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Sample records for quinolone resistance mechanisms

  1. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  2. Mechanism of quinolone action and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-03-18

    Quinolones are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibacterials in the world and are used to treat a variety of bacterial infections in humans. Because of the wide use (and overuse) of these drugs, the number of quinolone-resistant bacterial strains has been growing steadily since the 1990s. As is the case with other antibacterial agents, the rise in quinolone resistance threatens the clinical utility of this important drug class. Quinolones act by converting their targets, gyrase and topoisomerase IV, into toxic enzymes that fragment the bacterial chromosome. This review describes the development of the quinolones as antibacterials, the structure and function of gyrase and topoisomerase IV, and the mechanistic basis for quinolone action against their enzyme targets. It will then discuss the following three mechanisms that decrease the sensitivity of bacterial cells to quinolones. Target-mediated resistance is the most common and clinically significant form of resistance. It is caused by specific mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase IV that weaken interactions between quinolones and these enzymes. Plasmid-mediated resistance results from extrachromosomal elements that encode proteins that disrupt quinolone-enzyme interactions, alter drug metabolism, or increase quinolone efflux. Chromosome-mediated resistance results from the underexpression of porins or the overexpression of cellular efflux pumps, both of which decrease cellular concentrations of quinolones. Finally, this review will discuss recent advancements in our understanding of how quinolones interact with gyrase and topoisomerase IV and how mutations in these enzymes cause resistance. These last findings suggest approaches to designing new drugs that display improved activity against resistant strains.

  3. [Quinolones. Nowadays perspectives and mechanisms of resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Hernández, Diego Abelardo; Garza-Mayén, Gilda Sofía; Vázquez-López, Rosalno

    2015-10-01

    Quinolones are a family of synthetic broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs whose target is the synthesis of DNA. They directly inhibit DNA replication by interacting with two enzymes; DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. They have been widely used for the treatment of several community and hospital acquired infections, in the food processing industry and in the agricultural field, making the increasing incidence of quinolone resistance a frequent problem associated with constant exposition to diverse microorganisms. Resistance may be achieved by three non-exclusive mechanisms; through chromosomic mutations in the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, by reducing the intracytoplasmic concentrations of quinolones actively or passively and by Plasmid-Mediated Quinolones-Resistance genes, [Qnr determinant genes of resistance to quinolones, variant gene of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC(6')-Ib-c)] and encoding genes of efflux pumps (qepA and oqxAB)]. The future of quinolones is uncertain, however, meanwhile they continue to be used in an irrational way, increasing resistance to quinolones should remain as an area of primary priority for research.

  4. Prevalence and characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zając, Magdalena

    2014-07-16

    The study was focused on characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella isolated from animals, food, and feed between 2008 and 2011. Testing of Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations revealed 6.4% of 2680 isolates conferring ciprofloxacin resistance. Simultaneously 37.7% and 40.8% were accounted for, respectively, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin Non Wild-Type populations. Amplification and sequencing of quinolone resistance determining region of topoisomerases genes in 44 isolates identified multiple amino-acid substitutions in gyrA at positions Ser83 (N=22; → Leu, → Phe, → Tyr), Asp87 (N=22; → Asn, → Gly, → Tyr) and parC (Thr57Ser, N=23; Ala141Ser, N=1). No relevant mutations were identified in gyrB and parE. Twelve patterns combining one or two substitutions were related to neither serovar nor ciprofloxacin MIC. In 92 isolates suspected for plasmid mediated quinolone resistance two qnr alleles were found: qnrS1 (or qnrS3; N=50) and qnrB19 (or qnrB10; N=24). Additionally, two isolates with chromosomally encoded mechanisms carried qnrS1 and qnrS2. All tested isolates were negative for qnrA, qnrC, qnrD, qepA, aac(6')-Ib-cr. Both chromosomal and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance determinants were found in several Salmonella serovars and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis was used to assess phylogenetic similarity of selected isolates (N=82). Salmonella Newport was found to accumulate quinolone resistance determinants and the serovar was spreading clonally with either variable gyrA mutations, qnrS1/S3, or qnrB10/B19. Alternatively, various determinants are dispersed among related S. Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial selection pressure, multiple resistance determinants and scenarios for their acquisition and spread make extremely difficult to combat quinolone resistance.

  5. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n = 85) and swine (n = 39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP......-resistant isolates (MIC >= 4) from human (n = 51) and pig origin (n = 8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >= 0.125) from human (n = 34) and pig origin (n = 31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing, of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs......A and qnrS genes conferring quinolone resistance by target protection were detected in two human low-level CIP-resistant isolates that did not display NAL resistance. As expected, target mutation in QRDRs was the most prevalent mechanism of quinolone resistance. This mechanism was complemented by efflux...

  6. Structural insights into the quinolone resistance mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Piton

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural studies of the two individual domains constituting the catalytic DNA gyrase reaction core, namely the Toprim and the breakage-reunion domains. This allowed us to produce a model of the catalytic reaction core in complex with DNA and a quinolone molecule, identifying original mechanistic properties of quinolone binding and clarifying the relationships between amino acid mutations and resistance phenotype of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase. These results are compatible with our previous studies on quinolone resistance. Interestingly, the structure of the entire breakage-reunion domain revealed a new interaction, in which the Quinolone-Binding Pocket (QBP is blocked by the N-terminal helix of a symmetry-related molecule. This interaction provides useful starting points for designing peptide based inhibitors that target DNA gyrase to prevent its binding to DNA.

  7. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Lina Maria; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik; Guardabassi, Luca; Nielsen, Lene; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2008-06-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n=85) and swine (n=39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >or= 4) from human (n=51) and pig origin (n=8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >or= 0.125) from human (n=34) and pig origin (n=31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. QRDR mutations occurred in all except two isolates (98%). All high-level CIP-resistant E. coli had one or two mutations in gyrA in combination with mutations in parC or parE. Mutations in parC and parE were only found in combination with gyrA mutations, and no mutations were observed in gyrB. Efflux pump mechanisms were detected in 10 human (11.8%) and 29 porcine (74.4%) isolates by an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) agar dilution assay. The aac(6')-Ib-cr gene mediating resistance by enzymatic modification was found in 12 high-level CIP-resistant human isolates. The qnrA and qnrS genes conferring quinolone resistance by target protection were detected in two human low-level CIP-resistant isolates that did not display NAL resistance. As expected, target mutation in QRDRs was the most prevalent mechanism of quinolone resistance. This mechanism was complemented by efflux mechanisms in most porcine isolates. Transferable resistance by target protection or enzymatic modification was less common (10%) and restricted to human isolates.

  8. Quinolone resistance: much more than predicted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro eHernandez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, it was predicted that mutations in target genes would be the only mechanism through which resistance could be acquired, because there will not be quinolone resistance genes in nature. Contrary to this prediction, a variety of elements ranging from efflux pumps, target-protecting proteins and even quinolone-modifying enzymes have been shown to contribute to quinolone resistance. The finding of some of these elements in plasmids indicates that quinolone resistance can be transferable. As a result, there has been a developing interest on the reservoirs for quinolone resistance genes and on the potential risks associated with the use of these antibiotics in non-clinical environments. As a matter of fact, plasmid-encoded, quinolone-resistance qnr genes originated in the chromosome of aquatic bacteria, thus the use of quinolones in fish farming might constitute a risk for the emergence of resistance. Failure to predict the development of quinolone resistance reinforces the need of taking into consideration the wide plasticity of biological systems for future predictions. This plasticity allows pathogens to deal with toxic compounds, including those with a synthetic origin as quinolones.

  9. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance and implications for human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone antibiotics have been widely used in human and veterinary medicine. This has caused the development of resistance and difficulties in the treatment of complicated bacterial infections in humans. The resistance to quinolones develops due to chromosome mutations and it can also be transferred by plasmids. The target enzyme for quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria is Gyrasa A, while the target enzyme in Grampositive bacteria is mostly topoisomerase IV. Gyrase A consists of two subunits encoded by genes gyrA and gyrB. The function of the enzyme is to introduce negative super coiling in DNA and therefore is essential for the replication of bacteria. Quinolone resistance develops if point mutations at 83 and/or 87 codon are introduced on gyrA. Establishing a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to this group of antimicrobials will reveal possible mutations. Recently it was discovered that quinolone resistance is transmittable by plasmid termed PMQR (plasmid mediated quinolone resistance. The target gene marked qnr encodes a pentapeptide repeat family protein. Pentapeptide repeats form sheets, involved in protein-protein interactions. Qnr protein binds to GyrA protecting the enzyme from the inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin. The distribution of qnr related resistance is higher in humans than in animals. In poultry, however, this type of resistance is present more than in other animals. Plasmid mediated resistance contributes to the faster spread of quinolone resistance. Proper food handling will significantly contribute to decreasing the risk from infection to which people are exposed. In medical and veterinary laboratories antimicrobial resistance monitoring in clinical and environmental isolates is advised. Since correlation between antibiotics application and antimicrobial resistance is often suggested, antimicrobial use must be under strict control of the authorities both in human and in veterinary medicine. .

  10. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. / Mecanismos de resistência às quinolonas em Salmonella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Rocha Moreira de Oliveira

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a common and widespread zoonotic disease of humans and a frequent cause of foodborne disease. Treatment of severe and systemic salmonellosis is usually done with fluoroquinolones. In this review resistance mechanisms of Salmonella to quinolones are discussed. Single point mutations in the quinolone resistant determining region (QRDR of the gyrA gene may be sufficient to generate high levels of resistance to non-fluorated quinolones and also may decrease the fluoroquinolones susceptibility. Other resistance mechanisms that should be considered are mutations in parC gene, the possibility of acquiring resistance through plasmidial transference and hyper-expression of efflux pumps. Fluoroquinolones resistance is still relatively uncommon in Salmonella compared to other species belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. However, the more careful use of fluoroquinolones in veterinary and human medicine is essential to decrease the selective pressure which can avoid the emergence and spread of resistant clones and consequently maintain the clinical efficacy of this group of antibiotics.A salmonelose é uma zoonose de importância mundial e uma das mais freqüentes doenças de origem alimentar. As fluoroquinolonas são a principal opção para o tratamento de salmoneloses graves ou sistêmicas. Esta revisão de literatura teve como objetivo apresentar os principais mecanismos envolvidos na resistência de Salmonella spp a estes antimicrobianos. Mutações de ponto na Região Determinante de Resistência à Quinolona (QRDR do gene gyrA podem gerar altos níveis de resistência a quinolonas não-fluoradas, além de reduzir a suscetibilidade as fluoroquinolonas. Outros mecanismos de resistência que também precisam ser considerados são as mutações no gene parC, a possibilidade do envolvimento de plasmídios de resistência e o sistema de efluxo ativo. A resistência às fluoroquinolonas ainda é incomum em Salmonella spp., quando

  11. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: Resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Taylor, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone...... maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions....

  12. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: Resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Taylor, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone...... resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and central measures...... maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions....

  13. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested.

  14. Characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae recovered from diseased companion animals in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, T; de Jong, A; Limelette, A; Lebreil, A L; Madoux, J; de Champs, C

    2016-10-15

    ComPath is a European monitoring programme dedicated to the collection of bacterial pathogens from diseased dogs and cats to determine their antibiotic susceptibility. The objective was to characterize genetic determinants associated with quinolone resistance among 69 enrofloxacin non-wild type strains selected among 604 non-duplicate Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected in 10EU countries from 2008 to 2010: quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). Among them, 17% (12/69) carried at least one PMQR (9/12 qnrB, qnrS or qnrD and 4/12 aac(6')-Ib-cr) and 83% (57/69) no PMQR. All the Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates chromosomally carried oqxAB . No qepA genes were detected. Eight strains did not carry any mutations in QRDR (4 PMQR-positive and 4 PMQR-negative strains). From the 12 PMQR-positive strains, 4 showed enrofloxacin MICs≤2μg/mL, and 8 MICs≥8μg/mL (resistant). These latter strains carried 1-5 mutations in QRDR, including a ParE I529L mutation. qnrD was found in 2 Proteus mirabilis and the plasmids were similar to pDIJ09-518a previously described. For the 57 non-PMQR strains, 29 strains showed MICs≤2μg/mL (4 with no QRDR mutations, 21 with 1 mutation in GyrA, 4 with 2 mutations in GyrA) and 28 showed enrofloxacin MICs≥8μg/mL carrying at least 2 mutations in QRDR, including a ParE I529L mutation for 2 Escherichia coli strains with a total of 5 QRDR mutations. No GyrB mutations were found. qnr was the major PMQR and qnrD was only detected in Proteus spp. Twelve strains carried at least 4 mutations.

  15. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms and extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in Escherichia coli isolated from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, D; Leite-Martins, L; Bessa, L J; Cunha, S; Fernandes, R; de Matos, A; Manaia, C M; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistances is now a worldwide problem. Investigating the mechanisms by which pets harboring resistant strains may receive and/or transfer resistance determinants is essential to better understanding how owners and pets can interact safely. Here, we characterized the genetic determinants conferring resistance to β-lactams and quinolones in 38 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of dogs, through PCR and sequencing. The most frequent genotype included the β-lactamase groups TEM (n=5), and both TEM+CTX-M-1 (n=5). Within the CTX-M group, we identified the genes CTX-M-32, CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55/79, CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-2/44. Thirty isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin presented two mutations in the gyrA gene and one or two mutations in the parC gene. A mutation in gyrA (reported here for the first time), due to a transversion and transition (TCG→GTG) originating a substitution of a serine by a valine in position 83 was also detected. The plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene, qnrs1, was detected in three isolates. Dogs can be a reservoir of genetic determinants conferring antimicrobial resistance and thus may play an important role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance to humans and other co-habitant animals.

  16. A molecular analysis of quinolone-resistant Haemophilus influenzae: validation of the mutations in Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hisashi; Shirakura, Tetsuro; Fukuchi, Kunihiko; Takuma, Takahiro; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Niki, Yoshihito

    2014-04-01

    The mechanism of quinolone-resistance is considered to be amino acid mutations in the type II topoisomerase. We validated the genetic mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Haemophilus influenzae. We obtained 29 H. influenzae strains from a nationwide surveillance program in Japan (including 11 quinolone-resistant strains [moxifloxacin: MFLX or levofloxacin MIC ≥2 μg/ml]). We analyzed the sequences of the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions (QRDRs) in GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE. Furthermore, we induced resistance in susceptible strains by exposing them to quinolone, and investigated the relationship between mutations in the QRDRs and the MICs. Five amino acid substitutions in GyrA (at Ser84 and Asp88) and ParC (at Gly82, Ser84 and Glu88) were found to be closely related to the MICs. The strains with a MFLX MIC of 0.125-1 and 2-4 μg/ml had one and two mutations, respectively. The strains with a MFLX MIC of ≥8 μg/ml had three or more mutations. The strains with induced resistance with MFLX MICs of 0.5-1 and ≥2 μg/ml also had one and two mutations, respectively. We confirmed that these five mutations strongly contribute to quinolone resistance and found that the degree of resistance is related to the number of the mutations. In addition, the three strains of 18 susceptible strains (16.7%) also had a single mutation. These strains may therefore be in the initial stage of quinolone resistance. Currently, the frequency of quinolone-resistant H. influenzae is still low. However, as has occurred with β-lactams, an increase in quinolone use may lead to more quinolone-resistant strains.

  17. 沙眼衣原体对喹诺酮类耐药机制的进展%Update on the mechanism of Chlamydia trachomatis resistance to quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓静; 刘全忠

    2009-01-01

    Quinolones are commonly used to treat Chlamydiatra chomatis inection in clinic at present.However,the resistance of Chlamydia trachomatis to quinolones has been increasingly reported.It has becn shown that the resistance is related to point mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determinning region of DNA gyrase gene and topoisomerase IV subunit genes.These mutations are located most commonly at Ser-83,less frequently at Asp-87.There are also some other mechanisms underlying the resistance.Further studies are needed for the elucidation of exact mechanism of Chlamydia trachomatis resistance to quinolones.%喹诺酮类药物目前在临床上常用于治疗沙眼衣原体感染,但近年来有关沙眼衣原体对其耐药的报道不断出现.研究发现,喹诺酮类耐药的产生与DNA回旋酶和拓扑异构酶Ⅳ亚单位基因的喹诺酮耐药决定区域的点突变有关.最常见的突变位于Ser-83,少数情况下位于Asp-87,还有一些其他可能的耐药机制.沙眼衣原体对喹诺酮类耐药的确切机制尚待进一步研究.

  18. Topoisomerase IV-quinolone interactions are mediated through a water-metal ion bridge: mechanistic basis of quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Although quinolones are the most commonly prescribed antibacterials, their use is threatened by an increasing prevalence of resistance. The most common causes of quinolone resistance are mutations of a specific serine or acidic residue in the A subunit of gyrase or topoisomerase IV. These amino acids are proposed to serve as a critical enzyme-quinolone interaction site by anchoring a water-metal ion bridge that coordinates drug binding. To probe the role of the proposed water-metal ion bridge, we characterized wild-type, GrlA(E85K), GrlA(S81F/E85K), GrlA(E85A), GrlA(S81F/E85A) and GrlA(S81F) Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV, their sensitivity to quinolones and related drugs and their use of metal ions. Mutations increased the Mg(2+) concentration required to produce maximal quinolone-induced DNA cleavage and restricted the divalent metal ions that could support quinolone activity. Individual mutation of Ser81 or Glu85 partially disrupted bridge function, whereas simultaneous mutation of both residues abrogated protein-quinolone interactions. Results provide functional evidence for the existence of the water-metal ion bridge, confirm that the serine and glutamic acid residues anchor the bridge, demonstrate that the bridge is the primary conduit for interactions between clinically relevant quinolones and topoisomerase IV and provide a likely mechanism for the most common causes of quinolone resistance.

  19. [Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae producing acquired AmpC β-lactamases and/or carbapenemases in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Agüero, Jesús; Miró, Elisenda; Conejo, María Del Carmen; Oteo, Jesús; Bou, Germán; González-López, Juan José; Oliver, Antonio; Navarro, Ferran; Pascual, Álvaro; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-06-23

    Quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae species has increased over the past few years, and is significantly associated to beta-lactam resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in acquired AmpC β-lactamase and/or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The presence of chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms [mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC and qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA genes] was evaluated in 289 isolates of acquired AmpC β-lactamase- and/or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae collected between February and July 2009 in 35 Spanish hospitals. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes were detected in 92 isolates (31.8%), qnr genes were detected in 83 isolates (28.7%), and the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene was detected in 20 isolates (7%). qnrB4 gene was the most prevalent qnr gene detected (20%), associated, in most cases, with DHA-1. Only 14.6% of isolates showed no mutations in gyrA or parC with a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.5mg/L or higher, whereas PMQR genes were detected in 90% of such isolates. qnrB4 gene was the most prevalent PMQR gene detected, and was significantly associated with acquired AmpC β-lactamase DHA-1. PMQR determinants in association with other chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms, different to mutations in gyrA and parC (increased energy-dependent efflux, altered lipopolysaccharide or porin loss), could lead to ciprofloxacin MIC values that exceed breakpoints established by the main international committees to define clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  1. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  2. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  3. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Joost; Veldman, Kees; Dierikx, Cindy; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mevius, Dik

    2012-04-23

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional data on quinolone resistance mechanisms in non-pathogenic bacteria from healthy veal calves is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Escherichia coli isolates from veal calves, after more than 20 years of quinolone usage in veal calves. MIC values were determined for all isolates collected as part of a national surveillance program on antimicrobial resistance in commensal bacteria in food-producing animals in The Netherlands. From the strains collected from veal calves in 2007 (n=175) all isolates with ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 0.125 mg/L (n=25) were selected for this study, and screened for the presence of known quinolone resistance determinants. In this selection only chromosomal mutations in the topoisomerase type II and IV genes were detected. The number of mutations found per isolate correlated with an increasing ciprofloxacin MIC. No plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were found. The contribution of efflux pumps varied from no contribution to a 16-fold increase in susceptibility. No correlation was found with the presence of resistance genes of other antimicrobial classes, even though all quinolone non-wild type isolates were resistant to 3 or more classes of antibiotics other than quinolones. Over twenty years of quinolone usage in veal calves in The Netherlands did not result in a widespread occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, limiting the transmission of quinolone resistance to clonal distribution.

  4. In vitro activity of Ozenoxacin against quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Y; Tato, M; Espinal, P; Garcia-Alonso, F; Gargallo-Viola, D; Cantón, R; Vila, J

    2013-12-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210-1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections.

  5. Contribution of topoisomerase IV mutation to quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuko; Takei, Masaya; Kishii, Ryuta; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Deguchi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium remains poorly understood due to difficulties with in vitro culture, especially of clinical isolates. In this study, to confirm the association between mutations in topoisomerases and antimicrobial susceptibilities to quinolones, ciprofloxacin-resistant mutant strains were selected using the cultivable type strain ATCC 33530. Sequence analysis revealed that the mutant strains harbored mutations in topoisomerase IV: Gly81Cys in ParC, Pro261Thr in ParC, or Asn466Lys in ParE. The MICs of all quinolones tested against the mutant strains were 2- to 16-fold higher than those against the wild-type strain. No cross-resistance was observed with macrolides or tetracyclines. We determined the inhibitory activities of quinolones against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in order to investigate the correlation between antimicrobial susceptibility and inhibitory activity against the target enzymes, considered the primary targets of quinolones. Furthermore, using enzymatic analysis, we confirmed that Gly81Cys in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) contributed to quinolone resistance. This is the first study to isolate quinolone-resistant mutant strains of M. genitalium harboring substitutions in the parC or parE gene in vitro and to measure the inhibitory activities against the purified topoisomerases of M. genitalium.

  6. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-01-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, ...

  7. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-03-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, in contrast to other quinolone resistance mutations. The two loci appear to interact functionally, because nfxB was not expressed in the presence of marA::Tn5. Both nfxB and cfxB decreased the expression of ompF up to 50-fold at the posttranscriptional level as determined in strains containing ompF-lacZ operon and protein fusions. Both mutations also decreased norfloxacin accumulation in intact cells. This decrease in accumulation was abolished by energy inhibitors and by removal of the outer membrane. These findings, in conjunction with those of Cohen et al. (S. P. Cohen, D. C. Hooper, J. S. Wolfson, K. S. Souza, L. M. McMurry, and S. B. Levy, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1187-1191, 1988), suggest a model for quinolone resistance by decreased permeation in which decreased diffusion through porin channels in the outer membrane interacts with a saturable drug efflux system at the inner membrane.

  8. Quinolone resistance in absence of selective pressure: the experience of a very remote community in the Amazon forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Pallecchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quinolones are potent broad-spectrum bactericidal agents increasingly employed also in resource-limited countries. Resistance to quinolones is an increasing problem, known to be strongly associated with quinolone exposure. We report on the emergence of quinolone resistance in a very remote community in the Amazon forest, where quinolones have never been used and quinolone resistance was absent in 2002. METHODS: The community exhibited a considerable level of geographical isolation, limited contact with the exterior and minimal antibiotic use (not including quinolones. In December 2009, fecal carriage of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli was investigated in 120 of the 140 inhabitants, and in 48 animals reared in the community. All fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were genotyped and characterized for the mechanisms of plasmid- and chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Despite the characteristics of the community remained substantially unchanged during the period 2002-2009, carriage of quinolone-resistant E. coli was found to be common in 2009 both in humans (45% nalidixic acid, 14% ciprofloxacin and animals (54% nalidixic acid, 23% ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of human and animal origin showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, a high level of genetic heterogeneity, and a combination of GyrA (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn and ParC (Ser80Ile substitutions commonly observed in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli. CONCLUSIONS: Remoteness and absence of antibiotic selective pressure did not protect the community from the remarkable emergence of quinolone resistance in E. coli. Introduction of the resistant strains from antibiotic-exposed settings is the most likely source, while persistence and dissemination in the absence of quinolone exposure is likely mostly related with poor sanitation. Interventions aimed at reducing the spreading of resistant isolates (by improving sanitation

  9. Apigenin as an anti-quinolone-resistance antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported the first 'reverse antibiotic' (RA), nybomycin (NYB), which showed a unique antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains. NYB specifically suppressed the growth of quinolone-resistant S. aureus strains but was not effective against quinolone-susceptible strains. Although NYB was first reported in 1955, little was known about its unique antimicrobial activity because it was before the synthesis of the first quinolone ('old quinolone'), nalidixic acid, in 1962. Following our re-discovery of NYB, we looked for other RAs among natural substances that act on quinolone-resistant bacteria. Commercially available flavones were screened against S. aureus, including quinolone-resistant strains, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were compared using the microbroth dilution method. Some of the flavones screened showed stronger antimicrobial activity against quinolone-resistant strains than against quinolone-susceptible ones. Amongst them, apigenin (API) was the most potent in its RA activity. DNA cleavage assay showed that API inhibited DNA gyrase harbouring the quinolone resistance mutation gyrA(Ser84Leu) but did not inhibit 'wild-type' DNA gyrase that is sensitive to levofloxacin. An API-susceptible S. aureus strain Mu50 was also selected using agar plates containing 20mg/L API. Whole-genome sequencing of selected mutant strains was performed and frequent back-mutations (reverse mutations) were found among API-resistant strains derived from the API-susceptible S. aureus strains. Here we report that API represents another molecular class of natural antibiotic having RA activity against quinolone-resistant bacteria.

  10. Increasing quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has remained sensitive to most antibiotics. However, national surveillance data from Denmark show that quinolone resistance in S. Enteritidis has increased from 0.8% in 1995 to 8.5% in 2000. These data support concerns that the current use...... of quinolone in food animals leads to increasing resistance in S. Enteritidis and that action should be taken to limit such use....

  11. Differentiation in quinolone resistance by virulence genotype in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Agnello

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading pathogen that has become increasingly resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics due to widespread prescribing. Adverse outcomes have been shown for patients infected with fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. The type III secretion system (TTSS is a major virulence determinant during acute infections through the injection of effector toxins into host cells. Most strains exhibit a unique TTSS virulence genotype defined by the presence of either exoS or exoU gene encoding two of the effector toxins, ExoS and ExoU, respectively. Specific TTSS effector genotype has been shown previously to differentially impact virulence in pneumonia. In this study, we examined the relationship between TTSS effector genotype and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in a collection of 270 respiratory isolates. We found that a higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant compared to exoS+ strains (63% vs 49%, p = 0.03 despite its lower overall prevalence (38% exoU+ vs 56% exoS+. Results from sequencing the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs of the 4 target genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE indicated that strains containing the exoU gene were more likely to acquire ≥ 2 mutations than exoS+ strains at MICs ≤ 8 µg/ml (13% vs none and twice as likely to have mutations in both gyrA and parC than exoS+ strains (48% vs 24% p = 0.0439. Our findings indicate that P. aeruginosa strains differentially develop resistance-conferring mutations that correlate with TTSS effector genotype and the more virulent exoU+ subpopulation. Differences in mutational processes by virulence genotype that were observed suggest co-evolution of resistance and virulence traits favoring a more virulent genotype in the quinolone-rich clinical environment.

  12. Research of quinolones plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms and countermeasure%喹诺酮类药物的质粒介导耐药机制及其对抗防御措施研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建华; 宋丰贵

    2008-01-01

    随着喹诺酮类抗菌药物在临床上的广泛应用,细菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药性上升迅速.研究发现,细菌对喹诺酮类药物耐药的机制主要为靶位改变及主动外排,两者均为染色体介导.近年发现与两者完全不同的质粒介导耐药机制,且越来越多的临床菌株得以证实.本文主要对喹诺酮类药物的质粒介导的耐药机制及如何采取相应对抗防御措施进行综述.%Along with widespread application of quinolones antibiotics in clinic,quinolones resistanceof bacteria has rapidly risen. It is discovered that mechanisms of quinolones resistance of bacteria are mainlyinvolves change of target site and initiative excretion, which are both mediated by chromosome. In recentyears,plasmid-mediated drug resistance mechanism has been discovered,which is completely different fromthem. More and more clinical bacteria strains have been confirmed. The paper summarizes plasmid-mediatedquinolones resistance mechanisms and measures taken.

  13. Mechanism of Quinolone Resistance and Its Research Progress%喹诺酮类药物的作用机制耐药机制及研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杨; 欧宁

    2014-01-01

    Quinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics for clinical infections, by binding on topoisomerases to prevent DNA replication. But the problems of drug resistance increase seriously in recent years. This arti-cle reviews the mechanism of quinolone resistance and its research progress.%喹诺酮类药物主要作用于DNA拓扑异构酶,阻碍DNA复制,发挥广谱抗菌作用。但该类药物的耐药问题日益严重,耐药菌株频现。本文综述喹诺酮类药物的耐药机制及其研究进展。

  14. Drug Resistance Mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa to Quinolones Antibacterial%铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文广

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in nosocomial infection, the resistance of which to quinolones is becoming more and more serious. The main mechanisms of pseudomonas aeruginosa to quinolone resistance are: change of antibacterial drag target site structure to avoid the effect of antibacterial drags; efflux pump system makinge the drag excreted out of bacteria. There are many problems to be further explored for the mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to quinolones. Here is to make a review on the research progress.%铜绿假单胞菌是一种重要的医院内感染条件致病菌,对喹诺酮类药物耐药日趋严重.目前发现铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类药物耐药的主要机制为:改变抗菌药物作用的靶位点结构,从而逃避抗菌药物的作用;主动泵出系统使药物排出细菌体外.有关铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药机制,仍存在许多问题有待进一步探索.现就铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药机制研究进展进行综述.

  15. Research on the new resistance mechanism of quinolones mediated by aac(6')-Ib-cr%aac(6')-Ib-cr介导的喹喏酮类新耐药机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙攀; 殷瑜; 陈代杰

    2009-01-01

    AAC(6')- Ib are important aminoglycoside acetyltransferases.The variable gene aac(6')-Ib-cr acts on both quinolones and aminoglycosides, which belong to different classes of antibiotics based on their chemical structures, leading to the bacteria resistance. This paper briefly reviews the new resisitant mechanism of quinolones mediated by aac(6')-Ib-cr.%AAC(6')-Ib是重要的氨基糖苷乙酰基团转移酶,其变异基因aac(6')-Ib-cr可同时作用于氨基糖苷类和氟喹诺酮类两类结构不同的抗生素,是引起细菌耐药性的一种重要作用机制.该文主要对aac(6')-Ib-cr介导的喹诺酮类新耐药机制相关研究进行综述.

  16. 喹诺酮类药对常见病原菌耐药变迁与耐药机制初探%Change of resistance and drug resistance mechanism of quinolone against common bacteria in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小玲; 林渡娣; 杨春燕; 黄福新; 袁慧文

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand change of resistance and drug resistance mechanism of quinolone against common bacteria in clinical practice.Methods: To identify by Freneh Vitek-32 AMS analyzer, susceptibility test was performed with disc diffusion testing.The results were evaluated according to the standards of US Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to initially discuss bacterial resistance mechanisms by literature review.Results: Test results of resistance for 4 060 strains of common G+ and G- bacteria to quinolone indicated that drug resistance had increased in various degrees, the order of their resistance was: ciprofloxacin>levofloxacin>gatifloxacin>moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin resistance against MRSA and MRCNS became more than 95.0% and 70.0% respectively.They were regarded as highly resistant to clinical medicine and should not be the first choice in clinical treatment any more.As for bacterial resistance mechanism it was mainly because of the decrease for intracellular drug accumulation concentration of bacteria and mutations at the target enzyme or target site, as well as resistance or multiple drug resistance caused by pLasmid mediation.Conclusion:Drug resistance against quinolone is increased annually.from the perspective of resistance mechanism, except drug sensitivity test should be performed in clinical practice, medicated drugs and dosage should also be optimized according to PK/PD parameters.%目的:了解喹诺酮类药对临床常见病原菌的耐药性变迁及耐药机制.方法:采用法国Vitek-32 AMS分析仪进行鉴定,纸片扩散法进行药敏试验;根据美国临床实验室标准化研究所(CLSI)标准判断结果,并查阅文献初探细菌耐药机制.结果:依据喹诺酮类药对常见G+和G-菌4060株耐药性的监测结果,耐药性均有不同程度增加,其耐药性排序为环丙沙星>左氧氟沙星>加替沙星>莫西沙星,环丙沙星对MRSA和MRCNS的耐药率分别超过95.0%和70.0%,已高度耐

  17. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance; interactions between human, animal and environmental ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent ePOIREL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is being increasingly reported among human but also veterinary isolates during the last two to three decades, very likely as a consequence of the large clinical usage of those antibiotics. Even if the principle mechanisms of resistance to quinolones are chromosome-encoded, due to modifications of molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux, the emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR has been reported since 1998. Although these PMQR determinants confer low-level resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, they are a favorable background for selection of additional chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms. Different transferable mechanisms have been identified, corresponding to the production of Qnr proteins, of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6’-Ib-cr, or of the QepA-type or OqxAB-type efflux pumps. Qnr proteins protect target enzymes (DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition (mostly nalidixic acid. The AAC(6’-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Finally, the QepA and OqxAB efflux pumps extrude fluoroquinolones from the bacterial cell. A series of studies have identified the environment to be a reservoir of PMQR genes, with farm animals and aquatic habitats being significantly involved. In addition, the origin of the qnr genes has been identified, corresponding to the waterborne species Shewanella sp. Altogether, the recent observations suggest that the aquatic environment might constitute the original source of PMQR genes, that would secondly spread among animal or human isolates.

  18. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among non-typhi Salmonella enterica isolates, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We determined the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms among non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) spp. isolates from humans, food animals, and retail meat in the United States in 2007. Fifty-one (2.4%) of human isolates (n=2165), 5 (1.6%) of isolates from animal isolates (n=1915) an...

  19. 耐碳青霉烯类与喹诺酮类肺炎克雷伯菌的耐药机制研究%Investigation of resistant mechanism of carbapenem and quinolone-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红波; 黄东标; 王祥德

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the resistant mechanism of 20 strains of carbapenem-and quinolone-resistant K lebsiella pneumoniae .METHODS Totally 20 strains of K . pneumoniae were isolated from sputum specimens from inpatients in a third-grade hospital from Jan .to Jun .2012 .The modified Hodge test was performed to detect activities of carbapenemase ,then 40 kinds of class A-D beta-lactamase genes and quinolone-resistant genes were analyzed by PCR .RESULTS The modified Hodge test showed all 20 strains had carbapenemase activities ,TEM-1 and K PC-2 were all positive ,and TCC→ATC mutation emerged in 83rd codon of gyrA (amino acid sequence S→I) ,and GAC → GGC mutation emerged in 87th codon of gyrA (amino acid sequence D → G) .CONCLUSION Carrying K PC-2 and mutations of QRDR in gyrA was the resistant mechanism of carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant K . pneumoniae ,and the coincidence of phenotypes and genotypes suggested that hospital infection existed .%目的:研究20株耐碳青霉烯类与喹诺酮类肺炎克雷伯菌的耐药机制。方法20株肺炎克雷伯菌分离自2012年1-6月医院住院患者的痰液样本,采用改良的 Hodge试验检测碳青霉烯酶活性,再用PCR法检测A~D类40种β-内酰胺酶基因和喹诺酮类耐药基因。结果20株肺炎克雷伯菌经改良的Hodge试验检测均有碳青霉烯酶活性,均检出 TEM-1和 K PC-2型β-内酰胺酶基因,出现 gyrA基因第83位密码子 TCC→ATC突变(氨基酸序列S→I),第87位密码子GAC→GGC突变(氨基酸序列D→G )。结论肺炎克雷伯菌携带 K PC-2型β-内酰胺酶基因和存在 gyrA基因QRDR区突变,其是碳青霉烯类与喹诺酮类药物的耐药机制,肺炎克雷伯菌药敏表型与耐药基因型相同疑似医院感染。

  20. Evaluation of quinolones for use in detection of determinants of acquired quinolone resistance, including the new transmissible resistance mechanisms qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')Ib-cr, in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and determinations of wild-type distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, L M; Aarestrup, F M

    2009-09-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family is mostly due to mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes. However, transferable genes encoding quinolone resistance have recently been described. The current methods for susceptibility testing are not adapted to the detection of new resistance determinants, which confer low levels of resistance. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of the screening of the different quinolones by disk diffusion assays and MIC determinations to detect fluoroquinolone resistance. Sixty-nine Escherichia coli strains and 62 Salmonella strains, including strains fully susceptible to quinolones, nalidixic acid-resistant strains, strains with resistance to fluoroquinolones (resistant to nalidixic acid), and strains showing low-level resistance to fluoroquinolones conferred by transferable quinolone resistance genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')Ib-cr, were selected. Disk diffusion assays and MIC determinations by the agar dilution method were performed, according to CLSI standards, with nalidixic acid, flumequine, oxolinic acid, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The MIC of levofloxacin was determined by an Etest. The results showed a trimodal distribution of the MICs for both E. coli and Salmonella. The MIC distributions for the isolates varied with the compounds tested. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance by MIC testing or disk diffusion assay was not efficient for the detection of some of the isolates carrying qnr and aac(6')Ib-cr. Transferable resistance genes would best be detected by testing for the MIC of ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin, as testing for the MICs of the other compounds would fail to detect isolates carrying aac(6')Ib-cr because the enzyme produced is able to reduce the activities of these two compounds only due to their chemical structures. In conclusion, screening with nalidixic

  1. Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Poultry Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Röderová, Magdaléna; Pudová, Vendula; Hanulík, Vojtěch; Halová, Dana; Julínková, Pavla; Dolejská, Monika; Papoušek, Ivo; Bardoň, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing bacterial resistance to quinolone antibiotics is apparent in both humans and animals. For humans, a potential source of resistant bacteria may be animals or their products entering the human food chain, for example poultry. Between July 2013 and September 2014, samples were collected and analyzed in the Moravian regions of the Czech Republic to isolate the bacterium Escherichia coli. As a result, 212 E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 126 environmental isolates from poultry houses and 86 isolates from cloacal swabs from market-weight turkeys. Subsequently, the E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to selected antibiotics. Resistance of the poultry isolates to quinolones ranged from 53% to 73%. Additionally, the presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes was studied. The genes were confirmed in 58% of the tested strains. The data on resistance of isolates from poultry were compared with results of resistance tests in human isolates obtained in the same regions. The high levels of resistance determined by both phenotyping and genotyping methods and reported in the present study confirm the fact that the use of fluoroquinolones in poultry should be closely monitored. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  2. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: a systematic review with a focus on Mediterranean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanat, B; Rodríguez-Martínez, J-M; Touati, A

    2017-03-01

    Quinolones are a family of synthetic broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. These molecules have been widely prescribed to treat various infectious diseases and have been classified into several generations based on their spectrum of activity. Quinolones inhibit bacterial DNA synthesis by interfering with the action of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Mutations in the genes encoding these targets are the most common mechanisms of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Moreover, three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998 and include Qnr proteins, the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib-cr, and plasmid-mediated efflux pumps QepA and OqxAB. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistance (extended spectrum beta-lactamases [ESBLs] and plasmidic AmpC [pAmpC] ß-lactamases) and can transfer multidrug resistance. The PMQR determinants are disseminated in Mediterranean countries with prevalence relatively high depending on the sources and the regions, highlighting the necessity of long-term surveillance for the future monitoring of trends in the occurrence of PMQR genes.

  3. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) Genes and Class 1 Integrons in Quinolone-Resistant Marine Bacteria and Clinical Isolates of Escherichia coli from an Aquacultural Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2017-06-23

    Antimicrobial usage in aquaculture selects for antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in the marine environment. The relevance of this selection to terrestrial animal and human health is unclear. Quinolone-resistance genes qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS were chromosomally located in four randomly chosen quinolone-resistant marine bacteria isolated from an aquacultural area with heavy quinolone usage. In quinolone-resistant uropathogenic clinical isolates of Escherichia coli from a coastal area bordering the same aquacultural region, qnrA was chromosomally located in two E. coli isolates, while qnrB and qnrS were located in small molecular weight plasmids in two other E. coli isolates. Three quinolone-resistant marine bacteria and three quinolone-resistant E. coli contained class 1 integrons but without physical association with PMQR genes. In both marine bacteria and uropathogenic E. coli, class 1 integrons had similar co-linear structures, identical gene cassettes, and similarities in their flanking regions. In a Marinobacter sp. marine isolate and in one E. coli clinical isolate, sequences immediately upstream of the qnrS gene were homologous to comparable sequences of numerous plasmid-located qnrS genes while downstream sequences were different. The observed commonality of quinolone resistance genes and integrons suggests that aquacultural use of antimicrobials might facilitate horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in diverse ecological locations.

  4. Drug interactions with Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV: biochemical basis for quinolone action and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Wang, Pengfei; Kerns, Robert J; Graves, David E; Turnbough, Charles L; Osheroff, Neil

    2012-01-10

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is considered a serious threat as a bioweapon. The drugs most commonly used to treat anthrax are quinolones, which act by increasing the levels of DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IV and gyrase. Quinolone resistance most often is associated with specific serine mutations in these enzymes. Therefore, to determine the basis for quinolone action and resistance, we characterized wild-type B. anthracis topoisomerase IV, the GrlA(S81F) and GrlA(S81Y) quinolone-resistant mutants, and the effects of quinolones and a related quinazolinedione on these enzymes. Ser81 is believed to anchor a water-Mg(2+) bridge that coordinates quinolones to the enzyme through the C3/C4 keto acid. Consistent with this hypothesized bridge, ciprofloxacin required increased Mg(2+) concentrations to support DNA cleavage by GrlA(S81F) topoisomerase IV. The three enzymes displayed similar catalytic activities in the absence of drugs. However, the resistance mutations decreased the affinity of topoisomerase IV for ciprofloxacin and other quinolones, diminished quinolone-induced inhibition of DNA religation, and reduced the stability of the enzyme-quinolone-DNA ternary complex. Wild-type DNA cleavage levels were generated by mutant enzymes at high quinolone concentrations, suggesting that increased drug potency could overcome resistance. 8-Methyl-quinazoline-2,4-dione, which lacks the quinolone keto acid (and presumably does not require the water-Mg(2+) bridge to mediate protein interactions), was more potent than quinolones against wild-type topoisomerase IV and was equally efficacious. Moreover, it maintained high potency and efficacy against the mutant enzymes, effectively inhibited DNA religation, and formed stable ternary complexes. Our findings provide an underlying biochemical basis for the ability of quinazolinediones to overcome clinically relevant quinolone resistance mutations in bacterial type II topoisomerases.

  5. Coexistence of blaOXA-23 with armA in quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Luan, Guangxin; Wang, Yanhong; Chang, Yaowen; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Jingni; Deng, Shanshan; Ling, Baodong; Jia, Xu

    2016-03-01

    A total of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected to determine the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and investigate the occurrence of carbapenem and high-level aminoglycoside resistance genes among quinolone-resistant strains. Among 77 quinolone-resistant A. baumannii harbored mutations of gyrA and parC, 41 isolates, which belonged to European clone II, had resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems due to the expression of armA and acquisition of blaOXA-23. Most of sequence type belonged to clonal complex 92. These results suggested hospital dissemination of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii carrying blaOXA-23, armA, and mutations of quinolone resistance-determining regions in western China.

  6. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

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    Giovanna Rincon Cruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers.

  7. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin prevent quinolone-resistance in a penicillin-resistant isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Moreillon Philippe

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuous spread of penicillin-resistant pneumococci represents a permanent threat in the treatment of pneumococcal infections, especially when strains show additional resistance to quinolones. The main objective of this study was to determine a treatment modality impeding the emergence of quinolone resistance. Results Exposure of a penicillin-resistant pneumococcus to increasing concentrations of trovafloxacin or ciprofloxacin selected for mutants resistant to these drugs. In the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin, development of trovafloxacin-resistance and high-level ciprofloxacin-resistance were prevented. Conclusions Considering the risk of quinolone-resistance in pneumococci, the observation might be of clinical importance.

  8. Impact of mutations in DNA gyrase genes on quinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Changkaew, Kanjana; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid substitutions providing quinolone resistance to Campyloabcter jejuni have been found in the quinolone resistance-determining region of protein DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA), with the highest frequency at position 86 followed by position 90. In this study, wild-type and mutant recombinant DNA gyrase subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. Soluble 97 kDa GyrA and 87 kDa DNA gyrase subunit B were shown to reconstitute ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. A quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay demonstrated the roles of Thr86Ile, Thr86Ala, Thr86Lys, Asp90Asn, and Asp90Tyr amino acid substitutions in reducing sensitivity to quinolones. The marked effect of Thr86Ile on all examined quinolones suggested the advantage of this substitution in concordance with recurring isolation of quinolone-resistant C. jejuni. An analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed the importance of the substituent at position 8 in quinolones to overcome the effect of Thr86Ile. Sitafloxacin (SIT), which has a fluorinate cyclopropyl ring at R-1 and a chloride substituent at R-8, a characteristic not found in other quinolones, showed the highest inhibitory activity against all mutant C. jejuni gyrases including ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. The results suggest SIT as a promising drug for the treatment of campylobacteriosis caused by CIP-resistant C. jejuni. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktepe, Orhan Cem; Aşık, Gülşah; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Biçmen, Meral; Gülay, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Quinolones are widely used antimicrobial agents, particularly for the treatment of infections caused by gram-negative bacilli such as E.coli. As a consequence, quinolone resistance has been increasing among this species in recent years. Bacterial resistance to quinolones usually results from mutations in the chromosomal genes which encode topoisomerases and also the expression of efflux pumps and loss of porines contributed to development of quinolone resistance. However, recent studies have shown that the spread and increase of quinolone resistance may be due to the transfer of plasmid-mediated genes. To date, three groups of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, namely qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA, have been described. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in E.coli clinical isolates. A total of 112 quinolone-resistant E.coli strains isolated from different clinical specimens (84 urine, 16 blood, 10 wound, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage) of which 78 (69.6%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positive, in Afyon Kocatepe University Hospital, Microbiology Laboratory were included in the study. In the isolates, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qepA, and aac(6')-1b-cr plasmid genes were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After aac(6')- 1b determinant was amplified by PCR, all aac(6')-1b positive amplicons were analyzed by digestion with BseGI restriction enzyme to identify aac(6')-1b-cr variant. It was found that, none of the strains horboured qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC and qepA genes, however, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene aac(6')-1b-cr was found positive in 59.8% (67/112) of the strains. It was notable that 86.6% (58/67) of those isolates were ESBL producers. The rates of quinolone resistance among E.coli isolates infections were high in our region and an increasing trend has been observed in recent years. Our data indicated that the presence of plasmid- mediated resistance genes

  10. Cellular Response to Ciprofloxacin in Low-Level Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli

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    Jesús Machuca

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bactericidal activity of quinolones has been related to a combination of DNA fragmentation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and programmed cell death (PCD systems. The underlying molecular systems responsible for reducing bactericidal effect during antimicrobial therapy in low-level quinolone resistance (LLQR phenotypes need to be clarified. To do this and also define possible new antimicrobial targets, the transcriptome profile of isogenic Escherichia coli harboring quinolone resistance mechanisms in the presence of a clinical relevant concentration of ciprofloxacin was evaluated. A marked differential response to ciprofloxacin of either up- or downregulation was observed in LLQR strains. Multiple genes implicated in ROS modulation (related to the TCA cycle, aerobic respiration and detoxification systems were upregulated (sdhC up to 63.5-fold in mutants with LLQR. SOS system components were downregulated (recA up to 30.7-fold. yihE, a protective kinase coding for PCD, was also upregulated (up to 5.2-fold. SdhC inhibition sensitized LLQR phenotypes (up to ΔLog = 2.3 after 24 h. At clinically relevant concentrations of ciprofloxacin, gene expression patterns in critical systems to bacterial survival and mutant development were significantly modified in LLQR phenotypes. Chemical inhibition of SdhC (succinate dehydrogenase validated modulation of ROS as an interesting target for bacterial sensitization.

  11. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

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    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  12. Emergence of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Central African Republic: genetic characterization

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    Frank Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams is frequent in Enterobacteriaceae, due to the wide use of these antibiotics clinically and in the food industry. Prescription of one of these categories of antibiotic may consequently select for bacteria resistant to both categories. Genetic mechanisms of resistance may be secondary to a chromosomal mutation located in quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV or to a plasmid acquisition. The insertion sequence ISCR1 is often associated with qnr and may favour its dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains in the Central African Republic. Findings Among seventeen ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urine, pus or stool between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Central African Republic, nine were resistant to ciprofloxacin (seven from community patients and two from hospitalized patients. The ESBL were previously characterized as CTX-M-15 and SHV-12. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs were determined by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. The presence of plasmid-borne ISCR1-qnrA region was determined by PCR and amplicons, if any, were sent for sequencing. Quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase gyrA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced for mutation characterization. We found that all CTX-M-producing strains were resistant to the tested quinolones. All the isolates had the same nucleotide mutation at codon 83 of gyrA. Two Escherichia coli strains with the highest MICs were shown to harbour an ISCR1-qnrA1 sequence. This genetic association might favour dissemination of resistance to quinolone and perhaps other antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae

  13. Dynamics of Quinolone Resistance in Fecal Escherichia coli of Finishing Pigs after Ciprofloxacin Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; XIA, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; LEI, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-ning

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided in...

  14. In vivo sequential selection of Escherichia coli with topoisomerase- and efflux-mediated misleading quinolone resistance phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smati, Mounira; Emond, Jean-Philippe; Arlet, Guillaume; Tankovic, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    Two mutants of Escherichia coli (V1 and V2) with acquired mechanisms of resistance to fluoroquinolones were isolated sequentially from blood cultures of a patient with cholangiocarcinoma treated repeatedly with ofloxacin; a third mutant (V3) was isolated under ciprofloxacin therapy. All mutants were related clonally. V1 was susceptible to quinolones but with diminished susceptibility to ofloxacin. V2 was hypersusceptible to nalidixic acid but had high-level resistance to ofloxacin. V3 was resistant to all quinolones. Ofloxacin selected for original gyrA and parC mutations, leading to the unusual and misleading resistance phenotypes of V1 and V2, whereas efflux played a major role in the increased resistance of V3.

  15. The mechanism of Quinolone resistance and its research progress%喹诺酮类抗菌药的耐药机制及其研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林惊世; 顾晟琰; 蒋震媚

    2012-01-01

    喹诺酮类(quinolones)药物是人工合成的含4-喹诺酮基本结构,对细菌DNA螺旋酶(DNA gyrase)具有选择性抑制作用,是一种DNA旋转酶抑制剂,干扰DNA超螺旋结构的解旋,从而阻碍DNA的复制,而呈现杀菌作用,故在分类上属慢效杀菌剂.笔者通过检索、查阅相应文献,综合归纳了喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药机制及其研究进展.

  16. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    , and tetracycline. An increasing proportion of DT104 isolates also have reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Methods The Danish salmonella surveillance program determines the phage types of all typhimurium strains from the food chain, and in the case of suspected outbreaks, five-drug-resistant strains...... findings here. Results Until 1997, DT104 infections made up less than 1 percent of all human salmonella infections. The strain isolated from patients in the first community outbreak of DT104 in Denmark, in 1998, was resistant to nalidixic acid and had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones...... with fluoroquinolones. Conclusions Our investigation of an outbreak of DT104 documented the spread of quinolone-resistant bacteria from food animals to humans; this spread was associated with infections that were difficult to treat. Because of the increase in quinolone resistance in salmonella, the use...

  17. Interplay between intrinsic and acquired resistance to quinolones in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, Guillermo; Salgado, Fabiola; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    To analyse whether the mutation-driven resistance-acquisition potential of a given bacterium might be a function of its intrinsic resistome, quinolones were used as selective agents and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was chosen as a bacterial model. S. maltophilia has two elements - SmQnr and SmeDEF - that are important in intrinsic resistance to quinolones. Using a battery of mutants in which either or both of these elements had been removed, the apparent mutation frequency for quinolone resistance and the phenotype of the selected mutants were found to be related to the intrinsic resistome and also depended on the concentration of the selector. Most mutants had phenotypes compatible with the overexpression of multidrug efflux pump(s); SmeDEF overexpression was the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Whole genome sequencing showed that mutations of the SmeRv regulator, which result in the overexpression of the efflux pump SmeVWX, are the cause of quinolone resistance in mutants not overexpressing SmeDEF. These results indicate that the development of mutation-driven antibiotic resistance is highly dependent on the intrinsic resistome, which, at least for synthetic antibiotics such as quinolones, did not develop as a response to the presence of antibiotics in the natural ecosystems in which S. maltophilia evolved.

  18. Structure based in silico analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Dahiya, Sushila; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase.

  19. Structure Based In Silico Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase. PMID:25962113

  20. Structure based in silico analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    Full Text Available Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase.

