WorldWideScience

Sample records for quiescent cell populations

  1. Differentiating quiescent cancer cell populations in heterogeneous samples with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaster, Tiffany M.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of relative fluorescence intensities of NAD(P)H and FAD with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) allows metabolic characterization of cancerous populations and correlation to treatment response. However, quiescent populations of cancer cells introduce heterogeneity to the tumor and exhibit resistance to standard therapies, requiring a better understanding of this influence on treatment outcome. Significant differences were observed between proliferating and quiescent cell populations upon comparison of respective redox ratios (pFAD lifetimes (p<0.05) across monolayers and in mixed samples. These results demonstrate that metabolic activity may function as a marker for separation and characterization of proliferating and quiescent cancer cells within mixed samples, contributing to comprehensive investigation of heterogeneity-dependent drug resistance.

  2. Cellular heterogeneity in the mouse esophagus implicates the presence of a non-quiescent epithelial stem cell population

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWard, Aaron D.; Cramer, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also utilized an in vitro 3-D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a non-quiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus. PMID:25373907

  3. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). Methods EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with c-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of a 10B-carrier. Responses of intratumour Q and total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cells was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. Results Following c-ray irradiation, the pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radiosensitivity compared with the whole tumour cell fraction, more remarkably in the Q than total cell populations. However, a significantly greater decrease in radiosensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction, evaluated using a delayed assay or a decrease in radiation dose rate, was more clearly observed among the Q than total cells. These changes in radiosensitivity were suppressed following carbon ion beam and neutron beam-only irradiaton. In the BNCR, the use of a 10B-carrier, especially L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B, enhanced the sensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cells more clearly in the Q than total cells. Conclusion The radiosensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction depends on the quality of radiation delivered and characteristics of the 10B-carrier used in the BNCR. Advances in knowledge The pimonidazole-unlabelled subfraction of Q tumour cells may be a critical target in tumour control. PMID:23255546

  4. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2013-01-01

    To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of a (10)B-carrier. Responses of intratumour Q and total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on frequencies of micronucleation and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cells was assessed by means of apoptosis frequency using immunofluorescence staining for pimonidazole. Following γ-ray irradiation, the pimonidazole-unlabelled tumour cell fraction showed significantly enhanced radiosensitivity compared with the whole tumour cell fraction, more remarkably in the Q than total cell populations. However, a significantly greater decrease in radiosensitivity in the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction, evaluated using a delayed assay or a decrease in radiation dose rate, was more clearly observed among the Q than total cells. These changes in radiosensitivity were suppressed following carbon ion beam and neutron beam-only irradiaton. In the BNCR, the use of a (10)B-carrier, especially L-para-boronophenylalanine-(10)B, enhanced the sensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cells more clearly in the Q than total cells. The radiosensitivity of the pimonidazole-unlabelled cell fraction depends on the quality of radiation delivered and characteristics of the (10)B-carrier used in the BNCR. The pimonidazole-unlabelled subfraction of Q tumour cells may be a critical target in tumour control.

  5. Isolation of quiescent and nonquiescent cells from yeast stationary-phase cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Chris; Büttner, Sabrina; Aragon, Anthony D.; Thomas, Jason A.; Meirelles, Osorio; Jaetao, Jason E.; Benn, Don; Ruby, Stephanie W.; Veenhuis, Marten; Madeo, Frank; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Quiescence is the most common and, arguably, most poorly understood cell cycle state. This is in part because pure populations of quiescent cells are typically difficult to isolate. We report the isolation and characterization of quiescent and nonquiescent cells from stationary-phase (SP) yeast

  6. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Innovative reporter gene systems are designed to mark quiescent or proliferating lung cancer cells (Aim 1) and then used to track and trace the dynamics of

  7. Cellular Dynamics of Memory B Cell Populations: IgM+ and IgG+ Memory B Cells Persist Indefinitely as Quiescent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek D; Wilmore, Joel R; Allman, David

    2015-11-15

    Despite their critical role in long-term immunity, the life span of individual memory B cells remains poorly defined. Using a tetracycline-regulated pulse-chase system, we measured population turnover rates and individual t1/2 of pre-established Ag-induced Ig class-switched and IgM-positive memory B cells over 402 d. Our results indicate that, once established, both IgG-positive and less frequent IgM-positive memory populations are exceptionally stable, with little evidence of attrition or cellular turnover. Indeed, the vast majority of cells in both pools exhibited t1/2 that appear to exceed the life span of the mouse, contrasting dramatically with mature naive B cells. These results indicate that recall Ab responses are mediated by stable pools of extremely long-lived cells, and suggest that Ag-experienced B cells employ remarkably efficient survival mechanisms.

  8. Cellular dynamics of memory B cell populations: IgM+ and IgG+ memory B cells persist indefinitely as quiescent cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek D.; Wilmore, Joel R.; Allman, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite their critical role in long-term immunity, the lifespan of individual memory B cells remains poorly defined. Using a tetracycline-regulated pulse-chase system, we measured population turnover rates and individual half-lives of pre-established antigen-induced immunoglobulin (Ig) class-switched and IgM-positive memory B cells over 402 days. Our results indicate that, once established, both IgG-positive and less frequent IgM-positive memory populations are exceptionally stable, with little evidence of attrition or cellular turnover. Indeed, the vast majority of cells in both pools exhibited half-lives that appear to exceed the lifespan of the mouse, contrasting dramatically with mature naïve B cells. These results indicate that recall antibody responses are mediated by stable pools of extremely long-lived cells, and suggest that antigen-experienced B cells employ remarkably efficient survival mechanisms. PMID:26438523

  9. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy PRINCIPAL...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... cancer . To eradicate chemoresistant tumor cells, it is important to identify the subset of tumor cells that can survive from chemotherapy and

  10. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contrasting quiescent G0 phase with mitotic cell cycling in the mouse immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Tomura

    Full Text Available A transgenic mouse line expressing Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator probes allows us to monitor the cell cycle in the hematopoietic system. Two populations with high and low intensities of Fucci signals for Cdt1(30/120 accumulation were identified by FACS analysis, and these correspond to quiescent G0 and cycling G1 cells, respectively. We observed the transition of immune cells between quiescent and proliferative phases in lymphoid organs during differentiation and immune responses.

  12. Amiloride, protein synthesis, and activation of quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, M; Cahn, F; Coutermarsh, B A

    1982-11-01

    Amiloride is known to inhibit both influx of sodium ions and activation of quiescent cells by growth factors. The coincidence of these effects has been cited to support the proposal that influx of sodium ions acts as a mitogenic signal. Although it was noted that amiloride inhibited protein synthesis, this was attributed to an action on transport of amino acids, particularly those coupled to sodium fluxes. We find, however, that amiloride directly inhibits polypeptide synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate. In Swiss 3T3 cells, concentrations of amiloride and of cycloheximide that are nearly matched in their degree of inhibition of protein synthesis, produce about the same degree of inhibition of transit of cells from G0 to S. Inhibition of protein synthesis is sufficient to explain the effect of amiloride on mitogenesis; the drug, therefore, is not suitable for testing the hypothesis that sodium influx is a mitogenic signal.

