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Sample records for radial dose distributions

  1. Radial dose distribution from carbon ion incident on liquid water

    Scifoni, E.; Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report calculations of the radial dose deposited along carbon-ion tracks in liquid water using different techniques depending on the energy range of secondary electrons. The models are developed in relation with the experimental data on electron penetration lengths. For electrons with energies higher than 45 eV, we use the Katz model. However, the main focus is on the low-energy electrons, which are largely responsible for DNA damage within 10 nm from the tracks. For these electrons, the dose calculation is based on their random walk behaviour. The results of this combined approach are compared to experimental measurements. Contributions to the deposited energy by electrons of different ranges of energy are discussed. (authors)

  2. Radial dose distribution of 192Ir and 137Cs seed sources

    Thomason, C.; Higgins, P.

    1989-01-01

    The radial dose distributions in water around /sup 192/ Ir seed sources with both platinum and stainless steel encapsulation have been measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for distances of 1 to 12 cm along the perpendicular bisector of the source to determine the effect of source encapsulation. Similar measurements also have been made around a /sup 137/ Cs seed source of comparable dimensions. The data were fit to a third order polynomial to obtain an empirical equation for the radial dose factor which then can be used in dosimetry. The coefficients of this equation for each of the three sources are given. The radial dose factor of the stainless steel encapsulated /sup 192/ Ir and that of the platinum encapsulated /sup 192/ Ir agree to within 2%. The radial dose distributions measured here for /sup 192/ Ir with either type of encapsulation and for /sup 137/ Cs are indistinguishable from those of other authors when considering uncertainties involved. For clinical dosimetry based on isotropic point or line source models, any of these equations may be used without significantly affecting accuracy

  3. Calculation of the radial dose distribution around the trajectory of an ion

    Pretzsch, G.

    1979-01-01

    The dose caused in polyester by incoming protons, alpha beams, 127 I ions, and 16 O ions has been calculated as a function of the distance perpendicularly to their trajectory. Based on simplified assumptions regarding the binding state of target electrons, emission of secondary electrons and their propagation in matter, it has been found that the dose depends on the distance to the ion trajectory (R) in the form Rsup(-l), l being about 2. The calculated radial dose distributions agree well with values calculated or measured by other authors

  4. Radial dose distribution of 6.0 MeV/n α-particle in water

    Soga, F.; Sato, Y.; Hirabayashi, M.; Ohsawa, D.

    2003-01-01

    For the study of radiation biology and its application to radiotherapy, the double differential cross section of electron emission from water vapor induced by 6.0 MeV alpha particle beam is measured. The energy spectra of electrons ranging 7- 10000 eV are detected by the electrostatic analyzer and micro channel plate. The measurements are made at angles between 20 and 160 degrees. With use of this data set, the radial dose distribution in water is calculated by using KURBUC code. It is the Monte Carlo type code of the electron transport process, where the track of the electron is simulated through each individual interactions including elastic scattering, ionization cross section and total excitation cross section in case that electrons with certain energy are put in the liquid-density water. In order to understand the effect of radiation when the particle flux is injected in the human body like radiotherapy using accelerator beam, the dose distribution in the biological substances is essential as the first step to know the effect of irradiation. From the double differential cross sections obtained, the cumulative density functions are produced concerning both energy and angle. These functions are used for the initial randomly produced rays for 3 dimensional Monte Carlo track simulations. The results show that the track of electrons emitted and slowed down is most frequent in the perpendicular direction to the initial beam direction and most of the secondary electrons are stopped within the range of 100 nanometers. The characteristic of the obtained radial dose distribution is nearly 1/r 2 dependence with broad plateau region (penumbra) and gradual decreasing tail of penumbra extending more than a few micrometers which is much longer than the theoretical prediction

  5. SU-F-18C-11: Diameter Dependency of the Radial Dose Distribution in a Long Polyethylene Cylinder

    Bakalyar, D; McKenney, S [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The radial dose distribution in the central plane of a long cylinder following a long CT scan depends upon the diameter and composition of the cylinder. An understanding of this behavior is required for determining the spatial average of the dose in the central plane. Polyethylene, the material for construction of the TG200/ICRU phantom (30 cm in diameter) was used for this study. Size effects are germane to the principles incorporated in size specific dose estimates (SSDE); thus diameter dependency was explored as well. Method: ssuming a uniform cylinder and cylindrically symmetric conditions of irradiation, the dose distribution can be described using a radial function. This function must be an even function of the radial distance due to the conditions of symmetry. Two effects are accounted for: The direct beam makes its weakest contribution at the center while the contribution due to scatter is strongest at the center and drops off abruptly at the outer radius. An analytic function incorporating these features was fit to Monte Carlo results determined for infinite polyethylene cylinders of various diameters. A further feature of this function is that it is integrable. Results: Symmetry and continuity dictate a local extremum at the center which is a minimum for the larger sizes. The competing effects described above can Resultin an absolute maximum occurring between the center and outer edge of the cylinders. For the smallest cylinders, the maximum dose may occur at the center. Conclusion: An integrable, analytic function can be used to characterize the radial dependency of dose for cylindrical CT phantoms of various sizes. One use for this is to help determine average dose distribution over the central cylinder plane when equilibrium dose has been reached.

  6. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around 192Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate 192 Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate (∼0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a 192 Ir wire source.

  7. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  8. Convex and Radially Concave Contoured Distributions

    Wolf-Dieter Richter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral representations of the locally defined star-generalized surface content measures on star spheres are derived for boundary spheres of balls being convex or radially concave with respect to a fan in Rn. As a result, the general geometric measure representation of star-shaped probability distributions and the general stochastic representation of the corresponding random vectors allow additional specific interpretations in the two mentioned cases. Applications to estimating and testing hypotheses on scaling parameters are presented, and two-dimensional sample clouds are simulated.

  9. On dose distribution comparison

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  10. Dosimetry analysis of distributions radials dose profiles of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicators using the MCNP-4C code and radio chromium films; Analise dosimetrica de perfis de distribuicoes radias de doses relativas de um aplicador de betaterapia de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y utilizando o codigo MCNP-4C e filmes radiocromicos

    Coelho, Talita S.; Yoriyaz, Helio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: tasallesc@gmail.co [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Radioterapia; Louzada, Mario J.Q. [UNESP, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Medicina Veterinaria

    2011-07-01

    Although they are no longer manufactured, the applicators of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y acquired in the decades of 1990 are still in use, by having half-life of 28.5 years. These applicators have calibration certificate given by their manufacturers, where few have been re calibrated. Thus it becomes necessary to accomplish thorough dosimetry of these applicators. This paper presents a dosimetric analysis distribution radial dose profiles for emitted by an {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicator, using the MCNP-4C code to simulate the distribution radial dose profiles and radio chromium films to get them experimentally . The results with the simulated values were compared with the results of experimental measurements, where both curves show similar behavior, which may validate the use of MCNP-4C and radio chromium films for this type of dosimetry. (author)

  11. Dosimetry analysis of distribution radial dose profiles of {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y beta therapy applicators using the MCNP-4C code and radio chromium films; Analise dosimetrica de perfis de distribuicoes radiais de doses relativas de um aplicador de betaterapia de {sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y utilizando o codigo MCNP-4C e filmes radiocromicos

    Coelho, T.S.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, M.A.R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Servico de Radioterapia; Louzada, M.J.Q. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Aracatuba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Medicina Veterinaria

    2010-07-01

    Although they are no longer manufactured, the applicators of {sup 90}Sr +{sup 90}Y acquired in the decades of 1990 are still in use, by having half-life of 28.5 years. These applicators have calibration certificate given by their manufacturers, where few have been recalibrated. Thus it becomes necessary to accomplish thorough dosimetry of these applicators. This paper presents a dosimetric analysis distribution radial dose profiles for emitted by an {sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y beta therapy applicator, using the MCNP-4C code to simulate the distribution radial dose profiles and radiochromium films to get them experimentally . The results with the simulated values were compared with the results of experimental measurements, where both curves show similar behavior, which may validate the use of MCNP-4C and radiochromium films for this type of dosimetry. (author)

  12. More accurate fitting of 125I and 103Pd radial dose functions

    Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-01-01

    In this study an improved functional form for fitting the radial dose functions, g(r), of 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy seeds is presented. The new function is capable of accurately fitting radial dose functions over ranges as large as 0.05 cm≤r≤10 cm for 125 I seeds and 0.10 cm≤r≤10 cm for 103 Pd seeds. The average discrepancies between fit and calculated data are less than 0.5% over the full range of fit and maximum discrepancies are 2% or less. The fitting function is also capable of accounting for the sharp increase in g(r) (upturn) seen for some sources for r 125 I seeds and 9 103 Pd seeds using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose. Fitting coefficients of the new function are tabulated for all 27 seeds. Extrapolation characteristics of the function are also investigated. The new functional form is an improvement over currently used fitting functions with its main strength being the ability to accurately fit the rapidly varying radial dose function at small distances. The new function is an excellent candidate for fitting the radial dose function of all 103 Pd and 125 I brachytherapy seeds and will increase the accuracy of dose distributions calculated around brachytherapy seeds using the TG-43 protocol over a wider range of data. More accurate values of g(r) for r<0.5 cm may be particularly important in the treatment of ocular melanoma

  13. Simulation study of radial dose due to the irradiation of a swift heavy ion aiming to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy: The effect of emission angles of secondary electrons

    Moribayashi, Kengo, E-mail: moribayashi.kengo@jaea.go.jp

    2015-12-15

    A radial dose simulation model has been proposed in order to advance the treatment planning system for heavy particle cancer therapy. Here, the radial dose is the dose due to the irradiation of a heavy ion as a function of distances from this ion path. The model proposed here may overcome weak points of paradigms that are employed to produce the conventional radial dose distributions. To provide the radial dose with higher accuracy, this paper has discussed the relationship between the emission angles of secondary electrons and the radial dose. It is found that the effect of emission angles becomes stronger on the radial dose with increasing energies of the secondary electrons.

  14. Stellar Angular Momentum Distributions and Preferential Radial Migration

    Wyse, Rosemary; Daniel, Kathryne J.

    2018-04-01

    I will present some results from our recent investigations into the efficiency of radial migration in stellar disks of differing angular momentum distributions, within a given adopted 2D spiral disk potential. We apply to our models an analytic criterion that determines whether or not individual stars are in orbits that could lead to radial migration around the corotation resonance. We couch our results in terms of the local stellar velocity dispersion and find that the fraction of stars that could migrate radially decreases as the velocity dispersion increases. I will discuss implications and comparisons with the results of other approaches.

  15. Comparison of Deterministic and Probabilistic Radial Distribution Systems Load Flow

    Gupta, Atma Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-12-01

    Distribution system network today is facing the challenge of meeting increased load demands from the industrial, commercial and residential sectors. The pattern of load is highly dependent on consumer behavior and temporal factors such as season of the year, day of the week or time of the day. For deterministic radial distribution load flow studies load is taken as constant. But, load varies continually with a high degree of uncertainty. So, there is a need to model probable realistic load. Monte-Carlo Simulation is used to model the probable realistic load by generating random values of active and reactive power load from the mean and standard deviation of the load and for solving a Deterministic Radial Load Flow with these values. The probabilistic solution is reconstructed from deterministic data obtained for each simulation. The main contribution of the work is: Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on balanced radial distribution load flow. Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on unbalanced radial distribution load flow. Compare the voltage profile and losses with probable realistic ZIP load modeling for balanced and unbalanced radial distribution load flow.

  16. Developing equivalent circuits for radial distribution networks

    Prada, Ricardo; Coelho, Agnelo; Rodrigues, Anselmo [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering], Emails: prada@ele.puc-rio.br, agnelo@ele.puc-rio.br, nebulok_99@yahoo.com; Silva, Maria da Guia da [Federal University of Maranhao, Sao Luiz, MA (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating External Equivalent in Electric Distribution Networks (EDN).The proposed method has as its main objectives the reduction of the computational costs in distribution network reconfiguration, investigation of the optimal allocation of banks of capacitors, investigation of the allocation of distributed generation, etc. In these sorts of problems a large number of alternative projects must be assessed in order to identify the optimal solution. The optimal solution comes up with the voltage level in the load points within specified limits. Consequently, the EDN must retain the external network load points but without major increasing in the dimension of the equivalent circuit. The proposed method has been tested and validated in a substation of the Electricity Utility of Maranhao - CEMAR, in Brazil. (author)

  17. Reliability worth assessment of radial systems with distributed generation

    Bellart Llavall, Francesc Xavier

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in technology, utilities generation (DG) on the distribution systems. Reliability worth is very important in power system planning and operation. Having a DG ensures reli increase the reliability worth. This research project presents the study of a radial distribution system and the impact of placing DG in order to increase the reliability worth. where a DG have to be placed. The reliability improvement is measured by different reliability indices tha...

  18. Dynamic radial distribution function from inelastic neutron scattering

    McQueeney, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A real-space, local dynamic structure function g(r,ω) is defined from the dynamic structure function S(Q,ω), which can be measured using inelastic neutron scattering. At any particular frequency ω, S(Q,ω) contains Q-dependent intensity oscillations which reflect the spatial distribution and relative displacement directions for the atoms vibrating at that frequency. Information about local and dynamic atomic correlations is obtained from the Fourier transform of these oscillations g(r,ω) at the particular frequency. g(r,ω) can be formulated such that the elastic and frequency-summed limits correspond to the average and instantaneous radial distribution function, respectively, and is thus called the dynamic radial distribution function. As an example, the dynamic radial distribution function is calculated for fcc nickel in a model which considers only the harmonic atomic displacements due to phonons. The results of these calculations demonstrate that the magnitude of the atomic correlations can be quantified and g(r,ω) is a well-defined correlation function. This leads to a simple prescription for investigating local lattice dynamics. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Optimal Operation of Radial Distribution Systems Using Extended Dynamic Programming

    Lopez, Juan Camilo; Vergara, Pedro P.; Lyra, Christiano

    2018-01-01

    An extended dynamic programming (EDP) approach is developed to optimize the ac steady-state operation of radial electrical distribution systems (EDS). Based on the optimality principle of the recursive Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the proposed EDP approach determines the optimal operation o...... approach is illustrated using real-scale systems and comparisons with commercial programming solvers. Finally, generalizations to consider other EDS operation problems are also discussed.......An extended dynamic programming (EDP) approach is developed to optimize the ac steady-state operation of radial electrical distribution systems (EDS). Based on the optimality principle of the recursive Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the proposed EDP approach determines the optimal operation...... of the EDS by setting the values of the controllable variables at each time period. A suitable definition for the stages of the problem makes it possible to represent the optimal ac power flow of radial EDS as a dynamic programming problem, wherein the 'curse of dimensionality' is a minor concern, since...

  20. Radial distributions of star populations in elliptical galaxies

    Angeletti, Lucio; Giannone, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical structure of stars in low-ellipticity early-type galaxies has been approached in a conceptually simple manner by making use of the mass structure inferred from the radial surface brightness and the stellar metal abundance as derived from that of the contracting gas mass when the stars formed. Families of models depending on three parameters can be used to fit the surface radial profiles of spectro-photometric indices. In particular, the behavior of the spectral index Mg 2 is selected, and the observations for eleven galaxies are matched with models. With the fitting values of the free parameters, we have studied the spatial (within the galaxy) and projected (on the image of the galaxy) distributions of the metal abundances. We present the results for three chosen galaxies characterized by rather different values of the fitting parameters. Our results can be of interest for the formation of stellar populations and call attention to the need for more detailed observations.

  1. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Rocha, Jose R Oliveira; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-01-01

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181-8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695-702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434-48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221-8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79-90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032-40)

  2. Investigation of radial dose effect on single event upset cross-section due to heavy ions using GEANT4

    Boorboor, S.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Jafari, H.

    2015-01-01

    The heavy ions are the main cause to produce single event upset (SEU) damage on electronic devices since they are high LET radiations. The dimension of electronic components in new technology, arise a challenge in radiation effect estimations. Accurate investigations require fully considering the ion track in energy deposition as a radial dose distribution. In this work, the distribution of delta rays as well as LET have been calculated to determine ionization structure around ion track by a Monte Carlo code, GEANT4. The radial dose of several heavy ions with different energy in silicon was investigated and compared with the works by other authors in this field. The results showed that heavy ions with identical LET can have different SEU cross-section in silicon transistors. As a demonstrative example, according to our results, the error probability for 4.8 GeV iron was 8 times greater than that for 15 MeV carbon ions, in transistors with new process technology which have small dimension and low critical charges. Our results show that considering radial dose distribution considerably improves the accuracy of the SEU cross-section estimation in electronic devices especially for new technologies. - Highlights: • The single event upset is produced by heavy ions interaction on electronic devices. • The radial dose of several heavy ions in silicon was calculated by GEANT4. • Heavy ions with identical LET had different SEU cross-section in silicon transistors. • Low dimension and critical charge devices were more sensitive to radial dose effect

  3. Calculation of breaking radiation dose fields in heterogenous media by a method of the transformation of axial distribution

    Mil'shtejn, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of dose fields in a heterogeneous tissue equivalent medium has shown that dose distributions have radial symmetry and can be described by a curve of axial distribution with renormalization of maximum ionization depth. A method of the calculation of a dose field in a heterogeneous medium using the principle of radial symmetry is presented

  4. Radial distribution of ions in pores with a surface charge

    Stegen, J.H.G. van der; Görtzen, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A sorption model applicable to calculate the radial equilibrium concentrations of ions in the pores of ion-selective membranes with a pore structure is developed. The model is called the radial uptake model. Because the model is applied to a Nafion sulfonic layer with very small pores and the radial

  5. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  6. radial

    JOHN WILLIAM BRANCH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La creación de modelos de objetos reales es una tarea compleja para la cual se ha visto que el uso de técnicas tradicionales de modelamiento tiene restricciones. Para resolver algunos de estos problemas, los sensores de rango basados en láser se usan con frecuencia para muestrear la superficie de un objeto desde varios puntos de vista, lo que resulta en un conjunto de imágenes de rango que son registradas e integradas en un modelo final triangulado. En la práctica, debido a las propiedades reflectivas de la superficie, las oclusiones, y limitaciones de acceso, ciertas áreas de la superficie del objeto usualmente no son muestreadas, dejando huecos que pueden crear efectos indeseables en el modelo integrado. En este trabajo, presentamos un nuevo algoritmo para el llenado de huecos a partir de modelos triangulados. El algoritmo comienza localizando la frontera de las regiones donde están los huecos. Un hueco consiste de un camino cerrado de bordes de los triángulos en la frontera que tienen al menos un borde que no es compartido con ningún otro triangulo. El borde del hueco es entonces adaptado mediante un B-Spline donde la variación promedio de la torsión del la aproximación del B-spline es calculada. Utilizando un simple umbral de la variación promedio a lo largo del borde, se puede clasificar automáticamente, entre huecos reales o generados por intervención humana. Siguiendo este proceso de clasificación, se usa entonces una versión automatizada del interpolador de funciones de base radial para llenar el interior del hueco usando los bordes vecinos.

  7. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  8. A simulation study on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife

    Chen, Chin-cheng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Lee, Chung-chi; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of the tissue heterogeneity on the dose distribution for a single beam of the gamma knife. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate both depth and radial profiles of the radiation dose in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms, respectively. The results are compared with the dose distribution calculated using the mathematical model of Gamma Plan, the treatment planning system of the gamma knife. The skull and sinus heterogeneity were simulated by a Teflon shell and an air shell, respectively. It was found that the tissue heterogeneity caused significant perturbation on the absolute depth dose at the focus as well as on the depth-dose distribution near the phantom surface and/or at the interface but little effect on the radial dose distribution. The effect of the beam aperture on the depth-dose distribution was also investigated in this study. (author)

  9. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  10. User-friendly Tool for Power Flow Analysis and Distributed Generation Optimisation in Radial Distribution Networks

    M. F. Akorede

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The intent of power distribution companies (DISCOs is to deliver electric power to their customers in an efficient and reliable manner – with minimal energy loss cost. One major way to minimise power loss on a given power system is to install distributed generation (DG units on the distribution networks. However, to maximise benefits, it is highly crucial for a DISCO to ensure that these DG units are of optimal size and sited in the best locations on the network. This paper gives an overview of a software package developed in this study, called Power System Analysis and DG Optimisation Tool (PFADOT. The main purpose of the graphical user interface-based package is to guide a DISCO in finding the optimal size and location for DG placement in radial distribution networks. The package, which is also suitable for load flow analysis, employs the GUI feature of MATLAB. Three objective functions are formulated into a single optimisation problem and solved with fuzzy genetic algorithm to simultaneously obtain DG optimal size and location. The accuracy and reliability of the developed tool was validated using several radial test systems, and the results obtained are evaluated against the existing similar package cited in the literature, which are impressive and computationally efficient.

  11. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    Neumann, Philipp; Eckhardt, Wolfgang; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a

  12. Application of a proposed overcurrent relay in radial distribution networks

    Conde, A.; Vazquez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, A.P. 36-F, CU, CP 66450, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    This paper contains the application criteria and coordination process for a proposed overcurrent relay in a radial power system with feed from one or multiple sources. This relay uses independent functions to detect faults and to calculate the operation time. Also this relay uses a time element function that allows it to reduce the time relay operation, enhancing the backup protection. Some of the proposed approaches improve the sensitivity of the relay. The selection of the best approach in the proposed relay is defined by the needs of the application. The proposed protection can be considered as an additional function protection to conventional overcurrent relays. (author)

  13. Optimal Placement and Sizing of Renewable Distributed Generations and Capacitor Banks into Radial Distribution Systems

    Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, renewable types of distributed generation in the distribution system have been much appreciated due to their enormous technical and environmental advantages. This paper proposes a methodology for optimal placement and sizing of renewable distributed generation(s (i.e., wind, solar and biomass and capacitor banks into a radial distribution system. The intermittency of wind speed and solar irradiance are handled with multi-state modeling using suitable probability distribution functions. The three objective functions, i.e., power loss reduction, voltage stability improvement, and voltage deviation minimization are optimized using advanced Pareto-front non-dominated sorting multi-objective particle swarm optimization method. First a set of non-dominated Pareto-front data are called from the algorithm. Later, a fuzzy decision technique is applied to extract the trade-off solution set. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is tested on the standard IEEE 33 test system. The overall results reveal that combination of renewable distributed generations and capacitor banks are dominant in power loss reduction, voltage stability and voltage profile improvement.

  14. The radial distribution of plutonium in high burnup UO2 fuels

    Lassmann, K.; O'Carroll, C.; Laar, J. van de; Walker, C.T.

    1994-01-01

    A new model (TUBRNP) is described which predicts the radial power density distribution as a function of burnup (and hence the radial burnup profile as a function of time) together with the radial profile of uranium and plutonium isotopes. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions of the TUBRNP model are made on fuels with enrichments in the range 2.9 to 8.25% and with burnups between 21 000 and 64 000 MWd/t. It is shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements and is a marked improvement on earlier versions. (orig.)

  15. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution

  16. Experimental measurements of spatial dose distributions in radiosurgery treatments

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Perez-Pastenes, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions requires an integrating, high-resolution dosimeter capable of providing a spatial map of absorbed dose. This paper describes the use of a commercial radiochromic dye film (GafChromic MD-55-2) to measure radiosurgery dose distributions with 6 MV X-rays in a head phantom. The response of the MD-55-2 was evaluated by digitizing and analyzing the films with conventional computer systems. Radiosurgery dose distributions were measured using the radiochromic film in a spherical acrylic phantom of 16 cm diameter undergoing a typical SRS treatment as a patient, and were compared with dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system. The comparison lead to mean radial differences of ±0.6 mm, ±0.9 mm, ±1.3 mm, ±1.9 mm, and ±2.8 mm, for the 80, 60, 50, 40, and 30% isodose curves, respectively. It is concluded that the radiochromic film is a convenient and useful tool for radiosurgery treatment planning validation

  17. Determination of the radial distribution function with the tomographic atom probe

    Heinrich, A.; Al-Kassab, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: An algorithm for the determination of the radial distribution function (RDF) and the partial radial distribution function from tomographic atom probe data is introduced and some examples for its application are discussed. Homogeneous distribution of atoms can easily be determined from measured data. Using our algorithm, the lattice of simple cubic structures may be estimated solely from TAP data. The results for bcc and fcc alloys and metals will be presented. By evaluating the vicinity of each atom, information about order phenomena in multi component alloy can be retrieved including short range order. The advantage of determining the (partial) radial distribution functions for any sample with our algorithm is that all data can be derived by one single experiment whereas all other methods of determining a pRDF require one experiment for each pRDF. (author)

  18. Voltage regulator placement in radial distribution system using plant ...

    user

    location and number along with tap setting of the voltage regulators that ... can be fixed or switched type; they are considered integer multiple of a capacitor unit ..... By simulating the growth process of plant phototropism, a probability model ..... He is referee for IEE Proceedings - Generation Transmission and Distribution and ...

  19. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  20. Characterization of the loss allocation techniques for radial systems with distributed generation

    Carpaneto, Enrico; Chicco, Gianfranco; Sumaili Akilimali, Jean

    2008-01-01

    In the restructured electricity industry, meaningful loss allocation methods are required in order to send correct signals to the market taking into account the location and characteristics of loads and generations, including the local sources forming the distributed generation (DG). This paper addresses the issues related to loss allocation in radial distribution systems with DG, with a three-fold focus. First, the key differences in the formulation of the loss allocation problem for radial distribution systems with respect to transmission systems are discussed, specifying the modeling and computational issues concerning the treatment of the slack node in radial distribution systems. Then, the characteristics of derivative-based and circuit-based loss allocation techniques are presented and compared, illustrating the arrangements used for adapting the various techniques to be applied to radial distribution systems with DG. Finally, the effects of introducing voltage-controllable local generation on the calculation of the loss allocation coefficients are discussed, proposing the adoption of a ''reduced'' representation of the system capable of taking into proper account the characteristics of the nodes containing voltage-controllable DG units. Numerical results are provided to show the time evolution of the loss allocation coefficients for distribution systems with variable load and local generation patterns. (author)

  1. Comparison of proton and photon dose distributions

    Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable work, as yet largely theoretical, in developing ways to improve the dose distributions which can be achieved with x-rays. Foremost among these developments are the use of non-coplanar beam directions, the use of intensity-modulated beams, and the implementation of computer-controlled delivery of complex plans using new beam modifiers such as multi-leaf collimators and beam scanners. One way of improving the dose distributions which have been achieved with conventional radiations is to use protons, with their quite different physical characteristics but very similar radiobiological properties as compared with supervoltage x-rays. Some substantial experience has been gained in the use of protons which has confirmed clinically that better results have been obtained as a result of their better dose distributions. Indeed, it is fair to say that the advantages which protons have demonstrated are, in large part, responsible for the renewed interest in improving the dose distributions from all radiation modalities. So much better are the dose distributions which the new techniques, mentioned above, offer that there is the impression that, with their use, photons can deliver dose distributions as good as can be obtained with protons. In this paper, the extent of the possible improvement will be discussed. It will be suggested that the integral dose is relatively little affected by the treatment technique - so that the lower normal tissue doses which the new approaches offer is almost always at the price of delivering dose to a larger volume. Protons can be matched pencil beam for pencil beam with photons - and then almost always deliver substantially less dose outside the target volume. Ultimately, the clinical importance of the differences will have to decided by clinical trial

  2. Dose distributions in electron irradiated plastic tubing

    Miller, A.; Pederson, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    Plastic tubes have been crosslinked by irradiation at a 10 MeV linear electron accelerator and at a 400 keV DC electron accelerator at different irradiation geometries. The diameter of the different tubes was 20, 33 and 110 millimeters. Dose distributions have been measured with thin radiochromic dye films, indicating that in all cases irradiation from two sides is a necessary and sufficient condition for obtaining a satisfactory dose distribution. (author)

  3. Weighted radial dimension: an improved fractal measurement for highway transportation networks distribution

    Feng, Yongjiu; Liu, Miaolong; Tong, Xiaohua

    2007-06-01

    An improved fractal measurement, the weighted radial dimension, is put forward for highway transportation networks distribution. The radial dimension (DL), originated from subway investigation in Stuttgart, is a fractal measurement for transportation systems under ideal assumption considering all the network lines to be homogeneous curves, ignoring the difference on spatial structure, quality and level, especially the highway networks. Considering these defects of radial dimension, an improved fractal measurement called weighted radial dimension (D WL) is introduced and the transportation system in Guangdong province is studied in detail using this novel method. Weighted radial dimensions are measured and calculated, and the spatial structure, intensity and connectivity of transportation networks are discussed in Guangdong province and the four sub-areas: the Pearl River Delta area, the East Costal area, the West Costal area and the Northern Guangdong area. In Guangdong province, the fractal spatial pattern characteristics of transportation system vary remarkably: it is the highest in the Pearl River Delta area, moderate in Costal area and lowest in the Northern Guangdong area. With the Pearl River Delta area as the centre, the weighted radial dimensions decrease with the distance increasing, while the decline level is smaller in the costal area and greater in the Northern Guangdong province. By analysis of the conic of highway density, it is recognized that the density decrease with the distance increasing from the calculation centre (Guangzhou), demonstrating the same trend as weighted radial dimensions shown. Evidently, the improved fractal measurement, weighted radial dimension, is an indictor describing the characteristics of highway transportation system more effectively and accurately.

  4. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    C. H. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer.

  5. Optimal siting of capacitors in radial distribution network using Whale Optimization Algorithm

    D.B. Prakash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In present days, continuous effort is being made in bringing down the line losses of the electrical distribution networks. Therefore proper allocation of capacitors is of utmost importance because, it will help in reducing the line losses and maintaining the bus voltage. This in turn results in improving the stability and reliability of the system. In this paper Whale Optimization Algorithm (WOA is used to find optimal sizing and placement of capacitors for a typical radial distribution system. Multi objectives such as operating cost reduction and power loss minimization with inequality constraints on voltage limits are considered and the proposed algorithm is validated by applying it on standard radial systems: IEEE-34 bus and IEEE-85 bus radial distribution test systems. The results obtained are compared with those of existing algorithms. The results show that the proposed algorithm is more effective in bringing down the operating costs and in maintaining better voltage profile. Keywords: Whale Optimization Algorithm (WOA, Optimal allocation and sizing of capacitors, Power loss reduction and voltage stability improvement, Radial distribution system, Operating cost minimization

  6. On the calculation of x-ray scattering signals from pairwise radial distribution functions

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Biasin, Elisa; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    We derive a formulation for evaluating (time-resolved) x-ray scattering signals of solvated chemical systems, based on pairwise radial distribution functions, with the aim of this formulation to accompany molecular dynamics simulations. The derivation is described in detail to eliminate any possi...

  7. Spatial distributions of dose enhancement around a gold nanoparticle at several depths of proton Bragg peak

    Kwon, Jihun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Sutherland, Kenneth [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Hashimoto, Takayuki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been recognized as a promising candidate for a radiation sensitizer. A proton beam incident on a GNP can produce secondary electrons, resulting in an enhancement of the dose around the GNP. However, little is known about the spatial distribution of dose enhancement around the GNP, especially in the direction along the incident proton. The purpose of this study is to determine the spatial distribution of dose enhancement by taking the incident direction into account. Two steps of calculation were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. First, the energy spectra of 100 and 195 MeV protons colliding with a GNP were calculated at the Bragg peak and three other depths around the peak in liquid water. Second, the GNP was bombarded by protons with the obtained energy spectra. Radial dose distributions were computed along the incident beam direction. The spatial distributions of the dose enhancement factor (DEF) and subtracted dose (D{sub sub}) were then evaluated. The spatial DEF distributions showed hot spots in the distal radial region from the proton beam axis. The spatial D{sub sub} distribution isotropically spread out around the GNP. Low energy protons caused higher and wider dose enhancement. The macroscopic dose enhancement in clinical applications was also evaluated. The results suggest that the consideration of the spatial distribution of GNPs in treatment planning will maximize the potential of GNPs.

  8. Dose distribution following selective internal radiation therapy

    Fox, R.A.; Klemp, P.F.; Egan, G.; Mina, L.L.; Burton, M.A.; Gray, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy is the intrahepatic arterial injection of microspheres labelled with 90Y. The microspheres lodge in the precapillary circulation of tumor resulting in internal radiation therapy. The activity of the 90Y injected is managed by successive administrations of labelled microspheres and after each injection probing the liver with a calibrated beta probe to assess the dose to the superficial layers of normal tissue. Predicted doses of 75 Gy have been delivered without subsequent evidence of radiation damage to normal cells. This contrasts with the complications resulting from doses in excess of 30 Gy delivered from external beam radiotherapy. Detailed analysis of microsphere distribution in a cubic centimeter of normal liver and the calculation of dose to a 3-dimensional fine grid has shown that the radiation distribution created by the finite size and distribution of the microspheres results in an highly heterogeneous dose pattern. It has been shown that a third of normal liver will receive less than 33.7% of the dose predicted by assuming an homogeneous distribution of 90Y

  9. Multi-objective PSO based optimal placement of solar power DG in radial distribution system

    Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ever increasing trend of electricity demand, fossil fuel depletion and environmental issues request the integration of renewable energy into the distribution system. The optimal planning of renewable distributed generation (DG is much essential for ensuring maximum benefits. Hence, this paper proposes the optimal placement of probabilistic based solar power DG into the distribution system. The two objective functions such as power loss reduction and voltage stability index improvement are optimized. The power balance and voltage limits are kept as constraints of the problem. The non-sorting pare to-front based multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO technique is proposed on standard IEEE 33 radial distribution test system.

  10. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    Nahum, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s a can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s a . The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs

  11. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    Nahum, A E [The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics

    1996-08-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s{sub a} can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s{sub a}. The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs.

  12. Dose distribution of non-coplanar irradiation

    Fukui, Toshiharu; Wada, Yoichi; Takenaka, Eiichi

    1987-02-01

    Non-coplanar irradiations were applied to the treatment of brain tumor. The dose distribution around the target area due to non-coplanar irradiation was half less than the dose when coplanar irradiation used. Integral volume dose due to this irradiation was not always less than that due to conventional opposing or rotational irradiation. This irradiation has the better application to the following;as a boost therapy, glioblastoma multiforme;as a radical therapy, recurrent brain tumor, well differentiated brain tumor such as craniopharyngioma, hypophyseal tumor etc and AV-malformation.

  13. The Peculiar Radial Distribution of Multiple Populations in the Massive Globular Cluster M80

    Dalessandro, E.; Cadelano, M.; Vesperini, E.; Salaris, M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Raso, S.; Hong, J.; Webb, J. J.; Zocchi, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the radial distribution of light-element multiple populations (LE-MPs) in the massive and dense globular cluster M80, based on a combination of UV and optical Hubble Space Telescope data. Surprisingly, we find that first-generation (FG) stars (FG) are significantly more centrally concentrated than extreme second-generation (SG) stars out to ∼2.5r h from the cluster center. To understand the origin of such peculiar behavior, we used a set of N-body simulations following the long-term dynamical evolution of LE-MPs. We find that, given the advanced dynamical state of the cluster, the observed difference does not depend on the primordial relative distributions of FG and SG stars. On the contrary, a difference of ∼0.05–0.10 M ⊙ between the average masses of the two subpopulations is needed to account for the observed radial distributions. We argue that such a mass difference might be the result of the higher He abundance of SG stars (of the order of ΔY ∼ 0.05–0.06) with respect to FG stars. Interestingly, we find that a similar He variation is necessary to reproduce the horizontal branch morphology of M80. These results demonstrate that differences in mass among LE-MPs, due to different He content, should be properly taken into account for a correct interpretation of their radial distribution, at least in dynamically evolved systems.

  14. Performance Analysis of Radial Distribution Systems with UPQC and D-STATCOM

    Gupta, Atma Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an effective method for finding optimum location of unified power quality conditioner (UPQC) and distributed static compensator (D-STATCOM) in radial distribution system. The bus having the minimum losses is selected as the candidate bus for UPQC placement and the optimal location of D-STATCOM is found by power loss index (PLI) method. The PLI values of all the buses are calculated and the bus having the highest PLI value is the most favorable bus and thus selected as candidate bus for D-STATCOM placement. Main contribution of this paper are: (i) finding optimum location of UPQC in radial distribution system (RDS) based on minimum power loss; (ii) finding the optimal size of UPQC which offers minimum losses; (iii) calculation of annual energy saving using UPQC and D-STATCOM; (iv) cost analysis with and without UPQC and D-STATCOM placement; and (v) comparison of results with and without UPQC and D-STATCOM placement in RDS. The algorithm is tested on IEEE 33-bus and 69-bus radial distribution systems by using MATLAB software.

  15. Multiagent System-Based Distributed Coordinated Control for Radial DC Microgrid Considering Transmission Time Delays

    Dou, Chun-Xia; Yue, Dong; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on a multi-agent based distributed coordinated control for radial DC microgrid considering trans-mission time delays. Firstly, a two-level multi-agent system is constructed, where local control is formulated based on local states and executed by means of the first-level agent......, and dis-tributed coordinated control law is formulated based on wide-area information and executed by means of the secondary- level agent in order to improve the voltage control performances. Afterwards, the research mainly focuses on designing the local controller and the distributed coordinated...

  16. REVERSED TREND OF RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SUBPOPULATIONS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS NGC 362 AND NGC 6723

    Lim, Dongwook; Lee, Young-Wook; Pasquato, Mario [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research and Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Il; Roh, Dong-Goo, E-mail: dwlim@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ywlee2@yonsei.ac.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    Most globular clusters (GCs) are now known to host multiple stellar populations with different abundances of light elements. Here we use narrow-band photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy for NGC 362 and NGC 6723 to investigate their chemical properties and radial distributions of subpopulations. We confirm that NGC 362 and NGC 6723 are among the GCs with multiple populations showing bimodal CN distribution and CN–CH anticorrelation without a significant spread in calcium abundance. These two GCs show more centrally concentrated CN-weak, earlier generation stars compared to the CN-strong, later generation stars. These trends are reversed with respect to those found in previous studies for many other GCs. Our findings, therefore, seem contradictory to the current scenario for the formation of multiple stellar populations, but mass segregation acting on the two subpopulations might be a possible solution to explain this reversed radial trend.

  17. Improvement of the CULTEX® exposure technology by radial distribution of the test aerosol.

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Heller, Wolf-Dieter; Krischenowski, Olaf; Möhle, Niklas; Hochrainer, Dieter

    2017-07-05

    The exposure of cellular based systems cultivated on microporous membranes at the air-liquid interface (ALI) has been accepted as an appropriate approach to simulate the exposure of cells of the respiratory tract to native airborne substances. The efficiency of such an exposure procedure with regard to stability and reproducibility depends on the optimal design at the interface between the cellular test system and the exposure technique. The actual exposure systems favor the dynamic guidance of the airborne substances to the surface of the cells in specially designed exposure devices. Two module types, based on a linear or radial feed of the test atmosphere to the test system, were used for these studies. In our technical history, the development started with the linear designed version, the CULTEX ® glass modules, fulfilling basic requirements for running ALI exposure studies (Mohr and Durst, 2005). The instability in the distribution of different atmospheres to the cells caused us to create a new exposure module, characterized by a stable and reproducible radial guidance of the aerosol to the cells. The outcome was the CULTEX ® RFS (Mohr et al., 2010). In this study, we describe the differences between the two systems with regard to particle distribution and deposition clarifying the advantages and disadvantages of a radial to a linear aerosol distribution concept. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Radial power density distribution of MOX fuel rods in the IFA-651

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Joo, Hyung Kook; Cheon, Jin Sik; Oh, Je Yong; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Two MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated in the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland in cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been irradiated in the HBWR from June, 2000 in the framework of OECD-HRP together with a reference MOX fuel rod supplied by the BNFL. Since fuel temperature, which is influenced by radial power distribution, is basic in analyzing fuel behavior, it is required to consider radial power distribution in the HBWR. A subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR that calculates radial power density distribution for three MOX fuel rods has been developed based on neutron physics results and DEPRESS program. The developed subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR gives good agreement with the physics calculation except slight under-prediction at the outer part of the pellet above the burnup of 20 MWd/kgHM. The subroutine will be incorporated into a computer code COSMOS and used to analyze the in-reactor behavior of the three MOX fuel rods during the Halden irradiation test. 24 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  19. Radial power density distribution of MOX fuel rods in the HBWR

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Joo, Hyung Kook; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-07-01

    Two MOX fuel rods, which ar being fabricated in the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland in cooperation with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), are going to be irradiated in the HBWR (Halden Boiling Water Reactor) from the beginning of 2000 in the framework of OECD Halden Reactor Programme (HRP) together with a reference MOX fuel rod supplied by the BNFL. Since fuel temperature, which is influenced by radial power distribution, is a basic property in analyzing fuel behavior, it is required to consider radial power distribution in the HBWR. A subroutine FACTOR H BWR that calculates radial power density distribution for three MOX fuel rods have been developed subroutine FACTOR H BWR gives good agreement with the physics calculation except slight underprediction in the central part and a little overprediction at the outer part of the pellet. The subroutine will be incorporated into a computer code COSMOS and used to analyze the in-reactor behavior of the three MOX fuel rods during the Halden irradiation test. (author). 5 refs., 3 tabs., 24 figs

  20. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E.

    2001-01-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of Radial Plutonium Isotope Distribution in Irradiated Test MOX Fuel Rods

    Oh, Jae Yong; Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Kim, Han Soo

    2009-01-15

    After Rod 3 and 6 (KAERI MOX) were irradiated in the Halden reactor, their post-irradiation examinations are being carried out now. In this report, PLUTON code was implemented to analyze Rod 3 and 6 (KAERI MOX). In the both rods, the ratio of a maximum burnup to an average burnup in the radial distribution was 1.3 and the contents of {sup 239}Pu tended to increase as the radial position approached the periphery of the fuel pellet. The detailed radial distribution of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, however, were somewhat different. To find the reason for this difference, the contents of Pu isotopes were investigated as the burnup increased. The content of {sup 239}Pu decreased with the burnup. The content of {sup 240}Pu increased with the burnup by the 20 GWd/tM but decreased over the 20 GWd/tM. The local burnup of Rod 3 is higher than that of Rod 6 due to the hole penetrated through the fuel rod. The content of {sup 239}Pu decreased more rapidly than that of {sup 240}Pu in the Rod 6 with the increased burnup. It resulted in a radial distribution of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu similar to Rod 3. The ratio of Xe to Kr is a parameter to find where the fissions occur in the nuclear fuel. In both Rod 3 and 6, it was 18.3 in the whole fuel rod cross section, which showed that the fissions occurred in the plutonium.

  2. Evaluating the effect placement capacitor and distributed photovoltaic generation for power system losses minimization in radial distribution system

    Rahman, Yuli Asmi; Manjang, Salama; Yusran, Ilham, Amil Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Power loss minimization have many advantagess to the distribution system radial among others reduction of power flow in feeder lines, freeing stress on feeder loading, deterrence of power procurement from the grid and also the cost of loss compensating instruments. This paper, presents capacitor and photovoltaic (PV) placement as alternative means to decrease power system losses. The paper aims to evaluate the best alternative for decreasing power system losses and improving voltage profile in the radial distribution system. To achieve the objectives of paper, they are used three cases tested by Electric Transient and Analysis Program (ETAP) simulation. Firstly, it performs simulation of placement capacitor. Secondly, simulated placement of PV. Lastly, it runs simulation of placement capacitor and PV simultaneously. The simulations were validated using the IEEE 34-bus test system. As a result, they proved that the installation of capacitor and PV integration simultaneously leading to voltage profile correction and power losses minimization significantly.

  3. To the calculation technique and interpretation of atom radial distribution curves in ternary alloy systems

    Dutchak, Ya.I.; Frenchko, V.S.; Voznyak, O.M.

    1975-01-01

    Certain models of the structure of three-component melts are considered: the ''quasi-eutectic'' one, the model of statistical distribution of atoms and the ''polystructural'' model. The analytical expressions are given for the area under the first maximum of the curve describing the radial distribution of atoms for certain versions of the ''polystructural'' model. On the example of In-Ga-Ga and Bi-Cd-Sn eutectic melts the possibility of estimating the nature of atomic ordering in three-component melts through checking the models under consideration has been demonstrated

  4. Stochastic Evaluation of Maximum Wind Installation in a Radial Distribution Network

    Chen, Peiyuan; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimization algorithm to find the maximum wind installation in a radial distribution network. The algorithm imposes a limit on the amount of wind energy that can be curtailed annually. The algorithm implements the wind turbine reactive power control and wind energy...... curtailment using sensitivity factors. The optimization is integrated with Monte Carlo simulation to account for the stochastic behavior of load demand and wind power generation. The proposed algorithm is tested on a real 20 kV Danish distribution system in Støvring. It is demonstrated that the algorithm...... executes reactive compensation and energy curtailment sequentially in an effective and efficient manner....

  5. Design and theoretical analysis of a sliding valve distribution radial piston pump

    Tong, Guo; Shengdun, Zhao; Yanghuiwen, Yu [Xian Jiaotong University, Xian (China); Peng, Shang [Xian Engineering University of Armed Police Force, Xian (China)

    2016-01-15

    A Sliding valve distribution radial piston pump (SVDRPP) is presented. In this pump, a new distribution method that uses sliding valves to distribute oil for the piston chambers is developed. With this design, the disadvantages brought by the distribution shaft and the check valves (traditional distribution mechanisms), such as the poor stress state of the shaft and the energy waste for opening the check valves, are expected to be eliminated. In addition, a method of using pressure oil to accomplish the returning stroke of the piston is also proposed, which could be used to replace the usage of springs along with their shortcomings. A pump with five pistons is designed as an example to elaborate the structure and the working principle of SVDRPP. Furthermore, the flow characteristics of SVDRPP are studied, and the formulas of the displacement, the average flow rate and the instantaneous flow rate are deduced.

  6. Design and theoretical analysis of a sliding valve distribution radial piston pump

    Tong, Guo; Shengdun, Zhao; Yanghuiwen, Yu; Peng, Shang

    2016-01-01

    A Sliding valve distribution radial piston pump (SVDRPP) is presented. In this pump, a new distribution method that uses sliding valves to distribute oil for the piston chambers is developed. With this design, the disadvantages brought by the distribution shaft and the check valves (traditional distribution mechanisms), such as the poor stress state of the shaft and the energy waste for opening the check valves, are expected to be eliminated. In addition, a method of using pressure oil to accomplish the returning stroke of the piston is also proposed, which could be used to replace the usage of springs along with their shortcomings. A pump with five pistons is designed as an example to elaborate the structure and the working principle of SVDRPP. Furthermore, the flow characteristics of SVDRPP are studied, and the formulas of the displacement, the average flow rate and the instantaneous flow rate are deduced

  7. Formulation and Analysis of an Approximate Expression for Voltage Sensitivity in Radial DC Distribution Systems

    Ho-Yong Jeong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Voltage is an important variable that reflects system conditions in DC distribution systems and affects many characteristics of a system. In a DC distribution system, there is a close relationship between the real power and the voltage magnitude, and this is one of major differences from the characteristics of AC distribution systems. One such relationship is expressed as the voltage sensitivity, and an understanding of voltage sensitivity is very useful to describe DC distribution systems. In this paper, a formulation for a novel approximate expression for the voltage sensitivity in a radial DC distribution system is presented. The approximate expression is derived from the power flow equation with some additional assumptions. The results of approximate expression is compared with an exact calculation, and relations between the voltage sensitivity and electrical quantities are analyzed analytically using both the exact form and the approximate voltage sensitivity equation.