  1. Introduction of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli to Swedish broiler population by imported breeding animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Stefan; Guillard, Thomas; Landén, Annica; Bengtsson, Björn; Nilsson, Oskar

    2016-10-15

    During recent years a rapid increase of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli have been noted in the Swedish broiler population, despite the lack of a known selective pressure. The current study wanted to investigate if imported breeding birds could be a source for the quinolone resistant E. coli. The occurrence of quinolone resistant E. coli was investigated, using selective cultivation with nalidixic acid, in grand-parent birds on arrival to Sweden and their progeny. In addition, sampling in hatcheries and empty cleaned poultry houses was performed. Clonality of isolates was investigated using a 10-loci multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). To identify the genetic basis for the resistance isolates were also analysed for occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and characterization of chromosomal mutations. E. coli resistant to nalidixic acid occurred in grandparent birds imported to Sweden for breeding purposes. Four predominant MLVA types were identified in isolates from grandparent birds, parent birds and broilers. However, resistant E. coli with identical MLVA patterns were also present in hatcheries and poultry houses suggesting that the environment plays a role in the occurrence. Nalidixic acid resistance was due to a mutation in the gyrA gene and no PMQR could be identified. The occurrence of identical clones in all levels of the production pyramid points to that quinolone resistant E. coli can be introduced through imported breeding birds and spread by vertical transmission to all levels of the broiler production pyramid.

  2. The Impact of Antibiotic Stewardship Programs in Combating Quinolone Resistance: A Systematic Review and Recommendations for More Efficient Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitiriga, Vasiliki; Vrioni, Georgia; Saroglou, George; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2017-04-01

    Quinolones are among the most commonly prescribed antibiotics worldwide. A clear relationship has been demonstrated between excessive quinolone use and the steady increase in the incidence of quinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens, both in hospital and community sites. In addition, exposure to quinolones has been associated with colonization and infection with healthcare-associated pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in hospitalized patients. Therefore, the management of quinolone prescribing in hospitals through antibiotic stewardship programs is considered crucial. Although suggestions have been made by previous studies on the positive impact of stewardship programs concerning the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria at hospital level, the association of quinolone-targeted interventions with reduction of quinolone resistance is vague. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the impact of stewardship interventions on quinolone resistance rates and healthcare-associated infections, through a literature review using systematic methods to identify and select the appropriate studies. Recommendations for improvements in quinolone-targeted stewardship programs are also proposed. Efforts in battling quinolone resistance should combine various interventions such as restriction formulary policies, prospective audits with feedback to prescribers, infection prevention and control measures, prompt detection of low-level resistance, educational programs, and guidelines for optimal quinolone usage. However, the effectiveness of such strategies should be assessed by properly designed and conducted clinical trials. Finally, novel approaches in diagnostic stewardship for rapidly detecting bacterial resistance, including PCR-based techniques, mass spectrometry, microarrays, and whole-genome sequencing as well as the prompt investigation on the clonality of quinolone-resistant strains, will strengthen our

  3. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance.

  4. Antimalarial therapy selection for quinolone resistance among Escherichia coli in the absence of quinolone exposure, in tropical South America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J Davidson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is thought to develop only in the presence of antibiotic pressure. Here we show evidence to suggest that fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli has developed in the absence of fluoroquinolone use. METHODS: Over 4 years, outreach clinic attendees in one moderately remote and five very remote villages in rural Guyana were surveyed for the presence of rectal carriage of ciprofloxacin-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB. Drinking water was tested for the presence of resistant GNB by culture, and the presence of antibacterial agents and chloroquine by HPLC. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli was examined after serial exposure to chloroquine. Patient and laboratory isolates of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin were assessed by PCR-sequencing for quinolone-resistance-determining-region (QRDR mutations. RESULTS: In the very remote villages, 4.8% of patients carried ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli with QRDR mutations despite no local availability of quinolones. However, there had been extensive local use of chloroquine, with higher prevalence of resistance seen in the villages shortly after a Plasmodium vivax epidemic (p<0.01. Antibacterial agents were not found in the drinking water, but chloroquine was demonstrated to be present. Chloroquine was found to inhibit the growth of E. coli in vitro. Replica plating demonstrated that 2-step QRDR mutations could be induced in E. coli in response to chloroquine. CONCLUSIONS: In these remote communities, the heavy use of chloroquine to treat malaria likely selected for ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli. This may be an important public health problem in malarious areas.

  5. Overcoming target-mediated quinolone resistance in topoisomerase IV by introducing metal-ion-independent drug-enzyme interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-12-20

    Quinolones, which target gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are the most widely prescribed antibacterials worldwide. Unfortunately, their use is threatened by the increasing prevalence of target-mediated drug resistance. Greater than 90% of mutations that confer quinolone resistance act by disrupting enzyme-drug interactions coordinated by a critical water-metal ion bridge. Quinazolinediones are quinolone-like drugs but lack the skeletal features necessary to support the bridge interaction. These compounds are of clinical interest, however, because they retain activity against the most common quinolone resistance mutations. We utilized a chemical biology approach to determine how quinazolinediones overcome quinolone resistance in Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV. Quinazolinediones that retain activity against quinolone-resistant topoisomerase IV do so primarily by establishing novel interactions through the C7 substituent, rather than the drug skeleton. Because some quinolones are highly active against human topoisomerase IIα, we also determined how clinically relevant quinolones discriminate between the bacterial and human enzymes. Clinically relevant quinolones display poor activity against topoisomerase IIα because the human enzyme cannot support drug interactions mediated by the water-metal ion bridge. However, the inclusion of substituents that allow quinazolinediones to overcome topoisomerase IV-mediated quinolone resistance can cause cross-reactivity against topoisomerase IIα. Therefore, a major challenge in designing drugs that overcome quinolone resistance lies in the ability to identify substituents that mediate strong interactions with the bacterial, but not the human, enzymes. On the basis of our understanding of quinolone-enzyme interactions, we have identified three compounds that display high activity against quinolone-resistant B. anthracis topoisomerase IV but low activity against human topoisomerase IIα.

  6. Distribution of quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines in aquatic environment and antibiotic resistance in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia has become the center of rapid industrial development and economic growth. However, this growth has far outpaced investment in public infrastructure, leading to the unregulated release of many pollutants, including wastewater-related contaminants such as antibiotics. Antibiotics are of major concern because they can easily be released into the environment from numerous sources, and can subsequently induce development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Recent studies have shown that for some categories of drugs this source-to-environment antibiotic resistance relationship is more complex. This review summarizes current understanding regarding the presence of quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines in aquatic environments of Indochina and the prevalence of bacteria resistant to them. Several noteworthy findings are discussed: 1 quinolone contamination and the occurrence of quinolone resistance are not correlated; 2 occurrence of the sul sulfonamide resistance gene varies geographically; and 3 microbial diversity might be related to the rate of oxytetracycline resistance.

  7. Occurrence of (fluoro)quinolones and (fluoro)quinolone resistance in soil receiving swine manure for 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Wantai; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua

    2015-10-15

    Because of the widespread use of antibiotics in animal breeding, the agricultural application of animal manure can lead to the introduction of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes to the soil and surrounding environment, which may pose a threat to public health. In this study, we investigated the status of (fluoro)quinolone (FQ) residues and FQ resistance levels in soil with and without receiving long-term swine manure. Six FQs (pipemidic acid, lomefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin) were only detected in manured soil, with individual concentrations ranging from below the detection limit to 27.2 μg kg(-1) and increasing with the increase in swine manure application rates. Higher load rates of swine manure yielded a higher number of ciprofloxacin-resistant (CIPr) bacteria after spreading. A total of 24 CIPr bacterial isolates were obtained from the tested soil, which belonged to four phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) or were related to nine different genera. Only 18 isolates from manured soil were positive for five plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrD, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in FQ-resistant bacteria from the soil environment. A similar result was observed for the total DNA from soil, with the exception of aac(6')-Ib being detected in the control sample. The absolute and relative abundances of total PMQR genes also increased with fertilization quantity. Significant correlations were observed between FQ resistance levels and FQ concentrations. These results indicated that the agricultural application of swine manure led to FQ residues and enhanced FQ resistance. This investigation provides baseline data on FQ resistance profiles in soils receiving long-term swine manure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The evidence for clonal spreading of quinolone resistance with a particular clonal complex of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, J; Cadež, N; Lušicky, M; Nielsen, E Møller; Ocepek, M; Raspor, P; Možina, S Smole

    2014-12-01

    Campylobacter is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and it represents a significant public health risk of increasing severity due to its escalating resistance to clinically important quinolone and macrolide antibiotics. As a zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter is transmitted along the food chain and naturally cycles from environmental waters, feedstuff, animals and food to humans. We determined antibiotic resistance profiles, as well as multilocus sequence types and flaA-SVR types for 52 C. jejuni isolated in Slovenia from human, animal, raw and cured chicken meat and water samples. Twenty-eight different sequence types, arranged in ten clonal complexes, three new allele types and five new sequence types were identified, indicating the relatively high diversity in a small group of strains. The assignment of strains from different sources to the same clonal complexes indicates their transmission along the food supply chain. The most prevalent clonal complex was CC21, which was also the genetic group with 95% of quinolone-resistant strains. Based on the genetic relatedness of these quinolone-resistant strains identified by polymerase chain reaction with a mismatch amplification mutation assay and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene, we conclude that the high resistance prevalence observed indicates the local clonal spread of quinolone resistance with CC21.

  9. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6 ')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6 ')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6 ')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source.

  10. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  11. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Veldman, K.T.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional dat

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Veldman, K.T.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional dat

  13. 铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类药物耐药的分子机制研究%Study on the molecular resistant mechanisms to quinolones in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈树林; 陈利达; 陈茶; 黄彬; 屈平华; 吴强贵

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular resistant mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to quinolones antibiotics and provide basis for clinical anti — infection therapy. Methods: The chromosome mediated — quinolones resistant genes gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and plasmid — mediated resistant genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, qepA, oqxA, oqxB and aac(6') -Ib-cr were determinated by PCR. DNA sequencing was used for identification of gyrA and parC. Results: In 98 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to ciprofloxacin, parE, qnrC and qnrS were not detected. The positive rates of gyrA, gyrB, parC, qnrA, qnrB, qnrD, qepA, aac(6') -1b -cr, oqxA and oqxB were 96.9% , 87.8% , 75.5% , 31.6% , 86.7% , 15. 3% , 11.2% , 53.1 % , 8.2% and 26.5% , respectively. By sequence analysis, 84 strains (85.7% ) had gyrA or parC mutation. 90 strains (91. 8% ) contained plasmid-mediated resistant genes, among them the positive rate of qnrB and aac (6') -Ib-cr were higher than other genes. Conclusion: Chromosome - mediated gene mutation as well as plasmid — mediated qnr, qepA, oqxAB and aac(6') — Ib — cr may be the main mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginos resistance to quinolones. qnrB and qnrD were found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa the first time.%目的:研究铜绿假单胞菌对喹诺酮类药物耐药的分子机制,为临床抗感染治疗提供依据.方法:用PCR法检测染色体介导的喹诺酮类耐药基因gyrA、gyrB、parC、parE和质粒介导的喹诺酮类耐药基因qnrA、qnrB、qnrC、qnrD、qnrS、qepA、aac(6’)-Ib-cr、oqxA和oqxB,并对gyrA和parC阳性结果进行测序分析.结果:98株耐环丙沙星的铜绿假单胞菌中未检出parE、qnrC和qnrS基因.gyrA、gyrB和parC的阳性率分别为96.9%、87.8%和75.5%.测序证实84株菌(85.7%)发生gyrA或parC基因突变.90株菌(91.8%)携带质粒介导的耐药基因,qnrA、qnrB、qnrD、qepA、aac(6’)-Ib-cr、oqxA和oqxB的阳性率分别为31.6%、86.7%、15.3%、11.2%、53.1

  14. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  15. [Bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin and other new quinolones against antimicrobial resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Intetsu; Kanayama, Akiko; Hasegawa, Miyuki; Kaneko, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a study assess the bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin (STFX) against Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from respiratory infections including penicillin-resistant (PRSP) isolates, macrolide resistant isolates possessing mefA and ermB resistance genes and quinolone resistance isolates with mutations in gyrA or gyrA and parC. Each isolate tested was grown in hemosupplemented Mueller-Hinton broth and adjusted to approximately 10(5) CFU/ mL. Isolates were than exposed to a Cmax antimicrobial blood level that would be attained with routine antimicrobial administration and an antimicrobial level that would be expected 4 hours post-Cmax (Cmax 4hr). Bactericidal activity was measured for up to 8 hours. Excluding a subset of S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), all quinolones showed bactericidal activity at Cmax and Cmax 4 hr antimicrobial concentrations for up to 8 hours. Against S. pneumoniae isolates with either gyrA or gyrA and parC mutations, bactericidal activity of STFX was shown for up to 4 to 8 hours following Cmax based on a limit of detection of quinolones tested where adjusted to concentrations corresponding to their MICs, STFX showed the most rapid bactericidal activity against PRSP. This rapid bactericidal activity in PRSP is a key to the effectiveness of STFX. Our findings show that beyond inhibition of bacterial replication by blocking their DNA replication pathway and synthesis of proteins, STFX demonstrated characteristics contributing to greater bactericidal activity compared to GRNX. In conclusion, of the newer quinolones, STFX showed the strongest bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the QRDR which indicates that it may show the most effective clinical utility among the quinolones in respiratory infections.

  16. In vitro selection of resistance in haemophilus influenzae by 4 quinolones and 5 beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catherine; Kosowska, Klaudia; Bozdogan, Bülent; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; McGhee, Pamela; Jacobs, Michael R; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2004-05-01

    We tested abilities of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefdinir to select resistant mutants in 5 beta-lactamase positive and 5 beta-lactamase negative Haemophilus influenzae strains by single and multistep methodology. In multistep tests, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefpodoxime exposure did not cause >4-fold minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase after 50 days. One mutant selected by cefdinir had one amino acid substitution (Gly490Glu) in PBP3 and became resistant to cefdinir. Cefixime exposure caused 8-fold MIC-increase in 1 strain with TEM but the mutant remained cefixime susceptible and had no alteration in PBP3 or TEM. Among 10 strains tested, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin caused >4-fold MIC increase in 6, 6, 5, and 2 strain, respectively. Despite the increases in quinolone MICs, none of the mutants became resistant to quinolones by established criteria. Quinolone selected mutants had quindone resistance-determining region (QRDR) alterations in GyrA, GyrB, ParC, ParE. Four quinolone mutants had no QRDR alterations. Among beta-lactams cefdinir and cefixime selected one mutant each with higher MICs however amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and cefpodoxime exposure did not select resistant mutants.

  17. Distinguishing importation from diversification of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae by molecular evolutionary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distinguishing the recent introduction of quinolone resistant gonococci into a population from diversification of resistant strains already in the population is important for planning effective infection control strategies. We applied molecular evolutionary analyses to DNA sequences from 9 housekeeping genes and gyrA, parC and porB of 24 quinolone resistant N. gonorrhoeae (QRNG and 24 quinolone sensitive isolates collected in Israel during 2000–2001. Results Phylogenetic and eBURST analyses and estimates of divergence time indicated QRNG were introduced on 3 separate occasions and underwent limited diversification by mutation, deletion and horizontal gene transfer. Reconstruction of N. gonorrhoeae demography showed a slowly declining effective strain population size from 1976 to 1993, rapid decline between 1994 and 1999, and an increase from 1999 to 2001. This is partially attributable to declining gonorrhea case rates from 1973 to 1994. Additional contributing factors are selective sweeps of antibiotic resistant gonococci and increased transmission from sex workers. The abrupt decline in the mid-1990s heralded an increased incidence of gonorrhea from 1997 to the present. The subsequent increase in effective strain population size since 1999 reflects the increased gonococcal census population and introduction of quinolone resistance strains. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the effective use of population genetic approaches to assess recent and historical population dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae.

  18. Prevalence and characterisation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and mutations in the gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes among Shigella isolates from Henan, China, between 2001 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Duan, Guangcai; Zhu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yuanlin; Fan, Qingtang

    2013-08-01

    A total of 293 Shigella isolates were isolated from patients with diarrhoea in four villages of Henan, China. This study investigated the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA and aac(6')-Ib-cr and compared the polymorphic quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE. Of the isolates, 292 were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid and pipemidic acid, whereas 77 were resistant to ciprofloxacin (resistance rate of 26.3%). Resistance of the Shigella isolates to ciprofloxacin significantly increased from 2001 to 2008 (PShigella isolates are common in China. This study found that there was a significant increase in mutation rates of the QRDR and the resistant rates to ciprofloxacin. Other mechanisms may be present in the isolates that also contribute to their resistance to ciprofloxacin.

  19. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Danish broilers at farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wedderkopp, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aims : To investigate the prevalence of quinolone resistance among Campylobacter jejuni and Camp. coli isolates from Danish poultry at the farm level, as well as for the whole country. Methods and Results : Data and isolates were collected from a national surveillance of Campylobacter in poultry......-resistant variant. Conclusions : Overall, quinolone resistance among Campylobacter isolates from Danish broilers was 7.5% in 1998 and 1999; it was higher among Camp. coli than Camp. jejuni . Genetic diversity among resistant isolates was lower than among susceptible isolates, and certain clones existed in both...... a resistant and a susceptible variant. Some resistant clones appeared to persist on the farms and were repeatedly isolated from poultry flocks. Significance and Impact of the Study : The study is important for the understanding of persistence and dynamics of Campylobacter in broiler houses. It also highlights...

  20. Occurrence of quinolone- and beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli in danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    ). In Denmark, antimicrobial resistance is annually monitored in both clinical and indicator E. coli isolated from poultry (DANMAP, 2006). However, very little is known on the prevalence of resistance at the flock level. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of flocks positive for E. coli...... resistant to quinolones or ß-lactams. Sock samples were collected from 10 broiler parent flocks and 10 broiler offspring flocks. Five pairs of socks were collected from each house. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar added with nalidixic acid (32 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (2 µg...... and nalidixic acid resistances were detected in all flocks. The numbers of E. coli resistant to these drugs were higher in plates from parent flocks than in those from offspring flocks. A broiler parent flock without any history of quinolone usage tested positive for ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, although...

  1. Quinolone Resistance among Salmonella enterica from Cattle, Broilers and Swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility to nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones of Salmonella Dublin, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium isolates from cattle, broilers, and pigs over time in Denmark and to characterise the gyrA, gyrB, and parC genes in quinolone-resistant isolates...

  2. Bartonella bacilliformis, endemic pathogen of the Andean region, is intrinsically resistant to quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Luis J; Flores, Lidia; Vargas, Martha; García-de-la-Guarda, Ruth; Quispe, Ruth L; Ibañez, Zoila B; Alvarado, Débora; Ramírez, Pablo; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the sequence of the region involved in the development of quinolone resistance of the gyrA and parC genes in a series of Bartonella bacilliformis isolates recovered prior to the introduction of quinolones, as well as one clinical isolate recovered in the 1970s, establishing the susceptibility levels to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Five B. bacilliformis were studied: four isolated before 1957, prior to the introduction of quinolones in clinical practice. The remaining strain was isolated in 1977. A fragment of the gyrA and parC genes was amplified and sequenced. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin was established by the E-test method. All the strains were resistant to nalidixic acid (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >256 mg/l). Three isolates presented decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and two were highly resistant (MIC >32 mg/l). All the strains presented an Ala at position 91 of GyrA and position 85 of ParC. B. bacilliformis presents a constitutive resistance to quinolones, which may be related to the presence of Ala at position 91 of GyrA and 85 of ParC. These results advise against the current clinical guidelines recommending the use of ciprofloxacin to treat bartonellosis in some countries of the Andean area. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [The molecular physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying the superb efficacy of quinolones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Quan-xin; He, Ying; Xie, Jian-ping

    2012-08-01

    The fluoroquinolones are the most widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, accounting for 18% of global antibacterial market share. They can kill bacteria rapidly with variety of derivatives available. Different quinolones vary significantly in rate and spectrum of killing, oxygen requirement for metabolism and reliance upon protein synthesis. Further understanding the sophisticated mechanisms of action of this important antibiotic family based on the molecular genetic response of bacteria can facilitate the discovery of better quinolone derivatives. Factors such as SOS response, bacterial toxin-antitoxin system, programmed death, chromosome fragmentation and reactive oxygen have been implicated in the action to some extent. "Two steps characteristic" of quinolones killing is also emphasized, which might inspire future better quinolones modification.

  4. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in typhoidal Salmonellae: A preliminary report from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Geetha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoroquinolones are the drugs extensively employed for the treatment of Salmonella infections. Over the couple of decades that have elapsed since the introduction of fluoroquinolones, resistance to these agents by Enterobacteriaceae family members has become common and widespread. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is mediated by genomic DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid as well as plasmid DNA, the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR facilitates higher level resistance by interacting with genomic mechanism and is capable of horizontal spread. Materials and Methods: During a period of 1-year, 63 typhoidal Salmonellae were isolated from 14,050 blood cultures and one parietal wall abscess. 36 (56.25% were Salmonella Typhi and 27 (42% were Salmonella Paratyphi A. They were all screened for resistance by the disc diffusion method and their minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using agar dilution, broth dilution and E-strip method. Ciprofloxacin resistant isolates were screened for PMQR determinants by polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: All the 63 isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid. Among the 36 S. Typhi isolates 20 were resistant to ciprofloxacin, of which 14 carried the plasmid gene qnrB and one carried the aac(6′-Ib-cr gene. qnrA and qnrS genes were not detected. Ciprofloxacin resistance was not seen in any of the S. Paratyphi A isolates. Conclusion: The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of typhoidal Salmonellae shows an increasing trend of PMQR. The allele B of qnr gene was found to be the predominant cause of PMQR in this study.

  5. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated in North-East Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, B; Mazzariol, A; Kocsis, E; Koncan, R; Fontana, R; Cornaglia, G

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in 756 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae originating from Microbiology Diagnostic Laboratories of North-East Italy. Five point zero two percent of isolates carried a qnr determinant while the aac(6')-Ib-cr determinant was detected in 9·25% of isolates. We also investigated the association between the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and the beta-lactamase genes, and characterized the plasmids carrying these determinants of resistance.

  6. Determinants of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli causing community-acquired urinary tract infection in Bejaia, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betitra, Yanat; Teresa, Vinuesa; Miguel, Viñas; Abdelaziz, Touati

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and the association with other resistance markers among Esherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from outpatient with urinary tract infection in north of Algeria. A total of 30 nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli isolates from outpatient with urinary tract infections from January 2010 to April 2011 in north of Algeria (Bejaia) were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disc diffusion assay, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of quinolone were determined by microdilution. Mutations in the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC genes and screening for qnr (A, B and S) and bla genes were done by PCR and DNA sequencing. Most of the E. coli isolates (56.66%) were shown to carry mutations in gyrA and parC (gyrA: Ser83Leu + Asp87Asn and parC:Ser80Ile). While, 16.66% had only an alteration in gyrA: Ser83Leu. One isolate produced qnrB-like and two qnrS-like. Four isolates were CTX-M-15 producers associated with TEM-1 producing in one case. Co-expression of blaCTX-M-15 and qnrB was determined in one E. coli isolate. Our findings suggested the community emergence of gyrA and parC alterations and Qnr determinants that contributed to the development and spread of fluoroquinolone resistance in Algerian E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Naeem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites—the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1 mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV of quinolones; (2 plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3 chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV. In the case of

  8. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Abdul; Badshah, Syed Lal; Muska, Mairman; Ahmad, Nasir; Khan, Khalid

    2016-03-28

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites--the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1) mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV) of quinolones; (2) plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3) chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV). In the case of chromosome

  9. Comparative Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P>0.05. The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P=0.5444. Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  10. Comparative analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ogutu, James O; Gu, Jiarui; Ding, Fengshu; You, Yuhong; Huo, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenli; Chen, Xiaobei; Fu, Yingmei; Zhang, Fengmin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P > 0.05). The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P = 0.5444). Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  11. 伤寒杆菌耐喹诺酮类机制分子生物学基础研究%A study on the molecular basis of quinolone resistance mechanism in salmonella typhi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖永红; 王其南

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between the gene mutations of DNA gyrase subunit A(gyrA)and quinolone resistance in Salmonella typhi. Methods The genes of gyrA DNA of Salmonella typhi S275(a clinically isolated quinolone susceptible strain)and its spontaneous quinolone-re-sistant mutant RGl were examined in this study with polymerase chain reaction(PCR),restrictive frag-ments length polymorphism(RFLP),single strand conformational polymorphism(SSCP)and nucleotide sequencing. Results Nudeotide sequencing of gyrA in Salmonella typhi S275 revealed that the bases of 128~426 kept highly conservative as compared with those of Escherichia coli KL-16,with only 7.49%difference in the gyrA nucleotides 128~426 between the two strains.Most of the mutations were silent mutations,which contributed to 3 amino acid substitutions in gyrase(including Thr-45→His,Arg-49→Leu and Val-56→Gly),and all these substitutions were located outside the quinolone resistance determining re-gion(amino acids 67-106 of subunit A of gyrase).In comparison with Salmonella typhi S275,a single mutation was found at base 247 of gyrA of Salmonella typhi RG1,with change transferred from T to G and led to a substitution of Ser-83→Ala.The mutation might be responsible for the increase of MICs of nalidixic acid,ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against Salmonella typhi from 2,0.06 and<0.03 to 512,2,and 1 mg/L respectively.Ser-83→A1a was also a newly discovered substitution in gyrA of Salmonella spp.The results of PCR-RFLP and SSCP were in concordance with results of nucleotide sequencing. Conclu.sions The mutation of gyrase at the 83rd amino acid maybe play a principal role in the resistance of Salmonella typhi to quinolone.%目的 研究伤寒杆菌DNA旋转酶A亚单位基因(gyrA)变异与其耐喹诺酮类的关系.方法 应用聚合酶链反应(PCR)检测、限制性片段长度多态性(RFLP)、单链构象多态性分析(SSCP)及序列测定,对伤寒杆菌$275(临床分离敏感菌株)及

  12. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Salmonella spp. Isolates from the Food Chain in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno R; Festivo, Marcia L; Rodrigues, Marcelle S; Costa, Renata G; Rodrigues, Elizabeth C Dos P; de Souza, Miliane M S; Rodrigues, Dalia Dos P

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is an important zoonotic pathogen related to foodborne diseases. Despite that quinolones/fluoroquinolones are considered a relevant therapeutic strategy against resistant isolates, the increase in antimicrobial resistance is an additional difficulty in controlling bacterial infections caused by Salmonella spp. Thus, the acquisition of resistance to quinolones in Salmonella spp. is worrisome to the scientific community along with the possibility of transmission of resistance through plasmids. This study investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. We evaluated 129 isolates, 39 originated from food of animal sources, and 14 from environmental samples and including 9 from animals and 67 from humans, which were referred to the National Reference Laboratory of Enteric Diseases (NRLEB/IOC/RJ) between 2009 and 2013. These samples showed a profile of resistance for the tested quinolones/fluoroquinolones. A total of 33 serotypes were identified; S. Typhimurium (63) was the most prevalent followed by S. Enteritidis (25). The disk diffusion test showed 48.8% resistance to enrofloxacin, 42.6% to ciprofloxacin, 39.53% to ofloxacin, and 30.2% to levofloxacin. According to the broth microdilution test, the resistance percentages were: 96.1% to nalidixic acid, 64.3% to enrofloxacin, 56.6% to ciprofloxacin, 34.1% to ofloxacin, and 30.2% to levofloxacin. Qnr genes were found in 15 isolates (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD), and the aac(6')-Ib gene in 23. The integron gene was detected in 67 isolates with the variable region between ±600 and 1000 bp. The increased detection of PMQR in Salmonella spp. is a serious problem in Public Health and must constantly be monitored. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to evaluated clonal profile among the most prevalent serovars resistant to different classes of quinolones. A total of 33 pulsotypes of S

  13. Prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from human origin in Extremadura, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Palomo, Gonzalo; Hormeño, Lorena; Herrera-León, Silvia; Domínguez, Lucas; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to the quinolones nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and the occurrence of quinolone resistance determinants have been investigated in 300 non-typhoidal Salmonella from human origin, isolated in the years between 2004 and 2008, in 6 hospitals within Extremadura (Spain). Salmonella Enteritidis was the major serotype found among quinolone-resistant isolates, most of which were clustered by clonal analysis to a single clone, which presented D87 or S83 substitutions in GyrA. Eleven isolates presented the non-classical quinolone resistance phenotype (resistance to CIP and susceptibility to NAL), lacking mutations in the quinolone resistance determinant region of topoisomerase genes. Among them, one Salmonella Typhimurium isolate carried a qnrS1 gene in a low-molecular-weight plasmid, pQnrS1-HLR25, identical to plasmids previously found in the UK, Taiwan, and USA. The occurrence of this genetic element could represent a risk for the horizontal transmission of quinolone resistance among Enterobacteriaceae in the Iberian Peninsula.

  14. Emergence of quinolone-resistant strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from paediatric patients since the approval of oral fluoroquinolones in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ohkusu, Misako; Hoshino, Tadashi; Naito, Sachiko; Takaya, Akiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-04-01

    Tosufloxacin (TFLX) is a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent. TFLX granules for children were initially released in Japan in 2010 to treat otitis media and pneumonia caused by drug-resistant bacteria, e.g. penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae. The evolution of bacterial resistance since TFLX approval is not known. To clarify the influence of quinolones administered to children since their approval, we examined the resistance mechanism of TFLX-resistant S. pneumoniae isolated from paediatric patients as well as patient clinical characteristics. TFLX-resistant strains (MIC ≥ 2 mg/L) were detected among clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae derived from children (≤15 years old) between 2010 and 2014. These strains were characterised based on quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs), i.e. gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype, and multilocus sequence type of strains were determined, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed, and patient clinical characteristics based on medical records were assessed for cases with underling TFLX-resistant strains. Among 1168 S. pneumoniae isolates, two TFLX-resistant strains were detected from respiratory specimens obtained from paediatric patients with frequent exposure to TFLX. Both strains had mutations in the QRDRs of gyrA and parC. One case exhibited gradual changes in the QRDR during the clinical course. This is the first study of quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolated from children, including clinical data, in Japan. These data may help prevent increases in infections of quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae in children; specifically, the results emphasise the importance of administering fluoroquinolones only in appropriate cases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quinolone Resistance among Salmonella enterica from Cattle, Broilers and Swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility to nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones of Salmonella Dublin, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium isolates from cattle, broilers, and pigs over time in Denmark and to characterise the gyrA, gyrB, and parC genes in quinolone-resistant isolates......, and one from 1999 were resistant to nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Sequence analysis of the gyrA gene in 37 nalidixic-resistant isolates identified two different base substitutions at codon serine-83 and two at aspartate-87...

  16. Identification of the main quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by MAMA-DEG PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormeño, Lorena; Palomo, Gonzalo; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Porrero, M Concepción; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Domínguez, Lucas; Campos, Maria J; Quesada, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Among zoonotic diseases, campylobacteriosis stands out as the major bacterial infection producing human gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial therapy, only recommended in critical cases, is challenged by resistance mechanisms that should be unambiguously detected for achievement of effective treatments. Quinolone (ciprofloxacin) resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, the 2 main Campylobacter detected in humans, is conferred by the mutation gyrA C-257-T, which can be genotyped by several methods that require a previous identification of the pathogen species to circumvent the sequence polymorphism of the gene. A multiplex PCR, based on degenerated oligonucleotides, has been designed for unambiguous identification of the quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter spp. isolates. The method was verified with 249 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans (141 isolates) and from the 3 most important animal sources for this zoonosis: poultry (34 isolates), swine (38 isolates), and cattle (36 isolates). High resistance to ciprofloxacin, MIC above 4μg/mL, linked to the mutated genotype predicted by MAMA-DEG PCR (mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR with degenerated primers) was found frequently among isolates from the different hosts.

  17. Dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of finishing pigs after ciprofloxacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; Xia, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; Lei, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance.

  18. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n = 62) and human (n = 67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6′)-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6′)-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000 pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored. PMID:26887245

  19. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; Rodrigues, Dalia dos Prazeres

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n=62) and human (n=67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6')-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6')-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored.

  20. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  1. Detection of plasmid-mediated IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase and quinolone resistance determinants in an ertapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-rong CHEN; Hong-wei ZHOU; Jia-chang CAI; Rong ZHANG; Gong-xiang CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of carbapenem resistance and the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr in a clinical isolate of Enterobacter cloacae. Methods: An ertapenem-resistant E. cloacae ZY106, which was isolated from liquor puris of a female gastric cancer patient in a Chinese hospital, was investigated. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by agar dilution method. Conjugation experiments, isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analyses of plasmid-mediated carbapenemases and quinolone resistance determinants were preformed to confirm the genotype. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were examined by urea-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Urea-SDS-PAGE). Results: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MCs) of imipenem, mer-openem, and ertapenem for ZY106 were 2,4, and 16 ug/ml, respectively. Conjugation studies with Escherichia coli resulted in the transfer of significantly reduced carbapenem susceptibility. ZY106 produced IMP-1 metallo-p-lactamase and CTX-M-3 extended-spectrum P-lactamase, and E. coli transconjugant produced IMP-1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant qnrSI was detected in ZY106. Transfer of the qnrSI-encoding-plasmid into E. coli by conjugation resulted in intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin in E. coli transconjugant. Urea-SDS-PAGE analysis of OMPs showed that ZY106 lacked an OMP of approximately 38 KDa. Conclusion: It is the first IMP-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae in China and the first report of a clinical isolate that harbors both blaIMP and qnrS genes as well. The blaIMP-1, blaCTX-M-3, and qnrSl are encoded at three different plasmids. IMP-1 combined with the loss of an OMP possibly resulted in ertapenem resistance and reduced imipenem and mero-penem susceptibility in E. cloacae.

  2. Genetic analysis of a pediatric clinical isolate of Moraxella catarrhalis with resistance to macrolides and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    During the surveillance conducted in 2012 by the Drug-resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease, we isolated a strain of Moraxella catarrhalis that demonstrated resistance to both macrolides and quinolones from a male pediatric patient aged 1.5 years who had developed acute bronchitis. Then we evaluated the susceptibility of this strain to different types of antibacterial agents and conducted a genetic analysis. The results of the susceptibility evaluation showed that the MIC values of azithromycin, clarithromycin, and rokitamycin were >64 μg/mL, >64 μg/mL, and 4 μg/mL, respectively; clearly demonstrating resistance to macrolides. The MIC values of the quinolones levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and garenoxacin were 4 μg/mL, 2 μg/mL, and 1 μg/mL, respectively; indicating decreased susceptibility. The genetic analysis of this strain revealed one mutation in 23s rRNA with a replacement of adenine by thymine at nucleotide position 2330 (A2330T) and another mutation in gyrB at nucleotide position 1481 by replacement of adenine with guanine (A1481G) that caused a substitution of the 494 th asparagine acid by glycine, as being associated with the observed resistance to macrolides and quinolones, respectively. Similar to drug-resistant bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, the prevalence of which has recently increased, the treatment of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis infections is considered difficult due to the development of resistance to different types of antibacterial agents. It is vital to maintain an unwavering focus on the trend toward an increasing number of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis strains and ensure the proper use of each antibacterial agent.

  3. Impact of the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Nakajima, Chie; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Rahim, Zeaur; Kim, Youn Uck; Oguri, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to quinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have generally been found within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) in the A subunit of DNA gyrase (GyrA) rather than the B subunit of DNA gyrase (GyrB). To clarify the contribution of an amino acid substitution, E540V, in GyrB to quinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis, we expressed recombinant DNA gyrases in Escherichia coli and characterized them in vitro. Wild-type and GyrB-E540V DNA gyrases were reconstituted in vitro by mixing recombinant GyrA and GyrB. Correlation between the amino acid substitution and quinolone resistance was assessed by the ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling assay, quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay, and DNA cleavage assay. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of eight quinolones against DNA gyrases bearing the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB were 2.5- to 36-fold higher than those against the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, the 25% maximum DNA cleavage concentrations were 1.5- to 14-fold higher for the E540V gyrase than for the wild-type enzyme. We further demonstrated that the E540V amino acid substitution influenced the interaction between DNA gyrase and the substituent(s) at R-7, R-8, or both in quinolone structures. This is the first detailed study of the contribution of the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB to quinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  4. 感染性心内膜炎患者表皮葡萄球菌感染状况及喹诺酮类药物耐药机制研究%Staphylococcus epidermidis infection status and quinolones resistance mechanism of patients with infective endocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李徽; 王春彤; 赵占秋; 郭晓红; 高春明

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study Staphylococcus epidermidis infection status and quinolones resistance mechanism of patients with infective endocarditis ,so as to provide references for the selection of clinical antibacterial drugs of S .epidermis .METHODS A total of 132 cases patients with infective endocarditis in the hospital from Jan .2014 to Dec .2015 were selected .The blood specimens were collected ,pathogens were cultured and separated ,drug sensitive test was carried ,minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined ,drug resistance of S .epi-dermidis to quinolones were detected ,gyrA gene was amplified and sequenced by PCR ,and the results were ana-lyzed .RESULTS Totally 36 cases of patients occurred S .epidermidis infection in 123 cases of patients ,with the infection rate of 27 .27% .The drug resistant rate of S .epidermidis to norfloxacin was 100 .00% .The length of PCR amplification of gyrA gene product was 275bp .Some of the strains had multiple-point mutations at the same time .CONCLUSION S .epidermidis is a major pathogen causing infective endocarditis .For the majority of quino-lones is widespread drug resistance .Resistant S .epidermidis exists gyrA gene variation .Drug resistant S .epi-dermidis exists gyrA gene variant ,and this may be one of the mechanisms of resistance to quinolones .%目的:研究感染性心内膜炎患者表皮葡萄球菌感染状况及喹诺酮类药物耐药机制,为表皮葡萄球菌临床抗菌用药的选择提供参考。方法选取医院2014年1月—2015年12月诊治132例感染性心内膜炎患者,采集血液标本,培养分离感染病原菌,进行药敏试验及最低抑菌浓度(M IC )测定,检测表皮葡萄球菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药性,同时采用PCR扩增gyrA基因及测序,分析结果。结果132例患者有36例分离出表皮葡萄球菌,感染率为27.27%;表皮葡萄球菌对诺氟沙星耐药率为100.00%;表皮葡萄球菌 PCR

  5. Genotypic characterization of quinolone resistant-Escherichia coli isolates from retail food in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayme, Kaotar; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bouchrif, Brahim; Karraouan, Bouchra; El Otmani, Fatima; Elmdaghri, Naima; Zerouali, Khalid; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the retail food as a possible vehicle for antimicrobial resistant, particularly quinolones resistant and pathogenic Escherichia coli. We determined the prevalence and characteristics of nalidixic acid (Nal) resistant E. coli isolates from diverse retail food samples. In all, 70 (28%) of 250 E. coli isolates studied were Nal-resistant E. coli and 91% of these were multi-drug resistant. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 32 isolates, including aac(6')-Ib-cr (n = 16), qnrS1 (n = 11) and qnrB19 (n = 7). Mutations in gyr A and par C genes were detected among 80% of the isolates, and the isolates showed substitution Ser83-Leu and Asp87-Asn in gyrA and Ser80-Ile in parC. In addition, three different gene cassettes were identified (aadA1, aadA7, aac(3)-Id) in 18%. Virulence-associated genes stx1, eae, sfa, hlyA and stx2 were found in six (8%), three (4%), two (3%), three (4%) and three (4%) isolates, respectively. E. coli isolates of phylogenetic group A were dominant (64%, 45/70). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed none epidemiological relationship between these isolates. The results of this work report the higher frequency of Nal-resistant E. coli isolates from Moroccan retail food samples including MDR and pathogenic isolates.

  6. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica food and animal isolates from Colombia: identification of a qnrB19-mediated quinolone resistance marker in two novel serovars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczmarczyk, M.; Martins, M.; McCusker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-three Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial foods and exotic animals in Colombia were studied. The serotypes, resistance profiles and where applicable the quinolone resistance genes were determined. Salmonella Anatum (n=14), Uganda (19), Braenderup (10) and Newport (10) were the most...... hitherto unrecognized in various Salmonella serovars in Colombia. We also report unusual high-level quinolone resistance in the absence of any DNA gyrase mutations in serovars S. Carrau, Muenchen and Uganda....

  7. Substitutions of Ser83Leu in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Acinetobacter pittii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dan-xia; Hu, Yun-jian; Zhou, Hong-wei; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Gong-xiang

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the mechanism of quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter pittii, 634 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates were collected throughout Zhejiang Province. Identification of isolates was conducted by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), blaOXA-51-like gene, and partial RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB) amplification. Twenty-seven isolates of A. pittii were identified. Among the 634 isolates, A. baumannii, A. pittii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and A. calcoaceticus counted for 87.22%, 4.26%, 8.20%, and 0.32%, respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility of nalidixic acid, ofloxacin, enoxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin for 27 A. pittii were determined by the agar dilution method. Detection of quinolone-resistant determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE was performed for the A. pittii isolates. In addition, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB) were investigated. All the 27 isolates demonstrated a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to old quinolones than the new fluoroquinolones. No mutation in gyrA, gyrB, parC, or parE was detected in 20 ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. Seven ciprofloxacin-resistant A. pittii were identified with a Ser83Leu mutation in GyrA. Among them, six isolates with simultaneous Ser83Leu amino acid substitution in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC displayed higher MIC values against ciprofloxacin. Additionally, three were identified with a Met370Ile substitution in ParE, and two were detected with a Tyr317His mutation in ParE, which were reported for the first time. No PMQR determinants were identified in the 27 A. pittii isolates. In conclusion, mutations in chromosome play a major role in quinolone resistance in A. pittii, while resistance mechanisms mediated by plasmid have

  8. Decay mechanisms of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics after electrospray ionization and ion activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Borislav; Schorr, Pascal; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed experimental investigation of charge isomers of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics molecules formed during electrospray ionization (ESI) with proposed dissociation mechanisms after collisional activation. Piperazinyl quinolones have been previously shown to exhibit erratic behavior during tandem MS analyses of biological samples, which originated from varying ratios of two isomeric variants formed during ESI. Here, a combination of ESI-collision-induced dissociation (CID), differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), high resolution MS, and density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of isomer formation and their individual dissociation behaviors. The study focused on ciprofloxacin; major findings were confirmed using structurally related 4-quinolones. DFT calculations showed a reversal of basicity for piperazinyl quinolones between liquid and gas phase. We provide an experimental comparison and theoretical treatment of factors influencing the formation ratio of the charge isomers during ESI, including solvent pH, protic/aprotic nature of solvent, and structural effects such as pK a and proton affinity. The actual dissociation mechanisms of the isomers of the protonated molecules were studied by separating the individual isomers via DMS-MS, which allowed type-specific CID spectra to be recorded. Both primary CID reactions of the two charge isomers originated from the same carboxyl group by charge-remote (CO(2) loss) and charge-mediated (H(2)O loss) fragmentation of the piperazinyl quinolones, depending on whether the proton resides on the more basic keto or the piperazinyl group, followed by a number of secondary dissociation reactions. The proposed mechanisms were supported by calculated energies of precursors, transition states, and products for competing pathways.

  9. In vitro activity of five quinolones and analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE in Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum clinical isolates from perinatal patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yasuhiro; Nakura, Yukiko; Wakimoto, Tetsu; Nomiyama, Makoto; Tokuda, Tsugumichi; Takayanagi, Toshimitsu; Shiraishi, Jun; Wasada, Kenshi; Kitajima, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Tomio; Nakayama, Masahiro; Mitsuda, Nobuaki; Nakanishi, Isao; Takeuchi, Makoto; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2015-04-01

    Ureaplasma spp. cause several disorders, such as nongonococcal urethritis, miscarriage, and preterm delivery with lung infections in neonates, characterized by pathological chorioamnionitis in the placenta. Although reports on antibiotic resistance in Ureaplasma are on the rise, reports on quinolone-resistant Ureaplasma infections in Japan are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine susceptibilities to five quinolones of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum isolated from perinatal samples in Japan and to characterize the quinolone resistance-determining regions in the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Out of 28 clinical Ureaplasma strains, we isolated 9 with high MICs of quinolones and found a single parC gene mutation, resulting in the change S83L. Among 158 samples, the ParC S83L mutation was found in 37 samples (23.4%), including 1 sample harboring a ParC S83L-GyrB P462S double mutant. Novel mutations of ureaplasmal ParC (S83W and S84P) were independently found in one of the samples. Homology modeling of the ParC S83W mutant suggested steric hindrance of the quinolone-binding pocket (QBP), and de novo prediction of peptide structures revealed that the ParC S84P may break/kink the formation of the α4 helix in the QBP. Further investigations are required to unravel the extent and mechanism of antibiotic resistance of Ureaplasma spp. in Japan.

  10. Increasing resistance to quinolones: A four-year prospective study of urinary tract infection pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhiosefe Omigie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Orhiosefe Omigie, Lawrence Okoror, Patience Umolu, Gladys IkuuhDepartment of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, NigeriaAbstract: A four-year prospective study was carried out to determine the incidence and rate of development of resistance by common urinary tract infection (UTI pathogens to quinolone antimicrobial agents. Results show that there is high intrinsic resistance to the quinolones among strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (43.4%, Escherichia coli (26.3%, and Proteus spp. (17.1%. Over four years, rising rates of resistance were observed in P. aeruginosa (14.6% increase, Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%, and E. coli (9.7%. The highest potency was exhibited by ciprofloxacin (91.2%, levofloxacin (89.2%, and moxifloxacin (85.1%, while there were high rates of resistance to nalidixic acid (51.7% and pefloxacin (29.0%. Coliforms, particularly E. coli (>45%, remain the most prevalent causative agents of UTI while females within the age range of 20–50 years were most vulnerable to UTI.Keywords: UTI, microorganisms, antibiotics, resistance

  11. Resistance patterns to beta-lactams and quinolones in clinical isolates of bacteria from Cuban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzáles, I; Niebla, A; Vallin, C

    1995-01-01

    The resistance patterns to 26 beta-lactams and 8 quinolones of clinical isolates from Cuban hospitals were evaluated using the disk susceptibility test, according to the NCCLS guidelines (1992). The genera studied were Escherichia sp (320), Enterobacter sp (10), Klebsiella sp (90), Proteus sp (10), Pseudomonas sp (90), Serratia sp (20), and Staphylococcus sp (80). Higher resistance to beta-lactams was observed in the genera Pseudomonas, Escherichia and Klebsiella. For fluoroquinolones we found no significant resistance, with the exception of the genus Klebsiella. The most effective antibiotics were cephalosporins of the second and third generations, fluoroquinolones, and non-classical beta-lactams (cephamycins, moxalactam and monobactams). On the contrary, a pronounced resistance was found to penicillin, oxacillin, ticarcillin, ampicillin, methicillin, nalidixic acid and cinoxacin. These resistance patterns correspond to the high consumption of these antibiotics throughout the country.

  12. Plasmid-related quinolone resistance determinants in epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus, uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and marine bacteria from an aquaculture area in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Tomova, Alexandra; Cabello, Felipe C

    2014-08-01

    Marine bacteria from aquaculture areas with industrial use of quinolones have the potential to pass quinolone resistance genes to animal and human pathogens. The VPA0095 gene, related to the quinolone resistance determinant qnrA, from clinical isolates of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone after cloning into Escherichia coli K-12 either when acting alone or synergistically with DNA gyrase mutations. In addition, a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene from marine bacteria, aac(6')-Ib-cr, was identical to aac(6')-Ib-cr from urinary tract isolates of E. coli, suggesting a recent flow of this gene between these bacteria isolated from different environments. aac(6')-Ib-cr from E. coli also conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone and kanamycin when cloned into E. coli K-12.

  13. High-level quinolone resistance is associated with the overexpression of smeVWX in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, G; Ruiz de Alegría Puig, C; García de la Fuente, C; Martínez-Martínez, L; Martínez, J L; Sánchez, M B

    2015-05-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is the only known bacterium in which quinolone-resistant isolates do not present mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. The expression of the intrinsic quinolone resistance elements smeDEF, smeVWX and Smqnr was analysed in 31 clinical S. maltophilia isolates presenting a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range to ciprofloxacin between 0.5 and > 32 μg/mL; 11 (35.5%) overexpressed smeDEF, 2 (6.5%) presenting the highest quinolone MICs overexpressed smeVWX and 1 (3.2%) overexpressed Smqnr. Both strains overexpressing smeVWX presented changes at the Gly266 position of SmeRv, the repressor of smeVWX. Changes at the same position were previously observed in in vitro selected S. maltophilia quinolone-resistant mutants, indicating this amino acid is highly relevant for the activity of SmeRv in repressing smeVWX expression. For the first time SmeVWX overexpression is associated with quinolone resistance of S. maltophilia clinical isolates.

  14. Molecular epidemiological survey on quinolone resistance genotype and phenotype of Escherichia coli in septicemic broilers in Hebei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rong; Huo, Shuying; Li, Yurong; Chen, Ligong; Zhang, Feiyan; Wu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrA of Escherichia coli and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, qnr(qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS), and aac(6 ')-Ib-cr were detected, sequenced, and analyzed. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility tests (using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method) were performed for all 111 E. coli isolates from septicemic broilers in Hebei, China. The results show that the resistance rates were as follows: ofloxacin 99.10%, ciprofloxacin 93.69%, levofloxacin 91.89%, norfloxacin 90.09%, and gatifloxacin 76.58%. Of the PMQR genes examined, aac(6 ')-Ib-cr (36.04%) was the most frequently identified gene in all isolates, followed by qnrS (8.11%), qnrB (0.90%), and qnrA (0%). Of the QRDR examined in the 40 phenotypic quinolone-resistant isolates, compared with the gyrA(+) gene of E. coli K-12, 4 amino acid exchanges were found, namely Ser-83→Asp, Asp-87→Asn, Asp-87→Tyr, and Asp-87→Ala, and all 40 isolates had 1 or 2 exchanges in QRDR. It was concluded that quinolone-resistance in E. coli remains a serious problem in Hebei, China. Therefore, there is considerable local surveillance of quinolone resistance. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance of the qnr type remains rare in Hebei, China, and mutation in QRDR may be the main problem.

  15. Preincubation of pneumococci with beta-lactams alone or combined with levofloxacin prevents quinolone-induced resistance without increasing intracellular levels of levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottagnoud, Philippe; Johnson, Maggie; Cottagnoud, Marianne; Piddock, Laura

    2005-08-01

    Preincubation of pneumococci with sub-MIC concentrations of ceftriaxone (1/16x MIC), cefotaxime (1/8x MIC), and meropenem (1/4x MIC) alone or combined with levofloxacin (1/8x MIC) over 6 h prevents the emergence of levofloxacin-resistant mutants after 96 h of incubation but does not affect the intracellular accumulation of levofloxacin in two penicillin-resistant pneumococcal strains, suggesting a link between the mechanism of action of beta-lactams and the emergence of quinolone-induced resistance in pneumococci.

  16. QUINOLONE- AND ETA-LACTAM- RESISTANCE IN Escherichia coli FROM DANISH AND ITALIAN BROILER FLOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trevisani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of quinolone- and -lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among healthy broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark, sock samples were collected from 10 parent flocks and 10 offspring flocks, according to the procedure currently used for the surveillance of Salmonella in the EU. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar plates added with nalidixic acid (32 g/ml, ciprofloxacin (2 g/ml, ampicillin (32 g/ml, cefotaxime (2 g/ml or ceftiofur (8 g/ml. The -glucuronidase test was performed for verification of presumptive E. coli. The same methods were used to analyse sock samples collected from 6 Italian broiler flocks. PCR with primers for the CTX-M-type extended-spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs was performed on cephalosporin-resistant isolates. While resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid was widespread in both countries, resistance to ciprofloxacin and cephalosporins was more common among Italian flocks. In Denmark, ciprofloxacin resistance was only detected in 1 parent flock without any history of quinolone usage and none of the flocks was positive for cephalosporin-resistant E. coli. In Italy, resistance to ciprofloxacin was detected in all flocks and resistance to ceftiofur and cefotaxime were detected in 5 flocks. Primers specific for the CTX-M-type ESBLs generated PCR amplicons from isolates from 3 of these flocks. In industrialized countries, the poultry production system is highly standardized, and therefore comparable. However, the use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials is particularly limited in Danish poultry production. Accordingly, the results of this study could reflect the different policies in antimicrobial usage between the two countries.

  17. 质粒介导细菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药机制%Plasmid Mediated Mechanism of Bacterial Resistance to Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓波; 宋秀宇

    2009-01-01

    喹诺酮类抗菌药物是临床最为常用的抗菌药物之一,但其耐药的问题也日益严重。细菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药机制有:(1)染色体介导的耐药,包括药物作用靶位的改变(特别是喹诺酮耐药决定区(QRDR)的基因突变]、外膜通透性的下降、主动外排作用。(2)质粒介导的耐药。质粒介导的喹诺酮类耐药(plasmid mediated quinolone resistance,PMQR)由qnr(quinolone resistance,后来更名为qnrA)、aac-(6’)-Ⅰb-cr及qepA(quinolone efflux proteinA)等参与。PMQR机制的发现使人们对细菌耐喹诺酮类药物的机制有了新的认识。

  18. Evaluation of Quinolones for use in detection of determinants of acquired quinolone resistance, including the new transmissible resistance mechanisms (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6')Ib-cr) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and determinations of wild type distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2009-01-01

    resistance genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')Ib-cr, were selected. Disk diffusion assays and MIC determinations by the agar dilution method were performed, according to CLSI standards, with nalidixic acid, flumequine, oxolinic acid, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, norfloxacin...... diffusion assay was not efficient for the detection of some of the isolates carrying qnr and aac(6')Ib-cr. Transferable resistance genes would best be detected by testing for the MIC of ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin, as testing for the MICs of the other compounds would fail to detect isolates carrying aac(6...... would be maximized by screening with either ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin by both MIC determination and disk diffusion assays. Furthermore, a low concentration of ciprofloxacin (1 microg) in the disks seemed to increase the sensitivity of the disk diffusion assay....