  13. Silent Waters Run Deep. Quiescent stem cells in homeostasis and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Roth (Sabrina)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The Introduction summarizes the current literature on quiescence in adult stem cell niches and the various methods for the isolation of quiescent stem cells, outlines the complexity of the intestinal stem cell niche, and formulates the hypothesis that quiescent

  14. A global downregulation of microRNAs occurs in human quiescent satellite cells during myogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Merel; Werker, Paul M N; van Luyn, Marja J A; Krenning, Guido; Harmsen, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    During myogenesis, human satellite cells differentiate and form multinucleated myotubes, while a fraction of the human satellite cells enter quiescence. These quiescent satellite cells are able to activate, proliferate and contribute to muscle regeneration. Post-transcriptional regulation of

  15. The Lgr5 intestinal stem cell signature: robust expression of proposed quiescent '+4' cell markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz, J.; Stange, D.E.; Schepers, A.G.; van de Wetering, M.; Koo, B.K.; Itzkovitz, S.; Volckmann, R.; Kung, K.S.; Koster, J.; Radulescu, S.; Myant, K.; Versteeg, R.; Sansom, O.J.; van Es, J.H.; Barker, N.; van Oudenaarden, A.; Mohammed, S.; Heck, A.J.R.; Clevers, H.

    2012-01-01

    Two types of stem cells are currently defined in small intestinal crypts: cycling crypt base columnar (CBC) cells and quiescent '+4' cells. Here, we combine transcriptomics with proteomics to define a definitive molecular signature for Lgr5(+) CBC cells. Transcriptional profiling of FACS-sorted Lgr5

  16. Quiescent Sox2+ Cells Drive Hierarchical Growth and Relapse in Sonic Hedgehog Subgroup Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanner, Robert J.; Remke, Marc; Gallo, Marco; Selvadurai, Hayden J.; Coutinho, Fiona; Lee, Lilian; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Morrissy, Sorana; Zhu, Xueming; Aviv, Tzvi; Voisin, Veronique; Clarke, Ian D.; Li, Yisu; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Ma, Yussanne; Jones, Steven J.M.; Marra, Marco A.; Malkin, David; Northcott, Paul A.; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bader, Gary; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D.; Dirks, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Functional heterogeneity within tumors presents a significant therapeutic challenge. Here we show that quiescent, therapy-resistant Sox2+ cells propagate sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma by a mechanism that mirrors a neurogenic program. Rare Sox2+ cells produce rapidly cycling doublecortin+ progenitors that, together with their postmitotic progeny expressing NeuN, comprise tumor bulk. Sox2+ cells are enriched following anti-mitotic chemotherapy and Smoothened inhibition, creating a reservoir for tumor regrowth. Lineage traces from Sox2+ cells increase following treatment, suggesting that this population is responsible for relapse. Targeting Sox2+ cells with the antineoplastic mithramycin abrogated tumor growth. Addressing functional heterogeneity and eliminating Sox2+ cells presents a promising therapeutic paradigm for treatment of sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma. PMID:24954133

  17. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  18. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  19. Potentially lethal damage repair by total and quiescent tumor cells following various DNA-damaging treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Takagaki, Masao [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Hori, Hitoshi; Kasai, Soko; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro

    1999-08-01

    After continuous labeling of proliferating (P) cells with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days, SCC VII tumor-bearing mice received various kinds of DNA-damaging treatments: gamma-ray irradiation, tirapazamine (TPZ, hypoxia-specific cytotoxin) administration, or cisplatin injection. From 0.5 to 72 hr after treatment, tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. Single tumor cell suspensions were incubated for 48 hr with a cytokinesis-blocker, cytochalasin-B. Then, the micronucleus (MN) frequency for BrdU-unlabeled cells, quiescent (Q) cells at treatment, was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency for total (P+Q) cells was obtained from tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU labeling. The sensitivity to each DNA-damaging treatment was evaluated in terms of the frequency of induced micronuclei in binuclear tumor cells (MN frequency). Treatment with gamma-rays or cisplatin resulted in a larger MN frequency in total cells than in Q cells. In contrast, TPZ treatment produced a smaller MN frequency in total cells than in Q cells. Regardless of the treatment used, Q cells showed greater repair capacities than total cells. However, TPZ caused much smaller repair capacity in both total and Q cells, compared with gamma-rays or cisplatin. Gamma-rays and cisplatin produced similar repair patterns. Differences in sensitivity between total and Q cells and repair patterns of the two cell populations were thought to depend on differences between the two cell populations in the toxicity of the DNA-damaging treatment and distribution pattern of the anticancer agent. (author)

  20. Unique Organization of the Nuclear Envelope in the Post-natal Quiescent Neural Stem Cells

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    Arantxa Cebrián-Silla

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (B1 astrocytes; NSCs in the adult ventricular-subventricular-zone (V-SVZ originate in the embryo. Surprisingly, recent work has shown that B1 cells remain largely quiescent. They are reactivated postnatally to function as primary progenitors for neurons destined for the olfactory bulb and some corpus callosum oligodendrocytes. The cellular and molecular properties of quiescent B1 cells remain unknown. Here we found that a subpopulation of B1 cells has a unique nuclear envelope invagination specialization similar to envelope-limited chromatin sheets (ELCS, reported in certain lymphocytes and some cancer cells. Using molecular markers, [3H]thymidine birth-dating, and Ara-C, we found that B1 cells with ELCS correspond to quiescent NSCs. ELCS begin forming in embryonic radial glia cells and represent a specific nuclear compartment containing particular epigenetic modifications and telomeres. These results reveal a unique nuclear compartment in quiescent NSCs, which is useful for identifying these primary progenitors and study their gene regulation.

  1. Discriminating among stellar population synthesis models of the TP-AGB phase in early quiescent galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Mason; Newman, Andrew; Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    Galactic evolution at high redshifts is largely understood through stellar population synthesis (SPS) modeling of spectra and photometry integrated over all starlight of a galaxy. However, complex and poorly understood stellar phases like the unstable thermally-pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase make SPS modeling a difficult task. Recent models fail to agree on the TP-AGB contribution to the infrared luminosity, leading to significant discrepancy among the properties derived from modern SPS models when applied to early galaxies. Here we provide a thorough assessment of each of the most widely used SPS models by comparing their results and assessing their accuracy in modeling our unique dataset. We combine high-resolution spectroscopic observations from Keck/MOSFIRE with photometric data for 21 early quiescent galaxies with redshifts of z ~ 2. These galaxies are around the age of peak TP-AGB activity, between ~0.3 and 2 Gyr, and therefore provide an ideal test of the models. We find that models with a “light” TP-AGB contribution provide much better descriptions of our galaxies at ages of ~1 Gyr or less. This is true at high statistical significance and holds for models with or without dust reddening. However, contrary to previous studies, the model-dependent photometrically estimated ages are similar among the models, but they show only moderate agreement with the more model-independent spectroscopic ages derived from stellar absorption lines. The largest discrepancies are found for the Charlot & Bruzual (2007) models which show an artificial clustering of ages around 1 Gyr. The TP-AGB “light” models require more reddening, which can be independently tested by examining dust emission in the mid-infrared. The modeled fluxes are also mostly consistent with mid-infrared observations, with the exception of one model. Resolving these differences among the models will substantially strengthen our estimates of the properties of early quiescent

  2. Ages and metallicities for quiescent galaxies in the Shapley Supercluster: Driving parameters of the stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Russell J; Hudson, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    We use high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for a sample of 232 quiescent galaxies in the Shapley Supercluster, to investigate how their stellar populations depend on velocity dispersion, luminosity and stellar mass. The sample spans a large range in velocity dispersion (sigma from 30-300 km/s) and in luminosity (M_R from -18.7 to -23.2). Estimates of age, total metallicity (Z/H) and alpha-element abundance ratio (a/Fe) were derived from absorption-line analysis, using single-burst models. Age, Z/H and a/Fe are all correlated positively with velocity dispersion, but we also find significant residual trends with luminosity: at given sigma, the brighter galaxies are younger, less alpha-enriched, and have higher Z/H. At face value, these results might suggest that the stellar populations depend on stellar mass as well as on velocity dispersion. However, we show that the observed trends can be reproduced by models in which the stellar populations depend systematically only on sigma, and are independent of stellar ma...