  8. Incorporation of distributed generation and shunt capacitor in radial distribution system for techno-economic benefits

    Mukul Dixit

    2017-04-01

    The various costs such as purchase active power from grid, DG installation, capacitor installation, DG Operation and Maintenance (O&M are evaluated at two different load scenarios. In addition to that, technical and economical analyses are examined for various combinations of DGs and shunt capacitors. The proposed methodology is successfully demonstrated on 33-bus and 85-bus radial networks and the obtained numerical outcomes validate the suitability, importance and effectiveness to identify locations as well as sizes of DGs and shunt capacitors.

  9. Research on stress distribution regularity of cement sheaths of radial well based on ABAQUS

    Shi, Jihui; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Xiaolong; Xiao, Wen; Li, Menglai

    2017-12-01

    To ensure desirable outcome of hydraulic fracturing based on ultra-short radius radial systems, it is required to investigate the stress distribution regularity and stability of the cement sheath. On the basis of the theoretical model of the cement sheath stress distribution, a reservoir mechanical model was built using the finite element software, ABAQUS, according to the physical property of a certain oil reservoir of the Shengli oilfield. The stress distribution of the casing-cement-sheath-formation system under the practical condition was simulated, based on which analyses were conducted from multiple points of view. Results show that the stress on the internal interface of the cement sheath exceeds that on the external interface, and fluctuates with higher amplitudes, which means that the internal interface is the most failure-prone. The unevenness of the cement sheath stress distribution grows with the increasing horizontal principal stress ratio, and so does the variation magnitude. This indicates that higher horizontal principal stress ratios are unfavourable for the structural stability of the cement sheath. Both the wellbore quantity of the URRS and the physical property of the material can affect the cement sheath distribution. It is suggested to optimize the quantity of the radial wellbore and use cement with a lower elastic modulus and higher Poisson’s ratio. At last, the impact level of the above factor was analysed, with the help of the grey correlation analysis.

  10. Radial transport processes as a precursor to particle deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    van Thienen, P; Vreeburg, J H G; Blokker, E J M

    2011-02-01

    Various particle transport mechanisms play a role in the build-up of discoloration potential in drinking water distribution networks. In order to enhance our understanding of and ability to predict this build-up, it is essential to recognize and understand their role. Gravitational settling with drag has primarily been considered in this context. However, since flow in water distribution pipes is nearly always in the turbulent regime, turbulent processes should be considered also. In addition to these, single particle effects and forces may affect radial particle transport. In this work, we present an application of a previously published turbulent particle deposition theory to conditions relevant for drinking water distribution systems. We predict quantitatively under which conditions turbophoresis, including the virtual mass effect, the Saffman lift force, and the Magnus force may contribute significantly to sediment transport in radial direction and compare these results to experimental observations. The contribution of turbophoresis is mostly limited to large particles (>50 μm) in transport mains, and not expected to play a major role in distribution mains. The Saffman lift force may enhance this process to some degree. The Magnus force is not expected to play any significant role in drinking water distribution systems. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulative study on dose distribution of 103Pd stent in blood-vessel

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Xu Zhiyong; Sun Fuyin; Xu Shuhe; Ma Fengwu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dose distribution of 103 Pd stent in the blood-vessel. Methods: Simulative study on dose distribution of endovascular 103 Pd stent was conducted with thermoluminescence dosimeter. The vessel wall was substituted by muscle equivalent material in this simulative study. Results: When radioactivity of the study 103 Pd stent was 9.8 MBq the absorbed dose from the stent surface by muscle equivalent material was 9.8 Gy at 17 d (the half-life period of 103 Pd). The radioactivity of 103 Pd stent surface rapidly attenuated over the radial distance. 80% of the radioactivity at the area that was radially 0.4 mm apart from the stent surface was absorbed by the simulative blood-vessel wall. Conclusion: Endovascular 103 Pd stent does not exert significant injury on the surrounding organs or tissues

  12. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  13. Gas puff radiation performance as a function of radial mass distribution

    Coleman, Philip L.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Prasad, Rahul; Qi, Niansheng; Waisman, Eduardo; Failor, B.H.; Levine, J.S.; Sze, H.

    2002-01-01

    The basic concept of a z-pinch, that JxB forces implode a shell of mass, creating a hot dense plasma on-axis, is coming under closer scrutiny. Wire arrays may start with an initial cold mass in a near 'ideal' shell, but in fact they appear to develop complex radial mass distributions well before the final x-ray output. We consider here the situation for gas puff z-pinches. While the ideal of a gas 'shell' has been the nominal objective for many years, detailed measurements of gas flow show that nozzles used for plasma radiation sources (PRS) also have complex radial distributions. In particular, there are significant data showing that the best x-ray yield comes from the least shell-like distributions. Recent experiments on the Double Eagle generator with argon have further enhanced this view. For those tests with a double 'shell' nozzle, there was a factor of almost 4 increase in yield when the relative mass (outer:inner) in the two shells was changed from 2:1 to less than 1:1. We suggest the following explanation. A configuration with most of its mass at large radii is subject to severe disruption by instabilities during the implosion. A more continuous radial mass distribution with dρ/dr < 0 may mitigate instability development (via the 'snowplow stabilization' mechanism) and thus enhance the thermalization of the kinetic energy of the imploding mass. In addition, the appropriate balance of outer to inner mass maximizes the formation of a strong shock in the core of the pinch that heats the plasma and leads to x-ray emission

  14. A simplified treatment of radial enrichment distributions of LWR fuel assemblies in criticality calculations

    Hennebach, M.; Schnorrenberg, N.

    2008-01-01

    Criticality safety assessments are usually performed for fuel assembly models that are as generic as possible to encompass small modifications in geometry that have no impact on criticality. Dealing with different radial enrichment distributions for a fuel assembly type, which is especially important for BWR fuel, poses more of a challenge, since this characteristic is rather obviously influencing the neutronic behaviour of the system. Nevertheless, the large variability of enrichment distributions makes it very desirable and even necessary to treat them in a generalized way, both to keep the criticality safety assessment from becoming too unwieldy and to avoid having to extend it every time a new variation comes up. To be viable, such a generic treatment has to be demonstrably covering, i.e. lead to a higher effective neutron multiplication factor k eff than any of the radial enrichment distributions it represents. Averaging the enrichment evenly over the fuel rods of the assembly is a general and simple approach, and under reactor conditions, it is also a covering assumption: the graded distribution is introduced to achieve a linear power distribution, therefore reducing the enrichment of the better moderated rods at the edge of the assembly. With an even distribution of the average enrichment over all rods, these wellmoderated rods will cause increased fission rates at the assembly edges and a rise in k eff . Since the moderator conditions in a spent nuclear fuel cask differ strongly from a reactor even when considering optimal moderation, the proof that a uniform enrichment distribution is a covering assumption compared with detailed enrichment distributions has to be cask-specific. In this report, a method for making that proof is presented along with results for fuel assemblies from BWR reactors. All results are from three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations with the SCALE 5.1 code package [1], using a 44-group neutron crosssection library based on ENDF

  15. RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STARS, GAS AND DUST IN SINGS GALAXIES. I. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY AND MORPHOLOGY

    Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present ultraviolet through far-infrared (FIR) surface brightness profiles for the 75 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). The imagery used to measure the profiles includes Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV data, optical images from Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, near-IR data from Two Micron All Sky Survey, and mid- and FIR images from Spitzer. Along with the radial profiles, we also provide multi-wavelength asymptotic magnitudes and several nonparametric indicators of galaxy morphology: the concentration index (C 42 ), the asymmetry (A), the Gini coefficient (G), and the normalized second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M-bar 20 ). In this paper, the first of a series, we describe the technical aspects regarding the surface photometry, and present a basic analysis of the global and structural properties of the SINGS galaxies at different wavelengths. The homogeneity in the acquisition, reduction, and analysis of the results presented here makes these data ideal for multiple unanticipated studies on the radial distribution of the properties of stars, dust, and gas in galaxies. Our radial profiles show a wide range of morphologies and multiple components (bulges, exponential disks, inner and outer disk truncations, etc.) that vary not only from galaxy to galaxy but also with wavelength for a given object. In the optical and near-IR, the SINGS galaxies occupy the same regions in the C 42 -A-G-M-bar 20 parameter space as other normal galaxies in previous studies. However, they appear much less centrally concentrated, more asymmetric, and with larger values of G when viewed in the UV (due to star-forming clumps scattered across the disk) and in the mid-IR (due to the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8.0 μm and very hot dust at 24 μm). In an accompanying paper by Munoz-Mateos et al., we focus on the radial distribution of dust

  16. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    Neumann, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a computationally cheap, 1D approximation of the arising integral expressions as in the single-centered case is not possible anymore. We propose a simple, yet accurate model invoking standard molecule- and site-based RDFs to approximate the respective integral equation. The new open boundary force model is validated for ethane in different scenarios and shows very good agreement with data from periodic simulations. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  17. On the radial distribution of white dwarfs in the Galactic globular cluster omega Cen

    Calamida, A.; Corsi, C. E.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Koester, D.; Pulone, L.; Monelli, M.; Amico, P.; Buonanno, R.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Marchetti, E.; Nonino, M.; Romaniello, M.

    We present deep and accurate photometry (F435W, F625W, F658N) of the Galactic Globular Cluster omega Cen collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We identified ≈ 6,500 white dwarf (WD) candidates and compared their radial distribution with that of Main Sequence (MS) stars. We found a mild evidence that young WDs ( 0.1 ≲ t ≲ 0.6 Gyr) are less centrally concentrated when compared to MS stars in the magnitude range 25 < F435W < 26.5.

  18. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi (China); Lacey, Roy A. [Stony Brook University, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) spectra of identified particles (π{sup ±}, K{sup ±}, p, and anti p) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √(s{sub NN}) (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow p{sub T} range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide p{sub T} range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T{sub 0}) and radial flow velocity (β{sub T}) increase with the increase of √(s{sub NN}), which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T{sub 0} and β{sub T} in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass. (orig.)

  19. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2012-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  20. Constraints on radial migration in spiral galaxies - II. Angular momentum distribution and preferential migration

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2018-05-01

    The orbital angular momentum of individual stars in galactic discs can be permanently changed through torques from transient spiral patterns. Interactions at the corotation resonance dominate these changes and have the further property of conserving orbital circularity. We derived in an earlier paper an analytic criterion that an unperturbed stellar orbit must satisfy in order for such an interaction to occur, i.e. for it to be in a trapped orbit around corotation. We here use this criterion in an investigation of how the efficiency of induced radial migration for a population of disc stars varies with the angular momentum distribution of that population. We frame our results in terms of the velocity dispersion of the population, this being an easier observable than is the angular momentum distribution. Specifically, we investigate how the fraction of stars in trapped orbits at corotation varies with the velocity dispersion of the population, for a system with an assumed flat rotation curve. Our analytic results agree with the finding from simulations that radial migration is less effective in populations with `hotter' kinematics. We further quantify the dependence of this trapped fraction on the strength of the spiral pattern, finding a higher trapped fraction for higher amplitude perturbations.

  1. Heuristic for solving capacitor allocation problems in electric energy radial distribution networks

    Maria A. Biagio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the capacitor allocation problem in radial distribution networks is to minimize technical losses with consequential positive impacts on economic and environmental areas. The main objective is to define the size and location of the capacitors while considering load variations in a given horizon. The mathematical formulation for this planning problem is given by an integer nonlinear mathematical programming model that demands great computational effort to be solved. With the goal of solving this problem, this paper proposes a methodology that is composed of heuristics and Tabu Search procedures. The methodology presented explores network system characteristics of the network system reactive loads for identifying regions where procedures of local and intensive searches should be performed. A description of the proposed methodology and an analysis of computational results obtained which are based on several test systems including actual systems are presented. The solutions reached are as good as or better than those indicated by well referenced methodologies. The technique proposed is simple in its use and does not require calibrating an excessive amount of parameters, making it an attractive alternative for companies involved in the planning of radial distribution networks.

  2. The radial distribution of cosmic rays in the heliosphere at solar maximum

    McDonald, F. B.; Fujii, Z.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.

    2003-08-01

    To obtain a more detailed profile of the radial distribution of galactic (GCRs) and anomalous (ACRs) cosmic rays, a unique time in the 11-year solar activity cycle has been selected - that of solar maximum. At this time of minimum cosmic ray intensity a simple, straight-forward normalization technique has been found that allows the cosmic ray data from IMP 8, Pioneer 10 (P-10) and Voyagers 1 and 2 (V1, V2) to be combined for the solar maxima of cycles 21, 22 and 23. This combined distribution reveals a functional form of the radial gradient that varies as G 0/r with G 0 being constant and relatively small in the inner heliosphere. After a transition region between ˜10 and 20 AU, G 0 increases to a much larger value that remains constant between ˜25 and 82 AU. This implies that at solar maximum the changes that produce the 11-year modulation cycle are mainly occurring in the outer heliosphere between ˜15 AU and the termination shock. These observations are not inconsistent with the concept that Global Merged Interaction. regions (GMIRs) are the principal agent of modulation between solar minimum and solar maximum. There does not appear to be a significant change in the amount of heliosheath modulation occurring between the 1997 solar minimum and the cycle 23 solar maximum.

  3. Radial distributions of surface mass density and mass-to-luminosity ratio in spiral galaxies

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2018-03-01

    We present radial profiles of the surface mass density (SMD) in spiral galaxies directly calculated using rotation curves of two approximations of flat-disk (SMD-F) and spherical mass distribution (SMD-S). The SMDs are combined with surface brightness using photometric data to derive radial variations of the mass-to-luminosity ratio (ML). It is found that the ML generally has a central peak or a plateau, and decreases to a local minimum at R ˜ 0.1-0.2 h, where R is the radius and h is the scale radius of optical disk. The ML, then, increases rapidly until ˜0.5 h, and is followed by gradual rise till ˜2 h, remaining at around ˜2 [M_{⊙} L^{-1}_{⊙}] in the w1 band (infrared λ3.4 μm) and ˜ 10 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band (λ6200-7500 Å). Beyond this radius, the ML increases steeply with approaching the observed edges at R ˜ 5 h, attaining to as high values as ˜20 in w1 and ˜ 10^2 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band, which are indicative of dominant dark matter. The general properties of the ML distributions will be useful for constraining cosmological formation models of spiral galaxies.

  4. Calculation of dose distribution above contaminated soil

    Kuroda, Junya; Tenzou, Hideki; Manabe, Seiya; Iwakura, Yukiko

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between altitude and the distribution of the ambient dose rate in the air over soil decontamination area by using PHITS simulation code. The geometry configuration was 1000 m ×1000 m area and 1m in soil depth and 100m in altitude from the ground to simulate the area of residences or a school grounds. The contaminated region is supposed to be uniformly contaminated by Cs-137 γ radiation sources. The air dose distribution and space resolution was evaluated for flux of the gamma rays at each altitude, 1, 5, 10, and 20m. The effect of decontamination was calculated by defining sharpness S. S was the ratio of an average flux and a flux at the center of denomination area in each altitude. The suitable flight altitude of the drone is found to be less than 15m above a residence and 31m above a school grounds to confirm the decontamination effect. The calculation results can be a help to determine a flight planning of a drone to minimize the clash risk.

  5. Feature Extraction Method for High Impedance Ground Fault Localization in Radial Power Distribution Networks

    Jensen, Kåre Jean; Munk, Steen M.; Sørensen, John Aasted

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to the localization of high impedance ground faults in compensated radial power distribution networks is presented. The total size of such networks is often very large and a major part of the monitoring of these is carried out manually. The increasing complexity of industrial...... of three phase voltages and currents. The method consists of a feature extractor, based on a grid description of the feeder by impulse responses, and a neural network for ground fault localization. The emphasis of this paper is the feature extractor, and the detection of the time instance of a ground fault...... processes and communication systems lead to demands for improved monitoring of power distribution networks so that the quality of power delivery can be kept at a controlled level. The ground fault localization method for each feeder in a network is based on the centralized frequency broadband measurement...

  6. A Novel Analytical Technique for Optimal Allocation of Capacitors in Radial Distribution Systems

    Sarfaraz Nawaz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel analytical technique is proposed to determine the optimal size and location of shunt capacitor units in radial distribution systems. An objective function is formulated to reduce real power loss, to improve the voltage profile and to increase annual cost savings. A new constant, the Loss Sensitivity Constant (LSC, is proposed here. The value of LSC decides the location and size of candidate buses. The technique is demonstrated on an IEEE-33 bus system at different load levels and the 130-bus distribution system of Jamawa Ramgarh village, Jaipur city. The obtained results are compared with the latest optimization techniques to show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed technique.

  7. The analysis of annual dose distributions for radiation workers

    Mill, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    The system of dose limitation recommended by the ICRP includes the requirement that no worker shall exceed the current dose limit of 50mSv/a. Continuous exposure at this limit corresponds to an annual death rate comparable with 'high risk' industries if all workers are continuously exposed at the dose limit. In practice, there is a distribution of doses with an arithmetic mean lower than the dose limit. In its 1977 report UNSCEAR defined a reference dose distribution for the purposes of comparison. However, this two parameter distribution does not show the departure from log-normality normally observed for actual distributions at doses which are a significant proportion of the annual limit. In this report an alternative model is suggested, based on a three parameter log-normal distribution. The third parameter is an ''effective dose limit'' and such a model fits very well the departure from log-normality observed in actual dose distributions. (author)

  8. Measurement of distribution coefficients using a radial injection dual-tracer test

    Pickens, J.F.; Jackson, R.E.; Inch, K.J.; Merritt, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    The dispersive and adsorptive properties of a sandy aquifer were evaluated by using a radial injection dual-tracer test with 131 I as the nonreactive tracer and 85 Sr as the reactive tracer. The tracer migration was monitored by using multilevel point-sampling devices located at various radial distances and depths. Nonequilibrium physical and chemical adsorption effects for 85 Sr were treated as a spreading or dispersion mechanism in the breakthrough curve analysis. The resulting effective dispersivity values for 85 Sr were typically a factor of 2 to 5 larger than those obtained for 131 I. The distribution coefficient (K/sub d//sup Sr/) values obtained from analysis of the breakthrough curves at three depths and two radial distances ranged from 2.6 to 4.5 ml/g. These compare favorably with values obtained by separation of fluids from solids in sediment cores, by batch experiments on core sediments and by analysis of a 25-year-old radioactive waste plume in another part of the same aquifer. Correlations of adsorbed 85 Sr radioactivity with grain size fractions demonstrated preferential adsorption to the coarsest fraction and to the finest fraction. The relative amounts of electrostatically and specifically adsorbed 85 Sr on the aquifer sediments were determined with desorption experiments on core sediments using selective chemical extractants. The withdrawal phase breakthrough curves for the well, obtained immediately following the injection phase, showed essentially full tracer recoveries for both 131 I and 85 Sr. Relatively slow desorption of 85 Sr provided further indication of the nonequilibrium nature of the adsorption-desorption phenomena

  9. Small disturbances stability analysis applied in a radial distribution system with distributed generation units; Analise de estabilidade a pequenos disturbios aplicada em um sistema de distribuicao radial com unidades de geracao distribuida

    Dorca, Daniel Azevedo; Camacho, Jose Roberto [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Curso de Mestrado em Engenharia Eletrica

    2008-07-01

    This work investigates the small-disturbance stability of a 30 bus radial distribution system with distributed generation units. This work is realized through the time domain simulations and through the eigenvalue analysis and participation factors. The eigenvalue analysis show that is possible to predict a possible system instability face to a disturbance. The development of this work was stimulated by the increasing of the distributed generation units in the distribution networks. (author)

  10. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    Sahoo, N.C. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Prasad, K. [Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2006-11-15

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration. (author)

  11. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    Sahoo, N.C.; Prasad, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration

  12. A Raikov-Type Theorem for Radial Poisson Distributions: A Proof of Kingman's Conjecture

    Van Nguyen, Thu

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper we prove the following conjecture in Kingman, J.F.C., Random walks with spherical symmetry, Acta Math.,109, (1963), 11-53. concerning a famous Raikov's theorem of decomposition of Poisson random variables: "If a radial sum of two independent random variables X and Y is radial Poisson, then each of them must be radial Poisson."

  13. Radial and azimuthal distribution of Io's oxygen neutral cloud observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    Koga, R.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Yoneda, M.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kimura, T.; Smith, H. T.

    2017-12-01

    We report the spatial distributions of oxygen neural cloud surrounding Jupiter's moon Io and along Io's orbit observed by the HISAKI satellite. Atomic oxygen and sulfur in Io's atmosphere escape from the exobase and move to corona ( 5.8 Io radii) mainly due to atmospheric sputtering. Io plasma torus is formed by ionization of these atoms by electron impact and charge exchange processes. It is essential to examine the dominant source of Io plasma torus, particularly in the vicinity of Io (5.8 Io radii; extended neutral clouds). The spatial distribution of oxygen and sulfur neutral clouds is important to understand the source. The extreme ultraviolet spectrometer called EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) installed on the Hisaki satellite observed Io plasma torus continuously in 2014-2015, and we carried out the monitoring of the distribution of atomic oxygen emission at 130.4 nm. The emission averaged over the distance range of 4.5-6.5 Jovian radii on the dawn and dusk sides strongly depends on the Io phase angle (IPA), and has a emission peak between IPA of 60-90 degrees on the dawn side, and between 240-270 degrees on the dusk side, respectively. It also shows the asymmetry with respect to Io's position: the intensity averaged for IPA 60-90 degrees (13.3 Rayleighs (R)) is 1.2 times greater than that for IPA 90-120 degrees (11.1 R) on the dawn side. The similar tendency is found on the dusk side. Weak atomic oxygen emission (4 R) uniformly distributes in every IPA. We also examined the radial distribution of the oxygen neutral cloud during the same period and found the emission peak near Io's orbit with decreasing the intensity toward 8.0 Jupiter radii. The results show the high density component of the oxygen neutral cloud is concentrated around Io and extends mainly toward leading side of Io. In addition, the low density neutrals uniformly exist along Io's orbit. Both components extend radially outward up to 8 Jovian radii with

  14. Effects of Acids, Bases, and Heteroatoms on Proximal Radial Distribution Functions for Proteins.

    Nguyen, Bao Linh; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-04-14

    The proximal distribution of water around proteins is a convenient method of quantifying solvation. We consider the effect of charged and sulfur-containing amino acid side-chain atoms on the proximal radial distribution function (pRDF) of water molecules around proteins using side-chain analogs. The pRDF represents the relative probability of finding any solvent molecule at a distance from the closest or surface perpendicular protein atom. We consider the near-neighbor distribution. Previously, pRDFs were shown to be universal descriptors of the water molecules around C, N, and O atom types across hundreds of globular proteins. Using averaged pRDFs, a solvent density around any globular protein can be reconstructed with controllable relative error. Solvent reconstruction using the additional information from charged amino acid side-chain atom types from both small models and protein averages reveals the effects of surface charge distribution on solvent density and improves the reconstruction errors relative to simulation. Solvent density reconstructions from the small-molecule models are as effective and less computationally demanding than reconstructions from full macromolecular models in reproducing preferred hydration sites and solvent density fluctuations.

  15. Controlling Voltage Levels of Distribution Network-Radial Feeder after Connecting Wind Turbines to the Network

    Muhammad Al Badri

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several factors in power generation and supply need to be taken into account such as shortages of energy supply, system stability, and energy quality and system disruption due to network losses, industrial development and population expansion. The addition of wind turbines to the distribution network is of great benefit in providing additional power and solving these problems, but this addition is accompanied by the problem of low voltage network. This research found optimal solutions to the problem of low voltage distribution network after connecting wind turbines. The main idea of this paper is to optimize the low-voltage problem as a result of connecting the wind turbines to the "far end" of the radial feeder for a distribution network and to obtain a voltage level within an acceptable and stable range. The problem of low voltage solved by using the load-drop compensation, capacitor-bank and “doubly-fed” induction generators. The results of this study were based on the operation of the entire design of the simulation system which would be compatible with the reality of the energy flow of all network components by using the PSCAD program. The present analysis program revealed an optimum solution for the low voltage profile of the distribution network after connecting the wind turbine.

  16. Analysis of the radial distribution curves of partially ordered condensed carbon films

    Palatnik, L.S.; Derevyanchenko, A.S.; Nechitajlo, A.A.; Stetsenko, A.N.; Gorbenko, N.I.

    1977-01-01

    The Fourier analysis of the electron scattering curves has been carried out to determine the short-range order structure of carbon condensates. The intensity curves for carbon films condensed in a approximately 10 -6 Torr vacuum upon a substrate heated up to 600 deg C were obtained by diffraction techniques with filtration of the inelastic scattered electron background. The radial distribution curve errors were analyzed and quantified with the aid of a computer to determine the short-range order of the condensed carbon. It has been shown that carbon films consist of regions measuring approximately 20 A formed by parallelly packed graphite nets with azimuthal orientation different from that in ideal graphite crystals

  17. Radial Distribution of the Nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge Current in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Malashin, M. V.; Moshkunov, S. I.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Shershunova, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental results on the radial distribution of the nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) current in flat millimeter air gaps under atmospheric pressure and natural humidity of 40-60% at a voltage rise rate at the electrodes of 250 V/ns are presented. The time delay of the appearance of discharge currents was observed to increase from the center to the periphery of the air gap at discharge gap heights above 3 mm, which correlated with the appearance of constricted channels against the background of the volume DBD plasma. Based on the criterion of the avalanche-streamer transition, it is found out that the development of a nanosecond DBD in air gaps of 1-3 mm occurs by the streamer mechanism.

  18. The radial distribution of the neutron field in the core of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Huy, Ngo Quang [Centre for Nuclear Technique Application, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Thong, Ha Van; Long, Vu Hai; Khang, Ngo Phu; Binh, Nguyen Duc; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Vinh, Le Vinh [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    Determination of the radial distribution of the thermal neutron field in the core of the Dalat reactor is done by the Cu foil activation method. The measured data are fitted by the least square method to determine several physical parameters of the reactor, as follows: 1. Buckling B{sub r}{sup 2}=(84.6{+-}5.5)10{sup -4}/cm{sup 2}. 2. The effective radius R{sub eff}=(27.6{+-}1.0)cm. 3. The extrapolation distance {lambda}=(8.7{+-}1.0)cm. 4. The unequal coefficient of the effective multiplication K{sub r}=1.77{+-}0.11. (author). 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Field Emission and Radial Distribution Function Studies of Fractal-like Amorphous Carbon Nanotips

    Lebrón-Colón M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The short-range order of individual fractal-like amorphous carbon nanotips was investigated by means of energy-filtered electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope (TEM. The nanostructures were grown in porous silicon substrates in situ within the TEM by the electron beam-induced deposition method. The structure factorS(k and the reduced radial distribution functionG(r were calculated. From these calculations a bond angle of 124° was obtained which suggests a distorted graphitic structure. Field emission was obtained from individual nanostructures using two micromanipulators with sub-nanometer positioning resolution. A theoretical three-stage model that accounts for the geometry of the nanostructures provides a value for the field enhancement factor close to the one obtained experimentally from the Fowler-Nordheim law.

  20. Calculation of pellet radial power distributions with a Monte Carlo burnup code

    Suzuki, Motomu; Yamamoto, Toru; Nakata, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) has been working on an irradiation test program of high-burnup MOX fuel at Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). MOX and UO 2 fuel rods had been irradiated up to about 64 GWd/t (rod avg.) as a Japanese utilities research program (1st phase), and using those fuel rods, in-situ measurement of fuel pellet centerline temperature was done during the 2nd phase of irradiation as the JNES test program. As part of analysis of the temperature data, power distributions in a pellet radial direction were analyzed by using a Monte Carlo burnup code MVP-BURN. In addition, the calculated results of deterministic burnup codes SRAC and PLUTON for the same problem were compared with those of MVP-BURN to evaluate their accuracy. Burnup calculations with an assembly model were performed by using MVP-BURN and those with a pin cell model by using SRAC and PLUTON. The cell pitch and, therefore, fuel to moderator ratio in the pin cell calculation was determined from the comparison of neutron energy spectra with those of MVP-BURN. The fuel pellet radial distributions of burnup and fission reaction rates at the end of the 1st phase irradiation were compared between the three codes. The MVP-BURN calculation results show a large peaking in the burnup and fission rates in the pellet outer region for the UO 2 and MOX pellets. The SRAC calculations give very close results to those of the MVP-BURN. On the other hand, the PLUTON calculations show larger burnup for the UO 2 and lower burnup for the MOX pellets in the pellet outer region than those of MVP-BURN, which lead to larger fission rates for the UO 2 and lower fission rates for the MOX pellets, respectively. (author)

  1. Dose as a function of radial distance from a 930 MeV 4He ion beam

    Varma, M.N.; Paretzke, H.; Baum, J.W.; Lyman, J.T.; Howard, J.

    1975-01-01

    A unique mesh wall ionization chamber (approximating a wall-less ionization chamber) was used to measure dose as a function of radial distance from a 930 MeV 4 He ion beam in air. Measurements were made at distances from about 10 to 40 cm from the ion path. This represents simulated distances of approximately 102 to 404 μm in tissue having a density of 1 g/cm 3 . Experimental values are compared with theoretical calculations, and probable causes of differences found are discussed. (auth)

  2. A Monte Carlo program converting activity distribution to absorbed dose distributions in a radionuclide treatment planning system

    Tagesson, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    In systemic radiation therapy, the absorbed dose distribution must be calculated from the individual activity distribution. A computer code has been developed for the conversion of an arbitrary activity distribution to a 3-D absorbed dose distribution. The activity distribution can be described either analytically or as a voxel based distribution, which comes from a SPECT acquisition. Decay points are sampled according to the activity map, and particles (photons and electrons) from the decay are followed through the tissue until they either escape the patient or drop below a cut off energy. To verify the calculated results, the mathematically defined MIRD phantom and unity density spheres have been included in the code. Also other published dosimetry data were used for verification. Absorbed fraction and S-values were calculated. A comparison with simulated data from the code with MIRD data shows good agreement. The S values are within 10-20% of published MIRD S values for most organs. Absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in spheres (masses between 1 g and 200 kg) are within 10-15% of those published. Radial absorbed dose distributions in a necrotic tumor show good agreement with published data. The application of the code in a radionuclide therapy dose planning system, based on quantitative SPECT, is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    Jamal, M H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear.

  4. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    Jamal, M. H.; Khamis, I.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear. (author)

  5. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  6. SU-E-T-259: Particle Swarm Optimization in Radial Dose Function Fitting for a Novel Iodine-125 Seed

    Wu, X [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Al (United States); Duan, J; Popple, R; Huang, M; Shen, S; Brezovich, I [University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Cardan, R [UAB University of Alabama, Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Benhabib, S [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the coefficients of bi- and tri-exponential functions for the best fit of radial dose functions of the new iodine brachytherapy source: Iodine-125 Seed AgX-100. Methods: The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method was used to search for the coefficients of the biand tri-exponential functions that yield the best fit to data published for a few selected radial distances from the source. The coefficients were encoded into particles, and these particles move through the search space by following their local and global best-known positions. In each generation, particles were evaluated through their fitness function and their positions were changed through their velocities. This procedure was repeated until the convergence criterion was met or the maximum generation was reached. All best particles were found in less than 1,500 generations. Results: For the I-125 seed AgX-100 considered as a point source, the maximum deviation from the published data is less than 2.9% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.2% for tri-exponential fitting function. For its line source, the maximum deviation is less than 1.1% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.08% for tri-exponential fitting function. Conclusion: PSO is a powerful method in searching coefficients for bi-exponential and tri-exponential fitting functions. The bi- and tri-exponential models of Iodine-125 seed AgX-100 point and line sources obtained with PSO optimization provide accurate analytical forms of the radial dose function. The tri-exponential fitting function is more accurate than the bi-exponential function.

  7. Energies and radial distributions of Bs mesons - the effect of hypercubic blocking

    Koponen, Jonna

    2006-12-01

    This is a follow-up to our earlier work for the energies and the charge (vector) and matter (scalar) distributions for S-wave states in a heavy-light meson, where the heavy quark is static and the light quark has a mass about that of the strange quark. We study the radial distributions of higher angular momentum states, namely P- and D-wave states, using a "fuzzy" static quark. A new improvement is the use of hypercubic blocking in the time direction, which effectively constrains the heavy quark to move within a 2a hypercube (a is the lattice spacing). The calculation is carried out with dynamical fermions on a 163 × 32 lattice with a ≈ 0.10 fm generated using the non-perturbatively improved clover action. The configurations were gener- ated by the UKQCD Collaboration using lattice action parameters β = 5.2, c SW = 2.0171 and κ = 0.1350. In nature the closest equivalent of this heavy-light system is the Bs meson. Attempts are now being made to understand these results in terms of the Dirac equation.

  8. Determining profile of dose distribution for PD-103 brachytherapy source

    Berkay, Camgoz; Mehmet, N. Kumru; Gultekin, Yegin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Brachytherapy is a particular radiotherapy for cancer treatments. By destructing cancerous cells using radiation, the treatment proceeded. When alive tissues are subject it is hazardous to study experimental. For brachytherapy sources generally are studied as theoretical using computer simulation. General concept of the treatment is to locate the radioactive source into cancerous area of related tissue. In computer studies Monte Carlo mathematical method that is in principle based on random number generations, is used. Palladium radioisotope is LDR (Low radiation Dose Rate) source. Main radioactive material was coated with titanium cylinder with 3mm length, 0.25 mm radius. There are two parts of Pd-103 in the titanium cylinder. It is impossible to investigate differential effects come from two part as experimental. Because the source dimensions are small compared with measurement distances. So there is only simulation method. In dosimetric studies it is aimed to determine absorbed dose distribution in tissue as radial and angular. In nuclear physics it is obligation to use computer based methods for researchers. Radiation studies have hazards for scientist and people interacted with radiation. When hazard exceed over recommended limits or physical conditions are not suitable (long work time, non economical experiments, inadequate sensitivity of materials etc.) it is unavoidable to simulate works and experiments before practices of scientific methods in life. In medical area, usage of radiation is required computational work for cancer treatments. Some computational studies are routine in clinics and other studies have scientific development purposes. In brachytherapy studies there are significant differences between experimental measurements and theoretical (computer based) output data. Errors of data taken from experimental studies are larger than simulation values errors. In design of a new brachytherapy source it is important to consider detailed

  9. Analysis of the performance of fuel cells PWR with a single enrichment and radial distribution of enrichments

    Vargas, S.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Del Valle, E.; Xolocostli M, J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the design of fuel assemblies is the efficient use of uranium achieving burnt homogeneous of the fuel rods as well as the burnt maximum possible of the same ones to the unload. In the case of the assemblies type PWR has been decided actually for fuel assemblies with a single radial enrichment. The present work has like effect to show the because of this decision, reason why a comparison of the neutronic performance of two fuel cells takes place with the same enrichment average but one of them with radial distribution of enrichment and the other with a single enrichment equal to the average. The results shown in the present study of the behavior of the neutron flow as well as the power distribution through of assembly sustain the because of a single radial enrichment. (Author)

  10. Relations between the matter density and layer thickness radial distributions in spherically symmetric objects: for high energy nuclear physics and astrophysics use

    Zielinska, M.; Zawislawski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Strugalski, Z.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown how it is possible to transform known data on radial distribution of the matter layer thickness to unknown radial distribution of the matter density inside spherically symmetric objects. Appropriate formulas and testing of them are presented. An application of the method for the radial distribution of the matter density inside a target nucleus is discussed as an example. 2 refs.; 2 figs

  11. Simulation of magnetic induction distribution in a coaxial linear motor with axial and radial direction of permanent magnets magnetization

    G.M. Golenkov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of computer simulation and experimental study of magnetic induction distribution in a coaxial linear motor air gap throughout the length of the runner active part at different heights of the air gap between the runner and the inductor magnetic core for motors with axial and radial direction of the permanent magnets magnetization.

  12. An accurate expression for radial distribution function of the Lennard-Jones fluid

    Morsali, Ali; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Ali Mansoori, G.; Abbaspour, Mohsen

    2005-01-01

    A simple and accurate expression for radial distribution function (RDF) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is presented. The expression explicitly states the RDF as a continuous function of reduced interparticle distance, temperature, and density. It satisfies the limiting conditions of zero density and infinite distance imposed by statistical thermodynamics. The distance dependence of this expression is expressed by an equation which contains 11 adjustable parameters. These parameters are fitted to 353 RDF data, obtained by molecular dynamics calculations, and then expressed as functions of reduced distance, temperature and density. This expression, having a total of 65 constants, reproduces the RDF data with an average root-mean-squared deviation of 0.0152 for the range of state variables of 0.5= * = * = * =ρσ 3 are reduced temperature and density, respectively). The expression predicts the pressure and the internal energy of the Lennard-Jones fluid with an uncertainty that is comparable to that obtained directly from the molecular dynamics simulations

  13. Analytical approximation of the nanoscale dose distribution in an irradiated medium with an embedded nanoparticle

    Chernov, V; Barboza-Flores, M; Chernov, G

    2012-01-01

    In this work we propose an analytical approach describing the dose distribution around a NP embedded in a medium. The approach describes the following sequence of events: The homogenous and isotropic creation of secondary electrons under incident photon fluence; travel of the created electrons toward the NP surface and their escaping from the NP with different energies and angles; deposition of energy in surrounding medium. The radial dose distribution around the NP was found as the average energy deposited by the escaped electrons in a spherical shell at a distance r from the NP center normalized to its mass. The continuous slowing down approximation and the assumption that created electrons travel in a straight-line path were used. As result, a set of analytical expressions describing the dose distribution was derived. The expressions were applied to the calculation of the dose distribution around spherical gold NPs of different size embedded in water. It was shown that the dose distribution is close to the 1/r 2 dependence and practically independent of the NP radius.

  14. Radiation dose distributions close to the shower axis calculated for high energy electron initiated electromagnetic showers in air

    Geer, S.; Gsponer, A.

    1983-01-01

    Absorbed radiation doses produced by 500, 1,000 and 10,000 MeV electron initiated electromagnetic showers in air have been calculated using a Monte Carlo program. The radial distributions of the absorbed dose near to the shower axis are found to be significantly narrower than predicted by simple analytical shower theory. For a 500 MeV, 10 kA, 100 ns electron beam pulse, the region in which the total dose is in excess of 1 krad and the dose rate in excess of 10 10 rad/s is a cigar-shaped envelope of radius 1 m and length 200 m. (orig.) [de

  15. Radial dose functions for 103Pd, 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir brachytherapy sources: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study

    Mainegra, E.

    2000-01-01

    Radial dose functions g(r) in water around 103 Pd, 125 I, 169 Yb and 192 Ir brachytherapy sources were estimated by means of the EGS4 simulation system and extensively compared with experimental as well as with theoretical results. The DLC-136/PHOTX cross section library, water molecular form factors, bound Compton scattering and Doppler broadening of the Compton-scattered photon energy were considered in the calculations. Use of the point source approach produces reasonably accurate values of the radial dose function only at distances beyond 0.5 cm for 103 Pd sources. It is shown that binding corrections for Compton scattering have a negligible effect on radial dose function for 169 Yb and 192 Ir seeds and for 103 Pd seeds under 5.0 cm from the source centre and for the 125 I seed model 6702 under 8.0 cm. Beyond those limits there is an increasing influence of binding corrections on radial dose function for 103 Pd and 125 I sources. Results in solid water medium underestimate radial dose function for low-energy sources by as much as 6% for 103 Pd and 2.5% for 125 I already at 2 cm from source centre resulting in a direct underestimation of absolute dose rate values. It was found necessary to consider medium boundaries when comparing results for the radial dose function of 169 Yb and 192 Ir sources to avoid discrepancies due to the backscattering contribution in the phantom medium. Values of g(r) for all source types studied are presented. Uncertainties lie under 1% within one standard deviation. (author)

  16. THE STRESS STATE OF THE RADIALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEMISPHERICAL SHELL UNDER LOCALLY DISTRIBUTED VERTICAL LOAD

    Andreev Vladimir Igorevich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: one of the promising trends in the development of structural mechanics is the development of methods for solving problems in the theory of elasticity for bodies with continuous inhomogeneity of any deformation characteristics: these methods make it possible to use the strength of the material most fully. In this paper, we consider the two-dimensional problem for the case when a vertical, locally distributed load acts on the hemisphere and the inhomogeneity is caused by the influence of the temperature field. Research objectives: derive governing system of equations in spherical coordinates for determination of the stress state of the radially inhomogeneous hemispherical shell under locally distributed vertical load. Materials and methods: as a mechanical model, we chose a thick-walled reinforced concrete shell (hemisphere with inner and outer radii a and b, respectively, b > a. The shell’s parameters are a = 3.3 m, b = 4.5 m, Poisson’s ratio ν = 0.16; the load parameters are f = 10MPa - vertical localized load distributed over the outer face, θ0 = 30°, temperature on the internal surface of the shell Ta = 500 °C, temperature on the external surface of the shell Tb = 0 °C. The resulting boundary-value problem (a system of differential equations with variable coefficients is solved using the Maple software package. Results: maximal compressive stresses σr with allowance for material inhomogeneity are reduced by 10 % compared with the case when the inhomogeneity is ignored. But it is not so important compared with a 3-fold decrease in the tensile stress σθ on the inner surface and a 2-fold reduction in the tensile stress σθ on the outer surface of the hemisphere as concretes generally have a tensile strength substantially smaller than the compressive strength. Conclusions: the method presented in this article makes it possible to reduce the deformation characteristics of the material, i.e. it leads to a reduction in stresses

  17. Radial distribution of the contributions to band broadening of a silica-based semi-preparative monolithic column.

    Abia, Jude A; Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-04-01

    Using an on-column local electrochemical microdetector operated in the amperometric mode, band elution profiles were recorded at different radial locations at the exit of a 10 mm id, 100 mm long silica-based monolithic column. HETP plots were then acquired at each of these locations, and all these results were fitted to the Knox equation. This provided a spatial distribution of the values of the eddy diffusion (A), the molecular diffusion (B), and the resistance to the kinetics of mass transfer (C) terms. Results obtained indicate that the wall region yields higher A values and smaller C values than the central core region. Significant radial fluctuations of these contributions to band broadening occur throughout the exit column cross-section. This phenomenon is due to the structural radial heterogeneity of the column.

  18. Optimized Dose Distribution of Gammamed Plus Vaginal Cylinders

    Supe, Sanjay S.; Bijina, T.K.; Varatharaj, C.; Shwetha, B.; Arunkumar, T.; Sathiyan, S.; Ganesh, K.M.; Ravikumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy arising in the female genital tract. Intracavitary vaginal cuff irradiation may be given alone or with external beam irradiation in patients determined to be at risk for locoregional recurrence. Vaginal cylinders are often used to deliver a brachytherapy dose to the vaginal apex and upper vagina or the entire vaginal surface in the management of postoperative endometrial cancer or cervical cancer. The dose distributions of HDR vaginal cylinders must be evaluated carefully, so that clinical experiences with LDR techniques can be used in guiding optimal use of HDR techniques. The aim of this study was to optimize dose distribution for Gammamed plus vaginal cylinders. Placement of dose optimization points was evaluated for its effect on optimized dose distributions. Two different dose optimization point models were used in this study, namely non-apex (dose optimization points only on periphery of cylinder) and apex (dose optimization points on periphery and along the curvature including the apex points). Thirteen dwell positions were used for the HDR dosimetry to obtain a 6-cm active length. Thus 13 optimization points were available at the periphery of the cylinder. The coordinates of the points along the curvature depended on the cylinder diameters and were chosen for each cylinder so that four points were distributed evenly in the curvature portion of the cylinder. Diameter of vaginal cylinders varied from 2.0 to 4.0 cm. Iterative optimization routine was utilized for all optimizations. The effects of various optimization routines (iterative, geometric, equal times) was studied for the 3.0-cm diameter vaginal cylinder. The effect of source travel step size on the optimized dose distributions for vaginal cylinders was also evaluated. All optimizations in this study were carried for dose of 6 Gy at dose optimization points. For both non-apex and apex models of vaginal cylinders, doses for apex point and three dome

  19. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion filtering of Monte Carlo dose distributions

    Miao Binhe; Jeraj, Robert; Bao Shanglian; Mackie, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for radiotherapy dose calculations, if used correctly. However, any Monte Carlo dose calculation is burdened with statistical noise. In this paper, denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions with a three-dimensional adaptive anisotropic diffusion method was investigated. The standard anisotropic diffusion method was extended by changing the filtering parameters adaptively according to the local statistical noise. Smoothing of dose distributions with different noise levels in an inhomogeneous phantom, a conventional and an IMRT treatment case is shown. The resultant dose distributions were analysed using several evaluating criteria. It is shown that the adaptive anisotropic diffusion method can reduce statistical noise significantly (two to five times, corresponding to the reduction of simulation time by a factor of up to 20), while preserving important gradients of the dose distribution well. The choice of free parameters of the method was found to be fairly robust

  20. Dose equivalent distributions in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility

    Allen, B.J.; Bailey, G.M.; McGregor, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The incident neutron dose equivalent in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility is measured by a calibrated remmeter. Dose equivalent rates and distributions are calculated by Monte Carlo techniques which take account of the secondary neutron flux from the collimator. Experiment and calculation are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The effective dose equivalent per exposure is determined by weighting organ doses, and the potential detriment per exposure is calculated from ICRP risk factors

  1. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Radial distribution of power starting from the reactivity using nodal schemes of second and third order

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G.; Valle G, E. del

    2003-01-01

    In this work two nodal schemes of finite element are presented, one of second and the other of third order of accurate that allow to determine the radial distribution of power starting from the corresponding reactivities.The schemes here developed were obtained taking as starting point the equation developed by Driscoll et al, the one which is based on the diffusion approach of 1-1/2 energy groups. This equation relates the power fraction of an assemble with their reactivity and with the power fractions and reactivities of the assemblies that its surround it. Driscoll and collaborators they solve in form approximate such equation supposing that the reactivity of each assemble it is but a lineal function of the burnt one of the fuel. The spatial approach carries out it with the classic technique of finite differences centered in mesh. Nevertheless that the algebraic system to which its arrive it can be solved without more considerations introduce some additional suppositions and adjustment parameters that it allows them to predict results comparable to those contributed by three dimensions analysis and this way to reduce the one obtained error when its compare their results with those of a production code like CASMO. Also in the two schemes that here are presented the same approaches of Driscoll were used being obtained errors of the one 10% and of 5% for the second schemes and third order respectively for a test case that it was built starting from data of the Cycle 1 of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant. These errors its were obtained when comparing with a computer program based on the matrix response method. It is sought to have this way a quick and efficient tool for the multicycle analysis in the fuel management. However, this model presents problems in the appropriate prediction of the average burnt of the nucleus and of the burnt one by lot. (Author)

  3. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units-Radial distribution function histogramming

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  4. Effects of radial distribution of entropy diffusivity on critical modes of anelastic thermal convection in rotating spherical shells

    Sasaki, Youhei; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Yamada, Michio

    2018-03-01

    Linear stability analysis of anelastic thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell with entropy diffusivities varying in the radial direction is performed. The structures of critical convection are obtained in the cases of four different radial distributions of entropy diffusivity; (1) κ is constant, (2) κT0 is constant, (3) κρ0 is constant, and (4) κρ0T0 is constant, where κ is the entropy diffusivity, T0 is the temperature of basic state, and ρ0 is the density of basic state, respectively. The ratio of inner and outer radii, the Prandtl number, the polytropic index, and the density ratio are 0.35, 1, 2, and 5, respectively. The value of the Ekman number is 10-3 or 10-5 . In the case of (1), where the setup is same as that of the anelastic dynamo benchmark (Jones et al., 2011), the structure of critical convection is concentrated near the outer boundary of the spherical shell around the equator. However, in the cases of (2), (3) and (4), the convection columns attach the inner boundary of the spherical shell. A rapidly rotating annulus model for anelastic systems is developed by assuming that convection structure is uniform in the axial direction taking into account the strong effect of Coriolis force. The annulus model well explains the characteristics of critical convection obtained numerically, such as critical azimuthal wavenumber, frequency, Rayleigh number, and the cylindrically radial location of convection columns. The radial distribution of entropy diffusivity, or more generally, diffusion properties in the entropy equation, is important for convection structure, because it determines the distribution of radial basic entropy gradient which is crucial for location of convection columns.