  19. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  20. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-05-26

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼ 40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage.

  1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among extended spectrum beta lactase producing Enterobacteriaceae from bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domokos, Judit; Kristóf, Katalin; Szabó, Dóra

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes [qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB] among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodcultures in Hungary. A total of 103 isolates were tested for quinolone susceptibility by microdilution method and PMQR genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. About 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 50 ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. strains (48%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin; 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 47 ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. strains (45%) were resistant to levofloxacin; and 88 strains including 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 48 (47%) ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. were resistant to moxifloxacin. Among the 103 ESBL-producing isolates, 77 (75%) isolates (30 E. coli and 47 Klebsiella spp.) harbored PMQR genes. The most commonly detected gene was aac(6')-Ib-cr (65%). The occurrence of qnrS gene was 6%. Interestingly, qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, and qepA were not found in any isolates. Among 77 PMQR-positive isolates, 27 (35.1%) and 1 (1.3%) carried two and three different PMQR genes, respectively. Only Klebsiella spp. harbored more than one PMQR genes. Observing prevalence of PMQR genes in the last 8 years, the increasing incidence of aac(6')-Ib-cr and oqxAB can be seen. Our results highlight high frequency of PMQR genes among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli isolates with an increasing dynamics in Hungary.

  2. Quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistance in Escherichia coli from Danish and Italian broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    Frederiksberg C, Denmark 2Dipartimento di Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria e Patologia Animale, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università di Bologna, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (BO), Italy   The prevalence of quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark...

  3. Risk factors for quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in feces from preweaned dairy calves and postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, Anna; Waller, Karin Persson; Emanuelson, Ulf; Unnerstad, Helle Ericsson; Persson, Ylva; Bengtsson, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone resistance may emerge in gut bacteria (e.g., in Escherichia coli) of animals. Such bacteria could cause infections in the animal itself or be transmitted to humans via the food chain. Quinolone resistance is also observed in fecal E. coli of healthy dairy cattle, but the prevalence varies between farms, not solely as a result of varying degree of fluoroquinolone exposure. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the fecal shedding of quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) from dairy calves and postpartum cows. Rectal swabs from 15 preweaned calves and 5 postpartum cows per farm were collected on 23 Swedish dairy farms to determine the prevalence of QREC. Risk factors for the shedding of QREC were investigated using multivariable statistical models. Quinolone-resistant E. coli were found on all but one farm. Factors associated with QREC shedding by calves were being younger than 18 d, being fed milk from cows treated with antimicrobials, recent use of fluoroquinolones in the herd, carriage of QREC by postpartum cows, and using the calving area never or rarely as a sick pen compared with often. Factors associated with QREC shedding by cows were calving in group pens or freestalls compared with single pens or tiestalls, purchasing cattle, sharing animal transports with other farmers, and poor farm hygiene. Proper biosecurity and improved hygiene, as well as minimizing fluoroquinolone exposure and waste milk feeding, may be important factors to reduce the burden of QREC on dairy farms.

  4. Quinolone resistance and ESBL/AmpC’s in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves : prevalence and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the prevalence and molecular characteristics of resistance to (fluoro)quinolones and Extended Spectrum Cephalosporins (ESC) in veal calves were described using Escherichia coli as an indicator organism. Ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were used as indicator antimicrobials for quinolo

  5. Quinolone resistance and ESBL/AmpC’s in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves : prevalence and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the prevalence and molecular characteristics of resistance to (fluoro)quinolones and Extended Spectrum Cephalosporins (ESC) in veal calves were described using Escherichia coli as an indicator organism. Ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were used as indicator antimicrobials for quinolo

  6. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump.

  7. Multidrug Resistance in Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Effluent and the Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Varela, Ana Rita; Pereira, Thamiris V; Fochat, Romário C; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-03-01

    This study is aimed to assess if hospital effluents represent an important supplier of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria that, being discharged in the municipal collector, may be disseminated in the environment and bypassed in water quality control systems. From a set of 101 non-Escherichia coli Gram-negative bacteria with reduced susceptibility to quinolones, was selected a group of isolates comprised by those with the highest indices of MDR (defined as nonsusceptibility to at least one agent in six or more antimicrobial categories, MDR ≥6) or resistance to meropenem or ceftazidime (n = 25). The isolates were identified and characterized for antibiotic resistance phenotype, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, and other genetic elements and conjugative capacity. The isolates with highest MDR indices were mainly from hospital effluent and comprised ubiquitous bacterial groups of the class Gammaproteobacteria, of the genera Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas, and of the class Flavobacteriia, of the genera Chryseobacterium and Myroides. In this group of 25 strains, 19 identified as Gammaproteobacteria harbored at least one PMQR gene (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrB, qnrS, or oqxAB) or a class 1 integron gene cassette encoding aminoglycoside, sulfonamide, or carbapenem resistance. Most of the E. coli J53 transconjugants with acquired antibiotic resistance resulted from conjugation with Enterobacteriaceae. These transconjugants demonstrated acquired resistance to a maximum of five classes of antibiotics, one or more PMQR genes and/or a class 1 integron gene cassette. This study shows that ubiquitous bacteria, other than those monitored in water quality controls, are important vectors of antibiotic resistance and can be disseminated from hospital effluent to aquatic environments. This information is relevant to support management options aiming at the control of this public health problem.

  8. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. as carriers and potential tracers of acquired antibiotic resistance in hospital and municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Ana Rita; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-01-15

    Members of the genus Aeromonas are recognized carriers of antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments. However, their importance on the spread of resistance from hospital effluents to the environment is poorly understood. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. (n = 112) isolated from hospital effluent (HE) and from raw (RWW) and treated wastewater (TWW) of the receiving urban wastewater treatment plant (UWTP) were characterized. Species identification and genetic intraspecies diversity were assessed based on the 16S rRNA, cpn60 and gyrB genes sequence analysis. The antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, qnrVC; qepA; oqxAB; aac(6′)-Ib-cr; blaOXA; incU) were analyzed in function of the origin and taxonomic group. Most isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas hydrophila (50% and 41%, respectively). The quinolone and the beta-lactamase resistance genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA, including gene blaOXA-101, identified for the first time in Aeromonas spp., were detected in 58% and 56% of the isolates, respectively, with identical prevalence in HE and UWTP wastewater. In contrast, the gene qnrS2 was observed mainly in isolates from the UWTP (51%) and rarely in HE isolates (3%), suggesting that its origin is not the clinical setting. Bacterial groups and genes that allow the identification of major routes of antibiotic resistance dissemination are valuable tools to control this problem. In this study, it was concluded that members of the genus Aeromonas harboring the genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA are relevant tracers of antibiotic resistance dissemination in wastewater habitats, while those yielding the gene qnrS2 allow the traceability from non-clinical sources.

  9. Antibacterial action of quinolones: from target to network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-08-01

    Quinolones are widely used broad-spectrum antibacterials with incomplete elucidated mechanism of action. Here, molecular basis for the antibacterial action of quinolones, from target to network, is fully discussed and updated. Quinolones trap DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV to form reversible drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes, resulting in bacteriostasis. Cell death arises from chromosome fragmentation in protein synthesis-dependent or -independent pathways according to distinguished quinolone structures. In the former pathway, irreversible oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species kills bacteria eventually. Toxin-antitoxin mazEF is triggered as an additional lethal action. Bacteria survive and develop resistance by SOS and other stress responses. Enlarged knowledges of quinolone actions and bacterial response will provide new targets for drug design and approaches to prevent bacterial resistance.

  10. Dysglycemia associated with quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghandour, Sarah; Azar, Sami T

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is well known to be associated with fluctuations of blood glucose levels. This review aims at exploring the association between glycemic fluctuations and antibiotics mainly focusing on quinolones. Quinolones are associated with hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Several mechanism are proposed to explain this causality.

  11. In Vitro Resistance Development to Nemonoxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Unique Profile for a Novel Nonfluorinated Quinolone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Siddhartha; Makin, Kelly; Twinem, Tracy; Leunk, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Selection of resistant strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae was studied in vitro with nemonoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated quinolone (NFQ), in comparison with quinolone benchmarks, ciprofloxacin, garenoxacin, and gatifloxacin. In stepwise resistance selection studies, a 256-fold loss of potency was observed after three to four steps of exposure to ciprofloxacin or garenoxacin. In contrast, the loss of potency was limited to eightfold after three steps of exposure to nemonoxacin and repeated attempts to isolate highly resistant organisms after four steps of exposure yielded isolates that could not be subcultured in liquid medium. The quinolone resistance-determining regions of the target genes, parC, parE, gyrA, and gyrB, were analyzed through DNA sequencing. Known mutations, especially in the hotspots of parC and gyrA, were selected with exposure to garenoxacin, ciprofloxacin, and gatifloxacin. In contrast, mutations selected with nemonoxacin were limited to GyrA, GyrB, and ParE, sparing ParC, which is known as a key driver of resistance in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. This observation is consistent with previous data using other NFQs, which showed no loss of potency due to ParC mutations in clinical isolates. This apparently unique feature of nemonoxacin is potentially attributable to the structural uniqueness of the NFQs, distinguishing them from the fluoroquinolones that are commonly prescribed for infections by S. pneumoniae. PMID:27267788

  12. Molecular characterization of genes encoding the quinolone resistance determining regions of Malaysian Streptococcus pneumoniae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding the quinolones resistance determining regions (QRDRs in Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected by PCR and the sequence analysis was carried out to identify point mutations within these regions. The study was carried out to observe mutation patterns among S. pneumoniae strains in Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 100 isolates was determined against various antibiotics, out of which 56 strains were categorised to have reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (≥2 μg/mL. These strains were subjected to PCR amplification for presence of the gyrA, parC , gyrB and parE genes. Eight representative strains with various susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones were sequenced. Two out of the eight isolates that were sequenced were shown to have a point mutation in the gyrA gene at position Ser81. The detection of mutation at codon Ser81 of the gyrA gene suggested the potential of developing fluoroquinolone resistance among S. pneumoniae isolates in Malaysia. However, further experimental work is required to confirm the involvement of this mutation in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Malaysia.

  13. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Ciprofloxacin-Nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Blood Cultures in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Young Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:To analyze the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from patients at a tertiary care hospital in Korea.

  14. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Rapid Mutation Screening in Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV Genes in Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Tein Ngoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n=52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N and parE (n=1; M438I. Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16>256 μg/mL. Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes.

  15. 深圳市菌痢流行分子特征与对质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药机制%The molecular characteristics of bacillary dysentery epidemic and the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of plasmid mediated quinolones in Shenzhen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡长争; 舒少为; 陈爱平; 黄国清; 周美容

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the molecular characteristics of bacillary dysentery epidemic and the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of plasmid mediated quinolones in Shenzhen.Methods Clinical specimens were collected in 18 hospitals in Shenzhen form January 2010 to Febuary 2014 and isolation cultivation and serotype identiifcation were applied. The plasmid mediated main type of quinolones genes were detected by PCR. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was tested by Agar dilution method. Transcojugants genotype and drug resistance were tested by joint transfer experiment.Results Serological distribution: during all 126 strains ofShigella, there were 108 (87.51%) strains ofShigellalfexneri and 16 (12.70%) strains ofShigella sonnei. The superiority serotype of shigella flexneri was serumⅣ-C, with 42 strains counted for 38.89%. Commonly used antimicrobial susceptibility situation analysis: the sensitivity ofShigella lfexneri to NAl, FEP and GM were signiifcantly lower than that ofShigella sonnei, while the sensitivity ofShigella lfexneri to LEV, GIP, NOR, CAZ and AMC were signiifcantly higher than that ofShigella sonnei (P all < 0.05). Ampliifcation results and sequence analysis: 3 (2.38%) cases with qnr genes, 4 cases with aac6’ genes, and 1 case with qepA genes were checked out in 126 strainsShigella. Minimum inhibitory concentration: compared with receptor bacteria, the MIC of transconjugants on NAL, GIP, LEV, NOR, GM were improved by 2-32 times. Conclusions The main types ofShigella infection in Shenzhen areShigella lfexneri andShigellasonnei. The superiority serotype of shigella lfexneri isⅣ-C. Target gene mutation is the main cause of quinolones resistance. The quinolones resistance of different types of shigella varies signiifcantly.%目的:分析深圳市菌痢流行分子特征及对质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药机制。方法对2010年1月至2014年2月深圳市18家医院收集的临床标本进行分离培养与血清型鉴定,

  16. Changes of the Quinolones Resistance to Gram-positive Cocci Isolated during the Past 8 Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Chen, Qihui; Yao, Hanxin; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci isolated in the First Bethune Hospital during the past 8 years. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were 50.8%∼83.3% and 79.4%∼81.5%during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci had increased. Monitoring of the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to guide rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  17. Characterization of ESBLs and associated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from an urban wastewater treatment plant in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alouache, Souhila; Estepa, Vanesa; Messai, Yamina; Ruiz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Bakour, Rabah

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was the characterization of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and quinolone resistance in cefotaxime-resistant coliform isolates from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). ESBLs were detected in 19 out of 24 isolates (79%) from raw water and in 21 out of 24 isolates (87.5%) from treated water, identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Molecular characterization of ESBLs and quinolone resistance showed allele profiles CTX-M-15 (3), CTX-M-3 (5), CTX-M-15+qnrB1 (1), CTX-M-3+qnrB1 (1), CTX-M-15+aac-(6')-Ib-cr (4), and CTX-M-15+qnrB1+aac-(6')-Ib-cr (7). A double mutation S83L and D87N (GyrA) and a single mutation S80I (ParC) were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates. In K. pneumoniae, mutations S83I (GyrA)+S80I (ParC) or single S80I mutation were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, and no mutation was observed in ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. bla(CTX-M), qnrB1, and aac-(6')-Ib-cr were found, respectively, in these genetic environments: ISEcp1-bla(CTX-M)-orf477, orf1005-orf1-qnrB1, and Tn1721-IS26-aac-(6')-Ib-cr-bla(OXA-1)-catB4. bla(CTX-M-15) was located on IncF plasmid in E. coli and bla(CTX-M-3) on IncL/M plasmid in both species (E. coli and K. pneumoniae). E. coli isolates were affiliated to the phylogroups/MLST: D/ST405 (CC405), A/ST10 (CC10), A/ST617 (CC10), and B1/ST1431. K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to phylogroup KpI and to sequence types ST15, ST17, ST36, ST48, ST54, and ST147. The study showed a multi-drug resistance at the inflow and outflow of the WWTP, with ESBL production, plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance, and mutations in topoisomerases. The findings highlight the similarity of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in the clinical setting and the environment, and the role of the latter as a source of dissemination of resistance genes.

  18. Study on Drug Resistance and Relative Mechanisms of Chlamydia Trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯淑萍; 刘全忠

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Chlamydia Trachomatis (C.T.) is one of the most common pathogens of human sexually transmitted diseases. Treatment of C.T. infection primarily depends on Tetracyclines, Macrolides and Quinolones, but with the wide use of antibiotics an increasing number of drug-resistant Chlamydia trachomatis cases have been reported. This review summarizes the resistant conditions and the possible resistance mechanisms of C.T..

  19. Association of mutation patterns in GyrA and ParC genes with quinolone resistance levels in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoying; Li, Zhen; Wei, Wan; Ma, Chunyan; Song, Xiaomin; Li, Shufen; He, Wenying; Tian, Jianjun; Huo, Xiaoyan

    2015-02-01

    The quinolone resistance of 19 lactic acid bacterial strains belonging to the genera Enterococcus and Lactobacillus isolated from the natural fermented koumiss and yoghurt were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the quinolone resistance levels and to explore the association of the resistance with the mutation patterns in gyrA and parC genes, as is currently recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Joint Expert Committee in Guidelines for Evaluation of Probiotics in Food for probiotic lactic acid bacteria drug resistance in 2001. The Oxford Cup method and double-tube dilution method were used to determine the quinolone resistance levels of the isolated strains. Generally, all of the 19 strains showed resistance towards norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin when the Oxford cup method was used, whereas the incidence was lower (to norfloxacin 89.5% and to ciprofloxacin 68.4%) when minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoints (CLSI M100-S23) were tested. Furthermore, gene sequencing was conducted on gyrA and parC of topoisomerase II of these isolated strains. The genetic basis for quinolone resistance may be closely related to mutations in gyrA genes as there were 10 mutation sites in amino-acid sequences encoded by gyrA genes in 10 quinolone resistance strains and 14 mutation sites in Enterococcus durans HZ28, whereas no typical mutations were detected in parC genes.

  20. Quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistance in Escherichia coli from Danish and Italian broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    , sock samples were collected from 10 parent flocks and 10 offspring flocks, according to the procedure currently used for the surveillance of Salmonella in the EU. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar plates added with nalidixic acid (32 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (2 µg...... on cephalosporin-resistant isolates. While resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid was widespread in both countries, resistance to ciprofloxacin and cephalosporins was more common among Italian flocks. In Denmark, ciprofloxacin resistance was only detected in one parent flock without any history of quinolone...... usage and none of the flocks was positive for cephalosporin-resistant E. coli. In Italy, resistance to ciprofloxacin was detected in all flocks and resistances to ceftiofur and cefotaxime were detected in five flocks. Primers specific for the CTX-M-type ESBLs generated PCR amplicons from isolates from...

  1. Characterization of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants in High-Level Quinolone-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolates from the Community: First Report of qnrD Gene in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanat, Betitera; Machuca, Jesús; Díaz-De-Alba, Paula; Mezhoud, Halima; Touati, Abdelaziz; Pascual, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to assess the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-producing isolates in a collection of quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae of community origin isolated in Bejaia, Algeria. A total of 141 nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacteriaceae community isolates were collected in Bejaia (Northern Algeria) and screened for PMQR genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For PMQR-positive strains, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the target genes, gyrA and parC, were detected with a PCR-based method and sequencing. Southern blotting, conjugation and transformation assays and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing were also performed. The prevalence of PMQR-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates was 13.5% (19/141); 11 of these isolates produced Aac(6')-Ib-cr and 8 were qnr-positive (4 qnrB1-like, 2 qnrS1-like, and 2 qnrD1-like), including the association with aac(6')-Ib-cr gene in three cases. PMQR gene transfer by conjugation was successful in 6 of 19 isolates tested. PFGE revealed that most of the PMQR-positive Escherichia coli isolates were unrelated, except for two groups comprising two and four isolates, respectively, including the virulent multidrug-resistant clone E. coli ST131 that were clonally related. Our findings indicate that PMQR determinants are prevalent in Enterobacteriaceae isolates from the community studied. We describe the first report of the qnrD gene in Algeria.

  2. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  3. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong-Ya; Sun, Chang-Jian; Yu, Jing-Bo; Ma, Jun; Xue, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX), intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX) and Sparfloxacin (SFX), and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  4. Impact of a short exposure to levofloxacin on faecal densities and relative abundance of total and quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J; Armand-Lefèvre, L; Luce, E; El Mniai, A; Chau, F; Casalino, E; Andremont, A; Ruppé, E

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the intestinal microbiota during antibiotic treatment is well documented but its early dynamic is not. Here, we compared the densities of total Enterobacteriaceae and relative abundance (RA) of quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (QRE) in the first stool passed by patients who had a short exposure to levofloxacin (levofloxacin, n=12) or not (control, n=8). Mean densities (SD) (log CFU/g stool) of total Enterobacteriaceae were lower in the levofloxacin group than in the control group-3.4 (1.6) versus 6.7 (1.7), respectively, p Enterobacteriaceae and the QRE-RA.

  5. Quinolone-resistance in Salmonella is associated with decreased mRNA expression of virulence genes invA and avrA, growth and intracellular invasion and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Li, Lin; Shen, Jian-Zhong; Yang, Fu-Jiang; Wu, Yong-Ning

    2009-02-01

    A variety of environmental factors, such as oxygen, pH, osmolarity and antimicrobial agents, modulate the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) genes. This study investigated SPI-1 gene expression and the pathogenicity of quinolone-resistant Salmonella. mRNA expression levels of the invA and avrA genes, located in SPI-1, in quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Salmonella strains were determined using real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Twenty-five quinolone-resistant Salmonella mutants were derived from quinolone-susceptible strains by multiple-passage selection through increasing concentrations of ciprofloxacin in vitro, while an additional 15 strains were quinolone-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates. Sequence analysis showed no gene deletion or point mutations of nine SPI-1 genes (including invA and avrA) occurred in either the selected or clinical quinolone-resistant strains, while a single gyrA point mutation (S83F) was observed in all 40 quinolone-resistant strains. The mRNA expression levels of invA and avrA were significantly decreased (P<0.005) in quinolone-resistant strains (clinically acquired or experimentally selected in vitro), compared to the quinolone-susceptible strains. The resistant strains also had a slower growth rate combined with decreased epithelial cell invasion and intracellular replication in epithelial cells and macrophages. The results suggest that quinolone-resistance may be associated with lower virulence and pathogenicity than in quinolone-susceptible strains.

  6. Use of antibiotics and about quinolones in veterinary therapy (ro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crina L. Mosneang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Romania are being done extensively efforts in the veterinarians education to emphasize the importance and the European regulations familiar behavior, relating to veterinary drugs prescribing, the issues of residues, of antibacterial resistance and of judicious use of the veterinary conditionigs. In this respect, the present synthesis presents an overview, a useful and necessary bibliographical remembrance to veterinary practitioner about antibiotics and quinolones in particular. Are summarized: bacterial antagonism, methods for studying the effectiveness of antibiotics, the mode of action of antibiotics, the phenomenon of resistance to antibiotics and toxic secondary phenomena caused by antibiotics, continued by information about quinolone-carbonic acid derivatives (quinolones them action mechanism, classification and presentation of the main representatives, indications and contraindications, etc. Referate is conceived in two parts about antibiotics and about quinolones.

  7. Prevalence and Resistance Status of Escherichia Coli in Quinolones and Its Prevention and Cure Strategies%大肠埃希氏菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药现状及防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勇德; 唐志君

    2014-01-01

    喹诺酮类药物(Quinolones,Qs)是一类合成广谱抗菌药,自20世纪60年代萘啶酸被运用于临床医学以后,同时喹诺酮类药物的耐药问题便接踵而至,这使得喹诺酮类药物成为开发最活跃,更新换代最迅速的药物。由于其具有抗菌谱广,抗菌活性强,与常用抗菌药物无交叉耐药,已成为临床治疗感染性疾病的主要药物之一。然而,随着喹诺酮类药物在人医和兽医临床的广泛、长期、大量盲目滥用,使得其耐药性近年呈蔓延增长趋势,耐药程度越来越重,耐药菌株越来越多。其中,大场杆菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药性问题是当前国内外研究的热点。本文综述了大肠杆菌对氟喹诺酮类药物耐药现状及特点,并分析了其耐药机制,简要综述了减缓耐药性的一些防治策略。%The Quinolones is a kind of synthetic wide table antimicrobial, Dixiben was applied to clinic medicine since the sixties of the 20th century the question of resistance of Quinolones appeared at the same time that made Quinolones become and develop the most active, update the fastest medicine. Because it has antibacterial wide tables, the antibacterial activity is strong and have not been cross resistance with daily antibacterial medicines, have become one of the clinical main medicines to treat the infective disease. However, as the Quinolones abuse in people and veterinarian's medicine and clinical y extensively and long-termly and in a large amount led to bacterias resistance to quinolones show a tendency to spread and increase in recent years, resistance degree to be more and more heavy , resistance of strains are more and more many. Quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli is a focus studied both at home and abroad at present . The review focuses on prevalence and resistance status of E.coli in Quinolones, the mechanism of Quinolones resistance in E.coli and provides some prevention and cure strategies

  8. Occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and virulence genes in avian Escherichia coli isolates from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarem, Meradi; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Nayme, Kaotar; Akila, Abdi; Zerouali, Khalid; El Mdaghri, Naima; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2017-02-28

    The emergence and spread of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in poultry products puts consumers at risk of exposure to the strains of E. coli that resist antibiotic treatment. The objective of this study was to define the prevalence and virulence potential of poultry-associated nalidixic acid (NAL)-resistant E. coli in the Annaba city, Algeria. In total, 33 samples of retail chicken meat were purchased from various butcher shops and examined for bacterial contamination with NAL-resistant E. coli. These isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and were also investigated for the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and virulence genes using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic grouping of the NAL-resistant E. coli isolates was determined by the conventional multiplex PCR method. Twenty-nine (87.8%) products yielded NAL-resistant E. coli. Antibiograms revealed that 96.55% of NAL-resistant E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). Resistance was most frequently observed against sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (96.6%), tetracycline (96.6%), ciprofloxacin (72%), and amoxicillin (65.5%). Group A was the most prevalent phylogenetic group, followed by groups D, B1, and B2. The PMQR determinants were detected in three isolates with qnrB72 and qnrS1 type identified. Four (13.8%) isolates carried one of the Shiga toxin E. coli-associated genes stx1, stx2, and ehxA alleles. The high prevalence of NAL-resistant E. coli isolated from retail chicken meat with detection of MDR E. coli harboring Shiga toxin genes in this study gives a warning signal for possible occurrence of foodborne infections with failure in antibiotic treatment.

  9. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants among carbapeneme non-susceptible Enterobacter cloacae.

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    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. METHODS: The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes bla(KPC and bla(SME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs bla(IMP, bla(VIM and bla(NDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs,bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6'-Ib-cr and ARDs (including aac(6'-Ib, armA and rmtB of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7% harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7% carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6% were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1% were ARD positive. Among the 5 bla(IMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80% contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100% harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1% were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9% were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3% were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing bla(NDM-1, bla(IMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported.

  10. Characterization of the quinolone resistant determining regions in clinical isolates of pneumococci collected in Canada

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    Melano Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to examine Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates collected from a longitudinal surveillance program in order to determine their susceptibility to currently used fluoroquinolones and of the frequency and type of mutations in the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs of their parC and gyrA genes. Methods The Canadian Bacterial Surveillance Network has been collecting clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae from across Canada since 1988. Broth microdilution susceptibility testing was carried out according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The QRDRs of the parC and gyrA genes were sequenced for all isolates with ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 4 mg/L, and a large representative sample of isolates (N = 4,243 with MIC ≤ 2 mg/L. Results A total of 4,798 out of 30,111 isolates collected from 1988, and 1993 to 2007 were studied. Of those isolates that were successfully sequenced, 184 out of 1,032 with mutations in parC only, 11 out of 30 with mutations in gyrA only, and 292 out of 298 with mutations in parC and gyrA were considered resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L. The most common substitutions in the parC were at positions 137 (n = 722, 79 (n = 209, and 83 (n = 56, of which substitutions at positions 79 and 83 were associated with 4-fold increase in MIC to ciprofloxacin, whereas substitutions at position 137 had minimal effect on the ciprofloxacin MIC. A total of 400 out of 622 isolates with Lys-137 parC mutation belonged to serotypes 1, 12, 31, 7A, 9V, 9N and 9L, whereas only 49 out of 3064 isolates with no mutations belonged to these serotypes. Twenty-one out of 30 isolates with substitutions at position 81 of the gyrA gene had an increased MIC to ciprofloxacin. Finally, we found that isolates with mutations in both parC and gyrA were significantly associated with increased MIC to fluoroquinolones. Conclusions Not all mutations, most frequently Lys-137, found in the

  11. Quinolone resistant campylobacter infections in Denmark: risk factors and clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Neimann, J.; Nielsen, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    origin) was associated with a decreased risk. Typing data showed an association between strains from retail food products and broiler chickens and quinolone-sensitive domestically acquired C. jejuni infections. An association between treatment with a fluoroquinolone before stool-specimen collection...

  12. Activated carbon adsorption of quinolone antibiotics in water: Performance, mechanism, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hao; Li, Xuebing; Wang, Jun; Lin, Pengfei; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Suffet, I H Mel

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of antibiotics has led to their presence in the aquatic environment, and introduces potential impacts on human and ecological health. The capability of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to remove six frequently used quinolone (QN) antibiotics during water treatment was evaluated to improve drinking water safety. The kinetics of QN adsorption by PAC was best described by a pseudo second-order equation, and the adsorption capacity was well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Isotherms measured at different pH showed that hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, and π-π dispersion force were the main mechanisms for adsorption of QNs by PAC. A pH-dependent isotherm model based on the Freundlich equation was developed to predict the adsorption capacity of QNs by PAC at different pH values. This model had excellent prediction capabilities under different laboratory scenarios. Small relative standard derivations (RSDs), i.e., 0.59%-0.92% for ciprofloxacin and 0.09%-3.89% for enrofloxacin, were observed for equilibrium concentrations above the 0.3mg/L level. The RSDs increased to 11.9% for ciprofloxacin and 32.1% for enrofloxacin at μg/L equilibrium levels, which is still acceptable. This model could be applied to predict the adsorption of other chemicals having different ionized forms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Progress in research of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene of enterobacteria%肠杆菌科细菌质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药基因研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符浩; 夏兴; 陈代杰

    2011-01-01

    继首个质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药基因qnrAl之后,qnrB,qnrS,qnrC和qnrD等其他一些类似基因也相继被发现.另 外,两种质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药机制,即外排泵QepA和OqxAB以及氨基糖苷甲基转移酶Aac(6’)-Ib-cr陆续被报道.本文综述肠杆菌科细菌质粒介导的喹诺酮耐药基因研究进展.%Since the first plasmid-mediated quinolone antibiotics resistance gene (PMQR, currently named qnrAl) was reported, some other genes such as qnrB, qnrS, qnrC and qnrD have also been characterized. In addition, two other plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms: the modification of quinolones with a piperazinyl substituent by the acetyltransferase, Aac (6') -Ib-cr, and active efflux by QepA and OqxAB have also been reported. This review describes the progress in research of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene of enterobacteria.

  14. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrA and gyrB genes and detection of quinolone resistance mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiff, H E; Salazar, L; Guerrero, C; Philipp, W; Huang, W M; Kreiswirth, B; Cole, S T; Jacobs, W R; Telenti, A

    1994-04-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has resulted in increased interest in the fluoroquinolones (FQs) as antituberculosis agents. To investigate the frequency and mechanisms of FQ resistance in M. tuberculosis, we cloned and sequenced the wild-type gyrA and gyrB genes, which encode the A and B subunits of the DNA gyrase, respectively; DNA gyrase is the main target of the FQs. On the basis of the sequence information, we performed DNA amplification for sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to examine the presumed quinolone resistance regions of gyrA and gyrB from reference strains (n = 4) and clinical isolates (n = 55). Mutations in codons of gyrA analogous to those described in other FQ-resistant bacteria were identified in all isolates (n = 14) for which the ciprofloxacin MIC was > 2 micrograms/ml. In addition, we selected ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis Erdman and H37ra. Spontaneously resistant mutants developed at a frequency of 1 in 10(7) to 10(8) at ciprofloxacin concentrations of 2 micrograms/ml, but no primary resistant colonies were selected at higher ciprofloxacin concentrations. Replating of those first-step mutants selected for mutants with high levels of resistance which harbored gyrA mutations similar to those found among clinical FQ-resistant isolates. The gyrA and gyrB sequence information will facilitate analysis of the mechanisms of resistance to drugs which target the gyrase and the implementation of rapid strategies for the estimation of FQ susceptibility in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  15. Characterization of CTX-M enzymes, quinolone resistance determinants, and antimicrobial residues from hospital sewage, wastewater treatment plant, and river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Danieli; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; da Silva Nogueira, Keite; de Lima, Thiago Marenda Rosa; Cardoso, Marco André; Pontarolo, Roberto; Degaut Pontes, Flávia Lada; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are widespread in hospitals and have been increasingly isolated from aquatic environments. The aim of the present study was to characterize extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from a hospital effluent, sanitary effluent, inflow sewage, aeration tank, and outflow sewage within a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), as well as river water upstream and downstream (URW and DRW, respectively), of the point where the WWTP treated effluent was discharged. β-lactamase (bla) genes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) were assessed by amplification and sequencing in 55 ESBL-positive and/or quinolone-resistant isolates. Ciprofloxacin residue was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography. ESBL-producing isolates were identified in both raw (n=29) and treated (n=26) water; they included Escherichia coli (32), Klebsiella pneumoniae (22) and Klebsiella oxytoca (1). Resistance to both cephalosporins and quinolone was observed in 34.4% of E. coli and 27.3% of K. pneumoniae. Resistance to carbapenems was found in 5.4% of K. pneumoniae and in K. oxytoca. Results indicate the presence of blaCTX-M (51/55, 92.7%) and blaSHV (8/55, 14.5%) ESBLs, and blaGES (2/55, 3.6%) carbapenemase-encoding resistance determinants. Genes conferring quinolone resistance were detected at all sites, except in the inflow sewage and aeration tanks. Quinolone resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the QRDR of GyrA (47%) or to the presence of PMQR (aac-(6')-Ib-cr, oqxAB, qnrS, and/or qnrB; 52.9%) determinants. Ciprofloxacin residue was absent only from URW. Our results have shown strains carrying ESBL genes, PMQR determinants, and mutations in the gyrA QRDR genes mainly in hospital effluent, URW, and DRW samples. Antimicrobial use, and the inefficient removal of MDR bacteria and antibiotic residue during sewage treatment, may

  16. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Quinolone binding to the gyrase-DNA complex induces a conformational change that results in the blocking of supercoiling. Under these conditions gyrase is still capable of ATP hydrolysis which now proceeds through an alternative pathway involving two different conformations of the enzyme (Kampranis......, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...

  17. Antipneumococcal activity of DW-224a, a new quinolone, compared to those of eight other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Credito, Kim; Pankuch, Glenn A; Lin, Gengrong; Bozdogan, Bülent; McGhee, Pamela; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Choi, Dong-Rack; Ryu, Jei Man; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2006-06-01

    DW-224a is a new broad-spectrum quinolone with excellent antipneumococcal activity. Agar dilution MIC was used to test the activity of DW-224a compared to those of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gemifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, and azithromycin against 353 quinolone-susceptible pneumococci. The MICs of 29 quinolone-resistant pneumococci with defined quinolone resistance mechanisms against seven quinolones and an efflux mechanism were also tested. DW-224a was the most potent quinolone against quinolone-susceptible pneumococci (MIC(50), 0.016 microg/ml; MIC(90), 0.03 microg/ml), followed by gemifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. beta-Lactam MICs rose with those of penicillin G, and azithromycin resistance was seen mainly in strains with raised penicillin G MICs. Against the 29 quinolone-resistant strains, DW-224a had the lowest MICs (0.06 to 1 microg/ml) compared to those of gemifloxacin, clinafloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. DW-224a at 2x MIC was bactericidal after 24 h against eight of nine strains tested. Other quinolones gave similar kill kinetics relative to higher MICs. Serial passages of nine strains in the presence of sub-MIC concentrations of DW-224a, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, and azithromycin were performed. DW-224a yielded resistant clones similar to moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin but also yielded lower MICs. Azithromycin selected resistant clones in three of the five parents tested. Amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefuroxime did not yield resistant clones after 50 days.

  18. [Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistant Esherichia coli by Rectal Swab Method--Annual Change of Prevalence of Quinolone-resistant and ESBL Producing Strains from 2009 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Yoshitsugu; Sako, Shinichi; Yano, Tomofumi; Kosaka, Noriko

    2015-09-01

    Although most of commonly used antimicrobial agents had been susceptible to Esherichia coli, recently there are a lot of reports concerning about community-acquired infection caused by resistant E. coli. The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of resistant E. coli in normal flora colonization by the rectal swab method. From June 2009 to December 2013, 251 male patients (50-85 year-old, median 68) planned to transrectal prostate biopsy participated in this study. Stools stuck on the glove at the digital examination were provided for culture specimen. Identification of E. coli and determination of MIC was performed by MicroScan WalkAway40plus (Siemens). Isolated E. coli were deemed quinolone-resistant strains when their MIC of levofloxacine was 4 μg/mL or above according to the breakpoint MIC by the CLSI criteria. ESBL producing ability was determined by the double disk method used by CVA contained ESBL definition disc (Eikenkagaku). Of the 251 study patients, 224 patients had positive cultures of E. coli. Twenty-four patients had quinolone-resistant strains and 9 patients had ESBL producing strains. The prevalence of quinolone-resistant strains in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 5.9% (2 out of 34 strains), 13.5% (5 out of 37 strains), 12.5% (4 out of 32 strains), 9.0% (6 out of 67) and 13.0% (7 out of 54 strains), respectively. The prevalence of ESBL producing strains in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 0% (0 out of 34 strains), 5.4% (2 out of 37 strains), 3.1% (1 out of 32 strains), 3.0% (2 out of 67 strains) and 7.4% (4 out of 54 strains), respectively. In 2013, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant E. coli, both quinolone-resistant and ESBL producing strains, were increasing. We have to pay a close attention to the increase of resistant E. coli.

  19. Mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yujiao, Zhang; Xiaojing, Li; Kaixia, Mi

    2016-10-20

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest bacterial infectious disease. It is still a global-health threat, particularly because of the drug-resistant forms. Fluoroquinolones, with target of gyrase, are among the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. However, their widespread use has led to bacterial resistance. The molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported, such as DNA gyrase mutations, drug efflux pumps system, bacterial cell wall thickness and pentapeptide proteins (MfpA) mediated regulation of gyrase. Mutations in gyrase conferring quinolone resistance play important roles and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have shown that the regulation of DNA gyrase affects mycobacterial drug resistance, but the mechanisms, especially by post-translational modification and regulatory proteins, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the fluoroquinolone drug development, and the molecular genetics of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacteria. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis will open a new view on understanding drug resistance in mycobacteria and lead to novel strategies to develop new accurate diagnosis methods.

  20. Occurrence of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance, and Disinfectant Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Ready-To-Eat Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Ye, Lei; Kromann, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    There are growing concerns about the coselection of resistance against antibiotics and disinfectants in bacterial pathogens. The aim of this study was to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone...... resistance genes (PMQRs), and quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (QACs) in Escherichia coli isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products obtained in Guangzhou, China, and to determine whether these genes were colocalized in the isolates. A total of 64 E. coli isolates were obtained from 720 RTE...... meat samples. Multidrug resistance was observed in 70.3% of the isolates. A 100% of the isolates were resistant to benzalkonium chloride. Four types of β-lactamase genes were identified in the 16 ESBL-producing E. coli isolates: blaSHV (9.4%), blaTEM (7.8%), blaCTX-M-15 (1.6%), and blaCTX-M-9 (1...

  1. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni DNA gyrase as the target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Usui, Masaru; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Changkaew, Kanjana; Nakajima, Chie; Tamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones have long been used as the first-line treatment for Campylobacter infections. However, an increased resistance to quinolones has raised public health concerns. The development of new quinolone-based antibiotics with high activity is critical for effective, as DNA gyrase, the target of quinolones, is an essential enzyme for bacterial growth in several mechanisms. The evaluation of antibiotic activity against Campylobacter jejuni largely relies on drug susceptibility tests, which require at least 2 days to produce results. Thus, an in vitro method for studying the activity of quinolones against the C. jejuni DNA gyrase is preferred. To identify potent quinolones, we investigated the interaction of C. jejuni DNA gyrase with a number of quinolones using recombinant subunits. The combination of purified subunits exhibited DNA supercoiling activity in an ATP dependent manner. Drug concentrations that inhibit DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50s) of 10 different quinolones were estimated to range from 0.4 (sitafloxacin) to >100 μg/mL (nalidixic acid). Sitafloxacin showed the highest inhibitory activity, and the analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated that a fluorine atom at R-6 might play the important role in the inhibitory activity against C. jejuni gyrase. Measured quinolone IC50s correlated well with minimum inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.9943). These suggest that the in vitro supercoiling inhibition assay on purified recombinant C. jejuni DNA gyrase is a useful and predictive technique to monitor the antibacterial potency of quinolones. And furthermore, these data suggested that sitafloxacin might be a good candidate for clinical trials on campylobacteriosis.

  2. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of Enterobacteriaceae family representatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Kotsyuba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the basic medical scheme of antibiotics use for treatment of lesions caused by enterobacteria and mechanisms of resistance of Enterobacteriaceae to different classes of antibiotics. It is known that the main mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics are enzymatic inactivation, modification of the target, efflux, violation of conduct through the membrane and formation of metabolic shunt. The most common cases of resistance to beta-lactams among Enterobacteriaceae relate to production of plasmid and chromosomal beta-lactamases, violation of the permeability of the outer membrane, and modification of target penicillin binding proteins. Active release of antibiotics from the cell, or efflux, in Enterobacteriaceae is used for maintaining resistance to tetracyclines, macrolides, carbapenems. Genes of efflux system are localized on plasmids and contribute to rapid spreading among Enterobacteriaceae. Mutations are the basis of resistance to novobiocinum and rifampicinum. Enzymatic inactivation by modifying is typical for resistance to aminoglycosides. Three groups of enzymes are engaged in the process, by adding the molecule of acetic acid, phosphate or adenine. Joining of these groups is irreversible and leads to complete loss of biological activity of the antibiotic. Resistance to aminoglycosides appears also due to inhibition of drug penetration, that is associated with genetically determined mechanisms of electron transport through the membrane. Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is associated with the modification of topoisomerase II and IV which are targets of these groups of antibiotics. Resistance is possible as a result of changes in the structure of the target, breaching of penetration into the cell, and active release from the cell. The highest level of resistance is develope in the case of two- or three-stage mutations in one or the other, or both, subunits in different genes. At the same time, for breaching of

  3. Hydrophilicity of quinolones is not an exclusive factor for decreased activity in efflux-mediated resistant mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, T; Tabata, F; Iwata, Y; Hanzawa, H; Sugawara, M; Ohya, S

    1996-08-01

    The elevated expression of the norA gene is responsible for efflux-mediated resistance to quinolones in Staphylococcus aureus (E.Y.W. Ng, M. Trucksis, and D.C. Hooper, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1345-1355, 1994). For S. aureus transformed with a plasmid containing the cloned norA gene, SA113(pTUS20) (H. Yoshida, M. Bogaki, S. Nakamura, K. Ubukata, and M. Konno, J. Bacteriol. 172:6942-6949, 1990), and an overexpressed mutant, SA-1199B (G.W. Kaatz, S.M. Seo, and C.A. Ruble, J. Infect. Dis. 163:1080-1086, 1991), the MICs of norfloxacin increased 16 and 64 times compared with its MICs for the recipient and wild-type strains, SA113 and SA-1199, respectively. MICs of CS-940, however, increased only two and eight times, even though these two fluoroquinolones are similarly hydrophilic (apparent logPs of approximately -1). No good correlation was found, among 15 developed and developing quinolones, between the increment ratio in MICs and hydrophobicity (r = 0.61). Analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship among 40 fluoroquinolones revealed that the MIC increment ratio was significantly correlated with the bulkiness of the C-7 substituent and bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the C-8 substituent of fluoroquinolones (r = 0.87) and not with its molecular hydrophobicity (r = 0.47). Cellular accumulation of norfloxacin in SA-1199B was significantly lower than that in SA-1199, and it was increased by addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. On the other hand, accumulations of CS-940 in these strains were nearly identical, and they were not affected by addition of the protonophore.

  4. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Animals, and the Environment in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderova, Magdalena; Halova, Dana; Papousek, Ivo; Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Hanulik, Vojtech; Pudova, Vendula; Broz, Petr; Htoutou-Sedlakova, Miroslava; Sauer, Pavel; Bardon, Jan; Cizek, Alois; Kolar, Milan; Literak, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a common commensal bacterial species of humans and animals that may become a troublesome pathogen causing serious diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance phenotypes and genotypes in E. coli isolates of different origin from one area of the Czech Republic. E. coli isolates were obtained from hospitalized patients and outpatients, chicken farms, retailed turkeys, rooks wintering in the area, and wastewaters. Susceptibility of the isolates grown on the MacConkey agar with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) to 23 antimicrobial agents was determined. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and ESBL genes was tested by PCR and sequencing. Specific mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were also examined. Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were performed to assess the clonal relationship. In total, 1050 E. coli isolates were obtained, including 303 isolates from humans, 156 from chickens, 105 from turkeys, 114 from the rooks, and 372 from wastewater samples. PMQR genes were detected in 262 (25%) isolates. The highest occurrence was observed in isolates from retailed turkey (49% of the isolates were positive) and inpatients (32%). The qnrS1 gene was the most common PMQR determinant identified in 146 (56%) followed by aac(6′)-Ib-cr in 77 (29%), qnrB19 in 41 (16%), and qnrB1 in 9 (3%) isolates. All isolates with high level of ciprofloxacin resistance (>32 mg/L) carried double or triple mutations in gyrA combined with single or double mutations in parC. The most frequently identified substitutions were Ser(83)Leu; Asp(87)Asn in GyrA, together with Ser(80)Ile, or Glu(84)Val in ParC. Majority of these isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams and multiresistance phenotype was found in 95% isolates. Forty-eight different sequence types among 144 isolates analyzed were found, including five major clones ST131 (26), ST355 (19), ST48 (13), ST95 (10), and ST10 (5). No isolates

  5. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Human Isolates in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsaneh Shams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib-cr, and qepA among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Kashan, Iran. A total of 185 K. pneumoniae isolates were tested for quinolone resistance and ESBL-producing using the disk diffusion method and double disk synergy (DDST confirmatory test. ESBL-producing strains were further evaluated for the blaCTX-M genes. The PCR method was used to show presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and the purified PCR products were sequenced. Eighty-seven ESBL-producing strains were identified by DDST confirmatory test and majority (70, 80.5% of which carried blaCTX-M genes including CTX-M-1 (60%, CTX-M-2 (42.9%, and CTX-M-9 (34.3%. Seventy-seven ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates harbored PMQR genes, which mostly consisted of aac(6′-Ib-cr (70.1% and qnrB (46.0%, followed by qnrS (5.7%. Among the 77 PMQR-positive isolates, 27 (35.1% and 1 (1.3% carried 2 and 3 different PMQR genes, respectively. However, qnrA and qepA were not found in any isolate. Our results highlight high ESBL occurrence with CTX-M type and high frequency of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes among ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates in Kashan.

  6. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eBernardini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained S. maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on efflux pumps' overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457.. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  7. Quinolone resistance and gyr gene mutations in multi-drug resistant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis%耐多药结核分枝杆菌对喹诺酮类药物的耐药性与gyr基因突变的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽丽; 夏强; 赵秀芹; 刘志广; 万康林

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析耐多药结核分枝杆菌(Multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis,MDR-TB)临床分离株的gyr基因突变特点,探讨MDR-TB对喹诺酮类药物耐药产生与gyr基因突变的关系.方法 采用比例法对耐多药结核临床分离菌株进行氧氟沙星的药物敏感性检测,应用DNA直接测序法检测MDR-TB的gyr基因突变情况.结果 125株MDR-TB临床分离株中,50株对喹诺酮类耐药,耐药率为40%.50株耐药菌株中,40株gyr基因发生突变:其中39株gyrA基因突变,突变率为78%,突变位点包括90,91和94位氨基酸;5株gyrB基因突变,其中4株合并gyrA基因突变,gyrB基因突变位点为500,506,534和539位氨基酸.结论 MDR-TB中的喹诺酮类药物耐药态势比较严峻,其对喹诺酮类药物耐药机制主要与gyrA基因突变有关.%In order ot analyze the characteristics of gyr gene mutations in clinical isolates from the patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and the relation between MDR-TB with quinolone resistance and gyr gene mutations,the susceptibility of the MDR-TB clinical isolates to quinolones was tested by the proportion method.Gyr gene mutations of MDR-TB strains were detected by direct DNA sequencing.The results showed that there were 50 strains with quinolone resistance in 125 MDR-TB clinical isolates.The quinolone resistance rate was 40%.There were 40 with gyr mutations in 50 MDRTB with quinolone resistance.Of 40 quinolone resistant MDR-TB with gyr mutations, 39 mutated at condon 90, 91 and 94 of gyrA gene with a mutation rate of 78%.For 5 gyrB mutatans, 4 were associated with gyrA gene mutations.The mutation sites of gyrB were at condon 500, 506, 534 and 539 of gyrB gene.This study shows that the situation of MDR-TB with quinolone resistance is very serious.The mechanism of quinolone resistance in MDR-TB is mainly in connection with the mutation of gyrA gene.

  8. Activity of gemifloxacin against quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in vitro and in a mouse pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Bédos, J P; Mohler, J; Moine, P; Cherbuliez, C; Peytavin, G; Fantin, B; Köhler, T

    2005-03-01

    Gemifloxacin is a novel fluoronaphthyridone quinolone with enhanced in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. We investigated the activities of gemifloxacin and trovafloxacin, their abilities to select for resistance in vitro and in vivo, and their efficacies in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Immunocompetent Swiss mice were infected with 10(5) CFU of a virulent, encapsulated S. pneumoniae strain, P-4241, or its isogenic parC, gyrA, parC gyrA, and efflux mutant derivatives (serotype 3); and leukopenic mice were infected with 10(7) CFU of two poorly virulent clinical strains (serotype 11A) carrying either a parE mutation or a parC, gyrA, and parE triple mutation. The drugs were administered six times every 12 h, starting at either 3 or 18 h postinfection. In vitro, gemifloxacin was the most potent agent against strains with and without acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. While control mice died within 6 days, gemifloxacin at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg of body weight was highly effective (survival rates, 90 to 100%) against the wild-type strain and against mutants harboring a single mutation, corresponding to area under the time-versus-serum concentration curve at 24 h (AUC(24))/MIC ratios of 56.5 to 113, and provided a 40% survival rate against a mutant with a double mutation (parC and gyrA). A total AUC(24)/MIC ratio of 28.5 was associated with poor efficacy and the emergence of resistant mutants. Trovafloxacin was as effective as gemifloxacin against mutants with single mutations but did not provide any protection against the mutant with double mutations, despite treatment with a high dose of 200 mg/kg. Gemifloxacin preferentially selected for parC mutants both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta S; Pereira, Anabela; Araújo, Susana M; Castro, Bruno B; Correia, António C M; Henriques, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR) dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of fecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of fecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull feces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and feces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull feces (29 and 32%) were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%). Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull feces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes bla TEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A), and tet(B), were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (bla CTX-M-1 and bla SHV-12) and seagull feces (bla CMY-2). Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull feces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived fecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health.

  10. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S. Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of faecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of faecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull faeces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and faeces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull faeces (29% and 32% were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%. Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull faeces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A and tet(B, were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12 and seagull faeces (blaCMY-2. Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull faeces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived faecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health.

  11. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to quinolones%鲍氏不动杆菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝英; 张凤民; 王洪; 孟凡飞; 徐晖; 付英梅; 王金冬; 方文娟; 尤玉红; 钟秀丽

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析临床分离的鲍氏不动杆菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药特点及耐药机制.方法 采用K-B纸片法测定33株鲍氏不动杆菌对喹诺酮类等21种抗菌药物的耐药性;用PCR技术扩增33株鲍氏不动杆菌的gyrA基因的耐药决定区,PCR产物经纯化后测序与GenBank中的标准序列比较,分析其突变情况.结果 33株鲍氏不动杆菌中,8株对环丙沙星耐药,占24.2%,4株对左氧氟沙星耐药占12.1%;对环丙沙星耐药的8个菌株均有gyrA基因突变,导致氨基酸变异为Ser-83→Leu,其中包括对左氧氟沙星耐药的4个菌株;所有对环丙沙星敏感的菌株未出现gyrA基因突变.结论 gyrA基因突变决定鲍氏不动杆菌对喹诺酮类抗菌药物的耐药.%OBJECTIVE To analyze the drug resistance characteristics and mechanisms to quinolones in 33 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Harbin. METHODS A total of 33 strains of A. Baumannii were collected and their susceptibility to 21 antimicrobial agents was determined by K-B disk diffusion method. Quinolone resistance determining regions in gyrA gene were amplified by PCR and the PCR products were purified and sequenced, which were then compared with the standard sequences in the GenBank to analyze mutations. RESULTS The resistance rates of A. Baumannii to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin were 24. 2% (8/33) and 12. 1% (4/33) , respectively. DNA sequencing showed that all the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates had gyrA mutation (Ser-83→Leu in 8 strains), which included the four isolates resistant to levofloxacin. No gyrA gene mutation was found in ciprofloxacin-susceptible strains. CONCLUSION Drug resistance of clinical isolates of A. Baumannii to quinolones is determined by the mutation in gyrA.