  3. A SUBSTANTIAL POPULATION OF MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 4 FROM ZFOURGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Labbé, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Spitler, Lee R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Allen, Rebecca; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Altieri, Bruno [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC)/ESA, Villanueva de la Cañada, 28691, Madrid (Spain); Brammer, Gabriel B. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Dickinson, Mark; Inami, Hanae [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Kawinwanichakij, Lalit; Mehrtens, Nicola; Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andy; Murphy, David; Persson, S. Eric; Quadri, Ryan, E-mail: straatman@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    We report the likely identification of a substantial population of massive M ∼ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} galaxies at z ∼ 4 with suppressed star formation rates (SFRs), selected on rest-frame optical to near-IR colors from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE). The observed spectral energy distributions show pronounced breaks, sampled by a set of near-IR medium-bandwidth filters, resulting in tightly constrained photometric redshifts. Fitting stellar population models suggests large Balmer/4000 Å breaks, relatively old stellar populations, large stellar masses, and low SFRs, with a median specific SFR of 2.9 ± 1.8 × 10{sup –11} yr{sup –1}. Ultradeep Herschel/PACS 100 μm, 160 μm and Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data reveal no dust-obscured SFR activity for 15/19(79%) galaxies. Two far-IR detected galaxies are obscured QSOs. Stacking the far-IR undetected galaxies yields no detection, consistent with the spectral energy distribution fit, indicating independently that the average specific SFR is at least 10 × smaller than that of typical star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 4. Assuming all far-IR undetected galaxies are indeed quiescent, the volume density is 1.8 ± 0.7 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup –3} to a limit of log{sub 10} M/M {sub ☉} ≥ 10.6, which is 10 × and 80 × lower than at z = 2 and z = 0.1. They comprise a remarkably high fraction (∼35%) of z ∼ 4 massive galaxies, suggesting that suppression of star formation was efficient even at very high redshift. Given the average stellar age of 0.8 Gyr and stellar mass of 0.8 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, the galaxies likely started forming stars before z = 5, with SFRs well in excess of 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, far exceeding that of similarly abundant UV-bright galaxies at z ≥ 4. This suggests that most of the star formation in the progenitors of quiescent z ∼ 4 galaxies was obscured by dust.

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells promote survival of T cells in a quiescent state.

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    Benvenuto, Federica; Ferrari, Stefania; Gerdoni, Ezio; Gualandi, Francesca; Frassoni, Francesco; Pistoia, Vito; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Uccelli, Antonio

    2007-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of the bone marrow that provides signals supporting survival and growth of bystander hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). MSC modulate also the immune response, as they inhibit proliferation of lymphocytes. In order to investigate whether MSC can support survival of T cells, we investigated MSC capacity of rescuing T lymphocytes from cell death induced by different mechanisms. We observed that MSC prolong survival of unstimulated T cells and apoptosis-prone thymocytes cultured under starving conditions. MSC rescued T cells from activation induced cell death (AICD) by downregulation of Fas receptor and Fas ligand on T cell surface and inhibition of endogenous proteases involved in cell death. MSC dampened also Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of CD95 expressing Jurkat leukemic T cells. In contrast, rescue from AICD was not associated with a significant change of Bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis induced by cell stress. Accordingly, MSC exhibited a minimal capacity of rescuing Jurkat cells from chemically induced apoptosis, a process disrupting the mitochondrial membrane potential regulated by Bcl-2. These results suggest that MSC interfere with the Fas receptor regulated process of programmed cell death. Overall, MSC can inhibit proliferation of activated T cells while supporting their survival in a quiescent state, providing a model of their activity inside the HSC niche. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  5. A massive, quiescent, population II galaxy at a redshift of 2.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriek, Mariska; Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Shapley, Alice E.; Choi, Jieun; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; van de Voort, Freeke; Coil, Alison L.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2016-12-01

    Unlike spiral galaxies such as the Milky Way, the majority of the stars in massive elliptical galaxies were formed in a short period early in the history of the Universe. The duration of this formation period can be measured using the ratio of magnesium to iron abundance ([Mg/Fe]) in spectra, which reflects the relative enrichment by core-collapse and type Ia supernovae. For local galaxies, [Mg/Fe] probes the combined formation history of all stars currently in the galaxy, including younger and metal-poor stars that were added during late-time mergers. Therefore, to directly constrain the initial star-formation period, we must study galaxies at earlier epochs. The most distant galaxy for which [Mg/Fe] had previously been measured is at a redshift of z ≈ 1.4, with [Mg/Fe] = . A slightly earlier epoch (z ≈ 1.6) was probed by combining the spectra of 24 massive quiescent galaxies, yielding an average [Mg/Fe] = 0.31 ± 0.12 (ref. 7). However, the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of the data and the use of index analysis techniques for both of these studies resulted in measurement errors that are too large to allow us to form strong conclusions. Deeper spectra at even earlier epochs in combination with analysis techniques based on full spectral fitting are required to precisely measure the abundance pattern shortly after the major star-forming phase (z > 2). Here we report a measurement of [Mg/Fe] for a massive quiescent galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.1, when the Universe was three billion years old. With [Mg/Fe] = 0.59 ± 0.11, this galaxy is the most Mg-enhanced massive galaxy found so far, having twice the Mg enhancement of similar-mass galaxies today. The abundance pattern of the galaxy is consistent with enrichment exclusively by core-collapse supernovae and with a star-formation timescale of 0.1 to 0.5 billion years—characteristics that are similar to population II stars in the Milky Way. With an average past star

  6. AP-1 is a component of the transcriptional network regulated by GSK-3 in quiescent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Tullai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protein kinase GSK-3 is constitutively active in quiescent cells in the absence of growth factor signaling. Previously, we identified a set of genes that required GSK-3 to maintain their repression during quiescence. Computational analysis of the upstream sequences of these genes predicted transcription factor binding sites for CREB, NFκB and AP-1. In our previous work, contributions of CREB and NFκB were examined. In the current study, the AP-1 component of the signaling network in quiescent cells was explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, two AP-1 family members, c-Jun and JunD, bound to predicted upstream regulatory sequences in 8 of the 12 GSK-3-regulated genes. c-Jun was phosphorylated on threonine 239 by GSK-3 in quiescent cells, consistent with previous studies demonstrating inhibition of c-Jun by GSK-3. Inhibition of GSK-3 attenuated this phosphorylation, resulting in the stabilization of c-Jun. The association of c-Jun with its target sequences was increased by growth factor stimulation as well as by direct GSK-3 inhibition. The physiological role for c-Jun was also confirmed by siRNA inhibition of gene induction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that inhibition of c-Jun by GSK-3 contributes to the repression of growth factor-inducible genes in quiescent cells. Together, AP-1, CREB and NFκB form an integrated transcriptional network that is largely responsible for maintaining repression of target genes downstream of GSK-3 signaling.