  5. Bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along pipe wall in chlorinated drinking water distribution system of East China.

    Liu, Jingqing; Ren, Hongxing; Ye, Xianbei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Hu, Baolan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms in the pipe wall may lead to water quality deterioration and biological instability in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs). In this study, bacterial community radial-spatial distribution in biofilms along the pipe wall in a chlorinated DWDS of East China was investigated. Three pipes of large diameter (300, 600, and 600 mm) were sampled in this DWDS, including a ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP) with pipe age of 11 years and two gray cast iron pipes (GCIP) with pipe ages of 17 and 19 years, and biofilms in the upper, middle, and lower parts of each pipe wall were collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the biofilm density and total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) contents increased gradually from the top to the bottom along the pipe wall. Microorganisms were concentrated in the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, together accounting for more than 80 % of the total biomass in the biofilms. The bacterial communities in biofilms were significantly different in different areas of the pipe wall and had no strong interaction. Compared with the upper and lower parts of the pipe wall, the bacterial community in the middle of the pipe wall was distributed evenly and had the highest diversity. The 16S rRNA genes of various possible pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica, were detected in the biofilms, and the abundances of these possible pathogens were highest in the middle of the pipe wall among three areas. The detachment of the biofilms is the main reason for the deterioration of the water quality in DWDSs. The results of this study suggest that the biofilms in the middle of the pipe wall have highly potential risk for drinking water safety, which provides new ideas for the study of the microbial ecology in

  6. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids considering agglomeration and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles

    Zheng, Z. M.; Wang, B.

    2018-06-01

    Conventional heat transfer fluids usually have low thermal conductivity, limiting their efficiency in many applications. Many experiments have shown that adding nanosize solid particles to conventional fluids can greatly enhance their thermal conductivity. To explain this anomalous phenomenon, many theoretical investigations have been conducted in recent years. Some of this research has indicated that the particle agglomeration effect that commonly occurs in nanofluids should play an important role in such enhancement of the thermal conductivity, while some have shown that the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity might be accounted for by the structure of nanofluids, which can be described using the radial distribution function of particles. However, theoretical predictions from these studies are not in very good agreement with experimental results. This paper proposes a prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids, considering both the agglomeration effect and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles. The resulting theoretical predictions for several sets of nanofluids are highly consistent with experimental data.

  7. External dose distributions of exposure to natural uranium slab for calibration of beta absorbed dose

    Chen Lishu

    1987-01-01

    The depth dose distributions and uniformity of beta radiation fields from a natural uranium slab in equilibration were measured using a tissue equivalent extrapolation chamber and film dosimeter. The advantages for calibration of enviromental dose instument or survey meter and personal dosimeter, for routine monitoring in terms of directional dose equivalent and superficial individual dose equivalent were summarized. Finally, the values measured agree well with that of theoretical calculation

  8. External dose distributions of exposure to natural uranium slab for calibration of beta absorbed dose

    Lishu, Chen

    1987-05-01

    The depth dose distributions and uniformity of beta radiation fields from a natural uranium slab in equilibration were measured using a tissue equivalent extrapolation chamber and film dosimeter. The advantages for calibration of enviromental dose instument or survey meter and personal dosimeter, for routine monitoring in terms of directional dose equivalent and superficial individual dose equivalent were summarized. Finally, the values measured agree well with that of theoretical calculation.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Radial and Angular Distribution of γ-Ray's Energy Deposition in Scintillation Optical Fibre

    Tang Shibiao; Yin Zejie; Tang Yu; Huang Huan

    2006-01-01

    Angular and radial distributions of the energy deposition of γ-ray radiation in scintillation optical fibres are simulated and analysed using the Geant4 system. The results show a linear relation between the energy deposition and the radius of the fibres. The deposition is roughly inversely proportional to sinθ with θ the incident angle relative to the fibre axis. The results could provide corrections to the measurements of the scintillation fibres used in monitoring the γ-ray radiation

  10. Study of Different Tissue Density Effects on the Dose Distribution of a 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Model MED3633

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical application of encapsulated radioactive brachytherapy sources has a major role in cancer treatment. In the present research, the effects of different tissue densities on the dose distribution of a 103Pd brachytherapy source in a spherical phantom of 50 cm radius have been studied. Material and Methods: As is well known, absorbed dose in tissue depends to its density, but this difference is not clear in measurements. Therefore, we applied the MCNP code to evaluate the effect of density on the dose distribution. 103Pd brachytherapy sources are used to treat prostate, breast and other cancers. Results: Absorbed dose has been calculated and presented around a source placed in the center of the phantom for different tissue densities. Also, we derived anisotropy and radial dose functions and compared our Monte Carlo results with experimental results of Rivard and Li et al. for F(1, θ and g(r in 1.040 g/cm3 tissue. Conclusion: The results of this study show that relative dose variations around the source center are very considerable at different densities, because of the presence of a photoabsorber (Au-Cu alloy in the source core. Dose variation exceeds 80% at the point (Z = 2.4 mm, Y = 0 mm. Computed values of anisotropy and radial dose functions are in good agreement with the experimental results of Rivard and Li et al.

  11. Device for simulation of integral dose distribution in multifield radiotherapy

    Belyakov, E K; Voronin, V V; Kolosova, V F; Moskalev, A I; Marova, Yu M; Stavitskii, R V; Yarovoi, V S

    1974-11-15

    Described is a device for simulation of the sum dose distribution at multifield radiation therapy; the device comprises a mechanical unit on which the emission sources and detectors are mounted, an electromechanical scanning equipment, amplifiers, an adder, a position sensor and a recording instrument. The device suggested raises an accuracy of a sick man radiation program elaboration at a remote multifield radiation therapy, permits to estimate the irradiated medium heterogeneity and beam shaper influence on the sum dose distribution and also ensured the information on the sum dose distribution of the relative or absolute units. Additional filters simulating heterogeneity and beam shaping conditions of ionizing radiation may be mounted between the quantum emission sources and detectors, and an amplifier with a variable amplification factor may be placed between the adders and printers. Thus it is possible to obtain a sum dose distribution at static methods of the remote radiation therapy at a high degree of accuracy (up to +-10%).

  12. Validation of the TUBRNP model with the radial distribution of plutonium in MOX fuel measured by SIMS and EPMA

    O` Carroll, C; Laar, J Van De; Walker, C T [CEC Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The new model TUBRNP (TRANSURANUS burnup) predicts the radial power density distribution as a function of burnup (and hence the radial burnup profile as a function of time) together with the radial profile of plutonium. Comparisons between measurements and the prediction of the TUBRNP model have been made for UO{sub 2} LWR fuels: they were found to be in excellent agreement and it is seen that TUBRNP is a marked improved on previous models. A powerful techniques for the characterization of irradiation fuel is Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). Uranium, plutonium and fission product distributions can be analysed quantitatively. A complement, providing isotopic information with a lateral resolution comparable to EPMA, is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Recently, the technique has been successfully applied for the measurement of the radial distribution of plutonium isotopes in irradiated nuclear fuel pins. The extension of the TUBRNP model to mixed oxide fuels seems to be the natural step to take. In MOX fuels the picture is greatly complicated by the presence of the (U, Pu)O{sub 2} agglomerates. The rim effect referred to above may be masked by the high concentrations of plutonium in the bulk of the fuel. A detailed investigation of a number of MOX fuel samples has been made using the TUBRNP model. Results are presented for a range of fuels with different enrichment and burnup. Through its participation in the PRIMO and DOMO programmes, PSI in conjunction with the Institute for Transuranium Elements had the opportunity to validate the new theoretical model TUBRNP. The authors with therefore to express their thanks to the organizers and to the numerous European and Japanese organizations which have supported these two international programmes on MOX fuel behavior. 7 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  13. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model.

    Jaikuna, Tanwiwat; Khadsiri, Phatchareewan; Chawapun, Nisa; Saekho, Suwit; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit

    2017-02-01

    To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model. The Isobio software was developed using MATLAB version 2014b to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histograms. The physical dose from each voxel in treatment planning was extracted through Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), and the accuracy was verified by the differentiation between the dose volume histogram from CERR and the treatment planning system. An equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD 2 ) was calculated using biological effective dose (BED) based on the LQL model. The software calculation and the manual calculation were compared for EQD 2 verification with pair t -test statistical analysis using IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (64-bit). Two and three-dimensional biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram were displayed correctly by the Isobio software. Different physical doses were found between CERR and treatment planning system (TPS) in Oncentra, with 3.33% in high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) determined by D 90% , 0.56% in the bladder, 1.74% in the rectum when determined by D 2cc , and less than 1% in Pinnacle. The difference in the EQD 2 between the software calculation and the manual calculation was not significantly different with 0.00% at p -values 0.820, 0.095, and 0.593 for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and 0.240, 0.320, and 0.849 for brachytherapy (BT) in HR-CTV, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The Isobio software is a feasible tool to generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram for treatment plan evaluation in both EBRT and BT.

  14. Phantoms for IMRT dose distribution measurement and treatment verification

    Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Mutic, Sasa; Purdy, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient treatment dose distributions is currently based on custom-built or modified dose measurement phantoms. The only commercially available IMRT treatment planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) is supplied with a film phantom that allows accurate spatial localization of the dose distribution using radiographic film. However, measurements using other dosimeters are necessary for the thorough verification of IMRT. Methods: We have developed a phantom to enable dose measurements using a cylindrical ionization chamber and the localization of prescription isodose curves using a matrix of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chips. The external phantom cross-section is identical to that of the commercial phantom, to allow direct comparisons of measurements. A supplementary phantom has been fabricated to verify the IMRT dose distributions for pelvis treatments. Results: To date, this phantom has been used for the verification of IMRT dose distributions for head and neck and prostate cancer treatments. Designs are also presented for a phantom insert to be used with polymerizing gels (e.g., BANG-2) to obtain volumetric dose distribution measurements. Conclusion: The phantoms have proven useful in the quantitative evaluation of IMRT treatments

  15. Field size and dose distribution of electron beam

    Kang, Wee Saing

    1980-01-01

    The author concerns some relations between the field size and dose distribution of electron beams. The doses of electron beams are measured by either an ion chamber with an electrometer or by film for dosimetry. We analyzes qualitatively some relations; the energy of incident electron beams and depths of maximum dose, field sizes of electron beams and depth of maximum dose, field size and scatter factor, electron energy and scatter factor, collimator shape and scatter factor, electron energy and surface dose, field size and surface dose, field size and central axis depth dose, and field size and practical range. He meets with some results. They are that the field size of electron beam has influence on the depth of maximum dose, scatter factor, surface dose and central axis depth dose, scatter factor depends on the field size and energy of electron beam, and the shape of the collimator, and the depth of maximum dose and the surface dose depend on the energy of electron beam, but the practical range of electron beam is independent of field size

  16. Determination and analysis of neutron flux distribution on radial Piercing beam port for utilization of Kartini research reactor

    Widarto

    2002-01-01

    Determination and analysis of neutron flux measurements on radial piercing beam port have been done as completion experimental data document and progressing on utilization of the Kartini research reactor purposes. The analysis and determination of the neutron flux have been carried out by using Au foils detector neutron activation analysis method which put on the radius of cross section (19 cm) and a long of radial piercing beam port (310 cm) Based on the calculation, distribution of the thermal neutron flux is around (8.3 ± 0.9) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (6.8 ± 0.5) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 and fast neutron is (5.0 ± 0.2) x 10 5 ncm -2 s -1 to (1.43 ± 0.6) x 10 7 ncm -2 s -1 . Analyzing by means of curve fitting method could be concluded that the neutron flux distribution on radial piercing beam port has profiled as a polynomial curve. (author)

  17. Dose Distribution of Rectum and Bladder in Intracavitary Irradiation

    Chu, S. S.; Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The intrauterine irradiation is essential to achieve adequate tumor dose to central tumor mass of uterine malignancy in radiotherapy. The complications of pelvic organ are known to be directly related to radiation dose and physical parameters. The simulation radiogram and medical records of 206 patients, who were treated with intrauterine irradiation from Feb. 1983 to Oct. 1983, were critically analyzed. The physical parameters to include distances between lateral walls of vaginal fornices, longitudinal and lateral cervix to the central axis of ovoid were measured for low dose rate irradiation system and high dose rate remote control after loading system. The radiation doses and dose distributions within cervical area including interesting points and bladder, rectum, according to sources arrangement and location of applicator, were estimated with personal computer. Followings were summary of study results; 1. In distances between lateral walls of vaginal fornices, the low dose rate system showed as 4-7cm width and high dose rate system showed as 5-6cm. 2. In Horizontal angulation of tandem to body axis, the low dose rate system revealed mid position 64.6%, left deviation 19.2% and right deviation 16.2%. 3. In longitudinal angulation of tandem to body axis, the mid position was 11.8% and anterior angulation 88.2% in low dose rate system but in high dose rate system, anterior angulation was 98.5%. 4. Down ward displacement of ovoid below external os was only 3% in low dose rate system and 66.6% in high dose rate system. 5. In radiation source arrangement, the most activities of tandem and ovoid were 35 by 30 in low dose rate system but 50 by 40 in high dose rate system. 6. In low and high dose rate system, the total doses and TDF were 80, 70 Gy and 131, 123 including 40 Gy external irradiation. 7. The doses and TDF in interesting points Co, B, were 98, 47 Gy and 230, 73 in high dose rate system but in low dose rate system 125, 52 Gy and 262, 75 respectively. 8. Doses

  18. Oxygen distribution in packed-bed membrane reactors for partial oxidations: effect of the radial porosity profiles on the product selectivity

    Kurten, U.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional, pseudohomogeneous reactor model was presented to describe the radial and axial concentration profiles in a packed-bed membrane reactor and the local velocity field while accounting for the influences due to the distributive membrane flow and the radial porosity profile. The effect

  19. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    Cecatti, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author) [pt

  20. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  1. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    When a liquid solution in an optical cell is irradiated by an intense pulsed electron beam, it may be important in the chemical analysis of the solution to know the distribution of energy deposited throughout the cell. For the present work, absorbed dose distributions were measured by thin...... radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum with a maximum energy of ≈MeV. The measured three-dimensional dose distributions showed sharp gradients...... in dose at the largest penetration depths in the cell and at the extreme lateral edges of the cell interior near the optical windows. This method of measurement was convenient because of the high spatial resolution capability of the detector and the linearity and absence of dose-rate dependence of its...

  2. New dose limits and distribution of annual doses for controlled groups

    Vukcevic, M.; Stankovic, S.; Kovacevic, M.

    1993-01-01

    The new calculations of neutron doses received by the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as the epidemiological data on the incidence of fatal cancers in the survivors, had led to the conclusion that the risk estimates should be raised by the factor 2 or 3. In this work, the distribution of monthly doses for occupationals was analysed in order to determine the percent of workers who might be considered as overexposed, on the basis of the new dose limits. (author)

  3. Multi objective Flower Pollination Algorithm for solving capacitor placement in radial distribution system using data structure load flow analysis

    Tamilselvan V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The radial distribution system is a rugged system, it is also the most commonly used system, which suffers by loss and low voltage at the end bus. This loss can be reduced by the use of a capacitor in the system, which injects reactive current and also improves the voltage magnitude in the buses. The real power loss in the distribution line is the I2R loss which depends on the current and resistance. The connection of the capacitor in the bus reduces the reactive current and losses. The loss reduction is equal to the increase in generation, necessary for the electric power provided by firms. For consumers, the quality of power supply depends on the voltage magnitude level, which is also considered and hence the objective of the problem becomes the multi objective of loss minimization and the minimization of voltage deviation. In this paper, the optimal location and size of the capacitor is found using a new computational intelligent algorithm called Flower Pollination Algorithm (FPA. To calculate the power flow and losses in the system, novel data structure load flow is introduced. In this, each bus is considered as a node with bus associated data. Links between the nodes are distribution lines and their own resistance and reactance. To validate the developed FPA solutions standard test cases, IEEE 33 and IEEE 69 radial distribution systems are considered.

  4. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of dose rate (1–1014 rad s−1). Upon irradiation of the film, the profile of the radiation field is registered as a permanent colored image of the dose distribution. Unlike most other types of dyed plastic dose meters, the optical density produced by irradiation is in most cases stable for periods...... of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...

  5. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....

  6. Hurst's Exponent Determination for Radial Distribution Functions of In, Sn and In-40 wt%Sn Melt

    Zhou Yong-Zhi; Li Mei; Geng Hao-Ran; Yang Zhong-Xi; Sun Chun-Jing

    2011-01-01

    Hurst's exponent of radial distribution functions (RDFs) within the short-range scope of In, Sn and In-40 wt % Sn melts are determined by the rescaled range analysis method. Hurst's exponents H are between 0.94 and 0.97, which display long-range dependence. Within short-range scope, the number of particles from a reference particle belongs to fractional Brownian motion. After RDF serials are randomly scrambled, Hurst's exponents all dramatically dropped, which proves long-range dependence. H irregularly varies as the temperature rises, but the change tendency is not consistent with the correlation radius r c . (general)

  7. GALAXY ENVIRONMENTS OVER COSMIC TIME: THE NON-EVOLVING RADIAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTIONS AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z = 1.6

    Tal, Tomer; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Franx, Marijn; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the environments of massive galaxies in four redshift bins between z = 0.04 and z = 1.6, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey. We measure the projected radial distribution of galaxies in cylinders around a constant number density selected sample of massive galaxies and utilize a statistical subtraction of contaminating sources. Our analysis shows that massive primary galaxies typically live in group halos and are surrounded by 2-3 satellites with masses more than one-tenth of the primary galaxy mass. The cumulative stellar mass in these satellites roughly equals the mass of the primary galaxy itself. We further find that the radial number density profile of galaxies around massive primaries has not evolved significantly in either slope or overall normalization in the past 9.5 Gyr. A simplistic interpretation of this result can be taken as evidence for a lack of mergers in the studied groups and as support for a static evolution model of halos containing massive primaries. Alternatively, there exists a tight balance between mergers and accretion of new satellites such that the overall distribution of galaxies in and around the halo is preserved. The latter interpretation is supported by a comparison to a semi-analytic model, which shows a similar constant average satellite distribution over the same redshift range.

  8. Studies of absorbed dose determinations and spatial dose distributions for high energy proton beams

    Hiraoka, Takeshi

    1982-01-01

    Absolute dose determinations were made with three types of ionization chamber and a Faraday cup. Methane based tissue equivalent (TE) gas, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, air were used as an ionizing gas with flow rate of 10 ml per minute. Measurements were made at the entrance position of unmodulated beams and for a beam of a spread out Bragg peak at a depth of 17.3 mm in water. For both positions, the mean value of dose determined by the ionization chambers was 0.993 +- 0.014 cGy for which the value of TE gas was taken as unity. The agreement between the doses estimated by the ionization chambers and the Faraday cup was within 5%. Total uncertainty estimated in the ionization chamber and the Faraday cup determinations is 6 and 4%, respectively. Common sources of error in calculating the dose from ionization chamber measurements are depend on the factors of ion recombination, W value, and mass stopping power ratio. These factors were studied by both experimentally and theoretically. The observed values for the factors show a good agreement to the predicted one. Proton beam dosimetry intercomparison between Japan and the United States was held. Good agreement was obtained with standard deviation of 1.6%. The value of the TE calorimeter is close to the mean value of all. In the proton spot scanning system, lateral dose distributions at any depth for one spot beam can be simulated by the Gaussian distribution. From the Gaussian distributions and the central axis depth doses for one spot beam, it is easy to calculate isodose distributions in the desired field by superposition of dose distribution for one spot beam. Calculated and observed isodose curves were agreed within 1 mm at any dose levels. (J.P.N.)

  9. Exploring functionally related enzymes using radially distributed properties of active sites around the reacting points of bound ligands

    Ueno Keisuke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics approaches, particularly those solving the 3D structures of many proteins with unknown functions, have increased the desire for structure-based function predictions. However, prediction of enzyme function is difficult because one member of a superfamily may catalyze a different reaction than other members, whereas members of different superfamilies can catalyze the same reaction. In addition, conformational changes, mutations or the absence of a particular catalytic residue can prevent inference of the mechanism by which catalytic residues stabilize and promote the elementary reaction. A major hurdle for alignment-based methods for prediction of function is the absence (despite its importance of a measure of similarity of the physicochemical properties of catalytic sites. To solve this problem, the physicochemical features radially distributed around catalytic sites should be considered in addition to structural and sequence similarities. Results We showed that radial distribution functions (RDFs, which are associated with the local structural and physicochemical properties of catalytic active sites, are capable of clustering oxidoreductases and transferases by function. The catalytic sites of these enzymes were also characterized using the RDFs. The RDFs provided a measure of the similarity among the catalytic sites, detecting conformational changes caused by mutation of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the RDFs reinforced the classification of enzyme functions based on conventional sequence and structural alignments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the application of RDFs provides advantages in the functional classification of enzymes by providing information about catalytic sites.

  10. Radial power distribution shaping within a PWR fuel assembly utilizing asymmetrically loaded gadolinia-bearing fuel pins

    Stone, I.Z.

    1992-01-01

    As in-core fuel management designs evolve to meet the demands of increasing energy output, more innovative methods are developed to maintain power peaking within acceptable thermal margin limits. In-core fuel management staff must utilize various loading pattern strategies such as cross-core movement of fuel assemblies, multibatch enrichment schemes, and burnable absorbers as the primary means of controlling the radial power distribution. The utilization of fresh asymmetrically loaded gadolinia-bearing assemblies as a fuel management tool provides an additional means of controlling the radial power distribution. At Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), fresh fuel assemblies fabricated with asymmetrically loaded gadolinia-bearing fuel rods have been used successfully for several cycles of reactor operation. Asymmetric assemblies are neutronically modeled using the same tools and models that SNP uses to model symmetrically loaded gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies. The CASMO-2E code is used to produce the homogenized macroscopic assembly cross sections for the nodal core simulator. Optimum fuel pin locations within the asymmetrical assembly are determined using the pin-by-pin PDQ7 assembly core model for each new assembly design. The optimum pin location is determined by the rod loading that minimizes the peak-to-average pin power

  11. Radial distributions of magnetic field strength in the solar corona as derived from data on fast halo CMEs

    Fainshtein, Victor; Egorov, Yaroslav

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, information about the distance between the body of rapid coronal mass ejection (CME) and the associated shock wave has been used to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona. In all cases, this technique allows us to find coronal magnetic field radial profiles B(R) applied to the directions almost perpendicular to the line of sight. We have determined radial distributions of magnetic field strength along the directions close to the Sun-Earth axis. For this purpose, using the "ice-cream cone" model and SOHO/LASCO data, we found 3D characteristics for fast halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) and for HCME-related shocks. With these data, we managed to obtain the B(R) distributions as far as ≈43 solar radii from the Sun's center, which is approximately twice as far as those in other studies based on LASCO data. We have concluded that to improve the accuracy of this method for finding the coronal magnetic field we should develop a technique for detecting CME sites moving in the slow and fast solar wind. We propose a technique for selecting CMEs whose central (paraxial) part actually moves in the slow wind.

  12. Radial distributions of magnetic field strength in the solar corona as derived from data on fast halo CMEs

    Fainshtein V.G.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, information about the distance between the body of rapid coronal mass ejection (CME and the associated shock wave has been used to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona. In all cases, this technique allows us to find coronal magnetic field radial profiles B(R applied to the directions almost perpendicular to the line of sight. We have determined radial distributions of magnetic field strength along the directions close to the Sun–Earth axis. For this purpose, using the “ice-cream cone” model and SOHO/LASCO data, we found 3D characteristics for fast halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs and for HCME-related shocks. With these data we managed to obtain the B(R distributions as far as ≈43 solar radii from the Sun's center, which is approximately twice as far as those in other studies based on LASCO data. We have concluded that to improve the accuracy of this method for finding the coronal magnetic field we should develop a technique for detecting CME parts moving in the slow and fast solar wind. We propose a technique for selecting CMEs whose central (paraxial part actually moves in the slow wind.

  13. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely...... to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution....... This can be estimated by measurement of a suitable analogue, e.g. a well-bleached aeolian sample, but this requires such an analogue to be available, and in addition the assumptions that the sample is in fact a) well-bleached, and b) has a similar dose rate heterogeneity to the fossil deposit. Finally...

  14. Investigation on 3D dose distribution in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Masi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo calculations for dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) require experimental validations. We measured the 3D dose distribution in a breast phantom in a DBT scan, using XR-QA2 radiochromic films. We positioned film pieces at the entrance surface, at the bottom surface and at four depths between adjacent slabs in the 5-slabs, 5-cm-thick phantom simulating a compressed breast with 50% glandular fraction. We irradiated the phantom at 40kV (half value layer 1.1mm Al) for three angular tilting of the beam central axis ( {±}25° and 0° normal incidence). We determined the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the average dose in the phantom (in terms of air kerma normalized to the entrance air kerma), showing the angular dependence of the depth-resolved 3D dose distributions. In transverse planes the maximum dose variations were between 5.0% and 14.8% for normal incidence, and by 8.6% from the central to the tilted view. In the direction of the beam axis, the dose decreases up to about 71% from the entrance to the exit value. The extimated backscatter fraction was between 3% and 8%.

  15. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  16. Dose distribution to spinal structures from intrathecally administered yttrium-90

    Mardirossian, George; Hall, Michael; Montebello, Joseph; Stevens, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Previous treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) malignancies by intrathecal administration of 131I-radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies has led to the assumption that more healthy tissue will be spared when a pure beta-emitter such as 90Y replaces 131I. The purpose of this study is to compare and quantitatively evaluate the dose distribution from 90Y to the CSF space and its surrounding spinal structures to 131I. A 3D digital phantom of a section of the T-spine was constructed from the visible human project series of images which included the spinal cord, central canal, subarachnoid space, pia mater, arachnoid, dura mater, vertebral bone marrow and intervertebral disc. Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP4C) was used to model the 90Y and 131I radiation distribution. Images of the CSF compartment were convolved with the radiation distribution to determine the dose within the subarachnoid space and surrounding tissues. 90Y appears to be a suitable radionuclide in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) malignancies when attached to mAb's and the dose distribution would be confined largely within the vertebral foramen. This choice may offer favourable dose improvement to the subarachnoid and surface of spinal cord over 131I in such an application.

  17. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    Thomsen, Kristina J.; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution. This can be estimated by measurement of a suitable analogue, e.g. a well-bleached aeolian sample, but this requires such an analogue to be available, and in addition the assumptions that the sample is in fact a) well-bleached, and b) has a similar dose rate heterogeneity to the fossil deposit. Finally, it is an implicit assumption in such analysis that any over-dispersion is not significantly dose dependent. In this study we have undertaken laboratory investigations of the dose dependency of over-dispersion using a well-bleached modern sample with an average measured dose of 36 ± 3 mGy. This sample was prepared as heated (750 °C for 1 h), bleached and untreated portions which were then given uniform gamma doses ranging from 100 mGy to 208 Gy. We show that for these samples the relative laboratory over-dispersion is not constant as a function of dose and that the over-dispersion is smaller in heated samples. We also show that the dim grains in the distributions have a greater over-dispersion than the bright grains, implying that insensitive samples will have greater values of over-dispersion than sensitive samples.

  18. Dose distributions of pendulum fields in the field border plane

    Schrader, R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations (program SIDOS-U2) and LiF measurements taken in a cylindric water phantom are used to investigate the isodose distributions of different pendulum irradiation methods (Co-60) in a plane which is parallel to the central ray plane and crosses the field borders at the depth of the axis. The dose values compared to the maximum values of the central ray plane are completely different for each pendulum method. In case of monoaxial pendulum methods around small angles, the maximum dose value found in the border plane is less than 50% of the dose in the central ray plane. The relative maximum of the border plane moves to tissues laying in a greater depth. In case of bi-axial methods, the maximum value of the border plane can be much more than 50% of the maximum dose measured in the central ray plane. (orig.) [de

  19. Dose response study of PVA-Fx gel for three dimensional dose distribution

    Brindha, S.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Shen, Bin; Saw, Cheng B.

    2001-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques involve complex field arrangements using conformal and intensity modulated radiation that requires three dimensional treatment planning. The verification of these plans poses even more challenge. In 1984, Gore et al., proposed that ferrous gel dosimeters combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to measure three dimensional radiation dose distributions. Since then, there has been much interest in the development of gel dosimetry to aid the determination of three dimensional dose distributions during field arrangements. In this work, preparation and study of the MR characteristics of a PVA-Fx gel reported in the literature is presented

  20. Effect of Wall Friction and Vortex Generation on Radial Void Distribution The Wall - Vortex Effect

    Rouhani, Zia

    1974-09-15

    Arguments are presented to prove the existence of rolling vortices in two-phase flow. In liquid phase they will appear in a boundary layer near the walls while in the continuous vapor phase they will occur near the interface with a liquid film. The intensity and size of these vortices are expected to depend on the local velocity gradients normal to the walls. A discussion is given of the interaction between the rotational field associated with such vortices and bubbles in liquid flow or droplets in vapor-flow. This interaction is called the wall-vortex effect. It appears that several, apparently unrelated, phenomena observed in two-phase flow systems may be interpreted in terms of this mechanism. Among these are: Radial void peaking near the walls; Slip ratios less than unity observed even in vertical upward flow; Reduced droplet diffusion near the liquid film; Reduced vapor mixing between subchannels at low steam qualities; and Accelerated flashing process in flow of depressurized liquid. Finally, a comparison with the well-known Magnus effect is also included

  1. Phase diagrams and radial distribution of the electric field components of coaxial discharges with outer dielectric tube at different wave modes

    Neichev, Z; Benova, E; Gamero, A; Sola, A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate phase diagrams and electric field radial distribution of coaxial discharges, sustained by a traveling electromagnetic wave, assuming finite and infinite thickness of the discharge chamber in the model. The calculations are made for azimuthally symmetric and dipolar wave modes. The phase diagrams and the radial profiles of the electric field at various thicknesses of the outer dielectric tube of the chamber and different discharge conditions are obtained. For the purpose of low pressure coaxial plasma modelling, radial profiles of the electric field at different discharge conditions have been investigated experimentally and compared with the theoretical results

  2. Inherent calibration of microdosemeters for dose distributions in lineal energy

    Crossman, J.S.P.; Watt, D.E. [Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1994-12-31

    A method, utilising the inherent electron event spectra, is described for the absolute calibration of microdosemeters in the presence of a photon field. The method, which avoids the problems and uncertainties present in conventional calibration techniques, involves simple extrapolation of the dose distribution in lineal energy associated with `exact stopper` electrons. Validation of the method is made using the published experimental distributions of Rossi, of Kliauga, and of Dvorak and by direct theoretical calculation of the components of the microdose distributions for gamma rays. Further experimental data from a cylindrical TEPC in a photon field generated by an external source of {sup 137}Cs are obtained for comparison. A `universal` calibration curve for the dose-weighted lineal energy as a function of the simulated mean diameter of the microdosemeter, is presented for use in practical applications. (author).

  3. Inherent calibration of microdosemeters for dose distributions in lineal energy

    Crossman, J.S.P.; Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A method, utilising the inherent electron event spectra, is described for the absolute calibration of microdosemeters in the presence of a photon field. The method, which avoids the problems and uncertainties present in conventional calibration techniques, involves simple extrapolation of the dose distribution in lineal energy associated with 'exact stopper' electrons. Validation of the method is made using the published experimental distributions of Rossi, of Kliauga, and of Dvorak and by direct theoretical calculation of the components of the microdose distributions for gamma rays. Further experimental data from a cylindrical TEPC in a photon field generated by an external source of 137 Cs are obtained for comparison. A 'universal' calibration curve for the dose-weighted lineal energy as a function of the simulated mean diameter of the microdosemeter, is presented for use in practical applications. (author)

  4. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  5. A new reconfiguration scheme for voltage stability enhancement of radial distribution systems

    Arun, M.; Aravindhababu, P.

    2009-01-01

    Network reconfiguration is an operation problem, which entails altering the topological structure of the distribution feeders by rearranging the status of switches in order to obtain an optimal configuration in order to minimise the system losses. This paper presents a new reconfiguration algorithm that enhances voltage stability and improves the voltage profile besides minimising losses without incurring any additional cost for installation of capacitors, tap changing transformers and related switching equipment in the distribution system. Test results on a 69 node distribution system reveal the superiority of this algorithm.

  6. QUENCHING DEPENDS ON MORPHOLOGIES: IMPLICATIONS FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET-OPTICAL RADIAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS IN GREEN VALLEY GALAXIES

    Pan, Zhizheng; Lin, Weipeng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Jinrong; Kong, Xu [Center of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Jinzhai Road 96, Hefei 230026 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: panzz@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-09-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)+Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images, to investigate how the residual recent star formation is distributed in these galaxies. We find that the dust-corrected u – r colors of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are flat out to R {sub 90}, while the colors monotonously turn blue when r > 0.5 R {sub 50} for late-type galaxies (LTGs). More than half of the ETGs are blue-cored and have remarkable positive NUV – r color gradients, suggesting that their star formations are centrally concentrated. The rest have flat color distributions out to R {sub 90}. The centrally concentrated star formation activity in a large portion of ETGs is confirmed by the SDSS spectroscopy, showing that ∼50% of the ETGs have EW(Hα) >6.0 Å. Of the LTGs, 95% show uniform radial color profiles, which can be interpreted as a red bulge plus an extended blue disk. The links between the two kinds of ETGs, e.g., those objects having remarkable ''blue-cores'' and those having flat color gradients, are less known and require future investigations. It is suggested that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI.

  7. Investigations of the radial distributions of nucleons in 1fsub(7/2)-shell nuclei by elastic alpha particle scattering

    Gils, H.J.

    1984-12-01

    The radial size and shape of the distribution of nucleons - i.e. the sum of protons and neutrons - in atomic nuclei of the 1fsub(7/2) shell is investigated in the present work. The experimental basis of the studies are differential cross sections of elastic α particle scattering by sup(40,42,43,44,48)Ca, 50 Ti, 51 V, 52 Cr precisely measured over a wide angular range at the 104 MeV α particle beam from the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron. The experimental cross sections are analyzed using so-called 'model independent' optical potentials by which the data are very well reproduced. The error bands of these potentials are determined in a well-defined form from the analyses. The high sensitivity of the data to the radial form of the real optical potential justifies, in principle, that the experiments are a suitable tool for investigating nuclear density distributions. Some pre-informations on this question are obtained from the optical potential analyses. For a more direct access to the nuclear matter distributions - in particular to differences between neighbouring nuclei - a semimicroscopic reaction model is presented which on the one hand is based on a fully microscopic many body approach. On the other hand all quantities being not of particular interest for the results are treated in a phenomenological way. Thereby, it is possible to reproduce the experimental cross sections as well as by the 'model independent' potentials and to obtain full consistency between the two approaches. This has not been achieved by any other microscopic reaction model. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. QUENCHING DEPENDS ON MORPHOLOGIES: IMPLICATIONS FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET-OPTICAL RADIAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS IN GREEN VALLEY GALAXIES

    Pan, Zhizheng; Lin, Weipeng; Li, Jinrong; Kong, Xu; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)+Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images, to investigate how the residual recent star formation is distributed in these galaxies. We find that the dust-corrected u – r colors of early-type galaxies (ETGs) are flat out to R 90 , while the colors monotonously turn blue when r > 0.5 R 50 for late-type galaxies (LTGs). More than half of the ETGs are blue-cored and have remarkable positive NUV – r color gradients, suggesting that their star formations are centrally concentrated. The rest have flat color distributions out to R 90 . The centrally concentrated star formation activity in a large portion of ETGs is confirmed by the SDSS spectroscopy, showing that ∼50% of the ETGs have EW(Hα) >6.0 Å. Of the LTGs, 95% show uniform radial color profiles, which can be interpreted as a red bulge plus an extended blue disk. The links between the two kinds of ETGs, e.g., those objects having remarkable ''blue-cores'' and those having flat color gradients, are less known and require future investigations. It is suggested that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI

  9. Radial profile of the electron distribution from electron cyclotron emission measurements

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1993-07-01

    A numerical study is presented, showing the possibility to invert the electron distribution function from a small set of non-thermal spectra, for a regime of lower hybrid current drive. (Author) 7 refs.

  10. Radial profile of the electron distribution from electron cyclotron emission measurements

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study is presented, showing the possibility to invert the electron distribution function from a small set of non-thermal spectra, for a regime of lower hybrid current drive. (Author) 7 refs

  11. Distributed Gradient Descent for Solving Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    Gan, Lingwen; Low, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Node controllers and power distribution networks in accordance with embodiments of the invention enable distributed power control, One embodiment includes a node controller comprising a memory containing: a plurality of node operating parameters; and a plurality of node operating parameters describing operating parameters for a set of at least one node selected from the group consisting of at least one downstream node and at least one upstream node; wherein the processor is configured by the ...

  12. Radial density distribution of a warm dense plasma formed by underwater electrical explosion of a copper wire

    Nitishinskiy, M.; Yanuka, D.; Virozub, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-12-01

    Time- and space-resolved evolution of the density (down to 0.07 of solid state density) of a copper wire during its microsecond timescale electrical explosion in water was obtained by X-ray backlighting. In the present research, a flash X-ray source of 20 ns pulse-width and >60 keV photon energy was used. The conductivity of copper was evaluated for a temperature of 10 kK and found to be in good agreement with the data obtained in earlier experiments [DeSilva and Katsouros, Phys. Rev. E 57, 5945 (1998) and Sheftman and Krasik, Phys. Plasmas 18, 092704 (2011)] where only electrical and optical diagnostics were applied. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation shows a good agreement between the simulated and experimental waveforms of the current and voltage and measured the radial expansion of the exploding wire. Also, the radial density distribution obtained by an inverse Abel transform analysis agrees with the results of these simulations. Thus, the validity of the equations of state for copper and the conductivity model used in the simulations was confirmed for the parameters of the exploding wire realized in the present research.

  13. The multi-layered ring under parabolic distribution of radial stresses combined with uniform internal and external pressure

    Christos F. Markides

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recently introduced solution for the stress- and displacement-fields, developed in a multi-layered circular ring, composed of a finite number of linearly elastic concentric layers, subjected to a parabolic distribution of ra-dial stresses, is here extended to encompass a more general loading scheme, closer to actual conditions. The loading scheme includes, besides the para¬-bolic radial stresses, a combination of uniform pressures acting along the outer- and inner- most boundaries of the layered ring. The analytic solution of the problem is achieved by adopting Savin’s pioneering approach for an infinite plate with a hole strengthened by rings. Taking advantage of the results provided by the ana¬lytic solution, a numerical model, simulating the configuration of a three-layered ring (quite commonly encountered in practic¬al applications is validated. The numerical model is then used for a parametric analysis enlightening some crucial aspects of the overall response of the ring.

  14. Measurement system for depth dose distribution in cancer therapy

    Nishizawa, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hirotsugu; Tsutaka, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Ikuo

    1999-01-01

    An accurate estimation of an absorbed dose distribution in human tissue is indispensable to efficiently perform radiotherapy in humans. Previously, various methods for such estimation have been developed, however, there is some problem in those methods, it takes too long times (3-4 hours) to determine the absorbed dose distribution through scanning by ionization chamber in water phantom. So, a determination system of depth dose was developed with an aim to determine the absorbed dose of X-ray or electron beam in materials similar to human body. This system was composed of a detector including scintillation fibers which allows emission due to radio-interaction, CCD camera for determination of light distribution of the emission and personal computer for data processing. Though the accuracy of this system was ±2% similar to that of the conventional measuring method, measuring time was reduced to almost 5 min, markedly shorter than that of the conventional water phantom (3-4 hours). The efficacy of works including the adjustment of irradiation system, planning, etc. would be improved by application of this system. (M.N.)

  15. Power system reconfiguration in a radial distribution network for reducing losses and to improve voltage profile using modified plant growth simulation algorithm with Distributed Generation (DG

    R. Rajaram

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Network reconfiguration which is constrained non linear optimization problem has been solved for loss minimization, load balancing, etc. for last two decades using various heuristic search evolutionary algorithms like binary particle swarm optimization, neuro-fuzzy techniques, etc. The contribution of this paper lies in considering distributed generation which are smaller power sources like solar photovoltaic cells or wind turbines connected in the customer roof top. This new connection in the radial network has made unidirectional current flow to become bidirectional there by increasing the efficiency but sometimes reducing stability of the system. Modified plant growth simulation algorithm has been applied here successfully to minimize real power loss because it does not require barrier factors or cross over rates because the objectives and constraints are dealt separately. The main advantage of this algorithm is continuous guiding search along with changing objective function because power from distributed generation is continuously varying so this can be applied for real time applications with required modifications. This algorithm here is tested for a standard 33 bus radial distribution system for loss minimization and test results here shows that this algorithm is efficient and suitable for real time applications.

  16. THE POSTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF sin(i) VALUES FOR EXOPLANETS WITH MT sin(i) DETERMINED FROM RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    Ho, Shirley; Turner, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Radial velocity (RV) observations of an exoplanet system giving a value of M T sin(i) condition (i.e., give information about) not only the planet's true mass M T but also the value of sin(i) for that system (where i is the orbital inclination angle). Thus, the value of sin(i) for a system with any particular observed value of M T sin(i) cannot be assumed to be drawn randomly from a distribution corresponding to an isotropic i distribution, i.e., the presumptive prior distribution. Rather, the posterior distribution from which it is drawn depends on the intrinsic distribution of M T for the exoplanet population being studied. We give a simple Bayesian derivation of this relationship and apply it to several 'toy models' for the intrinsic distribution of M T , on which we have significant information from available RV data in some mass ranges but little or none in others. The results show that the effect can be an important one. For example, even for simple power-law distributions of M T , the median value of sin(i) in an observed RV sample can vary between 0.860 and 0.023 (as compared to the 0.866 value for an isotropic i distribution) for indices of the power law in the range between -2 and +1, respectively. Over the same range of indices, the 95% confidence interval on M T varies from 1.0001-2.405 (α = -2) to 1.13-94.34 (α = +2) times larger than M T sin(i) due to sin(i) uncertainty alone. More complex, but still simple and plausible, distributions of M T yield more complicated and somewhat unintuitive posterior sin(i) distributions. In particular, if the M T distribution contains any characteristic mass scale M c , the posterior sin(i) distribution will depend on the ratio of M T sin(i) to M c , often in a non-trivial way. Our qualitative conclusion is that RV studies of exoplanets, both individual objects and statistical samples, should regard the sin(i) factor as more than a 'numerical constant of order unity' with simple and well-understood statistical

  17. A Double-Resistive Active Power Filter System to Attenuate Harmonic Voltages of a Radial Power Distribution Feeder

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Han, Ruijing; Shen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    voltages. This paper proposes a double-resistive active power filter (D-RAPF) system consisting of a terminal-RAPF and an attenuation-RAPF for each individual harmonic. The terminal-RAPF operating as the characteristic impedance of the feeder is installed at the end bus to suppress harmonic propagation......Harmonic propagation between power-factor correction capacitors and system inductors seriously deteriorates power quality in a radial power distribution feeder. Installation of a resistive active power filter (RAPF) at the end bus only suppresses harmonic propagation, not attenuates harmonic...... at all harmonic frequencies. The attenuation-RAPF, whose control gain can be set according to the requirements of the harmonic voltage distortion limit, is installed at a specific position for each individual harmonic to attenuate the corresponding harmonic voltages. The D-RAPF system not only suppresses...

  18. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  19. Operating cost minimization of a radial distribution system in a deregulated electricity market through reconfiguration using NSGA method

    Chandramohan, S.; Atturulu, Naresh; Devi, R.P. Kumudini; Venkatesh, B.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, mechanisms for trade in ancillary services such as reactive power will be implemented in many deregulated power systems. In such an operating framework, a Distribution Corporation (DisCo) would have to purchase reactive power along with real power from the connected transmission corporation. A DisCo would want to minimize its operating costs by minimizing the total amount of real and reactive power drawn from the connected transmission system. Optimally reconfiguring the network will achieve such a goal. In this work, we use a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA) for reconfiguring a radial DisCo to minimize its operating costs considering real and reactive power costs while maximizing its operating reliability and satisfying the regular operating constraints. This method is tested on sample test systems and reported. (author)

  20. Fission rate distribution at the 84-pin radial section of a SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR assembly

    Perret, Gregory; Murphy, Michael F.; Jatuff, Fabian [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Westinghouse boiling water reactor SVEA-96 Optima2 assemblies were studied during the LWRPROTEUS program at the PROTEUS facility in the Paul Scherrer Institute. Measured radial fission rate distributions at the 84-pin elevation are compared with MCNPX predictions using both ENDF/B-VI (Release 2) and JEFF-3.1 data libraries. Predicted fission rates agree within +-4.5% using both libraries. Fission rates were over-predicted in UO{sub 2} pins close to the missing 1/3 pins and under-predicted in UO{sub 2} pins close to the missing 2/3 pins. Recurrent under-estimations were observed in the UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pins, for both libraries, which might be explained by over-estimated thermal cross-sections of {sup 157}Gd, as suggested in a recent work of G. Leinweber et al. (2006). (authors)

  1. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Han, Su Chul; Hong, Dong Hee

    2016-01-01

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures

  2. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  3. Principles of protection: a formal approach for evaluating dose distributions

    Wikman-Svahn, Per; Peterson, Martin; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-01-01

    One of the central issues in radiation protection consists in determining what weight should be given to individual doses in relation to collective or aggregated doses. A mathematical framework is introduced in which such assessments can be made precisely in terms of comparisons between alternative distributions of individual doses. In addition to evaluation principles that are well known from radiation protection, a series of principles that are derived from parallel discussions in moral philosophy and welfare economics is investigated. A battery of formal properties is then used to investigate the evaluative principles. The results indicate that one of the new principles, bilinear prioritarianism, may be preferable to current practices, since it satisfies efficiency-related properties better without sacrificing other desirable properties

  4. Fast Neutron Dose Distribution in a Linac Radiotherapy Facility

    Al-Othmany, D.Sh.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Kadi, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    CR-39 plastic detectors were used for fast neutron dose mapping in the radiotherapy facility at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH). Detectors were calibrated using a 252 Cf neutron source and a neutron dosimeter. After exposure chemical etching was performed using 6N NaOH solution at 70 degree C. Tracks were counted using an optical microscope and the number of tracks/cm 2 was converted to a neutron dose. 15 track detectors were distributed inside and outside the therapy room and were left for 32 days. The average neutron doses were 142.3 mSv on the accelerator head, 28.5 mSv on inside walls, 1.4 mSv beyond the beam shield, and 1 mSv in the control room

  5. Spatial distribution of absorbed dose onboard of International Space Station

    Jadrnickova, I.; Spumy, F.; Tateyama, R.; Yasuda, N.; Kawashima, H.; Kurano, M.; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Akatov, Yu.; Shurshakov, V.; Kobayashi, I.; Ohguchi, H.; Koguchi, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The passive detectors (LD and PNTD) were exposed onboard of Russian Service Module Qn the International Space Station (ISS) from August 2004 to October 2005 (425 days). The detectors were located at 6 different positions inside the Service Module and also in 32 pockets on the surface of the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom located in crew cabin. Distribution of absorbed doses and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors, as well as LET spectra of fluences of registered particles, are presented as the function of detectors' location. The variation of dose characteristics for different locations can be up to factor of 2. In some cases, data measured with passive detectors are also compared with the data obtained by means of active instruments. (authors)

  6. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  7. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  8. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor control probability

  9. A Bayesian approach to infer the radial distribution of temperature and anisotropy in the transition zone from seismic data

    Drilleau, M.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Verhoeven, O.; Moebs, G.; Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogical transformations and matter transfers within the Earth's mantle make the 350-1000 km depth range (considered here as the mantle transition zone) highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Most of the 3-D global tomographic models are anchored on small perturbations from 1-D models such as PREM, and are secondly interpreted in terms of temperature and composition distributions. However, the degree of heterogeneity in the transition zone can be strong enough so that the concept of a 1-D reference seismic model may be addressed. To avoid the use of any seismic reference model, we developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to directly interpret surface wave dispersion curves in terms of temperature and radial anisotropy distributions, considering a given composition of the mantle. These interpretations are based on laboratory measurements of elastic moduli and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. An originality of the algorithm is its ability to explore both smoothly varying models and first-order discontinuities, using C1-Bézier curves, which interpolate the randomly chosen values for depth, temperature and radial anisotropy. This parameterization is able to generate a self-adapting parameter space exploration while reducing the computing time. Using a Bayesian exploration, the probability distributions on temperature and anisotropy are governed by uncertainties on the data set. The method was successfully applied to both synthetic data and real dispersion curves. Surface wave measurements along the Vanuatu- California path suggest a strong anisotropy above 400 km depth which decreases below, and a monotonous temperature distribution between 350 and 1000 km depth. On the contrary, a negative shear wave anisotropy of about 2 % is found at the top of the transition zone below Eurasia. Considering compositions ranging from piclogite to pyrolite, the overall temperature profile and temperature gradient are higher for the continental path than for the oceanic

  10. The characteristics on dose distribution of a large field

    Lee, Sang Rok; Jeong, Deok Yang; Lee, Btiung Koo; Kwon, Young Ho

    2003-01-01

    In special cases of Total Body Irradiation(TBI), Half Body Irradiation(HBI), Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, E-Wing's sarcoma, lymphosarcoma and neuroblastoma a large field can be used clinically. The dose distribution of a large field can use the measurement result which gets from dose distribution of a small field (standard SSD 100 cm, size of field under 40 x 40 cm 2 ) in the substitution which always measures in practice and it will be able to calibrate. With only the method of simple calculation, it is difficult to know the dose and its uniformity of actual body region by various factor of scatter radiation. In this study, using Multidata Water Phantom from standard SSD 100 cm according to the size change of field, it measures the basic parameter (PDD,TMR,Output,Sc,Sp) From SSD 180 cm (phantom is to the bottom vertically) according to increasing of a field, it measures a basic parameter. From SSD 350 cm (phantom is to the surface of a wall, using small water phantom. which includes mylar capable of horizontal beam's measurement) it measured with the same method and compared with each other. In comparison with the standard dose data, parameter which measures between SSD 180 cm and 350 cm, it turned out there was little difference. The error range is not up to extent of the experimental error. In order to get the accurate data, it dose measures from anthropomorphous phantom or for this objective the dose measurement which is the possibility of getting the absolute value which uses the unlimited phantom that is devised especially is demanded. Additionally, it needs to consider ionization chamber use of small volume and stem effect of cable by a large field.