  12. Quinolone pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, R A

    1992-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones have broad antibacterial spectra and are active against most Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species. They exhibit excellent oral bioavailability, extensive tissue penetration, low protein binding, and a long elimination half-life. This review compares and contrasts the pharmakonetics of some quinolone antibiotics - especially pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, fleroxacin and lomefloxacin - in terms of their adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and interactions with other drugs and with food. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of these agents in the elderly and in patients with renal or hepatic impairment is discussed. The fluoroquinolones are established as a major class of antibiotics in the treatment of infections but pharmacokinetics factors should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate of these agents to use in individual patients.

  13. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Wild Birds and Chickens in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Lee, Hee-Soo; Kang, Min-Su

    2016-01-01

    A total of 2,423 nonduplicate isolates of Escherichia coli recovered from wild birds (n=793) and chickens (n=1,630) in South Korea were investigated for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. Altogether, 56 isolates with PMQR genes were identified, including 25 (3.2%) from wild birds and 31 (1.9%) from chickens, which were further characterized using molecular methods. Among them, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrB, and qepA genes were detected in 47 (1.9%), 6 (0.24%), 2 (0.08%), and 1 (0.04%) isolates, respectively. The most prevalent gene, qnrS, was identified in 21 (0.9%) and 26 (1.1%) isolates from wild birds and chickens, respectively. The qnrB gene was identified in two chicken isolates, which included qnrB19 and a novel qnrB44 gene. Plasmid isolation and Southern hybridization revealed that qnrS1 was located on a large (>200 kbp) plasmid. The spread of the PMQR genes was attributed to a combination of horizontal dissemination and clonal expansion. The horizontal dissemination of PMQR genes was mostly mediated by IncK plasmids. Molecular typing demonstrated that the majority of the PMQR-positive isolates were genetically diverse. Only one chicken isolate belonged to ST131, which harbored an additional CMY-2 gene. Our findings suggest that the wild birds could serve as reservoirs of PMQR genes and spread them over long distances through migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PMQR genes in Korean wild birds. This study also reports qnrS2, qnrB19, qnrB44, and qepA genes for the first time in animal E. coli isolates from South Korea.

  14. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence: An oxidative-reductive mechanism between quinolone antibiotics and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhead, Matthew S.; Wang, Heeyoung; Fallet, Marcel [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Gross, Erin M. [Department of Chemistry, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States)], E-mail: eringross@creighton.edu

    2008-04-21

    The cyclic voltammetry and electrogenerated chemiluminescent (ECL) reactions of a series of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics were investigated in a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. 7-Piperazinyl fluoroquinolone antibiotics were found to participate as a coreactant in an oxidative-reductive ECL mechanism with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}) as the luminescent reagent. The reaction mechanism was investigated in order to understand and optimize the processes leading to light emission. The optimal conditions included a solution pH {approx}7 at a flow rate of 3.0 mL min{sup -1} with no added organic modifier and application of 1.2 V vs. a Pt quasi-reference electrode (QRE). Fluoroquinolones containing a tertiary distal nitrogen on the piperazine ring, such as enrofloxacin and ofloxacin, reacted to produce more intense ECL than those with a secondary nitrogen, such as ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. The method linear range, precision, detection limits, and sensitivity for the detection of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were compared to that of tripropylamine. The method was applied to the determination of the ciprofloxacin content in a pharmaceutical preparation. The assay is discussed in terms of its analytical figures of merit, ease of use, speed, accuracy and application to pharmaceutical samples.

  15. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli in Central Greece: mechanisms of resistance and molecular identification

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    Mavroidi Angeliki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli isolates, that are also resistant to other classes of antibiotics, is a significant challenge to antibiotic treatment and infection control policies. In Central Greece a significant increase of ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli has occurred during 2011, indicating the need for further analysis. Methods A total of 106 ciprofloxacin-resistant out of 505 E. coli isolates consecutively collected during an eight months period in a tertiary Greek hospital of Central Greece were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and mechanisms of resistance to quinolones were assessed, whereas selected isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing and β-lactamase content. Results Sequence analysis of the quinolone-resistance determining region of the gyrA and parC genes has revealed that 63% of the ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli harbored a distinct amino acid substitution pattern (GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V, while 34% and 3% carried the patterns GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I and GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84G respectively. The aac (6’-1b-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant was also detected; none of the isolates was found to carry the qnrA, qnrB and qnrS. Genotyping of a subset of 35 selected ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli by multilocus sequence typing has revealed the presence of nine sequence types; ST131 and ST410 were the most prevalent and were exclusively correlated with hospital and health care associated infections, while strains belonging to STs 393, 361 and 162 were associated with community acquired infections. The GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V substitution pattern was found exclusively among ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates produced CTX-M-type enzymes; eight the CTX-M-15 and one the CTX-M-3 variant. CTX-M-1 like and KPC-2 enzymes were detected

  16. Novel hybrids of metronidazole and quinolones: synthesis, bioactive evaluation, cytotoxicity, preliminary antimicrobial mechanism and effect of metal ions on their transportation by human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sheng-Feng; Peng, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Rasheed, Syed; Vijaya Kumar, Kannekanti; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2014-10-30

    A novel series of hybrids of metronidazole and quinolones as antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. Furthermore, these highly active metronidazole-quinolone hybrids showed appropriate ranges of pKa, log P and aqueous solubility to pharmacokinetic behaviors and no obvious toxicity to A549 and human hepatocyte LO2 cells. Their competitive interactions with metal ions to HSA revealed that the participation of Mg(2+) ion in compound 7d-HSA association could result in a concentration increase of free compound 7d. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 7d with DNA suggested that possible antibacterial mechanism might be in relation with multiple binding sites between bioactive molecules and topo IV-DNA complex.

  17. Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamases, AmpC Beta-Lactamases and Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Klebsiella spp. from Companion Animals in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donati, Valentina; Feltrin, Fabiola; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization of 15 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) and 4 isolates of K. oxytoca (KO) from clinical cases in dogs and cats and showing extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) resistance. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC genes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance...... patterns observed, including two clusters of two (ST340) and four (ST101) indistinguishable isolates, respectively. All isolates harbored at least one ESBL or AmpC gene, all carried on transferable plasmids (IncR, IncFII, IncI1, IncN), and 16/19 were positive for PMQR genes (qnr family or aac(6')-Ib...... of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella with ESBL, AmpC and PMQR determinants, poses further and serious challenges in companion animal therapy and raise concerns for possible bidirectional transmission between pets and humans, especially at household level....

  18. Identification of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from hospital wastewaters and receiving waters in the Jinan area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ruirui; Ren, Ye; Xu, Hai

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) qnr genes by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolates collected from aquatic environments in Jinan during 2 years (2008.3-2009.11). Genes were identified to variant level by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or sequencing. qnrA1, qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrB6, qnrB9, qnrS1, and the new qnrB variant qnrB26 were detected in 31 strains from six genera (Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp., Shigella spp., and Citrobacter spp.), four of which contained double qnr genes. Other PMQR genes, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA, were found in 12 (38.7%) and 5 (16.1%) of 31 isolates, respectively; while qepA was found in Shigella spp. for the first time. Eight types of β-lactamase genes and eight other types of resistance genes were also present in the 31 qnr-positive isolates. The detection rate for five β-lactamase genes (blaTEM, blaCTX, ampR, blaDHA, and blaSHV) was >45%. Class 1 integrons and complex class 1 integrons were prevalent in these strains, which contained 15 different gene cassette arrays and 5 different insertion sequence common region 1 (ISCR1)-mediated downstream structures. qnrA1, qnrB2, and qnrB6 were present in three ISCR1-mediated downstream structures: qnrA1-ampR, sapA-like-qnrB2, and sdr-qnrB6. We also analyzed the horizontal transferability of PMQR genes and other resistance determinants. The qnr genes and some integrons and resistance genes from 18 (58.1%) of the 31 qnr-positive strains could be transferred to E. coli J53 Azi(R) or E. coli DH5α recipient strains using conjugation or transformation methods. The results showed that a high number of qnr genes were associated with other resistance genes in aquatic environments in Jinan. This suggests that we should avoid over-using antibiotics and monitor aquatic environments to control the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  19. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy.

  20. Presence of quinolone resistance to qnrB1 genes and blaOXA-48 carbapenemase in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martínez, J M; Díaz-de Alba, P; Lopez-Cerero; Ruiz-Carrascoso, G; Gomez-Gil, R; Pascual, A

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented on the presence of quinolone resistance qnrB1 genes in clinical isolates belonging to the largest series of infections caused by OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a single-centre outbreak in Spain. Evidence is also provided, according to in vitro results, that there is a possibility of co-transfer of plasmid harbouring blaOXA-48 with an other plasmid harbouring qnrB1 in presence of low antibiotic concentrations of fluoroquinolones, showing the risk of multi-resistance screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. 喹诺酮耐药大肠埃希菌尿道感染现状及危险因素分析%Quinolone resistant Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection:clinical status and risk factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张安兵

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the quinolone resistant Escherkhia coli infection status and risk factors, and provide a basis for selecting appropriate antibiotics in the clinical practice. Methods This study is a retrospective review from 2010 to 2011. 348 strains Escherichia coli isolated from urine specimens were analysis, using the quinolone susceptible isolates as the control group. The risk factors for the quinolone resistance strains were analyzed. Results Of the 348 E.coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection patient, 58.3% (203)were quinolone resistant. Logistic regression analysis showed three generation cephalosporins and quinolones drug use, urinary drainage and bacterium producing extra-broad spectrum beta-lactamase were the independent risk factors for ciprofloxacin resistance of E.coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection patients. Conclusion The epidemic of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli isolated from urine specimens were extremely serious. The drug resistance of the quinolone resistant isolates was strong. The patients infected with quinolone resistant strains had high medical cost and longer average length of stay in hospital. The quinolone resistant E.coli infection with multiple independent risk factors, the strengthening of these independent risk factor controls can effectively prevent the spread of quinolone resistant strains infection.%目的 分析喹诺酮耐药大肠埃希菌尿道感染现状及危险因素,为临床合理选用抗生素提供依据.方法 回顾性分析348例大肠埃希菌尿道感染临床现状,以喹诺酮敏感大肠埃希菌为对照菌株,对喹诺酮耐药大肠埃希菌感染危险因素进行分析.结果 348株大肠埃希菌尿道感染中检出喹诺酮耐药菌203株,占58.3%.Logistic回归分析显示三代头孢菌素及喹诺酮类药物使用、尿路引流和细菌产超广谱β-内酰胺酶是喹诺酮耐药大肠埃希菌感染的独立危险因素.结论 尿道感染大肠埃

  2. Fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms and phylogenetic background of clinical Escherichia coli strains isolated in south-east Poland.

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    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Skrzypek, Kinga; Siwiec, Radosław; Wrobel, Andrzej; Malm, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Fluorochinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in the treatment of several infections, including those caused by Escherichia coli. Due to the increasing resistance of bacteria to antimicrobials, an understanding of fluoroquinolone resistance is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of clinical E. coli strains to fluoroquinolones and characterize their mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Totally, 79 non-duplicate clinical E. coli isolates included in this study were mainly from skin lesion -36 (45.6%) isolates; 54 (68.4%) isolates were assigned to phylogenetic B2 group. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was found in 20 isolates. In the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) region of gyrA and parC, 4 types of point mutations were detected. Mutations in parC gene were found in all strains with gyrA mutations. Predominance of double mutation in codon 83 and 87 of gyrA (90%) and in codon 80 of parC (90%) was found. Moreover, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMRQ) determinants (qnrA or qnrB and/or aac(6')-Ib-cr) were present in 5 (25%) out of 20 fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Resistance to fluoroquinolones in all of the tested clinical E. coli isolates correlated with point mutations in both gyrA and parC. The majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains belonged to D and B2 phylogenetic groups.

  3. High Prevalence of β-lactamase and Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Escherichia coli from Dogs in Shaanxi, China

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    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Haixia; Li, Yinqian; Hao, Caiju

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL), plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (pAmpC) and carbapenemases as well as plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistant (PMQR) among extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESC-R) Escherichia coli from dogs in Shaanxi province in China. Methods: A total of 40 ESC-R Escherichia coli selected from 165 Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolated from dogs were screened and characterized for the genes encoding for the ESBLs, pAmpC, carbapenemases and PMQR genes by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic groups, virulence gene profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to investigate the genetic background of the ESC-R E. coli isolates. Results: Among 40 ESC-R E. coli, the predominant β-lactamase gene was blaCTX−Ms (n = 35), and followed by blaTEM−1 (n = 31), blaSHV−12 (n = 14), blaOXA−48 (n = 8), blaTEM−30 (n = 4), blaCMY−2 (n = 3) and blaDHA−1 (n = 2). The most common specific blaCTX−M gene subtype was blaCTX−M−15 (n = 31), and followed by blaCTX−M−123 (n = 14), blaCTX−M−1 (n = 10), blaCTX−M−14 (n = 10) and blaCTX−M−9 (n = 7). PMQR genes were detected in 32 (80%) isolates, and the predominant PMQR gene was aac(6′)-Ib-cr (n = 26), followed by qnrS (n = 12), qnrD (n = 9), qnrB (n = 8), qepA (n = 4), and all PMQR genes were detected in co-existence with β-lactamase genes. traT (n = 34) and fimH (n = 32) were the most prevalent virulence genes, and virulence genes fimH, iutA, fyuA, malX, iha, and sat were more prevalent in phylogenetic group B2. The 40 ESC-R isolates analyzed were assigned to 22 sequence types (STs), and the clonal lineages ST131 (n = 10) and ST10 (n = 9) were the predominant STs. Conclusion: High prevalence of β-lantamases and PMQR genes were detected among ESC-R E. coli from companion animals. This is also the first description of the co-existence of six

  4. High Prevalence of β-lactamase and Plasmid-mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Extended-spectrum Cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from Dogs in Shaanxi, China

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    Xiaoqiang Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL, plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (pAmpC and carbapenemases as well as plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistant (PMQR among extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESC-R Escherichia coli from dogs in Shaanxi province in China.Methods: A total of 40 ESC-R Escherichia coli selected from 165 Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC isolated from dogs were screened and characterized for the genes encoding for the ESBLs, pAmpC, carbapenemases and PMQR genes by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic groups, virulence gene profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used to investigate the genetic background of the ESC-R E. coli isolates. Results: Among 40 ESC-R E. coli, the predominant β-lactamase gene was blaCTX-Ms (n=35, and followed by blaTEM-1 (n=31, blaSHV-12 (n=14, blaOXA-48 (n=8, blaTEM-30 (n=4, blaCMY-2 (n=3 and blaDHA-1 (n=2. The most common specific blaCTX-M gene subtype was blaCTX-M-15 (n=31, and followed by blaCTX-M-123 (n=14, blaCTX-M-1 (n=10, blaCTX-M-14 (n=10 and blaCTX-M-9 (n=7. PMQR genes were detected in 32 (80% isolates, and the predominant PMQR gene was aac(6'-Ib-cr (n=26, followed by qnrS (n=12, qnrD (n=9, qnrB (n=8, qepA (n=4, and all PMQR genes were detected in co-existence with β-lactamase genes. traT (n=34 and fimH (n=32 were the most prevalent virulence genes, and virulence genes fimH, iutA, fyuA, malX, iha and sat were more prevalent in phylogenetic group B2. The 40 ESC-R isolates analyzed were assigned to 22 sequence types (STs, and the clonal lineages ST131 (n=10 and ST10 (n=9 were the predominant STs. Conclusion: High prevalence of β-lantamases and PMQR genes were detected among ESC-R E. coli from companion animals. This is also the first description of the co-existence of six β-lantamase genes and five PMQR genes in one E. coli isolate. Moreover, ten ST131 clones harboring CTX

  5. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  6. Mechanisms of Herbicide-resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Hong; CHEN Yibing; TAO Bo

    2006-01-01

    This paper discussed mechanisms of herbicide-resistance. There are at least four mechanisms identified by which weeds become resistant to a herbicide. The two most common mechanisms are those involving metabolic reactions and changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid sequence (mutations) that alter the structure and features of the target proteins. The other two mechanisms involve either an alteration in the penetration or translocation of the herbicides to the target site or the depolarization of membrane within the weed.

  7. 尿道感染大肠埃希菌对喹诺酮耐药性及相关因素分析%Drug Resistance and Risk Factors Analysis of Escherichia Coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection to Quinolone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昭勇; 张吉才; 杜毅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the drug resistance and risk factors of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection (UTI) to quinolone. Methods Drug resistance of 705 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from 749 urine specimens of UTI from 2010 to 2011 in our hospital were detected and divided into the resistance group and the sensitive group according to sensitiveness to quinolone, and the risk factors of the quinolone resistance strains were analyzed. Results In 705 strains isolates E. coli, there were 474 strains (67. 2% ) of quinolone resistance in the resistance group, 231 strains (32. 8% ) of quinolone sensitiveness in the sensitive group and there was no carbapenem resistant strain. The differences in resistance rates of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, piperacillin, amikacin, bactrim, gentamicin and cefepime of the two groups were statistically significant (P<0. 05) . Logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of female patients, drug use of tert-cephalosporins and quinolones, urinary drainage and bacterium producing extended spectrum β lactamases (ESBLS) were independent risk factors of quinolone resistance E. coli. The differences in hospital stay and cost of the two groups were statistically significant (P<0. 05). Conclusion The detection rate of quinolone resistance escherichia coli isolated from UIT is high. The emergence of resistant strains is related to antibiotic application, invasive handling and bacterial variation. To strengthen the independent risk factors regulation can effectively prevent and control spread of infection.%目的 探讨尿道感染(urinary tract infection,UIT)大肠埃希菌对喹诺酮耐药性及其相关因素.方法 对我院2010-2011年749例UIT尿液标本中分离的705株大肠埃希菌的耐药性进行检测,以对喹诺酮敏感与否分为耐药株组和敏感株组,分析耐药株感染的相关因素.结果 705株大肠埃希菌中对喹诺酮耐药474株(67.2

  8. Fluorescence quenching as a tool to investigate quinolone antibiotic interactions with bacterial protein OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Patrícia; Sousa, Isabel; Winterhalter, Mathias; Gameiro, Paula

    2009-02-01

    The outer membrane porin OmpF is an important protein for the uptake of antibiotics through the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria; however, the possible binding sites involved in this uptake are still not recognized. Determination, at the molecular level, of the possible sites of antibiotic interaction is very important, not only to understand their mechanism of action but also to unravel bacterial resistance. Due to the intrinsic OmpF fluorescence, attributed mainly to its tryptophans (Trp(214), Trp(61)), quenching experiments were used to assess the site(s) of interaction of some quinolone antibiotics. OmpF was reconstituted in different organized structures, and the fluorescence quenching results, in the presence of two quenching agents, acrylamide and iodide, certified that acrylamide quenches Trp(61) and iodide Trp(214). Similar data, obtained in presence of the quinolones, revealed distinct behaviors for these antibiotics, with nalidixic acid interacting near Trp(214) and moxifloxacin near Trp(61). These studies, based on straightforward and quick procedures, show the existence of conformational changes in the protein in order to adapt to the different organized structures and to interact with the quinolones. The extent of reorganization of the protein in the presence of the different quinolones allowed an estimate on the sites of protein/quinolone interaction.

  9. Emerging quinolones resistant transfer genes among gram-negative bacteria, isolated from faeces of HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in the City of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

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    Enabulele IO

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 1431 gram-negative bacilli from June 2001 to September 2005 were obtained from the faeces of 920 HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in Benin City, Nigeria, were screened for quinolones resistance gene. The HIV/AIDS patients CD4 cells range was ≤14/mm3 ≥800/mm3 of blood. Out of the 1431 isolates, 343 (23.9% were resistance to quinolones with a MIC ≥4μg/ml for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin while a MIC of ≥32 µg/ml for nalidixic acid. The screened isolates include Pseudomonas aeruginosa 64(18.7%, E coli 92(26.8%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 53(15.4%, Salmonella typhi 39(11.4%, Shigella dysenteriae 36(10.5%, Proteus mirabilis 34(9.9% and Serratia marcescens 25(7.3%. The average resistance of the isolates to the various quinolones ranged from 42.7% to 66.7%. Klebsiella were the most resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 66.7% while Proteus were the less resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 42.7%. Most isolates were resistant to Nalidixic acid followed by norfloxacin while the less resistant were to the pefloxacin. The frequency of qnr genes transfer to EJRifr as recipient ranged from 2 x 10-2 to 6 x 10-6 with an average of 2 plasmids per cell. The molecular weight of the plasmids ranged from <2.9kbp to <5.5 kbp. This indicated that plasmids allowed the movement of genetic materials including qnr resistant genes between bacteria species and genera in Benin City, Nigeria.

  10. Contribution of different mechanisms to the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica

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    Abeer Ahmed Rushdy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the potential factors include gene mutation, efflux pump and alteration of permeability associated with quinolone-resistance of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis and to evaluate the degree of synergistic activity of efflux pump inhibitors when combined with ciprofloxacin against resistant isolates. METHODS: Antimicrobial resistance patterns of fifty-eight Salmonella isolates were tested. Five isolates were selected to study the mechanism of resistance associated with quinolone group, including mutation in topoisomerase-encoding gene, altered cell permeability, and expression of an active efflux system. In addition, the combination between antibiotics and efflux pump inhibitors to overcome the microbial resistance was evaluated. RESULTS: Five Salmonella isolates totally resistant to all quinolones were studied. All isolates showed alterations in outer membrane proteins including disappearance of some or all of these proteins (Omp-A, Omp-C, Omp-D and Omp-F. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence/absence of the efflux pump inhibitors: carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, norepinephrin and trimethoprim. Minimum inhibitory concentration values for two of the isolates were 2-4 fold lower with the addition of efflux pump inhibitors. All five Salmonella isolates were amplified for gyrA and parC genes and only two isolates were sequenced. S. Enteritidis 22 had double mutations at codon 83 and 87 in addition to three mutations at parC at codons 67, 76 and 80 whereas S. Typhimurium 57 had three mutations at codons 83, 87 and 119, but no mutations at parC. CONCLUSIONS: Efflux pump inhibitors may inhibit the major AcrAB-TolC in Salmonella efflux systems which are the major efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in Gramnegative clinical isolates.

  11. Fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms of Shigella flexneri isolated in Bangladesh.

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    Ishrat J Azmi

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species isolated in Bangladesh and to compare with similar strains isolated in China.A total of 3789 Shigella isolates collected from Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b, during 2004-2010 were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility. Analysis of plasmids, plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance genes, PFGE, and sequencing of genes of the quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR were conducted in representative strains isolated in Bangladesh and compared with strains isolated in Zhengding, China. In addition, the role of efflux-pump was studied by using the efflux-pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP.Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Shigella species increased from 0% in 2004 to 44% in 2010 and S. flexneri was the predominant species. Of Shigella spp, ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR strains were mostly found among S. flexneri (8.3%, followed by S. sonnei (1.5%. Within S. flexneri (n = 2181, 14.5% were resistance to ciprofloxacin of which serotype 2a was predominant (96%. MIC of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were 6-32 mg/L, 8-32 mg/L, and 8-24 mg/L, respectively in S. flexneri 2a isolates. Sequencing of QRDR genes of resistant isolates showed double mutations in gyrA gene (Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn/Gly and single mutation in parC gene (Ser80Ile. A difference in amino acid substitution at position 87 was found between strains isolated in Bangladesh (Asp87Asn and China (Asp87Gly except for one. A novel mutation at position 211 (His→Tyr in gyrA gene was detected only in the Bangladeshi strains. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was increased by the presence of CCCP indicating the involvement of energy dependent active efflux pumps. A single PFGE type was found in isolates from Bangladesh and China suggesting their genetic relatedness.Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella undermines a major challenge in current

  12. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms of Shigella flexneri Isolated in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Ishrat J.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Akter, Fatema; Hasan, Trisheeta N.; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Akter, Mahmuda; Banik, Atanu; Sultana, Halima; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Mohammad K.; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species isolated in Bangladesh and to compare with similar strains isolated in China. Methods A total of 3789 Shigella isolates collected from Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b, during 2004–2010 were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility. Analysis of plasmids, plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance genes, PFGE, and sequencing of genes of the quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR) were conducted in representative strains isolated in Bangladesh and compared with strains isolated in Zhengding, China. In addition, the role of efflux-pump was studied by using the efflux-pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Results Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Shigella species increased from 0% in 2004 to 44% in 2010 and S. flexneri was the predominant species. Of Shigella spp, ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) strains were mostly found among S. flexneri (8.3%), followed by S. sonnei (1.5%). Within S. flexneri (n = 2181), 14.5% were resistance to ciprofloxacin of which serotype 2a was predominant (96%). MIC of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were 6–32 mg/L, 8–32 mg/L, and 8–24 mg/L, respectively in S. flexneri 2a isolates. Sequencing of QRDR genes of resistant isolates showed double mutations in gyrA gene (Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn/Gly) and single mutation in parC gene (Ser80Ile). A difference in amino acid substitution at position 87 was found between strains isolated in Bangladesh (Asp87Asn) and China (Asp87Gly) except for one. A novel mutation at position 211 (His→Tyr) in gyrA gene was detected only in the Bangladeshi strains. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was increased by the presence of CCCP indicating the involvement of energy dependent active efflux pumps. A single PFGE type was found in isolates from Bangladesh and China suggesting their genetic relatedness. Conclusions Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella

  13. Cepas de Campylobacter jejuni resistentes a quinolonas aisladas de humanos, gallinas y pollos Quinolone resistant Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated from humans and from poultry

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    Rodolfo Notario

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Se compararon 8 aislamientos de Campylobacter jejuni provenientes de humanos con enfermedad diarreica aguda, con 23 aislamientos de cloaca de gallinas y pollos obtenidos de zonas próximas a la ciudad de Rosario, todos resistentes a la ciprofloxacina. Las muestras se sembraron en agar selectivo y se incubaron en microaerofilia a 42 °C. Las colonias se identificaron con el método tradicional. Los aislamientos se conservaron a -70 °C en caldo cerebro corazón con 17% v/v de glicerina. La clonalidad se determinó por RAPD-PCR, utilizando el primer 1254 (Stern NJ. Se interpretaron los aislamientos como clones distintos cuando diferían en una banda de amplificación. Se obtuvieron 5 clones diferentes. Los patrones I, II y V fueron aislados en criaderos industriales de pollos y en humanos (el II también en un establecimiento de gallinas ponedoras de huevos. En un gallinero familiar se obtuvo el patrón I. El patrón III sólo se obtuvo de humanos. El patrón IV se halló en uno de los criaderos pero no en humanos. Se pudo determinar que 93.5% de las cepas se aislaron tanto de animales como de humanos, por lo que se considera posible que la colonización de criaderos con cepas resistentes a los antimicrobianos pudiera ser el origen de la infección de humanos.Eight quinolone resistant Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated from humans with diarrheal disease were compared with 23 isolates from chicken and from laying hens. Samples were cultured on selective agar in microaerophilia, identified by conventional tests, and conserved in 17% glycerol at -70 °C. Clones were determined by RAPD-PCR employing the 1254 primer (Stern NJ. Five patterns were obtained. Patterns I, II, and V were found in both poultry and human isolates. Pattern I was obtained from poultry in a domestic henhouse. Pattern III was only obtained from humans whereas pattern IV was only obtained from poultry. A 95.3% of clones were found in both, humans and poultry. According to these

  14. Quinolone-based drugs against Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp.

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    Anquetin, Guillaume; Greiner, Jacques; Vierling, Pierre

    2005-09-01

    Owing to the rapid emergence of multi-resistant strains of Plasmodium spp. (the causative agents of malaria) and the limitations of drugs used against Toxoplasma gondii (an important opportunistic pathogen associated with AIDS and congenital birth defects), the discovery of new therapeutical targets and the development of new drugs are needed. The presence of the prokaryotic-like organelle in apicomplexan parasites (i.e. plastids), which comprise these major human pathogens, may represent a unique target for antibiotics against these protozoa. Quinolones which are known to be highly potent against bacteria were also found to specifically disrupt these parasites. They inhibit DNA replication by interacting with two essential bacterial type II topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. There are some clues that quinolones act on plastids with a similar mechanism of action. After a brief presentation of plasmodium and toxoplasma dedicated to their life cycle, the chemotherapies presently used in clinics to fight against these protozoa and the potential new targets and drugs, we will focus our attention on their plastid which is one of these promising new targets. Then, we will present the various drugs and generations of quinolones, the leading molecules, and their inhibitory effects against these parasites together with their pharmacological properties that have been established from in vitro and in vivo studies. We will also discuss their possible mode of action.

  15. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

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    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  16. Mechanisms of Resistance to Cabazitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, George E.; Wang, Yan C.; Francisco, E. Brian; Rose, John C.; Martinez, Francisco J.; Coller, John; Brassard, Diana; Vrignaud, Patricia; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2015-01-01

    We studied mechanisms of resistance to the novel taxane cabazitaxel in established cellular models of taxane resistance. We also developed cabazitaxel-resistant variants from MCF-7 breast cancer cells by stepwise selection in drug alone (MCF-7/CTAX) or drug plus the transport inhibitor PSC-833 (MCF-7/CTAX-P). Among multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, cabazitaxel was relatively less cross-resistant than paclitaxel and docetaxel (15 vs. 200-fold in MES-SA/Dx5 and 9 vs. 60-fold in MCF-7/TxT50, respectively). MCF-7/TxTP50 cells that were negative for MDR but had 9-fold resistance to paclitaxel were also 9-fold resistant to cabazitaxel. Selection with cabazitaxel alone (MCF-7/CTAX) yielded 33-fold resistance to cabazitaxel, 52-fold resistance to paclitaxel, activation of ABCB1, and 3-fold residual resistance to cabazitaxel with MDR inhibition. The MCF-7/CTAX-P variant did not express ABCB1, nor did it efflux rhodamine-123, BODIPY-labeled paclitaxel, and [3H]-docetaxel. These cells are hypersensitive to depolymerizing agents (vinca alkaloids and colchicine), have reduced baseline levels of stabilized microtubules, and impaired tubulin polymerization in response to taxanes (cabazitaxel or docetaxel) relative to MCF-7 parental cells. Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) RNA and protein were elevated in both MCF-7/CTAX and MCF-7/CTAX-P. Decreased BRCA1 and altered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers are also associated with cabazitaxel resistance in these MCF-7 variants, and may serve as predictive biomarkers for its activity in the clinical setting. In summary, cabazitaxel resistance mechanisms include MDR (although at a lower level than paclitaxel and docetaxel), and alterations in microtubule dynamicity, as manifested by higher expression of TUBB3, decreased BRCA1, and by the induction of EMT. PMID:25416788

  17. Quinolone-containing therapies in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Chih-Ming; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones, especially levofloxacin, are used in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori worldwide. Many consensus guidelines recommend that the second-line rescue therapy for H. pylori eradication consists of a proton pump inhibitor, a quinolone, and amoxicillin as an option. Unfortunately, quinolone is well associated with a risk of developing bacterial resistance. In this paper, we review quinolone-containing H. pylori eradication regimens and the challenges that influence the efficacy of eradication. It is generally suggested that the use of levofloxacin should be confined to "rescue" therapy only, in order to avoid a further rapid increase in the resistance of H. pylori to quinolone. The impact of quinolone-containing H. pylori eradication regimens on public health issues such as tuberculosis treatment must always be taken into account. Exposure to quinolone is relevant to delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the development of drug resistance. Extending the duration of treatment to 14 days improves eradication rates by >90%. Tailored therapy to detect fluoroquinolone-resistant strains can be done by culture-based and molecular methods to provide better eradication rates. Molecular methods are achieved by using a real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the presence of a gyrA mutation, which is predictive of treatment failure with quinolones-containing triple therapy.

  18. 喹诺酮类药物的耐药、联合用药及不良反应分析%Analysis of drug resistance,drug combination and adverse reactions of quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志勇

    2013-01-01

    目的研究喹诺酮类药物的耐药、联合用药和不良反应。方法对本院应用喹诺酮类药物治疗后出现不良反应的60例患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果常见的不良反应主要为全身性损伤(14例,23.4%)、皮肤方面的损伤(12例,20.0%)和神经系统损伤(18例,30.0%)。喹诺酮类药物目前的耐药情况比较严重。结论喹诺酮类药物应合理使用,并掌握其临床适应证以及剂量,尽可能避免联合用药的不合理性和不良反应的发生。%Objective To investigate the resistance,drug combination and adverse reactions of quinolones. Methods Clinical data of 60 patients who had adverse reactions after using quinolones in our hospital were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results The main common adverse reactions were systemic injury(14 patients,23.4%),skin injury (12 patients,20.0%) and nervous system injury(18 patients,30.0%). The current drug resistance situation of quinolones was severe. Conclusion Quinolones should be used rationally and their clinical indications and doses should be mastered in order to avoid the irrationality of drug combination and the occurrence of adverse reactions.

  19. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam eEl Hage

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder. However, there is a wide range of variability in response to antidepressants that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to antidepressant therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes.

  20. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hage, Wissam; Leman, Samuel; Camus, Vincent; Belzung, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant (AD) properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is a wide range of variability in response to ADs that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to AD therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:24319431

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar paratyphi A with special reference to quinolone resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoorashetty Manohar Rudresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Typhoid fever is endemic in India. Extensive use of first-line antibiotics has led to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR Salmonella typhi. Ciprofloxacin has become empirical therapy of choice against MDR salmonellae. Recent year′s emergence of low-level ciprofloxacin resistance in salmonellae resulted in delayed response and serious complications. Nalidixic acid (NA screen test is used as surrogate marker for detection low-level ciprofloxacin resistance. In this study, we evaluated prevalence of MDR and low-level ciprofloxacin resistant S. typhi and Salmonella paratyphi A. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 blood culture isolates of S. typhi and S. paratyphi A were tested for antibiotic susceptibility according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI method. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to ciprofloxacin was carried out by E-test and agar dilution method. Results: Among the 50 salmonella isolates, 80% were S. typhi and 20% were S. paratyphi A. MDR was found in 2% S. typhi. NA resistant salmonellae showed ciprofloxacin MIC ranging from 0.25 to 0.75 μg/ml. One isolate of S. typhi showed ciprofloxacin MIC of 32 μg/ml and was also resistant to ceftriaxone. NA screen test for low-level ciprofloxacin resistance was 100% sensitive and 97.9% specific. Interpretation and Conclusion: NA resistant isolates should be tested for ciprofloxacin MIC to decide therapeutic options. The current CLSI breakpoints may have to be re-evaluated for salmonellae.

  2. New Role of Quinolones in Respiratory Tract Infections

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    Ronald F Grossman

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of limited activity of the standard quinolones such as ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against some clinically important organisms including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, new quinolones have been developed. In addition to their improved activity against S pneumoniae, some also demonstrate excellent anaerobic activity. None of the quinolones have a role to play in the treatment of paediatric infections. Quinolones (both older and newer agents have demonstrated equivalent efficacy to standard antimicrobials in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Several groups have suggested that quinolones are excellent agents in the treatment of high risk patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. These patients include the elderly, and those with frequent exacerbations, significant comorbid conditions. long duration of chronic bronchitis and major impairment of lung function. There is no evidence to suggest that the newer quinolones will differ from the currently available agents for th is disease. The major advantage of the newer quinolones appears to be in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia where pneumococcal infection is a real concern. A new parenteral quinolone with pneumococcal activity may replace the standard macrolide/cephalosporin combination that is commonly prescribed. For patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the newer agents are alternative choices, especially among patients with early onset pneumonia (less than five days of hospitalization, but are unlikely to replace ciprofloxacin in the intensive care unit setting because of poor Pseudomonas aeruginosa coverage.

  3. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir Bhattacharya; Debleena Dey; Sib Sankar Roy

    2007-03-01

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, leading to a reduced amount of IR protein in insulin target cells. PDK1-independent phosphorylation of PKCε causes this reduction in insulin receptor gene expression. One of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in insulin target cells is suggested by these studies. We provide an overview of this important area, emphasizing the current status.

  4. Occurrence of quinolone- and beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli in danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    An increased concern for the possible transfer of resistant bacteria or mobile resistance elements from food animals to humans has resulted in rigorous legislation preventing i.e. practical use of fluoroquinolones in the Danish broiler industry (Olesen et al., 2004; Petersen et al., 2006). In Den......An increased concern for the possible transfer of resistant bacteria or mobile resistance elements from food animals to humans has resulted in rigorous legislation preventing i.e. practical use of fluoroquinolones in the Danish broiler industry (Olesen et al., 2004; Petersen et al., 2006......, and F. M. Aarestrup. 2004. Prevalence of ß-lactamases among ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolated from food animals in Denmark. Micr. Drug Res. 10:334-340. Petersen, A., J. P. Christensen, P. Kuhnert, M. Bisgaard, J. E. Olsen. 2006. Vertical transmission of a fluoroquinolone...

  5. Extended-spectrum-beta-lactamases, AmpC beta-lactamases and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in klebsiella spp. from companion animals in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Donati

    Full Text Available We report the genetic characterization of 15 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP and 4 isolates of K. oxytoca (KO from clinical cases in dogs and cats and showing extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC resistance. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL and AmpC genes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR and co-resistances were investigated. Among KP isolates, ST101 clone was predominant (8/15, 53%, followed by ST15 (4/15, 27%. ST11 and ST340, belonging to Clonal Complex (CC11, were detected in 2012 (3/15, 20%. MLST on KP isolates corresponded well with PFGE results, with 11 different PFGE patterns observed, including two clusters of two (ST340 and four (ST101 indistinguishable isolates, respectively. All isolates harbored at least one ESBL or AmpC gene, all carried on transferable plasmids (IncR, IncFII, IncI1, IncN, and 16/19 were positive for PMQR genes (qnr family or aac(6'-Ib-cr. The most frequent ESBL was CTX-M-15 (11/19, 58%, detected in all KP ST101, in one KP ST15 and in both KP ST340. blaCTX-M-15 was carried on IncR plasmids in all but one KP isolate. All KP ST15 isolates harbored different ESC resistance genes and different plasmids, and presented the non-transferable blaSHV-28 gene, in association with blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-1 (on IncR, or on IncN, blaSHV-2a (on IncR or blaCMY-2 genes (on IncI1. KO isolates were positive for blaCTX-M-9 gene (on IncHI2, or for the blaSHV-12 and blaDHA-1 genes (on IncL/M. They were all positive for qnr genes, and one also for the aac(6'-Ib-cr gene. All Klebsiella isolates showed multiresistance towards aminoglycosides, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, trimethoprim and amphenicols, mediated by strA/B, aadA2, aadB, ant (2"-Ia, aac(6'-Ib, sul, tet, dfr and cat genes in various combinations. The emergence in pets of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella with ESBL, AmpC and PMQR determinants, poses further and serious challenges in companion animal therapy and raise concerns for possible bi-directional transmission between

  6. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the pathophy

  7. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the pathophy

  8. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the

  9. Brief communication: detection of clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from China containing transferable quinolone resistance determinants exhibiting resistance to both aminoglycoside and β-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xinying; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Naxin; Liu, Yuxia; Luo, Yanping; Zhou, Guang; Guan, Xizhou

    2014-01-01

    Though aminoglycosides are routinely used clinically as antimicrobial agents for the treatment of severe infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, resistance to the same is an increasing problem. One such resistance mechanism is the production of 16S rRNA methylases. The objective of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and molecular epidemology of 16S rRNA methylase genes among 43 K. pneumoniae isolates (each of which had at least one PQMR gene and ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration greater than 0.25) recovered from nine tertiary hospitals in China. Our results suggest great genetic variation in terms of 16S rRNA methylase gene of K. pneumoniae hosts containing at least one PQMR gene. This further reinforces the clinical and systemic urgency required to characterize and block their transmission routes.

  10. Evaluation of quinolone antibacterial consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Bernaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that play an important role in the treatment of serious bacterial infections, especially hospital-acquired infections and others in which resistance to older antibacterial classes is suspected and as first-line therapy is recommended. To determine the place, compare and analyze the use of quinolone antibacterial in the most important departments of EMI during 2009 to 2014 and to assess their results for improvement of patients treatment quality was designed this study. In the evaluated period consumption of quinolone antibacterial in EMI recorded a decline from 91 to 46 DDD/1000 or by 49.45%, in IC departaments from 338.6 to 132.07 or by 61%, and vice versa in SSOT departments an increase from 41.28 to 57.59 DDD/1000 or by 31.51%. Medium annual consumption in all institution recorded 63.03 DDD/1000, respectvely 174.90 in IC and 45.10 in SSOT departments. In 2014 IC departments recorded 2439.8 lei per DDD/1000, that was 8.72 times more than cost of 279.9 lei in SSOT departments and 7.51 times than 324.96 lei per DDD/1000 in all EMI. The yearly medium in EMI is around the same with all other international hospitals of 66.13 DDD/1000 and by 27.23% higher than 49.54 DDD/1000 recorded in large acute Australian public hospitals. The obtained results will be an important data for optimization in planning annual hospital necessities and rational antimicrobial prescribing as well as suggest the idea for expansion development and support antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.

  11. Enhanced resistance to fluoroquinolones in laboratory-grown mutants & clinical isolates of Shigella due to synergism between efflux pump expression & mutations in quinolone resistance determining region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Taneja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a worldwide emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and laboratory-induced spontaneous mutants of Shigella spp. were used and the relative contributions of acrAB-tolC efflux pumps, gyrase and topoisomerase target gene mutations towards fluoroquinolone resistance were determined. Methods: Eight Shigella flexneri and six S. dysenteriae clinical isolates were studied. Three consecutive mutants resistant to ciprofloxacin for S. flexneri SFM1 (≥0.25 µg/ml, SFM2 (≥4 µg/ml and SFM3 (≥32 µg/ml were selected in 15 steps from susceptible isolates by serial exposure to increasing concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Similarly, two mutants for S. dysenteriae SDM1 (≥0.25 µg/ml and SDM2 (≥4 µg/ml were selected in eight steps. After PCR amplification sequence analyses of gyrase and topoisomerase target genes were performed. Expression of efflux genes acrA, acrB, acrR and tolC was measured using real-time PCR. Results: Mutations were observed in gyrA Ser [83]→Leu, Asp [87]→Asn/Gly, Val [196]→Ala and in parC Phe [93]→Val, Ser [80]→Ile, Asp [101]→Glu and Asp [110]→Glu. Overall, acrA and acrB overexpression was associated with fluoroquinolone resistance ( p0 <0.05; while tolC and acrR expression levels did not. Interpretation & conclusions: Fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella spp. is the end product of either a single or a combination of mutations in QRDRs and/ or efflux activity. Novel polymorphisms were observed at Val [196]→Ala in gyrA in clinical isolates and Phe [93]→Val, Asp [101]→Glu, Asp [110]→Glu and in parC in majority of laboratory-grown mutants.

  12. The safety of quinolones in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefet, Enav; Salim, Raed; Chazan, Bibiana; Akel, Hiba; Romano, Shabtai; Nachum, Zohar

    2014-11-01

    Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are highly efficient antibiotics. However, concerns regarding possible harmful effects have limited their use during pregnancy. Nevertheless, accumulating clinical data suggest that they may be safe during pregnancy. This review aimed to explore the mechanisms of action of the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, which set the stage for concerns regarding possible teratogenic and mutagenic effects; to clarify the clinical dilemmas that brought forth the necessity in reevaluating the use of those medications during pregnancy; and to review the accumulated data regarding their safety during pregnancy in animal models and humans.

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  14. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  15. Metal Complexes of Quinolone Antibiotics and Their Applications: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Uivarosi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotics with good oral absorption and excellent bioavailability. Due to the chemical functions found on their nucleus (a carboxylic acid function at the 3-position, and in most cases a basic piperazinyl ring (or another N-heterocycle at the 7-position, and a carbonyl oxygen atom at the 4-position quinolones bind metal ions forming complexes in which they can act as bidentate, as unidentate and as bridging ligand, respectively. In the polymeric complexes in solid state, multiple modes of coordination are simultaneously possible. In strongly acidic conditions, quinolone molecules possessing a basic side nucleus are protonated and appear as cations in the ionic complexes. Interaction with metal ions has some important consequences for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of quinolones, and is also involved in the mechanism of action of these bactericidal agents. Many metal complexes with equal or enhanced antimicrobial activity compared to the parent quinolones were obtained. New strategies in the design of metal complexes of quinolones have led to compounds with anticancer activity. Analytical applications of complexation with metal ions were oriented toward two main directions: determination of quinolones based on complexation with metal ions or, reversely, determination of metal ions based on complexation with quinolones.

  16. Metal complexes of quinolone antibiotics and their applications: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uivarosi, Valentina

    2013-09-11

    Quinolones are synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotics with good oral absorption and excellent bioavailability. Due to the chemical functions found on their nucleus (a carboxylic acid function at the 3-position, and in most cases a basic piperazinyl ring (or another N-heterocycle) at the 7-position, and a carbonyl oxygen atom at the 4-position) quinolones bind metal ions forming complexes in which they can act as bidentate, as unidentate and as bridging ligand, respectively. In the polymeric complexes in solid state, multiple modes of coordination are simultaneously possible. In strongly acidic conditions, quinolone molecules possessing a basic side nucleus are protonated and appear as cations in the ionic complexes. Interaction with metal ions has some important consequences for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of quinolones, and is also involved in the mechanism of action of these bactericidal agents. Many metal complexes with equal or enhanced antimicrobial activity compared to the parent quinolones were obtained. New strategies in the design of metal complexes of quinolones have led to compounds with anticancer activity. Analytical applications of complexation with metal ions were oriented toward two main directions: determination of quinolones based on complexation with metal ions or, reversely, determination of metal ions based on complexation with quinolones.

  17. Extended spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli fecal isolates from healthy companion animals in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Massilia; Mairi, Assia; Touati, Abdelaziz; Hassissene, Lila; Brasme, Lucien; Guillard, Thomas; De Champs, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of fecal carriage of Escherichia coli strains producing Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) isolated from healthy pets (dogs and cats) in Algeria. Fecal samples from 171 healthy pets (102 dogs and 69 cats) in one veterinary practice and private owners were included. After isolates identification, antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion procedure. ESBL were detected by combination disk tests. PCR and sequencing were used to characterize genes encoding ESBLs and PMQR. Transfer of ESBL and PMQR genes was assessed by conjugation experiments. Phylogenetic groups of E. coli were determined by PCR. Of the 171 animals, 20 carried an ESBL producing E. coli giving a prevalence of ESBL fecal carriage of 11.7%. All isolates were susceptible to carbapenems, cefoxitin, piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin and fosfomycine. For the rest of the tested β-lactams, susceptibility rates ranged from 35% to 70% for cefepime and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid respectively. Concerning the non-beta-lactams antibiotics, the rates of susceptibility ranged between 5% to trimethoprim and 95% for chloramphenicol. The beta-lactamase genes identified in E. coli isolates were blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-1, blaSHV-12 and blaTEM-1. The PMQR determinants aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and qnrB5 genes were identified in 15 isolates. Transconjugants were obtained for two isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli isolates belong to commensal phylogroups of A and B1. We reported here for the first time in Algeria ESBL and PMQR-producing E. coli in healthy cats and dogs.

  18. Acute toxicity evaluation for quinolone antibiotics and their chlorination disinfection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2014-09-01

    Acute toxicity of 21 quinolone antibiotics was monitored using photobacterium Vibrio fischeri assay. The minimum IC20 (inhibitory concentration for 20% luminescence elimination) was obtained at the least 18.86μmol/L for the tested quinolones. A quantitative structure-activity relationship model was established to investigate the possible mechanism for the acute toxicity. The critical physicochemical descriptors, describing σ and π atom electronegativity, implied that the electron transfer might occur between the quinolones and photobacterium V. fischeri. Although the quinolones exhibited limited acute toxicity to photobacterium, toxicity elevation was detected after their chlorination. Hence, chlorination disinfection treatment of quinolone-containing water should be of concerns.

  19. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kate M; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Cornnell, Heather H; Ribeiro, Maria C; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma), LL/2 (murine lung) and HCT116 (human colon) tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast) and PC3M (human prostate) tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells) and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells). Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes qnrA1, qnrB1 and aac(6′-1b-cr in a multiple drug-resistant isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Magesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Resistance to fluoroquinolones, a commonly prescribed antimicrobial for Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms, is of importance in therapy. The purpose of this study was to screen for the presence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR determinants in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Materials and Methods: Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL isolates of K. pneumoniae collected during October 2009 were screened by the antimicrobial susceptibility test. The plasmids from these isolates were analysed by specific Polymerase chain Reaction (PCR for qnrA, qnrB and aac(6′-1b. The amplified products were sequenced to confirm the allele. Results: Our analysis showed that 61% out of the 23 ESBL K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 56% to levofloxacin. The PMQR was demonstrated by transforming the plasmids from two isolates P12 and P13 into E. coli JM109. The PMQR gene qnrA was found in 16 isolates and qnrB in 11 isolates. The plasmid pKNMGR13 which conferred an minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of more than 240 ΅g/ml in sensitive E. coli was found to harbour the qnrA1 and qnrB1 allele. Furthermore, the gene aac(6′-1b-cr encoding a variant aminoglycoside 6′-N Acetyl transferase which confers resistance to fluoroquinolones was found in the same plasmid. Conclusions: Our report shows the prevalence of PMQR mediated by qnrA and qnrB in multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates from Chennai. A multidrug-resistant plasmid conferring high resistance to ciprofloxacin was found to harbour another PMQR gene, aac(6′-1b-cr mutant gene. This is the first report screening for PMQR in K. pneumoniae isolates from India.

  1. Rapid evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Nigeria is temporally associated with fluoroquinolone use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance has necessitated fluoroquinolone use but little is known about the selective forces and resistance trajectory in malaria-endemic settings, where selection from the antimalarial chloroquine for fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria has been proposed. Methods Antimicrobial resistance was studied in fecal Escherichia coli isolates in a Nigerian community. Quinolone-resistance determining regions of gyrA and parC were sequenced in nalidixic acid resistant strains and horizontally-transmitted quinolone-resistance genes were sought by PCR. Antimicrobial prescription practices were compared with antimicrobial resistance rates over a period spanning three decades. Results Before 2005, quinolone resistance was limited to low-level nalixidic acid resistance in fewer than 4% of E. coli isolates. In 2005, the proportion of isolates demonstrating low-level quinolone resistance due to elevated efflux increased and high-level quinolone resistance and resistance to the fluoroquinolones appeared. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to single nucleotide polymorphisms in quinolone target genes gyrA and/or parC. By 2009, 35 (34.5%) of isolates were quinolone non-susceptible with nine carrying gyrA and parC SNPs and six bearing identical qnrS1 alleles. The antimalarial chloroquine was heavily used throughout the entire period but E. coli with quinolone-specific resistance mechanisms were only detected in the final half decade, immediately following the introduction of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial ciprofloxacin. Conclusions Fluoroquinolones, and not chloroquine, appear to be the selective force for fluoroquinolone-resistant fecal E. coli in this setting. Rapid evolution to resistance following fluoroquinolone introduction points the need to implement resistant containment strategies when new antibacterials are introduced into resource-poor settings with high infectious disease burdens. PMID:22060770

  2. Primary antibiotic resistance and associated mechanisms in Helicobacter pylori isolates from Senegalese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seck Abdoulaye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic combination therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication must be adapted to local resistance patterns, but the epidemiology of H. pylori resistance to antibiotics is poorly documented in Africa. The aim was to determine the antibiotic resistance rates, as well as the associated molecular mechanisms, of strains isolated in Dakar, Senegal. Methods One hundred and eight H. pylori strains were isolated between 2007 and 2009 from 108 patients presenting with upper abdominal pain to the Gastroenterology Department of Le Dantec Hospital. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin and tetracyclin using the E-test method. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant strains and in gyrA and gyrB of levofloxacin-resistant strains were investigated. Results Isolates were characterized by no resistance to amoxicillin (0%, tetracycline (0%, and very low rate of resistance to clarithromycin (1%, but a high rate of resistance to metronidazole (85%. The clarithromycin-resistant strain displayed the A2143G mutation. A worrying rate of levofloxacin resistance was detected (15%. N87I and D91N were the most common mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining region of gyrA. Conclusions The first-line empirical regimen for H. pylori eradication in Senegal should include clarithromycin. Increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance detected should discourage the use of levofloxacin-containing regimens without prior antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  3. First characterisation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance-qnrS1 co-expressed bla CTX-M-15 and bla DHA-1 genes in clinical strain of Morganella morganii recovered from a Tunisian Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mahrouki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Aim of this study was to show the emergence of the qnr genes among fluoroquinolone-resistant, AMPC and ESBL (extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase co-producing Morganella morganii isolate. Materials and Methods: A multi resistant Morganella morganii SM12012 isolate was recovered from pus from a patient hospitalized in the intensive care unit at the Military hospital, Tunisia. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested with the agar disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. ESBLs were detected using a standard double-disk synergy test. The characterization of beta-lactamases and associated resistance genes were performed by isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing. Results: The antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the high resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins (MICs: 64-512 μg/ml and fluoroquinolones (MICs: 32-512 μg/ml. But M. morganii SM12012 isolate remained susceptible to carbapenems (MICs: 4-<0.25 μg/ml. The double-disk synergy test confirmed the phenotype of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. Three identical β-lactamases with pI values of 6.5, 7.8 and superior to 8.6 were detected after isoelectric focusing analysis. These β-lactamases genes can be successfully transferred by the conjugative plasmid. Molecular analysis demonstrated the co-production of bla DHA-1, bla CTX-M-15 and qnrS1 genes on the same plasmid. The detection of an associated chromosomal quinolone resistance revealed the presence of a parC mutation at codon 80 (Ser80-lle80. Conclusion: This is the first report in Tunisia of nosocomial infection due to the production of CTX-M-15 and DHA-1 β-lactamases in M. morganii isolate with the association of quinolone plasmid resistance. The incidence of these strains invites continuous monitoring of such multidrug-resistant strains and the further study of their epidemiologic evolution.

