with the 1 1/2-D transport code shows that profile effects near the outer edge of the hot electron ring lead to enhanced confinement by at least a factor of 2 to 5 beyond the simple scaling that is obtained from the global analysis. The radial profiles of core plasma density and temperatures (or core pressure) obtained from 1 1/2-D transport calculations are found to be similar to those theoretically required for stability.

  9. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    CERN Document Server

    van Milligen, B Ph; Garcia, L; Bruna, D Lopez; Carreras, B A; Xu, Y; Ochando, M; Hidalgo, C; Reynolds-Barredo, J M; Fraguas, A Lopez

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ($\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$) was purposely scanned outward through an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity (or radial electric field) were characterized using a two channel Doppler Reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the stationary $\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$ magnetic island. Inside from the rational surface, the Hurst coefficient, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was found to be significantly enhanced. Simultaneously, heat transport was enhanced as well, establishing a clear link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The variation of the Hurst coefficie...

  10. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Transportation Research Center

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  11. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Profiling of Sugar Transporter Family in the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezhong Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sugar transporters (STs play pivotal roles in the growth, development, and stress responses of phloem-sucking insects, such as the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, 137 sugar transporters (STs were identified based on analysis of the genome and transcriptome of B. tabaci MEAM1. B. tabaci MEAM1 encodes a larger number of STs than other selected insects. Phylogenetic and molecular evolution analysis showed that the 137 STs formed three expanded clades and that the genes in Sternorrhyncha expanded clades had accelerated rates of evolution. B. tabaci sugar transporters (BTSTs were divided into three groups based on their expression profiles across developmental stages; however, no host-specific BTST was found in B. tabaci fed on different host plants. Feeding of B. tabaci adults with feeding diet containing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci and mortality was significantly improved in B. tabaci fed on dsRNA compared to the control, which indicates the sugar transporters may be used as potential RNAi targets for B. tabaci bio-control. These results provide a foundation for further studies of STs in B. tabaci.

  12. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Profiling of Sugar Transporter Family in the Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zezhong; Xia, Jixing; Pan, Huipeng; Gong, Cheng; Xie, Wen; Guo, Zhaojiang; Zheng, Huixin; Yang, Xin; Yang, Fengshan; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhang, Youjun

    2017-01-01

    Sugar transporters (STs) play pivotal roles in the growth, development, and stress responses of phloem-sucking insects, such as the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, 137 sugar transporters (STs) were identified based on analysis of the genome and transcriptome of B. tabaci MEAM1. B. tabaci MEAM1 encodes a larger number of STs than other selected insects. Phylogenetic and molecular evolution analysis showed that the 137 STs formed three expanded clades and that the genes in Sternorrhyncha expanded clades had accelerated rates of evolution. B. tabaci sugar transporters (BTSTs) were divided into three groups based on their expression profiles across developmental stages; however, no host-specific BTST was found in B. tabaci fed on different host plants. Feeding of B. tabaci adults with feeding diet containing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci and mortality was significantly improved in B. tabaci fed on dsRNA compared to the control, which indicates the sugar transporters may be used as potential RNAi targets for B. tabaci bio-control. These results provide a foundation for further studies of STs in B. tabaci.

  13. Yucca Mountain transportation routes: Preliminary characterization and risk analysis; Volume 2, Figures [and] Volume 3, Technical Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souleyrette, R.R. II; Sathisan, S.K.; di Bartolo, R. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Transportation Research Center

    1991-05-31

    This report presents appendices related to the preliminary assessment and risk analysis for high-level radioactive waste transportation routes to the proposed Yucca Mountain Project repository. Information includes data on population density, traffic volume, ecologically sensitive areas, and accident history.

  14. Topology mapping to characterize cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporters: BicA (SulP/SLC26 family) and SbtA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, G Dean; Howitt, Susan M

    2014-09-01

    This mini-review addresses advances in understanding the transmembrane topologies of two unrelated, single-subunit bicarbonate transporters from cyanobacteria, namely BicA and SbtA. BicA is a Na(+)-dependent bicarbonate transporter that belongs to the SulP/SLC26 family that is widespread in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Topology mapping of BicA via the phoA/lacZ fusion reporter method identified 12 transmembrane helices with an unresolved hydrophobic region just beyond helix 8. Re-interpreting this data in the light of a recent topology study on rat prestin leads to a consensus topology of 14 transmembrane domains with a 7+7 inverted repeat structure. SbtA is also a Na(+)-dependent bicarbonate transporter, but of considerably higher affinity (Km 2-5 μM versus >100 μM for BicA). Whilst SbtA is widespread in cyanobacteria and a few bacteria, it appears to be absent from eukaryotes. Topology mapping of SbtA via the phoA/lacZ fusion reporter method identified 10 transmembrane helices. The topology consists of a 5+5 inverted repeat, with the two repeats separated by a large intracellular loop. The unusual location of the N and C-termini outside the cell raises the possibility that SbtA forms a novel fold, not so far identified by structural and topological studies on transport proteins.