  11. Influence of random setup error on dose distribution

    Zhai Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of random setup error on dose distribution in radiotherapy and determine the margin from ITV to PTV. Methods: A random sample approach was used to simulate the fields position in target coordinate system. Cumulative effect of random setup error was the sum of dose distributions of all individual treatment fractions. Study of 100 cumulative effects might get shift sizes of 90% dose point position. Margins from ITV to PTV caused by random setup error were chosen by 95% probability. Spearman's correlation was used to analyze the influence of each factor. Results: The average shift sizes of 90% dose point position was 0.62, 1.84, 3.13, 4.78, 6.34 and 8.03 mm if random setup error was 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 mm,respectively. Univariate analysis showed the size of margin was associated only by the size of random setup error. Conclusions: Margin of ITV to PTV is 1.2 times random setup error for head-and-neck cancer and 1.5 times for thoracic and abdominal cancer. Field size, energy and target depth, unlike random setup error, have no relation with the size of the margin. (authors)

  12. Low earth orbit radiation dose distribution in a phantom head

    Konradi, A.; Badhwar, G.D.; Cash, B.L.; Hardy, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to compare analytical methods with data obtained during exposure to space radiation, a phantom head instrumented with a large number of radiation detectors was flown on the Space Shuttle on three occasions: 8 August 1989 (STS-28), 28 February 1990 (STS-36), and 24 April 1990 (STS-31). The objective of this experiment was to obtain a measurement of the inhomogeneity in the dose distribution within a phantom head volume. The orbits of these missions were complementary-STS-28 and STS-36 had high inclination and low altitude, while STS-31 had a low inclination and high altitude. In the cases of STS-28 and STS-36, the main contribution to the radiation dose comes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with a minor to negligible part supplied by the inner belt through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), and for STS-28 an even smaller one from a proton enhancement during a solar flare-associated proton event. For STS-31, the inner belt protons dominate and the GCR contribution is almost negligible. The internal dose distribution is consistent with the mass distribution of the orbiter and the self-shielding and physical location of the phantom head. (author)

  13. Axial and radial distribution of neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using foil activation analysis and Monte Carlo

    Abrefah, G.R.

    2009-02-01

    The Monte-Carlo method and experimental methods were used to determine the neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels of the Ghana Research Reactor -1. The MCNP5 code was used for this purpose to simulate the radial and axial distribution of the neutron fluxes within all the ten irradiation channels. The results obtained were compared with the experimental results. After the MCNP simulation and experimental procedure, it was observed that axially, the fluxes rise to a peak before falling and then finally leveling out. Axially and radially, it was also observed that the fluxes in the centre of the channels were lower than on the sides. Radially, the fluxes dip in the centre while it increases steadily towards the sides of the channels. The results have shown that there are flux variations within the irradiation channels both axially and radially. (au)

  14. Inhomogeneous target-dose distributions: a dimension more for optimization?

    Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Derycke, Sylvie; Colle, Christophe O.; Wagter, Carlos de; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if the use of inhomogeneous target-dose distributions, obtained by 3D conformal radiotherapy plans with or without beam intensity modulation, offers the possibility to decrease indices of toxicity to normal tissues and/or increase indices of tumor control stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Ten patients with stage III NSCLC were planned using a conventional 3D technique and a technique involving noncoplanar beam intensity modulation (BIM). Two planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined: PTV1 included macroscopic tumor volume and PTV2 included macroscopic and microscopic tumor volume. Virtual simulation defined the beam shapes and incidences as well as the wedge orientations (3D) and segment outlines (BIM). Weights of wedged beams, unwedged beams, and segments were determined by optimization using an objective function with a biological and a physical component. The biological component included tumor control probability (TCP) for PTV1 (TCP1), PTV2 (TCP2), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung, spinal cord, and heart. The physical component included the maximum and minimum dose as well as the standard deviation of the dose at PTV1. The most inhomogeneous target-dose distributions were obtained by using only the biological component of the objective function (biological optimization). By enabling the physical component in addition to the biological component, PTV1 inhomogeneity was reduced (biophysical optimization). As indices for toxicity to normal tissues, NTCP-values as well as maximum doses or dose levels to relevant fractions of the organ's volume were used. As indices for tumor control, TCP-values as well as minimum doses to the PTVs were used. Results: When optimization was performed with the biophysical as compared to the biological objective function, the PTV1 inhomogeneity decreased from 13 (8-23)% to 4 (2-9)% for the 3D-(p = 0.00009) and from 44 (33-56)% to 20 (9-34)% for the BIM

  15. Determination of the dose and dose distribution in radiation-linked polyolefins

    Andress, B.; Fischer, P.; Repp, H.H.; Roehl, P.

    1984-01-01

    The method serves the determination of the radiation dose and dose distribution in polyolefins cross-linked by electron beams; the cross-linking takes place in the presence of an additive which is inserted in the polyolefin by radiation. After the cross-linking the fraction of the additive which is not inserted will be extracted from the polyolefin and afterwards the total extinction of the polyolefin will be determined by photometry. This process allows in particular the determination of the quality of the irradiation conditions for the electron-beam cross-linking of medium-voltage cables insulated by polyolefins. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiation shielding and dose rate distribution for the building of the high dose rate accelerator

    Matsuda, Koji; Takagaki, Torao; Nakase, Yoshiaki; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-03-01

    A high dose rate electron accelerator was established at Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Takasaki Establishment, JAERI in the fiscal year of 1975. This report shows the fundamental concept for the radiation shielding of the accelerator building and the results of their calculations which were evaluated through the model experiments. After the construction of the building, the leak radiation was measured in order to evaluate the calculating method of radiation shielding. Dose rate distribution of X-rays was also measured in the whole area of the irradiation room as a data base. (author)

  17. Effect of nonuniform radial density distribution on the space charge dominated beam bunching

    Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2011-01-01

    Beam dynamics of a space charge dominated beam during the bunch compression is studied self consistently for the case of fixed shape non-uniform bell shape and hollow shape density distributions in the transverse direction. We have used thick slices at different parts of the beam to account for variation in the beam radius in the study of the transverse dynamics. The longitudinal dynamics has been studied using the disc model. The axial variation of the radius of the slices and emittance growth arising from the phase dependence of the transverse rf forces are also included in the simulation. We have modified the beam envelope equation to take into account the longitudinal space charge effect on the transverse motion which arises due to the finite bunch size. To demonstrate the application of the theoretical formulations developed, we have studied a sinusoidal beam bunching system and presented detailed numerical results.

  18. 125I eye plaque dose distribution including penumbra characteristics.

    de la Zerda, A; Chiu-Tsao, S T; Lin, J; Boulay, L L; Kanna, I; Kim, J H; Tsao, H S

    1996-03-01

    The two main purposes of this work are (1) to determine the penumbra characteristics for 125I eye plaque and the relative influence of the plaque and eye-air interface on the dose distribution, and (2) to initiate development of a treatment planning algorithm for clinical dose calculations. Dose was measured in a newly designed solid water eye phantom for an 125I (6711) seed at the center of a 20 mm COMS eye plaque using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) "cubes" and "minichips" inside and outside the eye, in the longitudinal and transverse central planes. TLD cubes were used in most locations, except for short distances from the seed and in the penumbra region. In the presence of both the plaque and the eye-air interface, the dose along the central axis was found to be reduced by 10% at 1 cm and up to 20% at 2.5 cm, relative to the bulk homogeneous phantom case. In addition, the overall dose reduction was greater for larger off-axis coordinates at a given depth. The penumbra characteristics due to the lip collimation were quantified, particularly the dependence of penumbra center and width on depth. Only small differences were observed between the profiles in the transverse and longitudinal planes. In the bulk geometry (without the eye-air interface), the dose reduction due to the presence of the plaque alone was found to be 7% at a depth of 2.5 cm. The additional reduction of 13% observed, with the presence of eye-air interface (20% combined), can be attributed to the lack of backscattering from the air in front of the eye. The dose-reduction effect due to the anterior air interface alone became unnoticeable at a depth of 1.1 cm (1.5 cm from the eye-air interface). An analytic fit to measured data was developed for clinical dose calculations for a centrally loaded seed. The central axis values of the dose rates multiplied by distance squared, Dr2, were fitted with a double exponential function of depth. The off-axis profile of Dr2, at a given depth, was

  19. Clinical implications of alternative TCP models for nonuniform dose distributions

    Deasy, J. O.

    1995-01-01

    Several tumor control probability (TCP) models for nonuniform dose distributions were compared, including: (a) a logistic/inter-patient-heterogeneity model, (b) a probit/inter-patient-heterogeneity model, (c) a Poisson/radioresistant-strain/identical-patients model, (d) a Poisson/inter-patient-heterogeneity model and (e) a Poisson/intra-tumor- and inter-patient-heterogeneity model. The models were analyzed in terms of the probability of controlling a single tumor voxel (the voxel control probability, or VCP), as a function of voxel volume and dose. Alternatively, the VCP surface can be thought of as the effect of a small cold spot. The models based on the Poisson equation which include inter-patient heterogeneity ((d) and (e)) have VCP surfaces (VCP as a function of dose and volume) which have a threshold 'waterfall' shape: below the waterfall (in dose), VCP is nearly zero. The threshold dose decreases with decreasing voxel volume. However, models (a), (b), and (c) all show a high probability of controlling a voxel (VCP>50%) with very low dose (e.g., 1 Gy) if the voxel is small (smaller than about 10 -3 of the tumor volume). Model (c) does not have the waterfall shape at low volumes due to the assumption of patient uniformity and a neglect of the effect of the clonogens which are more radiosensitive (and more numerous). Models (a) and (b) deviate from the waterfall shape at low volumes due to numerical differences between the functions used and the Poisson function. Hence, the Possion models which include inter-patient heterogeneities ((d) and (e)) are more sensitive to the effects of small cold spots than the other models considered

  20. The determination of the space distribution, energy spectrum and dose parameters of thermal column beam resulting from swimming pool reactor

    Chen Changmao; Xie Jianlun; Leng Ruiping; Song Shushou; Su Jingling

    1991-01-01

    The axial and radial distribution, epithermal energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate of thermal column beam resulting from SPR have been determined in the Institute of Atomic Energy. The results show that the neutron fluence rate along the axial direction decreases as the distance increases outside the thermal column channel, and the trend of fluence rate attenuation follows approximately the inverse square law of a point source. When the reactor thermal power rate is 3 MW, at a distance of 50 cm to the channel, the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate are about 1.61 x 10 7 and 6.1 x 10 4 n/cm 2 · s respectively; dose equivalent rates are some 62 and 2.9 cSv/h respectively. At the end of the chennal, γ dose equivalent rate is 60 cSv/h or so

  1. Calculations of dose distributions using a neural network model

    Mathieu, R; Martin, E; Gschwind, R; Makovicka, L; Contassot-Vivier, S; Bahi, J

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of tumours, while sparing, as much as possible, surrounding healthy tissues. In order to master and optimize the dose distribution within the patient, dosimetric planning has to be carried out. Thus, for determining the most accurate dose distribution during treatment planning, a compromise must be found between the precision and the speed of calculation. Current techniques, using analytic methods, models and databases, are rapid but lack precision. Enhanced precision can be achieved by using calculation codes based, for example, on Monte Carlo methods. However, in spite of all efforts to optimize speed (methods and computer improvements), Monte Carlo based methods remain painfully slow. A newer way to handle all of these problems is to use a new approach in dosimetric calculation by employing neural networks. Neural networks (Wu and Zhu 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 913-22) provide the advantages of those various approaches while avoiding their main inconveniences, i.e., time-consumption calculations. This permits us to obtain quick and accurate results during clinical treatment planning. Currently, results obtained for a single depth-dose calculation using a Monte Carlo based code (such as BEAM (Rogers et al 2003 NRCC Report PIRS-0509(A) rev G)) require hours of computing. By contrast, the practical use of neural networks (Mathieu et al 2003 Proceedings Journees Scientifiques Francophones, SFRP) provides almost instant results and quite low errors (less than 2%) for a two-dimensional dosimetric map

  2. An IMRT dose distribution study using commercial verification software

    Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Fernando, W.; Rykers, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT requires users to confirm that the isodose distributions and relative doses calculated by their planning system match the doses delivered by their linear accelerators. To this end the commercially available software, VeriSoft TM (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was trialled to determine if the tools and functions it offered would be of benefit to this process. The CMS Xio (Computer Medical System) treatment planning system was used to generate IMRT plans that were delivered with an upgraded Elekta SL15 linac. Kodak EDR2 film sandwiched in RW3 solid water (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used to measure the IMRT fields delivered with 6 MV photons. The isodose and profiles measured with the film generally agreed to within ± 3% or ± 3 mm with the planned doses, in some regions (outside the IMRT field) the match fell to within ± 5%. The isodose distributions of the planning system and the film could be compared on screen and allows for electronic records of the comparison to be kept if so desired. The features and versatility of this software has been of benefit to our IMRT QA program. Furthermore, the VeriSoft TM software allows for quick and accurate, automated planar film analysis.Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  3. Conceptual basis for calculations of absorbed-dose distributions

    Sinclair, W.K.; Rossi, H.H.; Alsmiller, R.G.; Berger, M.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Roesch, W.C.; Spencer, L.V.; Zaider, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation on matter are initiated by processes in which atoms and molecules of the medium are ionized or excited. Over a wide range of conditions, it is an excellent approximation to assume that the average number of ionizations and excitations is proportional to the amount of energy imparted to the medium by ionizing radiation in the volume of interest. The absorbed dose, that is, the average amount of energy imparted to the medium per unit mass, is therefore of central importance for the production of radiation effects, and the calculation of absorbed-dose distributions in irradiated media is the focus of interest of the present report. It should be pointed out, however, that even though absorbed dose is useful as an index relating absorbed energy to radiation effects, it is almost never sufficient; it may have to be supplemented by other information, such as the distributions of the amounts of energy imparted to small sites, the correlation of the amounts of energy imparted to adjacent sites, and so on. Such quantities are termed stochastic quantities. Unless otherwise stated, all quantities considered in this report are non-stochastic. 266 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Distributed collaborative probabilistic design for turbine blade-tip radial running clearance using support vector machine of regression

    Fei, Cheng-Wei; Bai, Guang-Chen

    2014-12-01

    To improve the computational precision and efficiency of probabilistic design for mechanical dynamic assembly like the blade-tip radial running clearance (BTRRC) of gas turbine, a distribution collaborative probabilistic design method-based support vector machine of regression (SR)(called as DCSRM) is proposed by integrating distribution collaborative response surface method and support vector machine regression model. The mathematical model of DCSRM is established and the probabilistic design idea of DCSRM is introduced. The dynamic assembly probabilistic design of aeroengine high-pressure turbine (HPT) BTRRC is accomplished to verify the proposed DCSRM. The analysis results reveal that the optimal static blade-tip clearance of HPT is gained for designing BTRRC, and improving the performance and reliability of aeroengine. The comparison of methods shows that the DCSRM has high computational accuracy and high computational efficiency in BTRRC probabilistic analysis. The present research offers an effective way for the reliability design of mechanical dynamic assembly and enriches mechanical reliability theory and method.

  5. Effect of temporal distribution of dose on oncogenic transformation

    Miller, R.C.; Brenner, D.J.; Geard, C.R.; Marino, S.A.; Hall, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    Risk estimates for neutron hazards are of considerable social and economic importance. Effectiveness per unit dose of X or γ rays (low-LET radiations) has been consistently observed to be dependent on the temporal distribution of dose. In a series of comparisons, 0.5 Gy of single or fractionated (five fractions in 8 h), neutrons of 0.23, 0.35, 0.45, 5.9, or 13.7 MeV were delivered to a synchronous C3H 10T1/2 cells. Transformation frequencies per surviving cell are shown. Cells exposed to one energy (5.9 MeV) show a significant enhancement at the 95% level due to fractionated exposures, and at the 85% confidence level the 0.35- and 0.45-MeV fractionated exposures additionally result in significantly greater transformation frequencies. The frequencies of surviving cells per dish between a single or fractionated exposure vary by less than 10%. In three of five pairwise comparisons, fractionated exposures result in statistically greater frequencies of transformants per dish, and are in complete agreement with the results when induction is expressed as transformants per surviving cell. However, after 0.23-MeV neutron irradiation, the single dose resulted in a greater incidence of transformed foci than the fractionated dose

  6. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    Chauvie, Stephane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities

  7. Analysis of dose distribution in interventionist radiology professionals

    Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Silva, Leonardo Peres; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Luz, Eara de Souza

    2005-01-01

    In this work, an evaluation was made of the distribution of dose received by professionals involved in some procedures of Interventional Radiology at hospitals and clinics in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. For these measurements thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) of LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD100) were used, positioned at different points of the body of professionals: the hands, knees, neck, forehead and chest, inside and outside the lead apron. The measurements were made by procedure and/or a day of work, and the TLD were calibrated in equivalent operating magnitude of personal dose (Hp (d)) at different depths: 0.07 mm, 3 mm and 10 mm. In some procedures, physicians (holders of service and residents) received significant doses. The results show the importance of the appropriate training of these professionals and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as thyroid shield, which is not always used. Based on these evaluations, some suggestions were made in order to optimize the dose values in these procedures and a discussion on the need for additional monitoring points

  8. Dose equivalent distribution during occupational exposure in oncology

    Marco H, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the radiological surveillance of occupationally exposed workers at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiology during 26 years. The incidence of the equivalent dose in the personal working with radiant sources and radioactive substances in areas of x rays diagnostic, teletherapy, brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and biomedical research was showed. The employed dosimetric system makes use of ORWO RD3/RD4 monitoring film with copper and lead filters inside a plastic cassette manufactured in Cuba. The experimental method is supported by the optical densitometric analysis of films together with a set of standard film calibrated in standard X and gamma photon beams by means of a secondary standard dosimeter, type NPL. Statistics show that except those workings with radium-226, manual brachytherapy or Mo-99/Tc-99 generator elution, the equivalent dose distribution in our workers has been kept in regions well down the annual permissible limit. (authors). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Simulation of lung cancer treatment with equivalent dose calculation and analysis of the dose distribution profile

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Marques L, J.; Da Silva, A. X.; Dos Reis J, J. P.; Da Silva J, W. F. R.; Arruda C, S. C.; Monteiro de S, E.; Santos B, D. V.

    2017-10-01

    Actually, lung cancer is one of the most lethal types, due to the disease in the majority of the cases asymptomatic in the early stages, being the detection of the pathology in advanced stage, with tumor considerable volume. Dosimetry analysis of healthy organs under real conditions is not feasible. Therefore, computational simulations are used to auxiliary in dose verification in organs of patients submitted to radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to calculate the equivalent dose, due to photons, in surrounding in healthy organs of a patient submitted to radiotherapy for lung cancer, through computational modeling. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX code (Version, 2006], Rex and Regina phantom [ICRP 110, 2008], radiotherapy room, Siemens Oncor Expression accelerator operating at 6 MV and treatment protocol adopted at the Inca (National Cancer Institute, Brazil). The results obtained, considering the dose due to photons for both phantom indicate that organs located inside the thoracic cavity received higher dose, being the bronchi, heart and esophagus more affected, due to the anatomical positioning. Clinical data describe the development of bronchiolitis, esophagitis, and cardiomyopathies with decreased cardiopulmonary function as one of the major effects of lung cancer treatment. In the Regina phantom, the second largest dose was in the region of the breasts with 615,73 mSv / Gy, while in the Rex 514,06 mSv / Gy, event related to the difference of anatomical structure of the organ. Through the t mesh command, a qualitative analysis was performed between the dose deposition profile of the planning system and the simulated treatment, with a similar profile of the dose distribution being verified along the patients body. (Author)

  10. Effect of head size on 10B dose distribution

    Gupta, N.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.

    1992-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treatment of brain tumors is based on the utilization of large epithermal-neutron fields. Epithermal neutrons thermalize at depths of ∼2.5 cm inside the head and provide a maximum thermal fluence at deep-seated tumor sites with minimum damage to normal tissue. Brain tissue is a highly scattering medium for epithermal and thermal neutrons; therefore, a broad treatment field enables epithermal neutrons to enter the head over a large area. These neutrons slow down as they undergo scattering collisions and contribute to the thermal-neutron fluence at the tumor location. With the use of large neutron fields, the size of the head affects the thermal-neutron distribution and thereby the 10 B absorbed dose distribution inside the head. In this paper, the authors describe measurements using a boron trifluoride (BF 3 )-filled proportional counter to determine the effect of head size on 10 B absorbed dose distributions for a broad field accelerator epithermal-neutron source

  11. Radial force distribution changes associated with tangential force production in cylindrical grasping, and the importance of anatomical registration.

    Pataky, Todd C; Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-01-10

    Radial force (F(r)) distributions describe grip force coordination about a cylindrical object. Recent studies have employed only explicit F(r) tasks, and have not normalized for anatomical variance when considering F(r) distributions. The goals of the present study were (i) to explore F(r) during tangential force production tasks, and (ii) to examine the extent to which anatomical registration (i.e. spatial normalization of anatomically analogous structures) could improve signal detectability in F(r) data. Twelve subjects grasped a vertically oriented cylindrical handle (diameter=6 cm) and matched target upward tangential forces of 10, 20, and 30 N. F(r) data were measured using a flexible pressure mat with an angular resolution of 4.8°, and were registered using piecewise-linear interpolation between five manually identified points-of-interest. Results indicate that F(r) was primarily limited to three contact regions: the distal thumb, the distal fingers, and the fingers' metatacarpal heads, and that, while increases in tangential force caused significant increases in F(r) for these regions, they did not significantly affect the F(r) distribution across the hand. Registration was found to substantially reduce between-subject variability, as indicated by both accentuated F(r) trends, and amplification of the test statistic. These results imply that, while subjects focus F(r) primarily on three anatomical regions during cylindrical grasp, inter-subject anatomical differences introduce a variability that, if not corrected for via registration, may compromise one's ability to draw anatomically relevant conclusions from grasping force data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved

  13. AIRGAP MAGNETIC INDUCTION DISTRIBUTION IN A COAXIALLY-LINEAR SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR WITH AXIAL AND RADIAL DIRECTION OF THE RUNNER PERMANENT MAGNETS MAGNETIZATION

    Abbasian Mohsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Results of theoretical and experimental research on magnetic induction distribution in the air gap of a coaxially-linear synchronous motor with reciprocal motion within the pole pitch and axial and radial direction of the permanent magnets magnetization are presented.

  14. Measuring trace gas emission from multi-distributed sources using vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) and backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) techniques

    Two micrometeorological techniques for measuring trace gas emission rates from distributed area sources were evaluated using a variety of synthetic area sources. The accuracy of the vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) and the backward Lagrangian (bLS) techniques with an open-path optical spectrosco...

  15. Modelling the radial distribution of the inventory of U and Pu isotopes in PWR fuel rods at high burnup

    Furlano, L.; Marino, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays trends on nuclear reactors are to take advantage of a more efficient use of the fuels. In this way, goals like decreasing the volume of radioactive wastes, increasing life time in the reactor, extended burnup and accident-tolerance fuels are taken as the principal guidelines for the design and construction for actual nuclear fuels. The development of tools and the capability of prediction of the behaviour of nuclear fuels under irradiation let us design and improve the new demanding conditions without neglecting the security and economics. In this way, the study of the evolution and details of the fissile material of the fuel in particular the 235 U inventory evolution and the 239 Pu production and evolution are demanding conditions. We implemented the PILR code, based on the RAPID model, for the radial distribution of U and Pu radioisotopes. The aim of this work is to determine production and disappearance of Pu and U isotopes during the irradiation of commercial and experimental fuel rods. (author)

  16. Sensitivity of ion-induced sputtering to the radial distribution of energy transfers: A molecular dynamics study

    Mookerjee, S.; Khan, S. A.; Roy, A.; Beuve, M.; Toulemonde, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using different models for the deposition of energy on the lattice and a classical molecular dynamics approach to the subsequent transport, we evaluate how the details of the energy deposition model influence sputtering yield from a Lennard-Jones target irradiated with a MeV/u ion beam. Two energy deposition models are considered: a uniform, instantaneous deposition into a cylinder of fixed radius around the projectile ion track, used in earlier molecular dynamics and fluid dynamics simulations of sputtering yields; and an energy deposition distributed in time and space based on the formalism developed in the thermal spike model. The dependence of the sputtering yield on the total energy deposited on the target atoms is very sensitive to the energy deposition model. To clarify the origin of this strong dependence, we explore the role of the radial expansion of the electronic system prior to the transfer of its energy to the lattice. The results imply that observables such as the sputtering yield may be used as signatures of the fast electron-lattice energy transfer in the electronic energy-loss regime, and indicate the need for more experimental and theoretical investigations of these processes

  17. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  18. Interface effects on dose distributions in irradiated media

    Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    It has long been recognized that nonuniformities in dose distributions may occur in the immediate vicinity of a boundary between two different media. Considerable work has been done to determine interface effects in media irradiated by photons or in media containing β- or α-particle emitters. More recently interface effects have become of interest in additional problems, including pion radiotherapy and radiation effects in electronic microcircuits in space vehicles. These problems arise when pion capture stars or proton-nucleus interactions produce a spectrum of charged nuclear fragments near an interface. The purpose of this paper is to examine interface effects in detail as to their specific origin. We have made Monte Carlo calculations of dose distributions near an interface in a systematic way for a number of idealized cases in order to indicate the separate influences of several factors including different stopping powers of the two media, nonconstancy (e.g., Bragg peak) in the energy loss curve for the particles, different particle spectra in the two media, and curvature of the boundary between the two media

  19. Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability in heavy-ion radiotherapy

    Wen Xiaoqiong; Li Qiang; Zhou Guangming; Li Wenjian; Wei Zengquan

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the influence of the un-uniform dose distribution on the clinical treatment result, the Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability was investigated. Basing on the formula deduced previously for survival fraction of cells irradiated by the un-uniform heavy-ion irradiation field and the theory of tumor control probability, the tumor control probability was calculated for a tumor mode exposed to different dose distribution homogeneity. The results show that the tumor control probability responding to the same total dose will decrease if the dose distribution homogeneity gets worse. In clinical treatment, the dose distribution homogeneity should be better than 95%

  20. The change of radial power factor distribution due to RCCA insertion at the first cycle core of AP1000

    Susilo, J.; Suparlina, L.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The using of a computer program for the PWR type core neutronic design parameters analysis has been carried out in some previous studies. These studies included a computer code validation on the neutronic parameters data values resulted from measurements and benchmarking calculation. In this study, the AP1000 first cycle core radial power peaking factor validation and analysis were performed using CITATION module of the SRAC2006 computer code. The computer code has been also validated with a good result to the criticality values of VERA benchmark core. The AP1000 core power distribution calculation has been done in two-dimensional X-Y geometry through ¼ section modeling. The purpose of this research is to determine the accuracy of the SRAC2006 code, and also the safety performance of the AP1000 core first cycle operating. The core calculations were carried out with the several conditions, those are without Rod Cluster Control Assembly (RCCA), by insertion of a single RCCA (AO, M1, M2, MA, MB, MC, MD) and multiple insertion RCCA (MA + MB, MA + MB + MC, MA + MB + MC + MD, and MA + MB + MC + MD + M1). The maximum power factor of the fuel rods value in the fuel assembly assumedapproximately 1.406. The calculation results analysis showed that the 2-dimensional CITATION module of SRAC2006 code is accurate in AP1000 power distribution calculation without RCCA and with MA+MB RCCA insertion.The power peaking factor on the first operating cycle of the AP1000 core without RCCA, as well as with single and multiple RCCA are still below in the safety limit values (less then about 1.798). So in terms of thermal power generated by the fuel assembly, then it can be considered that the AP100 core at the first operating cycle is safe.

  1. Generation of uniformly distributed dose points for anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization methods in brachytherapy.

    Lahanas, M; Baltas, D; Giannouli, S; Milickovic, N; Zamboglou, N

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the accuracy of statistical parameters of dose distributions in brachytherapy using actual clinical implants. These include the mean, minimum and maximum dose values and the variance of the dose distribution inside the PTV (planning target volume), and on the surface of the PTV. These properties have been studied as a function of the number of uniformly distributed sampling points. These parameters, or the variants of these parameters, are used directly or indirectly in optimization procedures or for a description of the dose distribution. The accurate determination of these parameters depends on the sampling point distribution from which they have been obtained. Some optimization methods ignore catheters and critical structures surrounded by the PTV or alternatively consider as surface dose points only those on the contour lines of the PTV. D(min) and D(max) are extreme dose values which are either on the PTV surface or within the PTV. They must be avoided for specification and optimization purposes in brachytherapy. Using D(mean) and the variance of D which we have shown to be stable parameters, achieves a more reliable description of the dose distribution on the PTV surface and within the PTV volume than does D(min) and D(max). Generation of dose points on the real surface of the PTV is obligatory and the consideration of catheter volumes results in a realistic description of anatomical dose distributions.

  2. A new design of a lead-acrylic shield for staff dose reduction in radial and femoral access coronary catheterization

    Eder, H. [Deptartment of Radiation Protection (Germany); Seidenbusch, M.C.; Treitl, M. [Muenchen Univ. Clinical Center (Germany). Inst. for Clinical Radiology; Gilligan, P. [Mater Private Hospital, Dublin (Ireland). Medical Physics

    2015-10-15

    Today's standard radiation protection during coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions is the combined use of lead acrylic shields and table-mounted lower body protection. Ambient dose measurements, however, have shown that these protection devices need improvement. Using an anthropomorphic physical phantom, various scenarios were investigated with respect to personnel exposure: (a) enlarging the shield (b) adding a flexible protective curtain to the bottom side of the shield, and (c) application of radioprotective patient drapes. For visualization of the dose reduction effect, Monte Carlo simulations were performed. The flexible curtain in contact with the patient's body reduces the ambient dose rate at the operator's position by up to (87.5 % ± 7.1) compared to the situation with the bare shield. The use of both the flexible curtain and the patient drape reduces the ambient dose rate by up to (90.8 % ± 7). Similar results were achieved for the assisting personnel when they were positioned next to the operator. In addition, the enlarged shield provides better protection of the head region of tall operators. Adding a flexible protective curtain to the bottom side of the shield can protect operators from high doses, especially for body parts which are not protected by lead aprons, e.g. head, and eye lenses. This may be important with respect to lower dose limits for eye lenses in future. The protective effect in real-life working conditions is still being evaluated in an ongoing clinical study.

  3. Use of a concise prescription for specifying absolute dose distribution in external beam radiation therapy

    Viggers, D.A.; Shalev, S.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy dose distributions are usually calculated relative to some normalization point to which a prescribed dose in grays is to be delivered. Often the radiation therapist requests that the prescribed dose be delivered to some other point(s), such as the 90% isodose. Therefore the prescribed dose is not well defined. Furthermore, this procedure leaves the shape of the dose distribution unspecified. The authors have used a dose prescription specifying the volumes of target and nontarget tissue that must lie within dose limits stated in grays. These dose-volume limits determine the magnitude and shape of the dose distribution. The prescription is well defined while allowing the absolute dose at a chosen point to be adjusted so that the dose distribution satisfies the prescription

  4. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic

    Palmer, A. L.; Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE ® with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO 2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE ® , 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE ® , and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated

  5. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE® radiochromic plastic.

    Palmer, A L; Di Pietro, P; Alobaidli, S; Issa, F; Doran, S; Bradley, D; Nisbet, A

    2013-06-01

    Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE(®) with optical-CT readout. Ge-doped SiO2 fibers with 6 μm active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 μm active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE(®), 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE(®), and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental conditions used in this study, the useful range from an isolated HDR source was 5-40 mm for

  6. Natural background radiation and population dose distribution in India

    Nambi, K.S.V.; Bapat, V.N.; David, M.; Sundaram, V.K.; Sunta, C.M.; Soman, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A country-wide survey of the outdoor natural background gamma radiation levels has been made using mailed thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The salient features of the results are: (1) The air-kerma levels and the population doses in various states follow log-normal and normal distributions respectively. (2) The national average value for the air dose (air-kerma) is 775 ± 370 (1σ)μGy/y. (3) The lowest air-kerma recorded is 0.23 mGy/y at Minicoy (Laccadive Islands) and the highest is 26.73 mGy/y at Chavra (monazite areas, Kerala). (4) There are significant temporal variation s (even as high as ± 40 per cent) of the background radiation level at many locations and at least in 10 locations where radon/thoron measurements are available, these could be associated with the seasonal variations in radon/thoron levels. (5) The mail control TLDs indicate a country-wide average value of 785 ± 225 μGy/y for the air-kerma which can be considered to provide a truly national average value for the natural background radiation level in India. (6) The mean natural radiation per caput for the country works out to be 690 ± 200 (1σ) Sv/y. (7) The natural radiation per caput seems to be maximum for Andhra Pradesh (1065 ± 325 μSv/y) and minimum for Maharashtra (370 ± 80 μSv/y). (8) The population dose from the external natural background radiation is estimated to be half a million person-Sievert. (9) Assuming 1 CRP risk factor, it can be estimated that just one out of the 43 cancer deaths occurring on an average per 100,000 population in India, can be attributed to the external natural background radiation. (author). 18 refs., 13 tabs., 9 figs

  7. Scaling neutron absorbed dose distributions from one medium to another

    Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1982-11-01

    Central axis depth dose (CADD) and off-axis absorbed dose ratio (OAR) measurements were made in water, muscle and whole skeletal bone TE-solutions, mineral oil and glycerin with a clinical neutron therapy beam. These measurements show that, for a given neutron beam quality and field size, there is a universal CADD distribution at infinity if the depth in the phantom is expressed in terms of appropriate scaling lengths. These are essentially the kerma-weighted neutron mean free paths in the media. The method used in ICRU No. 26 to scale the CADD by the ratio of the densities is shown to give incorrect results. the OAR's measured in different media at depths proportional to the respective mean free paths were also found to be independent of the media to a good approximation. It is recommended that relative CADD and OAR measurements be performed in water because of its universality and convenience. A table of calculated scaling lengths is given for various neutron energy spectra and for various tissues and materials of practical importance in neutron dosimetry

  8. A prediction method of the effect of radial heat flux distribution on critical heat flux in CANDU fuel bundles

    Yuan, Lan Qin; Yang, Jun; Harrison, Noel

    2014-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments to study fuel behaviors have been performed in the experimental loops of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in support of the development of new fuel technologies. Before initiating a fuel irradiation experiment, the experimental proposal must be approved to ensure that the test fuel strings put into the NRU loops meet safety margin requirements in critical heat flux (CHF). The fuel strings in irradiation experiments can have varying degrees of fuel enrichment and burnup, resulting in large variations in radial heat flux distribution (RFD). CHF experiments performed in Freon flow at CRL for full-scale bundle strings with a number of RFDs showed a strong effect of RFD on CHF. A prediction method was derived based on experimental CHF data to account for the RFD effect on CHF. It provides good CHF predictions for various RFDs as compared to the data. However, the range of the tested RFDs in the CHF experiments is not as wide as that required in the fuel irradiation experiments. The applicability of the prediction method needs to be examined for the RFDs beyond the range tested by the CHF experiments. The Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV was employed to simulate the CHF behavior for RFDs that would be encountered in fuel irradiation experiments. The CHF predictions using the derived method were compared with the ASSERT simulations. It was observed that the CHF predictions agree well with the ASSERT simulations in terms of CHF, confirming the applicability of the prediction method in fuel irradiation experiments. (author)

  9. Calculation of the dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays

    Cho, Sang H.; Reece, Warren D.; Poston, John W. Sr. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The dose distribution in water from {sup 71}Ge K-shell x-rays (E{sub ave}=9.44 eV) was calculated for various source configurations using both analytic and GS4 Monte Carlo calculations. The point source kernel and the buildup factor are presented. The buildup factor for a point source in water has been found to increase up to about 1.1 as radial distance approaches 1 cm. Comparison between {sup 71}Ge and {sup 90}Sr/Y shows a similarity between their relative dose distribution in water. The dose distribution from a disc source was calculated using the EGS4 code and compared with the results from analytic calculation. Excellent agreement was observed, confirming the validity of analytic calculations. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge disc source was calculated to be about 1.3x10{sup -5} Gy MBq{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Based on the results from his study, {sup 71}Ge activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 10} Bq({approx}1 Ci) might be necessary to obtain dose rates typical of {sup 90}Sr/Y ophthalmic applicators. The possibility of using {sup 71}Ge as a source of radioactive stents was also investigated. A {sup 71}Ge stent was modelled as a cylindrical shell source and the dose rates were determined by Monte Carlo calculations. Some calculated results are compared with published values for a {sup 32}P-coated stent. The dose rate at 0.01 cm from a {sup 71}Ge stent has been calculated to be about .5x10{sup -3} Gy MBq{sup -1}h{sup -1}, which is much lower than the reported dose rate at the same distance from a {sup 32}P-coated stent. However, an initial source activity of the order of 3.7x10{sup 7} Bq ({approx}1 mCi) would easily result in a typical target dose ({approx}24 Gy) needed for intravascular stent applications. In conclusion, {sup 71}Ge sources could be used as alternatives to beta sources and, unlike high-energy ({approx}MeV) beta sources, may provide easily predictable dose distributions in heterogeneous media and low dose rates, which might be beneficial for

  10. High-resolution 3D dose distribution measured for two low-energy x-ray brachytherapy seeds: 125I and 103Pd

    Massillon-JL, G.; Minniti, R.; Mitch, M.G.; Soares, C.G.; Hearn, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the 3D absorbed dose distribution around 125 I and 103 Pd low-energy photon brachytherapy seeds using a high-spatial-resolution gel scanning system to address the current difficulty in measuring absorbed dose at close distances to these sources as a consequence of high dose rate gradient. A new version of BANG-gel coupled with a small format laser CT scanner has been used. Measurements were performed with 100 μm resolution in all dimensions. In particular, radial dose function and absorbed dose rate in the plane parallel to the sources longitudinal-axis were derived at radial distances smaller than or equal to 1 cm. In addition, the energy dependence was evaluated, finding that, within measurement uncertainties, the gel response is independent of the energy for energy photon values between 20 keV and 1250 keV. We have observed that at distances larger than 1.4 mm from the source, the delivered dose is similar to predictions from published Monte Carlo calculations (MC) for the 125 I seed. For distances between 1 mm and 3 mm, differences in magnitude and shape are significant for the 103 Pd seed, where an enhancement is observed. In the enhancement region, a difference of up to 70% in the radial dose function was obtained. Such observation suggests a contribution from other radionuclides emitting beta-particles or electrons, and not considered by MC. To understand the effect, spectrometry measurements were performed. A small contribution of 102 Rh/ 102m Rh radionuclide relative to 103 Pd was observed and its importance on the absorbed dose measured at close distances to the seed is time dependent and consequently, avoids reproducible measurements. Finally, the results obtained in this work underscore the importance of using high-spatial-resolution and water-equivalent detectors for measuring absorbed dose in low-energy photon radiation fields.

  11. Evaluation of patient and staff absorbed doses during coronary angiography and intervention by femoral and radial artery access

    Di Pace, L.; Nobili, C.; Sandri, S.

    2002-01-01

    ITER is an international research and development (RD) project to develop fusion energy as the way to a clean and sustainable energy source. It is perhaps the largest international collaborative RD investment after the International Space Station. ITER would be the final step in fusion research before the creation of a fusion power demonstration plant. Last ITER project was established in 2000 and refers to a compact, reduced cost, fusion reactor. It is the last step of a story started more then ten years ago. Engineering design activities started in 1992 with the collaboration of Japan, USA, EU and Russia. In 1999 USA left the project and the three remaining partners decided to develop a reduced cost design named ITER FEAT. Worker safety studies began in 1992 and were mainly devoted to the assessment of radiation collective dose, or occupational radiation exposure (ORE). Collective dose evaluation for ITER project started as a work proposal aimed to provide a reference for the ITER designers in order to optimize the project from the worker safety point of view

  12. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  13. Scaling neutron absorbed dose distributions from one medium to another

    Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Central axis depth dose (CADD) and off-axis absorbed dose ratio (OAR) measurements were made in water, muscle and whole skeletal bone tissue-equivalent (TE) solutions, mineral oil, and glycerin with a clinical neutron therapy beam. These measurements show that, for a given neutron beam quality and field size, there is a universal CADD distribution at infinity if the depth in the phantom is expressed in terms of appropriate scaling lengths. These are essentially the kerma-weighted neutron mean free paths in the media. The method used in ICRU Report No. 26 to scale the CADD by the ratio of the densities is shown to give incorrect results. The OARs measured in different media at depths proportional to the respective mean free paths were also found to be independent of the media to a good approximation. Therefore, neutron beam CADDs and OARs may be measured in either TE solution (USA practice) or water (European practice), and having determined the respective scaling lengths, all measurements may be scaled from one medium to any other. It is recommended that for general treatment planning purposes, scaling be made to TE muscle with a density of 1.04 g cm -3 , since this value represents muscle and other soft tissues better than TE solution of density 1.07 g cm -3 . For such a transformation, relative measurements made in water are found to require very small corrections. Hence, it is further recommended that relative CADD and OAR measurements be performed in water because of its universality and convenience. Finally, a table of calculated scaling lengths is given for various neutron energy spectra and for various tissues and materials of practical importance in neutron dosimetry

  14. A peculiar distribution of radial velocities of faint radio-galaxies with 13.0<=msub(corr)<=15.5

    Karoji, H.; Nottale, L.; Vigier, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    A sample of 41 radio-galaxies with 13.0<=msub(corr)<=15.5 has been analyzed to test the angular redshift anisotropy discovered on Sc I galaxies by Rubin, Rubin and Ford (1973). The sample does not present their anisotropy but contains an even more curious distribution of radial velocities which suggests that the Rubin-Ford effect results from an anomalous redshift of light when it travels through clusters of galaxies. (Auth.)

  15. Study of dose distribution in high energy photon beam used in radiotherapy

    Rafaravavy, R.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Bridier, A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution in a medium traversed by a photon beam depends on beam energy, field size and medium nature. Percent depth dose (PDD), Dose Profile (DP) and Opening Collimator Factor (OCF) curves will be established to study this distribution. So, the PDD curves are composed by tree parts: the build-up region, the maximal dose and the quasi-equilibrium region. The maximum dose depth and the dose in depth increase with increasing photon beam energy but the dose surface decreases. The PDD increases with increasing field size.

  16. 3D Model Studies on the Effect of Bed and Powder Type Upon Radial Static Pressure and Powder Distribution in Metallurgical Shaft Furnaces

    Panic B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of gases in metallurgical shaft furnaces has a decisive influence on the course and process efficiency. Radial changes in porosity of the bed cause uneven flow of gas along the radius of the reactor, which sometimes is deliberate and intentional. However, holdup of solid particles in descending packed beds of metallurgical shaft furnaces can lead to unintentional changes in porosity of the bed along the radial reactor. Unintentional changes in porosity often disrupt the flow of gas causing poor performance of the furnace. Such disruptions of flow may occur in the blast furnace due to high level of powder content in gas caused by large amount of coal dust/powder insufflated as fuel substitute. The paper describes the model test results of radial distribution of static pressure and powder hold up within metallurgical reactor. The measurements were carried out with the use of 3D physical model of two-phase flow gas-powder in the moving (descending packed bed. Sinter or blast furnace pellets were used as packed bed while carbon powder or iron powder were used as the powder. Wide diversity within both static pressure distribution and powder distribution along the radius of the reactor were observed once the change in the type of powder occurred.

  17. The Gaia-ESO Survey: the present-day radial metallicity distribution of the Galactic disc probed by pre-main-sequence clusters

    Spina, L.; Randich, S.; Magrini, L.; Jeffries, R. D.; Friel, E. D.; Sacco, G. G.; Pancino, E.; Bonito, R.; Bravi, L.; Franciosini, E.; Klutsch, A.; Montes, D.; Gilmore, G.; Vallenari, A.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Smiljanic, R.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Donati, P.; Frasca, A.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The radial metallicity distribution in the Galactic thin disc represents a crucial constraint for modelling disc formation and evolution. Open star clusters allow us to derive both the radial metallicity distribution and its evolution over time. Aims: In this paper we perform the first investigation of the present-day radial metallicity distribution based on [Fe/H] determinations in late type members of pre-main-sequence clusters. Because of their youth, these clusters are therefore essential for tracing the current interstellar medium metallicity. Methods: We used the products of the Gaia-ESO Survey analysis of 12 young regions (age ages is not easily explained by the models. Our results reveal a complex interplay of several processes (e.g. star formation activity, initial mass function, supernova yields, gas flows) that controlled the recent evolution of the Milky Way. Based on observations made with the ESO/VLT, at Paranal Observatory, under program 188.B-3002 (The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey).Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A70

  18. Measurement of the radial density distribution of the light emissions near the trajectory of fast ions in nitrogen

    Ibach, T.