  4. Characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes in extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae pediatric clinical isolates in Mexico.

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    Jesus Silva-Sánchez

    Full Text Available This work describes the characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance (PMQR genes from a multicenter study of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae pediatric clinical isolates in Mexico. The PMQR gene-positive isolates were characterized with respect to ESBLs, and mutations in the GyrA and ParC proteins were determined. The phylogenetic relationship was established by PFGE and the transfer of PMQR genes was determined by mating assays. The prevalence of the PMQR genes was 32.1%, and the rate of qnr-positive isolates was 15.1%; 93.3% of the latter were qnrB and 6.4% were qnrA1. The distribution of isolates in terms of bacterial species was as follows: 23.5% (4/17 corresponded to E. cloacae, 13.7% (7/51 to K. pneumoniae, and 13.6% (6/44 to E. coli. In addition, the prevalence of aac(6'-Ib-cr and qepA was 15.1% and 1.7%, respectively. The molecular characteristics of qnr- and qepA-positive isolates pointed to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL CTX-M-15 as the most prevalent one (70.5%, and to SHV-12 in the case of aac(6'-Ib-cr-positive isolates. GyrA mutations at codons Ser-83 and Asp-87, and ParC mutations at codons Ser-80 were observed in 41.1% and 35.2% of the qnr-positive isolates, respectively. The analysis of the transconjugants revealed a co-transmission of bla(CTX-M-15 with the qnrB alleles. In general, the prevalence of PMQR genes (qnr and aac(6'-Ib-cr presented in this work was much lower in the pediatric isolates, in comparison to the adult isolates in Mexico. Also, ESBL CTX-M-15 was the main ESBL identified in the pediatric isolates, whereas in the adult ones, ESBLs corresponded to the CTX-M and the SHV families. In comparison with other studies, among the PMQR-genes identified in this study, the qnrB-alleles and the aac(6'-Ib-cr gene were the most prevalent, whereas the qnrS1, qnrA1 and qnrB-like alleles were the most prevalent in China and Uruguay.

  5. Characterization of carbapenemases, extended spectrum β-lactamases, quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible Escherichia coli from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanming; Xu, Xiuyu; Pu, Shuli; Huang, Shifeng; Sun, Jide; Yang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Liping

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Escherichiacoli isolates harboring carbapenemases or combining an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzyme with loss of porins present an increasingly urgent clinical danger. Combined resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS) isolates will inevitably create problems. In the current study, we characterized the carbapenemases and ESBLs, and the prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible (CNS) E.coli isolates from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China in 2012. Thirty non-duplicated CNS E.coli isolates were screened via antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the drug resistance profiles of the 30 strains were analyzed. Carbapenemase genes blaKPC-2, ESBL genes including blaCTX-M-3, blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM, ARD genes including aac(6')-Ib, armA and rmtB, and QRD genes including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS and aac(6')-Ib-cr were identified and clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Of the 30 isolates, 2 (6.7%) harbored carbapenemase gene blaKPC-2; 29 (96.7%) carried ESBLs; 20 (66.7%) were QRD positive; and 11 (36.7%) were ARD positive. Between the two blaKPC-2 positive strains, one contained ESBL, QRD and ARD genes, while the other expressed ESBL genes but was negative for both QRD and ARD genes. Of the 29 ESBLs positive isolates, 2 (6.9%) were carbapenemase positive, 19 (65.5%) were QRD positive, and 11 (37.9%) were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 30 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. coli isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. Production of ESBLs was associated with the carbapenem resistance and QRD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. coli isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. This is the first report of a multidrug resistant carbapenem-non-susceptible E.coli co

  6. Characteristics of antibiotic resistance and sequence type of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in Japan and the antibacterial activity of DS-8587.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Saito; Shikata, Mototsugu; Chiba, Megumi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2014-04-01

    DS-8587 is a novel broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with extended antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of DS-8587 in 31 quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates. Efflux pump and qnr genes, mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions of target enzymes, and sequence types determined by multilocus sequence typing were analyzed. Forty-two quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates were analyzed for comparison. For susceptibility testing, DS-8587 exhibited more effective antibacterial activity when compared with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. When combined with the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, the MIC of DS-8587 was less affected when compared with the MIC exhibited by combined ciprofloxacin and 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine. The efflux pump genes adeA/adeB/adeC and regulatory elements adeR/adeS were detected in 23 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. The qnrA/qnrB/qnrS genes were not detected in any A. baumannii isolates analyzed. Mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions were observed in all 31 quinolone-resistant isolates. Multilocus sequence typing analyses revealed that 22 of 31 quinolone-resistant isolates belonged to ST-2, corresponding to international clonal lineage II. In conclusion, DS-8587 exhibits potent antibacterial activity against quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates that harbor mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. In the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-napthylmethyl)-piperazine, no significant changes were observed in the MIC for DS-8587. DS-8587 should be considered as a treatment option for A. baumannii including ST-2 strains that are predominant among the quinolone-resistant A. baumannii isolates found in Japan. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  7. Resistant mechanism study of benzalkonium chloride selected Salmonella Typhimurium mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Haoyan

    2014-02-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is one of the invaluable biocides that is extensively used in healthcare settings as well as in the food processing industry. After exposing wild-type Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s or its AcrAB inactivation mutant to gradually increasing levels of benzalkonium chloride, resistance mutants S-41, S-150, S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 were selected and these mutants also showed a 2-64-fold stable minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. In S-41 and S-150, the expression of acrB was increased 2.7- and 7.6-fold, and ΔtolC or ΔacrAB mutants of S-41 and S-150 showed the same MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the equivalent Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s mutants. However, in S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73, the expression of acrF was increased 96-, 230-, and 267-fold, respectively, and ΔtolC or ΔacrEF mutants of S-AB-23, S-AB-38, and S-AB-73 showed the similar MICs to all tested antimicrobials as the ΔtolC mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium 14028s. Our data showed that constitutively over-expressed AcrAB working through TolC was the main resistance mechanism in ST14028s benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants. However, after AcrAB had been inactivated, benzalkonium chloride-resistant mutants could still be selected and constitutively over-expressed, AcrEF became the dominant efflux pump working through TolC and being responsible for the increasing antimicrobial resistance. These data indicated that different mechanisms existed for acrB and acrF constitutive over-expression. Since exposure to benzalkonium chloride may lead to Salmonella mutants with a decreased susceptibility to quinolones, which is currently one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of life-threatening salmonelosis, research into the pathogenesis and epidemiology of the benzalkonium chloride resistance mutants will be of increasing importance.

  8. Quinolones in the treatment of Salmonella carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Noriega, E; Andrade-Villanueva, J; Amaya-Tapia, G

    1989-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella typhi are commonly followed by a chronic carrier state despite positive clinical and initial bacteriologic responses. The use of primary antibiotics like chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has several major drawbacks, including in some instances the failure to prevent the carrier state. The appearance worldwide of strains with multiple resistance to the most commonly used regimens has prompted the search for new forms of therapy. Among the agents studied have been third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, which are active in vitro against bacterial enteropathogens like S. typhi. Resolution of chronic carriage of S. typhi and other salmonellae is difficult, and regimens commonly fail (including those that combine antibiotic administration with removal of the gallbladder). In addition to being active in vitro against Salmonella species, the newer quinolones adequately penetrate the intestinal lumen, liver, bile, and gallbladder. Initial experience with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin in oral treatment of the chronic S. typhi carrier state in adults has been promising.

  9. High Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance and IncQ Plasmids Carrying qnrS2 Gene in Bacteria from Rivers near Hospitals and Aquaculture in China.

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    Yanping Wen

    Full Text Available Effluents from hospital and aquaculture are considered important sources of quinolone resistance. However, little information is available on the impact of this effluent on nearby rivers. In this study, 188 ciprofloxacin-resistant bacterial isolates obtained from rivers near hospitals and aquaculture were screened for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes. Species identification, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and PMQR gene transferability assessment were conducted for PMQR-positive bacteria. Representative qnrS2-encoding plasmids were subsequently sequenced using a primer-walking approach. In total, 44 isolates (23.4% were positive for qnr genes (16 qnrB2, 3 qnrS1, and 25 qnrS2 and 32 isolates (17.0% were positive for aac(6'-Ib-cr. Other PMQR genes were not detected. The qnrB2 and aac(6'-Ib-cr genes had a higher prevalence in aquaculture samples than in hospital samples, and were significantly associated with Enterobacteriaceae (p < 0.05. In contrast, the prevalence of qnrS2 was not site-related, but was significantly associated with Aeromonas spp. (p < 0.05. All PMQR isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics. Eleven qnrS2-harboring plasmids from Aeromonas spp., including a novel conjugative plasmid pHP18, were selected for sequencing. These plasmids were small in size (6,388-16,197 bp and belonged to the IncQ or IncU plasmid family, with qnrS2 being part of a mobile insertion cassette. Taken together, our findings suggest that aquaculture is a possible source for aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB2 dissemination, and demonstrate the ubiquity of qnrS2 in aquatic environments. Finally, Aeromonas spp. served as vectors for qnrS2 with the help of IncQ-type plasmids.

  10. 武汉地区7家医院连续5年喹诺酮类药用药频度与细菌耐药性分析%Analysis of the Use Density and Bacterial Resistance of Quinolones in 5 Consecutive Years in Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪震; 刘东; 沈倩倩; 杜光; 孙自镛

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the use density and bacterial resistance of quinolo-nes. Method: The consumption of quinolones in the past 5 years was investigated and the relationship between their consumption and bacterial resistance was statistically analyzed by linear correlation. Result;The resistance rates of most bacteria monitored exceeded the warning line by 30% . With the change of the use density of quinolones, the resistance rates of Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria changed in the past 5 years. There was a highly correlation between the use density of quinolones and the resistance rates of Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria. Conclusion: The bacterial resistance of quinolones was at a high level. The consumption of quinolones could create their affection on the bacterial resistance in some degree. The application of quinolones should be strictly managed to delay the bacterial resistance.%目的:研究喹诺酮类抗菌药的用量与细菌耐药率之间的关系,促进临床合理用药.方法:回顾性调查武汉地区7家医院2005~2009年喹诺酮类抗菌药的用量,并与监测菌的耐药率做相关分析.结果:大多数监测菌种对喹诺酮类药的耐药率均超过30%;鲍曼不动杆菌对喹诺酮类药的耐药率随喹诺酮类药用量的变化而变化,与喹诺酮类药总用药频度高度相关.结论:喹诺酮类药对多数常见菌种的耐药率较高,其用药频度对细菌耐药性变异也有一定影响.应严格把握喹诺酮类药的临床适应证,加强对喹诺酮类药的管理,以减少或延缓细菌耐药性的发生.

  11. 尿路分离大肠埃希菌耐药性及喹诺酮类药物耐药株危险因素病例对照研究%The drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection and risk factors of quinolone resistance strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昭勇; 张吉才; 杜毅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection and risk factors of quinolone resistance strains.Methods A total of 705 cases (strains) with Escherichia coli drug resistance isolated from urine specimens were divided into quinolone sensitive group [474 cases(strains)] and quinolone resistance group [231 cases(strains)].The risk factors of the quinolone resistance strains were analyzed.Results The sensitivity rate of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid,cefalotin,ceftazidime,aztreonam,piperacillin,amikacin,compound sulfamethoxazole,ciprofloxacin,gentamicin,levofloxacin,cefepime in quinolone resistance group was higher than that in quinolone sensitive group [50.2%(238/474) vs.78.8%(182/231),11.6%(55/474) vs.48.5%(112/231),17.9%(85/474) vs.63.2%(146/231),15.0%(71/474) vs.57.6%(133/231),3.2%(15/474) vs.27.7%(64/231),80.8%(383/474)vs.93.1%(215/231),16.0%(76/474) vs.49.8%(115/231),0 vs.100.0%(231/231),32.5% (154/474)vs.70.6% (163/231),3.8% (18/474) vs.98.7% (228/231),18.6% (88/474) vs.63.2% (146/231),P <0.05].Logistic regression analysis showed history of using the third generation cephalosporins and quinolones,urinary drainage and bacterium producing extra-broad spectrum beta-lactamase was independent risk factor for quinolone resistance Escherichia coli (P < 0.05).Conclusions The epidemic of quinolone resistance Escherichia coli isolated from urine specimens is extremely serious.The quinolone resistance is strong,and infection patients have a high medical cost and average length of stay.The quinolone resistance Escherichia coli infection has multiple independent risk factors.To strengthen the control of the independent risk factors can effectively prevent quinolone resistance strains infection spread.%目的 分析尿路感染大肠埃希菌耐药性及喹诺酮类药物耐药株感染危险因素.方法 监测705例(株)尿路感染大肠埃希菌的耐

  12. Photoprocesses in quinolone substituted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, N. Y.; Vusovich, O. V.

    2002-03-01

    In the present work the analysis of the possible ways of energy degradation of electron excited states of 4-methyl-7- hydxyquinolone-2 (Q) and its protolytic species is presented (Figure 1); a ratio of radiative and nonradiative channels of deactivation of energy of electronic excitation is established; constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercrossing conversion), proceeding after act of absorption of light are designed. Study of exited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in quinolones is interesting as a source of information on the relative importance of these processes in the photophysics and photochemistry of such molecular systems.

  13. Fluoroquinolones: is there a different mechanism of action and resistance against Streptococcus pneumoniae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, I; Simpson, I

    2000-10-01

    Starting in the 1950s, study and elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics led to the understanding of both the biology of bacteria and the mode of action of antibiotics. This holds true for the relationship between Streptococcus pneumoniae and the fluoroquinolones. A new feature in this approach is the availability of the nearly complete chromosome sequence of this major human pathogen. In S. pneumoniae, resistance appears to be mainly due to mutational alterations in the intracellular targets of the fluoroquinolones, the type II DNA topoisomerase gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Both enzymes appear to be the primary targets of the drugs in this species. Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the gyrA gene or the parC gene, which encode the A subunits of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV respectively, confer resistance to single-step mutants. Mutations in gyrB and parE, which encode the B subunits of DNA gyrase and topo IV, respectively, have also been implicated in the fluoroquinolone resistance of certain mutants obtained in vitro. The antibiotics most affected by a single mutation are those for which the mutation occurs in their preferred target e.g. gyrase for sparfloxacin and gatifloxacin and topo IV for ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. The activity of all fluoroquinolones is decreased further when two or more mutations are present. Because they possess similar targets of action, there is cross resistance, albeit at various degrees depending on the intrinsic activity of the molecule, among fluoroquinolones. This stresses, once more, the misleading concept of breakpoints for clinical categorization. A second mechanism of resistance, enhanced active efflux of hydrophilic quinolones such as norfioxacin and ciprofloxacin, is mediated by the membrane-associated protein, PmrA (pneumococcal multidrug resistance). This protein is a 12-transmembrane segment proton-dependent multidrug efflux pump of the major

  14. 喹诺酮类药物的研究进展%Research Progress of Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秋月

    2014-01-01

    喹诺酮类药物是一类人工合成的抗菌药物,目前广泛应用于临床抗感染治疗中,具有较强的抗菌活性。本文主要从喹诺酮类药物的作用机制、临床应用、不良反应及耐药机制等方面进行分析和整理,综述其研究进展并对其未来的研究方向提出了建议,希望为今后喹诺酮药物的研究提供一定的参考依据。%Quinolones are a group of synthetic antibacteril drugs with strong antibacterial activity which have a broad range of clinic applications in recent years. In this article, research progress of quinolones was analyzed and summarized from the aspects of action mechanism, clinical application, adverse reactions and drug resistance mechanism, and the future research direction of quinolones was proposed.

  15. The determination of plamid-mediated qnr gene in quinolone-resistant Shigella%氟喹诺酮耐药志贺菌中质粒介导qnr基因的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪雅萍; 应春妹; 张灏旻; 叶杨芹; 于嘉屏

    2011-01-01

    目的 检测志贺菌对氟喹诺酮抗菌药物的耐药情况,探讨氟喹诺酮耐药与志贺菌携带质粒介导qnr基因的关系.方法 用纸片扩散法对100株志贺菌(福氏志贺菌50株,宋内志贺菌50株)进行耐药性检测,聚合酶链反应(PCR)检测志贺菌质粒介导qnr基因并进行DNA测序,分析qnr基因的存在与药敏结果的关系.结果 100株志贺菌中有9株检出qnr基因,检出率为9% (9/100),福氏志贺菌为4% (2/50),宋内志贺菌为14%(7/50);qnr基因阳性菌株对氧氟沙星的耐药率(11.1%)高于阴性菌株(5.5%),但差异无统计学意义.qnr基因阳性菌株对5种氟喹诺酮药物的抑菌圈中位数比较均缩小.结论宋内志贺菌质粒介导氟喹诺酮耐药qnr基因的携带率明显高于福氏志贺菌;志贺菌若携带质粒介导qnr基因则会导致对氟喹诺酮药物的敏感性下降.%Objective To investigate the quinolone-resistance of Shigella isolates and its relationship with the plamid-mediated qnr gene. Methods A total of 100 Shigella isolates were collected. SO isolates were ShigeUa flexneri, and 50 isolates were Shigella sonnei. The drug resistance was determined by disc diffusion method. The qnr gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). The qnr gene segments were amplified and sequenced to analyze the correlation between quinolone-resistance and the presence of qnr gene. Results The qnr gene was identified in 9 (9% )of the 100 ShigeUa isolates,2 (4% ) of the 50 Shigella flexneri and 7 ( 14% ) of the 50 Shigella sonnei. The resistance rate of ofloxacin in qnr positive isolates(11. 1% ) was higher than that in qnr negative isolates(5.5% ) , but there was no statistical significance. The median diameters of 5 quinolone inhibition zones of the isolates with qnr gene were smaller than those without qnr gene. Conclusions The plamid-mediated qnr gene in Shigella sonnei isolates is more than that in Shigella flexneri isolates. The plamid-mediated qnr

  16. International collaborative study on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolated from animals, humans, food and the environment in 13 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldman, Kees; Cavaco, Lina; Mevius, Dik

    2011-01-01

    containing MIC values for Salmonella and E. coli isolated between 1994 and 2009 in animals, humans, food and the environment from 13 European countries were screened for isolates exhibiting a defined quinolone resistance phenotype, i.e. reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and nalidixic acid. PCR....... In Salmonella, qnrS1 (n = 125) and variants of qnrB (n = 138) were frequently identified, whereas qnrA1 (n = 3) and aac(6')-1b-cr (n = 3) were rarely found. qnrD was detected in 22 Salmonella isolates obtained from humans and animals. In E. coli, qnrS1 was identified in 19 isolates and qnrB19 was found in one...

  17. 全基因测序法分析肺炎克雷伯菌JM45株对喹诺酮类药物耐药基因%Analysis of quinolone-resistance genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae JM45 by whole genome sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱健铭; 姜如金; 吴康乐; 翁幸鐾; 孔海深

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the quinolone-resistance genes in pandrug-resistant K lebsiella pneumoniae JM45 and study the drug resistance mechanisms of the strain to the quinolones antibiotics .METHODS The whole genome sequencing ( completed graph)was performed by using high throughput Roche 454 sequencing approach , then the quinolone-resistance genes were analyzed ,and the molecular evolutionary analysis was performed with full-length gyrA and parC between JM45 and other 6 K .pneumoniae isolates .RESULTS A complete genome (chromosome) sequence and 2 plasmids sequences were obtained in JM45 .The size of chromosome was 5 273 812 bp (GC content :65 .8% ) ,the size of plasmid 1 was 317 156 bp (GC content :53 .0% ) ,and the size of plasmid 2 was 12 209 bp (GC content :55 .3% ) .gyrA (Feature ID :KPN_1614) and parC (Feature ID :KPN_0743) were positive in chromosome .As compared with the K .pneumoniae strains which were sensitive to quinolones ,the 83 rd codon of gyrA in JM45 changed from TCC to ATC(Ser→Ile) ,and the 80th codon of parC in JM45 changed from AGC to ATC(Ser→ Ile) .CONCLUSION Mutations of gyrA and parC in quinolone resist-ance-determining region (QRDR) play a key role in quinolone resistance of JM 45 .And the molecular evolutionary analysis of full-length gyrA and parC suggests that the closest relationship exists between JM 45 and K .pneumon-iae subsp .pneumoniae HS11286 (the same sequence) ,and that the farthest relationship exists between JM 45 and K .p neumoniae 342 .%目的:分析泛耐药肺炎克雷伯菌JM45株携带的喹诺酮类药物耐药基因,研究其对喹诺酮类药物的耐药机制。方法采用Roche454高通量测序技术对肺炎克雷伯菌JM 45株做全基因组测序(完成图),分析喹诺酮类耐药基因携带状况,再将 gy rA与p arC全长基因与其他6株肺炎克雷伯菌做分子进化分析。结果最终得到JM 45株一条完整的基因组(染色体)序列及两条质粒序列;基因组(

  18. Molecular mechanism of cisplatin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of many tumors,particularly in ovarian cancer.GST-π,metallothionein(MT), multidrug resistance associated proteins(MRPs), nucleotide excision repair(NER), mismatch repair(MMR) and oncogenes contribute to drug resistance of cisplatin.

  19. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance in ESKAPE Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirijan Santajit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species are the leading cause of nosocomial infections throughout the world. Most of them are multidrug resistant isolates, which is one of the greatest challenges in clinical practice. Multidrug resistance is amongst the top three threats to global public health and is usually caused by excessive drug usage or prescription, inappropriate use of antimicrobials, and substandard pharmaceuticals. Understanding the resistance mechanisms of these bacteria is crucial for the development of novel antimicrobial agents or other alternative tools to combat these public health challenges. Greater mechanistic understanding would also aid in the prediction of underlying or even unknown mechanisms of resistance, which could be applied to other emerging multidrug resistant pathogens. In this review, we summarize the known antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of ESKAPE pathogens.

  20. The molecular physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying the superb efficacy of quinolones%喹诺酮类药物作用的生理和遗传的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙泉鑫; 何颖; 谢建平

    2012-01-01

    氟喹诺酮类药物是目前使用最广泛的广谱抗生素,占据了全球抗生素类药物市场约18%的份额.其杀菌快速,而且具备大量的衍生物库,为药物更新换代提供了良好的基础.但这些衍生物在杀菌的速度、代谢过程中对氧需求、对蛋白合成的依赖性等方面的差异很大.从药物作用后细菌分子遗传层面的应答特征揭示各类衍生物的深层次作用机制,可以为寻找更有效的新喹诺酮类药物提供坚实基础.SOS应答、毒素-抗毒素系统,细菌程序性死亡、染色体片段化以及活性氧簇等新机制可能不同程度参与了喹诺酮类药物的杀菌过程.本文重点介绍喹诺酮作用的“二步特征”.该特征的引入有助于理解不同喹诺酮类药物的杀菌特征,也有助于开发新的喹诺酮类药物.%The fluoroquinolones are the most widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, accounting for 18% of global antibacterial market share. They can kill bacteria rapidly with variety of derivatives available. Different quinolones vary significantly in rate and spectrum of killing, oxygen requirement for metabolism and reliance upon protein synthesis. Further understanding the sophisticated mechanisms of action of this important antibiotic family based on the molecular genetic response of bacteria can facilitate the discovery of better quinolone derivatives. Factors such as SOS response, bacterial toxin-antitoxin system, programmed death, chromosome fragmentation and reactive oxygen have been implicated in the action to some extent. "Two steps characteristic" of quinolones killing is also emphasized, which might inspire future better quinolones modification.

  1. First resistance mechanisms characterization in glyphosate-resistant Leptochloa virgata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alcántara-de la Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptochloa virgata (L. P. Beauv. is an annual weed common in citrus groves in the states of Puebla and Veracruz, Mexico limiting their production. Since 2010, several L. virgata populations were identified as being resistant to glyphosate, but studies of their resistance mechanisms developed by this species have been conducted. In this work, three glyphosate-resistant populations (R8, R14 and R15 collected in citrus orchards from Mexico, were used to study their resistance mechanisms comparing them to one susceptible population (S. Dose-response and shikimic acid accumulation assays confirmed the glyphosate resistance of the three resistant populations. Higher doses of up to 720 g ae ha-1 (field dose were needed to control by 50% plants of resistant populations. The S population absorbed between 7 and 13% more 14C-glyphosate than resistant ones, and translocated up to 32.2% of 14C-glyphosate to the roots at 96 h after treatment (HAT. The R8, R14 and R15 populations translocated only 24.5, 26.5 and 21.9%, respectively. The enzyme activity of 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS was not different in the S, R8 and R14 populations. The R15 Population exhibited 165.9 times greater EPSPS activity. Additionally, this population showed a higher EPSPS basal activity and a substitution in the codon 106 from Proline to Serine in the EPSPS protein sequence. EPSPS gene expression in the R15 population was similar to that of S population. In conclusion, the three resistant L. virgata populations show reduced absorption and translocation of 14C-glyphosate. Moreover, a mutation and an enhanced EPSPS basal activity at target-site level confers higher resistance to glyphosate. These results describe for the first time the glyphosate resistance mechanisms developed by resistant L. virgata populations of citrus orchards from Mexico.

  2. First Resistance Mechanisms Characterization in Glyphosate-Resistant Leptochloa virgata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia M.; Giménez, María J.; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo E.; Domínguez-Valenzuela, José A.; Barro, Francisco; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Leptochloa virgata (L.) P. Beauv. is an annual weed common in citrus groves in the states of Puebla and Veracruz, Mexico limiting their production. Since 2010, several L. virgata populations were identified as being resistant to glyphosate, but studies of their resistance mechanisms developed by this species have been conducted. In this work, three glyphosate-resistant populations (R8, R14, and R15) collected in citrus orchards from Mexico, were used to study their resistance mechanisms comparing them to one susceptible population (S). Dose-response and shikimic acid accumulation assays confirmed the glyphosate resistance of the three resistant populations. Higher doses of up to 720 g ae ha-1 (field dose) were needed to control by 50% plants of resistant populations. The S population absorbed between 7 and 13% more 14C-glyphosate than resistant ones, and translocated up to 32.2% of 14C-glyphosate to the roots at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The R8, R14, and R15 populations translocated only 24.5, 26.5, and 21.9%, respectively. The enzyme activity of 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) was not different in the S, R8 and R14 populations. The R15 Population exhibited 165.9 times greater EPSPS activity. Additionally, this population showed a higher EPSPS basal activity and a substitution in the codon 106 from Proline to Serine in the EPSPS protein sequence. EPSPS gene expression in the R15 population was similar to that of S population. In conclusion, the three resistant L. virgata populations show reduced absorption and translocation of 14C-glyphosate. Moreover, a mutation and an enhanced EPSPS basal activity at target-site level confers higher resistance to glyphosate. These results describe for the first time the glyphosate resistance mechanisms developed by resistant L. virgata populations of citrus orchards from Mexico. PMID:27917189

  3. Antifungal Agents: Mode of Action, Mechanisms of Resistance, and Correlation of These Mechanisms with Bacterial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Rice, Louis B

    1999-01-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to ...

  4. Correlation of Mutation Patterns in gyrA and parC Genes in Ureaplasma Urealyticum Isolates with Quinolones Resistance%gyrA和parC基因突变与解脲支原体喹诺酮类药物耐药相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春燕; 杜江; 吴森林; 孙爱华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze mutations in the quinolone -resistance - determining - region ( QRDR) within genes of gyrA and parC patterns in gyrA and parC genes and quinolones resistance in ureaplasma urealyticum(Uu) isolates. Methods Mycoplasma detection kits were used to culture and identificate mycoplasma as well as drug sensitivity. PCR and DNA sequencing were conducted to analyze QRDR associated genes of gyrA and parC in 42 isolates. Results Only 1 isolate susceptible to all quinolones. Fourty - one isolates showed varying degree resistance to at least one kind of quinolones. Sequencing analysis of gyrA and parC revealed that the susceptible i-solate and 1 resistance isolate had no mutation, Fourty resistance isolates had mutation of D112E and/or S83L in GyrA and ParC. Conclusion Three quinolones should not be routine therapy for ureaplasma urealyticum infections. Mutations in gyrA and parC genes play an important role in the development of quinolones resistance in ureaplasma urealyticum.%目的 探讨解脲支原体gyrA和parC基因喹诺酮耐药决定区(QRDR)突变与喹诺酮类药物耐药的相关性.方法 用支原体培养、鉴定和药敏一体化试剂盒分离获得42株解脲支原体并检测对3种喹诺酮类药物的耐药性,同时PCR法扩增临床分离株的gyrA和parC基因喹诺酮耐药决定区并进行测序分析.结果 对3种喹诺酮均敏感1株,41株至少对1种药物呈现不同程度耐药.gyrA和parC基因喹诺酮耐药决定区测序发现上述敏感株和1株耐药株不发生突变,其余40株耐药株gyrA和parC基因发生D112E和(或)S83L突变.结论 3种喹诺酮类药物耐药均较严重,已不适合作为临床推荐用药,解脲支原体gyrA和parC基因喹诺酮耐药决定区突变与耐药密切相关.

  5. Resistance mechanisms to arsenicals and antimonials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    Salts and organic derivatives of arsenic and antimony are quite toxic. Living organisms have adapted to this toxicity by the evolution of resistance mechanisms. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells develop resistance when exposed to arsenicals or antimonials. In the case of bacteria resistance is conferred by plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operons. The genes and gene products of the ars operon of the clinically-isolated conjugative R-factor R773 have been identified and their mechanism of action elucidated. The operon encodes an ATP-driven pump that extrudes arsenite and antimonite from the cells. The lowering of their intracellular concentration results in resistance. Arsenate resistance results from the action of the plasmid-encoded arsenate reductase that reduces arsenate to arsenite, which is then pumped out of the cell.

  6. ESBL, plasmidic AmpC, and associated quinolone resistance determinants in coliforms isolated from hospital effluent: first report of qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, and blaCMY-4 in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anssour, Lynda; Messai, Yamina; Derkaoui, Meriem; Alouache, Souhila; Estepa, Vanesa; Somalo, Sergio; Torres, Carmen; Bakour, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    The characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases , plasmidic AmpC (pAmpC), and associated plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in cefotaxime-resistant coliforms isolated from hospital effluent in Algiers showed blaCTX-M genes in 89%, blaTEM-1 in 79·8%, and pAmpC genes (blaCIT) in 2·7% isolates. Association of ISEcp1B with blaCTX-M was found in all CTX-M+ isolates, and 97·2% harboured class 1 integrons. Sequencing showed blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-3, and blaCMY-4 genes. blaCTX-M-3 and blaCTX-M-15 were located in Inc L/M conjugative plasmids. The PMQR determinants identified were qnrB1, qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, qnrS2, and aac(6')-Ib-cr. qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, and blaCMY-4 are described for the first time in Algeria and qnrB19 for the first time in non-clinical environments. This study highlights the major potential role of hospital effluents as providers of resistance genes to natural environments.

  7. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  8. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2014-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  10. Molecular analysis of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vanessa G; Farrell, David J; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Tan, Jingyuan; Tijet, Nathalie; Perusini, Stephen J; Towns, Lynn; Lo, Stephen; Low, Donald E; Melano, Roberto G

    2011-02-01

    Surveillance of gonococcal antimicrobial resistance and the molecular characterization of the mechanisms underlying these resistance phenotypes are essential in order to establish correct empirical therapies, as well as to describe the emergence of new mechanisms in local bacterial populations. To address these goals, 149 isolates were collected over a 1-month period (October-November 2008) at the Ontario Public Health Laboratory, Toronto, Canada, and susceptibility profiles (8 antibiotics) were examined. Mutations in previously identified targets or the presence of some enzymes related to resistance (r), nonsusceptibility (ns) (resistant plus intermediate categories), or reduced susceptibility (rs) to the antibiotics tested were also studied. A significant proportion of nonsusceptibility to penicillin (PEN) (89.2%), tetracycline (TET) (72.3%), ciprofloxacin (CIP) (29%), and macrolides (erythromycin [ERY] and azithromycin; 22.3%) was found in these strains. Multidrug resistance was observed in 18.8% of the collection. Although all the strains were susceptible to spectinomycin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) (ceftriaxone and cefixime), 9.4% of them displayed reduced susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. PBP 2 mosaic structures were found in all of these ESC(rs) isolates. Alterations in the mtrR promoter, MtrR repressor (TET(r), PEN(ns), ESC(rs), and ERY(ns)), porin PIB (TET(r) and PEN(ns)), and ribosomal protein S10 (TET(r)) and double mutations in gyrA and parC quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) (CIP(r)) were associated with and presumably responsible for the resistance phenotypes observed. This is the first description of ESC(rs) in Canada. The detection of this phenotype indicates a change in the epidemiology of this resistance and highlights the importance of continued surveillance to preserve the last antimicrobial options available.

  11. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes through induction of insulin resistance. Treatment of type 2 diabetes has been limited by little translational knowledge of insulin resistance although there have been several well-documented hypotheses for insulin resistance. In those hypotheses, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia and lipotoxicity have been the major concepts and have received a lot of attention. Oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, genetic background, aging, fatty liver, hypoxia and lipodystrophy are active subjects in the study of these concepts. However, none of those concepts or views has led to an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. The reason is that there has been no consensus for a unifying mechanism of insulin resistance. In this review article, literature is critically analyzed and reinterpreted for a new energy-based concept of insulin resistance, in which insulin resistance is a result of energy surplus in cells. The energy surplus signal is mediated by ATP and sensed by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Decreasing ATP level by suppression of production or stimulation of utilization is a promising approach in the treatment of insulin resistance. In support, many of existing insulin sensitizing medicines inhibit ATP production in mitochondria. The effective therapies such as weight loss, exercise, and caloric restriction all reduce ATP in insulin sensitive cells. This new concept provides a unifying cellular and molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, which may apply to insulin resistance in aging and lipodystrophy. PMID:23471659

  12. Mechanisms of insulin resistance in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    Obesity increases the risk for type 2 diabetes through induction of insulin resistance. Treatment of type 2 diabetes has been limited by little translational knowledge of insulin resistance although there have been several well-documented hypotheses for insulin resistance. In those hypotheses, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperinsulinemia and lipotoxicity have been the major concepts and have received a lot of attention. Oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, genetic background, aging, fatty liver, hypoxia and lipodystrophy are active subjects in the study of these concepts. However, none of those concepts or views has led to an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. The reason is that there has been no consensus for a unifying mechanism of insulin resistance. In this review article, literature is critically analyzed and reinterpreted for a new energy-based concept of insulin resistance, in which insulin resistance is a result of energy surplus in cells. The energy surplus signal is mediated by ATP and sensed by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Decreasing ATP level by suppression of production or stimulation of utilization is a promising approach in the treatment of insulin resistance. In support, many of existing insulin sensitizing medicines inhibit ATP production in mitochondria. The effective therapies such as weight loss, exercise, and caloric restriction all reduce ATP in insulin sensitive cells. This new concept provides a unifying cellular and molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, which may apply to insulin resistance in aging and lipodystrophy.

  13. Mechanisms of Resistance to Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Adriana; Di Venosa, Gabriela; Hasan, Tayyaba; Batlle, Alcira

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of a photosensitizer (PS) followed by illumination with visible light, leading to generation of reactive oxygen species. The mechanisms of resistance to PDT ascribed to the PS may be shared with the general mechanisms of drug resistance, and are related to altered drug uptake and efflux rates or altered intracellular trafficking. As a second step, an increased inactivation of oxygen reactive species is also associated to PDT resistance via antioxidant detoxifying enzymes and activation of heat shock proteins. Induction of stress response genes also occurs after PDT, resulting in modulation of proliferation, cell detachment and inducing survival pathways among other multiple extracellular signalling events. In addition, an increased repair of induced damage to proteins, membranes and occasionally to DNA may happen. PDT-induced tissue hypoxia as a result of vascular damage and photochemical oxygen consumption may also contribute to the appearance of resistant cells. The structure of the PS is believed to be a key point in the development of resistance, being probably related to its particular subcellular localization. Although most of the features have already been described for chemoresistance, in many cases, no cross-resistance between PDT and chemotherapy has been reported. These findings are in line with the enhancement of PDT efficacy by combination with chemotherapy. The study of cross resistance in cells with developed resistance against a particular PS challenged against other PS is also highly complex and comprises different mechanisms. In this review we will classify the different features observed in PDT resistance, leading to a comparison with the mechanisms most commonly found in chemo resistant cells. PMID:21568910

  14. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    insulin action from receptor to the alteration of blood glucose. Hence, in order to ... and regulation of the insulin receptor in our efforts to unravel the cause of this ... defined mechanisms of signal transduction. Structure ..... found in muscle and fat is the most important and mediates ..... glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  15. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Olumuyiwa Olaitan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp. and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins.Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin, including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  17. Mechanisms of resistance to paraquat in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this brief review is to draw information from studies of the mechanism of evolved resistance in weeds, together with information from laboratory studies of paraquat tolerance in model plants. Plants having mutations that limit paraquat uptake into cytoplasm, that confer various stress tolerances or that have transgenes that co-express two or more of the chloroplast Halliwell-Asada cycle enzymes can all exhibit enhanced tolerance to paraquat. However, none of these mechanisms correspond to the high-level resistances that have evolved naturally in weeds. Most, but not all, of the evidence from studies of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds can reasonably be reconciled with the proposal of a single major gene mechanism that sequesters paraquat away from chloroplasts and into the vacuole. However, the molecular details of this putative mechanism remain ill-defined.

  18. The regioselective iodination of quinolines, quinolones, pyridones, pyridines and uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Uttam; Deb, Arghya; Lupton, David W; Maiti, Debabrata

    2015-12-28

    A radical based direct C-H iodination protocol for quinolines, quinolones, pyridones, pyridines, and uracil has been developed. The iodination occurs in a C3 selective manner for quinolines and quinolones. Pyridones and pyridines undergo C3 and C5 iodination, while dimethyl uracil undergoes C5 iodination. Scope of the method was demonstrated through the rapid synthesis of both electron rich as well as electron poor heteroaromatic iodides. The protocol was found to be scalable and general, while a mechanism has been proposed.

  19. Antifungal agents: mode of action, mechanisms of resistance, and correlation of these mechanisms with bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, M A; Rice, L B

    1999-10-01

    The increased use of antibacterial and antifungal agents in recent years has resulted in the development of resistance to these drugs. The significant clinical implication of resistance has led to heightened interest in the study of antimicrobial resistance from different angles. Areas addressed include mechanisms underlying this resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, alternate options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms, and strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of resistance. In this review, the mode of action of antifungals and their mechanisms of resistance are discussed. Additionally, an attempt is made to discuss the correlation between fungal and bacterial resistance. Antifungals can be grouped into three classes based on their site of action: azoles, which inhibit the synthesis of ergosterol (the main fungal sterol); polyenes, which interact with fungal membrane sterols physicochemically; and 5-fluorocytosine, which inhibits macromolecular synthesis. Many different types of mechanisms contribute to the development of resistance to antifungals. These mechanisms include alteration in drug target, alteration in sterol biosynthesis, reduction in the intercellular concentration of target enzyme, and overexpression of the antifungal drug target. Although the comparison between the mechanisms of resistance to antifungals and antibacterials is necessarily limited by several factors defined in the review, a correlation between the two exists. For example, modification of enzymes which serve as targets for antimicrobial action and the involvement of membrane pumps in the extrusion of drugs are well characterized in both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

  20. Chemical structure and pharmacokinetics of novel quinolone agents represented by avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bela; Domokos, J; Szabo, D

    2016-05-23

    Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents with a basic chemical structure of bicyclic ring. Fluorine atom at position C-6 and various substitutions on the basic quinolone structure yielded fluoroquinolones, namely norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and numerous other agents. The target molecules of quinolones and fluoroquinolones are bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. Broad-spectrum and excellent tissue penetration make fluoroquinolones potent agents but their toxic side effects and increasing number of resistant pathogens set limits on their use. This review focuses on recent advances concerning quinolones and fluoroquinolones, we will be summarising chemical structure, mode of action, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. We will be describing fluoroquinolones introduced in clinical trials, namely avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and non-fluorinated nemonoxacin. These agents have been proved to have enhanced antibacterial effect even against ciprofloxacin resistant pathogens, and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features are going to make them potential antimicrobial agents in the future.

  1. Proteome studies of bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Psaroulaki, Anna; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Tselentis, Yannis; Gevaert, Kris; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-31

    Ever since antibiotics were used to help humanity battle infectious diseases, microorganisms straight away fought back. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms indeed provide microbes with possibilities to by-pass and survive the action of antibiotic drugs. Several methods have been employed to identify these microbial resistance mechanisms in an ongoing effort to reduce the steadily increasing number of treatment failures due to multi-drug-resistant microbes. Proteomics has evolved to an important tool for this area of research. Following rapid advances in whole genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have been widely used to investigate microbial gene expression. This review highlights the contribution of proteomics in identifying microbial drug resistance mechanisms. It summarizes different proteomic studies on bacteria resistant to different antibiotic drugs. The review further includes an overview of the methodologies used, as well as lists key proteins identified, thus providing the reader not only a summary of research already done, but also directions for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  2. The Magnitude of the Association between Fluoroquinolone Use and Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae May Be Lower than Previously Reported

    OpenAIRE

    Bolon, Maureen K.; Wright, Sharon B.; Gold, Howard S.; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2004-01-01

    Case-control analyses of resistant versus susceptible isolates have implicated fluoroquinolone exposure as a strong risk factor for fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. We suspect that such methodology may overestimate this association. A total of 84 cases with fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates and 578 cases with fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared with 608 hospitalized controls in parallel multivariable analyse...

  3. Improving quinolone use in hospitals by using a bundle of interventions in an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Ina; Cooper, Ben; van Buitenen, Carin; Winters, Marjolein; Andriesse, Gunnar; Kluytmans, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of multiple targeted interventions on the level of use of quinolones and the observed rates of resistance to quinolones in Escherichia coli isolates from hospitalized patients. A bundle consisting of four interventions to improve the use of quinolones was implemented. The outcome was measured from the monthly levels of use of intravenous (i.v.) and oral quinolones and the susceptibility patterns for E. coli isolates from hospitalized patients. Statistical analyses were performed using segmented regression analysis and segmented Poisson regression models. Before the bundle was implemented, the annual use of quinolones was 2.7 defined daily doses (DDDs)/100 patient days. After the interventions, in 2007, this was reduced to 1.7 DDDs/100 patient days. The first intervention, a switch from i.v. to oral medication, was associated with a stepwise reduction in i.v. quinolone use of 71 prescribed daily doses (PDDs) per month (95% confidence interval [CI] = 47 to 95 PDDs/month, P quinolones (reduction, 107 PDDs/month [95% CI = 58 to 156 PDDs/month). Before the interventions the quinolone resistance rate was increasing, on average, by 4.6% (95% CI = 2.6 to 6.1%) per year. This increase leveled off, which was associated with intervention 2 and intervention 4, active monitoring of prescriptions and feedback. Trends in resistance to other antimicrobial agents did not change. This study showed that the hospital-wide use of quinolones can be significantly reduced by an active policy consisting of multiple interventions. There was also a stepwise reduction in the rate of quinolone resistance associated with the bundle of interventions.

  4. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Resistance exists against every effective anticancer drug and can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, activation of detoxifying systems, activation of DNA repair mechanisms, evasion of drug-induced apoptosis, etc. In the first part of this chapter, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on individual cellular mechanisms responsible for MDR, with a special emphasis on ATP-binding cassette transporters, perhaps the main theme of this textbook. Although extensive work has been done to characterize MDR mechanisms in vitro, the translation of this knowledge to the clinic has not been crowned with success. Therefore, identifying genes and mechanisms critical to the development of MDR in vivo and establishing a reliable method for analyzing clinical samples could help to predict the development of resistance and lead to treatments designed to circumvent it. Our thoughts about translational research needed to achieve significant progress in the understanding of this complex phenomenon are therefore discussed in a third section. The pleotropic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy is summarized in a concluding diagram.

  5. Non-Phenotypic Tests to Detect and Characterize Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Agnese; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Sendi, Parham; Bonomo, Robert A.; Endimiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades, we have observed a rapid increase of infections due to multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Regrettably, these isolates possess genes encoding for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (e.g., blaCTX-M, blaTEM, blaSHV) or plasmid-mediated AmpCs (e.g., blaCMY) that confer resistance to last-generation cephalosporins. Furthermore, other resistance traits against quinolones (e.g., mutations in gyrA and parC, qnr elements) and aminoglycosides (e.g., aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and 16S rRNA methylases) are also frequently co-associated. Even more concerning is the rapid increase of Enterobacteriaceae carrying genes conferring resistance to carbapenems (e.g., blaKPC, blaNDM). Therefore, the spread of these pathogens puts in peril our antibiotic options. Unfortunately, standard microbiological procedures require several days to isolate the responsible pathogen and to provide correct antimicrobial susceptibility test results. This delay impacts the rapid implementation of adequate antimicrobial treatment and infection control countermeasures. Thus, there is emerging interest in the early and more sensitive detection of resistance mechanisms. Modern non-phenotypic tests are promising in this respect, and hence, can influence both clinical outcome and healthcare costs. In this review, we present a summary of the most advanced methods (e.g., next-generation DNA sequencing, multiplex PCRs, real-time PCRs, microarrays, MALDITOF MS, and PCR/ESI MS) presently available for the rapid detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae. Taking into account speed, manageability, accuracy, versatility, and costs, the possible settings of application (research, clinic, and epidemiology) of these methods and their superiority against standard phenotypic methods are discussed. PMID:24091103

  6. Glioblastoma Multiforme Therapy and Mechanisms of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulian P. Ramirez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV brain tumor characterized by a heterogeneous population of cells that are highly infiltrative, angiogenic and resistant to chemotherapy. The current standard of care, comprised of surgical resection followed by radiation and the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide, only provides patients with a 12–14 month survival period post-diagnosis. Long-term survival for GBM patients remains uncommon as cells with intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment repopulate the tumor. In this review we will describe the mechanisms of resistance, and how they may be overcome to improve the survival of GBM patients by implementing novel chemotherapy drugs, new drug combinations and new approaches relating to DNA damage, angiogenesis and autophagy.

  7. Mechanisms of Anticancer Drugs Resistance: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Chorawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of cancer involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Development of chemoresistance is a persistent problem during the chemotherapy treatment. Cytotoxic drugs that selectively, but not exclusively, target actively proliferating cells include such diverse groups as DNA-alkylating agents, anti-metabolites, intercalating agents and mitotic inhibitors. Resistance constitutes a lack of response to drug-induced tumour growth inhibition; it may be inherent in a subpopulation of heterogeneous cancer cells or be acquired as a cellular response to drug exposure. Principle mechanisms may include altered membrane transport involving the p-glycoprotein product of the multidrug resistance (MDR gene as well as other associated proteins, altered target enzyme, decreased drug activation, increased drug degradation due to altered expression of drug metabolising enzymes, drug inactivation due to conjugation with increased glutathione, subcellular redistribution, drug interaction, enhanced DNA repair and failure to apoptosis as a result of mutated cell cycle proteins such as p53. Attempts to overcome resistance involves the use of combination drug therapy using different classes of drugs with minimally overlapping toxicities to allow maximal dosages, necessary for bone marrow recovery. Adjuvant therapy with p-glycoprotein inhibitors and in specific instances, the use of growth factor and protein kinase C inhibitors are newer experimental approaches that may also prove effective in delaying onset of resistance. Gene knockout using antisense molecules may be effective way of blocking drug resistance.

  8. The effects of oral and intramuscular administration and dose escalation of enrofloxacin on the selection of quinolone resistance among Salmonella and coliforms in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Lykkesfeldt, J.; Svendsen, O.;

    2003-01-01

    The effect of route of administration and dose of enrofloxacin (Baytril(R)) on the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella and Escherichia coli in the intestinal tract of pigs was investigated. Healthy pigs at the age of 8-10 weeks were infected with a mixture of susceptible wild-...

  9. Analysis of the Fluoroquinolone Antibiotic Resistance Mechanism of Salmonella enterica Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Young; Lee, Si-Kyung; Park, Myeong-Soo; Na, Hun-Taek

    2016-09-28

    Quinolone-resistant Salmonella strains were isolated from patient samples, and several quinolone-sensitive strains were used to analyze mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE and to screen for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Among the 21 strains that showed resistance to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin (MIC 0.125-2.0 μg/ml), 17 strains had a mutation in QRDR codon 87 of gyrA, and 3 strains had a single mutation (Ser83 → Phe). Another cause of resistance, efflux pump regulation, was studied by examining the expression of acrB, ramA, marA, and soxS. Five strains, including Sal-KH1 and Sal-KH2, showed no increase in relative expression in an analysis using the qRT-PCR method (p < 0.05). In order to determine the genes involved in the resistance, the Sal-9 isolate that showed decreased susceptibility and did not contain a mutation in the gyrA QRDR was used to make the STM (MIC 8 μg/ml) and STH (MIC 16 μg/ml) ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. The gyrA QRDR Asp87 → Gly mutation was identified in both the STM and STH mutants by mutation analysis. qRT-PCR analysis of the efflux transporter acrB of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system showed increased expression levels in both the STM (1.79-fold) and STH (2.0-fold) mutants. In addition, the expression of the transcriptional regulator marA was increased in both the STM (6.35-fold) and STH (21.73-fold) mutants. Moreover, the expression of soxS was increased in the STM (3.41-fold) and STH (10.05-fold) mutants (p < 0.05). Therefore, these results indicate that AcrAB-TolC efflux pump activity and the target site mutation in gyrA are involved in quinolone resistance.

  10. Molecular mechanism of the qnrA gene-mediated quionlone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG SHENG XIAO; JIAN LU; WEI YUAN WU; CHUANG HONG WU; LI XIA WEN

    2007-01-01

    To explore the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene qnrA in Gramnegative bacteria and to investigate its molecular genetic background and resistance profile in isolates harboring this gene, a total of 629 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates of non-repetitive Gram-negative bacteria were collected from clinical specimens between April 2004 and April 2006 and these isolates were screened for qnrA gene by PCR using specific primers combined with DNA sequencing. The extended spectnan β-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC-producing isolates were distinguished by the phenotypic confirmatory test combined with DNA sequencing, and the antibiotics susceptibility test for qnrA-positive isolates was carried out by Kirby-Bauer and E-test method. To detect the location of the qnrA gene, plasmid conjugation and Southern hybridization were performed and the integron structure containing the qnrA gene was cloned by PCR strategy and sequenced by primer walking. It was demonstrated that the incidence of the qnrA-positive strains in nalidixic acid-resistant bacteria was 1.9% (12/629), in which the detection rates for Klebiesiella pneumoniae. Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes,Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella choeraesuis were 2.2% (3/138), 17. 1% (6/35), 9. 1%(1/11), 12.5% (1/8), and 14.3% (1/7), respectively. The qnrA gene was found to be embedded in the complex su/1-type integron located on plasmids with varied size (80-180 kb). Among them, 4qnrA-positive isolates carried integron In37 and 8 isolates carried a novel integron, temporarily designated as InX. All the qnrA-positive isolates were ESBL-producing and transferable for the multi-drug resistance. It is concluded that the plasmid-mediated drug-resistance mechanism exists in the quinolone resistant strains of isolates from hospitals in Guangdong area, but the incidence was rather low. Nevertheless, it is still possible that the horizontal transfer of the resistant qnrA gene might lead to the spreading of

  11. Comparative in vitro activities of nemonoxacin (TG-873870), a novel nonfluorinated quinolone, and other quinolones against clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Lai, Jui-Fen; Chen, Hua-Chien; King, Chi-Hsin R

    2010-03-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of nemonoxacin (TG-873870), a novel nonfluorinated quinolone, against 770 clinical isolates were investigated. Nemonoxacin (tested as its malate salt, TG-875649) showed better in vitro activity than ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against different species of staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae. The in vitro activity of TG-875649 was also comparable to or better than that of moxifloxacin against these pathogens, which included ciprofloxacin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  12. Actualidad de las quinolonas Present situation of quinolones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    2005-04-01

    the addition of a piperazinyl group in position 7 and an atom of fluor in position 6 made possible the development of a series of antibacterial agents called piperazinyl fluoroquinolones, or simply fluoroquinolones . The first of them was norfloxacin, with which a greater antimicrobial activity of the group and its systemic use was achieved. For years, the fluoroquinolones were considered as an homogeneous group of antibiotics with similar characteristics and, therefore, as the second and last possibility of generation of quinilones, but the chances of transformation of their chemical structure have produced a vertiginous development of this group, which makes it the most accelerated within the antibiotics, with compounds of higher antibacterial spectrum, tissue penetration and safety and with a lower manifestation of antimicrobial resistance that has been proved up to now. At present, there are 4 generations of quinolones, their use is wider and their development continues. As a result of it, it is made a review that includes spectrum and mechanism of action, bacterial resistance, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, adverse effects, indications and dosage of the most used

  13. Distribution characteristics and drug resistant analysis of plasmid-mediated quinolone drug resistant gene qnr of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates separated from sputum samples in our hospital%痰标本中质粒介导喹诺酮耐药基因qnr在肺炎克雷伯菌中的分布特征及耐药分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    菅凌燕; 何晓静; 于莹

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解从痰标本中分离出的肺炎克雷伯菌对16种抗茵药物的耐药性,以及研究由质粒介导的喹诺酮类耐药基因qnr在肺炎克雷伯菌中的存在情况.方法:用PCR及直接测序的方法对135株肺炎克雷伯菌进行qnr基因检测,并用K-B纸片法检测其对16种抗茵药物的体外抗菌活性.另外,用琼脂平皿二倍稀释法检测阳性菌株对左氧氟沙星的MIC值.结果:135株肺炎克雷伯菌中,9株(6.6%)检出qnr基因.阳性菌株均对亚胺培南敏感且对多种抗生素耐药,其中2株qnr阳性菌株对左氧氟沙星敏感.结论:肺炎克雷伯菌中存在质粒介导喹诺酮类耐药基因qnr基因,qnr阳性菌株呈现多重耐药.临床工作中,应加强对耐药基因的监测,降低细菌耐药的发生.%OBJECTIVE To explore the drug resistant characteristics to 16 kinds of antibiotics and the distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone drug resistant gene qnr of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates separated from sputum samples. METHODS By using PCR and direct sequencing method, the gene qnr of Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected. Then, the antibacterial activities of 16 kinds of antibiotics on Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in vitro were studied. Finally, was detected the MIC value of levofloxacin on gene qnr positive Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates with agar plate two-fold dilution method. RESULTS Among all 135 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, 9 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates was determined with gene qnr. These isolates were all sensitive to imipenem and resistant to the other kinds of antibiotics. There were also 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates sensitive to levofloxacin. CONCLUSION There are plasmid-mediated quinolone drug resistant gene qnr in our hospital. Qnr positive i-solates were multi-drug resistant. In clinic, we should pay attention to monitor on drug resistant genes and decrease the frequencies of drug resistant.