  15. Genome-wide identification and characterization of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily is the largest transporter gene family responsible for transporting specific molecules across lipid membranes in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters not only have important functions in molecule transport, but also play roles in insecticide resistance, metabolism and development. Results From the genome of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we have identified 51 putative ABC genes which are classified into eight subfamilies (A-H by phylogenetic analysis. Gene duplication is very evident in the ABCC and ABCG subfamilies, whereas gene numbers and structures are well conserved in the ABCD, ABCE, ABCF, and ABCH subfamilies. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of 32 silkworm ABC genes can be detected in at least one tissue during different developmental stages, and the expression patterns of some of them were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A large number of ABC genes were highly expressed in the testis compared to other tissues. One of the ABCG genes, BmABC002712, was exclusively and abundantly expressed in the Malpighian tubule implying that BmABC002712 plays a tissue-specific role. At least 5 ABCG genes, including BmABC005226, BmABC005203, BmABC005202, BmABC010555, and BmABC010557, were preferentially expressed in the midgut, showing similar developmental expression profiles to those of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E-response genes. 20E treatment induced the expression of these ABCG genes in the midgut and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of USP, a component of the 20E receptor, decreased their expression, indicating that these midgut-specific ABCG genes are 20E-responsive. Conclusion In this study, a genome-wide analysis of the silkworm ABC transporters has been conducted. A comparison of ABC transporters from 5 insect species provides an overview of this vital gene superfamily in insects. Moreover, tissue- and stage-specific expression data of the

  16. Application of a Two-Storage Zone Model to Characterize Transport and Reaction of Solutes and Solute Tracers in Streams and Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.; Newlin, J. T.

    2004-05-01

    Natural streams and wetlands exchange water and solutes between the main flow zone and a complex assemblage of "transient storage" zones that include stagnant water in pools, areas of flow recirculation, and subsurface flow paths through bed sediments and deeper alluvial sediments. Exchange between faster moving waters of the main flow zone and the slowly moving waters in storage zones results in delayed downstream transport of solutes, relative to what would be predicted from velocity measurements in the main flow zone. The transient storage concept is useful particularly for understanding the fate and transport of contaminants in streams, such as nutrients and metals, because solutes transported into storage zones come in close contact with reactive substrates such as sediment, periphyton, and macrophyte leaves. Delayed transport and characterization of transient storage zones can be quantified with solute tracer injections and modeling. Many of the widely used stream transport models that consider transient storage, such as the OTIS-P model (Runkel, USGS WRIR 98-4018, 1998), use only a single storage zone (i.e., linear reservoir with exponential residence time distribution) to account for transient storage. Choi et al. (WRR, 36:1511, 2000) showed that a model with two independent storage zones improved the characterization of transient storage in systems having both `slow' and `fast' exchange zones while retaining an appropriate level of model simplicity. We modified the OTIS-P model to include the option of simulating transport by allowing for exchange with two independent storage zones. The new model package, called OTIS-2Stor, also incorporates new options for weighting tracer concentration measurements while estimating the parameters of the model using the same non-linear least squares regression routine that is included in OTIS-P. Our experiences in headwater channels of Indiana and in the Florida Everglades demonstrate that, if used in conjunction with

  17. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  18. One-year results of cemented bipolar radial head prostheses for comminuted radial head fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laun, Reinhold

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comminuted radial head fractures (Mason type III continue to pose a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. When internal fixation is not possible, radial head arthroplasty has been advocated as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiological short-term results of patients with Mason type III radial head fractures treated with a cemented bipolar radial prosthesis. Methods: Twelve patients received cemented bipolar radial head hemiarthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures. In all patients a CT scan was obtained prior to surgical treatment to assess all associated injuries. Postoperatively an early motion protocol was applied. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 12.7 months.Results: According to the Mayo Modified Wrist Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the functional rating index of Broberg and Morrey, and the DASH Score good to excellent results were obtained. Grip strength and range of motion were almost at the level of the unaffected contralateral side. Patient satisfaction was high, no instability or signs of loosening of the implant, and only mild signs of osteoarthritis were seen.Conclusion: Overall good to excellent short-term results for primary arthroplasty for comminuted radial head fractures were observed. These encouraging results warrant the conduction of further studies with long-term follow-up and more cases to see if these short-term results can be maintained over time.