  7. Distinct cell stress responses induced by ATP restriction in quiescent human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Yalamanchili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quiescence is the prevailing state of many cell types under homeostatic conditions. Yet, surprisingly little is known about how quiescent cells respond to energetic and metabolic challenges. To better understand compensatory responses of quiescent cells to metabolic stress, we established, in human primary dermal fibroblasts, an experimental ‘energy restriction’ model. Quiescence was achieved by short-term culture in serum-deprived media and ATP supply restricted using a combination of glucose transport inhibitors and mitochondrial uncouplers. In aggregate, these measures led to markedly reduced intracellular ATP levels while not compromising cell viability over the observation period of 48 h. Analysis of the transcription factor landscape induced by this treatment revealed alterations in several signal transduction nodes beyond the expected biosynthetic adaptations. These included increased abundance of NF-κB regulated transcription factors and altered transcription factor subsets regulated by Akt and p53. The observed changes in gene regulation and corresponding alterations in key signaling nodes are likely to contribute to cell survival at intracellular ATP concentrations substantially below those achieved by growth factor deprivation alone. This experimental model provides a benchmark for the investigation of cell survival pathways and related molecular targets that are associated with restricted energy supply associated with biological aging and metabolic diseases.

  8. Targeting of cytosolic phospholipase A2α impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mu; Xie, Chanlu; Kiang, Mei-Yee; Teng, Ying; Harman, David; Tiffen, Jessamy; Wang, Qian; Sved, Paul; Bao, Shisan; Witting, Paul; Holst, Jeff; Dong, Qihan

    2015-10-27

    Cell cycle re-entry of quiescent cancer cells has been proposed to be involved in cancer progression and recurrence. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes membrane glycerophospholipids to release arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are implicated in cancer cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cPLA2α in cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells. When PC-3 and LNCaP cells were rendered to a quiescent state, the active form of cPLA2α with a phosphorylation at Ser505 was lower compared to their proliferating state. Conversely, the phospho-cPLA2α levels were resurgent during the induction of cell cycle re-entry. Pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2α with Efipladib upon induction of cell cycle re-entry inhibited the re-entry process, as manifested by refrained DNA synthesis, persistent high proportion of cells in G0/G1 and low percentage of cells in S and G2/M phases, together with a stagnant recovery of Ki-67 expression. Simultaneously, Efipladib prohibited the emergence of Skp2 while maintained p27 at a high level in the nuclear compartment during cell cycle re-entry. Inhibition of cPLA2α also prevented an accumulation of cyclin D1/CDK4, cyclin E/CDK2, phospho-pRb, pre-replicative complex proteins CDC6, MCM7, ORC6 and DNA synthesis-related protein PCNA during induction of cell cycle re-entry. Moreover, a pre-treatment of the prostate cancer cells with Efipladib during induction of cell cycle re-entry subsequently compromised their tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Hence, cPLA2α plays an important role in cell cycle re-entry by quiescent prostate cancer cells.

  9. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-07

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  10. Loss of the anaphase-promoting complex in quiescent cells causes unscheduled hepatocyte proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Karin G.; Ricci, Romeo; Giménez-Abián, Juan F.; Taghybeeglu, Shahryar; Kudo, Nobuaki R.; Jochum, Wolfram; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; Nasmyth, Kim

    2004-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin protein ligase that together with Cdc20 and Cdh1 targets mitotic proteins for degradation by the proteosome. APC–Cdc20 activity during mitosis triggers anaphase by destroying securin and cyclins. APC–Cdh1 promotes degradation of cyclins and other proteins during G1. We show that loss of APC/C during embryogenesis is early lethal before embryonic day E6.5 (E6.5). To investigate the role of APC/C in quiescent cells, we conditionally inactivated the subunit Apc2 in mice. Deletion of Apc2 in quiescent hepatocytes caused re-entry into the cell cycle and arrest in metaphase, resulting in liver failure. Re-entry into the cell cycle either occurred without any proliferative stimulus or could be easily induced. We demonstrate that the APC has an additional function to prevent hepatocytes from unscheduled re-entry into the cell cycle. PMID:14724179

  11. A stochastic model of a cell population with quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A cell population in which cells are allowed to enter a quiescent (nonproliferating) phase is analyzed using a stochastic approach. A general branching process is used to model the population which, under very mild conditions, exhibits balanced exponential growth. A formula is given for the asymptotic fraction of quiescent cells, and a numerical example illustrates how convergence toward the asymptotic fraction exhibits a typical oscillatory pattern. The model is compared with deterministic models based on semigroup analysis of systems of differential equations.

  12. Identification of quiescent, stem-like cells in the distal female reproductive tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Wang

    Full Text Available In fertile women, the endometrium undergoes regular cycles of tissue build-up and regression. It is likely that uterine stem cells are involved in this remarkable turn over. The main goal of our current investigations was to identify slow-cycling (quiescent endometrial stem cells by means of a pulse-chase approach to selectively earmark, prospectively isolate, and characterize label-retaining cells (LRCs. To this aim, transgenic mice expressing histone2B-GFP (H2B-GFP in a Tet-inducible fashion were administered doxycycline (pulse which was thereafter withdrawn from the drinking water (chase. Over time, dividing cells progressively loose GFP signal whereas infrequently dividing cells retain H2B-GFP expression. We evaluated H2B-GFP retaining cells at different chase time points and identified long-term (LT; >12 weeks LRCs. The LT-LRCs are negative for estrogen receptor-α and express low levels of progesterone receptors. LRCs sorted by FACS are able to form spheroids capable of self-renewal and differentiation. Upon serum stimulation spheroid cells are induced to differentiate and form glandular structures which express markers of mature műllerian epithelial cells. Overall, the results indicate that quiescent cells located in the distal oviduct have stem-like properties and can differentiate into distinct cell lineages specific of endometrium, proximal and distal oviduct. Future lineage-tracing studies will elucidate the role played by these cells in homeostasis, tissue injury and cancer of the female reproductive tract in the mouse and eventually in man.