  14. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more

  15. Recent progress in the development of anti-malarial quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beteck, Richard M; Smit, Frans J; Haynes, Richard K; N'Da, David D

    2014-08-30

    Available anti-malarial tools have over the ten-year period prior to 2012 dramatically reduced the number of fatalities due to malaria from one million to less than six-hundred and thirty thousand. Although fewer people now die from malaria, emerging resistance to the first-line anti-malarial drugs, namely artemisinins in combination with quinolines and arylmethanols, necessitates the urgent development of new anti-malarial drugs to curb the disease. The quinolones are a promising class of compounds, with some demonstrating potent in vitro activity against the malaria parasite. This review summarizes the progress made in the development of potential anti-malarial quinolones since 2008. The efficacy of these compounds against both asexual blood stages and other stages of the malaria parasite, the nature of putative targets, and a comparison of these properties with anti-malarial drugs currently in clinical use, are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazolo[4,5-h]quinolone Derivatives with Novel Anti-Microbial Properties against Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sini, Mohammad; Mayyas, Amal; Al-Karablieh, Nehaya; Darwish, Rula; Al-Hiari, Yusuf; Aburjai, Talal; Arabiyat, Shereen; Abu-Qatouseh, Luay

    2017-05-20

    Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer, and the development of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Treatment and eradication of H. pylori infection can prevent relapse and accelerate the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers as well as regression of malignancy. Due to the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates of H. pylori, alternative approaches using newly discovered antimicrobial agents in combination with the standard antibiotic regimens for the treatment of H. pylori are of major importance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of newly synthesized 8-amino 7-substituted fluoroquinolone and their correspondent cyclized triazolo derivatives when either alone or combined with metronidazole against metronidazole-resistant H. pylori. Based on standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods and checkerboard titration assay, all of the tested compounds showed interesting antimicrobial activity against 12 clinical strains of H. pylori, with best in vitro effect for compounds 4b and 4c. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) mean values showed synergistic pattern in all compounds of Group 5. In addition, additive activities of some of the tested compounds of Group 4 were observed when combined with metronidazole. In contrast, the tested compounds showed no significant urease inhibition activity. These results support the potential of new fluoroquinolone derivatives to be useful in combination with anti-H. pylori drugs in the management of H. pylori-associated diseases.

  17. Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Heterocyclic Quinolones Targeting the Respiratory Chain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, W David; Gibbons, Peter D; Leung, Suet C; Amewu, Richard; Stocks, Paul A; Stachulski, Andrew; Horta, Pedro; Cristiano, Maria L S; Shone, Alison E; Moss, Darren; Ardrey, Alison; Sharma, Raman; Warman, Ashley J; Bedingfield, Paul T P; Fisher, Nicholas E; Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Mead, Sally; Caws, Maxine; Berry, Neil G; Ward, Stephen A; Biagini, Giancarlo A; O'Neill, Paul M; Nixon, Gemma L

    2017-05-11

    A high-throughput screen (HTS) was undertaken against the respiratory chain dehydrogenase component, NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase (Ndh) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The 11000 compounds were selected for the HTS based on the known phenothiazine Ndh inhibitors, trifluoperazine and thioridazine. Combined HTS (11000 compounds) and in-house screening of a limited number of quinolones (50 compounds) identified ∼100 hits and four distinct chemotypes, the most promising of which contained the quinolone core. Subsequent Mtb screening of the complete in-house quinolone library (350 compounds) identified a further ∼90 hits across three quinolone subtemplates. Quinolones containing the amine-based side chain were selected as the pharmacophore for further modification, resulting in metabolically stable quinolones effective against multi drug resistant (MDR) Mtb. The lead compound, 42a (MTC420), displays acceptable antituberculosis activity (Mtb IC50 = 525 nM, Mtb Wayne IC50 = 76 nM, and MDR Mtb patient isolates IC50 = 140 nM) and favorable pharmacokinetic and toxicological profiles.

  18. [The history of the development and changes of quinolone antibacterial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Isao; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The quinolones, especially the new quinolones (the 6-fluoroquinolones), are the synthetic antibacterial agents to rival the Beta-lactam and the macrolide antibacterials for impact in clinical usage in the antibacterial therapeutic field. They have a broad antibacterial spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and mycobacterial pathogens as well as anaerobes. Further, they show good-to-moderate oral absorption and tissue penetration with favorable pharmacokinetics in humans resulting in high clinical efficacy in the treatment of many kinds of infections. They also exhibit excellent safety profiles as well as those of oral Beta-lactam antibiotics. The bacterial effects of quinolones inhibit the function of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The history of the development of the quinolones originated from nalidixic acid (NA), developed in 1962. In addition, the breakthrough in the drug design for the scaffold and the basic side chains have allowed improvements to be made to the first new quinolone, norfloxacin (NFLX), patented in 1978. Although currently more than 10,000 compounds have been already synthesized in the world, only two percent of them were developed and tested in clinical studies. Furthermore, out of all these compounds, only twenty have been successfully launched into the market. In this paper, the history of the development and changes of the quinolones are described from the first quinolone, NA, via, the first new quinolone (6-fluorinated quinolone) NFLX, to the latest extended-spectrum quinolone antibacterial agents against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. NA has only modest activity against Gram-negative bacteria and low oral absorption, therefore a suitable candidate for treatment of systemic infections (UTIs) is required. Since the original discovery of NA, a series of quinolones, which are referred to as the old quinolones, have been developed leading to the first new quinolone, NFLX, with moderate improvements

  19. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  20. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  1. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, phenotypes, and mechanisms of Gram-negative bacteria from infected patients in upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Gamal F; Mohamed, Heba A; Ashour, Hossam M

    2011-02-17

    With the re-emergence of older antibiotics as valuable choices for treatment of serious infections, we studied the aminoglycoside resistance of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with ear, urinary tract, skin, and gastrointestinal tract infections at Minia university hospital in Egypt. Escherichia coli (mainly from urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract infections) was the most prevalent isolate (28.57%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.7%) (mainly from ear discharge and skin infections). Isolates exhibited maximal resistance against streptomycin (83.4%), and minimal resistance against amikacin (17.7%) and intermediate degrees of resistance against neomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Resistance to older aminoglycosides was higher than newer aminoglycosides. The most common aminoglycoside resistance phenotype was that of streptomycin resistance, present as a single phenotype or in combination, followed by kanamycin-neomycin as determined by interpretative reading. The resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were capable of producing aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and using efflux as mechanisms of resistance. Using checkerboard titration method, the most frequently-observed outcome in combinations of aminoglycosides with β-lactams or quinolones was synergism. The most effective combination was amikacin with ciprofloxacin (100% Synergism), whereas the least effective combination was gentamicin with amoxicillin (53.3% Synergistic, 26.7% additive, and 20% indifferent FIC indices). Whereas the studied combinations were additive and indifferent against few of the tested strains, antagonism was never observed. The high resistance rates to aminoglycosides exhibited by Gram-negative bacteria in this study could be attributed to the selective pressure of aminoglycoside usage which could be controlled by successful implementation of infection control measures.

  2. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, phenotypes, and mechanisms of Gram-negative bacteria from infected patients in upper Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal F Gad

    Full Text Available With the re-emergence of older antibiotics as valuable choices for treatment of serious infections, we studied the aminoglycoside resistance of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients with ear, urinary tract, skin, and gastrointestinal tract infections at Minia university hospital in Egypt. Escherichia coli (mainly from urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract infections was the most prevalent isolate (28.57%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.7% (mainly from ear discharge and skin infections. Isolates exhibited maximal resistance against streptomycin (83.4%, and minimal resistance against amikacin (17.7% and intermediate degrees of resistance against neomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Resistance to older aminoglycosides was higher than newer aminoglycosides. The most common aminoglycoside resistance phenotype was that of streptomycin resistance, present as a single phenotype or in combination, followed by kanamycin-neomycin as determined by interpretative reading. The resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were capable of producing aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and using efflux as mechanisms of resistance. Using checkerboard titration method, the most frequently-observed outcome in combinations of aminoglycosides with β-lactams or quinolones was synergism. The most effective combination was amikacin with ciprofloxacin (100% Synergism, whereas the least effective combination was gentamicin with amoxicillin (53.3% Synergistic, 26.7% additive, and 20% indifferent FIC indices. Whereas the studied combinations were additive and indifferent against few of the tested strains, antagonism was never observed. The high resistance rates to aminoglycosides exhibited by Gram-negative bacteria in this study could be attributed to the selective pressure of aminoglycoside usage which could be controlled by successful implementation of infection control measures.

  3. [Review and categorization of quinolone antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Jirí

    2005-02-01

    No standard categorization of quinolone antibiotics into generations may be found in either Czech or world literature. The author recommends a categorization into four groups defined according to their spectrum of action and utilization: 1) preparations for the treatment of urinary tract infections; 2) systemically acting quinolones chiefly efficacious against Gram-negative bacteria; 3) so-called respiratory quinolones; and 4) quinolones with a very broad spectrum of action suitable for the treatment of very complicated infections. The author describes the chief characteristics of the most important quinolone antibiotics, including preparations either in their development stage or whose development has been prematurely interrupted because of adverse side-effects. The list includes all preparations that are or were temporarily registered in the Czech Republic.

  4. Comparison of clinical categories for Escherichia coli harboring specific qnr and chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants according to CLSI and EUCAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    EUCAST breakpoints are more restrictive than those defined by CLSI. This study highlights the discrepancies between CLSI and EUCAST in a well characterized isogenic Escherichia coli collection and their correlations with specific quinolone resistance mechanisms. The greatest number of discrepancies was observed in strains containing 2-4 resistance mechanisms (MIC values on the borderline of clinical resistance). Bearing in mind that quinolones are concentration dependent antimicrobial agents, small changes in MIC may have relevant consequences for treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact.

  6. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  7. Mechanisms of Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli Isolates from Canadian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Baudry-Simner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants play a role in the increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones among Escherichia coli isolates in Canadian hospitals, and to determine the mechanisms of reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in a recent collection of 190 clinical E coli isolates.

  8. qnrD, a Novel Gene Conferring Transferable Quinolone Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky and Bovismorbificans Strains of Human Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik; Xia, S.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, four Salmonella isolates from humans in the Henan province of China showed reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.125 to 0.25 mu g/ml) but were susceptible to nalidixic acid ( MIC, 4 to 8 mu g/ml). All isolates were negative for known qnr genes ( A, B, and S), aac(6......')Ib-cr, and mutations in gyrA and parC. Plasmid DNA was extracted from all four isolates and transformed into Escherichia coli TG1 and DH10B cells by electroporation, and transformants were selected on 0.06 mu g/ml ciprofloxacin containing brain heart infusion agar plates. Resistance to ciprofloxacin...... qnrD, showed 48% similarity to qnrA1, 61% similarity to qnrB1, and 41% similarity to qnrS1. Further subcloning of the qnrD coding region into the constitutively expressed tetA gene of vector pBR322 showed that the gene conferred an increase in the MIC of ciprofloxacin by a factor of 32 ( from an MIC...

  9. 枸橼酸杆菌中质粒介导喹诺酮耐药基因的检测%Study of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Citrobacter freundii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵宜波; 李旭; 胡立芬; 谢琴秀

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解枸橼酸杆菌中质粒介导喹诺酮耐药(PMQR)基因的分布,以期发现新型PMQR基因.测定临床分离的PMQR基因阳性枸橼酸杆菌对临床常用抗菌药物的敏感性.方法 收集安徽医科大学第一附属医院检验科2009年临床分离的枸橼酸杆菌,PCR扩增qnr、aac(6′)-Ib-cr和qepA基因,产物纯化测序,测序结果在GenBank上比对并行转移接合实验.对收集的PMQR基因阳性枸橼酸杆菌及其接合子,采用琼脂对倍稀释法进行临床常用抗菌药物的药物敏感试验.结果 收集的枸橼酸杆菌共31株,8株菌株扩增出qnr,qnr基因阳性率为25.8%;其中6株扩增出qnrB.4株qnr阳性菌株的qnr基因转移接合成功.在qnr阳性的枸橼酸杆菌中,测序发现1种PMQR基因新亚型,命名为qnrB24.所有qnr阳性临床菌株对喹诺酮类药物的耐药率为87.5%,对头孢噻肟、阿米卡星、头孢他啶、头孢吡肟和庆大霉素的耐药率分别为75.0%、7.5%、62.5%、37.5%和87.5%,所有qnr阳性菌株对亚胺培南耐药表型为敏感.喹诺酮类药物对qnr阳性的接合子最低抑菌浓度升高10~23倍,敏感性下降.结论 安徽地区枸橼酸杆菌中qnr基因型的检出率较高,以qnrB基因型为主,qnr阳性枸橼酸杆菌对常用抗菌药物耐药性较高.%Objectives This study was conducted to detect and analyze the presence of plasmidmediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants [qnr,aac-(6′)-Ib-cr and qepA] among clinical isolates of Citrobacter freundii strains isolated from patients in Anhui,China,and to understand the susceptibility of PMQR positive strains to commonly used antimicrobial agents.Methods During the year 2009,31 Citrobacter strains were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University.Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect PMQR genes.Amplicons were purified,sequenced and compared with data from the GenBank.Conjugation experiments were conducted to

  10. Metallo-beta-lactamases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa--a novel mechanism resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Olszańska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since about twenty years, following the introduction into therapeutic of news beta-lactam antibiotics (broad-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams and carbapenems, a very significant number of new beta-lactamases appeared. These enzymes confer to the bacteria which put them, the means of resisting new molecules. The genetic events involved in this evolution are of two types: evolution of old enzymes by mutation and especially appearance of new genes coming for some, from bacteria of the environment. Numerous mechanisms of enzymatic resistance to the carbapenems have been described in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The important mechanism of inactivation carbapenems is production variety of b-lactam hydrolysing enzymes associated to carbapenemases. The metallo-beta-enzymes (IMP, VIM, SPM, GIM types are the most clinically significant carbapenemases. P. aeruginosa posses MBLs and seem to have acquired them through transmissible genetic elements (plasmids or transposons associated with integron and can be transmission to other bacteria. They have reported worldwide but mostly from South East Asia and Europe. The enzymes, belonging to the molecular class B family, are the most worrisome of all beta-lactamases because they confer resistance to carbapenems and all the beta-lactams (with the exception of aztreonam and usually to aminoglycosides and quinolones. The dissemination of MBLs genes is thought to be driven by regional consumption of extended--spectrum antibiotics (e.g. cephalosporins and carbapenems, and therefore care must be taken that these drugs are not used unnecessarily.

  11. Evaluating the impact of a novel restricted reimbursement policy for quinolone antibiotics: A time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manns Braden

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly-funded drug plans often use prior authorization policies to limit drug prescribing. To guide physician prescribing of a class of antibiotics with broad antimicrobial activity (quinolone antibiotics in accordance with new prescribing guidelines, Alberta’s provincial health ministry implemented a new mechanism for formulary restriction entitled the optional special authorization (OSA program. We conducted an observational study to determine the impact of this new formulary restriction policy on antimicrobial prescription rates as well as any clinical consequences. Methods Quinolone antibiotic use, and adherence with quinolone prescribing guidelines, was assessed before and after implementation of the OSA program in patients with common outpatient infections using an administrative data cohort and a chart review cohort, respectively. At the same time this policy was implemented to limit quinolone prescribing, two new quinolone antibiotics were added to the formulary. Using administrative data, we analysed a total of 397,534 unique index visits with regard to overall antibiotic utilization, and through chart review, we analysed 1681 charts of patients with infections of interest to determine the indications for quinolone usage. Results Using segmented regression models adjusting for age, sex and physician enrollment in the OSA program, there was no statistically significant change in the monthly rate of all quinolone use (−3.5 (95% CI −5.5, 1.4 prescriptions per 1000 index visits following implementation of the OSA program (p = 0.74. There was a significant level change in the rate of quinolone antibiotic use for urinary tract infection (−33.6 (95% CI: -23.8, -43.4 prescriptions and upper respiratory tract infection (−16.1 (95%CI: -11.6, -20.6 prescriptions per 1000 index visits. Among quinolone prescriptions identified on chart review, 42.5% and 58.5% were consistent with formulary guidelines before and

  12. Presence of qnr gene in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to ciprofloxacin isolated from pediatric patients in China

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    Wang Chuanqing

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae results mainly from mutations in type II DNA topoisomerase genes and/or changes in the expression of outer membrane and efflux pumps. Several recent studies have indicated that plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms also play a significant role in fluoroquinolone resistance, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In China, the presence of the qnr gene in the clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae has been reported, but this transmissible quinolone resistance gene has not been detected in strains isolated singly from pediatric patients. Because quinolones associated with a variety of adverse side effects on children, they are not authorized for pediatric use. This study therefore aimed to investigate the presence of the qnr gene in clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae from pediatric patients in China. Methods A total 213 of non-repetitive clinical isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin from E. coli and K. pneumoniae were collected from hospitalized patients at five children's hospital in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Chongqing. The isolates were screened for the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes of qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS by PCR. Transferability was examined by conjugation with the sodium azide-resistant E. coli J53. All qnr-positive were analyzed for clonality by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR. Results The study found that 19 ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were positive for the qnr gene, and most of the qnr positive strains were ESBL producers. Conjugation experiments showed that quinolone resitance could be transferred to recipients. Apart from this, different DNA banding patterns were obtained by ERIC-PCR from positive strains, which means that most of them were not clonally related. Conclusion This report on transferable fluoroquinolone resistance due to the qnr gene among E. coli and K

  13. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eRuiz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonise our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesised in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesised free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilisation of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile.

  14. In vitro anti-Mycobacterium avium activities of quinolones: predicted active structures and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopman, G; Li, J Y; Wang, S; Pearson, A J; Chang, K; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Ellner, J J

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between the structures of quinolones and their anti-Mycobacterium avium activities has been previously derived by using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program. A number of substructural constraints required to overcome the resistance of most of the strains have been identified. Nineteen new quinolones which qualify under these substructural requirements were identified by the program and subsequently tested. The results show that the substructural attributes identified by the program produced a successful a priori prediction of the anti-M. avium activities of the new quinolones. All 19 quinolones were found to be active, and 4 of them are as active or better than ciprofloxacin. With these new quinolones, the updated multiple computer-automated structure evaluation program structure-activity relationship analysis has helped to uncover additional information about the nature of the substituents at the C5 and C7 positions needed for optimal inhibitory activity. A possible explanation of drug resistance based on the observation of suicide inactivation of bacterial cytochrome P-450 by the cyclopropylamine moiety has also been proposed and is discussed in this report. Furthermore, we confirm the view that the amount of the uncharged form present in a neutral pH solution plays a crucial role in the drug's penetration ability.

  15. 耐喹诺酮类药物沙门菌毒力岛基因和耐药基因突变研究%Mutations of Salmonella pathogenicity island gene and QRDRs genes in quinolone-resistant Salmonella strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉平; 康维钧

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the gene variations of Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) genes and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) genes in different serovars and ciprofloxacin-resistant Salomonella strains.Methods:The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs)for ciprofloxacin were determined u-sing the standard broth microdilution method-on 40 Salmonella strains in 6 serovars.Three SPI-1 genes and QRDRs genes were sequenced and compared in different Salmonella strains to analyze the gene mutations and the relationship with Salmonella virulence.Results:Three SPI-1 genes were detected in all the 40 Salmonella strains,but the base variations belonging to silent mutations were obse.rved in different serovars.No gene deletion or mutation was observed in SPI-1 genes,but gyrA point mutations (S83F and/or D87N/G) and parC point mutation (S87R)were observed in all the 40 ciprofloxacin-resistant strains.Conclusion:The SPI-1 gene variations showed the evolution of virulence in Salmonella.Ciprofloxacin may not induce gene sequence variation or deletion of SPI-1genes.However,the gyrA gene mutations may indicate the virulence reduction of Salmonella strains.%目的:研究耐喹诺酮类药物沙门菌毒力岛基因和喹诺酮耐药基因在不同血清型及耐环丙沙星菌株中基因变异情况.方法:对分属于6个不同血清型的40株沙门菌测定环丙沙星MIC;对沙门菌毒力岛Ⅰ的3个主要基因和喹诺酮耐药基因进行测序比对,分析其基因变异情况及与毒力的关系.结果:40株沙门菌其毒力岛Ⅰ的3个基因全部为阳性,不同血清型其基因序列存在不同程度的变异;环丙沙星耐药株喹诺酮耐药基因gyrA均发生了S83F和/或D87N/G点突变,parC基因发生了S87R的点突变.结论:毒力岛Ⅰ基因在不同血清型的变异,说明其毒力仍在进化中;环丙沙星并未引起沙门菌毒力岛基因突变或缺失,但喹诺酮耐药基因均发生了点突变,这可能与其毒力降低相关.

  16. Mechanism of Burn Resistance of Alloy Ti40

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Ti fire found in high performance engines promotes the development of burn resistant Ti alloys. The burn resistant mechanism of Ti40 alloy is investigated. Ti40 alloy reveals good burn resistance. Its interfacial products between burning products and the matrix are tenacious,which retard the diffusion of oxygen into the matrix. Two burn resistant mechanisms, that is, fast scatter dispersion of heat and suppression of oxygen diffusion, are proposed.

  17. Insecticide resistance and resistance mechanisms in bed bugs, Cimex spp. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Kai; Doggett, Stephen L; Veera Singham, G; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2017-06-29

    The worldwide resurgence of bed bugs [both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F.)] over the past two decades is believed in large part to be due to the development of insecticide resistance. The transcriptomic and genomic studies since 2010, as well as morphological, biochemical and behavioral studies, have helped insecticide resistance research on bed bugs. Multiple resistance mechanisms, including penetration resistance through thickening or remodelling of the cuticle, metabolic resistance by increased activities of detoxification enzymes (e.g. cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and esterases), and knockdown resistance by kdr mutations, have been experimentally identified as conferring insecticide resistance in bed bugs. Other candidate resistance mechanisms, including behavioral resistance, some types of physiological resistance (e.g. increasing activities of esterases by point mutations, glutathione S-transferase, target site insensitivity including altered AChEs, GABA receptor insensitivity and altered nAChRs), symbiont-mediated resistance and other potential, yet undiscovered mechanisms may exist. This article reviews recent studies of resistance mechanisms and the genes governing insecticide resistance, potential candidate resistance mechanisms, and methods of monitoring insecticide resistance in bed bugs. This article provides an insight into the knowledge essential for the development of both insecticide resistance management (IRM) and integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for successful bed bug management.

  18. Microstructure and mechanics of human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J S; Adio, A O; Pitt, A; Hayman, L; Thorn, C E; Shore, A C; Whatmore, J L; Winlove, C P

    2016-12-01

    Vascular diseases such as diabetes and hypertension cause changes to the vasculature that can lead to vessel stiffening and the loss of vasoactivity. The microstructural bases of these changes are not presently fully understood. We present a new methodology for stain-free visualization, at a microscopic scale, of the morphology of the main passive components of the walls of unfixed resistance arteries and their response to changes in transmural pressure. Human resistance arteries were dissected from subcutaneous fat biopsies, mounted on a perfusion myograph, and imaged at varying transmural pressures using a multimodal nonlinear microscope. High-resolution three-dimensional images of elastic fibers, collagen, and cell nuclei were constructed. The honeycomb structure of the elastic fibers comprising the internal elastic layer became visible at a transmural pressure of 30 mmHg. The adventitia, comprising wavy collagen fibers punctuated by straight elastic fibers, thinned under pressure as the collagen network straightened and pulled taut. Quantitative measurements of fiber orientation were made as a function of pressure. A multilayer analytical model was used to calculate the stiffness and stress in each layer. The adventitia was calculated to be up to 10 times as stiff as the media and experienced up to 8 times the stress, depending on lumen diameter. This work reveals that pressure-induced reorganization of fibrous proteins gives rise to very high local strain fields and highlights the unique mechanical roles of both fibrous networks. It thereby provides a basis for understanding the micromechanical significance of structural changes that occur with age and disease.

  19. [Role of reactive oxygen species in the bactericidal action of quinolones--inhibitors of DNA gyrase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, V Iu; Mironov, A S; Zavigel'skiĭ, G B

    2014-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics inhibit DNA gyrase, but the induced degradation of chromosomal DNA is determined by a complex process of joint action quinolones and hydroxyl radical OH'. To quantify the level of stress responses and their time dependence in bacterial cells the induced specific lux-biosensors--the bacterium Escherichia coli, containing hybrid plasmids pColD'::lux; pSoxS'::lux; pKatG'::lux were used in this study. It is shown that quinolones (nalidixic acid, norfloxacin) induce SOS-response and oxidative stress with the formation of superoxide anion O2(-) in E. coli cells. The main parameters of SOS-response and oxidative stress, which depend on the quinolone concentration, are determined. Formation of superoxide anion O2(-) occurs almost simultaneously with the SOS-response. The mutant strain of E. coli sodA sodB, which do not contain active forms of superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, is characterized by an increased resistance to quinolones as compared to the wild type cells. At high concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid-->20 μg/mL; norfloxacin-->500 ng/mL) their bactericidal effect is partially caused by conversion of the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide H2O2, conducted by superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, which is followed by the Fenton reaction and the formation of toxic hydroxyl radical OH'. At low concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid--<20 μg/mL; norfloxacin--<500 ng/mL), the role of active oxygen species in the antimicrobial effect is practically nonexistent.

  20. A spatial approach for the epidemiology of antibiotic use and resistance in community-based studies: the emergence of urban clusters of Escherichia coli quinolone resistance in Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Trevor C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population antimicrobial use may influence resistance emergence. Resistance is an ecological phenomenon due to potential transmissibility. We investigated spatial and temporal patterns of ciprofloxacin (CIP population consumption related to E. coli resistance emergence and dissemination in a major Brazilian city. A total of 4,372 urinary tract infection E. coli cases, with 723 CIP resistant, were identified in 2002 from two outpatient centres. Cases were address geocoded in a digital map. Raw CIP consumption data was transformed into usage density in DDDs by CIP selling points influence zones determination. A stochastic model coupled with a Geographical Information System was applied for relating resistance and usage density and for detecting city areas of high/low resistance risk. Results E. coli CIP resistant cluster emergence was detected and significantly related to usage density at a level of 5 to 9 CIP DDDs. There were clustered hot-spots and a significant global spatial variation in the residual resistance risk after allowing for usage density. Conclusions There were clustered hot-spots and a significant global spatial variation in the residual resistance risk after allowing for usage density. The usage density of 5-9 CIP DDDs per 1,000 inhabitants within the same influence zone was the resistance triggering level. This level led to E. coli resistance clustering, proving that individual resistance emergence and dissemination was affected by antimicrobial population consumption.

  1. Action and resistance mechanisms of antibiotics: A guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections account for a major cause of death throughout the developing world. This is mainly due to the emergence of newer infectious agents and more specifically due to the appearance of antimicrobial resistance. With time, the bacteria have become smarter and along with it, massive imprudent usage of antibiotics in clinical practice has resulted in resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial resistance is recognized as a major problem in the treatment of microbial infections. The biochemical resistance mechanisms used by bacteria include the following: antibiotic inactivation, target modification, altered permeability, and “bypass” of metabolic pathway. Determination of bacterial resistance to antibiotics of all classes (phenotypes and mutations that are responsible for bacterial resistance to antibiotics (genetic analysis are helpful. Better understanding of the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance will help clinicians regarding usage of antibiotics in different situations. This review discusses the mechanism of action and resistance development in commonly used antimicrobials.

  2. Mechanisms of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, S.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    Some of non-pathogenic rhizosphere bacteria reduce disease by activating a resistance mechanism in the plant called rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). Rhizobacteria-mediated ISR resembles classic pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in that both types of induced

  3. Evaluation of Surrogate Disk Tests for Detection of Ciprofloxacin and Levofloxacin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Eszter; Skov, Robert; Hindler, Janet A.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica has become increasingly difficult due to evolving resistance mechanisms to this antimicrobial class in this organism. We evaluated two quinolone disks and five fluoroquinolone disks for their ability to act as a surrogate agent for the detection of fluoroquinolone resistance in a collection of 136 S. enterica isolates, including 111 with intermediate or resistant ciprofloxacin MICs mediated by a variety of resistance mechanisms. Ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and pefloxacin disks detected all isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin (0% very major error) and yielded false resistance (major error) in 8, 4, and 12% of susceptible isolates, respectively. Ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin provided clearer differentiation of susceptible and resistant isolates. PMID:26292293

  4. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I. Band

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are important innate immune defenses that inhibit colonization by pathogens and contribute to clearance of infections. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens are a major target, yet many of them have evolved mechanisms to resist these antimicrobials. These resistance mechanisms can be critical contributors to bacterial virulence and are often crucial for survival within the host. Here, we summarize methods used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist CAMPs. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to new therapeutic strategies against pathogens with extensive CAMP resistance.

  5. What have the mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate taught us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Dale L; Lindenmeyer, Richard Bradley; Ostlie, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    The intensive use of glyphosate alone to manage weeds has selected populations that are glyphosate resistant. The three mechanisms of glyphosate resistance that have been elucidated are (1) target-site mutations, (2) gene amplification and (3) altered translocation due to sequestration. What have we learned from the selection of these mechanisms, and how can we apply those lessons to future herbicide-resistant crops and new mechanisms of action? First, the diversity of glyphosate resistance mechanisms has helped further our understanding of the mechanism of action of glyphosate and advanced our knowledge of plant physiology. Second, the relatively rapid evolution of glyphosate-resistant weed populations provides further evidence that no herbicide is invulnerable to resistance. Third, as new herbicide-resistant crops are developed and new mechanisms of action are discovered, the weed science community needs to ensure that we apply the lessons we have learned on resistance management from the experience with glyphosate. Every new weed management system must be evaluated during development for its potential to select for resistance, and stewardship programs should be in place when the new program is introduced.

  6. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Da; Wu Jun-Jie; Tang Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry,the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention.The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study.Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms.We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models.Finally,simulations are presented.We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms,which are applied to explain their resistive switchings.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of bortezomib resistant adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Suzuki

    Full Text Available Bortezomib (Velcade™ is a reversible proteasome inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Despite its demonstrated clinical success, some patients are deprived of treatment due to primary refractoriness or development of resistance during therapy. To investigate the role of the duration of proteasome inhibition in the anti-tumor response of bortezomib, we established clonal isolates of HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells adapted to continuous exposure of bortezomib. These cells were ~30-fold resistant to bortezomib. Two novel and distinct mutations in the β5 subunit, Cys63Phe, located distal to the binding site in a helix critical for drug binding, and Arg24Cys, found in the propeptide region were found in all resistant clones. The latter mutation is a natural variant found to be elevated in frequency in patients with MM. Proteasome activity and levels of both the constitutive and immunoproteasome were increased in resistant cells, which correlated to an increase in subunit gene expression. These changes correlated with a more rapid recovery of proteasome activity following brief exposure to bortezomib. Increased recovery rate was not due to increased proteasome turnover as similar findings were seen in cells co-treated with cycloheximide. When we exposed resistant cells to the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib we noted a slower rate of recovery of proteasome activity as compared to bortezomib in both parental and resistant cells. Importantly, carfilzomib maintained its cytotoxic potential in the bortezomib resistant cell lines. Therefore, resistance to bortezomib, can be overcome with irreversible inhibitors, suggesting prolonged proteasome inhibition induces a more potent anti-tumor response.

  8. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of resistance mechanisms of three major classes of antifungal drugs for systemic use, amphotericin B (AMPH), flucytosine (5-FC) and several azole antifungals, in particular fluconazole (FLCZ), at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the number of reports of AMPH- or 5-FC-resistant fungal species and strains is limited, several mechanisms of resistance have been described. AMPH-resistant Candida have a marked decrease in ergosterol content compared with AMPH-susceptible control isolates. A lesion in the UMP-pyrophosphorylase is the most frequent determinant of 5-FC resistance in C. albicans. Recently resistance of C. albicans to azoles has become an increasing problem. Extensive biochemical studies have highlighted a significant diversity in mechanisms conferring resistance to FLCZ and other azoles, which include alterations in sterol biosynthesis, target site, uptake and efflux. Among them, the most important mechanism clinically is reduced access of the drug to the intracellular P450 14 DM target, probably because of the action of a multidrug resistance efflux pump, and overproduction of that target. However, other possible resistance mechanisms for azoles remain to be identified.

  9. Genetic Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterly, John S; Richardson, Chad L; Eltoukhy, Noha S; Qi, Chao; Scheetz, Marc H

    2011-02-01

    To summarize published data identifying known genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and the correlating phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance. MEDLINE databases (1966-July 15, 2010) were searched to identify original reports of genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii. Numerous genetic mechanisms of resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics are known to exist in A. baumannii, a gram-negative bacterium increasingly implicated in nosocomial infections. Mechanisms may be constitutive or acquired via plasmids, integrons, and transposons. Methods of resistance include enzymatic modification of antibiotic molecules, modification of antibiotic target sites, expression of efflux pumps, and downregulation of cell membrane porin channel expression. Resistance to β-lactams appears to be primarily caused by β-lactamase production, including extended spectrum β-lactamases (b/aTEM, blaSHV, b/aTX-M,b/aKPC), metallo-β-lactamases (blaMP, blaVIM, bla, SIM), and most commonly, oxacillinases (blaOXA). Antibiotic target site alterations confer resistance to fluoroquinolones (gyrA, parC) and aminoglycosides (arm, rmt), and to a much lesser extent, β-lactams. Efflux pumps (tet, ade, abe) contribute to resistance against β-lactams, tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides. Finally, porin channel deletion (carO, oprD) appears to contribute to β-lactam resistance and may contribute to rarely seen polymyxin resistance. Of note, efflux pumps and porin deletions as solitary mechanisms may not render clinical resistance to A. baumannii. A. baumannii possesses copious genetic resistance mechanisms. Knowledge of local genotypes and expressed phenotypes for A. baumannii may aid clinicians more than phenotypic susceptibilities reported in large epidemiologic studies. © 2011 SAGE Publications.

  10. Detecting mechanisms of acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Roger S; Shi, Hubing

    2014-01-01

    (V600)BRAF mutation was identified as an ideal target for clinical therapy due to its indispensable roles in supporting melanoma initiation and progression. Despite the fact that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) can elicit anti-tumor responses in the majority of treated patients and confer overall survival benefits, acquired drug resistance is a formidable obstacle to long-term management of the disease. Several aberrant events including RTK upregulation, NRAS mutation, mutant BRAF amplification or alternative splicing, and MEK mutation have been reported as acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Clinially, detection of these resistance mechanisms help understand drug response patterns and help guide combinatorial therapeutic strategies. Therefore, quick and accurate diagnosis of the resistant mechanisms in tumor biopsies has become an important starting point for personalized therapy. In this chapter, we review the major acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms, highlight their therapeutic implications, and provide the diagnostic methods from clinical samples.

  11. Mechanisms Linking Inflammation to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is now widespread around the world. Obesity-associated chronic low-grade inflammation is responsible for the decrease of insulin sensitivity, which makes obesity a major risk factor for insulin resistance and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndromes. The state of low-grade inflammation is caused by overnutrition which leads to lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Obesity might increase the expression of some inflammatory cytokines and activate several signaling pathways, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance by interfering with insulin signaling and action. It has been suggested that specific factors and signaling pathways are often correlated with each other; therefore, both of the fluctuation of cytokines and the status of relevant signaling pathways should be considered during studies analyzing inflammation-related insulin resistance. In this paper, we discuss how these factors and signaling pathways contribute to insulin resistance and the therapeutic promise targeting inflammation in insulin resistance based on the latest experimental studies.

  12. Drug-resistance mechanisms and prevalence of Enterobacter cloacae resistant to multi-antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杰; 顾怡明; 俞云松; 周志慧; 杜小玲

    2004-01-01

    @@The main drug-resistance mechanism of gram-negative bacteria is producing β-lactamases. Two kinds of enzymes cause drug resistance by hydrolyzing oxyimino-cephalosporins and aztreonam: one is chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamases, the other is plasmid-mediated extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Enterobacter cloacae can produce both of them, so that these strains are seriously resistance to many antibiotics. In order to study the main drug-resistant mechanism in Enterobacter cloacae, PCR and nucleotide sequencing were performed on 58 multidrug resistant strains.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  14. THEORETICAL STUDY OF PODOPHYLLOTOXIN AND QUINOLONE ANALOGUES AS ANTITUMOR DRUGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何峰; 戴颖仪; 朱孝峰; 黄爱东; 张翎; 颜少平; 刘宗潮

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the active sites of podophyllotoxin derivatives. Methods: Some podophyllotoxin derivatives were analyzed by quantum and mechanics method. Results: Some information was given according to the calculation results about HOMO and LUMO electron density. The C-4 position is the position for effective modification. The B ring and E ring are important active centers. Conclusion: The hole of positive charge in B ring easily combines with an acceptor within the molecular. Some quinolones with similar electronic construction to podophyllotoxin may have antitumor activity.

  15. A "Double-Edged" Scaffold: Antitumor Power within the Antibacterial Quinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisacchi, Gregory S; Hale, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, reports emerged describing experimental antibacterial quinolones having significant potency against eukaryotic Type II topoisomerases (topo II) and showing cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines. As a result, several pharmaceutical companies initiated quinolone anticancer programs to explore the potential of this class in comparison to conventional human topo II inhibiting antitumor drugs such as doxorubicin and etoposide. In this review, we present a modern re-evaluation of the anticancer potential of the quinolone class in the context of today's predominantly pathway-based (rather than cytotoxicity-based) oncology drug R&D environment. The quinolone eukaryotic SAR is comprehensively discussed, contrasted with the corresponding prokaryotic data, and merged with recent structural biology information which is now beginning to help explain the basis for that SAR. Quinolone topo II inhibitors appear to be much less susceptible to efflux-mediated resistance, a current limitation of therapy with conventional agents. Recent advances in the biological understanding of human topo II isoforms suggest that significant progress might now be made in overcoming two other treatment-limiting disadvantages of conventional topo II inhibitors, namely cardiotoxicity and drug-induced secondary leukemias. We propose that quinolone class topo II inhibitors could have a useful future therapeutic role due to the continued need for effective topo II drugs in many cancer treatment settings, and due to the recent biological and structural advances which can now provide, for the first time, specific guidance for the design of a new class of inhibitors potentially superior to existing agents.

  16. Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium DNA gyrase as a target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Suprasert, Apinun; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones exhibit good antibacterial activity against Salmonella spp. isolates and are often the choice of treatment for life-threatening salmonellosis due to multi-drug resistant strains. To assess the properties of quinolones, we performed an in vitro assay to study the antibacterial activities of quinolones against recombinant DNA gyrase. We expressed the S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase A (GyrA) and B (GyrB) subunits in Escherichia coli. GyrA and GyrB were obtained at high purity (>95%) by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose resin column chromatography as His-tagged 97-kDa and 89-kDa proteins, respectively. Both subunits were shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. Drug concentrations that suppressed DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50 s) or generated DNA cleavage by 25% (CC25 s) demonstrated that quinolones highly active against S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase share a fluorine atom at C-6. The relationships between the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), IC50 s and CC25 s were assessed by estimating a linear regression between two components. MICs measured against S. Typhimurium NBRC 13245 correlated better with IC50 s (R = 0.9988) than CC25 s (R = 0.9685). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test to identify quinolones with promising activity against S. Typhimurium. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting S. Typhimurium gyrase.

  17. Macrolides vs. quinolones for community-acquired pneumonia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalsky, K; Yahav, D; Lador, A; Eliakim-Raz, N; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    The relative efficacy, safety and ecological implications of macrolides vs. quinolones in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are debatable. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing any macrolide vs. any quinolone for the treatment of CAP among adult inpatients or outpatients, as monotherapy or both in combination with a beta-lactam. We did not limit inclusion by pneumonia severity, publication status, language or date of publication. The primary outcomes assessed were 30-day all-cause mortality and treatment failure. Two authors independently extracted the data. Fixed effect meta-analysis of risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals was performed. Sixteen trials (4989 patients) fulfilling inclusion criteria were identified, mostly assessing outpatients with mild to moderate CAP. All-cause mortality was not significantly different for macrolides vs. quinolones, RR 1.03 (0.63-1.68, seven trials), with a low event rate (2%). Treatment failure was significantly lower with quinolones, RR 0.78 (0.67-0.91, 16 trials). The definition of failure used in the primary studies was not clearly representative of patients' benefit. Microbiological failure was lower with quinolones, RR 0.63 (0.49-0.81, 13 trials). All adverse events, adverse events requiring discontinuation and any premature antibiotic discontinuation were significantly more frequent with macrolides, mainly on account of gastrointestinal adverse events. Resistance development was not assessed in the trials. Randomized controlled trials show an advantage of quinolones in the treatment of CAP with regard to clinical cure without need for antibiotic modification at end of treatment and gastrointestinal adverse events. The clinical significance of this advantage is unclear.

  18. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development.

  19. Tangent Resistance of Soil on Moldboard and the Mechanism of Resistance Reduction of Bionic Moldboard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Shi-qiao; Ren Lu-quan; Liu Yan; Han Zhi-wu

    2005-01-01

    The tangent resistance on the interface of the soil-moldboard is an important component of the resistance to moving soil . We developed simplified mechanical models to analyze this resistance. We found that it is composed of two components, the frictional and adhesive resistances. These two components originate from the soil pore, which induced a capillary suction effect, and the soil-moldboard contact area produced tangent adhesive resistance. These two components varied differently with soil moisture. Thus we predicted that resistance reduction against soil exerted on the non-smooth bionic moldboard is mainly due to the elimination of capillary suction and the reduction of physical-chemical adsorption of soil.

  20. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  1. Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus: The Never-Ending Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Jovan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Combating Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections using antibacterial drugs is actually an ongoing effort to overcome resistance mechanism of this microorganism. In this paper, we discussed (1 the mechanisms of resistance to some of the most commonly used antimicrobial agents in the treatment of S. aureus: methicillin, vancomicyn and quinolones. In addition, (2 efflux pump mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis in the presence of compounds that inhibit S. aureus growth and reproduction, as well as mechanisms of resistance to a number of antibiotics, have been reviewed.

  2. Synthesis of Quinolone Analogues:7-[(2S, 4R)-2-Aminomethyl-4- hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl] Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu Yu LIU; Hui Yuan GUO

    2004-01-01

    New quinolone derivatives of 7-[(2S, 4R)-2-aminomethyl-4-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl] quinolone-3-carboxylic acids were synthesized by condensation of 7-halo substituted quinolone-3-carboxylic acids with (2S, 4R)-2-aminomethyl-4-hydroxypyrrolidine. These compounds were characterized by FAB-MS and 1H NMR.

  3. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H.; Ose, Y; Tashima, T.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than t...

  5. New mechanisms of bacterial arsenic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chi Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is the most pervasive environmental substance and is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a Group 1 human carcinogen. Nearly every organism has resistance pathways for inorganic arsenic, and in bacteria, their genes are found in arsenic resistance (ars operons. Recently, a parallel pathway for organic arsenicals has been identified. The ars genes responsible for the organoarsenical detoxification includes arsM, which encodes an As(III S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase, arsI, which encodes a C–As bond lyase, and arsH, which encodes a methylarsenite oxidase. The identification and properties of arsM, arsI and arsH are described in this review.

  6. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganzo, Frank; Sung, Matthew; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance limits the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Despite attempts to develop curative anticancer treatments, tumors evolve evasive mechanisms limiting durable responses. Hence, diverse therapies are used to attack cancer, including cytotoxic and targeted agents. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are biotherapeutics designed to deliver potent cytotoxins to cancer cells via tumor-specific antigens. Little is known about the clinical manifestations of drug resistance to this class of therapy; however, recent preclinical studies reveal potential mechanisms of resistance. Because ADCs are a combination of antibody and small molecule cytotoxin, multifactorial modes of resistance are emerging that are inherent to the structure and function of the ADC. Decreased cell-surface antigen reduces antibody binding, whereas elevated drug transporters such as MDR1 and MRP1 reduce effectiveness of the payload. Inherent to the uniqueness of the ADC, other novel resistance mechanisms are emerging, including altered antibody trafficking, ADC processing, and intracellular drug release. Most importantly, the modular nature of the ADC allows components to be switched and replaced, enabling development of second-generation ADCs that overcome acquired resistance. This review is intended to highlight recent progress in our understanding of ADC resistance, including approaches to create preclinical ADC-refractory models and to characterize their emerging mechanisms of resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2825-34. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Biomarkers and mechanisms of natural disease resistance in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, van S.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define and test biomarkers for disease resistance in dairy cows and to determine the underlying mechanism in natural disease resistance. The health status of the cows is an important issue in dairy farming. Due to the mandatory reduction in the use of antibiotics, alter

  9. Herbicide resistance in weeds: Survey, characterization, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this paper is to present a systematic diagnostic approach towards the characterization of herbicide resistance in a given weed population with regards to profile (single, multiple, cross resistance), magnitude (fold level), mechanism, and related bio-physiological aspects. Diagnosing her...

  10. Mechanism of Resistance to Dietary Cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey R. Boone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alterations in expression of hepatic genes that could contribute to resistance to dietary cholesterol were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, which are known to be resistant to the serum cholesterol raising action of dietary cholesterol. Methods. Microarray analysis was used to provide a comprehensive analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in rats in response to dietary cholesterol. Changes were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Western blotting was employed to measure changes in hepatic cholesterol 7α hydroxylase protein. Results. Of the 28,000 genes examined using the Affymetrix rat microarray, relatively few were significantly altered. As expected, decreases were observed for several genes that encode enzymes of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The largest decreases were seen for squalene epoxidase and lanosterol 14α demethylase (CYP 51A1. These changes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. LDL receptor expression was not altered by dietary cholesterol. Critically, the expression of cholesterol 7α hydroxylase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bile acid synthesis, was increased over 4-fold in livers of rats fed diets containing 1% cholesterol. In contrast, mice, which are not resistant to dietary cholesterol, exhibited lower hepatic cholesterol 7α hydroxylase (CYP7A1 protein levels, which were not increased in response to diets containing 2% cholesterol.

  11. Chemotherapy resistance mechanisms in advanced skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvanesh Sukhlal Kalal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma.

  12. Conduction Mechanism of Valence Change Resistive Switching Memory: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Wah Lim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistive switching effect in transition metal oxide (TMO based material is often associated with the valence change mechanism (VCM. Typical modeling of valence change resistive switching memory consists of three closely related phenomena, i.e., conductive filament (CF geometry evolution, conduction mechanism and temperature dynamic evolution. It is widely agreed that the electrochemical reduction-oxidation (redox process and oxygen vacancies migration plays an essential role in the CF forming and rupture process. However, the conduction mechanism of resistive switching memory varies considerably depending on the material used in the dielectric layer and selection of electrodes. Among the popular observations are the Poole-Frenkel emission, Schottky emission, space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC, trap-assisted tunneling (TAT and hopping conduction. In this article, we will conduct a survey on several published valence change resistive switching memories with a particular interest in the I-V characteristic and the corresponding conduction mechanism.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. isolated from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mąka, Łukasz; Popowska, Magdalena

    This review summarizes current data on resistance among Salmonella spp. isolates of food origin from countries in different regions of the world. The mechanisms of resistance to different groups of antimicrobial compounds are also considered. Among strains resistant to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones the most prevalent mechanism is amino acid substitutions in quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of genes gyrA, parC but mechanism of growing importance is plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) associated with genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS but frequency of their detection is different. Resistance to sulfonamides is mostly associated with genes sul1 and sul2, while resistance to trimethoprim is associated with various variants of dhfr ( dfr) genes. Taking into account Salmonella spp. strains isolated from food, resistance to β-lactams is commonly associated with β-lactamases encoding by blaTEM genes. However strains ESBL and AmpC – positive are also detected. Resistance to aminoglicosides is commonly result of enzymatic inactivation. Three types of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme are: acetyltransferases (AAC), adenyltransferases (ANT) and phosphotransferases (APH). Resistance to tetracyclines among Salmonella spp. isolated from food is most commonly associated with active efflux. Among numerous genetic determinants encoding efflux pumps tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD, tetE and tetG are reported predominatingly. One of the most common mechanisms of resistance against chloramphenicol is its inactivation by chloramphenicol acetyltrasferases (CATs), but resistance to this compound can be also mediated by chloramphenicol efflux pumps encoded by the genes cmlA and floR. It is important to monitor resistance of Salmonella isolated from food, because the globalization of trade, leading to the long-distance

  14. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli; Ricardo Nitrini

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dy...

  15. Cross-resistance and biochemical mechanisms of resistance to indoxacarb in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Jun; Li, Dongyang; Wan, Hu; You, Hong; Li, Jianhong

    2017-08-01

    Indoxacarb belongs to a class of insecticides known as oxadiazines and is the first commercialized pyrazoline-type voltage-dependent sodium channel blocker. A moderate level of resistance to indoxacarb has evolved in field populations of Plutella xylostella from Central China. In the present study, cross-resistance, resistance stability and metabolic mechanisms of indoxacarb resistance were investigated in this moth species. A P. xylostella strain with a high level of resistance to indoxacarb was obtained through continuous selection in the laboratory. The strain showed cross-resistance to metaflumizone, beta-cypermethrin and chlorfenapyr, but no resistance to cyantraniliprole, chlorantraniliprole, abamectin, chlorfluazuron, spinosad and diafenthiuron compared with the susceptible strain. Synergism tests revealed that piperonyl butoxide (PBO) (synergistic ratio, SR=7.8) and diethyl maleate (DEF) (SR=3.5) had considerable synergistic effects on indoxacarb toxicity in the resistant strain (F58). Enzyme activity data showed there was an approximate 5.8-fold different in glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a 6.8-fold different in cytochrome P450 monooxygenase between the resistant strain (F58) and susceptible strain, suggesting that the increased activity of these two enzymes is likely the main detoxification mechanism responsible for the species' resistance to indoxacarb. These results will be helpful for insecticide resistance management strategies to delay the development of indoxacarb resistance in fields. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Proficiency study for quinolones in egg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, B.J.A.; Stolker, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Studie naar het voorkomen van quinolonen in eieren, beschrijving van de testmaterialen, evaluatie van de toegepaste methoden, resultaten en discussieThe aim of this proficiency study was to give laboratories the possibility to evaluate or demonstrate their competence for the analysis of quinolones i

  17. Molecular mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: knowns and unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Sophie; Hadjadj, Linda; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa

    2016-12-01

    Colistin, also referred to as polymyxin E, is an effective antibiotic against most multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and is currently used as a last-line drug for treating severe bacterial infections. Colistin resistance has increased gradually for the last few years, and knowledge of its multifaceted mechanisms is expanding. This includes the newly discovered plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1, which has been detected in over 20 countries within 3 months of its first report. We previously reported all of the known mechanisms of polymyxin resistance in our first review in 2014, but an update seems necessary in 2016, considering the significant recent discoveries that have been made in this domain. This review provides an update about what is already known, what is new, and some unresolved questions with respect to colistin resistance.