    1983-11-01

    For the analysis of the emission and deceleration mechanisms of ionisation-electrons (delta-electrons) during the passage of fast ions through gases, the radial density distribution of the light emission has been measured, which is related with the (0,0)-transitions of two optical bands in nitrogen. These measurements have been made using a small aperture limited ion beam. The first band under study is the 2. positive system at 337.1 nm excited mainly by low energy electrons around 20 eV, and the second band is the 1. negative system at 391.4 nm excited by fast electrons with simultaneous ionisation. For these measurements an experimental setup has been developed with a telescope-like optical system and interference filters to detect the emitted light with a high spacial resolution (4x10 -4 of profile width) and a high dynamic range (10 6 ). The experiments have been performed using proton beams of different energies between 270 keV and 2.8 MeV, He-3 beams with 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u and a Ne beam with 270 keV/u with gas pressures in the range between 0.133 to 13.3 mbar. Based on the method of Abel inversion the spacial light emission density is deduced from the experimental distance functions and normalized to a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The results show that approximately half of the total light emission in the 1. negative system and the ionisation is caused by the primary interaction of the ion beam. For the same energy per nucleon this contribution decreases relative to the contribution of the delta-electrons with increasing atomic number. In addition the delta-radiation becomes harder with increasing atomic number. Good agreement is obtained by comparison with the results of other authors, which are based on probe techniques and Monte-Carlo-calculations. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Absorbed dose distribution analyses in irradiation with adjacent fields

    Cudalbu, C.; Onuc, C.; Andrada, S.

    2002-01-01

    Because the special irradiation technique with adjacent fields is the most used in the case of medulloblastoma treatment, we consider very important to specify some general information about medulloblastoma. This malignant disease has a large incidence in children with age between 5-7 years. This tumor usually originates in the cerebellum and is referred to as primitive undifferentiated tumor. It may spread contiguously to the cerebellar peduncle, floor of the fourth ventricle, into the cervical spine. In addition, it may spread via the cerebrospinal fluid intracranially and/or to the spinal cord. For this purpose it is necessary to perform a treatment technique with cranial tangential fields combined with adjacent fields for the entire spinal cord to achieve a perfect coverage of the zones with malignant cells. The treatment in this case is an association between surgery-radio-chemotherapy, where the radiotherapy has a very important roll and a curative purpose. This is due to the fact that the migration of malignant cells in the body can't be controlled by surgery. Because of this special irradiation technique used in medulloblastoma treatment, we chase to describe in this paper this complex type of irradiation where the implications of the beams divergence in doses distribution are essentials

  20. Patient positioning and its influence on dose distribution

    Morrissey, J.; Moss, R.; Watkins, P.

    2000-01-01

    In comparison to conventional radiotherapy, the positioning of a patient for BNCT treatment has some unique aspects. In particular, the neutron beam coming from the core of a nuclear research reactor is fixed and horizontal. In particular, a head fixation mask, which is prepared at the patient referral hospital, is included in the CT images. The mask allows reproducible positioning for use during the treatment. Fiducial markers placed on the mask before imaging, provide reference points. The INEEL treatment planning code used in Petten produces a beam angle, and beam line entrance and exit co-ordinates. These are related to the fiducial marker co-ordinates. A spreadsheet, named COSINE, developed at Petten produces positioning co-ordinates from the data produced by the rtt MC code. These co-ordinates are related to a positioning frame, which allows the marking of the beams on the mask. In order to have reliable treatment data, the influence of small deviations of angle or target point on dose distribution must be known. To demonstrate this, a number of beams have been calculated with the Petten beam, with slight variations and compared with an approved plan. (author)

  1. Distribution of dose within the body from a photon emitter present in an organ

    Snyder, W.S.; Ford, M.R.; Warner, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    A dosimetric system was developed which provides estimates of mean radiation dose to organs from photon sources distributed uniformly in one or more organs. Although the sources of photons are assumed to be distributed uniformly, it is not true that dose from these photons is uniformly distributed. In particular, when a source of photons is located in a particular organ, nearby tissues will be irradiated at doses which decrease markedly with distance from the source. The mean dose may give a poor approximation to the actual dose if the tissues over which dose is averaged are extensive, for example, the remainder of the body. A set of enveloping organs was devised for liver, lungs, etc., which give mean dose at distances from zero to one centimeter from the source organ, from one to two centimeters, etc. These can be used to yield estimates of the extent of inhomogeneity of the dose distribution from a source of photons located in the source organ

  2. Tube Radial Distribution Flow Separation in a Microchannel Using an Ionic Liquid Aqueous Two-Phase System Based on Phase Separation Multi-Phase Flow.

    Nagatani, Kosuke; Shihata, Yoshinori; Matsushita, Takahiro; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems were delivered into a capillary tube to achieve tube radial distribution flow (TRDF) or annular flow in a microspace. The phase diagram, viscosity of the phases, and TRDF image of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and NaOH system were examined. The TRDF was formed with inner ionic liquid-rich and outer ionic liquid-poor phases in the capillary tube. The phase configuration was explained using the viscous dissipation principle. We also examined the distribution of rhodamine B in a three-branched microchannel on a microchip with ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems for the first time.

  3. Dose/volume–response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. Materials and methods: The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. Results: The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55–70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.12–0.21; Rs = 0.11–0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power

  4. Reappraisal of the reference dose distribution in the UNSCEAR 1977 report

    Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides the update of the reference dose distribution proposed by G.A.M. Web and D. Beninson in Annex E to the UNSCEAR 1977 Report. To demonstrate compliance with regulatory obligations regarding doses to individuals, they defined it with the following properties: 1) The distribution of annual doses is log-normal; 2) The mean of the annual dose distribution is 5 m Gy (10% of the ICRP 1977 dose limit); 3) The proportion of workers exceeding 50 m Gy is 0.1%. The concept of the reference dose distribution is still important to understand the inherent variation of individual doses to workers controlled by source-related and individual-related efforts of best dose reduction. In the commercial nuclear power plant, the dose distribution becomes the more apart from the log-normal due to the stronger ALARA efforts and the revised dose limits. The monitored workers show about 1 m Sv of annual mean and far less than 0.1% of workers above 20 m Sv. The updated models of dose distribution consist of log-normal (no feedback on dose X) ln(X)∼N(μ,σ 2 ), hybrid log-normal (feedback on higher X by ρ) hyb(ρX)=ρX+ln(ρX)∼N(μ,σ 2 ), hybrid S B (feedback on higher dose quotient X/(D-X) not close to D by ρ) hyb[ρX/(D.X)]∼N(μ,σ 2 ) and Johnson's S B (limit to D) ln[X/(D-X)]∼N(μ,σ 2 ). These models afford interpreting the degree of dose control including dose constraint/limit to the reference distribution. Some of distributions are examined to characterize the variation of doses to members of the public with uncertainty. (author)

  5. 3D simulation of the catalyst density radial distribution in a riser of the FCC unit; Simulacao 3D da distribuicao radial de densidade do catalisador num riser de uma unidade de FCC

    Apolonio, Adelia M.; Santos, Valdemir A. dos; Finkler, Christine L.L. [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dantas, Carlos C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Local variations in the catalyst/vacuum gas oils mixing can lead to low conversions in some parts of a fluid cracking catalytic riser, while in other parts, high conversions will produce undesirable fuel gas and coke quantities. Knowledge of the apparent solid concentration in a cross-section of the riser is then essential. A computational program to generate tri dimensional graphics and level curves of the radial catalyst density in FCC risers was elaborated. The algorithm is based on determinations of the polynomial coefficients with aid of least square method and was tested with literature data, obtained by applications of nuclear technique of gamma radiation attenuation. The simulation results showed convergence with the experimental data. The precision of the mapping depends on the number of measurements and promote better conditions of diagnostic of the distribution catalyst type in the riser. (author)

  6. CONDOS-II, Radiation Dose from Consumer Product Distribution Chain

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: This code was developed under sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to serve as a tool for assessing radiation doses that may be associated with consumer products that contain radionuclides. The code calculates radiation dose equivalents resulting from user-supplied scenarios of exposures to radionuclides contained in or released from sources that contain radionuclides. Dose equivalents may be calculated to total body, skin surface, skeletal bone, testes, ovaries, liver, kidneys, lungs, and maximally exposed segments of the gastrointestinal tract from exposures via (1) direct, external irradiation by photons (including Bremsstrahlung) emitted from the source, (2) external irradiation by photons during immersion in air containing photon-emitting radionuclides that have escaped from the source, (3) internal exposures by all radiations emitted by inhaled radionuclides that have escaped from the source, and (4) internal exposures by all radiations emitted by ingested radionuclides that have escaped from the source. 2 - Method of solution: Organ dose equivalents are approximated in two ways, depending on the exposure type. For external exposures, energy specific organ-to-skin-surface dose conversion ratios are used to approximate dose equivalents to specific organs from doses calculated to a point on the skin surface. The organ-to-skin ratios are incorporated in organ- and nuclide-specific dose rate factors, which are used to approximate doses during immersion in contaminated air. For internal exposures, 50 year dose equivalents are calculated using organ- and nuclide-specific, 50 year dose conversion factors. Doses from direct, external exposures are calculated using the energy-specific dose conversion ratios, user supplied exposure conditions, and photon flux approximations for eleven source geometries. Available source geometries include: point, shielded and unshielded; line, shielded and unshielded; disk, shielded

  7. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  8. Exposure subpopulations and peculiarities of individual dose distributions among inhabitants of the Semipalatinsk region

    Pivovarov, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: pivov@inp.kz; Rukhin, A.; Seredavina, T.; Sushkova, N. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Hill, P. [Forschungszentrum GmbH, Department of Safety and Radiation Protection, Juelich (Germany)], E-mail: p.hill@fz-juelich.de; Peterson, L.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: peterson.leif@ieee.org

    2007-07-15

    The results of integral dose estimations for inhabitants of four settlements near the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site obtained by EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel in 2004-2005 years are discussed. It was found that the observed dose distributions have a nonstandard bimodal form with a mode at low doses in the range from 0.3-0.5 Gy, and a tail with higher doses, possibly suggesting two subpopulations. Possible reasons for such high doses are discussed.

  9. Estimation of the dose distribution within, and total dose to, the body of an acutely overexposed person

    Beer, G.P. de; Feather, J.I.; Oude, A. de; Language, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    In a case of accidental overexposure of a person, it is important to obtain a reliable value of the whole body dose as well as of the dose distribution within the body. Any follow-up treatment based only on the clinical effects as and when they appear, may result in insufficient or even erroneous therapy. In this respect knowledge of total dose and its distribution within the body may be a valuable aid in deciding on the follow-up treatment, taking into account the latent nature of the clinical effects. The calculated whole body dose and its distribution within the body of a person overexposed to a 192 Ir radiography source, are compared to experimentally determined values. In both cases the calculated values prove to be of sufficient accuracy to serve as an aid in decisions on the follow-up treatment. (author)

  10. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. - Highlights: • This study aims to calculate the dose rate profiles after cobalt device ejection from open-pool-type reactor core. • MicroShield code was used to evaluate the dose rates inside the reactor control room. • McSKY code was used to evaluate the dose rates outside the reactor building. • The calculated dose rates for workers are higher than the permissible limits after 18 s from device ejection.

  11. Evaluation of heterogeneity dose distributions for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT: comparison of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation with other algorithms

    Takahashi Wataru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from three different algorithms with the x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC calculations, in actual computed tomography (CT scans for use in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT of small lung cancers. Methods Slow CT scan of 20 patients was performed and the internal target volume (ITV was delineated on Pinnacle3. All plans were first calculated with a scatter homogeneous mode (SHM which is compatible with Clarkson algorithm using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS. The planned dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In a second step, the CT images, structures and beam data were exported to other treatment planning systems (TPSs. Collapsed cone convolution (CCC from Pinnacle3, superposition (SP from XiO, and XVMC from Monaco were used for recalculating. The dose distributions and the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs were compared with each other. Results The phantom test revealed that all algorithms could reproduce the measured data within 1% except for the SHM with inhomogeneous phantom. For the patient study, the SHM greatly overestimated the isocenter (IC doses and the minimal dose received by 95% of the PTV (PTV95 compared to XVMC. The differences in mean doses were 2.96 Gy (6.17% for IC and 5.02 Gy (11.18% for PTV95. The DVH's and dose distributions with CCC and SP were in agreement with those obtained by XVMC. The average differences in IC doses between CCC and XVMC, and SP and XVMC were -1.14% (p = 0.17, and -2.67% (p = 0.0036, respectively. Conclusions Our work clearly confirms that the actual practice of relying solely on a Clarkson algorithm may be inappropriate for SRT planning. Meanwhile, CCC and SP were close to XVMC simulations and actual dose distributions obtained in lung SRT.

  12. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    Ehlerman, D.A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  13. Process control and dosimetry applied to establish a relation between reference dose measurements and actual dose distribution

    Ehlerman, D A.E. [Institute of Process Engineering, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The availability of the first commercial dose level indicator prompted attempts to verify radiation absorbed dose to items under quarantine control (e.g. for insect disinfestation) by some indicator attached to these items. Samples of the new commercial dose level indicators were tested for their metrological properties using gamma and electron irradiation. The devices are suitable for the intended purpose and the subjective judgement whether the threshold dose was surpassed is possible in a reliable manner. The subjective judgements are completely backed by the instrumental results. Consequently, a prototype reader was developed; first tests were successful. The value of dose level indicators and the implications of its use for food or quarantine inspection depends on a link between dose measured (indicated) at the position of such indicator and the characteristic parameters of the frequency distribution of dose throughout the product load i.e. a box or a container or a whole batch of multiple units. Therefore, studies into variability and statistical properties of dose distributions obtained under a range of commercial situations were undertaken. Gamma processing at a commercial multipurpose contract irradiator, electron processing and bremsstrahlung applications at a largescale research facility were included; products were apples, potatoes, wheat, maize, pistachio. Studies revealed that still more detailed information on irradiation geometries are needed in order to render meaningful information from dose label indicators. (author)

  14. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  15. Warfarin maintenance dose in older patients: higher average dose and wider dose frequency distribution in patients of African ancestry than those of European ancestry.

    Garwood, Candice L; Clemente, Jennifer L; Ibe, George N; Kandula, Vijay A; Curtis, Kristy D; Whittaker, Peter

    2010-06-15

    Studies report that warfarin doses required to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation decrease with age; however, these studies almost exclusively enrolled patients of European ancestry. Consequently, universal application of dosing paradigms based on such evidence may be confounded because ethnicity also influences dose. Therefore, we determined if warfarin dose decreased with age in Americans of African ancestry, if older African and European ancestry patients required different doses, and if their daily dose frequency distributions differed. Our chart review examined 170 patients of African ancestry and 49 patients of European ancestry cared for in our anticoagulation clinic. We calculated the average weekly dose required for each stable, anticoagulated patient to maintain an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0, determined dose averages for groups 80 years of age and plotted dose as a function of age. The maintenance dose in patients of African ancestry decreased with age (PAfrican ancestry required higher average weekly doses than patients of European ancestry: 33% higher in the 70- to 79-year-old group (38.2+/-1.9 vs. 28.8+/-1.7 mg; P=0.006) and 52% in the >80-year-old group (33.2+/-1.7 vs. 21.8+/-3.8 mg; P=0.011). Therefore, 43% of older patients of African ancestry required daily doses >5mg and hence would have been under-dosed using current starting-dose guidelines. The dose frequency distribution was wider for older patients of African ancestry compared to those of European ancestry (PAfrican ancestry indicate that strategies for initiating warfarin therapy based on studies of patients of European ancestry could result in insufficient anticoagulation and thereby potentially increase their thromboembolism risk. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dose rate distribution for products irradiated in a semi-industrial irradiation plant. 1st stage

    Mangussi, J.

    2005-01-01

    The model of the bulk product absorbed dose rate distribution in a semi industrial irradiation plant is presented. In this plant the products are subject to a dynamic irradiation process: single-plaque, single-direction, four-passes. The additional two passes, also one on each side of the plaque, serve to minimize the lateral dose variation as well as the depth-dose non-uniformity. The first stage of this model takes only into account the direct absorbed dose rate; the model outputs are the depth-dose distribution and the lateral-dose distribution. The calculated absorbed dose in the bulk product and its uniformity-ratio after the dynamic irradiation process for different products is compared. The model results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements in a bulk of irradiated product; and the air absorbed dose rate in the irradiation chamber behind the product subject to the dynamic irradiation process. (author) [es

  17. A new approach to the estimation of radiopharmaceutical radiation dose distributions

    Hetherington, E.L.R.; Wood, N.R.

    1975-03-01

    For a photon energy of 150 keV, the Monte Carlo technique of photon history simulation was used to obtain estimates of the dose distribution in a human phantom for three activity distributions relevant to diagnostic nuclear medicine. In this preliminary work, the number of photon histories considered was insufficient to produce complete dose contours and the dose distributions are presented in the form of colour-coded diagrams. The distribution obtained illustrate an important deficiency in the MIRD Schema for dose estimation. Although the Schema uses the same mathematical technique for calculating photon doses, the results are obtained as average values for the whole body and for complete organs. It is shown that the actual dose distributions, particularly those for the whole body may, differ significantly from the average value calculated using the MIRD Schema and published absorbed fractions. (author)

  18. The dose distribution surrounding sup 192 Ir and sup 137 Cs seed sources

    Thomason, C [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics; Mackie, T R [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Human Oncology; Lindstrom, M J [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Biostatistics Center; Higgins, P D [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1991-04-01

    Dose distributions in water were measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters for {sup 192}Ir seed sources with stainless steel and with platinum encapsulation to determine the effect of differing encapsulation. Dose distribution was measured for a {sup 137}Cs seed source. In addition, dose distributions surrounding these sources were calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and were compared to measured data. The two methods are in good agreement for all three sources. Tables are given describing dose distribution surrounding each source as a function of distance and angle. Specific dose constants were also determined from results of Monte Carlo simulation. This work confirms the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in modelling {sup 192}Ir and {sup 137}Cs seed sources to obtain brachytherapy dose distributions. (author).

  19. The dose distribution surrounding 192Ir and 137Cs seed sources

    Thomason, C.; Mackie, T.R.; Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI; Lindstrom, M.J.; Higgins, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    Dose distributions in water were measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters for 192 Ir seed sources with stainless steel and with platinum encapsulation to determine the effect of differing encapsulation. Dose distribution was measured for a 137 Cs seed source. In addition, dose distributions surrounding these sources were calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and were compared to measured data. The two methods are in good agreement for all three sources. Tables are given describing dose distribution surrounding each source as a function of distance and angle. Specific dose constants were also determined from results of Monte Carlo simulation. This work confirms the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in modelling 192 Ir and 137 Cs seed sources to obtain brachytherapy dose distributions. (author)

  20. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  1. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: mohamed.hussein@rmc.ca, E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lewis, B.J., E-mail: Brent.Lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  2. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Imae, Toshikazu; Takenaka, Shigeharu; Saotome, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a post-analysis method for cumulative dose distribution in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). VMAT is capable of acquiring respiratory signals derived from projection images and machine parameters based on machine logs during VMAT delivery. Dose distributions were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and machine parameters in the condition where respiratory signals were without division, divided into 4 and 10 phases. The dose distribution of each respiratory phase was calculated on the planned four-dimensional CT (4DCT). Summation of the dose distributions was carried out using deformable image registration (DIR), and cumulative dose distributions were compared with those of the corresponding plans. Without division, dose differences between cumulative distribution and plan were not significant. In the condition Where respiratory signals were divided, dose differences were observed over dose in cranial region and under dose in caudal region of planning target volume (PTV). Differences between 4 and 10 phases were not significant. The present method Was feasible for evaluating cumulative dose distribution in VMAT-SBRT using 4DCT and DIR. (author)

  4. The effects of radiotherapy treatment uncertainties on the delivered dose distribution and tumour control probability

    Booth, J.T.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in the precise quantity of radiation dose delivered to tumours in external beam radiotherapy is present due to many factors, and can result in either spatially uniform (Gaussian) or spatially non-uniform dose errors. These dose errors are incorporated into the calculation of tumour control probability (TCP) and produce a distribution of possible TCP values over a population. We also study the effect of inter-patient cell sensitivity heterogeneity on the population distribution of patient TCPs. This study aims to investigate the relative importance of these three uncertainties (spatially uniform dose uncertainty, spatially non-uniform dose uncertainty, and inter-patient cell sensitivity heterogeneity) on the delivered dose and TCP distribution following a typical course of fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose distributions used for patient treatments are modelled in one dimension. Geometric positioning uncertainties during and before treatment are considered as shifts of a pre-calculated dose distribution. Following the simulation of a population of patients, distributions of dose across the patient population are used to calculate mean treatment dose, standard deviation in mean treatment dose, mean TCP, standard deviation in TCP, and TCP mode. These parameters are calculated with each of the three uncertainties included separately. The calculations show that the dose errors in the tumour volume are dominated by the spatially uniform component of dose uncertainty. This could be related to machine specific parameters, such as linear accelerator calibration. TCP calculation is affected dramatically by inter-patient variation in the cell sensitivity and to a lesser extent by the spatially uniform dose errors. The positioning errors with the 1.5 cm margins used cause dose uncertainty outside the tumour volume and have a small effect on mean treatment dose (in the tumour volume) and tumour control. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of

  5. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  6. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  7. Distribution of exposure concentrations and doses for constituents of environmental tobacco smoke

    LaKind, J.S. [LaKind Associates (United States); Ginevan, M.E. [M.E. Ginevan and Associates (United States); Naiman, D.Q. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; James, A.C. [A.C. James and Associates (United States); Jenkins, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dourson, M.L.; Felter, S.P. [TERA (United States); Graves, C.G.; Tardiff, R.G. [Sapphire Group, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The ultimate goal of the research reported in this series of three articles is to derive distributions of doses of selected environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)-related chemicals for nonsmoking workers. This analysis uses data from the 16-City Study collected with personal monitors over the course of one workday in workplaces where smoking occurred. In this article, the authors describe distributions of ETS chemical concentrations and the characteristics of those distributions for the workplace exposure. Next, they present population parameters relevant for estimating dose distributions and the methods used for estimating those dose distributions. Finally, they derive distributions of doses of selected ETS-related constituents obtained in the workplace for people in smoking work environments. Estimating dose distributions provided information beyond the usual point estimate of dose and showed that the preponderance of individuals exposed to ETS in the workplace were exposed at the low end of the dose distribution curve. The results of this analysis include estimations of hourly maxima and time-weighted average (TWA) doses of nicotine from workplace exposures to ETS and doses derived from modeled lung burdens of ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM) and solanesol resulting from workplace exposures to ETS (extrapolated from 1 day to 1 year).

  8. SU-E-T-427: Feasibility Study for Evaluation of IMRT Dose Distribution Using Geant4-Based Automated Algorithms

    Choi, H; Shin, W; Testa, M; Min, C; Kim, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning validation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a precise and automated procedure is necessary to evaluate the patient dose distribution. The aim of this study is to develop an automated algorithm for IMRT simulations using DICOM files and to evaluate the patient dose based on 4D simulation using the Geant4 MC toolkit. Methods: The head of a clinical linac (Varian Clinac 2300 IX) was modeled in Geant4 along with particular components such as the flattening filter and the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Patient information and the position of the MLC were imported from the DICOM-RT interface. For each position of the MLC, a step- and-shoot technique was adopted. PDDs and lateral profiles were simulated in a water phantom (50×50×40 cm 3 ) and compared to measurement data. We used a lung phantom and MC-dose calculations were compared to the clinical treatment planning used at the Seoul National University Hospital. Results: In order to reproduce the measurement data, we tuned three free parameters: mean and standard deviation of the primary electron beam energy and the beam spot size. These parameters for 6 MV were found to be 5.6 MeV, 0.2378 MeV and 1 mm FWHM respectively. The average dose difference between measurements and simulations was less than 2% for PDDs and radial profiles. The lung phantom study showed fairly good agreement between MC and planning dose despite some unavoidable statistical fluctuation. Conclusion: The current feasibility study using the lung phantom shows the potential for IMRT dose validation using 4D MC simulations using Geant4 tool kits. This research was supported by Korea Institute of Nuclear safety and Development of Measurement Standards for Medical Radiation funded by Korea research Institute of Standards and Science. (KRISS-2015-15011032)

  9. Impact of hip prosthesis on dose distribution of pelvic radiotherapy

    Ren Jiangping; Zhang Songfang; Zhu Qibao; Guo Jianxin; Zha Yuanzi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the scattering effect of Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis which was high Z material for patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Methods: The hip prosthesis was set in water phantom (30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm), determining points were chosen on the entrance side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 2.0 cm to the hip prosthesis, and also on the exit side of both 6 MV and 10 MV beams at the distance of 3.0 cm, 5.0 cm, 7.0 cm to the hip prostheses. Dose behind the hip prosthesis at depths of 5.0 cm and 10.0 cm for 6 MV and 10 MV beams are also measured. Results: The dose deviation on the beams' entrance side is between 0 to 5.0%, the backscatter effect was more obviously with the higher energy beam. The dose deviation on the beams' exit side was between 21.6%-30.8%. With the same field size and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the beam energy was higher; while with the same energy and depth, dose deviation becomes smaller when the field size was bigger. Dose profiles behind the head of the hip prosthesis indicate obvious attenuation of the beam. Conclusions: Beam arrangements that avoid the prosthesis should be considered first or we should at least reduce the weight of the beam that pass through the prosthesis. (authors)

  10. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  11. Oblique incidence of electron beams - comparisons between calculated and measured dose distributions

    Karcher, J.; Paulsen, F.; Christ, G.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical applications of high-energy electron beams, for example for the irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes, can lead to oblique incidence of the beams. It is well known that oblique incidence of electron beams can alter the depth dose distribution as well as the specific dose per monitor unit. The dose per monitor unit is the absorbed dose in a point of interest of a beam, which is reached with a specific dose monitor value (DIN 6814-8[5]). Dose distribution and dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence were measured with a small-volume thimble chamber in a water phantom, and compared to both normal incidence and calculations of the Helax TMS 6.1 treatment planning system. At 4 MeV and 60 degrees, the maximum measured dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence was decreased up to 11%, whereas at 18MeV and 60 degrees this was increased up to 15% compared to normal incidence. Comparisons of measured and calculated dose distributions showed that the predicted dose at shallow depths is usually higher than the measured one, whereas it is smaller at depths beyond the depth of maximum dose. On the basis of the results of these comparisons, normalization depths and correction factors for the dose monitor value were suggested to correct the calculations of the dose per monitor unit. (orig.)

  12. Radially truncated galactic discs

    Grijs, R. de; Kregel, M.; Wesson, K H

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We present the first results of a systematic analysis of radially truncatedexponential discs for four galaxies of a sample of disc-dominated edge-onspiral galaxies. Edge-on galaxies are very useful for the study of truncatedgalactic discs, since we can follow their light distributions out

  13. Optimization of dose distribution for the system of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    Suh Taesuk.

    1990-01-01

    This work addresses a method for obtaining an optimal dose distribution of stereotactic radiosurgery. Since stereotactic radiosurgery utilizes multiple noncoplanar arcs and a three-dimensional dose evaluation technique, many beam parameters and complex optimization criteria are included in the dose optimization. Consequently, a lengthy computation time is required to optimize even the simplest case by a trial and error method. The basic approach presented here is to use both an analytical and an experimental optimization to minimize the dose to critical organs while maintaining a dose shaped to the target. The experimental approach is based on shaping the target volumes using multiple isocenters from dose experience, or on field shaping using a beam's eye view technique. The analytical approach is to adapt computer-aided design optimization to find optimum parameters automatically. Three-dimensional approximate dose models are developed to simulate the exact dose model using a spherical or cylindrical coordinate system. Optimum parameters are found much faster with the use of computer-aided design optimization techniques. The implementation of computer-aided design algorithms with the approximate dose model and the application of the algorithms to several cases are discussed. It is shown that the approximate dose model gives dose distributions similar to those of the exact dose model, which makes the approximate dose model an attractive alternative to the exact dose model, and much more efficient in terms of computer-aided design and visual optimization

  14. An examination of the distribution of patient doses from diagnostic x-ray procedures

    Morris, N.D.

    1983-02-01

    An examination was made of the distribution of patient doses from diagnostic radiology. The data were derived from an Australia wide survey carried out during the 1970's. There was a large range of doses to which patients were exposed. If establishments can reduce doses to below the most common value, the total dose to the population will be reduced to less than 60% of the present value

  15. Dose distribution in lungs and thyroid from scatter photons of x-ray mammography imaging

    Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of scatter photons in dose of mammography image in thyroid and lungs are studied. Thyroid and in the form of distribution function and total delivered dose studied by direct measurement with Thermoluminescence dosimeter. The results of measurements compared to other published measurements and the total dose compared to our modelling with Monte Carlo method.. Our phantoms for direct measurement of Dose are a compressed breast phantom placed on a female RANDO phantom. The results of modelling and measurement are in agreement for the total delivered dose to thyroid and lungs and comparable to doses reported by the other researcher

  16. Improvement of dose distribution of esophageal irradiation using the field-within-a-field technique

    Iwai, Tsugunori; Okabe, Keigo; Yamato, Hidetada; Murakami, Jyunji; Nakazawa, Yasuo; Kato, Mitsuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The wide radiation field for mediastinal dose distribution should be inhomogeneous with the usual simple opposed beam irradiation. The purpose of this study was to improve the dose distribution of the mediastinum using a conventional planning system with a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and the field-in-field technique. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is obtained in bilateral opposed-field irradiation. An overdose area obtained from the 3D dose distribution is defined and reprojected into the irradiation field. A new reduced field is created by removing the reprojected overdose area. A 3D dose distribution is again obtained and compared with the results from first one. Procedures were repeated until each of the target volumes was within ±5% of the prescribed dose and the irradiation volume within 107% or less of the prescribed dose. From the DVH analysis, our field-within-a-field technique resulted in a more uniform dose distribution within the conventional planning. The field-within-a-field technique involves many parameters, and an inverse planning algorithm is suitable for computation. However, with our method, the forward planning system is adequate for planning, at least in a relatively straightforward planning system such as bilateral opposed fields therapy. (author)

  17. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Medical Radiation Research Center, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, B1002 WIMR, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  18. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  19. Verification of IMRT dose distributions using a water beam imaging system

    Li, J.S.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Ma, C.-M.

    2001-01-01

    A water beam imaging system (WBIS) has been developed and used to verify dose distributions for intensity modulated radiotherapy using dynamic multileaf collimator. This system consisted of a water container, a scintillator screen, a charge-coupled device camera, and a portable personal computer. The scintillation image was captured by the camera. The pixel value in this image indicated the dose value in the scintillation screen. Images of radiation fields of known spatial distributions were used to calibrate the device. The verification was performed by comparing the image acquired from the measurement with a dose distribution from the IMRT plan. Because of light scattering in the scintillator screen, the image was blurred. A correction for this was developed by recognizing that the blur function could be fitted to a multiple Gaussian. The blur function was computed using the measured image of a 10 cmx10 cm x-ray beam and the result of the dose distribution calculated using the Monte Carlo method. Based on the blur function derived using this method, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was applied to recover the dose distribution for an IMRT plan from the measured WBIS image. The reconstructed dose distribution was compared with Monte Carlo simulation result. Reasonable agreement was obtained from the comparison. The proposed approach makes it possible to carry out a real-time comparison of the dose distribution in a transverse plane between the measurement and the reference when we do an IMRT dose verification

  20. Heterogeneity phantoms for visualization of 3D dose distributions by MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Mooij, Rob; Mark Perera, G.; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2004-01-01

    Heterogeneity corrections in dose calculations are necessary for radiation therapy treatment plans. Dosimetric measurements of the heterogeneity effects are hampered if the detectors are large and their radiological characteristics are not equivalent to water. Gel dosimetry can solve these problems. Furthermore, it provides three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions. We used a cylindrical phantom filled with BANG-3 registered polymer gel to measure 3D dose distributions in heterogeneous media. The phantom has a cavity, in which water-equivalent or bone-like solid blocks can be inserted. The irradiated phantom was scanned with an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Dose distributions were obtained by calibrating the polymer gel for a relationship between the absorbed dose and the spin-spin relaxation rate of the magnetic resistance (MR) signal. To study dose distributions we had to analyze MR imaging artifacts. This was done in three ways: comparison of a measured dose distribution in a simulated homogeneous phantom with a reference dose distribution, comparison of a sagittally scanned image with a sagittal image reconstructed from axially scanned data, and coregistration of MR and computed-tomography images. We found that the MRI artifacts cause a geometrical distortion of less than 2 mm and less than 10% change in the dose around solid inserts. With these limitations in mind we could make some qualitative measurements. Particularly we observed clear differences between the measured dose distributions around an air-gap and around bone-like material for a 6 MV photon beam. In conclusion, the gel dosimetry has the potential to qualitatively characterize the dose distributions near heterogeneities in 3D

  1. SU-F-J-133: Adaptive Radiation Therapy with a Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm That Optimizes Dose Distribution Considering Breathing Motion

    Ali, I; Algan, O; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To model patient motion and produce four-dimensional (4D) optimized dose distributions that consider motion-artifacts in the dose calculation during the treatment planning process. Methods: An algorithm for dose calculation is developed where patient motion is considered in dose calculation at the stage of the treatment planning. First, optimal dose distributions are calculated for the stationary target volume where the dose distributions are optimized considering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Second, a convolution-kernel is produced from the best-fitting curve which matches the motion trajectory of the patient. Third, the motion kernel is deconvolved with the initial dose distribution optimized for the stationary target to produce a dose distribution that is optimized in four-dimensions. This algorithm is tested with measured doses using a mobile phantom that moves with controlled motion patterns. Results: A motion-optimized dose distribution is obtained from the initial dose distribution of the stationary target by deconvolution with the motion-kernel of the mobile target. This motion-optimized dose distribution is equivalent to that optimized for the stationary target using IMRT. The motion-optimized and measured dose distributions are tested with the gamma index with a passing rate of >95% considering 3% dose-difference and 3mm distance-to-agreement. If the dose delivery per beam takes place over several respiratory cycles, then the spread-out of the dose distributions is only dependent on the motion amplitude and not affected by motion frequency and phase. This algorithm is limited to motion amplitudes that are smaller than the length of the target along the direction of motion. Conclusion: An algorithm is developed to optimize dose in 4D. Besides IMRT that provides optimal dose coverage for a stationary target, it extends dose optimization to 4D considering target motion. This algorithm provides alternative to motion management

  2. Calculation of dose distribution on Rhizophora spp soy protein ...

    Some of the commercial solid phantoms were unable to provide a good simulation to water at low and high energy ranges. A potential phantom from Malaysian mangrove wood family, Rhizophoraspp was fabricated with addition of Soy Protein. An Electron Gamma Sho (EGSnrc) code was used to evaluate the dose ...

  3. THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE ELEMENTS IN THE GALACTIC DISK. II. AZIMUTHAL AND RADIAL VARIATION IN ABUNDANCES FROM CEPHEIDS

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Gieren, W.; Graczyk, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the spectroscopic investigation of 101 Cepheids in the Carina region. These Cepheids extend previous samples by about 35% in number and increase the amount of the Galactic disk coverage especially in the direction of l ∼ 270 0 . The new Cepheids do not add much information to the radial gradient, but provide a substantial increase in azimuthal coverage. We find no azimuthal dependence in abundance over an 80 deg. angle from the Galactic center in an annulus of 1 kpc depth centered on the Sun. A simple linear fit to the Cepheid data yields a gradient d[Fe/H]/dR G = -0.055 ± 0.003 dex kpc -1 which is somewhat shallower than found from our previous, smaller Cepheid sample.

  4. Evaluation of dose distributions in gamma chamber using glass plate detector

    Narayan Pradeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial glass plate of thickness 1.75 mm has been utilized for evaluation of dose distributions inside the irradiation volume of gamma chamber using optical densitometry technique. The glass plate showed linear response in the dose range 0.10 Kilo Gray (kGy to 10 kGy of cobalt-60 gamma radiation with optical sensitivity 0.04 Optical Density (OD /kGy. The change in the optical density at each identified spatial dose matrix on the glass plate in relation to the position in the irradiation volume has been presented as dose distributions inside the gamma chamber. The optical density changes have been graphically plotted in the form of surface diagram of color washes for different percentage dose rate levels as isodose distributions in gamma chamber. The variation in dose distribution inside the gamma chamber unit, GC 900, BRIT India make, using this technique has been observed within ± 15%. This technique can be used for routine quality assurances and dose distribution validation of any gamma chamber during commissioning and source replacement. The application of commercial glass plate for dose mapping in gamma chambers has been found very promising due to its wider dose linearity, quick measurement, and lesser expertise requirement in application of the technique.

  5. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    Benchalal, M.; Leseur, J.; Chajon, E.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Simon, A.; Bellec, J.; Lena, H.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  7. A calculation of dose distribution around 32P spherical sources and its clinical application

    Ohara, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Kunihide; Maekoshi, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    In order to avoid the radiation hazard in radiation therapy of craniopharyngioma by using 32 P, it is helpful to prepare a detailed dose distribution in the vicinity of the source in the tissue. Valley's method is used for calculations. A problem of the method is pointed out and the method itself is refined numerically: it extends a region of xi where an approximate polynomial is available, and it determines an optimum degree of the polynomial as 9. Usefulness of the polynomial is examined by comparing with Berger's scaled absorbed dose distribution F(xi) and the Valley's result. The dose and dose rate distributions around uniformly distributed spherical sources are computed from the termwise integration of our polynomial of degree 9 over the range of xi from 0 to 1.7. The dose distributions calculated from the spherical surface to a point at 0.5 cm outside the source, are given, when the radii of sources are 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 cm respectively. The therapeutic dose for a craniopharyngioma which has a spherically shaped cyst, and the absorbed dose to the normal tissue, (oculomotor nerve), are obtained from these dose rate distributions. (auth.)

  8. The MLC tongue-and-groove effect on IMRT dose distributions

    Deng Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States). E-mail: jun@reyes.stanford.edu; Pawlicki, Todd; Chen Yan; Li Jinsheng; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the tongue-and-groove effect on the IMRT dose distributions for a Varian MLC. We have compared the dose distributions calculated using the intensity maps with and without the tongue-and-groove effect. Our results showed that, for one intensity-modulated treatment field, the maximum tongue-and-groove effect could be up to 10% of the maximum dose in the dose distributions. For an IMRT treatment with multiple gantry angles ({>=} 5), the difference between the dose distributions with and without the tongue-and-groove effect was hardly visible, less than 1.6% for the two typical clinical cases studied. After considering the patient setup errors, the dose distributions were smoothed with reduced and insignificant differences between plans with and without the tongue-and-groove effect. Therefore, for a multiple-field IMRT plan ({>=} 5), the tongue-and-groove effect on the IMRT dose distributions will be generally clinically insignificant due to the smearing effect of individual fields. The tongue-and-groove effect on an IMRT plan with small number of fields (<5) will vary depending on the number of fields in a plan (coplanar or non-coplanar), the MLC leaf sequences and the patient setup uncertainty, and may be significant (>5% of maximum dose) in some cases, especially when the patient setup uncertainty is small ({<=} 2 mm). (author)

  9. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige [Kinki Univ., Atomic Energy Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tatsumi, Kusuo [Kinki Univ., Life Science Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan); Yuan Yongling [Labor Hygiene Institute of Hunan Prov. (China); Wei Luxin [Laboratory of Industorial Hygiene, Ministry of Health (China)

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. (2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  10. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. 2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  11. Absorbed Dose Distributions in Small Copper Wire Insulation due to Multiple-Sided Irradiations by 0.4 MeV Electrons

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1979-01-01

    When scanned electron beams are used to crosslink polymeric insulation of wire and cable, an important goal is to achieve optimum uniformity of absorbed dose distributions. Accurate measurements of dose distributions in a plastic dosimeter simulating a typical insulating material (polyethylene......) surrounding a copper wire core show that equal irradiations from as few as four sides give approximately isotropy and satisfactorily uniform energy depositions around the wire circumference. Electron beams of 0.4 MeV maximum energy were used to irradiate wires having a copper core of 1.0 mm dia....... and insulation thicknesses between 0.4 and 0.8 mm. The plastic dosimeter simulating polyethylene insulations was a thin radiochromic polyvinyl butyral film wrapped several times around the copper wire, such that when unwrapped and analyzed optically on a scanning microspectrophotometer, high-resolution radial...

  12. Measurement of depth-dose distributions by means of the LiF-fluoroplastic thermoluminescent detectors

    Shaks, A.I.; Uryaev, I.A.; Trifonov, V.A.; Reshetnikova, L.V.

    1977-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions have been studied by means of thin-layer thermoluminescent detectors LiF-fluoroplast (8 mg/cm 2 ). Dosimetric characteristics of the detectors are described. They are: tissue-equivalence, dependence of sensitivity on the dose, dose rate and angle of incidence of radiation, and time-dependent storage, of the total light absorbed. Comparison of the results obtained with the measurements taken with an extrapolation chamber has demonstrated the possibility of measuring the depth-dose distributions by means of LiF-fluoroplast detectors

  13. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Randriantsizafy, R D; Ramanandraibe, M J [Madagascar Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Raboanary, R [Institut of astro and High-Energy Physics Madagascar, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2007-07-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  14. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Raboanary, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  15. Electron Beam Dose Distribution in the Presence of Non-Uniform Magnetic Field

    Mohamad Javad Tahmasebi-Birgani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Magnetic fields are capable of altering the trajectory of electron beams andcan be used in radiation therapy.Theaim of this study was to produce regions with dose enhancement and reduction in the medium. Materials and Methods The NdFeB permanent magnets were arranged on the electron applicator in several configurations. Then, after the passage of the electron beams (9 and 15 MeV Varian 2100C/D through the non-uniform magnetic field, the Percentage Depth Dose(PDDs on central axis and dose profiles in three depths for each energy were measured in a 3D water phantom. Results For all magnet arrangements and for two different energies, the surface dose increment and shift in depth of maximum dose (dmax were observed. In addition, the pattern of dose distribution in buildup region was changed. Measurement of dose profile showed dose localization and spreading in some other regions. Conclusion The results of this study confirms that using magnetic field can alter the dose deposition patterns and as a result can produce dose enhancement as well as dose reduction in the medium using high-energy electron beams. These effects provide dose distribution with arbitrary shapes for use in radiation therapy.

  16. Calculation of multi-dimensional dose distribution in medium due to proton beam incidence

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu; Inada, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    The method of analyzing the multi-dimensional dose distribution in a medium due to proton beam incidence is presented to obtain the reliable and simplified method from clinical viewpoint, especially for the medical treatment of cancer. The heavy ion beam being taken out of an accelerator has to be adjusted to fit cancer location and size, utilizing a modified range modulator, a ridge filter, a bolus and a special scanning apparatus. The precise calculation of multi-dimensional dose distribution of proton beam is needed to fit treatment to a limit part. The analytical formulas consist of those for the fluence distribution in a medium, the divergence of flying range, the energy distribution itself, the dose distribution in side direction and the two-dimensional dose distribution. The fluence distribution in polystyrene in case of the protons with incident energy of 40 and 60 MeV, the energy distribution of protons at the position of a Bragg peak for various values of incident energy, the depth dose distribution in polystyrene in case of the protons with incident energy of 40 and 60 MeV and average energy of 100 MeV, the proton fluence and dose distribution as functions of depth for the incident average energy of 250 MeV, the statistically estimated percentage errors in the proton fluence and dose distribution, the estimated minimum detectable tumor thickness as a function of the number of incident protons for the different incident spectra with average energy of 250 MeV, the isodose distribution in a plane containing the central axis in case of the incident proton beam of 3 mm diameter and 40 MeV and so on are presented as the analytical results, and they are evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  18. RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STARS, GAS, AND DUST IN SINGS GALAXIES. III. MODELING THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR COMPONENT IN GALAXY DISKS

    Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Boissier, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Kennicutt, R. C. Jr; Moustakas, J.; Prantzos, N.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of 42 spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We make use of ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared radial profiles, corrected for internal extinction using the total-infrared to UV ratio, to probe the emission of stellar populations of different ages as a function of galactocentric distance. We fit these radial profiles with models that describe the chemical and spectro-photometric evolution of spiral disks within a self-consistent framework. These backward evolutionary models successfully reproduce the multi-wavelength profiles of our galaxies, except for the UV profiles of some early-type disks for which the models seem to retain too much gas. From the model fitting we infer the maximum circular velocity of the rotation curve V C and the dimensionless spin parameter λ. The values of V C are in good agreement with the velocities measured in H I rotation curves. Even though our sample is not volume limited, the resulting distribution of λ is close to the lognormal function obtained in cosmological N-body simulations, peaking at λ ∼ 0.03 regardless of the total halo mass. We do not find any evident trend between λ and Hubble type, besides an increase in the scatter for the latest types. According to the model, galaxies evolve along a roughly constant mass-size relation, increasing their scale lengths as they become more massive. The radial scale length of most disks in our sample seems to have increased at a rate of 0.05-0.06 kpc Gyr -1 , although the same cannot be said of a volume-limited sample. In relative terms, the scale length has grown by 20%-25% since z = 1 and, unlike the former figure, we argue that this relative growth rate can be indeed representative of a complete galaxy sample.

  19. Radial Distribution of Stars, Gas, and Dust in SINGS Galaxies. III. Modeling the Evolution of the Stellar Component in Galaxy Disks

    Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Boissier, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Moustakas, J.; Prantzos, N.; Gallego, J.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the evolution of 42 spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. We make use of ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared radial profiles, corrected for internal extinction using the total-infrared to UV ratio, to probe the emission of stellar populations of different ages as a function of galactocentric distance. We fit these radial profiles with models that describe the chemical and spectro-photometric evolution of spiral disks within a self-consistent framework. These backward evolutionary models successfully reproduce the multi-wavelength profiles of our galaxies, except for the UV profiles of some early-type disks for which the models seem to retain too much gas. From the model fitting we infer the maximum circular velocity of the rotation curve V C and the dimensionless spin parameter λ. The values of V C are in good agreement with the velocities measured in H I rotation curves. Even though our sample is not volume limited, the resulting distribution of λ is close to the lognormal function obtained in cosmological N-body simulations, peaking at λ ~ 0.03 regardless of the total halo mass. We do not find any evident trend between λ and Hubble type, besides an increase in the scatter for the latest types. According to the model, galaxies evolve along a roughly constant mass-size relation, increasing their scale lengths as they become more massive. The radial scale length of most disks in our sample seems to have increased at a rate of 0.05-0.06 kpc Gyr-1, although the same cannot be said of a volume-limited sample. In relative terms, the scale length has grown by 20%-25% since z = 1 and, unlike the former figure, we argue that this relative growth rate can be indeed representative of a complete galaxy sample.

  20. The use of linear programming in optimization of HDR implant dose distributions

    Jozsef, Gabor; Streeter, Oscar E.; Astrahan, Melvin A.