  13. Opposite Effects of Soluble Factors Secreted by Adipose Tissue on Proliferating and Quiescent Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Pierre; Duteille, Franck; Ridel, Perrine; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; De Pinieux, Gonzague; Rédini, Françoise; Blanchard, Frédéric; Heymann, Dominique; Trichet, Valérie; Perrot, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transfer may be performed for aesthetic needs following resection of osteosarcoma, the most frequent primary malignant tumor of bone, excluding myeloma. The safety of autologous adipose tissue transfer regarding the potential risk of cancer recurrence must be addressed. Adipose tissue injection was tested in a human osteosarcoma preclinical model induced by MNNG-HOS cells. Culture media without growth factors from fetal bovine serum were conditioned with adipose tissue samples and added to two osteosarcoma cell lines (MNNG-HOS and MG-63) that were cultured in monolayer or maintained in nonadherent spheres, favoring a proliferation or quiescent stage, respectively. Proliferation and cell cycle were analyzed. Adipose tissue injection increased local growth of osteosarcoma in mice but was not associated with aggravation of lung metastasis or osteolysis. Adipose tissue-derived soluble factors increased the in vitro proliferation of osteosarcoma cells up to 180 percent. Interleukin-6 and leptin were measured in higher concentrations in adipose tissue-conditioned medium than in osteosarcoma cell-conditioned medium, but the authors' results indicated that they were not implicated alone. Furthermore, adipose tissue-derived soluble factors did not favor a G0-to-G1 phase transition of MNNG-HOS cells in nonadherent oncospheres. This study indicates that adipose tissue-soluble factors activate osteosarcoma cell cycle from G1 to mitosis phases, but do not promote the transition from quiescent G0 to G1 phases. Autologous adipose tissue transfer may not be involved in the activation of dormant tumor cells or cancer stem cells.

  14. The Relation between Galaxy Structure and Spectral Type: Implications for the Buildup of the Quiescent Galaxy Population at 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, Michael; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    We present the relation between galaxy structure and spectral type, using a K-selected galaxy sample at 0.51.5 and significantly smaller than all other galaxy types at the same redshift. This result suggests that the suppression of star formation may be associated with significant structural evolution at z>1.5. At z<1, galaxy types with intermediate sSFRs (10^{-11.5}-10^{-10.5} yr^-1) do not have post-starburst SED shapes. These galaxies have similar sizes as older quiescent galaxies, implying that they can passively evolve onto the quiescent sequence, without increasing the average size of the quiescent galaxy population.

  15. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  16. The cell cycle- and insulin-signaling-inhibiting miRNA expression pattern of very small embryonic-like stem cells contributes to their quiescent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Schneider, Gabriela; Ratajczak, Janina; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-08-01

    Murine Oct4(+), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), are a quiescent stem cell population that requires a supportive co-culture layer to proliferate and/or to differentiate in vitro. Gene expression studies have revealed that the quiescence of these cells is due to changes in expression of parentally imprinted genes, including genes involved in cell cycle regulation and insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). To investigate the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in VSEL quiescence, we performed miRNA studies in highly purified VSELs and observed a unique miRNA expression pattern in these cells. Specifically, we observed significant differences in the expression of certain miRNA species (relative to a reference cell population), including (i) miRNA-25_1 and miRNA-19 b, whose downregulation has the effect of upregulating cell cycle checkpoint genes and (ii) miRNA-675-3 p and miRNA-675-5 p, miRNA-292-5 p, miRNA-184, and miRNA-125 b, whose upregulation attenuates IIS. These observations are important for understanding the biology of these cells and for developing efficient ex vivo expansion strategies for VSELs isolated from adult tissues.

  17. The cell cycle- and insulin-signaling-inhibiting miRNA expression pattern of very small embryonic-like stem cells contributes to their quiescent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Schneider, Gabriela; Ratajczak, Janina; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Murine Oct4+, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), are a quiescent stem cell population that requires a supportive co-culture layer to proliferate and/or to differentiate in vitro. Gene expression studies have revealed that the quiescence of these cells is due to changes in expression of parentally imprinted genes, including genes involved in cell cycle regulation and insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). To investigate the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in VSEL quiescence, we performed miRNA studies in highly purified VSELs and observed a unique miRNA expression pattern in these cells. Specifically, we observed significant differences in the expression of certain miRNA species (relative to a reference cell population), including (i) miRNA-25_1 and miRNA-19 b, whose downregulation has the effect of upregulating cell cycle checkpoint genes and (ii) miRNA-675-3 p and miRNA-675-5 p, miRNA-292-5 p, miRNA-184, and miRNA-125 b, whose upregulation attenuates IIS. These observations are important for understanding the biology of these cells and for developing efficient ex vivo expansion strategies for VSELs isolated from adult tissues. PMID:25966979

  18. Islet1 and its co-factor Ldb1 are expressed in quiescent cells of mouse intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Makarev

    Full Text Available Islet1 belongs to Lim homeobox (Lhx gene family which encodes transcription factors that have been conserved in evolution. They form complexes with other transcriptional regulators, among them obligatory co-factors encoded by Ldb genes. Isl1 (Islet1, Lhx and Ldb1 genes play a crucial role in organ patterning, cell fate determination and cell differentiation in both embryonic and adult tissues. In this study we analyzed expression pattern of Isl1 and its co-factor Ldb1 in small intestine. We also studied the biological role of Ldb1 in gut endoderm. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a relatively high level of expression of Lhx1, Isl1, Isl2, Lmx1a, Ldb1 and Ldb2 mRNAs in the gut tissue as compared to the level of less abundant detectable Lmx1b mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a unique pattern of Ldb1 and Islet1 proteins in the crypt compartment. Ldb1 is produced at a low level in majority of crypt cells; but, its abundant expression was demonstrated for some single cells. Islet1 is also expressed in single cells of the crypt. Double staining experiments with Ldb1 and Isl1 antibodies showed that both genes are co-expressed in certain cells of the crypt. Further analysis revealed the Ldb1-expressing cells in the gut are both of endodermal and mesodermal origin. Proliferation studies using antibodies to phospho-histone H3 and Ki-67 antigens, as well as long-term BrdU labeling, showed that cells prominently expressing Ldb1/Islet1 are quiescent but do not belong to any known terminally differentiated cell lineages. They may represent a group of stem-like cells in the crypt. Further experiments by cell lineage tracing should be performed to better characterize this cell population. Functional studies of mice with Ldb1 gene ablated in gut endoderm revealed no specific role of Ldb1 in that tissue.

  19. Integrative miRNA and Gene Expression Profiling Analysis of Human Quiescent Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Mar; El Taghdouini, Adil; Perea, Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Blaya, Delia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Graupera, Isabel; Lozano, Juan José; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Lambrecht, Joeri; Ginès, Pere; van Grunsven, Leo A; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-06-22

    Unveiling the regulatory pathways maintaining hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in a quiescent (q) phenotype is essential to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat fibrogenic diseases. To uncover the miRNA-mRNA regulatory interactions in qHSCs, HSCs were FACS-sorted from healthy livers and activated HSCs (aHSCs) were generated in vitro. MiRNA Taqman array analysis showed HSCs expressed a low number of miRNAs (n = 259), from which 47 were down-regulated and 212 up-regulated upon activation. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed that 66% of qHSC-associated miRNAs correlated with more than 6 altered target mRNAs (17,28 ± 10,7 targets/miRNA) whereas aHSC-associated miRNAs had an average of 1,49 targeted genes. Interestingly, interaction networks generated by miRNA-targeted genes in qHSCs were associated with key HSC activation processes. Next, selected miRNAs were validated in healthy and cirrhotic human livers and miR-192 was chosen for functional analysis. Down-regulation of miR-192 in HSCs was found to be an early event during fibrosis progression in mouse models of liver injury. Moreover, mimic assays for miR-192 in HSCs revealed its role in HSC activation, proliferation and migration. Together, these results uncover the importance of miRNAs in the maintenance of the qHSC phenotype and form the basis for understanding the regulatory networks in HSCs.