  18. Generation and characterization of quinolone-specific DNA aptamers suitable for water monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemann, C; Freiin von Fritsch, U; Rudolph, S; Strehlitz, B

    2016-03-15

    Quinolones are antibiotics that are accredited in human and veterinary medicine but are regularly used in high quantities also in industrial livestock farming. Since these compounds are often only incompletely metabolized, significant amounts contaminate the aquatic environment and negatively impact on a variety of different ecosystems. Although there is increasing awareness of problems caused by pharmaceutical pollution, available methods for the detection and elimination of numerous pharmaceutical residues are currently inefficient or expensive. While this also applies to antibiotics that may lead to multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria, aptamer-based technologies potentially offer alternative approaches for sensitive and efficient monitoring of pharmaceutical micropollutants. Using the Capture-SELEX procedure, we here describe the selection of an aptamer pool with enhanced binding qualities for fluoroquinolones, a widely used group of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The selected aptamers were shown to detect various quinolones with high specificity, while specific binding activities to structurally unrelated drugs were not detectable. The quinolone-specific aptamers bound to ofloxacin, one of the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone, with high affinity (KD=0.1-56.9 nM). The functionality of quinolone-specific aptamers in real water samples was demonstrated in local tap water and in effluents of sewage plants. Together, our data suggest that these aptamers may be applicable as molecular receptors in biosensors or as catcher molecules in filter systems for improved monitoring and treatment of polluted water.

  19. Ribosome-targeting antibiotics and mechanisms of bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the main antibiotic targets in the bacterial cell. Crystal structures of naturally produced antibiotics and their semi-synthetic derivatives bound to ribosomal particles have provided unparalleled insight into their mechanisms of action, and they are also facilitating the design of more effective antibiotics for targeting multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this Review, I discuss the recent structural insights into the mechanism of action of ribosome-targeting antibiotics and the molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance, in addition to the approaches that are being pursued for the production of improved drugs that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis.

  20. Resistance Mechanisms of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae to Temephos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboozar Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anopheles stephensi is a sub-tropical species and has been considered as one of the most important vector of human malaria throughout the Middle East and South Asian region including the malarious areas of southern Iran. Current reports confirmed An. stephensi resistance to temephos in Oman and India. However, there is no comprehensive research on mechanisms of temephos resistance in An. stephensi in the literature. This study was designed in order to clarify the enzymatic and molecular mechanisms of temephos resistance in this species.Methods: Profile activities of α- and ß-esterases, mixed function oxidase (MFO, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, insensitive acetylcholinesterase, and para-nitrophenyl acetate (PNPA-esterase enzymes were tested for An. stephensi strain with resistance ratio of 15.82 to temephos in comparison with susceptible strain.Results: Results showed that the mean activity of α-EST, GST and AChE enzymes were classified as altered indicating metabolic mechanisms have considerable role in resistance of An. stephensi to temephos. Molecular study using PCR-RFLP method to trace the G119S mutation in ACE-1 gene showed lack of the mutation responsible for organophosphate insecticide resistance in the temephos-selected strain of An. stephensi.Conclusion: This study showed that the altered enzymes but not targets site insensitivity of ACE-1 are responsible for temephos resistance in An. stephensi in south of Iran.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: arsenal of resistance mechanisms, decades of changing resistance profiles, and future antimicrobial therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Webster, Thomas J; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Schweizer, Herbert P; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Marei, Hany E; Ashour, Hossam M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious public health issues facing humans since the discovery of antimicrobial agents. The frequent, prolonged, and uncontrolled use of antimicrobial agents are major factors in the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant variants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. The abundant data on the increased resistance to antipseudomonal agents support the need for global action. There is a paucity of new classes of antibiotics active against P. aeruginosa. Here, we discuss recent antibacterial resistance profiles and mechanisms of resistance by P. aeruginosa. We also review future potential methods for controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as phage therapy, nanotechnology and antipseudomonal vaccines.

  2. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  3. Different mechanisms of resistance modulate sulfite tolerance in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadai, Chiara; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    From a technological point of view, yeast resistance to sulfite is of great interest and represents an important technological character for winemaking. Several mechanisms are involved, and strain-dependent strategies to obtain SO2 resistance can deeply influence wine quality, although this choice is less relevant in determining the technological performance of the strain during fermentation. In this study, to better understand the strain-specific mechanisms of resistance, 11 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, whose genomes have been previously sequenced, were selected. Their attitude towards sulfites, in terms of resistance and production, was evaluated, and RNA-sequencing of four selected strains was performed during fermentation process in synthetic grape must in the presence of SO2. Results demonstrated that at molecular level, the physical effect of SO2 triggered multiple stress responses in the cell and high tolerance to general enological stressing condition increased SO2 resistance. Adaptation mechanism due to high basal gene expression level rather than specific gene induction in the presence of sulfite seemed to be responsible in modulating strain resistance. This mechanism involved higher basal gene expression level of specific cell wall proteins, enzymes for lipid biosynthesis, and enzymes directly involved in SO2 assimilation pathway and efflux.

  4. Detection of quinolones in commercial eggs obtained from farms in the Espaíllat Province in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, S; de los Santos, F Solís; Andino, A G; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the use of quinolones in broiler chickens resulted in residues in retail poultry meat obtained from nine districts in the Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic. Residues in poultry products are a concern due to consumer allergies and the potential to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the use of quinolones in poultry production and our previous findings in poultry meat, the objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of quinolone residues in eggs. Samples were collected from 48 different farms located in three of the four municipalities (Moca, Cayetano Germosén, and Jamao) of the Espaíllat Province. Each farm was sampled three times between July and September for a total of 144 samples. Samples were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for quinolone residues using the Equinox test. Operation systems (cage or floor), seasonality, and location were considered along with egg-producer sizes that were defined as small scale, 60,000 eggs per day. From small-, medium-, and large-scale producers, 69, 50, and 40% of samples were positive for quinolone residues, respectively. A greater number of samples were positive (61%) in floor-laying hen producers compared with those using cages (40%). In the Jamao municipality, 67% of the samples were positive compared with Moca and Cayetano Germosén, where 56 and 25% of samples were positive, respectively. Sampling time had an effect on percent positives: samples collected in July, August, and September were 71, 19, and 63% positive, respectively. Overall, 51% of the samples obtained from eggs produced in the province of Espaíllat were positive for quinolone residues at levels higher than the maximum limits for edible tissue established by the regulatory agencies, including the European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The results obtained from this research confirmed the presence of quinolone residue in eggs, which may present a health risk to some consumers.

  5. Mechanisms of lichen resistance to metallic pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarret, C.; Manceau, A.; Eybert-Berard, L. [Univ. of Grenoble and CNRS (France). Environmental Geochemistry Group; Cuny, D.; Haluwyn, C. van [Lab. de Botanique et de Cryptogamie, Lille (France); Deruelle, S. [Institut d`Ecologie, Paris (France); Hazemann, J.L.; Menthonnex, J.J. [Univ. of Grenoble and CNRS (France). Environmental Geochemistry Group]|[CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Cristallographie; Soldo, Y. [CNRS, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Cristallographie

    1998-11-01

    Some lichens have a unique ability to grow in heavily contaminated areas due to the development of adaptative mechanisms allowing a high tolerance to metals. Here the authors report on the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in the metal hyperaccumulator Diploschistes muscorum and of Pb in the metal tolerant lichen Xanthoria parietina. The speciation of Zn and Pb has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy using the advanced third-generation synchrotron radiation source of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF in Grenoble). This study reveals that in both lichens cells are protected from toxicity by complexation of heavy metals, but the strategies differ: in D. muscorum, Pb and Zn are accumulated through an enhanced synthesis of oxalate, which precipitates toxic elements as insoluble salts, whereas in X. parietina, Pb is complexed to carboxylic groups of the fungal cell walls. The authors conclude that hyperaccumulation of metals results from a reactive mechanism of organic acid production, whereas metallo-tolerance is achieved by a passive complexation to existing functional groups.

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Heat and mechanical resistance of zinc coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Horák

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the effect of temperature on structure of intermetallic phases of the protective zinc layer. The main objective of the article is a description of the structure and the changes that can occur during the heating process. The first part of the article deals with the description of the structure and mechanical properties of the interfacial phases and their arrangement. The main part of the article is aimed at study of brittle intermetallic phases, which arise due to increased temperature. For this reason, a set of samples of steel CSN 11 321 (DC01 was prepared. These samples were subjected to thermal heating in the tempering furnace. Subsequently metallographic cross sections were prepared, observed and assessed using SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. Also accelerated corrosion tests and pull off bend tests were performed. Conclusion of the article is trying to explain the influence of intermetallic phases on degradation of the protective layer.

  8. Biochemical mechanisms for metaflumizone resistance in beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiangrui; Sun, Xingxing; Su, Jianya

    2014-07-01

    The metaflumizone, which belongs to the class of voltage-dependent sodium channel blockers, was registered to control Spodoptera exigua on vegetables in China in 2009. The present study revealed S. exigua has developed high resistance to this novel chemistry insecticide shortly after 2-3 years application in Guangdong Province of China. The metabolic mechanisms for metaflumizone resistance in this insect were analysed. The inhibitor of esterases greatly potentiates the toxicity of this chemical against the field resistant populations. The synergism ratio is 5.7 and 3.4-fold for S. exigua collected from Huizhou, Guangdong Province in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The activity of esterases in field populations (HZ12) is also significantly greater than that in the susceptible strain, and further significantly increased by challenge with metaflumizone for 3 generations. However, the inhibitor of P450s or GSTs only has slight synergism on metaflumizone toxicity against resistant populations, and there are no obvious differences in activities of P450s or GSTs between resistant populations and the susceptible strain. These results suggest that esterases might take pivotal role in conferring metabolic resistance to metaflumizone in the field populations of S. exigua, and P450s or GSTs are not involved in this resistance. Moreover, flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) are discovered to involve in metaflumizone resistance in the field populations of S. exigua. The FMO inhibitor, methimazole, potentiates metaflumizone toxicity in resistant larva of this species substantially. The synergism ratios for methimazole in resistant populations HZ11 and HZ12 were 3.1 and 1.9, respectively. Enzymatic assays also revealed higher FMO activities in resistant populations than in the susceptible strain, and successive selection with metaflumizone further increased the FMO activity in the field resistant population, but not significantly. The higher FMO activities in the older larval

  9. Mechanisms of resistance to bacteriocins targeting the mannose phosphotransferase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Morten; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2011-05-01

    The membrane proteins IIC and IID of the mannose phosphotransferase system (Man-PTS) together form a membrane-located complex that serves as a receptor for several different bacteriocins, including the pediocin-like class IIa bacteriocins and the class IIc bacteriocin lactococcin A. Bacterial strains sensitive to class IIa bacteriocins readily give rise to resistant mutants upon bacteriocin exposure. In the present study, we have therefore investigated lactococcin A-resistant mutants of Lactococcus lactis as well as natural food isolates of Listeria monocytogenes with different susceptibilities to class IIa bacteriocins. We found two major mechanisms of resistance. The first involves downregulation of Man-PTS gene expression, which takes place both in spontaneous resistant mutants and in natural resistant isolates. The second involves normal expression of the Man-PTS system, but the underlying mechanism of resistance for these cells is unknown. In some cases, the resistant phenotype was linked to a shift in the metabolism; i.e., reduced growth on glucose due to reduction in Man-PTS expression was accompanied by enhanced growth on another sugar, such as galactose. The implications of these findings in terms of metabolic heterogeneity are discussed.

  10. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: resistance mechanisms and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavascki, Alexandre P; Carvalhaes, Cecília G; Picão, Renata C; Gales, Ana C

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are major nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Both are intrinsically resistant to many drugs and are able to become resistant to virtually any antimicrobial agent. An increasing prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates has been reported in many countries. The resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii include the production of beta-lactamases, efflux pumps, and target-site or outer membrane modifications. Resistance to multiple drugs is usually the result of the combination of different mechanisms in a single isolate or the action of a single potent resistance mechanism. There are many challenges in the treatment of MDR P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, especially considering the absence of new antimicrobials in the drug-development pipeline. In this review, we present the major resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, and discuss how they can affect antimicrobial therapy, considering recent clinical, microbiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic findings of the main drugs used to treat MDR isolates.

  11. Expression of the marA, soxS, acrB and ramA genes related to the AcrAB/TolC efflux pump in Salmonella entérica strains with and without quinolone resistance-determining regions gyrA gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Gomes Ferrari

    Full Text Available Several studies have been conducted in recent years to elucidate the structure, function and significance of AcrB, MarA, SoxS and RamA in Salmonella enterica. In this study, the relative quantification of acrB, soxS, marA and ramA genes expression was evaluated in 14 strains of S. enterica, with or without accompanying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA gene, that were exposed to ciprofloxacin during the exponential growth phase. The presence of ciprofloxacin during the log phase of bacterial growth activated the genes marA, soxS, ramA and acrB in all S. enterica strains analyzed in this study. The highest expression levels for acrB were observed in strains with gyrA mutation, and marA showed the highest expression in the strains without mutation. Considering only the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values 0.125 [1]g/mL (low susceptibility, with and without mutations in gyrA, the most expressed gene was marA. In this study, we observed that strains resistant to nalidixic acid may express genes associated with the efflux pump and the expression of the AcrAB-TolC pump genes seems to occur independently of mutations in gyrA.

  12. Expression of the marA, soxS, acrB and ramA genes related to the AcrAB/TolC efflux pump in Salmonella entérica strains with and without quinolone resistance-determining regions gyrA gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Gomes Ferrari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been conducted in recent years to elucidate the structure, function and significance of AcrB, MarA, SoxS and RamA in Salmonella enterica. In this study, the relative quantification of acrB, soxS, marA and ramA genes expression was evaluated in 14 strains of S. enterica, with or without accompanying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA gene, that were exposed to ciprofloxacin during the exponential growth phase. The presence of ciprofloxacin during the log phase of bacterial growth activated the genes marA, soxS, ramA and acrB in all S. enterica strains analyzed in this study. The highest expression levels for acrB were observed in strains with gyrA mutation, and marA showed the highest expression in the strains without mutation. Considering only the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values 0.125 [1]g/mL (low susceptibility, with and without mutations in gyrA, the most expressed gene was marA. In this study, we observed that strains resistant to nalidixic acid may express genes associated with the efflux pump and the expression of the AcrAB-TolC pump genes seems to occur independently of mutations in gyrA.

  13. Expression of the marA, soxS, acrB and ramA genes related to the AcrAB/TolC efflux pump in Salmonella enterica strains with and without quinolone resistance-determining regions gyrA gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela Gomes; Galiana, Antonio; Cremades, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Magnani, Marciane; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Oliveira, Tereza C R M; Royo, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted in recent years to elucidate the structure, function and significance of AcrB, MarA, SoxS and RamA in Salmonella enterica. In this study, the relative quantification of acrB, soxS, marA and ramA genes expression was evaluated in 14 strains of S. enterica, with or without accompanying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA gene, that were exposed to ciprofloxacin during the exponential growth phase. The presence of ciprofloxacin during the log phase of bacterial growth activated the genes marA, soxS, ramA and acrB in all S. enterica strains analyzed in this study. The highest expression levels for acrB were observed in strains with gyrA mutation, and marA showed the highest expression in the strains without mutation. Considering only the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration valuesmarA. In this study, we observed that strains resistant to nalidixic acid may express genes associated with the efflux pump and the expression of the AcrAB-TolC pump genes seems to occur independently of mutations in gyrA.

  14. Detection of quinolones in poultry meat obtained from retail centers in Santiago Province, the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfrany, R O; Caba, R E; Solís de Los Santos, F; Hanning, I

    2013-02-01

    In the Dominican Republic, poultry consumption per capita is greater than 34 kg of poultry meat per year. However, antibiotics, specifically the quinolone group, may be overused and can result in residues in the poultry meat. These residues are of concern because consumers may have allergies to antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can develop from overuse of antibiotics in production. Little is known concerning this issue specifically for Santiago Province in the Dominican Republic. Thus, the main purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence of residual quinolones in poultry meat and determine whether any residues detected were higher than the residue maximum limits (100 μg/kg) established by food industry authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority. A total of 135 samples of chicken breast were taken from different retail meat centers in the nine municipalities of Santiago Province (Santiago, Tamboril, Sabana Iglesia, Villa Bisonó, Puñal, Villa González, Licey, Jánico, and San José De Las Matas) and were analyzed using the Equinox test (Immunotec, Swanton, VT). Of the 135 samples analyzed, 50% from Sabana Iglesia, 20% from Licey, 20% from San Jose De Las Matas, and 6.25% from Santiago contained residues of quinolones higher than the residue maximum limits. No quinolone residues were detected in samples obtained from Janico, Punal, Tamboril, Villa Bisono, or Villa Gonzalez. The results of this investigation suggest that some poultry meat sold for human consumption in Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic contains quinolone residues and may represent a health risk to some consumers.

  15. Functions of a GyrBA fusion protein and its interaction with QnrB and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhui; Villet, Regis; Jacoby, George A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    In order to study the interactions between Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and the gyrase interacting protein QnrB in vivo, we constructed a gyrB-gyrA fusion and validated its ability to correct the temperature-sensitive growth of gyrA and gyrB mutants. Like wild-type gyrA, the gyrB-gyrA fusion complemented a quinolone-resistant gyrA mutant to increase susceptibility. It functioned as an active type II topoisomerase, catalyzed negative supercoiling of DNA, was inhibited by quinolone, and was protected by QnrB.

  16. Lead resistant bacteria: lead resistance mechanisms, their applications in lead bioremediation and biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is non-bioessential, persistent and hazardous heavy metal pollutant of environmental concern. Bioremediation has become a potential alternative to the existing technologies for the removal and/or recovery of toxic lead from waste waters before releasing it into natural water bodies for environmental safety. To our best knowledge, this is a first review presenting different mechanisms employed by lead resistant bacteria to resist high levels of lead and their applications in cost effective and eco-friendly ways of lead bioremediation and biomonitoring. Various lead resistant mechanisms employed by lead resistant bacteria includes efflux mechanism, extracellular sequestration, biosorption, precipitation, alteration in cell morphology, enhanced siderophore production and intracellular lead bioaccumulation.

  17. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy III. New antimicrobial agents from the quinolones group in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an essential need for searching for the new compounds effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This paper is the third part of a series associated with the exploration of new antibacterial agents and it discusses the compounds belonging to the group of quinolones and substances possessing a hybrid structure composed of the quinolone molecule and other compounds. Eleven new substances at the stage of clinical trials are presented. Three of them belong to the group of non-fluorinated quinolone (nemonoxacin, ozenoxacin and KRP-AM 1977X), while six are the quinolones containing fluorine atom at 6 position of the carbon atom in the quinoline ring (zabofloxacin, finafloxacin, delafloxacin, JNJ-Q2, WCK771 and KPI-10). The remaining two compounds possess a hybrid construction composed of the quinolone structure and other molecules (cadazolid and CBR-2092). There is a chance in the near future, that the presented compounds can extend the range of existing antibacterial drugs and provide an alternative to currently available medicinal products.

  18. Antistaphylococcal activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, compared to those of other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Esel, Duygu; Kelly, Linda M; Bozdogan, Bülent; Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Smith, Kathy; Ednie, Lois M; Hoellman, Dianne B; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2005-08-01

    The in vitro activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, was tested against staphylococci and compared to those of other antimicrobials. DX-619 had the lowest MIC ranges/MIC(50)s/MIC(90)s (microg/ml) against 131 Staphylococcus aureus strains (32), and ciprofloxacin (>32/>32). Raised quinolone MICs were associated with mutations in GyrA (S84L) and single or double mutations in GrlA (S80F or Y; E84K, G, or V) in all S. aureus strains tested. A recent vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strain (Hershey) was resistant to available quinolones and was inhibited by DX-619 at 0.25 microg/ml and sitafloxacin at 1.0 microg/ml. Vancomycin (except VRSA), linezolid, ranbezolid, tigecycline, and quinupristin-dalfopristin were active against all strains, and teicoplanin was active against S. aureus but less active against coagulase-negative staphylococci. DX-619 produced resistant mutants with MICs of 1 to >32 microg/ml after 32 microg/ml for ciprofloxacin, sitafloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were also more active than other tested drugs against selected mutants and had the lowest mutation frequencies in single-step resistance selection. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were bactericidal against six quinolone-resistant (including the VRSA) and seven quinolone-susceptible strains tested, whereas gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were bactericidal against 11, 10, 7, and 5 strains at 4x MIC after 24 h, respectively. DX-619 was also bactericidal against one other VRSA strain, five vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strains, and four vancomycin-intermediate coagulase-negative staphylococci. Linezolid, ranbezolid, and tigecycline were bacteriostatic and quinupristin-dalfopristin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin were bactericidal against two, eight, and nine strains, and daptomycin and oritavancin were rapidly bactericidal against all strains, including the VRSA. DX-619 has potent in vitro activity against staphylococci, including

  19. Testing and Modeling of Mechanical Characteristics of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical response of resistance welding machine is very important to the weld quality in resistance welding especially in projection welding when collapse or deformation of work piece occurs. It is mainly governed by the mechanical parameters of machine. In this paper, a mathematical...... for both upper and lower electrode systems. This has laid a foundation for modeling the welding process and selecting the welding parameters considering the machine factors. The method is straightforward and easy to be applied in industry since the whole procedure is based on tests with no requirements...

  20. Macrolide resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae: Focus on azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Palma, Noemí; Horna, Gertrudis; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2017-02-01

    From its introduction in 1952 onwards, the clinical use of macrolides has been steadily increasing, both in human and veterinary medicine. Although initially designed to the treatment of Gram-positive microorganisms, this antimicrobial family has also been used to treat specific Gram-negative bacteria. Some of them, as azithromycin, are considered in the armamentarium against Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, the facility that this bacterial genus has to gain or develop mechanisms of antibiotic resistance may compromise the future usefulness of these antibiotics to fight against Enterobacteriaceae infections. The present review is focused on the mechanisms of macrolide resistance, currently described in Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Endochin optimization: structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies of 3-substituted 2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolones with antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R Matthew; Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Mutka, Tina S; Burrows, Jeremy N; Kyle, Dennis E; Manetsch, Roman

    2010-10-14

    Since the 1940s endochin and analogues thereof were known to be causal prophylactic and potent erythrocytic stage agents in avian models. Preliminary screening in a current in vitro assay identified several 4(1H)-quinolones with nanomolar EC(50) against erythrocytic stages of multidrug resistant W2 and TM90-C2B isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. Follow-up structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on 4(1H)-quinolone analogues identified several key features for biological activity. Nevertheless, structure-property relationship (SPR) studies conducted in parallel revealed that 4(1H)-quinolone analogues are limited by poor solubilities and rapid microsomal degradations. To improve the overall efficacy, multiple 4(1H)-quinolone series with varying substituents on the benzenoid quinolone ring and/or the 3-position were synthesized and tested for in vitro antimalarial activity. Several structurally diverse 6-chloro-2-methyl-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones with EC(50) in the low nanomolar range against the clinically relevant isolates W2 and TM90-C2B were identified with improved physicochemical properties while maintaining little to no cross-resistance with atovaquone.

  2. Quantitative Contributions of Target Alteration and Decreased Drug Accumulation to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchmann, Sebastian; Dötsch, Andreas; Nouri, Bianka; Chaberny, Iris F.

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics constitute a clinically successful and widely used class of broad-spectrum antibiotics; however, the emergence and spread of resistance increasingly limits the use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment and management of microbial disease. In this study, we evaluated the quantitative contributions of quinolone target alteration and efflux pump expression to fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We generated isogenic mutations in hot spots of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and inactivated the efflux regulator genes so as to overexpress the corresponding multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. We then introduced the respective mutations into the reference strain PA14 singly and in various combinations. Whereas the combined inactivation of two efflux regulator-encoding genes did not lead to resistance levels higher than those obtained by inactivation of only one efflux regulator-encoding gene, the combination of mutations leading to increased efflux and target alteration clearly exhibited an additive effect. This combination of target alteration and overexpression of efflux pumps was commonly observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates; however, these two mechanisms were frequently found not to be sufficient to explain the level of fluoroquinolone resistance. Our results suggest that there are additional mechanisms, independent of the expression of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and/or MexXY-OprM efflux pump, that increase ciprofloxacin resistance in isolates with mutations in the QRDRs. PMID:23274661

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to decitabine in the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichun Qin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC is approved for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, but resistance to DAC develops during treatment and mechanisms of resistance remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance to DAC in MDS. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed Quantitative Real-Time PCR to examine expression of genes related to DAC metabolism prior to therapy in 32 responders and non-responders with MDS as well as 14 patients who achieved a complete remission and subsequently relapsed while on therapy (secondary resistance. We then performed quantitative methylation analyses by bisulfite pyrosequencing of 10 genes as well as Methylated CpG Island Amplification Microarray (MCAM analysis of global methylation in secondary resistance. RESULTS: Most genes showed no differences by response, but the CDA/DCK ratio was 3 fold higher in non-responders than responders (P<.05, suggesting that this could be a mechanism of primary resistance. There were no significant differences at relapse in DAC metabolism genes, and no DCK mutations were detected. Global methylation measured by the LINE1 assay was lower at relapse than at diagnosis (P<.05. On average, the methylation of 10 genes was lower at relapse (16.1% compared to diagnosis (18.1% (P<.05. MCAM analysis showed decreased methylation of an average of 4.5% (range 0.6%-9.7% of the genes at relapse. By contrast, new cytogenetic changes were found in 20% of patients. CONCLUSION: Pharmacological mechanisms are involved in primary resistance to DAC, whereas hypomethylation does not prevent a relapse for patients with DAC treatment.

  4. Mechanisms of biotic resistance across complex life cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Marc; Potter, Elaine E; Aguirre, J David; Stachowicz, John J

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is the ability of communities to inhibit the establishment, spread or impact of novel species. However, the interactions that underlie biotic resistance depend heavily on the contexts in which species interact. Consequently, studies of biotic resistance that consider single processes, patches, species or life-history stages may provide an incomplete picture of the capacity for communities to resist invasion. Many organisms have multiphasic life cycles, where individuals can occupy distinct niches at different stages of the life history. Generally, studies of biotic resistance focus on interactions within a single life-history stage, and interactions at other life-history stages are overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that different mechanisms of biotic resistance occur across the life history and together limit the invasion success of an introduced marine invertebrate (Ciona intestinalis) in Northern California. We tested the role of interactions (competition and predation) with the resident community in limiting the abundance of Ciona through experiments conducted on fertilization, larval survival, settlement, early postsettlement survival, and the survival of juveniles and adults. Under some circumstances, Ciona became abundant in mid-successional stages and showed more rapid growth rates than a morphologically similar native species, Ascidia ceratodes. However, predators reduced Ciona abundance much more than that of Ascidia at several life stages. Furthermore, Ciona appeared to be a weaker competitor at the adult stage. Early life-history interactions with other sessile species at the fertilization, larval and recruit stages had modest to no effects on Ciona abundance. The presence of biotic resistance mechanisms acting at multiple life stages, and potentially under different conditions, suggests that different components of biotic resistance interact to enhance the resident community's resistance to invasion.

  5. Fenpyroximate resistance in Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae): cross-resistance and biochemical resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Si-Hyeock; Lee, Si-Woo; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2004-10-01

    A field colony of the Two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Koch), resistant to fenpyroximate was further selected with fenpyroximate 5SC for 20 generations at a selection pressure of 30-50% mortality (designated as FR-20 strain). Resistance and cross-resistance levels of the FR-20 strain to 18 acaricides were determined using a spray method. The FR-20 strain was extremely resistant to fenpyroximate [resistance ratio (RR) 252]. The strain exhibited extremely strong positive cross-resistance to acrinathrin (RR 196), and high levels of resistance to benzoximate (RR 55) and propargite (RR 64). Moderate levels of cross-resistance (RR 11-40) to abamectin, fenbutatin oxide, fenpropathrin, pyridaben, pyridaben + bifenthrin and tebufenpyrad were observed. The FR-20 strain showed low levels of resistance (RR fenazaquin and milbemectin. Synergist experiments with different metabolic inhibitors revealed that piperonyl butoxide had the greatest effect on the efficacy of fenpyroximate, followed by iprobenfos and triphenyl phosphate. In a comparative assay with detoxifying enzymes, the FR-20 strain showed 2.5-fold higher activity in p-nitroanisole-O-demethylation, and 2.5- and 2.2-fold higher activities in alpha- and beta-naphthyl acetate hydrolysis, respectively. These results suggested that enhanced activities of both mixed-function oxidases and esterases likely contribute to the fenpyroximate resistance of the FR-20 strain of T urticae.

  6. Mechanism of resistance of evolved glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Todd A; Shaner, Dale L; Ward, Sarah M; Leach, Jan E; Preston, Christopher; Westra, Philip

    2011-06-01

    Evolved glyphosate resistance in weedy species represents a challenge for the continued success and utility of glyphosate-resistant crops. Glyphosate functions by inhibiting the plant enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). The resistance mechanism was determined in a population of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth from Georgia (U.S.). Within this population, glyphosate resistance correlates with increases in (a) genomic copy number of EPSPS, (b) expression of the EPSPS transcript, (c) EPSPS protein level, and (d) EPSPS enzymatic activity. Dose response results from the resistant and an F(2) population suggest that between 30 and 50 EPSPS genomic copies are necessary to survive glyphosate rates between 0.5 and 1.0 kg ha(-1). These results further confirm the role of EPSPS gene amplification in conferring glyphosate resistance in this population of Palmer amaranth. Questions remain related to how the EPSPS amplification initially occurred and the occurrence of this mechanism in other Palmer amaranth populations and other glyphosate-resistant species.

  7. Pathogen derived resistance to Potato virus Y: mechanisms and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. MÄKI-VALKAMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of pathogen derived resistance (PDR was proposed in 1985, genetic transformation of plants to express virus-derived sequences has been used to engineer resistance to many viruses. This paper reviews PDR approaches to Potato virus Y (PVY, type member of the genus Potyvirus. PDR to viruses operates often through RNA-mediated resistance mechanisms that do not require protein expression. Studies on the RNA-mediated resistance have led to the discovery of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS, a mechanism that controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and provides natural protection against virus infections. Viruses, in turn, can suppress the PTGS with some of their proteins, such as the helper component-proteinase protein of PVY. Expression of PVY proteins in transgenic plants entails a risk for heterologous encapsidation or synergism with viruses that infect the PVY-resistant transgenic plant. These risks are avoided using RNA-mediated resistance, but a risk still exists for recombination between the transgene transcript and the RNA genome of the infecting virus, which may create a virus with altered properties. The harmful consequences can be limited to some extent by removing functional motifs from the viral sequence used as a transgene.;

  8. The selection of resistance to and the mutagenicity of different fluoroquinolones in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, J M; Cabeza, J G; Ruiz Chaler, M; Montero, T; Hernandez, J; Mensa, J; Llagostera, M; Vila, J

    2005-09-01

    Two quinolone-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and five quinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were used to obtain in-vitro quinolone-resistant mutants in a multistep resistance selection process. The fluoroquinolones used were ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin and clinafloxacin. The mutagenicity of these quinolones was determined by the Salmonella and the Escherichia coli retromutation assays. All quinolone-resistant Staph. aureus mutants had at least one mutation in the grlA gene, while 86.6% of quinolone-resistant Strep. pneumoniae mutants had mutations in either or both the gyrA and parC genes. Moxifloxacin and levofloxacin selected resistant mutants later than the other quinolones, but this difference was more obvious in Staph. aureus. Accumulation of the fluoroquinolones by Staph. aureus did not explain these differences, since levofloxacin and moxifloxacin accumulated inside bacteria to the same extent as clinafloxacin and trovafloxacin. The results also showed that moxifloxacin and levofloxacin had less mutagenic potency in both mutagenicity assays, suggesting a possible relationship between the selection of resistance to quinolones and the mutagenic potency of the molecule. Furthermore, gemifloxacin selected efflux mutants more frequently than the other quinolones used. Thus, the risk of developing quinolone resistance may depend on the density of the microorganism at the infection site and the concentration of the fluoroquinolone, and also on the mutagenicity of the quinolone used, with moxifloxacin and levofloxacin being the least mutagenic.

  9. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  10. Cross-resistance of bisultap resistant strain of Nilaparvata lugens and its biochemical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shanfeng; Zhang, Runjie

    2011-02-01

    The resistant (R) strain of the planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) selected for bisultap resistance displayed 7.7-fold resistance to bisultap and also had cross-resistance to nereistoxin (monosultap, thiocyclam, and cartap), chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, and malathion but no cross-resistance to buprofezin, imidacloprid, and fipronil. To find out the biochemical mechanism of resistance to bisultap, biochemical assay was done. The results showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450) activity in R strain was 2.71-fold that in susceptible strain (S strain), in which the changed activity for general esterase (EST) was 1.91 and for glutathione S-transferases only 1.32. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) could significantly inhibit P450 activity (percentage of inhibition [PI]: 37.31%) in the R strain, with ESTs PI = 16.04% by triphenyl phosphate (TPP). The results also demonstrated that diethyl maleate had no synergism with bisultap. However, PBO displayed significant synergism in three different strains, and the synergism increased with resistance (S strain 1.42, Lab strain, 2.24 and R strain, 3.23). TPP also showed synergism for three strains, especially in R strain (synergistic ratio = 2.47). An in vitro biochemical study and in vivo synergistic study indicated that P450 might be play important role in the biochemical mechanism of bisultap resistance and that esterase might be the important factor of bisultap resistance. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) insensitivity play important role in bisultap resistance. We suggest that buprofezin, imidacloprid, and fipronil could be used in resistance management programs for N. lugens via alternation and rotation with bisultap.

  11. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro eNishizawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attractive alternative to the above-mentioned techniques. The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an accurate and rapid method for the detection of mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. This review highlights the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori and the molecular methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  12. Lipid-induced insulin resistance: unravelling the mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Varman T; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance has long been associated with obesity. More than 40 years ago, Randle and colleagues postulated that lipids impaired insulin-stimulated glucose use by muscles through inhibition of glycolysis at key points. However, work over the past two decades has shown that lipid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from defects in insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity. The steatotic liver is also resistant to insulin in terms of inhibition of hepatic glucose production and stimulation of glycogen synthesis. In muscle and liver, the intracellular accumulation of lipids—namely, diacylglycerol—triggers activation of novel protein kinases C with subsequent impairments in insulin signalling. This unifying hypothesis accounts for the mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes, lipodystrophy, and ageing; and the insulin-sensitising effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:20609972

  13. Pool of resistance mechanisms to glyphosate in Digitaria insularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Leonardo Bianco; Alves, Pedro Luis da Costa Aguiar; González-Torralva, Fidel; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo Enrique; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia María; De Prado, Rafael; Gil-Humanes, Javier; Barro, Francisco; de Castro, María Dolores Luque

    2012-01-18

    Digitaria insularis biotypes resistant to glyphosate have been detected in Brazil. Studies were carried out in controlled conditions to determine the role of absorption, translocation, metabolism, and gene mutation as mechanisms of glyphosate resistance in D. insularis. The susceptible biotype absorbed at least 12% more (14)C-glyphosate up to 48 h after treatment (HAT) than resistant biotypes. High differential (14)C-glyphosate translocation was observed at 12 HAT, so that >70% of the absorbed herbicide remained in the treated leaf in resistant biotypes, whereas 42% remained in the susceptible biotype at 96 HAT. Glyphosate was degraded to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), glyoxylate, and sarcosine by >90% in resistant biotypes, whereas a small amount of herbicide (up to 11%) was degraded by the susceptible biotype up to 168 HAT. Two amino acid changes were found at positions 182 and 310 in EPSPS, consisting of a proline to threonine and a tyrosine to cysteine substitution, respectively, in resistant biotypes. Therefore, absorption, translocation, metabolism, and gene mutation play an important role in the D. insularis glyphosate resistance.

  14. Mechanisms of resistance to HER2 target therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-01-01

    In the past years, several agents targeting signaling proteins critical for breast cancer growth and dissemination entered clinical evaluation. They include drugs directed against the HER/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, especially HER2; several downstream signal transducers; and proteins involved in tumor angiogenesis and dissemination. Unfortunately, resistance to targeted agents is a quite common feature, and understanding of the molecular mechanisms predicting response or failure has become a crucial issue to optimize treatment and select patients who are the best candidates to respond. The neoadjuvant setting offers unique opportunities allowing tumor sampling and search for molecular determinants of response. A variety of tumor and host factors may account for the onset of resistance. Major progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the primary and acquired resistance to targeted agents, especially the anti-HER2 drugs, which play a pivotal role in the weaponry against breast cancer.

  15. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  16. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haiyan Zhu, Hui Luo, Wenwen Zhang, Zhaojun Shen, Xiaoli Hu, Xueqiong Zhu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. Keywords: cisplatin, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, microRNA, molecular mechanism, resistance

  17. Mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems in meropenem- resistant Acinetobacter isolates from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the resistance mechanisms in Acinetobacter species by phenotypic methods. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility profile for 150 clinical isolates of Acinetobacte r was determined by the standard disk diffusion method. Isolates detected to be meropenem resistant were tested further by broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for meropenem. The resistant isolates were also tested for metallo β -lactamase (MBL production by the double-disk approximation test, for AmpC beta-lactamase production and efflux pump detection by agar microdilution MIC with and without reserpine. Results: Twenty-one isolates were found resistant to meropenem by the standard disk diffusion method. Nine samples were from patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs. Broth microdilution MICs of the isolates revealed low-level resistance to meropenem. MBL was not produced by any of these isolates. AmpC β -lactamases were produced by nine (43% isolates. ′Efflux pump′-mediated resistance to meropenem was detected in two out of nine random isolates tested for the same . Conclusions: Carbapenem resistance is not uncommon in Acinetobacter isolates. AmpC production may cause carbapenem resistance. MBL and efflux pump may not be important causes of carbapenem resistance.

  18. The operational mechanism of ferroelectric-driven organic resistive switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemerink, M.; Asadi, K.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a reliable memory element is crucial for the fabrication of 'plastic' logic circuits. We use numerical simulations to show that the switching mechanism of ferroelectric-driven organic resistive switches is the stray field of the polarized ferroelectric phase. The stray field modu

  19. Sphingolipids in neuroblastoma : Their role in drug resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sietsma, H; Dijkhuis, AJ; Kamps, W; Kok, JW

    2002-01-01

    Disseminated neuroblastoma usually calls for chemotherapy as the primary approach for treatment. Treatment failure is often attributable to drug resistance. This involves a variety of cellular mechanisms, including increased drug efflux through expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (e.g.,

  20. Mechanisms and consequences of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, D I; Hughes, D; Kubicek-Sutherland, J Z

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ongoing clinical studies aimed at modulating the expression of AMPs to boost the human innate immune response. In this review we discuss the potential problems associated with these therapeutic approaches. There is considerable experimental data describing mechanisms by which bacteria can develop resistance to AMPs. As for any type of drug resistance, the rate by which AMP resistance would emerge and spread in a population of bacteria in a natural setting will be determined by a complex interplay of several different factors, including the mutation supply rate, the fitness of the resistant mutant at different AMP concentrations, and the strength of the selective pressure. Several studies have already shown that AMP-resistant bacterial mutants display broad cross-resistance to a variety of AMPs with different structures and modes of action. Therefore, routine clinical administration of AMPs to treat bacterial infections may select for resistant bacterial pathogens capable of better evading the innate immune system. The ramifications of therapeutic levels of exposure on the development of AMP resistance and bacterial pathogenesis are not yet understood. This is something that needs to be carefully studied and monitored if AMPs are used in clinical settings.

  1. Emergence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus and spread of a single resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Snelders

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to triazoles was recently reported in Aspergillus fumigatus isolates cultured from patients with invasive aspergillosis. The prevalence of azole resistance in A. fumigatus is unknown. We investigated the prevalence and spread of azole resistance using our culture collection that contained A. fumigatus isolates collected between 1994 and 2007. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the prevalence of itraconazole (ITZ resistance in 1,912 clinical A. fumigatus isolates collected from 1,219 patients in our University Medical Centre over a 14-y period. The spread of resistance was investigated by analyzing 147 A. fumigatus isolates from 101 patients, from 28 other medical centres in The Netherlands and 317 isolates from six other countries. The isolates were characterized using phenotypic and molecular methods. The electronic patient files were used to determine the underlying conditions of the patients and the presence of invasive aspergillosis. ITZ-resistant isolates were found in 32 of 1,219 patients. All cases were observed after 1999 with an annual prevalence of 1.7% to 6%. The ITZ-resistant isolates also showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations of voriconazole, ravuconazole, and posaconazole. A substitution of leucine 98 for histidine in the cyp51A gene, together with two copies of a 34-bp sequence in tandem in the gene promoter (TR/L98H, was found to be the dominant resistance mechanism. Microsatellite analysis indicated that the ITZ-resistant isolates were genetically distinct but clustered. The ITZ-sensitive isolates were not more likely to be responsible for invasive aspergillosis than the ITZ-resistant isolates. ITZ resistance was found in isolates from 13 patients (12.8% from nine other medical centres in The Netherlands, of which 69% harboured the TR/L98H substitution, and in six isolates originating from four other countries. CONCLUSIONS: Azole resistance has emerged in A. fumigatus and might be more

  2. Nosocomial infection and its molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jufeng; Gao, Jianjun; Tang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial infection is a kind of infection, which is spread in various hospital environments, and leads to many serious diseases (e.g. pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, and puerperal fever), and causes higher mortality than community-acquired infection. Bacteria are predominant among all the nosocomial infection-associated pathogens, thus a large number of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, are adopted in clinical treatment. However, in recent years antibiotic resistance quickly spreads worldwide and causes a critical threat to public health. The predominant bacteria include Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In these bacteria, resistance emerged from antibiotic resistant genes and many of those can be exchanged between bacteria. With technical advances, molecular mechanisms of resistance have been gradually unveiled. In this review, recent advances in knowledge about mechanisms by which (i) bacteria hydrolyze antibiotics (e.g. extended spectrum β-lactamases, (ii) AmpC β-lactamases, carbapenemases), (iii) avoid antibiotic targeting (e.g. mutated vanA and mecA genes), (iv) prevent antibiotic permeation (e.g. porin deficiency), or (v) excrete intracellular antibiotics (e.g. active efflux pump) are summarized.

  3. Insulin Resistance: Metabolic mechanisms and consequences in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, E. Dale; O'Shea, Karen M.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of obesity and Type 2 diabetes and impacts the heart in various ways. Impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake is a uniformly observed characteristic of the heart in these states, although changes in upstream kinase signaling are variable and dependent on the severity and duration of the associated obesity or diabetes. The understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of insulin resistance in the heart is evolving. To maintain its high energy demands, the heart is capable of utilizing many metabolic substrates. Although, insulin signaling may directly regulate cardiac metabolism, its main role is likely the regulation of substrate delivery from the periphery to the heart. In addition to promoting glucose uptake, insulin regulates long chain fatty acid uptake, protein synthesis, and vascular function in the normal cardiovascular system. Recent advances in understanding the role of metabolic, signaling, and inflammatory pathways in obesity have provided opportunities to better understand the pathophysiology of insulin resistance in the heart. This review will summarize our current understanding of metabolic mechanisms for and consequences of insulin resistance in the heart and discuss potential new areas for investigating novel mechanisms that contribute to insulin resistance in the heart. PMID:22895668

  4. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in finfish aquaculture environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio D. Miranda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Consumer demand for affordable fish drives the ever-growing global aquaculture industry. The intensification and expansion of culture conditions in the production of several finfish species has been coupled with an increase in bacterial fish disease and the need for treatment with antimicrobials. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance prevalent in aquaculture environments is important to design effective disease treatment strategies, to prioritize the use and registration of antimicrobials for aquaculture use, and to assess and minimize potential risks to public health. In this brief article we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in finfish aquaculture environments and highlight specific research that should provide the basis of sound, science-based policies for the use of antimicrobials in aquaculture.

  5. Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, David C

    2010-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first described in 1995 and is the most closely related species to the predominant human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. C. dubliniensis is significantly less prevalent and less pathogenic than C. albicans and is primarily associated with infections in HIV-infected individuals and other immunocompromised cohorts. The population structure of C. dubliniensis consists of three well-defined major clades and is significantly less diverse than C. albicans. The majority of C. dubliniensis isolates are susceptible to antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections. To date only two major patterns of antifungal drug resistance have been identified and the molecular mechanisms of these are very similar to the resistance mechanisms that have been described previously in C. albicans. However, significant differences are evident in the predominant antifungal drug mechanisms employed by C. dubliniensis, differences that reflect its more clonal nature, its lower prevalence and characteristics of its genome, the complete sequence of which has only recently been determined.

  6. Characterisation of Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of a resistance welding machine have significant influence on weld quality, which must be considered when simulating the welding process numerically. However, due to the complexity of the machine structure and the mutual coupling of components of the machine system...... characterizing the dynamic mechanical characteristics of resistance welding machines is suggested, and a test set-up is designed determining the basic, independent machine parameters required in the model. The model is verified by performing a series of mechanical tests as well as real projection welds......., it is very difficult to measure or calculate the basic, independent machine parameters required in a mathematical model of the machine dynamics, and no test method has so far been presented in literature, which can be applied directly in an industrial environment. In this paper, a mathematical model...

  7. Characterisation of Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of a resistance welding machine have significant influence on weld quality, which must be considered when simulating the welding process numerically. However, due to the complexity of the machine structure and the mutual coupling of components of the machine system......, it is very difficult to measure or calculate the basic, independent machine parameters required in a mathematical model of the machine dynamics, and no test method has so far been presented in literature, which can be applied directly in an industrial environment. In this paper, a mathematical model...... characterizing the dynamic mechanical characteristics of resistance welding machines is suggested, and a test set-up is designed determining the basic, independent machine parameters required in the model. The model is verified by performing a series of mechanical tests as well as real projection welds....

  8. Identification of Mechanical parameters for Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical dynamic responses of resistance welding machine have a significant influence on weld quality and electrode service life, it must be considered when the real welding production is carried out or the welding process is simulated. The mathematical models for characterizing the mechanical...... to the complexities and differences of machine constructions. In this paper, a method of identifying the machine mechanical parameters based on the measured data is presented no matter how the machine construction and what types of machine are. The computations are implemented in MATLAB....

  9. Identification of Mechanical parameters for Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical dynamic responses of resistance welding machine have a significant influence on weld quality and electrode service life, it must be considered when the real welding production is carried out or the welding process is simulated. The mathematical models for characterizing the mechanical...... to the complexities and differences of machine constructions. In this paper, a method of identifying the machine mechanical parameters based on the measured data is presented no matter how the machine construction and what types of machine are. The computations are implemented in MATLAB....

  10. New luminophor-activators based on (fluoro)quinolone antibacterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, A.V. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Karaseva, E.T. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Korpela, T. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Karasev, V.E. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: karasev@ich.dvo.ru

    2008-11-15

    It was shown that (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics form strongly fluorescent solid-state complexes with Eu(III) and Tb(III) lanthanide ions, with a wavelength red-shift beneficial for applications to greenhouse-cover polymers. Complexes with optimal properties were prepared by the mechanical activation of fine-dispersed composite mixtures with the lanthanide salts. The spectral properties, photo-stability to UV-light, and compatibility with the polyethylene matrix were investigated. The formulation additives of the tablet forms of the antibiotic medicines did not quench the fluorescence from the lanthanide ions. Therefore, the outdated drug forms of the antibiotics can serve as cheap recyclable sources for the covering material of greenhouses. In addition, diphenylguanidine (DPG) was investigated as a coligand. DPG enhanced fluorescence of the fluoroquinolone complexes by decreasing the non-radiative energy loss through O-H vibration of H{sub 2}O.

  11. Niveles de resistencia a quinolonas y otros antimicrobianos en cepas de Escherichia coli comensales en niños de la zona periurbana de Lima, Perú Levels of quinolones resistance and other antimicrobial in non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in children from the periurban area of Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Pons

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal del estudio fue establecer el nivel de resistencia a antimicrobianos en un total de 222 cepas comensales de E. coli de origen fecal, en Perú. Las frecuencias de resistencia encontrados, frente los antimicrobianos evaluados, fueron: ampicilina (62,6%, cotrimoxazol (48,6%, tetraciclina (43,0% y cloranfenicol (15,8%. Destacan los elevados niveles de resistencia a quinolonas: 32% al ácido nalidíxico (NAL y 12% a ciprofloxacino (CIP. Estos elevados niveles hacia las quinolonas en cepas comensales aisladas en niños de esta franja de edad, realzan el uso extendido y el impacto de consumo de este tipo de antimicrobianos en la comunidad, mostrando el riesgo potencial de su pérdida de utilidad en el área.The main aim of this study was to establish the resistance levels to antimicrobial agents, in 222 non-pathogenic E. coli strains of fecal origin in Peru. The proportion of resistance found to the evaluated antimicrobials was ampicillin (62.6%, cotrimoxazole (48,6%, tetracycline (43,0% and chloramphenicol (15,8%. We emphasize the high resistance levels found for quinolones: 32% for nalidixic acid (NAL and 12% for ciprofloxacin (CIP. These high levels of quinoloneresistance in non-pathogenic strains isolated from children in this age group highlight the extensive use and the impact of the intake of this kind of antimicrobials in the community, showing the potential risk of the loss of their utility in the area.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF K562/ADM/VER CELL SUBLINE RESISTANT TO VERAPAMIL AND ITS RESISTANT MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢佐福; 周冬梅; 林贤东; 林声; 吴允昆

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To understand whether verapamil (VER) resistance development in the multidrug-resistant cell line and its mechanism. Methods: K562/ADM/VER cell subline resistant to verapamil was established through a gradual increase of VER concentration in the media. MTT method was used to assay resistance to VER, cross resistance to dipyriamole (DPM), cyclosporin A (CsA) in the cells, and HPLC and spectrofluorometer to detect intracellular accumulation of VER or ADM respectively, as well as S-P immunocytochemical technique for detection of genes expression. Results: It were observed that 7.9-fold increase in VER resistance, significantly reduced intracellular accumulation of VER or ADM and also develop across resistance to DPM and CsA in K562/ADM/VER cells, compared with its parent cell, K562/ADM. High-level of p-glycoprotein(pgp), middle-level of p53, p16, was present in two cell lines without expression of GSTPI, C-myc, C-myc, C-fos and C-erbB-2. Bc1-2 protein expression was found only in K562/ADM cells. Conclusion: K562/ADM cells were capable of being induced to develop resistance to VER.

  13. Mechanism of resistance to benzalkonium chloride by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Y; Yokoyama, H; Nishimura, H; Ose, Y; Tashima, T

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride (BC) were studied. The effluence of cell components was observed in susceptible P. aeruginosa by electron microscopy, but resistant P. aeruginosa seemed to be undamaged. No marked changes in cell surface potential between Escherichia coli NIHJC-2 and a spheroplast strain were found. The contents of phospholipids (PL) and fatty and neutral lipids (FNL) in the cell walls of resistant P. aeruginosa were higher than those in the cell walls of susceptible P. aeruginosa. The amounts of BC adsorbed to PL and FNL of cell walls of BC-resistant P. aeruginosa were lower than those for BC-susceptible P. aeruginosa. Fifteen species of cellular fatty acids were identified by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ability of BC to permeate the cell wall was reduced because of the increase in cellular fatty acids. These results suggested that the resistance of P. aeruginosa to BC is mainly a result of increased in the contents of PL and FNL. In resistant P. aeruginosa, the decrease in the amount of BC adsorbed is likely to be the result of increases in the contents of PL and FNL. Images PMID:2506813

  14. Molecular mechanism of resistance of Fusarium fujikuroi to benzimidazole fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zihao; Gao, Tao; Liang, Shuping; Liu, Kexue; Zhou, Mingguo; Chen, Changjun

    2014-08-01

    Although carbendazim (MBC) and other benzimidazole fungicides have effectively controlled bakanae disease of rice (which is caused by Fusarium fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides) in the past, MBC resistance has become common. Previous research has shown that MBC resistance results from a mutation in the β1 -tubulin (β1 tub) gene in F. verticillioides. However, MBC resistance in F. fujikuroi, a predominant species in China, does not result from a mutation in the β1 tub. The molecular mechanism of F. fujikuroi resistance against benzimidazole fungicides is poorly understood. In this study, we determined that although β1 tub and β2 -tubulin (β2 tub) in F. fujikuroi have high homology with β1 tub and β2 tub in F. verticillioides, MBC resistance in F. fujikuroi results from mutations in β2 tub [GAG(Glu)→GTG(Val) at codon 198, TTC(Phe)→TAC(Tyr) at codon 200, and GGC(Gly)→GGT(Gly) at codon 235] but not in β1 tub. Δβ2 tub (β2 tub deletion) mutants were highly sensitive to MBC, produced fewer conidia and were less virulent than parental strains. Complementation of the Δβ2 tub mutants with a copy of the whole β2 tub locus from their parental strains restored the level of MBC resistance (or sensitivity) to that of the parental strain.