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of high dose rate brachytherapy enabled optimization of dose distributions to be used on a routine basis. The objective of optimization is to homogenize the dose distribution within the implant while simultaneously satisfying dose constraints on certain points. This is accomplished by varying the time the source dwells at different locations. As the dose at any point is a linear function of the dwell times, a linear programming approach seems to be a natural choice. The dose constraints are inherently linear inequalities. Homogeneity requirements are linearized by minimizing the maximum deviation of the doses at points inside the implant from a prescribed dose. The revised simplex method was applied for the solution of this linear programming problem. In the homogenization process the possible source locations were chosen as optimization points. To avoid the problem of the singular value of the dose at a source location from the source itself we define the 'self-contribution' as the dose at a small distance from the source. The effect of varying this distance is discussed. Test cases were optimized for planar, biplanar and cylindrical implants. A semi-irregular, fan-like implant with diverging needles was also investigated. Mean central dose calculation based on 3D Delaunay-triangulation of the source locations was used to evaluate the dose distributions. The optimization method resulted in homogeneous distributions (for brachytherapy). Additional dose constraints--when applied--were satisfied. The method is flexible enough to include other linear constraints such as the inclusion of the centroids of the Delaunay-triangulation for homogenization, or limiting the maximum allowable dwell time

  1. Distribution of radionuclides in potato tubers. Implication for dose assessments

    Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T.; Poultney, S.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the distribution of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, Pu and Am in potato tubers has been carried out. Cesium-137 was essentially uniformly distributed throughout the tuber, whereas up to about 50% of the 90 Sr activity was found in the peel. Results for actinides indicated that most of the activity would be found in the peel and of this more than half would be located in the thin outermost skin. When account is taken of the form in which potatoes are consumed in the UK, the values of soil-plant transfer factors currently assumed in the NRPB model FARMLAND are reasonable for general assessment purposes. (author)

  2. Impact of dose-distribution uncertainties on rectal ntcp modeling I: Uncertainty estimates

    Fenwick, John D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2001-01-01

    A trial of nonescalated conformal versus conventional radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer has been carried out at the Royal Marsden NHS Trust (RMH) and Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), demonstrating a significant reduction in the rate of rectal bleeding reported for patients treated using the conformal technique. The relationship between planned rectal dose-distributions and incidences of bleeding has been analyzed, showing that the rate of bleeding falls significantly as the extent of the rectal wall receiving a planned dose-level of more than 57 Gy is reduced. Dose-distributions delivered to the rectal wall over the course of radiotherapy treatment inevitably differ from planned distributions, due to sources of uncertainty such as patient setup error, rectal wall movement and variation in the absolute rectal wall surface area. In this paper estimates of the differences between planned and treated rectal dose-distribution parameters are obtained for the RMH/ICR nonescalated conformal technique, working from a distribution of setup errors observed during the RMH/ICR trial, movement data supplied by Lebesque and colleagues derived from repeat CT scans, and estimates of rectal circumference variations extracted from the literature. Setup errors and wall movement are found to cause only limited systematic differences between mean treated and planned rectal dose-distribution parameter values, but introduce considerable uncertainties into the treated values of some dose-distribution parameters: setup errors lead to 22% and 9% relative uncertainties in the highly dosed fraction of the rectal wall and the wall average dose, respectively, with wall movement leading to 21% and 9% relative uncertainties. Estimates obtained from the literature of the uncertainty in the absolute surface area of the distensible rectal wall are of the order of 13%-18%. In a subsequent paper the impact of these uncertainties on analyses of the relationship between incidences of bleeding

  3. PROBING THE ROLE OF DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN SHAPING THE BSS RADIAL DISTRIBUTION. I. SEMI-ANALYTICAL MODELS AND PRELIMINARY N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Alessandrini, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Pasquato, M.; Lee, Y.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Vesperini, E. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We present semi-analytical models and simplified N-body simulations with 10{sup 4} particles aimed at probing the role of dynamical friction (DF) in determining the radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs) in globular clusters. The semi-analytical models show that DF (which is the only evolutionary mechanism at work) is responsible for the formation of a bimodal distribution with a dip progressively moving toward the external regions of the cluster. However, these models fail to reproduce the formation of the long-lived central peak observed in all dynamically evolved clusters. The results of N-body simulations confirm the formation of a sharp central peak, which remains as a stable feature over time regardless of the initial concentration of the system. In spite of noisy behavior, a bimodal distribution forms in many cases, with the size of the dip increasing as a function of time. In the most advanced stages, the distribution becomes monotonic. These results are in agreement with the observations. Also, the shape of the peak and the location of the minimum (which, in most of cases, is within 10 core radii) turn out to be consistent with observational results. For a more detailed and close comparison with observations, including a proper calibration of the timescales of the dynamical processes driving the evolution of the BSS spatial distribution, more realistic simulations will be necessary.

  4. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit

  5. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  6. Isotoxic dose escalation in the treatment of lung cancer by means of heterogeneous dose distributions in the presence of respiratory motion

    Baker, Mariwan; Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, Olfred

    2011-01-01

    To test, in the presence of intrafractional respiration movement, a margin recipe valid for a homogeneous and conformal dose distribution and to test whether the use of smaller margins combined with heterogeneous dose distributions allows an isotoxic dose escalation when respiratory motion...

  7. Predictive modelling of grain size distributions from marine electromagnetic profiling data using end-member analysis and a radial basis function network

    Baasch, B.; M"uller, H.; von Dobeneck, T.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we present a new methodology to predict grain-size distributions from geophysical data. Specifically, electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of seafloor sediments recovered from electromagnetic profiling data are used to predict grain-size distributions along shelf-wide survey lines. Field data from the NW Iberian shelf are investigated and reveal a strong relation between the electromagnetic properties and grain-size distribution. The here presented workflow combines unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques. Nonnegative matrix factorisation is used to determine grain-size end-members from sediment surface samples. Four end-members were found which well represent the variety of sediments in the study area. A radial-basis function network modified for prediction of compositional data is then used to estimate the abundances of these end-members from the electromagnetic properties. The end-members together with their predicted abundances are finally back transformed to grain-size distributions. A minimum spatial variation constraint is implemented in the training of the network to avoid overfitting and to respect the spatial distribution of sediment patterns. The predicted models are tested via leave-one-out cross-validation revealing high prediction accuracy with coefficients of determination (R2) between 0.76 and 0.89. The predicted grain-size distributions represent the well-known sediment facies and patterns on the NW Iberian shelf and provide new insights into their distribution, transition and dynamics. This study suggests that electromagnetic benthic profiling in combination with machine learning techniques is a powerful tool to estimate grain-size distribution of marine sediments.

  8. Analysis of Dose and Dose Distribution for Patients Undergoing Selected X-Ray Diagnostic Procedures in Ghana

    Schandorf, C.; Tetteh, G.K

    1998-07-01

    The levels of dose and dose distributions for adult patients undergoing five selected common types of X ray examination in Ghana were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) attached to the skin where the beam enters the patient. To assess the performance of each X ray room surveyed, the mean of the entrance surface dose for patients whose statistics were close to a standard patient (70 kg weight and 20 cm AP trunk thickness) were compared to the Commission of the European Communities guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP examinations. The third quartiles dose values were 1.3 mGy, 14.5 mGy, 12.0 mGy and 7.9 mGy for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP respectively. Analysis of the data show that 86%, 58%, 37.5% and 50% of radiographic rooms delivered a mean dose greater than the CEC guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen and skull AP respectively. This suggests that radiographic departments should undertake a review of their radiographic practice in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. (author)

  9. Analysis of Dose and Dose Distribution for Patients Undergoing Selected X-Ray Diagnostic Procedures in Ghana

    Schandorf, C.; Tetteh, G.K.

    1998-01-01

    The levels of dose and dose distributions for adult patients undergoing five selected common types of X ray examination in Ghana were determined using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) attached to the skin where the beam enters the patient. To assess the performance of each X ray room surveyed, the mean of the entrance surface dose for patients whose statistics were close to a standard patient (70 kg weight and 20 cm AP trunk thickness) were compared to the Commission of the European Communities guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP examinations. The third quartiles dose values were 1.3 mGy, 14.5 mGy, 12.0 mGy and 7.9 mGy for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen AP and skull AP respectively. Analysis of the data show that 86%, 58%, 37.5% and 50% of radiographic rooms delivered a mean dose greater than the CEC guideline values for chest PA, lumbar spine AP, pelvis/abdomen and skull AP respectively. This suggests that radiographic departments should undertake a review of their radiographic practice in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. (author)

  10. Statistical evaluation of the dose-distribution charts of the National Computerized Irradiation Planning Network

    Varjas, Geza; Jozsef, Gabor; Gyenes, Gyoergy; Petranyi, Julia; Bozoky, Laszlo; Pataki, Gezane

    1985-01-01

    The establishment of the National Computerized Irradiation Planning Network allowed to perform the statistical evaluation presented in this report. During the first 5 years 13389 dose-distribution charts were calculated for the treatment of 5320 patients, i.e. in average, 2,5 dose-distribution chart-variants per patient. This number practically did not change in the last 4 years. The irradiation plan of certain tumour localizations was performed on the basis of the calculation of, in average, 1.6-3.0 dose-distribution charts. Recently, radiation procedures assuring optimal dose-distribution, such as the use of moving fields, and two- or three-irradiation fields, are gaining grounds. (author)

  11. Distribution of dose loading in the Southern Caucasus

    Sisikashvili, M.S; Chankseliani, Z.J; Mikeladze, M.O

    2011-01-01

    Full tex:Evaluation of body burden on population of the region - the most important task of radioecology. The radiation burden is a major limiting factor in the decision on construction of the possible radioactive emissions, which is typical not only for objects with nuclear fuel. The need for thorough research is dictated by the experimentally established large scatter of data on radionuclide migration in the genesis of different environments and in the coefficients of the transition to the agricultural products produced in the ''zones of influence.'' The Caucasus is characterized by a big variety of a relief and climate, landscapes and soils. This variety causes a various mode of receipt and migration of radioisotopes in the soils, caused by physical and chemical features of the last. To estimate the dose rate of gamma radiation is necessary in addition to knowledge of the surface density of natural radionuclides (stored in the soil), to take into account the penetration of induced radionuclides.

  12. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  13. Estimation of dose distribution in occupationally exposed individuals to FDG-{sup 18}F

    Lacerda, Isabelle V. Batista de; Cabral, Manuela O. Monteiro; Vieira, Jose Wilson, E-mail: ilacerda.bolsista@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: manuela.omc@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Andrade Lima, Fernando R. de, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The use of unsealed radiation sources in nuclear medicine can lead to important incorporation of radionuclides, especially for occupationally exposed individuals (OEIs) during production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, computer simulation was proposed as an alternative methodology for evaluation of the absorbed dose distribution and for the effective dose value in OEIs. For this purpose, the Exposure Computational Model (ECM) which is named as FSUP (Female Adult Mesh - supine) were used. This ECM is composed of: voxel phantom FASH (Female Adult MeSH) in the supine position, the MC code EGSnrc and an algorithm simulator of general internal source. This algorithm was modified to adapt to specific needs of the positron emission from FDG-{sup 18}F. The obtained results are presented as absorbed dose/accumulated activity. To obtain the absorbed dose distribution it was necessary to use accumulative activity data from the in vivo bioassay. The absorbed dose distribution and the value of estimated effective dose in this study did not exceed the limits for occupational exposure. Therefore, the creation of a database with the distribution of accumulated activity is suggested in order to estimate the absorbed dose in radiosensitive organs and the effective dose for OEI in similar environment. (author)

  14. Dose distribution, using homogeneous material before the reload of the JS-6500 irradiator

    Carrasco A, H.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this report is to determine the dose distribution inside the aluminum containers used for the industrial irradiation, as well as to locate the positions of maximum and minimum doses, before the reloading of the JS-6500 Irradiator. (Author)

  15. The calculation of electron depth-dose distributions in multilayer medium

    Wang Chuanshan; Xu Mengjie; Li Zhiliang; Feng Yongxiang; Li Panlin

    1989-01-01

    Energy deposition in multilayer medium and the depth dose distribution in the layers are studied. Based on semi-empirical calculation of electron energy absorption in matter with EDMULT program of Tabata and Ito, further work has been carried out to extend the computation to multilayer composite material. New program developed in this paper makes IBM-PC compatible with complicated electron dose calculations

  16. Estimation of dose distribution in occupationally exposed individuals to FDG-18F

    Lacerda, Isabelle V. Batista de; Cabral, Manuela O. Monteiro; Vieira, Jose Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The use of unsealed radiation sources in nuclear medicine can lead to important incorporation of radionuclides, especially for occupationally exposed individuals (OEIs) during production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, computer simulation was proposed as an alternative methodology for evaluation of the absorbed dose distribution and for the effective dose value in OEIs. For this purpose, the Exposure Computational Model (ECM) which is named as FSUP (Female Adult Mesh - supine) were used. This ECM is composed of: voxel phantom FASH (Female Adult MeSH) in the supine position, the MC code EGSnrc and an algorithm simulator of general internal source. This algorithm was modified to adapt to specific needs of the positron emission from FDG- 18 F. The obtained results are presented as absorbed dose/accumulated activity. To obtain the absorbed dose distribution it was necessary to use accumulative activity data from the in vivo bioassay. The absorbed dose distribution and the value of estimated effective dose in this study did not exceed the limits for occupational exposure. Therefore, the creation of a database with the distribution of accumulated activity is suggested in order to estimate the absorbed dose in radiosensitive organs and the effective dose for OEI in similar environment. (author)

  17. Radial distribution of power starting from the reactivity using nodal schemes of second and third order; Distribucion radial de potencia a partir de la reactividad usando esquemas nodales de segundo y tercer orden

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Ocoyocac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work two nodal schemes of finite element are presented, one of second and the other of third order of accurate that allow to determine the radial distribution of power starting from the corresponding reactivities.The schemes here developed were obtained taking as starting point the equation developed by Driscoll et al, the one which is based on the diffusion approach of 1-1/2 energy groups. This equation relates the power fraction of an assemble with their reactivity and with the power fractions and reactivities of the assemblies that its surround it. Driscoll and collaborators they solve in form approximate such equation supposing that the reactivity of each assemble it is but a lineal function of the burnt one of the fuel. The spatial approach carries out it with the classic technique of finite differences centered in mesh. Nevertheless that the algebraic system to which its arrive it can be solved without more considerations introduce some additional suppositions and adjustment parameters that it allows them to predict results comparable to those contributed by three dimensions analysis and this way to reduce the one obtained error when its compare their results with those of a production code like CASMO. Also in the two schemes that here are presented the same approaches of Driscoll were used being obtained errors of the one 10% and of 5% for the second schemes and third order respectively for a test case that it was built starting from data of the Cycle 1 of the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant. These errors its were obtained when comparing with a computer program based on the matrix response method. It is sought to have this way a quick and efficient tool for the multicycle analysis in the fuel management. However, this model presents problems in the appropriate prediction of the average burnt of the nucleus and of the burnt one by lot. (Author)

  18. Tracking the dose distribution in radiation therapy by accounting for variable anatomy

    Schaly, B; Kempe, J A; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this research is to calculate the daily and cumulative dose distribution received by the radiotherapy patient while accounting for variable anatomy, by tracking the dose distribution delivered to tissue elements (voxels) that move within the patient. Non-linear image registration techniques (i.e., thin-plate splines) are used along with a conventional treatment planning system to combine the dose distributions computed for each 3D computed tomography (CT) study taken during treatment. For a clinical prostate case, we demonstrate that there are significant localized dose differences due to systematic voxel motion in a single fraction as well as in 15 cumulative fractions. The largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 29%, 2% and 24%, respectively, after the first fraction of radiation treatment compared to the planned dose. After 15 cumulative fractions, the largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 23%, 32% and 18%, respectively, compared to the planned dose. A sensitivity analysis of control point placement is also presented. This method provides an important understanding of actual delivered doses and has the potential to provide quantitative information to use as a guide for adaptive radiation treatments

  19. SU-E-T-514: Investigating the Dose Distributions of Equiangular Spaced Noncoplanar Beams

    Mitchell, T; Maxim, P; Hadsell, M; Loo, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that the use of noncoplanar beams in radiation therapy may Result in dose distributions that are comparable or better than standard coplanar beams [Pugachev, 2001]. A radiation therapy system designed with a noncoplanar beam geometry could allow for a full ring diagnostic quality imaging system to be placed around the patient. Additionally, if the noncoplanar beams were fixed in number and in their angle with respect to the patient’s axial plane, then both treatment and imaging could be achieved concurrently without the need for moving parts, which could greatly reduce treatment times. For such a system to be designed, it is necessary to determine the appropriate number of beams and the beam angles to achieve optimal dose distributions. For simplicity, the beam angles are assumed to be equiangular in the patient’s axial plane, and only the beam angle with respect to the axial plane are varied. This study aims to investigate the dose distributions produced by equiangular noncoplanar beams for multiple beam numbers and beam angles, and to compare these dose distributions with distributions achieved in coplanar volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Dose distributions produced by noncoplanar beams were calculated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system by varying the gantry, collimator, and couch angles to simulate the noncoplanar delivery method. Noncoplanar intensity-modulated (NC-IMRT) beams using 8, 12, and 16 beams with angles varying from 45 degrees to 54 with respect to the patient’s axial plane were studied. Results The NC-IMRT beams produced dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans for a number of treatment sites, and were capable of meeting similar dose-volume histogram constraints. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that a noncoplanar beam delivery method with fixed beam numbers and beam angles is capable of delivering dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans currently in use

  20. Fast gas heating and radial distribution of active species in nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen and N2:O2 mixtures

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    Fast gas heating is studied experimentally and numerically using pulsed nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen and N2:O2 mixtures under the conditions of high specific deposited energy (up to 1 eV/molecule) and high reduced electric fields (100–300 Td). Deposited energy, electric field and gas temperature are measured as functions of time. The radial distribution of active species is analyzed experimentally. The roles of processes involving {{{N}}}2({{B}}) ={{{N}}}2({{{B}}}3{{{\\Pi }}}{{g}},{{{W}}}3{{{Δ }}}{{u}},{{B}}{{\\prime} }3{{{Σ }}}{{u}}-), {{{N}}}2({{{A}}}3{{{Σ }}}{{u}}+) and N(2D) excited nitrogen species leading to heat release are analyzed using numerical modeling in the framework of 1D axial approximation.

  1. Experimental validation of CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M for radial fission rate distributions in a westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly

    Grimm, P.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Measured and calculated radial total fission rate distributions are compared for the three axial sections of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly, comprising 96, 92 and 84 fuel rods, respectively. The measurements were performed on a full-size fuel assembly in the PROTEUS zero-power experimental facility. The measured fission rates are compared to the results of the CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M fuel assembly codes. Detailed measured geometrical data were used in the models, and effects of the surrounding zones of the reactor were taken into account by correction factors derived from MCNPX calculations. The results of the calculations agree well with those of the experiments, with root-mean-square deviations between 1.2% and 1.5% and maximum deviations of 3-4%. The quality of the predictions by CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M is comparable. (authors)

  2. Verification of Dose Distribution in Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Irie, Daisuke; Saitoh, Jun-ichi, E-mail: junsaito@gunma-u.ac.jp; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Abe, Takanori; Kubota, Yoshiki; Sakai, Makoto; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate robustness of dose distribution of carbon-ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify factors affecting the dose distribution by simulated dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Eighty irradiation fields for delivery of C-ion RT were analyzed in 20 patients with stage I NSCLC. Computed tomography images were obtained twice before treatment initiation. Simulated dose distribution was reconstructed on computed tomography for confirmation under the same settings as actual treatment with respiratory gating and bony structure matching. Dose-volume histogram parameters, such as %D95 (percentage of D95 relative to the prescribed dose), were calculated. Patients with any field for which the %D95 of gross tumor volume (GTV) was below 90% were classified as unacceptable for treatment, and the optimal target margin for such cases was examined. Results: Five patients with a total of 8 fields (10% of total number of fields analyzed) were classified as unacceptable according to %D95 of GTV, although most patients showed no remarkable change in the dose-volume histogram parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength were significant predictive factors of unacceptable cases (P<.001 and P=.002, respectively). The main cause of degradation of the dose distribution was tumor displacement in 7 of the 8 unacceptable fields. A 6-mm planning target volume margin ensured a GTV %D95 of >90%, except in 1 extremely unacceptable field. Conclusions: According to this simulation analysis of C-ion RT for stage I NSCLC, a few fields were reported as unacceptable and required resetting of body position and reconfirmation. In addition, tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength (bone shift and/or chest wall thickness) were identified as factors influencing the robustness of dose distribution. Such uncertainties should be regarded

  3. EXTRACTION OF THE MEAN RADIAL MASS-DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES BY OBSERVATIONS OF WEAK GRAVITATIONAL IMAGING

    BREIMER, TG

    The gravitational fields of clusters of galaxies cause systematic distortions of the images of background galaxies. Recently, the lens inversion problem, reconstruction of the mean surface density distribution in the lens from the pattern of systematic distortions, has been the object of several

  4. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.; Bel, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy −1 ) and β (Gy −2 ) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different treatment

  5. Monte Carlo MCNP-4B-based absorbed dose distribution estimates for patient-specific dosimetry.

    Yoriyaz, H; Stabin, M G; dos Santos, A

    2001-04-01

    This study was intended to verify the capability of the Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code to evaluate spatial dose distribution based on information gathered from CT or SPECT. A new three-dimensional (3D) dose calculation approach for internal emitter use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was developed using the Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code as the photon and electron transport engine. It was shown that the MCNP-4B computer code can be used with voxel-based anatomic and physiologic data to provide 3D dose distributions. This study showed that the MCNP-4B code can be used to develop a treatment planning system that will provide such information in a time manner, if dose reporting is suitably optimized. If each organ is divided into small regions where the average energy deposition is calculated with a typical volume of 0.4 cm(3), regional dose distributions can be provided with reasonable central processing unit times (on the order of 12-24 h on a 200-MHz personal computer or modest workstation). Further efforts to provide semiautomated region identification (segmentation) and improvement of marrow dose calculations are needed to supply a complete system for RIT. It is envisioned that all such efforts will continue to develop and that internal dose calculations may soon be brought to a similar level of accuracy, detail, and robustness as is commonly expected in external dose treatment planning. For this study we developed a code with a user-friendly interface that works on several nuclear medicine imaging platforms and provides timely patient-specific dose information to the physician and medical physicist. Future therapy with internal emitters should use a 3D dose calculation approach, which represents a significant advance over dose information provided by the standard geometric phantoms used for more than 20 y (which permit reporting of only average organ doses for certain standardized individuals)

  6. Evaluation of concave dose distributions created using an inverse planning system

    Hunt, Margie A.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Spirou, Spirodon V.; Chui, C.-S.; Amols, Howard I.; Ling, Clifton C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop optimum inverse treatment planning strategies for the treatment of concave targets adjacent to normal tissue structures. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions were designed using an idealized geometry consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a concave kidney-shaped target (PTV) and cylindrical normal tissues (NT) placed 5-13 mm from the target. Targets with radii of curvature from 1 to 2.75 cm were paired with normal tissues with radii between 0.5 and 2.25 cm. The target was constrained to a prescription dose of 100% and minimum and maximum doses of 95% and 105% with relative penalties of 25. Maximum dose constraint parameters for the NT varied from 10% to 70% with penalties from 10 to 1000. Plans were evaluated using the PTV uniformity index (PTV D max /PTV D 95 ) and maximum normal tissue doses (NT D max /PTV D 95 ). Results: In nearly all situations, the achievable PTV uniformity index and the maximum NT dose exceeded the corresponding constraints. This was particularly true for small PTV-NT separations (5-8 mm) or strict NT dose constraints (10%-30%), where the achievable doses differed from the requested by 30% or more. The same constraint parameters applied to different PTV-NT separations yielded different dose distributions. For most geometries, a range of constraints could be identified that would lead to acceptable plans. The optimization results were fairly independent of beam energy and radius of curvature, but improved as the number of beams increased, particularly for small PTV-NT separations or strict dose constraints. Conclusion: Optimized dose distributions are strongly affected by both the constraint parameters and target-normal tissue geometry. Standard site-specific constraint templates can serve as a starting point for optimization, but the final constraints must be determined iteratively for individual patients. A strategy whereby NT constraints and penalties are modified until the highest

  7. Age-dependent effective doses for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    Hung, Tran Van

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effective doses for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air are reported. The calculations were performed for 160 radionuclides, which are important for safety assessment of nuclear facilities. The energies and intensities of photons emitted from radionuclides were taken from the decay data DECDC used for dose calculations. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ) for 6 age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years-old and adult. The effective doses for the adult are also compared to values given in the literature.

  8. Microscopic dose distribution around PuO2 particles in lungs of hamsters, rats and dogs

    Diel, J.H.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Syrian hamsters, Fischer-344 rats and Beagle dogs inhaled monodisperse aerosols of PuO 2 and were sacrificed 1 to 16 days after exposure. The microscopic distribution of dose and tissue-at-risk around individual particles in lung was studied using autoradiographs of the lungs. The dose pattern in dogs and rats was more diffuse than in hamsters, resulting in a calculation of about twice the tumor incidence in rats and dogs as in hamsters on the basis of dose pattern using the same dose-effect model for all three species. The tumorigenic effect of inhaled insoluble PuO 2 particles depends on the species inhaling the material; Syrian hamsters are much less susceptible than are rats or dogs. It has been suggested that a difference in dose distribution resulting from differences in particle distributions in the two species may contribute to the differences in susceptibility in Syrian hamsters and rats. The role of dose distribution in lung cancer production is explored in this study by measuring microscopic dose patterns in regions surrounding single PuO 2 particles in lung. The alveolar structures of the dog and rat are different than those of the hamster. Based on these measurements, particles of PuO 2 in lung are more likely to cause lung cancer in dogs and rats than in hamsters

  9. Asymmetric fan beams (AFB) for improvement of the craniocaudal dose distribution in helical tomotherapy delivery

    Gladwish, Adam; Kron, Tomas; McNiven, Andrea; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a novel radiotherapy technique that utilizes intensity modulated fan beams that deliver highly conformal dose distributions in a helical beam trajectory. The most significant limitation in dose delivery with a constant fan beam thickness (FBT) is the penumbra width of the dose distribution in the craniocaudal direction, which is equivalent to the FBT. We propose to employ a half-blocked fan beam at start and stop location to reduce the penumbra width by half. By opening the jaw slowly during the helical delivery until the desired FBT is achieved it is possible to create a sharper edge in the superior and inferior direction from the target. The technique was studied using a tomotherapy beam model implemented on a commercial treatment planning system (Theraplan Plus V3.0). It was demonstrated that the dose distribution delivered using a 25 mm fan beam can be improved significantly, to reduce the dose to normal structures located superiorly and inferiorly of the target. Dosimetry for this technique is straightforward down to a FBT of 15 mm and implementation should be simple as no changes in couch movement are required compared to a standard HT delivery. We conclude that the use of asymmetric collimated fan beams for the start and stop of the helical tomotherapeutic dose delivery has the potential of significantly improving the dose distribution in helical tomotherapy

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma knife. Possibilities of dose distribution optimizations

    Stuecklschweiger, G.

    1995-01-01

    On April 1992, the first stereotactic radiosurgical procedure using the gamma knife was performed at the University Medical School Graz, Department of Neurosurgery. Accurate dose optimization is the foundation of a convenient and responsible utilization of this modality. But there are limits, because the final collimation is only achieved by 1 of the 4 special helm collimators. The possibilities of dose optimization and its influence on the dose distributions were investigated and partly compared with results of film densitometry measurements. In detail, the technique, which uses the same isocenter, but different sized collimators was studied. The influence of these optimization techniques on the resulting dose distributions and the dose gradient at the edge of the treatment planning volume was analyzed. Also the visions for an effective dose optimization are discussed. With 2 shots of different diameters, located at the same target coordinates and different weighting of time any collimator size between the 4 mm and 18 mm can be achieved. Because of that, a combination of more than 2 collimators is not meaningful. With the combined shots the dose fall gradient was less than that of either of the single shots involved in the combination. With the available physical and technical possibilities only a limited, very time consuming optimization is practicable. The quality control of isodose distributions requires optimizations in hard-and software, that enable CT- or MRT-based 3-dimensional visualization and dose volume analysis. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Phantom experiment of depth-dose distributions for gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    Matsumoto, T.; Kato, K.; Sakuma, Y.; Tsuruno, A.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions in a tumor simulated phantom were measured for thermal neutron flux, capture gamma-ray and internal conversion electron dose rates for gadolinium neutron capture therapy. The results show that (i) a significant dose enhancement can be achieved in the tumor by capture gamma-rays and internal conversion electrons but the dose is mainly due to capture gamma-rays from the Gd(n, γ) reactions, therefore, is not selective at the cellular level, (ii) the dose distribution was a function of strongly interrelated parameters such as gadolinium concentrations, tumor site and neutron beam size (collimator aperture size), and (iii) the Gd-NCT by thermal neutrons appears to be a potential for treatment of superficial tumor. (author)

  12. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1 FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon; Kriek, Mariska; Schmidt, Kasper B.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of Hα emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the Hα emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z ∼ 1, with a median Sérsic index of n = 1.0 ± 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 ± 0.09 in Hα consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s –1 . The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be 'scaled-up' versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(Hα) ∼ 100 Å out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  13. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at z ~ 1 from the 3D-HST Survey

    Nelson, Erica June; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Patel, Shannon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of Hα emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z ~ 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the Hα emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z ~ 1, with a median Sérsic index of n = 1.0 ± 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 ± 0.09 in Hα consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s-1. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z ~ 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be "scaled-up" versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(Hα) ~ 100 Å out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  14. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at Z approximately 1 from the 3D-HST Survey

    Nelson, Erica June; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; DaCunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha Foerster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z approximately 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 +/- 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 +/- 0.09 in H consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90.330 km s(exp 1-). The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z approximately 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-up versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H alpha) at approximately 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  15. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at z1 From The 3D-HST Survey

    Nelson, Erica June; Dokkum, Pieter G. Van; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Cunha, Elisabete Da; Schreiber, Natascha Forster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time.Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond thelocal Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming-galaxies at z1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the Halpha emission, we find that star formation occurredin approximately exponential distributions at z1, with a median Sersic index of n=1.0 plus or minus 0.2. The stacks areelongated with median axis ratios of b/a 0.58 plus or minus 0.09 in Halpha consistent with (possibly thick) disks at randomorientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, withinclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km per second. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that starformation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-upversions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(Halpha)100 Angstroms out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  16. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    the annihilation process. Materials We have investigated the impact of substituting the target material on  the depth-dose distribution of pristine and  spread out antiproton beams using the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport program. Classical ICRP targets are compared to water phantoms. In addition, track average...... unrestricted LET is calculated for all configurations. Finally, we investigate which concentrations of gadolinium and boron are needed in a water target in order to observe a significant change in the antiproton depth-dose distribution.  Results Results indicate, that there is no significant change...... in the depth-dose distribution and average LET when substituting the materials. Adding boron and gadolinium up to concentrations of 1 per 1000 atoms to a water phantom, did not change the depth-dose profile nor the average LET. Conclusions  According to our FLUKA calculations, antiproton neutron capture...

  17. SU-E-T-113: Dose Distribution Using Respiratory Signals and Machine Parameters During Treatment

    Imae, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Kida, S; Nakano, M; Takeuchi, Y; Shiraki, T; Yano, K; Yamashita, H; Nakagawa, K; Ohtomo, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique capable of acquiring projection images during treatment. Treatment plans for lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) are calculated with planning computed tomography (CT) images only exhale phase. Purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution by reconstructing from only the data such as respiratory signals and machine parameters acquired during treatment. Methods: Phantom and three patients with lung tumor underwent CT scans for treatment planning. They were treated by VMAT while acquiring projection images to derive their respiratory signals and machine parameters including positions of multi leaf collimators, dose rates and integrated monitor units. The respiratory signals were divided into 4 and 10 phases and machine parameters were correlated with the divided respiratory signals based on the gantry angle. Dose distributions of each respiratory phase were calculated from plans which were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and the machine parameters during treatment. The doses at isocenter, maximum point and the centroid of target were evaluated. Results and Discussion: Dose distributions during treatment were calculated using the machine parameters and the respiratory signals detected from projection images. Maximum dose difference between plan and in treatment distribution was −1.8±0.4% at centroid of target and dose differences of evaluated points between 4 and 10 phases were no significant. Conclusion: The present method successfully evaluated dose distribution using respiratory signals and machine parameters during treatment. This method is feasible to verify the actual dose for moving target

  18. Dose distribution considerations of medium energy electron beams at extended source-to-surface distance

    Saw, Cheng B.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Pawlicki, Todd; Korb, Leroy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) on dose distributions for a range of medium energy electron beams and cone sizes. Methods and Materials: The depth-dose curves and isodose distributions of 6 MeV, 10 MeV, and 14 MeV electron beams from a dual photon and multielectron energies linear accelerator were studied. To examine the influence of cone size, the smallest and the largest cone sizes available were used. Measurements were carried out in a water phantom with the water surface set at three different SSDs from 101 to 116 cm. Results: In the region between the phantom surface and the depth of maximum dose, the depth-dose decreases as the SSD increases for all electron beam energies. The effects of extended SSD in the region beyond the depth of maximum dose are unobservable and, hence, considered minimal. Extended SSD effects are apparent for higher electron beam energy with small cone size causing the depth of maximum dose and the rapid dose fall-off region to shift deeper into the phantom. However, the change in the depth-dose curve is small. On the other hand, the rapid dose fall-off region is essentially unaltered when the large cone is used. The penumbra enlarges and electron beam flatness deteriorates with increasing SSD

  19. Axial distribution of absorbed doses in fast neutron field at the RB reactor

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.; Ninkovic, M.

    1988-11-01

    The coupled fast thermal system CFTS at the RB reactor is created for obtaining fast neutron fields. The axial distribution of fast neutron flux density in its second configuration (CFTS-2) is measured. The axial distribution of absorbed doses is computed on the basis of mentioned experimental results. At the end these experimental and computed results are given. (Author)

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF A 2ND DOSE OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT IN RABBITS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-FAILURE

    PLOTZ, FB; STEVENS, H; HEIKAMP, A; OETOMO, SB

    Newborn infants with respiratory distress who fail to respond to surfactant treatment receive a second dose of surfactant. The effect of this strategy on the distribution of surfactant to the lung is unknown. We therefore investigated the distribution of the first (100 mg/kg body weight) and second

  1. The dose distributions of γ ray in the silicon in and near the interfaces of silicon and various materials

    Ba Weizhen; Wu Qingzhi; He Chengfa; Chen Chaoyang

    1996-01-01

    The depth dose distributions of γ ray in the silicon in and near the interfaces of silicon and various materials, such as gold, have been studied. The dose distributions have been compared with equilibrium doses in the homogeneous silicon material, and considerable dose gradient distributions were obtained. In the case of silicon adjacent to high atomic numbered material, dose enhancement effects have been observed in and near the interfaces. The dose gradient distributions were explained by photoelectron effect, Auger effect and secondary electron transport mechanism of the low energy scattering photons

  2. Experimental analysis of axial and radial stress distribution in soft materials used for petrochemical valve stem sealing package

    Ripeanu, R. G.; Ispas, A.; Ispas, D.

    2017-02-01

    Paper presents experimental results obtained by authors regarding pressure values and distribution, by using a special pressure sensitive paper, type FujiFilm and adequate hardware equipment and a soft program FPD810 Win. Was obtained the proper axial force related for different materials in order to respect the valves sealing demands. Were showed that, pressure maps obtained depends of the construction of sealing package, density of the preformed band rings and corrected sealing replacing on location in case of square braided cord used.

  3. Systematic underestimation of the age of samples with saturating exponential behaviour and inhomogeneous dose distribution

    Brennan, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    In luminescence and ESR studies, a systematic underestimate of the (average) equivalent dose, and thus also the age, of a sample can occur when there is significant variation of the natural dose within the sample and some regions approach saturation. This is demonstrated explicitly for a material that exhibits a single-saturating-exponential growth of signal with dose. The result is valid for any geometry (e.g. a plain layer, spherical grain, etc.) and some illustrative cases are modelled, with the age bias exceeding 10% in extreme cases. If the dose distribution within the sample can be modelled accurately, it is possible to correct for the bias in the estimates of equivalent dose estimate and age. While quantifying the effect would be more difficult, similar systematic biases in dose and age estimates are likely in other situations more complex than the one modelled

  4. Conventional patient specific IMRT QA and 3DVH verification of dose distribution for helical tomotherapy

    Sharma, Prabhat Krishna; Joshi, Kishore; Epili, D.; Gavake, Umesh; Paul, Siji; Reena, Ph.; Jamema, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, patient-specific IMRT QA has transitioned from point dose measurements by ion chambers to films to 2D array measurements. 3DVH software has taken this transition a step further by estimating the 3D dose delivered to the patient volume from 2D diode measurements using a planned dose perturbation (PDP) algorithm. This algorithm was developed to determine, if the conventional IMRT QA though sensitive at detecting errors, has any predictive power in detecting dose errors of clinical significance related to dose to the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). The aim of this study is to compare the conventional IMRT patient specific QA and 3DVH dose distribution for patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT)

  5. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  6. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  7. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our study......- and dose prescription concept of prescribing a lower dose to the whole gland and an escalated dose to the GTV using LDR-BT seed planning was technically feasible and resulted in a significant dose-reduction to urethra and bladder neck....

  8. Biologically effective dose distribution based on the linear quadratic model and its clinical relevance

    Lee, Steve P.; Leu, Min Y.; Smathers, James B.; McBride, William H.; Parker, Robert G.; Withers, H. Rodney

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plans based on physical dose distributions do not necessarily entirely reflect the biological effects under various fractionation schemes. Over the past decade, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has emerged as a convenient tool to quantify biological effects for radiotherapy. In this work, we set out to construct a mechanism to display biologically oriented dose distribution based on the LQ model. Methods and Materials: A computer program that converts a physical dose distribution calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system to a biologically effective dose (BED) distribution has been developed and verified against theoretical calculations. This software accepts a user's input of biological parameters for each structure of interest (linear and quadratic dose-response and repopulation kinetic parameters), as well as treatment scheme factors (number of fractions, fractional dose, and treatment time). It then presents a two-dimensional BED display in conjunction with anatomical structures. Furthermore, to facilitate clinicians' intuitive comparison with conventional fractionation regimen, a conversion of BED to normalized isoeffective dose (NID) is also allowed. Results: Two sample cases serve to illustrate the application of our tool in clinical practice. (a) For an orthogonal wedged pair of x-ray beams treating a maxillary sinus tumor, the biological effect at the ipsilateral mandible can be quantified, thus illustrates the so-called 'double-trouble' effects very well. (b) For a typical four-field, evenly weighted prostate treatment using 10 MV x-rays, physical dosimetry predicts a comparable dose at the femoral necks between an alternate two-fields/day and four-fields/day schups. However, our BED display reveals an approximate 21% higher BED for the two-fields/day scheme. This excessive dose to the femoral necks can be eliminated if the treatment is delivered with a 3:2 (anterio-posterior/posterio-anterior (AP

  9. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  10. Impact of Mobile Dose-Tracking Technology on Medication Distribution at an Academic Medical Center.

    Kelm, Matthew; Campbell, Udobi

    2016-05-01

    Medication dose-tracking technologies have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce costs associated with re-dispensing doses reported as missing. Data describing this technology and its impact on the medication use process are limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of dose-tracking technology on pharmacy workload and drug expense at an academic, acute care medical center. Dose-tracking technology was implemented in June 2014. Pre-implementation data were collected from February to April 2014. Post-implementation data were collected from July to September 2014. The primary endpoint was the percent of re-dispensed oral syringe and compounded sterile product (CSP) doses within the pre- and post-implementation periods per 1,000 discharges. Secondary endpoints included pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses, labor costs, and staff satisfaction with the medication distribution process. We observed an average 6% decrease in re-dispensing of oral syringe and CSP doses from pre- to post-implementation (15,440 vs 14,547 doses; p = .047). However, when values were adjusted per 1,000 discharges, this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = .074). Pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses was significantly reduced from pre- to post-implementation ($834,830 vs $746,466 [savings of $88,364]; p = .047). We estimated that $2,563 worth of technician labor was avoided in re-dispensing missing doses. We also saw significant improvement in staff perception of technology assisting in reducing missing doses (p = .0003), as well as improvement in effectiveness of resolving or minimizing missing doses (p = .01). The use of mobile dose-tracking technology demonstrated meaningful reductions in both the number of doses re-dispensed and cost of pharmaceuticals dispensed.

  11. Development of semi-empirical equations for In-water dose distribution using Co-60 beams

    Abdalla, Siddig Abdalla Talha

    2001-08-01

    Knowledge of absorbed dose distribution is essential for the management of cancer using Co-60 teletherapy. Since direct measurement of dose in patient is impossible, indirect assessments are always carried. In this study direct assessments in phantoms were taken for dose distribution data. Mainly we concentrated on central axis dose and isodose curves data, which are essential for treatment planning. We started by development of a semi-empirical method which uses a more restricted number of measurements and uses graphical relation to develop the dose distribution. This method was based on the decrement lines method which was introduced by Orchard (1964) to develop isodose curve. In the beginning the already developed percent depth dose, Pdd, equation was modified and used to plot the Pdd lines for randomly selected field sizes. After that the dose profiles at depths 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm for randomly selected field sizes were plotted from the direct measurement. Then with the help of the PDD's equation, an equation for the slope of decrement lines is developed. From this slope equation a relation that gives the off axial distance was found. Making use of these relations, the iso lines 80%, 50% and 20% were plotted for the field sizes: 6*6 cm 2 , 10*10 cm 2 and 18*18 cm 2 . Finally these plotted lines were compared to their correspondents from the manufacturer and those used in the hospital (Rick). (Author)

  12. Estimation of four-dimensional dose distribution using electronic portal imaging device in radiation therapy

    Mizoguchi, Asumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a method to evaluate four-dimensional radiation dose distribution in a patient body based upon the animated image of EPID (electronic portal imaging device) which is an image of beam-direction at the irradiation. In the first place, we have obtained the image of the dose which is emitted from patient body at therapy planning using therapy planning CT image and dose evaluation algorism. In the second place, we have estimated the emission dose image at the irradiation using EPID animated image which is obtained at the irradiation. In the third place, we have got an affine transformation matrix including respiratory movement in the body by performing linear registration on the emission dose image at therapy planning to get the one at the irradiation. In the fourth place, we have applied the affine transformation matrix on the therapy planning CT image and estimated the CT image 'at irradiation'. Finally we have evaluated four-dimensional dose distribution by calculating dose distribution in the CT image 'at irradiation' which has been estimated for each frame of the EPID animated-image. This scheme may be useful for evaluating therapy results and risk management. (author)

  13. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic globular clusters - XIV. Multiple stellar populations within M 15 and their radial distribution

    Nardiello, D.; Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Bellini, A.; Cassisi, S.; Libralato, M.; Marino, A. F.

    2018-06-01

    In the context of the Hubble Space Telescope UV Survey of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), we derived high-precision, multi-band photometry to investigate the multiple stellar populations in the massive and metal-poor GC M 15. By creating for red-giant branch (RGB) stars of the cluster a `chromosome map', which is a pseudo two-colour diagram made with appropriate combination of F275W, F336W, F438W, and F814W magnitudes, we revealed colour spreads around two of the three already known stellar populations. These spreads cannot be produced by photometric errors alone and could hide the existence of (two) additional populations. This discovery increases the complexity of the multiple-population phenomenon in M 15. Our analysis shows that M 15 exhibits a faint sub-giant branch (SGB), which is also detected in colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) made with optical magnitudes only. This poorly populated SGB includes about 5 per cent of the total number of SGB stars and evolves into a red RGB in the mF336W versus mF336W - mF814W CMD, suggesting that M 15 belongs to the class of Type II GCs. We measured the relative number of stars in each population at various radial distances from the cluster centre, showing that all of these populations share the same radial distribution within statistic uncertainties. These new findings are discussed in the context of the formation and evolution scenarios of the multiple populations.

  14. IMAGING OF FLUOROPHORES IN CHROMATOGRAPHIC BEADS, RECONSTRUCTION OF RADIAL DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS AND CHARACTERISATION OF PROTEIN UPTAKING PROCESSES

    Bernd Stanislawski

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new adjustment calculus is presented to determine the true intraparticle distribution of bound protein within chromatographic beads from confocal fluorescence slice series. The calculus does not require knowledge about optical properties of different chromatographic materials like refractive index and turbidity, but it depends on a parameter which can be adjusted interactively. The algorithm is of complexity O(n where n is the pixel number. From the reconstructed data we compute the parameters of the protein uptaking process using a model-based approach. It is demonstrated that the protein uptaking rates of the beads strongly dependent on the conditions of the fluid phase influencing the strength of protein surface interaction.

  15. Performance inspection of smart superconducting fault current controller in radial distribution substation through PSCAD/EMTDC simulation

    MassoudiFarid, Mehrdad; Shin, Jae Woong; Lee, Ji Ho; Ko, Tae Kuk [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    In power grid, in order to level out the generation with demand, up-gradation of the system is occasionally required. This will lead to more fault current levels. However, upgrading all the protection instruments of the system is both costly and extravagant. This issue could be dominated by using Smart Fault Current Controller (SFCC). While the impact of Fault current Limiters (FCL) in various locations has been studied in different situations for years, the performance of SFCC has not been investigated extensively. In this research, SFCC which has adopted the characteristics of a full bridge thyristor rectifier with a superconducting coil is applied to three main locations such as load feeder, Bus-tie position and main feeder location and its behavior is investigated through simulation in presence and absence of small Distributed Generation unit (DG). The results show a huge difference in limiting the fault current when using SFCC.

  16. Analytic characterization of linear accelerator radiosurgery dose distributions for fast optimization

    Meeks, S.L.; Buatti, J.M.; Eyster, B.; Kendrick, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery utilizes non-coplanar arc therapy delivered through circular collimators. Generally, spherically symmetric arc sets are used, resulting in nominally spherical dose distributions. Various treatment planning parameters may be manipulated to provide dose conformation to irregular lesions. Iterative manipulation of these variables can be a difficult and time-consuming task, because (a) understanding the effect of these parameters is complicated and (b) three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations are computationally expensive. This manipulation can be simplified, however, because the prescription isodose surface for all single isocentre distributions can be approximated by conic sections. In this study, the effects of treatment planning parameter manipulation on the dimensions of the treatment isodose surface were determined empirically. These dimensions were then fitted to analytic functions, assuming that the dose distributions were characterized as conic sections. These analytic functions allowed real-time approximation of the 3D isodose surface. Iterative plan optimization, either manual or automated, is achieved more efficiently using this real time approximation of the dose matrix. Subsequent to iterative plan optimization, the analytic function is related back to the appropriate plan parameters, and the dose distribution is determined using conventional dosimetry calculations. This provides a pseudo-inverse approach to radiosurgery optimization, based solely on geometric considerations. (author)

  17. A three-dimensional dose-distribution estimation system using computerized image reconstruction

    Nishijima, Akihiko; Kidoya, Eiji; Komuro, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Asada, Naoki.

    1990-01-01

    In radiotherapy planning, three dimensional (3-D) estimation of dose distribution has been very troublesome and time-consuming. To solve this problem, a simple and fast 3-D dose distribution image using a computer and Charged Couple Device (CCD) camera was developed. A series of X-ray films inserted in the phantom using a linear accelerator unit was exposed. The degree of film density was degitized with a CCD camera and a minicomputer (VAX 11-750). After that these results were compared with the present depth dose obtained by a JARP type dosimeter, with a dose error being less than 2%. The 3-D dose distribution image could accurately depict the density changes created by aluminum and air put into the phantom. The contrast resolution of the CCD camera seemed to be superior to the convention densitometer in the low-to-intermediate contrast range. In conclusion, our method seem to be very fast and simple for obtaining 3-D dose distribution images and is very effective when compared with the conventional method. (author)

  18. Robotic stereotactic radioablation of breast tumors: Influence of beam size on the absorbed dose distributions

    Garnica-Garza, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) therapy for breast tumors has been shown to be an effective treatment strategy when applied concomitantly with chemotherapy, with the purpose of reducing the tumor volume thus making it more amenable for breast conserving surgery. In this paper we used Monte Carlo simulation within a realistic patient model to determine the influence that the variation in beam collimation radius has on the resultant absorbed dose distributions for this type of treatment. Separate optimized plans were obtained for treatments using 300 circular beams with radii of 0.5 cm, 0.75 cm, 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. Cumulative dose volume histograms were obtained for the gross, clinical and planning target volumes as well as for eight organs and structures at risk. Target coverage improves as the collimator size is increased, at the expense of increasing the volume of healthy tissue receiving mid-level absorbed doses. Interestingly, it is found that the maximum dose imparted to the skin is highly dependent on collimator size, while the dosimetry of other structures, such as both the ipsilateral and contralateral lung tissue are basically unaffected by a change in beam size. - Highlights: • Stereotactic body radiation therapy of breast tumors is analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation. • The influence of beam collimation on the absorbed dose distributions is determined. • Large field sizes increase target dose uniformity and midlevel doses to healthy structures. • Skin dose is greatly affected by changes in beam collimation.