  19. The Early Outcomes with Titanium Radial Head Implants in the Treatment of Radial Head Comminuted Fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jijun; YANG Shuhua; HU Yong

    2007-01-01

    The study assessed the early functional outcomes with cemented titanium implants of ra- dius in the treatment of comminuted fractures of radial heads. The functional outcomes of arthro- plasty with cemented titanium implants of radius in the treatment of radial head fractures (Mason Type Ⅲ: 6; Mason Type Ⅳ: 4) in l0 consecutive patients (mean age, 38 years) were evaluated over a mean time of 23.7 months (18-31 months). The patients were assessed on the basis of physical ex- amination, functional rating (Mayo) and radiographic findings. The parameters evaluated included motion, stability, pain, and grip strength. Five patients were considered to have excellent results, 4 patients had good results and 1 patient had fairly good results. There were no cases of infection, prosthetic failure, heterotopic ossification or dislocation. When medial collateral ligament was injured, radial head became the main stabilizing structure of the elbow. Titanium radial head implant may provide the stability similar to that of native radial head. We believe that titanium radial head im- plants may be indicated for the Mason Type Ⅲ and Mason Type Ⅳ radial head fractures.

  20. In vitro characterization of cadmium transport along the gastro-intestinal tract of freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinck, Joel S., E-mail: klinckjs@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    An in vitro gut sac technique was used to examine the mechanism(s) of cadmium (Cd) uptake along the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The spatial distribution of Cd between three compartments (mucus-binding, mucosal epithelium, and transport into blood space) was determined using a modified Cortland saline containing 50 {mu}M Cd (as CdCl{sub 2}) labeled with {sup 109}Cd radiotracer. Taking into account total surface areas, the order of relative importance for total Cd uptake rate was: posterior intestine > anterior intestine > stomach > mid intestine. Cd transport was not inhibited by experimentally reducing fluid transport rates by manipulation of osmotic gradients using mannitol, but was sensitive to internal luminal pressure changes, suggesting a mechanosensitive pathway. Q{sub 10} values (1, 11, and 19 {sup o}C) indicated a facilitated transport of Cd in the anterior- and mid-intestine. The effects of 10 mM Ca on the kinetics of Cd uptake suggest the presence of a common uptake pathway for Cd and Ca in the stomach, anterior-, and mid-intestine. Further evidence of a shared route of entry was found using three Ca channel blockers, lanthanum, verapamil, and nifedipine: both voltage-insensitive and voltage-sensitive Ca channels appear to be present in either some, or all portions of the GIT. Elevated Fe (500 {mu}M), Mg (50 mM), and Zn (500 {mu}M) showed varying degrees of inhibition of Cd transport depending on the compartment and segment of the GIT. Overall it appears that there are multiple sites, and mechanisms, of Cd uptake along the GIT of rainbow trout.

  1. Analysis of structure and transition of radial electric field in helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.

    2001-03-01

    A set of transport equations is analyzed, including the bifurcation of the radial electric field in toroidal helical systems. Calculations are made simulating CHS experiments. Both hard and soft transitions are found in the profile of the radial electric field. Whether the electric domain interface exists or not is examined. The electric domain interface is found to exist, depending on the ratio of the electron temperature to the ion temperature. The structure of the electric domain interface is also studied. The steep gradient of the radial electric field is obtained and the width of the electric domain interface is determined by the anomalous diffusivity of the electric field. The region where the electron root and ion root co-exist is obtained when changing the density or the heating power of electrons. The various types of the electrostatic potential structures are found. The condition for the turbulence suppression is examined in the parameter regime studied here. (author)

  2. RBF networks with mixed radial basis functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciftcioglu, O.; Sariyildiz, I.S.

    2000-01-01

    After the introduction to neural network technology as multivariable function approximation, radial basis function (RBF) networks have been studied in many different aspects in recent years. From the theoretical viewpoint, approximation and uniqueness of the interpolation is studied and it has been

  3. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  4. Dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Charles W.

    A dual-radial cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) has been proposed and partially evaluated. The cell has the capacity to produce considerably more power per gram of fuel than does a single-cell TFE, with a total electrical power in a fast reactor system of several hundred kWs, conservatively operated.

  5. Explaining Adaptive Radial-Based Direction Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bauwens (Luc); C.S. Bos (Charles); H.K. van Dijk (Herman); R.D. van Oest (Rutger)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this short paper we summarize the computational steps of Adaptive Radial-Based Direction Sampling (ARDS), which can be used for Bayesian analysis of ill behaved target densities. We consider one simulation experiment in order to illustrate the good performance of ARDS relative to the

  6. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of