  20. Glucose Regulates Cyclin D2 Expression in Quiescent and Replicating Pancreatic β-Cells Through Glycolysis and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpeter, Seth J.; Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Porat, Shay; Granot, Zvi; Shapiro, A. M. James; Magnuson, Mark A.; Eden, Amir; Grimsby, Joseph; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular triggers of pancreatic β-cell proliferation may facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for diabetes. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important role for cyclin D2 in β-cell proliferation and mass homeostasis, but its specific function in β-cell division and mechanism of regulation remain unclear. Here, we report that cyclin D2 is present at high levels in the nucleus of quiescent β-cells in vivo. The major regulator of cyclin D2 expression is glucose, acting via glycolysis and calcium channels in the β-cell to control cyclin D2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, cyclin D2 mRNA is down-regulated during S-G2-M phases of each β-cell division, via a mechanism that is also affected by glucose metabolism. Thus, glucose metabolism maintains high levels of nuclear cyclin D2 in quiescent β-cells and modulates the down-regulation of cyclin D2 in replicating β-cells. These data challenge the standard model for regulation of cyclin D2 during the cell division cycle and suggest cyclin D2 as a molecular link between glucose levels and β-cell replication. PMID:21521747

  1. Usefulness of hexamethylenetetramine in combination with chemotherapy using free and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in vivo, referring to the effect on quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Kono, Kenji; Nakamura, Jun; Tano, Keizo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Kashino, Genro; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Liu, Yong; Ono, Koji

    2009-05-01

    SCC VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all intratumor proliferating (P) cells. They received hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) either once intraperitoneally or continuously subcutaneously together with chemotherapy using intraperitoneally administered free doxorubicin (DXR) or intravenously injected pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). One hour after the free DXR loading or 24 h after the PLD loading, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of the total (P + Q) tumor cell population was determined from the tumors not treated with BrdU. Encapsulation of DXR into pegylated liposomes significantly enhanced cytotoxicity, especially in Q cells. HMTA, especially when administered continuously, efficiently increased the sensitivity to DXR, particularly in Q cells. The increase in sensitivity on the continuous rather than single administration of HMTA was a little clearer in the total cell population than in Q cells. DXR's encapsulation into pegylated liposomes and combination with HMTA, particularly when administered continuously, apparently reduced the difference in sensitivity to free DXR between the total and Q cell populations. In terms of the tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including Q cells, the encapsulation of DXR into pegylated liposomes and combination with HMTA, particularly through continuous administration, are very promising, taking into account that HMTA has been used clinically.

  2. Confirming the Quiescent Galaxy Population out to $z=3$: A Stacking Analysis of Mid-, Far-Infrared and Radio Data

    CERN Document Server

    Man, Allison W S; Toft, Sune; Magnelli, Benjamin; Karim, Alexander; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Floc'h, Emeric Le; Bertoldi, Frank; Casey, Caitlin M; Lee, Nicholas; Li, Yanxia; Navarrete, Felipe; Sheth, Kartik; Smolcic, Vernesa; Sanders, David B; Schinnerer, Eva; Zirm, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    We present stringent constraints on the average mid-, far-infrared and radio emissions of $\\sim$14200 quiescent galaxies (QGs), identified out to $z=3$ in the COSMOS field via their rest-frame NUV$-$r and r$-$J colors, and with stellar masses $M_{\\star}=10^{9.8-12.2} \\,M_{\\odot} $. Stacking in deep Spitzer (MIPS $24\\,\\mu$m), Herschel (PACS and SPIRE), and VLA (1.4 GHz) maps reveals extremely low dust-obscured star formation rates for QGs (SFR $ 2$), consistent with the low unobscured SFRs ($10\\times$ below those of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the $M_{\\star}$- and $z$-ranges considered. The stacked 1.4 GHz signals (S/N $> 5$) are, if attributed solely to star formation, in excess of the total (obscured plus unobscured) SFR limits, suggestive of a widespread presence of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) among QGs. Our results reaffirm the existence of a significant population QGs out to $z = 3$, thus corroborating the need for powerful quenching mechanism(s) to terminate star formation in gala...

  3. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouche, Lina; Laalami, Soumaya; Daerr, Adrian; Song, Solène; Holland, I Barry; Séror, Simone J; Hamze, Kassem; Putzer, Harald

    2017-02-07

    Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth) maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers) might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion.

  4. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Hamouche

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion.

  5. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouche, Lina; Laalami, Soumaya; Daerr, Adrian; Song, Solène; Holland, I. Barry; Séror, Simone J.; Hamze, Kassem

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth) maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers) might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion. PMID:28174308

  6. EXPLORING THE z = 3-4 MASSIVE GALAXY POPULATION WITH ZFOURGE: THE PREVALENCE OF DUSTY AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, Lee R.; Rees, Glen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Labbé, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Nanayakkara, Themiya [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Mehrtens, Nicola; Tilvi, Vithal; Tomczak, Adam R. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Quadri, Ryan F.; Persson, S. Eric; Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andrew J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Allen, Rebecca, E-mail: lee.spitler@mq.edu.au [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296 Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Our understanding of the redshift z > 3 galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular ''dropout'' technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FOURSTAR Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at z = 3-4. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M >10.6, reaching below M {sup *} at z = 3-4. On average, the massive z = 3-4 galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median R{sub tot}{sup AB}=27.48±0.41 (rest-frame M {sub 1700} = –18.05 ± 0.37). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about ∼100 × fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red (R – K {sub s} {sub AB} = 3.9 ± 0.2; rest-frame UV-slope β = –0.2 ± 0.3) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy spectral energy distributions by their rest-frame U–V and V–J colors and find a diverse population: 46{sub −6−17}{sup +6+10}% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, 40{sub −6−5}{sup +6+7}% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only 14{sub −3−4}{sup +3+10}% resemble luminous blue star-forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore, we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with 4 × lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at z > 3. With 5 × higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.

  7. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  8. Stellar populations from spectroscopy of a large sample of quiescent galaxies at z > 1: Measuring the contribution of progenitor bias to early size growth

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the stellar populations of a sample of 62 massive (log Mstar/Msun > 10.7) galaxies in the redshift range 1 < z < 1.6, with the main goal of investigating the role of recent quenching in the size growth of quiescent galaxies. We demonstrate that our sample is not biased toward bright, compact, or young galaxies, and thus is representative of the overall quiescent population. Our high signal-to-noise ratio Keck LRIS spectra probe the rest-frame Balmer break region which contains important absorption line diagnostics of recent star formation activity. We show that improved measures of the stellar population parameters, including the star-formation timescale tau, age and dust extinction, can be determined by fitting templates jointly to our spectroscopic and broad-band photometric data. These parameter fits allow us to backtrack the evolving trajectory of individual galaxies on the UVJ color-color plane. In addition to identifying which quiescent galaxies were recently quenched, we discover impor...

  9. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  10. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies with Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Katherine E; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F; Nelson, Erica J; Patel, Shannon G; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z~2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically-quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to Hbeta (4861A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G-band (4304A), Mg I (5175A), and Na I (5894A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was ~3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3^0.1_0.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: th...