  19. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    Figueroa, R. G.; Lozano, E.; Valente, M.

    2013-01-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  20. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via placenta transfer

    Millard, R. K.; Saunders, M.; Palmer, A. M.; Preece, A. W.

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed radiation doses to internal foetal organs were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) technique in this study. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the pregnant female as in MIRDOSE3 enabled estimation of absorbed dose to the whole foetus at two stages of gestation. Some foetal organ self-doses could have been estimated by invoking simple spherical models for thyroid, liver, etc, but we investigated the use of the MIRDOSE3 new-born phantom as a surrogate for the stage 3 foetus, scaled to be compatible with total foetal body mean absorbed dose/cumulated activity. We illustrate the method for obtaining approximate dose distribution in the foetus near term following intake of 1 MBq of 123I, 124I, 125I or 131I as sodium iodide by the mother using in vivo biodistribution data examples from a good model of placenta transfer. Doses to the foetal thyroid of up to 1.85 Gy MBq-1 were predicted from the 131I uptake data. Activity in the foetal thyroid was the largest contributor to absorbed dose in the foetal body, brain, heart and thymus. Average total doses to the whole foetus ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 mGy MBq-1 for stages 1 and 3 of pregnancy using the MIRDOSE3 program, and were considerably higher than those predicted from the maternal contributions alone. Doses to the foetal thymus and stomach were similar, around 2-3 mGy MBq-1. Some foetal organ doses from the radioiodides were ten times higher than to the corresponding organs of the mother, and up to 100 times higher to the thyroid. The fraction of activity uptakes in foetal organs were distributed similarly to the maternal ones.

  1. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via placenta transfer

    Millard, R.K. [Medical Physics Research Centre, Bristol Oncology Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rkmillard_69@yahoo.co.uk; Saunders, M.; Palmer, A.M.; Preece, A.W. [Medical Physics Research Centre, Bristol Oncology Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed radiation doses to internal foetal organs were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) technique in this study. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the pregnant female as in MIRDOSE3 enabled estimation of absorbed dose to the whole foetus at two stages of gestation. Some foetal organ self-doses could have been estimated by invoking simple spherical models for thyroid, liver, etc, but we investigated the use of the MIRDOSE3 new-born phantom as a surrogate for the stage 3 foetus, scaled to be compatible with total foetal body mean absorbed dose/cumulated activity. We illustrate the method for obtaining approximate dose distribution in the foetus near term following intake of 1 MBq of {sup 123}I, {sup 124}I, {sup 125}I or {sup 131}I as sodium iodide by the mother using in vivo biodistribution data examples from a good model of placenta transfer. Doses to the foetal thyroid of up to 1.85 Gy MBq{sup -1} were predicted from the {sup 131}I uptake data. Activity in the foetal thyroid was the largest contributor to absorbed dose in the foetal body, brain, heart and thymus. Average total doses to the whole foetus ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 mGy MBq{sup -1} for stages 1 and 3 of pregnancy using the MIRDOSE3 program, and were considerably higher than those predicted from the maternal contributions alone. Doses to the foetal thymus and stomach were similar, around 2-3 mGy MBq{sup -1}. Some foetal organ doses from the radioiodides were ten times higher than to the corresponding organs of the mother, and up to 100 times higher to the thyroid. The fraction of activity uptakes in foetal organs were distributed similarly to the maternal ones. (author)

  2. Evaluation and distribution of doses received by Cuban population due to environmental sources of radioactivity

    Zerquera, Juan T.; Prendes Alonso, Miguel; Fernandez Gomez, Isis M.; Lopez Bejerano, Gladys

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the frame of a national research project supported by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment of the Republic of Cuba doses received by Cuban population due to the exposure to existing in the environment sources of radiation were assessed. Direct measurements of sources representing 90% of average total doses to world population according to UNSCEAR data were made and estimations of doses were obtained for the different components of the total dose: doses due to the exposure to cosmic radiation, external terrestrial radiation, potassium contained in human body and inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides present in the environment. Using the obtained results it was made an estimation of total doses to Cuban population due to environmental radiation sources and the contributions of different dose components were assessed. This was carried out through a Monte Carlo simulation of the total doses using the parameter of dose distributions obtained for the different contributors (components) to total dose. On the basis of the estimations the average total effective dose to Cuban population due to the exposure to environmental sources was estimated as 1.1 ± 0.3 mSv per year. This low dose value is in the range of doses estimated by UNSCEAR for world population due to natural background and can be explained by the specific of Cuban environment: a majority of the population living at the sea level or at low altitudes, relative low content of primordial radionuclides in soils and high ventilation rates in dwellings. All the instructions specified in the Call for Abstracts should be taken into account. e/ 41 and 457. (author)

  3. Analysis of the Dose Distribution of Moving Organ using a Moving Phantom System

    Kim, Yon Lae; Park, Byung Moon; Bae, Yong Ki; Kang, Min Young; Bang, Dong Wan; Lee, Gui Won

    2006-01-01

    Few researches have been performed on the dose distribution of the moving organ for radiotherapy so far. In order to simulate the organ motion caused by respiratory function, multipurpose phantom and moving device was used and dosimetric measurements for dose distribution of the moving organs were conducted in this study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how dose distributions are changed due to respiratory motion. A multipurpose phantom and a moving device were developed for the measurement of the dose distribution of the moving organ due to respiratory function. Acryl chosen design of the phantom was considered the most obvious choice for phantom material. For construction of the phantom, we used acryl and cork with density of 1.14 g/cm 3 , 0.32 g/cm 3 respectively. Acryl and cork slab in the phantom were used to simulate the normal organ and lung respectively. The moving phantom system was composed of moving device, moving control system, and acryl and cork phantom. Gafchromic film and EDR2 film were used to measure dose distributions. The moving device system may be driven by two directional step motors and able to perform 2 dimensional movements (x, z axis), but only 1 dimensional movement(z axis) was used for this study. Larger penumbra was shown in the cork phantom than in the acryl phantom. The dose profile and isodose curve of Gafchromic EBT film were not uniform since the film has small optical density responding to the dose. As the organ motion was increased, the blurrings in penumbra, flatness, and symmetry were increased. Most of measurements of dose distributions, Gafchromic EBT film has poor flatness and symmetry than EDR2 film, but both penumbra distributions were more or less comparable. The Gafchromic EBT film is more useful as it does not need development and more radiation dose could be exposed than EDR2 film without losing film characteristics. But as response of the optical density of Gafchromic EBT film to dose is low, beam profiles

  4. Design and dosimetry of an eye plaque containing I-125 seeds: An improved dose distribution

    Detorie, N.A.; Tkacik, M.F.; Neglia, W.J.; Jenkins, D.; Shadday, J.

    1986-01-01

    To treat intraocular tumors, a temporarily implanted eye plaque, containing 24 I-125 seeds (3M model 6711), was fabricated from 0.6-mm-thick lead disk with a 1.5-cm diameter. The I-125 seeds were distributed in a particular geometric pattern to average the dose anisotropy of each individual seed. Water phantom measurements made with TLD chips (LiF) and film over the approximate depth range of 1-25 mm were compared with treatment planning computer calculations (Capintec RT-108). Data indicate that the specified geometry produces a dose distribution delivering a tumor dose of 10,000 rad to the tumor apex (7 mm) without exceeding a sclera dose (1 mm) of 40,000 rad. Information regarding fabrication, dosimetry, and radiation safety is presented

  5. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    Krishnan, L.; St George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9-20 MeV electron beams and 1.25-15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prosthesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations

  6. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    Krishnan, L.; St George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9--20 MeV electron beams and 1.25--15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prothesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations

  7. Monte Carlo Estimation of Absorbed Dose Distributions Obtained from Heterogeneous 106Ru Eye Plaques.

    Zaragoza, Francisco J; Eichmann, Marion; Flühs, Dirk; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    The distribution of the emitter substance in 106 Ru eye plaques is usually assumed to be homogeneous for treatment planning purposes. However, this distribution is never homogeneous, and it widely differs from plaque to plaque due to manufacturing factors. By Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, we study the absorbed dose distribution obtained from the specific CCA1364 and CCB1256 106 Ru plaques, whose actual emitter distributions were measured. The idealized, homogeneous CCA and CCB plaques are also simulated. The largest discrepancy in depth dose distribution observed between the heterogeneous and the homogeneous plaques was 7.9 and 23.7% for the CCA and CCB plaques, respectively. In terms of isodose lines, the line referring to 100% of the reference dose penetrates 0.2 and 1.8 mm deeper in the case of heterogeneous CCA and CCB plaques, respectively, with respect to the homogeneous counterpart. The observed differences in absorbed dose distributions obtained from heterogeneous and homogeneous plaques are clinically irrelevant if the plaques are used with a lateral safety margin of at least 2 mm. However, these differences may be relevant if the plaques are used in eccentric positioning.

  8. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  9. Jaws calibration method to get a homogeneous distribution of dose in the junction of hemi fields

    Cenizo de Castro, E.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Moreno Saiz, C.; Hernandez Rodriguez, R.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Martin-Viera Cueto, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Hemi fields treatments are widely used in radiotherapy. Because the tolerance established for the positioning of each jaw is 1 mm, may be cases of overlap or separation of up to 2 mm. This implies heterogeneity of doses up to 40% in the joint area. This paper presents an accurate method of calibration of the jaws so as to obtain homogeneous dose distributions when using this type of treatment. (Author)

  10. A γ dose distribution evaluation technique using the k-d tree for nearest neighbor searching

    Yuan Jiankui; Chen Weimin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors propose an algorithm based on the k-d tree for nearest neighbor searching to improve the γ calculation time for 2D and 3D dose distributions. Methods: The γ calculation method has been widely used for comparisons of dose distributions in clinical treatment plans and quality assurances. By specifying the acceptable dose and distance-to-agreement criteria, the method provides quantitative measurement of the agreement between the reference and evaluation dose distributions. The γ value indicates the acceptability. In regions where γ≤1, the predefined criterion is satisfied and thus the agreement is acceptable; otherwise, the agreement fails. Although the concept of the method is not complicated and a quick naieve implementation is straightforward, an efficient and robust implementation is not trivial. Recent algorithms based on exhaustive searching within a maximum radius, the geometric Euclidean distance, and the table lookup method have been proposed to improve the computational time for multidimensional dose distributions. Motivated by the fact that the least searching time for finding a nearest neighbor can be an O(log N) operation with a k-d tree, where N is the total number of the dose points, the authors propose an algorithm based on the k-d tree for the γ evaluation in this work. Results: In the experiment, the authors found that the average k-d tree construction time per reference point is O(log N), while the nearest neighbor searching time per evaluation point is proportional to O(N 1/k ), where k is between 2 and 3 for two-dimensional and three-dimensional dose distributions, respectively. Conclusions: Comparing with other algorithms such as exhaustive search and sorted list O(N), the k-d tree algorithm for γ evaluation is much more efficient.

  11. Evaluation of the breast absorbed dose distribution using the Fricke Xylenol Gel

    Czelusniak, C; Del Lama, L S; Moreira, M V; De Almeida, A

    2010-01-01

    During a breast cancer radiotherapy treatment, several issues have to be taken into account, among them, hot spots, gradient of doses delivered over the breast, as well as in the lungs and the heart. The present work aims to apply the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter in the study of these issues, using a CCD camera to analyse the dose deposited distribution. Thus, the CCD was used to capture the images of different cuvettes that were filled with FXG and irradiated considering analogous setups employed in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. Thereafter, these pictures where processed in a MatLab routine and the spatial dose distributions could be evaluated. These distributions were compared with the ones that were obtained from dedicated treatment planning's softwares. According to the results obtained, the FXG, allied with the CCD system, has shown to be a complementary tool in dosimetry, helping to prevent possible complications during breast cancer treatments.

  12. Effects of target size on the comparison of photon and charged particle dose distributions

    Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Tjoa, T.; Lyman, J.T.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.

    1989-12-01

    The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to quantify and evaluate the differences in the use of different radiation types and irradiation geometries in radiosurgery. We are examining dose distributions for photons using the ''Gamma Knife'' and the linear accelerator arc methods, as well as different species of charged particles from protons to neon ions. A number of different factors need to be studied to accurately compare the different modalities such as target size, shape and location, the irradiation geometry, and biological response. This presentation focuses on target size, which has a large effect on the dose distributions in normal tissue surrounding the lesion. This work concentrates on dose distributions found in radiosurgery, as opposed to those usually found in radiotherapy. 5 refs., 2 figs

  13. The influence of inhomogeneities on the dose distribution of fast electrons in radiotherapy

    Windemuth, M.

    1985-01-01

    Simple models are used to make a principal comparison between measured fast-electron dose distributions behind tissue inhomogeneities and those calculated by means of an irradiation planning system. The different organs were represented by water (for muscle), by cork (for the lungs) and by graphite (for bone). Corresponding to their density, inhomogeneities result, in principle, in a dose shift to a greater or smaller body depth which is correctly considered by the irradiation planning system. However, electron scattering transversal to beam direction will occur behind inhomogeneity edges which, in general, are not covered by the irradiation planning system, but which result in dose distributions deviating strongly from those expected as due to the shift. This is the reason for the limited accuracy of irradiation planning systems in complicated inhomogeneity distribution. The thesis demonstrates those cases which justify irradiation planning and those cases where they are not a reliable basis for irradiation. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Evaluation of the breast absorbed dose distribution using the Fricke Xylenol Gel

    Czelusniak, C; Del Lama, L S; Moreira, M V; De Almeida, A, E-mail: dalmeida@ffclrp.usp.b

    2010-11-01

    During a breast cancer radiotherapy treatment, several issues have to be taken into account, among them, hot spots, gradient of doses delivered over the breast, as well as in the lungs and the heart. The present work aims to apply the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter in the study of these issues, using a CCD camera to analyse the dose deposited distribution. Thus, the CCD was used to capture the images of different cuvettes that were filled with FXG and irradiated considering analogous setups employed in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. Thereafter, these pictures where processed in a MatLab routine and the spatial dose distributions could be evaluated. These distributions were compared with the ones that were obtained from dedicated treatment planning's softwares. According to the results obtained, the FXG, allied with the CCD system, has shown to be a complementary tool in dosimetry, helping to prevent possible complications during breast cancer treatments.

  15. Measurement of leakage dose distribution from Crookes tube using imaging plate

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Obara, Satoshi; Inoue, Hajime; Kato, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Hosoda, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Crookes tube is used on an educational site in the junior high school and the high school, etc. for the purpose to learn the character of cathode rays. When using the tube, X rays are generated, however, there is few example of confirming in which direction to scatter in detail. Understanding how the distribution of the leakage dose is important because of efficient exposure decrease. The distribution of X rays generated from Crookes tube was measured by arranging imaging plates in six surroundings to enclose Crookes tube. The electron collided with a metal target and X rays had extended backward. The dose was greatly different depending on the direction. When experimenting with Crookes tube, it is necessary to consider not only the dose but also distribution. (author)

  16. Dose distribution in head and neck during dental x-ray procedures

    Mason, E.W.; Goepp, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies, notably by Franklin (Angle Ortho., 43:53-64, 1973), have shown significant exposures during cephalometric dental procedures and ways in which these exposures can be reduced. Skin dose over thyroid tissue has been measured by Alcox (J. Am. Dent. Assoc., 88:568-579, 1974), and others. This study is an expansion of thyroid dose measurements by Block, Goepp, and Mason (Angle Ortho., 47:17-24, 1977). The internal dose distribution in the head and neck area due to cephalometric and panoramic dental x-ray procedures is shown along with the dependence of orbit and thyroid dose on patient positioning. Higher doses can be delivered to deep tissue by panoramic machines since tissue at the axis of rotation is exposed during the entire procedure. (author)

  17. Studies on the dose distribution and treatment technique of high energy electron beams

    Lee, D.H.; Chu, S.S.

    1978-01-01

    Some important properties of high energy electron beams from the linear accelerator, LMR-13, installed in the Yonsei Cancer Center were studied. The results of experimental studies on the problems associated with the 8, 10, and 12 MeV electron beam therapy were as followings; The ionization type dosemeters calibrated by 90 Sr standard source were suitable to the measurements of the outputs and the obsorbed doses in accuracy point of view, and dose measurements using ionization chambers were difficult when measuring doses in small field size and the regions of rapid fall off. The electron energies were measured precisely with an energy spectrometer, and the practical electron energy was calculated within 5% error in the maximum range of the high energy electron beam in water. The correcting factors of perturbated dose distributions owing to radiation field, energy, and materials of the treatment cone were checked and described systematically and thus the variation of dose distributions due to the non-homogeneities of tissues and slopping skin surfaces were completely compensated. The electron beams were adequately diffused using the scatterers, and minimized the bremsstrahlung, irradiation field size, and materials of scatterers. Thus, the therapeutic capacity with the limited electron energy could be extended by improving the dose distributions. (author)

  18. Experimental Determination of the Neutron Radiation-Dose Distribution in the Human Phantom

    Stipcic, Neda [Institute Rudjer Bogkovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1967-01-15

    The quality of the radiation delivering the radiation dose to the human phantom is quite different from that of the incident neutron beam. This paper describes the experimental investigation of the variation of neutron dose related to the variation of neutron fluence with depth in the human phantom. The distribution of neutron radiation was determined in the human phantom - a cube of paraffin wax 25 cm x 25 cm x 50 cm with a density of 0.92 cm{sup -3}. Po-Be and Ra-Be point sources were used as neutron sources. Neutron fluences were measured using different types of detector: scintillation detector, BF{sub 3} counter, and nuclear-track emulsions. Since the fluence measurements with these three types of detectors were carried out under the same experimental conditions, it was possible to separate and analyse each part of the radiation dose in the paraffin. From the investigations, the distribution of the total radiation dose was obtained as a function of the paraffin depth. The maximum value of this dose distribution is constant with respect to the distance between the source and the paraffin phantom. From the results obtained, some conclusions may be drawn concerning the amount of absorbed radiation dose in the human phantom. (author)

  19. [The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants].

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-10-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances.

  20. The use of polymer gel dosimetry to measure dose distribution around metallic implants

    Nagahata, Tomomasa; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Monzen, Hajime; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2014-01-01

    A semi-solid polymer dosimetry system using agar was developed to measure the dose distribution close to metallic implants. Dosimetry of heterogeneous fields where electron density markedly varies is often problematic. This prompted us to develop a polymer gel dosimetry technique using agar to measure the dose distribution near substance boundaries. Varying the concentration of an oxygen scavenger (tetra-hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride) showed the absorbed dose and transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance signal to be linear between 3 and 12 Gy. Although a change in the dosimeter due to oxidization was observed in room air after 24 hours, no such effects were observed in the first 4 hours. The dose distribution around the metal implants was measured using agar dosimetry. The metals tested were a lead rod, a titanium hip joint, and a metallic stent. A maximum 30% dose increase was observed near the lead rod, but only a 3% increase in the absorbed dose was noted near the surface of the titanium hip joint and metallic stent. Semi-solid polymer dosimetry using agar thus appears to be a useful method for dosimetry around metallic substances. (author)

  1. Geographical distribution of radiation risk unaccountable by direct exposure dose in hiroshima A-bomb victims

    Tonda, Tetsuji; Satoh, Kenichi; Ohani, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Death risks due to solid cancer were estimated from region to region where the A-bomb survivors had been actually exposed, to visualize the risk distribution on the map, which resulting in risk regional difference that had been unaccountable by direct exposure dose estimation. Analysis was performed with 3 hazard models of the previous one, + direct exposed dose as a confounding factor and, further, + spatial distance from the explosion point. Subjects were 37,382 A-bomb survivors at Jan. 1, 1970 with known positional coordinate at explosion, followed until Dec. 31, 2009, whose endpoint was set by 4,371 deaths due to cancer except leukemia, cancers of thyroid and breast. Confounding factors in the previous hazard model were sex, age at the exposure, dose and shielding. With the previous model, risk distribution was observed in a concentric circular region around the hypocenter and in an additional west to northwestern suburbs. The latter risk distribution was also seen with the second model in the same region, where dose decreased with -7 powers of the distance. When adjusted with -3 powers of the distance with the third model, the actual risk distribution was found best fitted, indicating the presence of distance-dependent risk. It was suggested that the region exposed to additional dose possibly derived from fallout had been the actual black rainfall area as those regions agreed with each other. (T.T.)

  2. Dose distribution of chest wall electron beam radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy

    Cong Yetong; Chen Dawei; Bai Lan; Zhou Yinhang; Piao Yongfeng; Wang Xi; Qu Yaqin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the dose distribution of different bolus after different energy electron beam irradiation to different chest wall radiotherapy for the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The paper simulated the dose distribution of women's left breast cancer after radical mastectomy by 6 and 9 MeV electron beam irradiation, and TLD was used to measure. Results: The dose of skin became higher and the dose of lung was less when 0.5 and 1.0 cm bolus were used on the body; with the increasing of the energy of electron beam, the high dose field became larger; and with the same energy of electron beam, the high dose field moved to surface of the body when the bolus was thicker. Conclusion: When different energy electron ray irradiates different thickness bolus, the dosage of skin surface increases and the dosage of anterior margin of lung reduces. With electron ray energy increasing, the high dosage field is widen, when the electron ray energy is identity, the high dosage field migrates to the surface after adding bolus. Using certain depth bolus may attain the therapeutical dose of target area. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of gafchromic EBT film for intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification

    Sankar, A.; Gopalkrishna Kurup, P.G.; Murali, V.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Mothilal Nehru, R.; Velmurugan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This work was undertaken with the intention of investigating the possibility of clinical use of commercially available self-developing radiochromic film - Gafchromic EBT film - for IMRT dose verification. The dose response curves were generated for the films using VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak EDR2 films. It was found that the EBT film has a linear response between the dose ranges of 0 and 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, like post-irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There is up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 and 40 h after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative difference between calculated and measured dose distributions was analyzed using Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance agreement. EDR2 films showed good and consistent results with the calculated dose distribution, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field size (4.5 x 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films. (author)

  4. Prediction of in-phantom dose distribution using in-air neutron beam characteristics for BNCS

    Verbeke, Jerome M.

    1999-12-14

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints, such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment, (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce by a factor of 10 the particle transport simulation time by modeling the moderator only.

  5. Prediction of in-phantom dose distribution using in-air neutron beam characteristics for BNCS

    Verbeke, Jerome M.

    1999-01-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints, such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment, (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce by a factor of 10 the particle transport simulation time by modeling the moderator only

  6. Dose distribution and clinical response of glioblastoma treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    Matsuda, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan)], E-mail: mhide-m@gk9.so-net.ne.jp; Yamamoto, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Kumada, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Tokai (Japan); Nakai, K.; Shirakawa, M.; Tsurubuchi, T.; Matsumura, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    The dose distribution and failure pattern after treatment with the external beam boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocol were retrospectively analyzed. BSH (5 g/body) and BPA (250 mg/kg) based BNCT was performed in eight patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV)-1 were defined as the residual gadolinium-enhancing volume. CTV-2 and CTV-3 were defined as GTV plus a margin of 2 and 3 cm, respectively. As additional photon irradiation, a total X-ray dose of 30 Gy was given to the T2 high intensity area on MRI. Five of the eight patients were alive at analysis for a mean follow-up time of 20.3 months. The post-operative median survival time of the eight patients was 27.9 months (95% CI=21.0-34.8). The minimum tumor dose of GTV, CTV-2, and CTV-3 averaged 29.8{+-}9.9, 15.1{+-}5.4, and 12.4{+-}2.9 Gy, respectively. The minimum tumor non-boron dose of GTV, CTV-2, and CTV-3 averaged 2.0{+-}0.5, 1.3{+-}0.3, and 1.1{+-}0.2 Gy, respectively. The maximum normal brain dose, skin dose, and average brain dose were 11.4{+-}1.5, 9.6{+-}1.4, and 3.1{+-}0.4 Gy, respectively. The mean minimum dose at the failure site in cases of in-field recurrence (IR) and out-field recurrence (OR) was 26.3{+-}16.7 and 14.9 GyEq, respectively. The calculated doses at the failure site were at least equal to the tumor control doses which were previously reported. We speculate that the failure pattern was related to an inadequate distribution of boron-10. Further improvement of the microdistribution of boron compounds is expected, and may improve the tumor control by BNCT.

  7. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose. (paper)

  8. Feasibility of optimizing the dose distribution in lung tumors using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography guided dose prescriptions

    Das, S.K.; Miften, M.M.; Zhou, S.; Bell, M.; Munley, M.T.; Whiddon, C.S.; Craciunescu, O.; Baydush, A.H.; Wong, T.; Rosenman, J.G.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Marks, L.B.

    2004-01-01

    The information provided by functional images may be used to guide radiotherapy planning by identifying regions that require higher radiation dose. In this work we investigate the dosimetric feasibility of delivering dose to lung tumors in proportion to the fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose activity distribution from positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The rationale for delivering dose in proportion to the tumor FDG-PET activity distribution is based on studies showing that FDG uptake is correlated to tumor cell proliferation rate, which is shown to imply that this dose delivery strategy is theoretically capable of providing the same duration of local control at all voxels in tumor. Target dose delivery was constrained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) maps of normal lung perfusion, which restricted irradiation of highly perfused lung and imposed dose-function constraints. Dose-volume constraints were imposed on all other critical structures. All dose-volume/function constraints were considered to be soft, i.e., critical structure doses corresponding to volume/function constraint levels were minimized while satisfying the target prescription, thus permitting critical structure doses to minimally exceed dose constraint levels. An intensity modulation optimization methodology was developed to deliver this radiation, and applied to two lung cancer patients. Dosimetric feasibility was assessed by comparing spatially normalized dose-volume histograms from the nonuniform dose prescription (FDG-PET proportional) to those from a uniform dose prescription with equivalent tumor integral dose. In both patients, the optimization was capable of delivering the nonuniform target prescription with the same ease as the uniform target prescription, despite SPECT restrictions that effectively diverted dose from high to low perfused normal lung. In one patient, both prescriptions incurred similar critical structure dosages, below dose-volume/function limits

  9. Pressure drop variation as a function of axial and radial power distribution in CANDU fuel channel with standard and CANFLEX 43 bundles

    Catana, Alexandru; Department of Energy Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    CANDU 600 nuclear reactors are usually fuelled with STANDARD (STD), 37 rods fuel bundles. Natural uranium (NU) dioxide (UO 2 ), is used as fuel composition. A new fuel bundle geometry called CANFLEX (CFX) with 43 rods is proposed and some new fuel composition are considered. Flexibility is the key word for the attempt to use some different fuel geometries and compositions for CANDU 600 nuclear reactors as well as for innovative ACR-700/1000 nuclear reactors. The fuel bundle considered in this paper is CFX-RU-0.90 that encodes the CANFLEX geometry, recycled dioxide uranium (RU) with 0.90% enrichment. The goal of this proposal is ambitious: a higher average discharge burn-up up to 14000 MWd/tU and, for the same amount of generated electric power, reduction in nuclear fuel fabrication, reduction of spent nuclear fuel radioactive waste and reduction of refueling operational work by using fewer bundles. An improved sub-channel approach for thermal-hydraulic analysis is used in this paper to compute some flow parameters, mainly the pressure drop along the CANDU 600 fuel channel when STD or CFX-RU-0.90 fuel bundles. Also an intermediate CFX-NU fuel bundle are used, for gradual comparison. For CFX-RU- 0.90 four fuel bundle shift refueling scheme is used instead of eight, that will determine different axial power distributions. At the same time radial power distribution is affected by the geometry and by the fuel composition of fuel bundle type used. Some other thermal-hydraulic flow parameters will be influenced, too. One of the most important parameter is pressure drop (PD) along the fuel channel because of its importance in drag force evaluation. We start with an axial power distribution, which is characteristic for a refueling scheme of eight or four fuel bundles on a shift. Comparative results are presented between STD37, CFX-NU CFX-RU-0.90 fuel bundles in a CANDU nuclear reactor operating conditions. Neutron flux distribution analysis shows that four bundle shift

  10. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  11. Impact of implanted metal plates on radiation dose distribution in vivo

    Liu Ming; Li Xingde; Niu Qingguo; Zhai Fushan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of metal plate on radiation dose distribution in surrounding tissues in cadaver specimens. Methods: Stainless steel plate, titanium plate, and muscle strip were implanted into the left thigh of a corpse, respectively. All the specimens were irradiated with 6 MV X-ray , SSD = 100 cm. The absorbed dose of surface was measured by thermoluminescent elements. Results: Surface dose distributions differed significantly among the three different materials (F = 57.35, P < 0.01), with the amounts of 1.18 Gy ± 0.04 Gy (stainless steel plate), 1.12 Gy ± 0.04 Gy (titanium plate) and 0.97 Gy ± 0.03 Gy (muscle strip), respectively. The surface absorbed doses on incident plane of stainless steel plate and titanium plate were significantly increased by 21.65% and 15.46% respectively as compared with that of muscle strip. The absorbed doses on the exit surface of stainless steel plate, titanium plate and muscle strip were 0.87 Gy ± 0.03 Gy, 0.90 Gy ± 0.02 Gy and 0.95 Gy ± 0.04 Gy, respectively (F =13.37, P <0.01). The doses on the exit surface of stainless steel plate and titanium plate were significantly lowered by 8.42% and 5.26% when compared with that of muscle strip. Using treatment planning system,the differences between dose distribution with and without metal plate were compared. Within 1 cm away from the incident plate, there was an obvious increase in the absorbed dose, while the influence was less than 5% 1 cm outside the surface. The effect of dose distribution on exit surface was less than 2%. Conclusions: The influence of metal plate on the radiotherapy dose distribution is significant. The deviations ranges from 5% to 29%. Under the same condition, the impact of stainless steel plate is much more than that of titanium alloy plate. (authors)

  12. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  13. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Carlsson Tedgren, A [Linkoping University, Linkoping, Linkoping (Sweden); Persson, M; Nilsson, J [Karolinska hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  14. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  15. Measuring Trace Gas Emission from Multi-Distributed Sources Using Vertical Radial Plume Mapping (VRPM and Backward Lagrangian Stochastic (bLS Techniques

    Thomas K. Flesch

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two micrometeorological techniques for measuring trace gas emission rates from distributed area sources were evaluated using a variety of synthetic area sources. The vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM and the backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS techniques with an open-path optical spectroscopic sensor were evaluated for relative accuracy for multiple emission-source and sensor configurations. The relative accuracy was calculated by dividing the measured emission rate by the actual emission rate; thus, a relative accuracy of 1.0 represents a perfect measure. For a single area emission source, the VRPM technique yielded a somewhat high relative accuracy of 1.38 ± 0.28. The bLS technique resulted in a relative accuracy close to unity, 0.98 ± 0.24. Relative accuracies for dual source emissions for the VRPM and bLS techniques were somewhat similar to single source emissions, 1.23 ± 0.17 and 0.94 ± 0.24, respectively. When the bLS technique was used with vertical point concentrations, the relative accuracy was unacceptably low,

  16. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad; Hofmann, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same 218 Po and 214 Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  17. Influence of boundary effects on electron beam dose distribution formation in multilayer targets

    Kaluska, I.; Zimek, Z.; Lazurik, V.T.; Lazurik, V.M.; Popov, G.F.; Rogov, Y.V.

    2010-01-01

    Computational dosimetry play a significant role in an industrial radiation processing at dose measurements in the product irradiated with electron beams (EB), X-ray and gamma ray from radionuclide sources. Accurate and validated programs for absorbed dose calculations are required for computational dosimetry. The program ModeStEB (modelling of EB processing in a three-dimensional (3D) multilayer flat targets) was designed specially for simulation and optimization of industrial radiation processing, calculation of the 3D absorbed dose distribution within multilayer packages. The package is irradiated with scanned EB on an industrial radiation facility that is based on the pulsed or continuous type of electron accelerators in the electron energy range from 0.1 to 25 MeV. Simulation of EB dose distributions in the multilayer targets was accomplished using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. Experimental verification of MC simulation prediction for EB dose distribution formation in a stack of plates interleaved with polyvinylchloride (PVC) dosimetric films (DF), within a packing box, and irradiated with a scanned 10 MeV EB on a moving conveyer is discussed. (authors)

  18. Influence of Daily Set-Up Errors on Dose Distribution During Pelvis Radiotherapy

    Kasabasic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Faj, D.; Rajevac, V.; Sobat, H.; Jurkovic, S.

    2011-01-01

    An external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) using megavoltage beam of linear accelerator is usually the treatment of choice for the cancer patients. The goal of EBRT is to deliver the prescribed dose to the target volume, with as low as possible dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. A large number of procedures and different professions involved in radiotherapy process, uncertainty of equipment and daily patient set-up errors can cause a difference between the planned and delivered dose. We investigated a part of this difference caused by daily patient set-up errors. Daily set-up errors for 35 patients were measured. These set-up errors were simulated on 5 patients, using 3D treatment planning software XiO (CMS Inc., St. Louis, MO). The differences in dose distributions between the planned and shifted ''geometry'' were investigated. Additionally, an influence of the error on treatment plan selection was checked by analyzing the change in dose volume histograms, planning target volume conformity index (CI P TV) and homogeneity index (HI). Simulations showed that patient daily set-up errors can cause significant differences between the planned and actual dose distributions. Moreover, for some patients those errors could influence the choice of treatment plan since CI P TV fell under 97 %. Surprisingly, HI was not as sensitive as CI P TV on set-up errors. The results showed the need for minimizing daily set-up errors by quality assurance programme. (author)

  19. Distribution and characteristics of gamma and cosmic ray dose rate in living environment

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    A series of environmental radiation surveys was carried out from the viewpoint of characterizing the natural radiation dose rate distribution in the living environment, including natural and artificial ones. Through the analysis of the data obtained at numbers of places, several aspects of the radiation field in living environments were clarified. That is the gamma ray dose rate varies due to the following three dominant causes: 1) the radionuclide concentration of surrounding materials acting as gamma ray sources, 2) the spatial distribution of surrounding materials, and 3) the geometrical and shielding conditions between the natural gamma ray sources and the measured point; whereas, the cosmic ray dose rate varies due to the thickness of upper shielding materials. It was also suggested that the gamma ray dose rate generally shows an upward tendency, and the cosmic ray dose rate a downward one in artificial environment. This kind of knowledge is expected to serve as fundamental information for accurate and realistic evaluation of the collective dose in the living environment. (author)

  20. Comparison between evaluating methods about the protocols of different dose distributions in radiotherapy

    Ju Yongjian; Chen Meihua; Sun Fuyin; Zhang Liang'an; Lei Chengzhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between tumor control probability (TCP) or equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and the heterogeneity degree of the dose changes with variable biological parameter values of the tumor. Methods: According to the definitions of TCP and EUD, calculating equations were derived. The dose distributions in the tumor were assumed to be Gaussian ones. The volume of the tumor was divided into several voxels, and the absorbed doses of these voxels were simulated by Monte Carlo methods. Then with the different values of radiosensitivity (α) and potential doubling time of the clonogens (T p ), the relationships between TCP or EUD and the standard deviation of dose (S d ) were evaluated. Results: The TCP-S d curves were influenced by the variable α and T p values, but the EUD-S d curves showed little variation. Conclusion: When the radiotherapy protocols with different dose distributions are compared, if the biological parameter values of the tumor have been known exactly, it's better to use the TCP, otherwise the EUD will be preferred

  1. Dose distributions of patients from chest fluoroscopy, upper GI-tract radiography and cinematography in Japan

    Kusama, T.; Kai, M.; Ohta, K.

    1996-01-01

    The per caput dose from medical exposure in Japan is several times higher than in other developed countries. There are no dose limitations for medical exposure. Then, the appropriate applications of radiation diagnosis/treatments (justification of practices) and the quality control of diagnosis/treatments (optimization of protection) are needed to reduce the doses from medical exposure. It is well documented that patient doses from a X-ray diagnosis are distributed in the broad range. Recently, the IAEA introduced guidance levels for some typical X-ray diagnosis and in vivo nuclear medicines. We carried out the investigation of dose distribution of patients from the X-ray examinations of chest, cardiovascular cinematography and upper GI-tract X-ray examination in order to give the basic information on the quality control of each X-ray diagnosis. These X-ray diagnoses are performed frequently in Japan, and especially chest X-ray examinations are carried out periodically to all population more than 18 years old as legal health check and GI-tract X-ray examinations to the persons more than 35 years old. The cardiovascular cinematography and the upper GI-tract X-ray examination bring higher effective dose for patients. More information is therefore, needed for the reduction and quality control of medical exposure in Japan. (author)

  2. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  3. Three-dimensional dose distribution in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films: Feasibility study

    Hwang, Yi-Shuan; Lin, Yu-Ying; Cheung, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish three-dimensional dose distributions for contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) using self-developed Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. Dose calibration and distribution evaluations were performed on a full-field digital mammography unit with dual energy (DE) contrast-enhanced option. Strategy for dose calibration of films in the DE mode was based on the data obtained from common target/filter/kVp combinations used clinically and the dose response model modified from Rampado's model. Dose derived from films were also verified by measured data from an ionization chamber. The average difference of dose was 8.9% in the dose range for clinical uses. Three-dimensional dose distributions were estimated using triangular acrylic phantom equipped with the mammography system. Five pieces of film sheets were separately placed between the acrylic slabs to evaluate the dose distribution at different depths. After normalizing the dose in each pixel to the maximum dose at the top-center position of the acrylic, normalized dose distribution for transverse, coronal and sagittal planes, could thus be obtained. The depth dose distribution evaluated in this study may further serve as a reference for evaluating the patient glandular dose at different depths based on the entrance exposure information. - Highlights: • CEDM techniques can enhance contrast uptake areas and suppress background tissue. • Dose for the dual-energy acquisition is about 20% higher than standard mode. • A new method is proposed to estimate the 3D dose distribution in dual-energy CEDM. • Depth of normalized dose ratio of 0.5 is less than but near 1 cm in the DE mode

  4. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters, calibrated by means of calorimetry, make possible the determination of absorbed-dose distributions due to low-energy scanned electron beam penetrations in moderately thin coatings and laminar media. For electrons of a few hundred keV, calibrated dosimeters...... of about 30–60 μm thickness may be used in stacks or interleaved between layers of materials of interest and supply a sufficient number of experimental data points throughout the depth of penetration of electrons to provide a depth-dose curve. Depth doses may be resolved in various polymer layers...... on different backings (wood, aluminum, and iron) for scanned electron beams (Emax = 400 keV) having a broad energy spectrum and diffuse incidence, such as those used in radiation curing of coatings, textiles, plastics, etc. Theoretical calculations of such distributions of energy depositions are relatively...

  5. Holographic Measurements of Electron-Beam Dose Distributions Around Inhomogeneities in Water

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Dose distribution measurements made in a small quartz cell filled with water, and with an Al rod placed in the water are reported. The cell was irradiated vertically from above with monoenergetic 3 MeV electrons from a Van de Graaff accelerator. The holographic interferometric method previously...

  6. A luminescence imaging system for the routine measurement of single-grain OSL dose distributions

    Kook, Myung Ho; Lapp, Torben; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    the potential of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD), providing extremely low level light detection. We characterize the performance of the device by discussing reproducibility and evaluating uncertainties in OSL signals. Finally we derive a typical single grain natural dose distribution...

  7. Measurement of spatial dose-rate distribution using a position sensitive detector

    Emoto, T.; Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the radiation detectors using plastic scintillation fibers (PSF) have been developed to measure the positions exposed to radiation such as neutrons and high energy charged particles. In particular, the time of flight (TOF) method for measuring the difference of time that two directional signals of scintillation light reach both ends of a PSF is a rather simple method for the measurement of the spatial distribution of fast neutron fluence rate. It is possible to use the PSF in nuclear facility working areas because of its flexibility, small diameter and long length. In order to apply TOF method to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution, the characteristic tests of a detector using PSFs were carried out. First, the resolution of irradiated positions and the counting efficiency were measured with collimated gamma ray. The sensitivity to unit dose rate was also obtained. The measurement of spatial dose rate distribution was also carried out. The sensor is made of ten bundled PSFs, and the experimental setup is described. The experiment and the results are reported. It was found that the PSF detector has the good performance to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution. (K.I.)