  15. The Landscape of Pancreatic Cancer Therapeutic Resistance Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Saswati; O'Hayer, Kevin; Blanco, Fernando F; Winter, Jordan M; Brody, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, PDA) is infamously moving to the top of the list as one of the most lethal cancers with an overall 5 year survival rate of 7%. Multiple genomic-based and molecular characterization studies of PDA specimens and established animal models have provided the field with multiple targets and a progression model of this disease. Still, to date, the best therapeutic options are surgery and combination cytotoxic therapies. In general, even in the best case scenario (i.e., an early stage diagnosis and a response to a specific therapy), most of these fortunate patients' PDA cells acquire or exert resistance mechanisms and eventually kill the patient. Herein, we touch on a growing field of investigation that focuses on PDA cell therapeutic resistance mechanisms. We examine extrinsic elements (i.e., the tumor microenvironment, hypoxia) to the intrinsic processes within the cell (i.e., post-transcriptional gene regulation and somatic mutations) that are important for therapeutic efficacy and resistance. Even as better targeted and personalized approaches move through the clinical trial pipeline the discussed resistance mechanisms will most likely play a role in the management of this deadly disease.

  16. Diversity of polymyxin resistance mechanisms among Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardello, Raquel; Visconde, Marina; Cayô, Rodrigo; Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz de; Mori, Marcelo Alves da Silva; Lincopan, Nilton; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Polymyxins have become drugs of last resort for treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative infections. However, the mechanisms of resistance to this compound have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance to this antimicrobial in two A. baumannii clinical isolates, respectively, susceptible (A027) and resistant (A009) to polymyxin B before and after polymyxin B exposure (A027(ind) and A009(ind)). The pmrAB and lpxACD were sequenced and their transcriptional levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR. The bacterial cell morphology was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and the membrane potential was measured using Zeta-potential analyzer. The virulence of strains was studied using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Both clinical isolates exhibited an elevation of the polymyxin B MIC after exposure to this compound. On the other hand, A027(ind) showed decreased values of MIC for β-lactams, aminoglycosides, vancomycin, teicoplanin, oxacillin and erythromycin. A027(ind) harbored two mutations in pmrB and the ISAba125 disrupting the lpxA. In contrast, A009(ind) strain exhibited increase of pmrB transcriptional level, after polymyxin B exposure, despite the absence of mutations in the pmrAB genes. The TEM images revealed a thicker and more electron-dense peptidoglycan layer for A009 than that of A027. The exposure to polymyxin B induced a strong condensation and darkening of intracellular material, mainly in A009(ind). In addition, the surface charge of A009 was significantly less negative than the one of A027. Using the C. elegans model, only A027(ind) strain showed a reduction on virulence. The diversity of polymyxin B resistance mechanisms among A. baumannii strains evaluated in this study confirms the complexity of these mechanisms, which may vary depending of the background of each strain.

  17. Mechanisms of resistance to sulfur dioxide in the Cucurbitaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressan, R.A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1978-05-01

    The relative resistance of four cultivars of the Cucurbitaceae (Cucumis sativus L. cv. National Pickling, and inbred line SC 25; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Prolific Straightneck Squash, and cv. Small Sugar Pumpkin) to SO/sub 2/ was determined. According to plots of the degree of exposure to SO/sub 2/ (which depends on the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the duration of the exposure), there is an 8-fold difference in resistance to this toxic gas among these cultivars. However, if the degree of injury is plotted as a function of the amount of SO/sub 2/ absorbed, all four cultivars appear similarly sensitive to the gas. We conclude that the principal reason for special and varietal differences in resistance among these cultivars is the relative rate of absorption of the gas. The densities of stomata on the upper and lower surfaces of leaves did not differ sufficiently between cultivars to account for the differences in absorption rates. It remains to be determined whether the differences in rate of SO/sub 2/ absorption reflect differences in stomatal activity. Resistance of individual leaves changes with position on the plant axis (age of the leaf). There exists a gradient of decreasing resistance from the apex downward. This resistance gradient cannot be accounted for by differences in rates of SO/sub 2/ absorption. We infer the existence of a biochemically based, developmentally controlled resistance mechanism which functions after SO/sub 2/ has entered the leaf. Biochemical comparisons of old and young leaves with such differences in resistance should be helpful in determining the biochemistry of SO/sub 2/ toxicity.

  18. A molecular mechanism of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Alassane; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Pandharkar, Trupti; Liu, Haining; Estiu, Guillermina; Stahelin, Robert V; Rizk, Shahir S; Njimoh, Dieudonne L; Ryan, Yana; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nguon, Chea; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Pfrender, Michael; Emrich, Scott; Mohandas, Narla; Dondorp, Arjen M; Wiest, Olaf; Haldar, Kasturi

    2015-04-30

    Artemisinins are the cornerstone of anti-malarial drugs. Emergence and spread of resistance to them raises risk of wiping out recent gains achieved in reducing worldwide malaria burden and threatens future malaria control and elimination on a global level. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed parasite genetic loci associated with artemisinin resistance. However, there is no consensus on biochemical targets of artemisinin. Whether and how these targets interact with genes identified by GWAS, remains unknown. Here we provide biochemical and cellular evidence that artemisinins are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PfPI3K), revealing an unexpected mechanism of action. In resistant clinical strains, increased PfPI3K was associated with the C580Y mutation in P. falciparum Kelch13 (PfKelch13), a primary marker of artemisinin resistance. Polyubiquitination of PfPI3K and its binding to PfKelch13 were reduced by the PfKelch13 mutation, which limited proteolysis of PfPI3K and thus increased levels of the kinase, as well as its lipid product phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). We find PI3P levels to be predictive of artemisinin resistance in both clinical and engineered laboratory parasites as well as across non-isogenic strains. Elevated PI3P induced artemisinin resistance in absence of PfKelch13 mutations, but remained responsive to regulation by PfKelch13. Evidence is presented for PI3P-dependent signalling in which transgenic expression of an additional kinase confers resistance. Together these data present PI3P as the key mediator of artemisinin resistance and the sole PfPI3K as an important target for malaria elimination.

  19. Mild and efficient Winterfeldt oxidation of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-γ-carbolines for the synthesis of dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]-quinolones and pyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Rong; Zhu, Jiangwei; Hu, Yongzhou

    2012-01-30

    The Winterfeldt oxidation (NaOH, DMF, air, rt) of substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-γ-carbolines has been developed, which provides a convenient and efficient method for the synthesis of the corresponding dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones in moderate to excellent yields (38-94%). The generality and substrate scope of this reaction are explored and a possible mechanism is proposed. The results imply that electron-withdrawing groups on N2 of tetrahydro-γ-carbolines and N5-H are necessary. The synthesis of 5 or 7-substituted pyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones in near quantitative yields was also achieved through deprotection and aromatization of N1-Boc-dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones.

  20. Regional variations in quinolone use in France and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallini, A; Taboulet, F; Bourrel, R

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate geographic variations in the use of quinolones in France and their associated factors. All reimbursement claims of antimicrobials were collected for 90 % of the French population for the year 2007. Dispensed quantities were then converted into defined daily doses (DDD) and adjusted for the age structure of the national population. Correlations between quinolone use and total antimicrobial use and some morbidity and socio-economic factors were studied using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. On average, 2.05 DDD of quinolones per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) were dispensed in 2007 in France, accounting for 10.2 % of the total antimicrobial consumption in adults. A 40 % variation was observed between the regions with the lowest (1.73 DID) and the highest use (2.44 DID). This variation was more important for anti-pneumococcal quinolones than for quinolones directed against urinary tract infections (coefficients of variation: 26 vs. 6 %). Quinolone use was correlated with some regional socio-economic factors (unemployment, growth domestic product, health expenditures) and physician density, but was independent of the total antimicrobial use. After adjustment for age, large variations in quantitative and qualitative quinolone use were observed across French regions, especially for anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These results, though not controlled for potential epidemics variations, argue in favour of a possible improvement in quinolone prescribing to be achieved in some regions.

  1. Mechanisms of Ciprofloxacin-Induced Resistance in Klebsiella Pneumoniae in Vitro%环丙沙星体外诱导肺炎克雷伯菌耐药机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩菊梅; 叶晓光

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨环丙沙星体外诱导敏感肺炎克雷伯菌(KPn)耐药的分子机制。方法对临床分离的敏感肺炎克雷伯菌体外使用环丙沙星,采用多步法诱导耐药,并随机选择10对临床分离敏感菌和诱导后高度耐药菌进行GyrA 基因 QRDR(喹诺酮抗性区,quinolone resistant-determining region)的聚合酶链式反应(PCR)扩增、SDS-PAGE 电泳鉴定外膜外排泵蛋白 TolC 及膜孔蛋白 porin 蛋白的表达。结果诱导后的 KPn 均成为耐药菌,其中高度耐药菌占73.81%。10株诱导的耐药菌中 Ser83突变率为30%;膜孔蛋白 porin 表达均减少,外排泵蛋白 TolC表达均增多。结论环丙沙星的使用与 KPn 耐药密切相关,并可引起 KPn 多种耐药分子产生。%ABSTRACT:Objective To investigate the molecular mechanisms of ciprofloxacin-induced resist-ance in Klebsiella pneumonia (KPn)in vitro.Methods The antibiotic resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from patients was induced by ciprofloxacin in vitro using multi-step test method.Ten pairs of susceptible clinical isolates and ciprofloxacin-induced resistant strains were randomly selected in this study.The quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR)of gyrA gene was amplified by PCR,and the expression of TolC protein and porin protein were detected by SDS-PAGE.Results All KPn showed drug resistance after ciprofloxacin induction,and highly drug-resistant bacteria accounted for 73.81%.Among the 10 ciprofloxacin-induced resistant strains,the mutation rate of Ser83 was 30%.In addition,porin expression decreased but TolC ex-pression increased after ciprofloxacin induction.Conclusion The use of ciprofloxacin is closely related to drug resistance and causes the production of a variety of drug-resistant molecules in KPn.

  2. [Trastuzumab (Herceptin) and breast cancer: mechanisms of resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieras, Véronique; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Degeorges, Armelle; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Mignot, Laurent; de Cremoux, Patricia

    2007-03-01

    The detection of overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in some breast cancer tumors has led to the development of a targeted treatment that is tumor selective, effective at extending life expectancy in the patients with advanced or early breast cancers. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody to HER2 is indicated for patients whose tumor demonstrates an amplified copy number for the HER2 oncogene and/or overexpresses the HER2 oncoprotein. Despite a high level of efficacy in combination with chemotherapy, trastuzumab as single agent has limited effectiveness (up to 30% response rates) and patients who respond to trastuzumab will relapse despite continued treatment. The mechanism of trastuzumab action is not fully understood but has been related to cell cycle inhibition. As to mechanisms of resistance, little is known but many preclinical data raised different hypothesis. Thus, the co-expression of growth factor receptors (EGFR family, IGF-1 R), and the activation of PI3K-Akt pathway, mainly by loss of PTEN function may be responsible for the resistance phenotype. It would be interesting to identify the mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance in breast tumors in order to reverse or prevent it. The characterization of these mechanisms would also provide novel strategies for alternative treatments.

  3. Mechanism Study of Reversible Resistivity Change in Oxide Thin Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.; Chang, S. H.; Phatak, C.; Magyari-Kope, Blanka; Nishi, Y; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Here we present our findings related to the mechanism of reversible resistivity in Pt/TiO2/Pt cells and in Ta2O5 thin films. Our findings for Pt/TiO2/Pt cells indicate that there exists a photovoltaic-like effect, which modulates the resistance reversibly by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the intensity of impinging x-rays. We found that this effect, combined with the x-ray irradiation induced phase transition confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, triggers a non-volatile reversible resistance change. For Ta2O5 thin films, we found that there are strong correlations among oxygen vacancy number and positions and energy gaps. Ab initio band structure calculations explain the evolution of the electronic excitation spectrum as a function of oxygen vacancy number and positions and importantly provide a predictive description of the oxygen deficient Ta oxide that may improve the desired performance based on atomic level design.

  4. [Determination of insecticide-resistance and resistance mechanisms of Blattella germanica (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Pantoja Cristina; Alvarez Gavilán, Yudelmis; de Armas Rodríguez, Yaxsier; Bisset Lazcano, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the level of resistance to four insecticides of 3 Blatella germanica strains collected from various places in the City of Havana province was evaluated. These strains were resistant to two pyrethroids (cypermethrin and lambda-cyalothrine) and to organophosphorate malathion but susceptible to carbamate propoxur. The values of alpha and beta esterases, acetylcholinesterase and gluthatione-S-transferase were estimated in three strains involved in the study. The results of the study showed high esterase activity in all the strains, mainly beta esterases and two of the three strains presented with high gluthation-S-transferase enzyme. No changes in acetylcholinesterase were demonstrated in relation to the reference strain. The association of levels of resistance to insecticides, the possible resistance mechanisms in each strain and the results of the enzymatic activity were also analyzed.

  5. Towards the Understanding of Resistance Mechanisms in Clinically Isolated Trimethoprim-resistant, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Lombardo, M; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutics such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has become an increasing problem in strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinically isolated trimethoprim-resistant strains reveal a double mutation, H30N/F98Y, in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). In order to develop novel and effective therapeutics against these resistant strains, we evaluated a series of propargyl-linked antifolate lead compounds for inhibition of the mutant enzyme. For the propargyl-linked antifolates, the F98Y mutation generates minimal (between 1.2- and 6-fold) losses of affinity and the H30N mutation generates greater losses (between 2.4- and 48-fold). Conversely, trimethoprim affinity is largely diminished by the F98Y mutation (36-fold) and is not affected by the H30N mutation. In order to elucidate a mechanism of resistance, we determined a crystal structure of a complex of this double mutant with a lead propargyl-linked antifolate. This structure suggests a resistance mechanism consistent both for the propargyl-linked class of antifolates and for trimethoprim that is based on the loss of a conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond.

  6. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  7. Mechanisms of Resistance and Clinical Relevance of Resistance to β-Lactams, Glycopeptides, and Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in a growing problem of antimicrobial resistance in the community and hospital settings. Antimicrobial classes for which resistance has become a major problem include the β-lactams, the glycopeptides, and the fluoroquinolones. In gram-positive bacteria, β-lactam resistance most commonly results from expression of intrinsic low-affinity penicillin-binding proteins. In gram-negative bacteria, expression of acquired β-lactamases presents a particular challenge owing to some natural spectra that include virtually all β-lactam classes. Glycopeptide resistance has been largely restricted to nosocomial Enterococcus faecium strains, the spread of which is promoted by ineffective infection control mechanisms for fecal organisms and the widespread use of colonization-promoting antimicrobials (especially cephalosporins and antianaerobic antibiotics). Fluoroquinolone resistance in community-associated strains of Escherichia coli, many of which also express β-lactamases that confer cephalosporin resistance, is increasingly prevalent. Economic and regulatory forces have served to discourage large pharmaceutical companies from developing new antibiotics, suggesting that the antibiotics currently on the market may be all that will be available for the coming decade. As such, it is critical that we devise, test, and implement antimicrobial stewardship strategies that are effective at constraining and, ideally, reducing resistance in human pathogenic bacteria. PMID:22305032

  8. Analysis of the gyrA gene of clinical Yersinia ruckeri isolates with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibello, Alicia; Porrero, M Concepción; Blanco, M Mar; Vela, Ana I; Liébana, Pilar; Moreno, Miguel A; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of seven clinical strains of Yersinia ruckeri representative of those isolated between 1994 and 2002 from a fish farm with endemic enteric redmouth disease was studied. All isolates displayed indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns, indicating that they represented a single strain. However, considering both inhibition zone diameters (IZD) and MICs, the isolates recovered in 2001-2002 formed a separate cluster with lower levels of susceptibility to all the quinolones tested, especially nalidixic acid (NA) and oxolinic acid (OA), compared with the isolates recovered between 1994 and 1998. Analysis of the PCR product of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene from clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to OA and NA revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg-83 (Escherichia coli numbering). Identical substitution was observed in induced OA-resistant mutant strains, which displayed IZD and MICs of quinolones similar to those of the clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobial agents. These data indicate in that for Y. ruckeri, the substitution of Ser by Arg at position 83 of the gyrA gene is associated with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

  9. Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maria Santos Amaral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, who progress after docetaxel therapy, had until very recently, only a few therapeutic options. Recent advances in this field brought about new perspectives in the treatment of this disease. Molecular, basic, and translational research has given us a better understanding on the mechanisms of CRPC. This great investment has turned into a more rational approach to the development of new drugs. Some of the new treatments are already available to our patients outside clinical trials and may include inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis; new chemotherapy agents; bone-targeted therapy; and immunotherapy. This paper aims to review the mechanisms of prostate cancer resistance, possible therapeutic targets, as well as new options to treat CRPC.

  10. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan Chen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, structural and functional studies reveal that tyrosine kinases (TKs act as the essential components of signal transduction pathways that regulate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis, and therefore become potential targets for anticancer therapy. Most of TK inhibitors (TKIs are small molecular and hydrophobic compounds, thus they can rapidly reach their specific intracellular targets and inhibit the activation of the related TKs. Unfortunately, accompanied with patients who gain great benefit of TKIs therapy, increasing evidences of acquired resistance to these agents have been documented. The unveiling point mutations within the kinase domain, gene amplification or overexpression, or modification of signaling pathway have been implicated in drug resistance. Additionally, overexpression of ABC transporters is likely to set stage for resistant development. In this review, we focus on the discussion of the molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to TKIs therapy. The mechanistic understanding may help to put forward new hypotheses on drug development and design better therapies to overcome TKIs resistance.

  11. [MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DRUG RESISTANCE NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE HISTORY AND PROSPECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoev, I N; Il'ina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is a strict human pathogen, which causes gonorrhea--an infectious disease, whose origin dates back to more than two thousand years. Due to the unique plasticity of the genetic material, these bacteria have acquired the capacity to adapt to the host immune system, cause repeated infections, as well as withstand antimicrobials. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1930s, gonococcus has displayed its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics. It is important to note that the known resistance determinants of N. gonorrhoeae were acquired through horizontal gene transfer, recombination and spontaneous mutagenesis, and may be located both in the chromosome and on the plasmid. After introduction of a new antimicrobial drug, gonococcus becomes resistant within two decades and replaces sensitive bacterial population. Currently Ceftriaxone is the last remaining antibiotic for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. However, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to Ceftriaxone was isolated in Japan a few years ago. Therefore, in the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable. In the present review, we discuss the chronology of the anti-gonorrhea drugs (antibiotics) replacement, the evolution of resistance mechanisms emergence and future perspectives of N. gonorrhoeae treatment.

  12. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  13. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Devendra K; Prakash, Anil; Johri, B N

    2007-12-01

    Plants possess a range of active defense apparatuses that can be actively expressed in response to biotic stresses (pathogens and parasites) of various scales (ranging from microscopic viruses to phytophagous insect). The timing of this defense response is critical and reflects on the difference between coping and succumbing to such biotic challenge of necrotizing pathogens/parasites. If defense mechanisms are triggered by a stimulus prior to infection by a plant pathogen, disease can be reduced. Induced resistance is a state of enhanced defensive capacity developed by a plant when appropriately stimulated. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and induced systemic resistance (ISR) are two forms of induced resistance wherein plant defenses are preconditioned by prior infection or treatment that results in resistance against subsequent challenge by a pathogen or parasite. Selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) suppress diseases by antagonism between the bacteria and soil-borne pathogens as well as by inducing a systemic resistance in plant against both root and foliar pathogens. Rhizobacteria mediated ISR resembles that of pathogen induced SAR in that both types of induced resistance render uninfected plant parts more resistant towards a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Several rhizobacteria trigger the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR pathway by producing SA at the root surface whereas other rhizobacteria trigger different signaling pathway independent of SA. The existence of SA-independent ISR pathway has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, which is dependent on jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signaling. Specific Pseudomonas strains induce systemic resistance in viz., carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and Arabidopsis, as evidenced by an enhanced defensive capacity upon challenge inoculation. Combination of ISR and SAR can increase protection against pathogens that are resisted through both pathways besides extended protection to a

  14. Breast cancer and possible mechanisms of therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer represents one of the most common cancers in women and is a major life threatening illness found all over the world. Therapy approaches include irradiation and surgery, with chemotherapy considered an important strategy to treat breast cancer. Platinum based anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin (cis-di-amino-dichloride-platin, CDDP, carboplatin, orthoplatin, etc., have been successfully used in breast cancer therapy because they activate multiple mechanisms to induce apoptosis in tumor cells. Nevertheless, during chemotherapy, drug resistance frequently develops; this impairs the successful treatment of breast cancer and often leads to patients’ decease. While combinations of anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy regimens reduced the occurrence of drug resistance (e.g. doxorubicin + docetaxel, doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide, docetaxel + herceptin + carboplatin the molecular mechanism of those effects are not completely understood. Here we review possible mechanisms related to breast cancer treatment and resistance to current therapies as well as possible new therapeutic targets (e.g. calcium signaling which could be used in the future.

  15. Evaluation of Rice Germplasm for Resistance to the Small Brown Planthopper(Laodelphax striatellus)and Analysis of Resistance Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Can-xing; ZHANG Shi-xian; LEI Cai-lin; CHENG Zhi-jun; CHEN Qing; ZHAI Hu-qu; WAN Jian-min

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-eight rice accessions were screened for resistance to the small brown planthopper(SBPH)resistance to SBPH were detected,accounting for 18.1%of the total accessions,which included 2 highly resistant,9 resistant and 14 moderately resistant varieties.Compared with indica rice,japonica rice was more susceptible to SBPH.Antixenosis test,antibiosis test and correlation analysis were performed to elucidate the resistance mechanism.The resistant check Rathu Heenati(RHT),highly resistant varieties Mudgo and Kasalath,and resistant variety IR36 expressed strong antixenosis and antibiosis against SBPH,indicating the close relationship between resistance level and these two resistance mechanisms in the four rice varieties.Antibiosis was the dominant resistance pattern in the resistant varieties Daorenqiao and Yangmaogu due to their high antibiosis but low antixenosis.Dular,ASD7 and Milyang 23 had relatively strong antixenosis and antibiosis,indicating the two resistance mechanisms were significant in these three varieties.The resistant DV85 expressed relatively high level of antixenosis but low antibiosis,whereas Zhaiyeqing 8 and Guiyigu conferred only moderate antibiosis and antixenosis to SBPH,suggesting tolerance in these three varieties.Antibiosis and antixenosis governed the resistance to SBPH in the moderately resistant accession 9311.Antixenosis was the main resistance type in V20A.Tolerance was considered to be an important resistance mechanism in Minghui 63 and Yangjing 9538 due to their poor antibiosis and antixenosis resistance.The above accessions with strong antibiosis or antixenosis were the ideal materials for the resistance breeding.

  16. Characterization of multidrug‑resistant osteosarcoma sublines and the molecular mechanisms of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Zeng; Ma, Shu-Rong; Rong, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Mei-Ju; Ji, Qiu-Ye; Meng, Ling-Jie; Gao, Yi-Yao; Yang, Yu-Dan; Wang, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a challenge for the treatment of cancer and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The current study exposed MG63 osteosarcoma cells to increasing concentrations of vincristine (VCR) to establish four VCR‑resistant MG63/VCR cell sublines (MG63/VCR1, 2, 3 and 4). The drug resistance indices (RI) of these sublines was detected with the CCK‑8 assay and determined to be163, 476, 1,247, and 2,707‑fold higher than that of parental cells, respectively. These sublines also exhibited cross‑resistance to doxorubicin, paclitaxel and pirarubicin. With increased RI, the proliferative capacity of these sublines was gradually reduced and cell morphology was also altered, characterized by increased formation of pseudopodia and long cytoplasmic processes at opposite poles. However, the migration capacity and expression of certain drug resistance‑associated genes were not in accordance with the increased RI; multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) expression was significantly increased in these sublines compared with parental cells. However, in the highly resistant MG63/VCR3 and MG63/VCR4 cells, MDR‑associated protein 1, topoisomerase II and LIM domain kinase 1 levels were significantly reduced compared with the moderately resistant MG63/VCR2 cells. Expression of glutathione S‑transferase‑π mRNA was determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and determined that it was not changed between MG63 and MG63/VCR cells. The data of the present study demonstrated that the molecular alterations of drug resistance may change with the degree of drug resistance. Taking cell morphology into consideration, the intratumor clonal and phenotypic heterogeneity may be responsible for drug resistance. These MG63/VCR sublines may be a valuable tool to assess drug resistance and the underlying mechanisms, and to identify novel drug resistance‑associated genes or strategies to overcome MDR in human

  17. Embryo mechanics: balancing force production with elastic resistance during morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lance A

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis requires the spatial and temporal control of embryo mechanics, including force production and mechanical resistance to those forces, to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. Thus, biomechanical processes play a key role in directly shaping the embryo. Additional roles for embryo mechanics during development may include the patterning of positional information and to provide feedback to ensure the success of morphogenetic movements in shaping the larval body and organs. To understand the multiple roles of mechanics during development requires familiarity with engineering principles of the mechanics of structures, the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials, and the integration of force and stress within embryonic structures as morphogenesis progresses. In this chapter, we review the basic engineering principles of biomechanics as they relate to morphogenesis, introduce methods for quantifying embryo mechanics and the limitations of these methods, and outline a formalism for investigating the role of embryo mechanics in birth defects. We encourage the nascent field of embryo mechanics to adopt standard engineering terms and test methods so that studies of diverse organisms can be compared and universal biomechanical principles can be revealed.

  18. Mechanisms of action of newer antibiotics for Gram-positive pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert Ew

    2005-04-01

    Certain Gram-positive bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae have achieved the status of "superbugs", in that there are few or no antibiotics available for therapy against these pathogens. Only a few classes of novel antibiotics have been introduced in the past 40 years, and all since 1999, including the streptogramin combination quinupristin/dalfopristin (Synercid), the oxazolidinone linezolid, and the lipopeptide daptomycin. This review discusses the mechanisms of antibiotic action against Gram-positive pathogens, and resistance counter-mechanisms developed by Gram-positive bacteria, with emphasis on the newer agents.

  19. Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones as Fluorine Bearing Antitubercular Clinical Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of lives worldwide and the global curse of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is attaining really dangerous levels. Synergistic interaction of HIV and TB is the twin epidemics in resource-limited countries as each potentiate progression of the other. The increasing emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB place an immense burden for the treatment of TB with currently available drugs. The situation urgently demands for the discovery of new drugs with novel mode of action and differs in structural features in order to overcome resistance appears in conventional TB therapeutics. The present report covers the discovery of three classes of antituberculosis drugs, Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones, undergoing clinical development with fluorine atom in their structures. Highly electronegative fluorine atom plays a signature role in advancing medicinal innovations as it existence in the drug compounds critically influences metabolic stability and lipophilicity thereby delaying its elimination by the body which results into a long term in vivo efficiency of the drug. Presence of fluorine atom(s) in the drug structures described in this report, has been associated with the several fold increase in the overall potency of the compound as demonstrated since the early discoveries. 6 Fluorinated derivatives from these three classes as pretomanid, delamanid, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, linezolid and sutezolid have been discussed with their antituberculosis effects, mode of action, chemical synthetic routes and results of clinical studies.

  20. Temporal interplay between efflux pumps and target mutations in development of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Tam, Vincent H

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥ 64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop.

  1. Temporal Interplay between Efflux Pumps and Target Mutations in Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Swick, Michelle C.; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Ming; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of resistance presents a debilitating change in the management of infectious diseases. Currently, the temporal relationship and interplay between various mechanisms of drug resistance are not well understood. A thorough understanding of the resistance development process is needed to facilitate rational design of countermeasure strategies. Using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model that simulates human drug treatment, we examined the appearance of efflux pump (acrAB) overexpression and target topoisomerase gene (gyrA and parC) mutations over time in the emergence of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. Drug-resistant isolates recovered early (24 h) had 2- to 8-fold elevation in the MIC due to acrAB overexpression, but no point mutations were noted. In contrast, high-level (≥64× MIC) resistant isolates with target site mutations (gyrA S83L with or without parC E84K) were selected more readily after 120 h, and regression of acrAB overexpression was observed at 240 h. Using a similar dosing selection pressure, the emergence of levofloxacin resistance was delayed in a strain with acrAB deleted compared to the isogenic parent. The role of efflux pumps in bacterial resistance development may have been underappreciated. Our data revealed the interplay between two mechanisms of quinolone resistance and provided a new mechanistic framework in the development of high-level resistance. Early low-level levofloxacin resistance conferred by acrAB overexpression preceded and facilitated high-level resistance development mediated by target site mutation(s). If this interpretation is correct, then these findings represent a paradigm shift in the way quinolone resistance is thought to develop. PMID:22232279

  2. Piezoelectric resonators with mechanical damping and resistance in current conduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yook-Kong; YONG; Mihir; S; PATEL

    2007-01-01

    A novel design method for high Q piezoelectric resonators was presented and proposed using the 3-D equations of linear piezoelectricity with quasi-electrostatic approximation which include losses attributed to mechanical damping in solid and resistance in current conduction. There is currently no finite element software for estimating the Q of a resonator without apriori assumptions of the resonator impedance or damping. There is a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of resonators and filters due to miniaturization and the rapid advances in frequency ranges in telecommunication.We presented new three-dimensional finite element models of quartz and barium titanate resonators with mechanical damping and resistance in current conduction. Lee, Liu and Ballato's 3-D equations of linear piezoelectricity with quasi-electro- static approximation which include losses attributed to mechanical damping in solid and resistance in current conduction were formulated in a weak form and implemented in COMSOL. The resulting finite element model could predict the Q and other electrical parameters for any piezoelectric resonator without apriori assumptions of damping or resistance. Forced and free vibration analyses were performed and the results for the Q and other electrical parameters were obtained. Comparisons of the Q and other electrical parameters obtained from the free vibration analysis with their corresponding values from the forced vibration analysis were found to be in excellent agreement. Hence, the frequency spectra obtained from the free vibration analysis could be used for designing high Q resonators. Results for quartz thickness shear AT-cut and SC-cut resonators and thickness stretch poled barium titanate resonators were presented. An unexpected benefit of the model was the prediction of resonator Q with energy losses via the mounting supports.

  3. Análise da resistência às quinolonas e sulfametoxazol-trimetoprim em uroculturas positivas para Escherichia coli em infecções do trato urinário comunitárias no período de 2010 a 2014 em Itajubá – MG / Analysis of quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in positive Escherichia coli urucultures in urinary tract infections in a community environment from 2010 to 2014 in Itajubá – MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia\tCoura\tda\tSilva

    2017-03-01

    -se fatores importantes na antibioticorresistência, especialmente nos maiores de 65 anos e no gênero feminino. Introduction: Communitarian urinary tract infections are frequently diagnosed ambulatorily, and they are the most important cause for using antibiotic therapy. Its most common agents are gram-negative bacils from the enterobacteriaceae family, especially Escherichia coli (E. coli. Focusing on this bacterium, the empiric antibiotic therapies which are mostly used in Brazil are trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, quinolones, 1st and 2nd generation of cephalosporin, amoxicillin, and nitrofurantoin. Aims: Foreseeing the intense growth of antibiotic therapy resistance to these drugs shown in the world's medical literature and the importance of local medical community having knowledge of this data, this article proposes the research of quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination resistance to E. coli bacteria isolated in community-acquired UTI urocultures, from a clinical analysis laboratory, in the period from 2010 to 2014 in a southern city of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods: Retrospective and descriptive study by database research in the period from 2010 to 2014. Urocultures and antibiogram analysis were done, and the statistic calculous were made by using qui-square's test. Results: 14870 urocultures were studied. However, only 3073 samples had significant bacterial growth (bigger than 105CFU. From this result, 2203 were E. coli samples and 870 were from other bacteria. The global resistance in this 5 year study for all antibiotics was 24,46 %. Furthermore, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination resistance was 19,65% and the quinolones group was 19,2%. Through research, we have noticed an increasing resistance through these five years (p<0,0001, thus, having bigger incidence in woman and in people older than 65 years old. Conclusion: Antibiotic resistance rates almost reach unacceptable levels for therapeutic use. Age and gender demonstrated importance

  4. Renaissance of antibiotics against difficult infections: Focus on oritavancin and new ketolides and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Lipoglycopeptide, ketolide, and quinolone antibiotics are currently in clinical development, with specific advantages over available molecules within their respective classes. The lipoglycopeptide oritavancin is bactericidal against MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and proved effective and safe for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) upon administration of a single 1200 mg dose (two completed phase III trials). The ketolide solithromycin (two phase III studies recruiting for community-acquired pneumonia) shows a profile of activity similar to that of telithromycin, but in vitro data suggest a lower risk of hepatotoxicity, visual disturbance, and aggravation of myasthenia gravis due to reduced affinity for nicotinic receptors. Among quinolones, finafloxacin and delafloxacin share the unique property of an improved activity in acidic environments (found in many infection sites). Finafloxacin (phase II completed; activity profile similar to that of ciprofloxacin) is evaluated for complicated urinary tract and Helicobacter pylori infections. The other quinolones (directed towards Gram-positive pathogens) show improved activity on MRSA and multiresistant S. pneumoniae compared to current molecules. They are in clinical evaluation for ABSSSI (avarofloxacin (phase II completed), nemonoxacin and delafloxacin (ongoing phase III)), respiratory tract infections (zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin (ongoing phase III)), or gonorrhea (delafloxacin).

  5. 金属离子对喹诺酮活性影响的研究进展%Research Progress of Metal Ions Influence The Activity of Quinolone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范卓文; 朱丽华; 杨爽爽; 闫丽莉; 孙建华

    2014-01-01

    喹诺酮类药物以抗菌活性强、抗菌谱广、疗效确切等优点被广泛应用于临床,一些研究结果表明金属离子对喹诺酮类药物的活性有一定的影响。本文概述了喹诺酮类药物的发展及作用机制,总结了金属离子对喹诺酮类的作用及喹诺酮类药物金属配合物的活性,最后展望了喹诺酮类药物今后的发展。%Quinolone are widely used clinically because of its antibacterial activity, widely spectrum antimicrobial, curative ef-fect, etc.Some studies show that the metal ions affect the activity of quinolone.This paper outlines the development and action mecha-nism of quinolone. Summarizes the role of metal ions on metal quinolone and the biological activity of quinolone complexes. Finally, prospects of the development of quinolone.

  6. Mechanisms of Nuclear Export in Cancer and Resistance to Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Tanani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumour suppressor proteins, such as p53, BRCA1, and ABC, play key roles in preventing the development of a malignant phenotype, but those that function as transcriptional regulators need to enter the nucleus in order to function. The export of proteins between the nucleus and cytoplasm is complex. It occurs through nuclear pores and exported proteins need a nuclear export signal (NES to bind to nuclear exportin proteins, including CRM1 (Chromosomal Region Maintenance protein 1, and the energy for this process is provided by the RanGTP/RanGDP gradient. Due to the loss of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, drug resistance is a major problem in cancer treatment, and often an initially successful treatment will fail due to the development of resistance. An important mechanism underlying resistance is nuclear export, and a number of strategies that can prevent nuclear export may reverse resistance. Examples include inhibitors of CRM1, antibodies to the nuclear export signal, and alteration of nuclear pore structure. Each of these are considered in this review.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of metabolic resistance to synthetic and natural xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchun; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotic resistance in insects has evolved predominantly by increasing the metabolic capability of detoxificative systems and/or reducing xenobiotic target site sensitivity. In contrast to the limited range of nucleotide changes that lead to target site insensitivity, many molecular mechanisms lead to enhancements in xenobiotic metabolism. The genomic changes that lead to amplification, overexpression, and coding sequence variation in the three major groups of genes encoding metabolic enzymes, i.e., cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), esterases, and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), are the focus of this review. A substantial number of the adaptive genomic changes associated with insecticide resistance that have been characterized to date are transposon mediated. Several lines of evidence suggest that P450 genes involved in insecticide resistance, and perhaps insecticide detoxification genes in general, may share an evolutionary association with genes involved in allelochemical metabolism. Differences in the selective regime imposed by allelochemicals and insecticides may account for the relative importance of regulatory or structural mutations in conferring resistance.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  9. Mechanisms of Hepatitis C Viral Resistance to Direct Acting Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a remarkable transformation in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in recent years with the development of direct acting antiviral agents targeting virus encoded proteins important for viral replication including NS3/4A, NS5A and NS5B. These agents have shown high sustained viral response (SVR rates of more than 90% in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials; however, this is slightly lower in real-life cohorts. Hepatitis C virus resistant variants are seen in most patients who do not achieve SVR due to selection and outgrowth of resistant hepatitis C virus variants within a given host. These resistance associated mutations depend on the class of direct-acting antiviral drugs used and also vary between hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes. The understanding of these mutations has a clear clinical implication in terms of choice and combination of drugs used. In this review, we describe mechanism of action of currently available drugs and summarize clinically relevant resistance data.

  10. Mechanisms of Nuclear Export in Cancer and Resistance to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tanani, Mohamed; Dakir, El-Habib; Raynor, Bethany; Morgan, Richard

    2016-03-14

    Tumour suppressor proteins, such as p53, BRCA1, and ABC, play key roles in preventing the development of a malignant phenotype, but those that function as transcriptional regulators need to enter the nucleus in order to function. The export of proteins between the nucleus and cytoplasm is complex. It occurs through nuclear pores and exported proteins need a nuclear export signal (NES) to bind to nuclear exportin proteins, including CRM1 (Chromosomal Region Maintenance protein 1), and the energy for this process is provided by the RanGTP/RanGDP gradient. Due to the loss of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, drug resistance is a major problem in cancer treatment, and often an initially successful treatment will fail due to the development of resistance. An important mechanism underlying resistance is nuclear export, and a number of strategies that can prevent nuclear export may reverse resistance. Examples include inhibitors of CRM1, antibodies to the nuclear export signal, and alteration of nuclear pore structure. Each of these are considered in this review.

  11. Diet-Induced Obesity and the Mechanism of Leptin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Leptin signaling blockade by chronic overstimulation of the leptin receptor or hypothalamic pro-inflammatory responses due to elevated levels of saturated fatty acid can induce leptin resistance by activating negative feedback pathways. Although, long form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) initiates leptin signaling through more than seven different signal transduction pathways, excessive suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3) activity is a potential mechanism for the leptin resistance that characterizes human obesity. Because the leptin-responsive metabolic pathways broadly integrate with other neurons to control energy balance, the methods used to counteract the leptin resistance has extremely limited effect. In this chapter, besides the impairment of central and peripheral leptin signaling pathways, limited access of leptin to central nervous system (CNS) through blood-brain barrier, mismatch between high leptin and the amount of leptin receptor expression, contradictory effects of cellular and circulating molecules on leptin signaling, the connection between leptin signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and self-regulation of leptin signaling has been discussed in terms of leptin resistance.

  12. On the mechanism of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    KAUST Repository

    Chinappi, Mauro

    2010-11-19

    Resistance to chloroquine of malaria strains is known to be associated with a parasite protein named PfCRT, the mutated form of which is able to reduce chloroquine accumulation in the digestive vacuole of the pathogen. Whether the protein mediates extrusion of the drug acting as a channel or as a carrier and which is the protonation state of its chloroquine substrate is the subject of a scientific debate. We present here an analytical approach that explores which combination of hypotheses on the mechanism of transport and the protonation state of chloroquine are consistent with available equilibrium experimental data. We show that the available experimental data are not, by themselves, sufficient to conclude whether the protein acts as a channel or as a transporter, which explains the origin of their different interpretation by different authors. Interestingly, though, each of the two models is only consistent with a subset of hypotheses on the protonation state of the transported molecule. The combination of these results with a sequence and structure analysis of PfCRT, which strongly suggests that the molecule is a carrier, indicates that the transported species is either or both the mono and di-protonated forms of chloroquine. We believe that our results, besides shedding light on the mechanism of chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum, have implications for the development of novel therapies against resistant malaria strains and demonstrate the usefulness of an approach combining systems biology strategies with structural bioinformatics and experimental data.

  13. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection.

  14. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  15. [Ecology and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antibiotics in peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edern, Anita; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Castrale, Cindy; Ficheux, Maxence; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    Peritonitis remains a common complication of peritoneal dialysis. The aim of our study is to describe the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated during peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis, to determine whether antibiotic therapy proposed by the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) is adapted to the mechanisms of resistance. All causative microorganisms of peritonitis, isolated in 106 dialysis patients and reported 170 episodes of peritonitis, during the study period (01/01/2005 to 31/12/2010) were reviewed. According to the usual classification, twelve groups of microorganism were created. An interpretive reading of antibiograms was performed in each group to identify resistance phenotypes. The species most frequently isolated are coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=73) of which 46 had PBP2a (penicillin-binding protein). Many Enterobacteriaceae were also isolated (n=45), they are susceptible to third generation cephalosporins with the exception of Enterobacteriaceae producing an extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) or a cephalosporinase. Except for staphylococci, probabilistic antibiotic therapy recommended by the ISPD to treat peritonitis is effective. Indeed, many staphylococci producing a PBP2a, a first-generation cephalosporin cannot be administered in all cases. It is therefore necessary to identify patients with a strain of staphylococcus producing a PBP2a, it must be treated by vancomycin.

  16. Mechanisms of Induced Resistance in Barley Against Drechslera teres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngs Jørgensen, H J; Lübeck, P S; Thordal-Christensen, H; de Neergaard, E; Smedegaard-Petersen, V

    1998-07-01

    ABSTRACT Quantitative and qualitative histopathological methods and molecular analyses were used to study the mechanisms by which preinoculation with either of the nonbarley pathogens, Bipolaris maydis and Septoria nodorum, inhibited growth of Drechslera teres. Collectively, our data suggest that induced resistance is the principal mechanism responsible for impeding the pathogen. The enhancement of resistance in the host was primarily manifested during penetration by D. teres, and after penetration, where growth of D. teres ceased soon after development of infection vesicles. Thus, 24 h after pretreatment with B. maydis or S. nodorum, the penetration frequency from D. teres appressoria was reduced from 42.7% in the controls to 9.5 and 14.8%, respectively. The reductions were associated with increased formation of fluorescent papillae in induced cells (early defense reaction). The postpenetrational inhibition of D. teres completely stopped fungal growth and was apparently linked to an enhancement of multicellular hypersensitive responses in inducer-treated leaves (late defense reaction). Papillae formation and multicellular hypersensitive reactions were also observed in fully susceptible, noninduced control leaves, but they were inadequate to stop fungal progress. Northern blots from leaves treated with either inducer alone support the conclusion that induced resistance is involved in suppression of D. teres by increased formation of papillae and hypersensitive reactions. Thus, the blots showed strong expression of several defense response genes that are involved in these reactions in barley attacked by Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei.

  17. Progresses in the Mechanism of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt in Cucumber(Cucumis sativus L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xingang; WU Fengzhi; WANG Xuezheng; YUAN Ye

    2008-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.cucumerinum (Owen) is one of the most devastating diseases in cucumber production worldwide.Recent progresses in the mechanism of resistance to Fusarium wilt in cucumber were reviewed in this paper,including pathogenic mechanism of Fusarium oxysporum,the resistance mechanism of cucumber,the heredity of resistance,and the location of resistance genes.Following works should be the location and cloning of resistance genes with molecular biologic methods.

  18. Infection control implications of heterogeneous resistance mechanisms in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, K E; Simner, P J; Tamma, P D; Milstone, A M

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) based upon a phenotypic demonstration of carbapenem resistance. However, considerable heterogeneity exists within this definitional umbrella. CRE may mechanistically differ by whether they do or do not produce carbapenemases. Moreover, patients can acquire CRE through multiple pathways: endogenously through antibiotic selective pressure on intestinal microbiota, exogenously through horizontal transmission or through a combination of these factors. Some evidence suggests that non-carbapenemase-producing CRE may be more frequently acquired by antibiotic exposure and carbapenemase-producing CRE via horizontal transmission, but definitive data are lacking. This review examines types of CRE resistance mechanisms, antibiotic exposure and horizontal transmission pathways of CRE acquisition, and the implications of these heterogeneities to the development of evidence-based CRE healthcare epidemiology policies. In our Expert Commentary & Five-Year View, we outline specific nosocomial CRE knowledge gaps and potential methodological approaches for their resolution.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of the efficacy of carbapenems and new quinolones against ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Okuda, Kazuyuki; Nakata, Chiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Okura, Hiroe; Komatsu, Masaru; Shimakawa, Kouichi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ura, Toshiro; Satoh, Kaori; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Wada, Yasunao; Orita, Tamaki; Kofuku, Tomomi; Yamasaki, Katsutoshi; Sakamoto, Masako; Nishio, Hisaaki; Kinoshita, Shohiro; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2009-02-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria are known to be resistant to penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams because of their substrate specificity, and these bacteria are sensitive only to a narrow range of antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of carbapenems and the new quinolones against ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, using a Monte Carlo simulation based on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) theory. The time above MIC (TAM, %) served as the PK/PD parameter for carbapenems, with the target level set at 40%. The AUC/MIC served as the PK/PD parameter for the new quinolones, with the target level set at more than 125. In the analysis of drug sensitivity, the MIC50 of all carbapenems other than imipenem was low (0.03 microg/ml), while the MIC50 of the new quinolones was higher (1-2 microg/ml). The probability of achieving the PK/PD target with carba penems after two doses at the usual dose level, as determined by the Monte Carlo simulation, was high for each of the carbapenems tested (99.0% for biapenem, 99.60% for meropenem, and 95.03% for doripenem), except for imipenem. Among the new quinolones, the highest probability of achieving the PK/PD target was obtained with pazufloxacin (42.90%). Thus, the results of the present study have revealed that carbapenems are effective at the regular dose and can be used as the first-choice antibiotics for ESBL-producing E. coli because the resistance ratios for carbapenems are low compared to those of the new quinolones.

  20. Microbial transformations of antimicrobial quinolones and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Sutherland, John B

    2012-12-01

    The quinolones are an important group of synthetic antimicrobial drugs used for treating bacterial diseases of humans and animals. Microorganisms transform antimicrobial quinolones (including fluoroquinolones) and the pharmacologically related naphthyridones, pyranoacridones, and cinnolones to a variety of metabolites. The biotransformation processes involve hydroxylation of methyl groups; hydroxylation of aliphatic and aromatic rings; oxidation of alcohols and amines; reduction of carboxyl groups; removal of methyl, carboxyl, fluoro, and cyano groups; addition of formyl, acetyl, nitrosyl, and cyclopentenone groups; and cleavage of aliphatic and aromatic rings. Most of these reactions greatly reduce or eliminate the antimicrobial activity of the quinolones.

  1. Herceptin resistance database for understanding mechanism of resistance in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sahil; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Rahul; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2014-03-27

    Monoclonal antibody Trastuzumab/Herceptin is considered as frontline therapy for Her2-positive breast cancer patients. However, it is not effective against several patients due to acquired or de novo resistance. In last one decade, several assays have been performed to understand the mechanism of Herceptin resistance with/without supplementary drugs. This manuscript describes a database HerceptinR, developed for understanding the mechanism of resistance at genetic level. HerceptinR maintains information about 2500 assays performed against various breast cancer cell lines (BCCs), for improving sensitivity of Herceptin with or without supplementary drugs. In order to understand Herceptin resistance at genetic level, we integrated genomic data of BCCs that include expression, mutations and copy number variations in different cell lines. HerceptinR will play a vital role in i) designing biomarkers to identify patients eligible for Herceptin treatment and ii) identification of appropriate supplementary drug for a particular patient. HerceptinR is available at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/herceptinr/.

  2. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  3. Molecular resistance mechanisms of macrolide-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Alaska, 1986 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Karen; Bulkow, Lisa; Bruce, Michael; Zulz, Tammy; Reasonover, Alisa; Harker-Jones, Marcella; Hurlburt, Debby; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains has reduced treatment options. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities, serotype distributions, and molecular resistance mechanisms among macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal isolates in Alaska from 1986 to 2010. We identified cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska from 1986 to 2010 through statewide population-based laboratory surveillance. All invasive pneumococcal isolates submitted to the Arctic Investigations Program laboratory were confirmed by standard microbiological methods and serotyped by slide agglutination and the Quellung reaction. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method, and macrolide-resistant genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Among 2,923 invasive pneumococcal isolates recovered from 1986 to 2010, 270 (9.2%) were nonsusceptible to erythromycin; 177 (66%) erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates demonstrated coresistance to penicillin, and 167 (62%) were multidrug resistant. The most frequent serotypes among the macrolide-resistant isolates were serotypes 6B (23.3%), 14 (20.7%), 19A (16.7%), 9V (8.9%), 19F (6.3%), 6A (5.6%), and 23F (4.8%). mef and erm(B) genes were detected in 207 (77%) and 32 (12%) of the isolates, respectively. Nineteen (7%) of the erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates contained both mef and erm(B) genotypes; 15 were of serotype 19A. There was significant year-to-year variation in the proportion of isolates that were nonsusceptible to erythromycin (P resistance among pneumococcal isolates from Alaska is mediated predominantly by mef genes, and this has not changed significantly over time. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of isolates that possess both erm(B) and mef, primarily due to serotype 19A isolates.

  4. Orally bioavailable 6-chloro-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones efficacious against multiple stages of Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R Matthew; Flanigan, David L; Monastyrskyi, Andrii; LaCrue, Alexis N; Sáenz, Fabián E; Maignan, Jordany R; Mutka, Tina S; White, Karen L; Shackleford, David M; Bathurst, Ian; Fronczek, Frank R; Wojtas, Lukasz; Guida, Wayne C; Charman, Susan A; Burrows, Jeremy N; Kyle, Dennis E; Manetsch, Roman

    2014-11-13

    The continued proliferation of malaria throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world has promoted a push for more efficacious treatments to combat the disease. Unfortunately, more recent remedies such as artemisinin combination therapies have been rendered less effective due to developing parasite resistance, and new drugs are required that target the parasite in the liver to support the disease elimination efforts. Research was initiated to revisit antimalarials developed in the 1940s and 1960s that were deemed unsuitable for use as therapeutic agents as a result of poor understanding of both physicochemical properties and parasitology. Structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies were conducted to generate a set of compounds with the general 6-chloro-7-methoxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone scaffold which were substituted at the 3-position with a variety of phenyl moieties possessing various properties. Extensive physicochemical evaluation of the quinolone series was carried out to downselect the most promising 4(1H)-quinolones, 7, 62, 66, and 67, which possessed low-nanomolar EC50 values against W2 and TM90-C2B as well as improved microsomal stability. Additionally, in vivo Thompson test results using Plasmodium berghei in mice showed that these 4(1H)-quinolones were efficacious for the reduction of parasitemia at >99% after 6 days.

  5. Drug resistance current situation and mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae%肺炎链球菌的耐药现状及其机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景文莹

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the main pathogenic bacteria causing community-ac-quired infections in children, is a common pathogenic bacteria of respiratory tract infections, and is a main pathogenic bacteria of meningitis, bacteremia, otitis media and sinusitis. At pres-ent, antibiotics are still the effective way of treatment for pneumococcal disease. But recently, drug-resistance streptococcus pneumoniae to various antibiotics is increasing, and it has a large regional differences in different areas. Multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae has become a global problem, this paper reviewed the drug resistance streptococcus pneumoniae and the resis-tance mechanisms to macrolide , tetracycline and quinolone antibiotic.%肺炎链球菌是引起儿童社区获得性感染的主要病原菌之一,是呼吸道感染的常见病原菌,也是脑膜炎、菌血症、中耳炎和鼻窦炎的主要致病菌。目前,抗菌药物的应用仍然是治疗肺炎链球菌疾病的有效手段。然而近年来,世界各地肺炎链球菌对各种抗生素的耐药率不断增加,且不同地区差异较大。肺炎链球菌多重耐药已逐渐成为全球性问题,本文综述了肺炎链球菌的耐药现状及其对大环内酯类、四环素类及喹诺酮类等抗生素的耐药机制。

  6. In Vitro Evaluation of CBR-2092, a Novel Rifamycin-Quinolone Hybrid Antibiotic: Studies of the Mode of Action in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Gregory T.; Bonventre, Eric J.; Doyle, Timothy B.; Du, Qun; Duncan, Leonard; Morris, Timothy W.; Roche, Eric D.; Yan, Dalai; Lynch, A. Simon

    2008-01-01

    Rifamycins have proven efficacy in the treatment of persistent bacterial infections. However, the frequency with which bacteria develop resistance to rifamycin agents restricts their clinical use to antibiotic combination regimens. In a program directed toward the synthesis of rifamycins with a lower propensity to elicit resistance development, a series of compounds were prepared that covalently combine rifamycin and quinolone pharmacophores to form stable hybrid antibacterial agents. We desc