  11. Deregulated c—myc expression in quiescent CHO cells induces target gene transcription and subsequent apoptotic phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGCHANGMING; CANSHI; 等

    1999-01-01

    Human c-myc cDNA was fused with the hormonebinding domain (HBD) cDNA of murine estrogen receptor gene and the chimeric gene was introduced into the CHO cells.The fusion protein,c-MycER,becomes activated when the synthetic steroid,4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (OHT),binds HBD.Activated c-MycER,likely c-Myc,can induce quiescent CHO cells reentry into S phase and subsequent cell death under serum-free condition.In addition,the expression of some proposed c-myc target genes such as ODC,MrDb,cad,rccl and rcl were found to increase upon OHT induction before S phase entry and apoptosis,indicating that these target genes are involved in cell cycle regulation and/or apoptosis control.However,the mutant D106-143c-MycER protein does not have above activities.

  12. A Nuclear Role for miR-9 and Argonaute Proteins in Balancing Quiescent and Activated Neural Stem Cell States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shauna Katz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, adult neural stem cells (NSCs produce new neurons and glia that contribute to crucial brain functions. Quiescence is an essential protective feature of adult NSCs; however, the establishment and maintenance of this state remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that in the adult zebrafish pallium, the brain-enriched miR-9 is expressed exclusively in a subset of quiescent NSCs, highlighting a heterogeneity within these cells, and is necessary to maintain NSC quiescence. Strikingly, miR-9, along with Argonaute proteins (Agos, is localized to the nucleus of quiescent NSCs, and manipulating their nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio impacts quiescence. Mechanistically, miR-9 permits efficient Notch signaling to promote quiescence, and we identify the RISC protein TNRC6 as a mediator of miR-9/Agos nuclear localization in vivo. We propose a conserved non-canonical role for nuclear miR-9/Agos in controlling the balance between NSC quiescence and activation, a key step in maintaining adult germinal pools.

  13. Auxin and ethylene interactions control mitotic activity of the quiescent centre, root cap size, and pattern of cap cell differentiation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Georgina; Barlow, Peter W; Feldman, Lewis J; Cassab, Gladys I

    2005-06-01

    Root caps (RCs) are the terminal tissues of higher plant roots. In the present study the factors controlling RC size, shape and structure were examined. It was found that this control involves interactions between the RC and an adjacent population of slowly dividing cells, the quiescent centre, QC. Using the polar auxin transport inhibitor 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), the effects of QC activation on RC gene expression and border cell release was characterized. Ethylene was found to regulate RC size and cell differentiation, since its addition, or the inhibition of its synthesis, affected RC development. The stimulation of cell division in the QC following NPA treatment was reversed by ethylene, and quiescence was re-established. Moreover, inhibition of both ethylene synthesis and auxin polar transport triggered a new pattern of cell division in the root epidermis and led to the appearance of supernumerary epidermal cell files with cap-like characteristics. The data suggest that the QC ensures an ordered internal distribution of auxin, and thereby regulates not only the planes of growth and division in both the root apex proper and the RC meristem, but also regulates cell fate in the RC. Ethylene appears to regulate the auxin redistribution system that resides in the RC. Experiments with Arabidopsis roots also reveal that ethylene plays an important role in regulating the auxin sink, and consequently cell fate in the RC.

  14. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zeniou

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM, the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  15. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniou, Maria; Fève, Marie; Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  16. Validation of Flow Cytometry and Magnetic Bead-Based Methods to Enrich CNS Single Cell Suspensions for Quiescent Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, T A; Reyelts, C D; Hoke, T A; Arikkath, J; Bonasera, S J

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident mononuclear phagocytes within the CNS parenchyma that intimately interact with neurons and astrocytes to remodel synapses and extracellular matrix. We briefly review studies elucidating the molecular pathways that underlie microglial surveillance, activation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis; we additionally place these studies in a clinical context. We describe and validate an inexpensive and simple approach to obtain enriched single cell suspensions of quiescent parenchymal and perivascular microglia from the mouse cerebellum and hypothalamus. Following preparation of regional CNS single cell suspensions, we remove myelin debris, and then perform two serial enrichment steps for cells expressing surface CD11b. Myelin depletion and CD11b enrichment are both accomplished using antigen-specific magnetic beads in an automated cell separation system. Flow cytometry of the resultant suspensions shows a significant enrichment for CD11b(+)/CD45(+) cells (perivascular microglia) and CD11b(+)/CD45(-) cells (parenchymal microglia) compared to starting suspensions. Of note, cells from these enriched suspensions minimally express Aif1 (aka Iba1), suggesting that the enrichment process does not evoke significant microglial activation. However, these cells readily respond to a functional challenge (LPS) with significant changes in the expression of molecules specifically associated with microglia. We conclude that methods employing a combination of magnetic-bead based sorting and flow cytometry produce suspensions highly enriched for microglia that are appropriate for a variety of molecular and cellular assays.

  17. Gene Expression Differences between Enriched Normal and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Quiescent Stem/Progenitor Cells and Correlations with Biological Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Affer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparing gene expression of normal and CML CD34+ quiescent (G0 cell, 292 genes were downregulated and 192 genes upregulated in the CML/G0 Cells. The differentially expressed genes were grouped according to their reported functions, and correlations were sought with biological differences previously observed between the same groups. The most relevant findings include the following. (i CML G0 cells are in a more advanced stage of development and more poised to proliferate than normal G0 cells. (ii When CML G0 cells are stimulated to proliferate, they differentiate and mature more rapidly than normal counterpart. (iii Whereas normal G0 cells form only granulocyte/monocyte colonies when stimulated by cytokines, CML G0 cells form a combination of the above and erythroid clusters and colonies. (iv Prominin-1 is the gene most downregulated in CML G0 cells, and this appears to be associated with the spontaneous formation of erythroid colonies by CML progenitors without EPO.

  18. Guttiferone K impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells via stabilization of FBXW7 and subsequent c-MYC degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Z; Yao, M; Li, Y; Xie, C; Holst, J; Liu, T; Cai, S; Lao, Y; Tan, H; Xu, H-X; Dong, Q

    2016-06-02

    Cell cycle re-entry by quiescent cancer cells is an important mechanism for cancer progression. While high levels of c-MYC expression are sufficient for cell cycle re-entry, the modality to block c-MYC expression, and subsequent cell cycle re-entry, is limited. Using reversible quiescence rendered by serum withdrawal or contact inhibition in PTEN(null)/p53(WT) (LNCaP) or PTEN(null)/p53(mut) (PC-3) prostate cancer cells, we have identified a compound that is able to impede cell cycle re-entry through c-MYC. Guttiferone K (GUTK) blocked resumption of DNA synthesis and preserved the cell cycle phase characteristics of quiescent cells after release from the quiescence. In vehicle-treated cells, there was a rapid increase in c-MYC protein levels upon release from the quiescence. However, this increase was inhibited in the presence of GUTK with an associated acceleration in c-MYC protein degradation. The inhibitory effect of GUTK on cell cycle re-entry was significantly reduced in cells overexpressing c-MYC. The protein level of FBXW7, a subunit of E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for degradation of c-MYC, was reduced upon the release from the quiescence. In contrast, GUTK stabilized FBXW7 protein levels during release from the quiescence. The critical role of FBXW7 was confirmed using siRNA knockdown, which impaired the inhibitory effect of GUTK on c-MYC protein levels and cell cycle re-entry. Administration of GUTK, either in vitro prior to transplantation or in vivo, suppressed the growth of quiescent prostate cancer cell xenografts. Furthermore, elevation of FBXW7 protein levels and reduction of c-MYC protein levels were found in the xenografts of GUTK-treated compared with vehicle-treated mice. Hence, we have identified a compound that is capable of impeding cell cycle re-entry by quiescent PTEN(null)/p53(WT) and PTEN(null)/p53(mut) prostate cancer cells likely by promoting c-MYC protein degradation through stabilization of FBXW7. Its usage as a clinical modality to