  8. Measurements of the electron dose distribution near inhomogeneities using a plastic scintillation detector

    Wells, C.M.M.; Mackie, T.R.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Holmes, M.A.; Papanikolaou, N.; Reckwerdt, P.J.; Cygler, J.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Bielajew, A.F.; Schmidt, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity is difficult with traditional dosimeters which themselves perturb the electron field. The authors tested the performance of a new high resolution, water-equivalent plastic scintillation detector which has ideal properties for this application. A plastic scintillation detector with a 1 mm diameter, 3 mm long cylindrical sensitive volume was used to measure the dose distributions behind standard benchmark inhomogeneities in water phantoms. The plastic scintillator material is more water equivalent than polystyrene in terms of its mass collision stopping power and mass scattering power. Measurements were performed for beams of electrons having initial energies of 6 and 18 MeV at depths from 0.2-4.2 cm behind the inhomogeneities. The detector reveals hot and cold spots behind heterogeneities at resolutions equivalent to typical film digitizer spot sizes. Plots of the dose distributions behind air, aluminum, lead, and formulations for cortical and inner bone-equivalent materials are presented. The plastic scintillation detector is suited for measuring the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity. 14 refs., 9 figs

  9. Radiation dose distribution monitoring at neutron radiography facility area, Nuclear Energy Unit, Malaysia

    Abdul Razak Daud

    1995-01-01

    One experiment was carried out to get the distribution of radiation doses at the neutron radiography facilities, Nuclear Energy Unit, Malaysia. The analysis was done to evaluate the safety level of the area. The analysis was used in neutron radiography work

  10. Study on dose distribution of therapeutic proton beams with prompt gamma measurement

    Kim, J. W. [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, C. H.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, D. K.; Yoon, M. Y. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The proton beam has an advantage of the sharp dose falloff in dose distribution called Bragg peak while conventional radiation therapy modalities such as photons exhibit considerable amount of exit dose. To take advantage of this property it is important to know the exact location of the distal dose falloff. An error can cause overdose to the normal tissue or underdose to the tumor volume. The only way of finding out the dose distribution in-situ in particle therapy is to measure the gammas produced by nuclear reactions with tissue materials. Two kinds of gammas can be used: one is prompt gamma and the other is coincident gamma from the positron-emission isotopes. We chose to detect prompt gammas, and developed a prompt gamma scanning system (PGS). The proton beams of the proton therapy facility at National Cancer Center were used. The gamma distribution was compared to the dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber at three different energies of 100, 150, 200 MeV's. The two distributions were well correlated within 1-2 mm. The effect of high-energy neutron appeared as blurred distribution near the distal dose falloff at the energy of 200 MeV. We then tested the PGS shielding design by adding additional layer of paraffin plates outside of the PGS, and found that fast neutrons significantly affect the background level. But the location of the dose fall-off was nearly coincident. The analysis of gamma energy spectrum showed that cut-off energy in gamma counting can be adjusted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Further the ATOM phantom, which has similar tissue structure to human, was used to investigate the gamma distribution for the case of inhomogeneous matter. The location of dose falloff region was found to be well defined as for water phantom. Next an actual therapy beam, which was produced by the double scattering method, was used, for which the dose falloff by the gamma distribution was completely wiped out by background neutrons. It is not

  11. Low doses of six toxicants change plant size distribution in dense populations of Lactuca sativa.

    Belz, Regina G; Patama, Marjo; Sinkkonen, Aki

    2018-08-01

    Toxicants are known to have negligible or stimulatory, i.e. hormetic, effects at low doses below those that decrease the mean response of a plant population. Our earlier observations indicated that at such low toxicant doses the growth of very fast- and slow-growing seedlings is selectively altered, even if the population mean remains constant. Currently, it is not known how common these selective low-dose effects are, whether they are similar among fast- and slow-growing seedlings, and whether they occur concurrently with hormetic effects. We tested the response of Lactuca sativa in complete dose-response experiments to six different toxicants at doses that did not decrease population mean and beyond. The tested toxicants were IAA, parthenin, HHCB, 4-tert-octylphenol, glyphosate, and pelargonic acid. Each experiment consisted of 14,400-16,800 seedlings, 12-14 concentrations, 24 replicates per concentration and 50 germinated seeds per replicate. We analyzed the commonness of selective low-dose effects and explored if toxic effects and hormetic stimulation among fast- and slow-growing individuals occurred at the same concentrations as they occur at the population level. Irrespective of the observed response pattern and toxicant, selective low-dose effects were found. Toxin effects among fast-growing individuals usually started at higher doses compared to the population mean, while the opposite was found among slow-growing individuals. Very low toxin exposures tended to homogenize plant populations due to selective effects, while higher, but still hormetic doses tended to heterogenize plant populations. Although the extent of observed size segregation varied with the specific toxin tested, we conclude that a dose-dependent alteration in size distribution of a plant population may generally apply for many toxin exposures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Entrances skin dose distribution maps for interventional neuroradiological procedures: A preliminary study

    Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2005-01-01

    Does estimation in interventional neuroradiology can be useful to limit skin radiation injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of entrance skin dose (ESD) maps in planning exposure condition optimisation. Thirteen cerebral angiography and five embolisation procedures were monitored, measuring ESD, dose-area product (DAP) and other operational parameters. A transmission ionisation chamber, simultaneously measuring air kerma and DAP, measured dose-related quantities. Data acquisition software collected dosimetric and geometrical data during the interventional procedure and provided a distribution map of ESD on a standard phantom digital image, with maximum value estimation. Values of 88-1710 mGy for maximum skin dose and 16.7-343 Gy cm 2 for DAP were found. These data confirm the possibility of deterministic effects during therapeutic interventional neuroradiological procedures like cerebral embolisation. ESD maps are useful to retrospectively study the exposure characteristics of a procedure and plan patient exposure optimisation. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  14. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Chen, W.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms

  15. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    Cusumano, Davide, E-mail: davide.cusumano@unimi.it [School of Medical Physics, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Fumagalli, Maria L. [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura [Department of Neurosurgery, Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); De Martin, Elena [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  16. Three-dimensional photon dose distributions with and without lung corrections for tangential breast intact treatments

    Chin, L.M.; Cheng, C.W.; Siddon, R.L.; Rice, R.K.; Mijnheer, B.J.; Harris, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of lung volume and photon energy on the 3-dimensional dose distribution for patients treated by intact breast irradiation is not well established. To investigate this issue, we studied the 3-dimensional dose distributions calculated for an 'average' breast phantom for 60Co, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 8 MV photon beams. For the homogeneous breast, areas of high dose ('hot spots') lie along the periphery of the breast near the posterior plane and near the apex of the breast. The highest dose occurs at the inferior margin of the breast tissue, and this may exceed 125% of the target dose for lower photon energies. The magnitude of these 'hot spots' decreases for higher energy photons. When lung correction is included in the dose calculation, the doses to areas at the left and right margin of the lung volume increase. The magnitude of the increase depends on energy and the patient anatomy. For the 'average' breast phantom (lung density 0.31 g/cm3), the correction factors are between 1.03 to 1.06 depending on the energy used. Higher energy is associated with lower correction factors. Both the ratio-of-TMR and the Batho lung correction methods can predict these corrections within a few percent. The range of depths of the 100% isodose from the skin surface, measured along the perpendicular to the tangent of the skin surface, were also energy dependent. The range was 0.1-0.4 cm for 60Co and 0.5-1.4 cm for 8 MV. We conclude that the use of higher energy photons in the range used here provides lower value of the 'hot spots' compared to lower energy photons, but this needs to be balanced against a possible disadvantage in decreased dose delivered to the skin and superficial portion of the breast

  17. Application of the Monte Carlo integration method in calculations of dose distributions in HDR-Brachytherapy

    Baltas, D; Geramani, K N; Ioannidis, G T; Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Giannouli, S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Source anisotropy is a very important factor in brachytherapy quality assurance of high dose rate HDR Ir 192 afterloading stepping sources. If anisotropy is not taken into account then doses received by a brachytherapy patient in certain directions can be in error by a clinically significant amount. Experimental measurements of anisotropy are very labour intensive. We have shown that within acceptable limits of accuracy, Monte Carlo integration (MCI) of a modified Sievert integral (3D generalisation) can provide the necessary data within a much shorter time scale than can experiments. Hence MCI can be used for routine quality assurance schedules whenever a new design of HDR or PDR Ir 192 is used for brachytherapy afterloading. Our MCI calculation results are comparable with published experimental data and Monte Carlo simulation data for microSelectron and VariSource Ir 192 sources. We have shown not only that MCI offers advantages over alternative numerical integration methods, but also that treating filtration coefficients as radial distance-dependent functions improves Sievert integral accuracy at low energies. This paper also provides anisotropy data for three new Ir 192 sources, one for microSelectron-HDR and two for the microSelectron-PDR, for which data currently is not available. The information we have obtained in this study can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  18. Image quality and dose distributions of three linac-based imaging modalities

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Ames, Evemarie; Nuesken, Frank; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Linac-based patient imaging is possible with a variety of techniques using different photon energies. The purpose of this work is to compare three imaging systems operating at 6 MV, flattening free filter (FFF) 1 MV, and 121 kV. The dose distributions of all pretreatment set-up images (over 1,000) were retrospectively calculated on the planning computed tomography (CT) images for all patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer treated at our institution in 2013. We analyzed the dose distribution and the dose to organs at risk. For head-and-neck cancer patients, the imaging dose from 6-MV cone beam CT (CBCT) reached maximum values at around 8 cGy. The 1-MV CBCT dose was about 63-79 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose for all organs at risk. Planar imaging reduced the imaging dose from CBCT to 30-40 % for both megavoltage modalities. The dose from the kilovoltage CBCT was 4-10 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose. For prostate cancer patients, the maximum dose from 6-MV CBCT reached 13-15 cGy, and was reduced to 66-73 % for 1 MV. Planar imaging reduces the MV CBCT dose to 10-20 %. The kV CBCT dose is 15-20 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose, slightly higher than the dose from MV axes. The dose distributions differ markedly in response to the different beam profiles and dose-depth characteristics. (orig.) [German] Linac-basierte Bildgebung zur Patientenlagerung ist mit einer Vielzahl von Techniken unterschiedlicher Photonenenergien moeglich. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich dreier Bildgebungssysteme mit 6 MV (Megavolt), FFF 1 MV, und 121 kV (Kilovolt). Fuer alle im Jahr 2013 an unserer Klinik behandelten Prostata- und HNO-Patienten wurden retrospektiv die Dosisverteilungen aller Verifikationsaufnahmen (ueber 1000 insgesamt) auf der Planungs-Computertomographie (CT) berechnet. Wir analysierten die Dosisverteilung und die Dosis an den Risikoorganen. Bei HNO-Patienten erreichte die Dosis von 6 MV ''Cone-beam''-CT (CBCT)Maximalwerte um 8 cGy. Mit 1 MV wird die Dosis auf 63

  19. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  20. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons

    Kwok, C.S.; Bialobzyski, P.J.; Yu, S.K.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1990-01-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of 204 Tl and 147 Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm 2 from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0--12 mg/cm 2 from the interface were measured to be 1.08±0.03 (SE) and 1.03±0.03 (SE) for 204 Tl and 147 Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05±0.02 and 1.01±0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB--soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2

  1. Study of distribution dose for chest radiography using the computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc

    Muniz, B.C.; Menezes, C.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (MCE) to perform dose studies in situations of radiation exposure without the need for individuals to be exposed. MCEs are essentially composed of a simulator of the radioactive source, a Monte Carlo code, and a phantom of voxels representing the human anatomy. The objective of this work was to perform a study of the dose distribution in the thoracic region in radiographic exams using the MCE ALDERSON / EGSnrc. For that, virtual simulations were performed using Monte Carlo Method techniques to calculate the dose in the simulator of voxels representative of the thoracic region. The results show that most beam energy was deposited in the skeleton for all simulated radiological techniques, while smaller fractions were deposited in the lungs and soft tissue. For example, at 90 kV voltage, 14% of the energy was deposited in the bone medium, while lungs and soft tissue receive only 5 and 3%, respectively. It is concluded that the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE can be used for studies of the dose distribution on chest radiographs used in radiodiagnosis practice, thus optimizing dose absorbed in the patient in clinical exams

  2. Dose distribution in the thyroid gland following radiation therapy of breast cancer--a retrospective study.

    Johansen, S; Reinertsen, K V; Knutstad, K; Olsen, D R; Fosså, S D

    2011-06-09

    To relate the development of post-treatment hypothyroidism with the dose distribution within the thyroid gland in breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional radiotherapy (RT). In two groups of BC patients postoperatively irradiated by computer tomography (CT)-based RT, the individual dose distributions in the thyroid gland were compared with each other; Cases developed post-treatment hypothyroidism after multimodal treatment including 4-field RT technique. Matched patients in Controls remained free for hypothyroidism. Based on each patient's dose volume histogram (DVH) the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy were then estimated (V20, V30, V40 and V50) together with the individual mean thyroid dose over the whole gland (MeanTotGy). The mean and median thyroid dose for the included patients was about 30 Gy, subsequently the total volume of the thyroid gland (VolTotGy) and the absolute volumes (cm3) receiving respectively thyroid gland receivingthyroid glands after loco-radiotherapy of BC, the risk of post-treatment hypothyroidism depends on the volume of the thyroid gland.

  3. Multi-isocenter stereotactic radiotherapy: implications for target dose distributions of systematic and random localization errors

    Ebert, M.A.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Kendrick, L.A.; Weston, S.; Harper, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation examined the effect of alignment and localization errors on dose distributions in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with arced circular fields. In particular, it was desired to determine the effect of systematic and random localization errors on multi-isocenter treatments. Methods and Materials: A research version of the FastPlan system from Surgical Navigation Technologies was used to generate a series of SRT plans of varying complexity. These plans were used to examine the influence of random setup errors by recalculating dose distributions with successive setup errors convolved into the off-axis ratio data tables used in the dose calculation. The influence of systematic errors was investigated by displacing isocenters from their planned positions. Results: For single-isocenter plans, it is found that the influences of setup error are strongly dependent on the size of the target volume, with minimum doses decreasing most significantly with increasing random and systematic alignment error. For multi-isocenter plans, similar variations in target dose are encountered, with this result benefiting from the conventional method of prescribing to a lower isodose value for multi-isocenter treatments relative to single-isocenter treatments. Conclusions: It is recommended that the systematic errors associated with target localization in SRT be tracked via a thorough quality assurance program, and that random setup errors be minimized by use of a sufficiently robust relocation system. These errors should also be accounted for by incorporating corrections into the treatment planning algorithm or, alternatively, by inclusion of sufficient margins in target definition

  4. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  5. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  6. Economic assessment of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution for cervix carcinoma

    Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Carrere, M.O.; Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Pommier, P.; Haie-Meder, C.; Quetin, P.; Kerr, C.; Delannes, M.; Castelain, B.; Peignaux, K.; Kirova, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Williaume, D.; Krzisch, C.; Thomas, L.; Lang, P.; Baron, M.H.; Cussac, A.; Lesaunier, F.; Maillard, S.; Barillot, I.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Our study aims at evaluating the cost of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution versus traditional treatments (iridium wires, cesium, non-optimized P.D.R.). Issues surrounding reimbursement were also explored. Materials and methods: This prospective, multi-centre, non-randomized study conducted in the framework of a project entitled 'Support Program for Costly Diagnostic and Therapeutic Innovations' involved 21 hospitals. Patients with cervix carcinoma received either classical brachytherapy or the innovation. The direct medical costs of staff and equipment, as well as the costs of radioactive sources, consumables and building renovation were evaluated from a hospital point of view using a micro costing approach. Subsequent costs per brachytherapy were compared between the four strategies. Results: The economic study included 463 patients over two years. The main resources categories associated with P.D.R. brachytherapy (whether optimized or not) were radioactive sources (1053 Euros) and source projectors (735 Euros). Optimized P.D.R. induced higher cost of imagery and dosimetry (respectively 130 Euros and 367 Euros) than non-optimized P.D.R. (47 Euros and 75 Euros). Extra costs of innovation over the less costly strategy (iridium wires) reached more than 2100 Euros per treatment, but could be reduced by half in the hypothesis of 40 patients treated per year (instead of 24 in the study). Conclusion: Aside from staff, imaging and dosimetry, the current hospital reimbursements largely underestimated the cost of innovation related to equipment and sources. (authors)

  7. Establishing the impact of temporary tissue expanders on electron and photon beam dose distributions.

    Asena, A; Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Trapp, J V

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments under a variety of conditions. Using EBT2 radiochromic film, both electron and photon beam dose distribution measurements were made for different phantoms, and beam geometries. This was done to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the implant's perturbation effects under a wider variety of conditions. The magnetic disk present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 20% in a photon tangent treatment and 56% in electron boost fields immediately downstream of the implant. The effects of the silicon elastomer are also much more apparent in an electron beam than a photon beam. Evidently, each component of the TTE attenuates the radiation beam to different degrees. This study has demonstrated that the accuracy of photon and electron treatments of post-mastectomy patients is influenced by the presence of a tissue expander for various beam orientations. The impact of TTEs on dose distributions establishes the importance of an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy patients. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    Massager, Nicolas; Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Benmebarek, Nadir; Desmedt, Françoise; Devriendt, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose–volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  9. Improvement of dose distributions in abutment regions of intensity modulated radiation therapy and electron fields

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to radiate tumors that are in close proximity to vital organs. Targets consisting of a deep-seated region followed by a superficial one may be treated with abutting photon and electron fields. However, no systematic study regarding matching of IMRT and electron beams was reported. In this work, a study of dose distributions in the abutment region between tomographic and step-and-shoot IMRT and electron fields was carried out. A method that significantly improves dose homogeneity between abutting tomographic IMRT and electron fields was developed and tested. In this method, a target region that is covered by IMRT was extended into the superficial target area by ∼2.0 cm. The length and shape of IMRT target extension was chosen such that high isodose lines bent away from the region treated by the electrons. This reduced the magnitude of hot spots caused by the 'bulging effect' of electron field penumbra. To account for the uncertainties in positioning of the IMRT and electron fields, electron field penumbra was modified using conventional (photon) multileaf collimator (MLC). The electron beam was delivered in two steps: half of the dose delivered with MLCs in retracted position and another half with MLCs extended to the edge of electron field that abuts tomographic IMRT field. The experimental testing of this method using film dosimetry has demonstrated that the magnitude of the hot spots was reduced from ∼45% to ∼5% of the prescription dose. When an error of ±1.5 mm in field positioning was introduced, the dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region did not exceed ±15% of the prescription dose. With step-and-shoot IMRT, the most homogeneous dose distribution was achieved when there was a 3 mm gap between the IMRT and electron fields

  10. Isodose distributions and dose uniformity in the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility calculated using the MCNP code

    Oliveira, C

    2001-01-01

    A systematic study of isodose distributions and dose uniformity in sample carriers of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility was carried out using the MCNP code. The absorbed dose rate, gamma flux per energy interval and average gamma energy were calculated. For comparison purposes, boxes filled with air and 'dummy' boxes loaded with layers of folded and crumpled newspapers to achieve a given value of density were used. The magnitude of various contributions to the total photon spectra, including source-dependent factors, irradiator structures, sample material and other origins were also calculated.

  11. Problems in the measurement of electron-dose distribution with film dosimeters inserted into solid materials

    Okuda, Shuichi; Fukuda, Kyue; Tabata, Tatsuo; Okabe, Shigeru

    1981-01-01

    On the insertion of film dosimeters into solid materials, thin air gaps are formed. The influence of such gaps on measured profiles of depth-dose distributions was investigated for aluminum irradiated with collimated beams of 15-MeV electrons. Measurements were made by changing the gap width or the incidence angle of the electrons. The present results showed that streaming of incident electrons through the gaps resulted in the appearance of a peak and a minimum in a depth-dose curve measured. This effect was suppressed by the increase of the angle between the film and the electron-beam axis. (author)

  12. Perturbation effects of the carbon fiber-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distribution.

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy, in conjunction with surgical implant fixation, is a common combined treatment in cases of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary nails and plates. The purpose of this work was to investigate the perturbation effects of the new CFR-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distributions and to evaluate these effects in comparison with traditional titanium screws. The investigation was performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a 6 MV photon beam. The project consisted of two main stages. First, a comparison of measured and MC calculated doses was performed to verify the validity of the MC simulation results for different materials. For this purpose, stainless steel, titanium, and CFR-PEEK plates of various thicknesses were used for attenuation and backscatter measurements in a solid water phantom. For the same setup, MC dose calculations were performed. Next, MC dose calculations for titanium, CFR-PEEK screws, and CFR-PEEK screws with ultrathin titanium coating were performed. For the plates, the results of our MC calculations for all materials were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the MC model can be used for calculation of dose perturbation effects caused by the screws. For the CFR-PEEK screws, the maximum dose perturbation was less than 5%, compared to more than 30% perturbation for the titanium screws. Ultrathin titanium coating had a negligible effect on the dose distribution. CFR-PEEK implants have good prospects for use in radiotherapy because of minimal dose alteration and the potential for more accurate treatment planning. This could favorably influence treatment efficiency and decrease possible over- and underdose of adjacent tissues. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantages

  13. THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRIES, DIFFERENT RADIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF LARGE AND SMALL DUST GRAINS IN PDS 70 {sup ,}

    Hashimoto, J.; Wisniewski, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Tsukagoshi, T. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Brown, J. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dong, R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Zhu, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kusakabe, N.; Akiyama, E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandt, T. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Currie, T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grady, C. A., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@ou.edu [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and {sup 12}CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ∼65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ∼80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  14. The Structure of Pre-Transitional Protoplanetary Disks. II Azimuthal Asymmetries, Different Radial Distributions of Large and Small Dust Grains in PDS 70

    Hashimoto, J.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Brown, J. M.; Dong, R.; Muto, T.; Zhu, Z.; Wisniewski, J.; Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-micron size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and CO-12 J = 2 yields 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of approx. 65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of approx. 80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  15. New aspects in distribution of population dose loads in Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site region

    Hill, P.; Pivovarov, S.; Rukhin, A.; Seredavina, T.; Sushkova, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The question on dose loads of Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) region population is not fully solved till now. There is rather different estimations of doses, received by people of nearest to SNTS settlements. It may be explain by absence of individual dosimeters during and after nuclear weapon tests and also many various ways of radiation exposure receiving. During last some years we have done a people dose loads estimations by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) tooth enamel dosimetry method - one of the best and reliable for retrospective dosimetry. It was studied tooth enamel people from settlements Dolon, Bodene, Cheremushki, Mostik, which was irradiated mainly by the first atomic explosion 1949, settlement Sarjal, irradiated by the first thermonuclear explosion in 1953, and control settlement Maysk, which is sited close to SNTS, but there was no any radioactive traces due to east wind. The results display a not expected rather surprising picture: in all settlements, including control one Maysk, the dose loads distribution was rather similar, it has ex fast bimodal form with rather high doses in the second one. The possible reasons of such situation is discussed. The results obtained is compared with last estimations of Semipalatinsk region dose loads of population, which were specially attentively discussed at International Symposiums in Hiroshima (Japan, 2005) and Bethesda (MD, USA, 2006). (author)

  16. Initial investigations of dose distribution patterns for an industrial electron accelerator

    Ehlermann, D.A.E.

    1994-01-01

    A newly developed accelerator for electrons in the dose range of up 10 mev at 10 kw performance replaces a similar type of accelerator that has been in use during the past 25 years. It is characterized by some decisive technical changes. The ray, rather than moving from one point to the next, is now distributed over the merchandise for the duration of an impulse. In the direction of conveyance, irradiation is carried out on successive fields as was done formerly. As the duration of impulse is no longer than 12 μs, some problems arose in respect of operation and measuring techniques: the time distribution of microwave energy or rays emitted during the individual impulses has a bearing on the dose distribution pattern at a right angle to the direction of transport in both the superficial and deep layers of the merchandise. Some of the initial measuring results are represented here. The accelerator's operational parameters were then so adjusted that a largely homogeneous dose distribution was achieved throughout. (orig.) [de

  17. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  18. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Klüter, Sebastian; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  19. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    Shah, Jainil P., E-mail: jainil.shah@duke.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Mann, Steve D. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); McKinley, Randolph L. [ZumaTek, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Tornai, Martin P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm{sup 3} voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  20. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm"3 voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  1. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Chen, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which used Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input (i.e., the source routine) to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. Experimental work included the fabrication of child phantoms to match the existing mathematical models. These phantoms were constructed of molded lucite shells filled with differing materials to simulate lung, skeletal, and soft-tissue regions. The skeleton regions of phantoms offered the opportunity to perform meaningful measurements of absorbed dose to bone marrow and bone. Thirteen to fourteen sites in various bones of the skeleton were chosen for placement of TLDs. These sites represented important regions in which active bone marrow is located. Sixteen typical radiographic examinations were performed representing common pediatric diagnostic procedures. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms. For selected radiological exposures, the risk factors of leukemia, thyroid cancer, and genetic death are estimated for one-year- and five-year-old children

  2. Radiotherapy in differentiated thyroid cancer: Optimal dose distribution using a wax bolus

    Mayer, R.; Stucklschweiger, G.; Oechs, A.; Pakish, B.; Hackl, A.; Preidler, K.; Szola, D.

    1994-01-01

    The study includes 53 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, who underwent surgical and radioiodine therapy as well as hormone therapy. Postoperative radiotherapy was performed in all patients in 'mini-mantle-technique' with parallel opposed fields, followed by an anterior boost-field with electrons up to 60-64 Gy, using a wax bolus for optimal dose distribution in the target volume sparing out the spinal cord as much as possible. The dose to the spinal cord did not exceed 44 Gy in any case. The study shows that radiotherapy with doses up to 60-64 Gy plays an important role in postsurgical therapeutic management. Therefore nonradical surgery is a less important prognostic factor for survival and local recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer than histological diagnosis in combination with age and lymph node involvement

  3. 137Cs source dose distribution using the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimetry

    Sato, R.; De Almeida, A.; Moreira, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Dosimetric measurements close to radioisotope sources, such as those used in brachytherapy, require high spatial resolution to avoid incorrect results in the steep dose gradient region. In this work the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter was used to obtain the spatial dose distribution. The readings from a 137 Cs source were performed using two methods, visible spectrophotometer and CCD camera images. Good agreement with the Sievert summation method was found for the transversal axis dose profile within uncertainties of 4% and 5%, for the spectrophotometer and CCD camera respectively. Our results show that the dosimeter is adequate for brachytherapy dosimetry and, owing to its relatively fast and easy preparation and reading, it is recommended for quality control in brachytherapy applications.

  4. Dose Distribution over Different Parts of Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy Treatment in Bangladesh

    Miah, F.K.; Ahmed, M.F.; Begum, Z.; Alam, B.; Chowdhury, Q.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to determine the dose distribution over different parts of the body of 12 cancer patients during radiotherapy treatment. Patients with breast cancer, lung cancer, cervix and larynx cancer treated with either X ray therapy or 60 Co therapy were particularly considered. The doses to the organs and tissues outside the primary beam of the patients under treatment were found to vary with a maximum value of 9096 ± 25 mSv at the neck of a lung cancer patient to a minimum value of 2 ± 0.5 mSv at the right leg of a breast cancer patient. The variation of doses was well explained by the exposure and patient data given for each patient. The measured data in each part of the body have been found to be consistent indicating confidence in the measurements. (author)

  5. Photon beam dose distributions for patients with implanted temporary tissue expanders

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions of photon beams in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. EBT2 radiochromic film and ion chamber measurements were taken to quantify the attenuation and backscatter effects of the inhomogeneity. Results illustrate that the internal magnetic port present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 25% in photon tangent fields immediately downstream of the implant. It was also shown that the silicone elastomer shell of the tissue expander reduced the dose to the target volume by as much as 8%. This work demonstrates the importance for an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy breast cancer patients.

  6. Dose rate distribution of the GammaBeam: 127 irradiator using MCNPX code

    Gual, Maritza Rodriguez; Batista, Adriana de Souza Medeiros; Pereira, Claubia; Faria, Luiz O. de; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2013-01-01

    The GammaBeam - 127 Irradiator is widely used for biological, chemical and medical applications of the gamma irradiation technology using Cobalt 60 radioactive at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The source has maximum activity of 60.000Ci, which is composed by 16 double encapsulated radioactive pencils placed in a rack. The facility is classified by the IAEA as Category II (dry storage facility). The aim of this work is to present a modelling developed to evaluate the dose rates at the irradiation room and the dose distribution at the irradiated products. In addition, the simulations could be used as a predictive tool of dose evaluation in the irradiation facility helping benchmark experiments in new similar facilities. The MCNPX simulated results were compared and validated with radiometric measurements using Fricke and TLDs dosimeters along several positions inside the irradiation room. (author)

  7. Definition of the dose(tempo)-distribution in the biological irradiation-facility of the RIVM

    Bader, F.J.M.

    1990-02-01

    The RIVM biological irradiation facility (BBF) for the irradiation of biological samples and small animals is a self shielded device and can be safely operated in an existing laboratory environment. There are two 137 Cs sources (15TBq) in a bilateral geometry to give maximum dose uniformity. The easily accessible irradiation chamber is housed in a rotating lead shielding. The dosimetry of BBF was performed by the Dosimetry Section of the RIVM. Experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose in plastic tubes filled with water and the dose distribution over the tube-holder. Separate experiments were made to determine the absorbed dose during the rotation of the irradiation chamber and to check the irradiation timer. For the experiments LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) extruded ribbons were used. The TLDs were calibrated in a collimated beam of 137 Cs gamma rays. The determination of the absorbed dose in water was based on a users biological irradiation set up. The TLDs were individually sealed in thin plastic foil and put in plastic tubes filled for 1/3 with water. The tubes were vertically placed in the tube-holder and placed in the centre of the irradiation chamber. The results show that the absorbed dose in water (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.97 Gy/timer-unit, with a total uncertainty of 7 percent (1σ). During the rotation of the irradiation chamber the absorbed dose (determined on January 1, 1990) is equal to 0.38 Gy, with a total uncertainty of 15 percent (1σ). The variation of the dose distribution was determined at 15 different measurement points distributed over the tube-holder. The dosis in the measurement point in the centre of the tube-holder was taken as reference value. The maximum observed deviation over the other 14 measurement points amounts to -16 percent of it. The BBF-timer was checked against a special timer. The results indicate that within a range from 2-11 'timer-units' no differences are present. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 fotos

  8. The influence of patient positioning uncertainties in proton radiotherapy on proton range and dose distributions

    Liebl, Jakob, E-mail: jakob.liebl@medaustron.at [EBG MedAustron GmbH, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz (Austria); Paganetti, Harald; Zhu, Mingyao; Winey, Brian A. [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: Thirty-eight clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50%- and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs), and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: The authors identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position, respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. For target volumes TCP decreases by more than 10% (absolute) occurred in less than 2.2% of the considered treatment scenarios for anatomy-based patient positioning and were nonexistent for fiducial-based patient positioning. EUD changes for target volumes were up to 35% (anatomy-based positioning) and 16% (fiducial-based positioning). Conclusions: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions

  9. EPR imaging of dose distributions aiming at applications in radiation therapy

    Lund, E.; Kolbun, N.; Adolfsson, E.; Gustafsson, H.

    2014-01-01

    A one-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging method for visualisation of dose distributions in photon fields has been developed. Pressed pellets of potassium dithionate were homogeneously irradiated in a 60 Co radiation field to 600 Gy. The EPR analysis was performed with an X-Band (9.6 GHz) Bruker E540 EPR and EPR imaging spectrometer equipped with an E540 GC2X two-axis X-band gradient coil set with gradients along the y axis (along the sample tube) and z axis (along B 0 ) and an ER 4108TMHS resonator. Image reconstruction, including deconvolution, baseline corrections and corrections for the resonator sensitivity, was performed using an in-house-developed Matlab code for the purpose to have a transparent and complete algorithm for image reconstruction. With this method, it is possible to visualise a dose distribution with an accuracy of ∼5 % within ±5 mm from the centre of the resonator. (authors)

  10. Design of shared unit-dose drug distribution network using multi-level particle swarm optimization.

    Chen, Linjie; Monteiro, Thibaud; Wang, Tao; Marcon, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Unit-dose drug distribution systems provide optimal choices in terms of medication security and efficiency for organizing the drug-use process in large hospitals. As small hospitals have to share such automatic systems for economic reasons, the structure of their logistic organization becomes a very sensitive issue. In the research reported here, we develop a generalized multi-level optimization method - multi-level particle swarm optimization (MLPSO) - to design a shared unit-dose drug distribution network. Structurally, the problem studied can be considered as a type of capacitated location-routing problem (CLRP) with new constraints related to specific production planning. This kind of problem implies that a multi-level optimization should be performed in order to minimize logistic operating costs. Our results show that with the proposed algorithm, a more suitable modeling framework, as well as computational time savings and better optimization performance are obtained than that reported in the literature on this subject.

  11. Three-dimensional cluster formation and structure in heterogeneous dose distribution of intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Yuan, Yading; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Peñagarícano, José A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate three-dimensional cluster structure and its correlation to clinical endpoint in heterogeneous dose distributions from intensity modulated radiation therapy. Twenty-five clinical plans from twenty-one head and neck (HN) patients were used for a phenomenological study of the cluster structure formed from the dose distributions of organs at risks (OARs) close to the planning target volumes (PTVs). Initially, OAR clusters were searched to examine the pattern consistence among ten HN patients and five clinically similar plans from another HN patient. Second, clusters of the esophagus from another ten HN patients were scrutinized to correlate their sizes to radiobiological parameters. Finally, an extensive Monte Carlo (MC) procedure was implemented to gain deeper insights into the behavioral properties of the cluster formation. Clinical studies showed that OAR clusters had drastic differences despite similar PTV coverage among different patients, and the radiobiological parameters failed to positively correlate with the cluster sizes. MC study demonstrated the inverse relationship between the cluster size and the cluster connectivity, and the nonlinear changes in cluster size with dose thresholds. In addition, the clusters were insensitive to the shape of OARs. The results demonstrated that the cluster size could serve as an insightful index of normal tissue damage. The clinical outcome of the same dose-volume might be potentially different. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of absorbed dose in human eye simulated by SRNA-2KG computer code

    Ilic, R.; Pesic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Mostacci, D.

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly increasing performances of personal computers and development of codes for proton transport based on Monte Carlo methods will allow, very soon, the introduction of the computer planning proton therapy as a normal activity in regular hospital procedures. A description of SRNA code used for such applications and results of calculated distributions of proton-absorbed dose in human eye are given in this paper. (author)

  13. Device for the generation of homogeneous dose distributions in irradiated materials

    Leonhardt, J.; Schulze, H.; Boes, J.; Decker, U.; Schmidt, J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been directed at a device for the generation of homogeneous dose distributions in materials irradiated by charged particles. This device can be applied to the initiation of radiation-chemical reactions in solids, of cross-linking and vulcanizing reactors, of crystal defect annealings, etc. A movable absorber (e.g. a wedge or a solid of revolution) which periodically changes the energy of particles striking the specimen has been installed in the beam hole of the beam generating system

  14. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.; DILMANIAN, F.A.; PEGGS, S.G.; SCHLYEER, D.J.; VASKA, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O. These radioisotopes, mainly 11 C, 13 N and 15 O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner

  15. Semi-empirical model for the generation of dose distributions produced by a scanning electron beam

    Nath, R.; Gignac, C.E.; Agostinelli, A.G.; Rothberg, S.; Schulz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    There are linear accelerators (Sagittaire and Saturne accelerators produced by Compagnie Generale de Radiologie (CGR/MeV) Corporation) which produce broad, flat electron fields by magnetically scanning the relatively narrow electron beam as it emerges from the accelerator vacuum system. A semi-empirical model, which mimics the scanning action of this type of accelerator, was developed for the generation of dose distributions in homogeneous media. The model employs the dose distributions of the scanning electron beams. These were measured with photographic film in a polystyrene phantom by turning off the magnetic scanning system. The mean deviation calculated from measured dose distributions is about 0.2%; a few points have deviations as large as 2 to 4% inside of the 50% isodose curve, but less than 8% outside of the 50% isodose curve. The model has been used to generate the electron beam library required by a modified version of a commercially-available computerized treatment-planning system. (The RAD-8 treatment planning system was purchased from the Digital Equipment Corporation. It is currently available from Electronic Music Industries

  16. Study of the impact of artificial articulations on the dose distribution under medical irradiation

    Buffard, E. [IRMA/CREST/FEMTO-st, UMR-CNRS 6174, Po-circumflex le Universitaire BP 71427 25211 Montbeliard (France)]. E-mail: edwige.buffard@pu-pm.univ-fcomte.fr; Gschwind, R. [IRMA/CREST/FEMTO-st, UMR-CNRS 6174, Po-circumflex le Universitaire BP 71427 25211 Montbeliard (France)]. E-mail: regine.gschwind@pu-pm.univ-fcomte.fr; Makovicka, L. [IRMA/CREST/FEMTO-st, UMR-CNRS 6174, Po-circumflex le Universitaire BP 71427 25211 Montbeliard (France); Martin, E. [IRMA/CREST/FEMTO-st, UMR-CNRS 6174, Po-circumflex le Universitaire BP 71427 25211 Montbeliard (France); Meunier, C. [IRMA/CREST/FEMTO-st, UMR-CNRS 6174, Po-circumflex le Universitaire BP 71427 25211 Montbeliard (France); David, C. [Departement Oncologie et Radiotherapie, CH A. Boulloche 25200 Montbeliard (France)

    2005-02-01

    Perturbations due to the presence of high density heterogeneities in the body are not correctly taken into account in the Treatment Planning Systems currently available for external radiotherapy. For this reason, the accuracy of the dose distribution calculations has to be improved by using Monte Carlo simulations. In a previous study, we established a theoretical model by using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc [I. Kawrakow, D.W.O. Rogers, The EGSnrc code system: MC simulation of electron and photon transport. Technical Report PIRS-701, NRCC, Ottawa, Canada, 2000] in order to obtain the dose distributions around simple heterogeneities. These simulations were then validated by experimental results obtained with thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber. The influence of samples composed of hip prostheses materials (titanium alloy and steel) and a substitute of bone were notably studied. A more complex model was then developed with the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc [D.W.O. Rogers, C.M. MA, G.X. Ding, B. Walters, D. Sheikh-Bagheri, G.G. Zhang, BEAMnrc Users Manual. NRC Report PPIRS 509(a) rev F, 2001] in order to take into account the hip prosthesis geometry. The simulation results were compared to experimental measurements performed in a water phantom, in the case of a standard treatment of a pelvic cancer for one of the beams passing through the implant. These results have shown the great influence of the prostheses on the dose distribution.

  17. The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    El Naqa, I; Cui, J; Lindsay, P; Olivera, G; Deasy, J O

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction. (note)

  18. NOTE: The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    El Naqa, I.; Cui, J.; Lindsay, P.; Olivera, G.; Deasy, J. O.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction.

  19. Fast neutron flux and intracranial dose distribution at a neutron irradiation facility

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Aizawa, Otohiko; Nozaki, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    A head phantom filled with water was used to measure the fast neutron flux using 115 In(n, n')sup(115m)In and 103 Rh(n, n')sup(103m)Rh reactions. γ-ray from sup(115m)In and x-ray from sup(103m)Rh were detected by a Ge(Li) and a Na(Tl)I counter, respectively. TLD was used to investigate the γ-dose rate distribution inside the phantom. Flux of fast neutron inside the phantom was about 1 x 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, which was 3 order smaller than that of thermal neutron. The fast neutron flux decreased to 1/10 at 15 cm depth, and γ-dose rate was about 200 R/h at 100 kW inside the phantom. Total dose at the surface was 350 rad/h, to which, fast neutrons contributed more than γ-rays. The rate of fast neutron dose was about 10% of thermal neutron's in Kerma dose unit (rad), however, the rate was highly dependent on RBE value. (Nakanishi, T.)

  20. Dose distributions in thorax inhomogeneity for fast neutron beam from NIRS cyclotron

    Kutsutani-Nakamura, Yuzuru; Furukawa, Shigeo; Iinuma, T.A.; Kawashima, Katsuhiro; Hoshino, Kazuo; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Sakashita, Kunio; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The power law tissue-air ratio (TAR) method developed by Batho appears to be practical use for inhomogeneity corrections to the dose calculated in a layered media for photon beam therapy. The validity was examined in applying the modified power law TAR and the isodose shift methods to the dose calculation in thorax tissue inhomogeneity containing the boundary region for fast neutron beam. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a thick beryllium target with 30 MeV deuterons. Lung phantom was made of granulated tissue equivalent plastic, which resulted in density of 0.30 and 0.60 g/cm 3 . Depth dose distributions for neutron beam were measured in thorax phantom by an air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber with TE plastic wall. The power law TAR method considering TAR of zero depth at boundary was compared with the measured data and a good result was obtained that the calculated dose was within ±3 % against the measured. But the isodose shift method is not so good for dose calculation in thorax tissue inhomogeneity using fast neutron beam. (author)

  1. Commercial milk distribution profiles and production locations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Deonigi, D.E.; Anderson, D.M.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. For this period iodine-131 is the most important offsite contributor to radiation doses from Hanford operations. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 is the dominant radiation pathway for individuals who drank milk (Napier 1992). Information has been developed on commercial milk cow locations and commercial milk distribution during 1945 and 1951. The year 1945 was selected because during 1945 the largest amount of iodine-131 was released from Hanford facilities in a calendar year (Heeb 1993); therefore, 1945 was the year in which an individual was likely to have received the highest dose. The year 1951 was selected to provide data for comparing the changes that occurred in commercial milk flows (i.e., sources, processing locations, and market areas) between World War II and the post-war period. To estimate the doses people could have received from this milk flow, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk people consumed, the source of the milk, the specific feeding regime used for milk cows, and the amount of iodine-131 contamination deposited on feed.

  2. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Huang, Yung-Hui; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31±15.24 mR/h (error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  3. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling [Department of Dental Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Hui [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31{+-}15.24 mR/h (<100 mR/h), (2) error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (<7%) and (3) the error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (<10%) error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  4. Dose distribution at junctional area abutting X-ray and electron fields

    Yang, Kwang Mo

    2004-01-01

    For the head and neck radiotherapy, abutting photon field with electron field is frequently used for the irradiation of posterior neck when tolerable dose on spinal cord has been reached. Using 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron beams of Clinac1800(Varian, USA) linear accelerator, we performed film dosimetry by the X-OMAT V film of Kodak in solid water phantom according to depths(0 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). 6 MV X-ray and 9 MeV electron(1 Gy) were exposes to 8 cm depth and surface(SSD 100 cm) of phantom. The dose distribution to the junction line between photon(10 x 10 cm field with block) and electron(15 cm x 15 cm field with block) fields was also measured according to depths(0 cm, 0.5 1.5 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm). At the junction line between photon and electron fields, the hot spot was developed on the side of the photon field and a cold spot was developed on that of the electron field. The hot spot in the photon side was developed at depth 1.5 cm with 7 mm width. The maximum dose of hot spot was increased to 6% of reference doses in the photon field. The cold spot in the electron side was developed at all measured depths(0.5 cm-3 cm) with 1-12.5 mm widths. The decreased dose in the cold spot was 4.5-30% of reference dose in the electron field. When we make use of abutting photon field with electron field for the treatment of head and neck cancer we should consider the hot and cold dose area in the junction of photon and electron field according to location of tumor.

  5. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture

    Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with 134Cs and 137Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima D...

  6. SU-F-J-59: Assessment of Dose Response Distribution in Individual Human Tumor

    Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chen, S; Krauss, D; Chen, P [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Wilson, G [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To fulfill precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number, voxel-by-voxel dose response or radio-sensitivity in individual human tumor needs to be determined in early treatment to guide treatment adaptation. In this study, multiple FDG PET images obtained pre- and weekly during the treatment course were utilized to determine the distribution/spectrum of dose response parameters in individual human tumors. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 18 HN cancer patients were used in the study. Spatial parametric image of tumor metabolic ratio (dSUV) was created following voxel by voxel deformable image registration. Each voxel value in dSUV was a function of pre-treatment baseline SUV and treatment delivered dose, and used as a surrogate of tumor survival fraction (SF). Regression fitting with break points was performed using the LQ-model with tumor proliferation for the control and failure group of tumors separately. The distribution and spectrum of radiation sensitivity and growth in individual tumors were determined and evaluated. Results: Spectrum of tumor dose-sensitivity and proliferation in the controlled group was broad with α in tumor survival LQ-model from 0.17 to 0.8. It was proportional to the baseline SUV. Tlag was about 21∼25 days, and Tpot about 0.56∼1.67 days respectively. Commonly tumor voxels with high radio-sensitivity or larger α had small Tlag and Tpot. For the failure group, the radio-sensitivity α was low within 0.05 to 0.3, but did not show clear Tlag. In addition, tumor voxel radio-sensitivity could be estimated during the early treatment weeks. Conclusion: Dose response distribution with respect to radio-sensitivity and growth in individual human tumor can be determined using FDG PET imaging based tumor metabolic ratio measured in early treatment course. The discover is critical and provides a potential quantitative objective to implement tumor specific precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number.

  7. Breast dose in mammography is about 30% lower when realistic heterogeneous glandular distributions are considered

    Hernandez, Andrew M., E-mail: amhern@ucdavis.edu [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M. [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Current dosimetry methods in mammography assume that the breast is comprised of a homogeneous mixture of glandular and adipose tissues. Three-dimensional (3D) dedicated breast CT (bCT) data sets were used previously to assess the complex anatomical structure within the breast, characterizing the statistical distribution of glandular tissue in the breast. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of bCT-derived heterogeneous glandular distributions on dosimetry in mammography. Methods: bCT-derived breast diameters, volumes, and 3D fibroglandular distributions were used to design realistic compressed breast models comprised of heterogeneous distributions of glandular tissue. The bCT-derived glandular distributions were fit to biGaussian functions and used as probability density maps to assign the density distributions within compressed breast models. The MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo code was used to estimate monoenergetic normalized mean glandular dose “DgN(E)” values in mammography geometry. The DgN(E) values were then weighted by typical mammography x-ray spectra to determine polyenergetic DgN (pDgN) coefficients for heterogeneous (pDgN{sub hetero}) and homogeneous (pDgN{sub homo}) cases. The dependence of estimated pDgN values on phantom size, volumetric glandular fraction (VGF), x-ray technique factors, and location of the heterogeneous glandular distributions was investigated. Results: The pDgN{sub hetero} coefficients were on average 35.3% (SD, 4.1) and 24.2% (SD, 3.0) lower than the pDgN{sub homo} coefficients for the Mo–Mo and W–Rh x-ray spectra, respectively, across all phantom sizes and VGFs when the glandular distributions were centered within the breast phantom in the coronal plane. At constant breast size, increasing VGF from 7.3% to 19.1% lead to a reduction in pDgN{sub hetero} relative to pDgN{sub homo} of 23.6%–27.4% for a W–Rh spectrum. Displacement of the glandular distribution, at a distance equal to 10% of the

  8. Experimental validation of radial reconstructed pin-power distributions in full-scale BWR fuel assemblies with and without control blade

    Giust, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.giust@axpo.c [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Axpo Kernenergie AG, Parkstrasse 23, CH-5401 Baden (Switzerland); Grimm, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full-size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96+ in the zero power reactor PROTEUS at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This paper presents comparisons of reconstructed 2D pin fission rates from nodal diffusion calculations to the experimental results in two configurations: one 'regular' (I-1A) and the other 'controlled' (I-2A). Both configurations consist of an array of 3 x 3 SVEA-96+ fuel assemblies moderated with light water at 20 {sup o}C. In configuration I-2A, an L-shaped hafnium control blade (half of a real cruciform blade) is inserted adjacent to the north-west corner of the central fuel assembly. To minimise the impact of the surroundings, all measurements were done in fuel pins belonging to the central assembly. The 3 x 3 experimental configuration (test zone) was modelled using the core monitoring and design tools that are applied at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). These are the 2D transport code HELIOS, used for the cross-section generation, and the 3D, 2-group nodal diffusion code PRESTO-2. The exterior is represented, in the axial and radial directions, by 2-group partial current ratios (PCRs) calculated at the test zone boundary using a 3D Monte Carlo (MCNPX) model of the whole PROTEUS reactor. Sensitivity cases are analysed to show the impact of changes in the 2D lattice modelling on the calculated fission rate distribution and reactivity. Further, the effects of variations in the test zone boundary PCRs and their behaviour in energy are investigated. For the test zone configuration without control blade, the pin-power reconstruction methodology delivers the same level of accuracy as the 2D transport calculations. On the other hand, larger deviations that are inherent to the use of reflected geometry in the lattice calculations are observed for the configuration with the control blade inserted. In the basic (reference) simulation cases, the calculated-to-experimental (C

  9. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas CGG; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  10. Dose distribution in the thyroid gland following radiation therapy of breast cancer-a retrospective study

    Johansen, S; Reinertsen, KV; Knutstad, K; Olsen, DR; Fosså, SD

    2011-01-01

    To relate the development of post-treatment hypothyroidism with the dose distribution within the thyroid gland in breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional radiotherapy (RT). In two groups of BC patients postoperatively irradiated by computer tomography (CT)-based RT, the individual dose distributions in the thyroid gland were compared with each other; Cases developed post-treatment hypothyroidism after multimodal treatment including 4-field RT technique. Matched patients in Controls remained free for hypothyroidism. Based on each patient's dose volume histogram (DVH) the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy were then estimated (V20, V30, V40 and V50) together with the individual mean thyroid dose over the whole gland (MeanTotGy). The mean and median thyroid dose for the included patients was about 30 Gy, subsequently the total volume of the thyroid gland (VolTotGy) and the absolute volumes (cm 3 ) receiving respectively < 30 Gy and ≥ 30 Gy were calculated (Vol < 30 and Vol ≥ 30) and analyzed. No statistically significant inter-group differences were found between V20, V30, V40 and V50Gy or the median of MeanTotGy. The median VolTotGy in Controls was 2.3 times above VolTotGy in Cases (ρ = 0.003), with large inter-individual variations in both groups. The volume of the thyroid gland receiving < 30 Gy in Controls was almost 2.5 times greater than the comparable figure in Cases. We concluded that in patients with small thyroid glands after loco-radiotherapy of BC, the risk of post-treatment hypothyroidism depends on the volume of the thyroid gland

  11. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; D’Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192 Ir sources and 50 kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator. (paper)

  12. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    Lee, C.C.; Lee, Y.J.; Tung, C.J.; Cheng, H.W.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R 50% ) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R 50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent R eq,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively. - Highlights: ► Proton dose simulation based on the MCNPX 2.6.0 in homogeneous and CT phantoms. ► CT number (HU) conversion to electron density based on Schneider's approach. ► Good agreement among MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes in a homogeneous water phantom. ► Water equivalent R 50 in CT phantoms are compatible to those of NIST database

  13. Accurate estimation of dose distributions inside an eye irradiated with {sup 106}Ru plaques

    Brualla, L.; Sauerwein, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). NCTeam, Strahlenklinik; Sempau, J.; Zaragoza, F.J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Tecniques Energetiques; Wittig, A. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2013-01-15

    Background: Irradiation of intraocular tumors requires dedicated techniques, such as brachytherapy with {sup 106}Ru plaques. The currently available treatment planning system relies on the assumption that the eye is a homogeneous water sphere and on simplified radiation transport physics. However, accurate dose distributions and their assessment demand better models for both the eye and the physics. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, conveniently adapted to simulate the beta decay of {sup 106}Ru over {sup 106}Rh into {sup 106}Pd, was used to simulate radiation transport based on a computerized tomography scan of a patient's eye. A detailed geometrical description of two plaques (models CCA and CCB) from the manufacturer BEBIG was embedded in the computerized tomography scan. Results: The simulations were firstly validated by comparison with experimental results in a water phantom. Dose maps were computed for three plaque locations on the eyeball. From these maps, isodose curves and cumulative dose-volume histograms in the eye and for the structures at risk were assessed. For example, it was observed that a 4-mm anterior displacement with respect to a posterior placement of a CCA plaque for treating a posterior tumor would reduce from 40 to 0% the volume of the optic disc receiving more than 80 Gy. Such a small difference in anatomical position leads to a change in the dose that is crucial for side effects, especially with respect to visual acuity. The radiation oncologist has to bring these large changes in absorbed dose in the structures at risk to the attention of the surgeon, especially when the plaque has to be positioned close to relevant tissues. Conclusion: The detailed geometry of an eye plaque in computerized and segmented tomography of a realistic patient phantom was simulated accurately. Dose-volume histograms for relevant anatomical structures of the eye and the orbit were obtained with unprecedented accuracy. This represents an important step

  14. Accurate estimation of dose distributions inside an eye irradiated with 106Ru plaques

    Brualla, L.; Sauerwein, W.; Sempau, J.; Zaragoza, F.J.; Wittig, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Irradiation of intraocular tumors requires dedicated techniques, such as brachytherapy with 106 Ru plaques. The currently available treatment planning system relies on the assumption that the eye is a homogeneous water sphere and on simplified radiation transport physics. However, accurate dose distributions and their assessment demand better models for both the eye and the physics. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, conveniently adapted to simulate the beta decay of 106 Ru over 106 Rh into 106 Pd, was used to simulate radiation transport based on a computerized tomography scan of a patient's eye. A detailed geometrical description of two plaques (models CCA and CCB) from the manufacturer BEBIG was embedded in the computerized tomography scan. Results: The simulations were firstly validated by comparison with experimental results in a water phantom. Dose maps were computed for three plaque locations on the eyeball. From these maps, isodose curves and cumulative dose-volume histograms in the eye and for the structures at risk were assessed. For example, it was observed that a 4-mm anterior displacement with respect to a posterior placement of a CCA plaque for treating a posterior tumor would reduce from 40 to 0% the volume of the optic disc receiving more than 80 Gy. Such a small difference in anatomical position leads to a change in the dose that is crucial for side effects, especially with respect to visual acuity. The radiation oncologist has to bring these large changes in absorbed dose in the structures at risk to the attention of the surgeon, especially when the plaque has to be positioned close to relevant tissues. Conclusion: The detailed geometry of an eye plaque in computerized and segmented tomography of a realistic pa