  19. What Are the Progenitors of Compact, Massive, Quiescent Galaxies at z=2.3? The Population of Massive Galaxies at z>3 from NMBS and CANDELS

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanon, Mauro; Rudnick, Gregory H; Brammer, Gabriel B; Whitaker, Katherine E

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Using public data from the NMBS and CANDELS surveys, we study the population of massive galaxies at z>3 to identify the potential progenitors of z~2 compact, massive, quiescent (CMQ) galaxies, furthering our understanding of the evolution of massive galaxies. Our work is enabled by high-resolution CANDELS images and accurate photometric redshifts, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) from 37-band NMBS photometry. The total number of z>3 massive galaxies is consistent with the number of massive quiescent (MQ) galaxies at z~2, implying that the SFRs for all of these galaxies must be much lower by z~2. We discover 4 CMQ galaxies at z>3, pushing back the time for which such galaxies have been observed. However, the volume density for these galaxies is significantly less than that of galaxies at z10^(10.6)Msun, likely to become members of the CMQ galaxy population at z~2. We evolve the stellar masses and SFRs of each individual z>3 galaxy adopting 5 different star formation histories (SFHs) an...

  20. Induction of pPLT2-PLT2-GR in Quiescent Center (QC) cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santuari, Luca; Heidstra, Renze

    2016-01-01

    Organ formation in animals and plants relies on precise control of cell state transitions to turn stem cell daughters into fully differentiated cells. In plants, cells cannot rearrange due to shared cell walls. Thus, differentiation progression and the accompanying cell expansion must be tightly

  1. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  2. Accumulated quiescent neural stem cells in adult hippocampus of the mouse model for the MECP2 duplication syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhifang; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Jingjing; Yuan, Bo; Yu, Bin; Tong, Dali; Cheng, Cheng; Shao, Yinqi; Xia, Shengnan; Zhang, Ran; Lyu, Jingwen; Yu, Xiuya; Dong, Chen; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Qiu, Zilong

    2017-01-01

    Duplications of Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) -containing segments lead to the MECP2 duplication syndrome, in which severe autistic symptoms were identified. Whether adult neurogenesis may play a role in pathogenesis of autism and the role of MECP2 on state determination of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) remain largely unclear. Using a MECP2 transgenic (TG) mouse model for the MECP2 duplication syndrome, we found that adult hippocampal quiescent NSCs were significantly accumulated in TG mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice, the neural progenitor cells (NPCs) were reduced and the neuroblasts were increased in adult hippocampi of MECP2 TG mice. Interestingly, we found that parvalbumin (PV) positive interneurons were significantly decreased in MECP2 TG mice, which were critical for determining fates of adult hippocampal NSCs between the quiescence and activation. In summary, we found that MeCP2 plays a critical role in regulating fate determination of adult NSCs. These evidences further suggest that abnormal development of NSCs may play a role in the pathogenesis of the MECP2 duplication syndrome. PMID:28139724

  3. Msi2 Maintains Quiescent State of Hair Follicle Stem Cells by Directly Repressing the Hh Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianghui; Tian, Yuhua; Song, Yongli; Shi, Jianyun; Xu, Jiuzhi; Xiong, Kai; Li, Jia; Xu, Wenjie; Zhao, Yiqiang; Shuai, Jianwei; Chen, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V; Lengner, Christopher J; Ren, Fazheng; Xue, Lixiang; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-05-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo precisely regulated cycles of active regeneration (anagen), involution (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen). Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) play important roles in regenerative cycling. Elucidating mechanisms that govern HFSC behavior can help uncover the underlying principles of hair development, hair growth disorders, and skin cancers. RNA-binding proteins of the Musashi (Msi) have been implicated in the biology of different stem cell types, yet they have not been studied in HFSCs. Here we utilized gain- and loss-of-function mouse models to demonstrate that forced MSI2 expression retards anagen entry and consequently delays hair growth, whereas loss of Msi2 enhances hair regrowth. Furthermore, our findings show that Msi2 maintains quiescent state of HFSCs in the process of the telogen-to-anagen transition. At the molecular level, our unbiased transcriptome profiling shows that Msi2 represses Hedgehog signaling activity and that Shh is its direct target in the hair follicle. Taken together, our findings reveal the importance of Msi2 in suppressing hair regeneration and maintaining HFSC quiescence. The previously unreported Msi2-Shh-Gli1 pathway adds to the growing understanding of the complex network governing cyclic hair growth. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells increase proliferation but do not change quiescent state of osteosarcoma cells: Potential implications according to the tumor resection status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Pierre; Le Nail, Louis-Romée; Brennan, Meadhbh Á.; Rosset, Philippe; De Pinieux, Gonzague; Layrolle, Pierre; Heymann, Dominique; Perrot, Pierre; Trichet, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional therapy of primary bone tumors includes surgical excision with wide resection, which leads to physical and aesthetic defects. For reconstruction of bone and joints, allografts can be supplemented with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Similarly, adipose tissue transfer (ATT) is supplemented with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to improve the efficient grafting in the correction of soft tissue defects. MSC-like cells may also be used in tumor-targeted cell therapy. However, MSC may have adverse effects on sarcoma development. In the present study, human ADSCs, MSCs and pre-osteoclasts were co-injected with human MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma cells in immunodeficient mice. ADSCs and MSCs, but not the osteoclast precursors, accelerated the local proliferation of MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma cells. However, the osteolysis and the metastasis process were not exacerbated by ADSCs, MSCs, or pre-osteoclasts. In vitro proliferation of MNNG-HOS and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells was increased up to 2-fold in the presence of ADSC-conditioned medium. In contrast, ADSC-conditioned medium did not change the dormant, quiescent state of osteosarcoma cells cultured in oncospheres. Due to the enhancing effect of ADSCs/MSCs on in vivo/in vitro proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, MSCs may not be good candidates for osteosarcoma-targeted cell therapy. Although conditioned medium of ADSCs accelerated the cell cycle of proliferating osteosarcoma cells, it did not change the quiescent state of dormant osteosarcoma cells, indicating that ADSC-secreted factors may not be involved in the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26998421

  5. Intermittent parathyroid hormone administration converts quiescent lining cells to active osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Wan; Pajevic, Paola Divieti; Selig, Martin; Barry, Kevin J; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Shin, Chan Soo; Baek, Wook-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2012-10-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone mass, at least in part, by increasing the number of osteoblasts. One possible source of osteoblasts might be conversion of inactive lining cells to osteoblasts, and indirect evidence is consistent with this hypothesis. To better understand the possible effect of PTH on lining cell activation, a lineage tracing study was conducted using an inducible gene system. Dmp1-CreERt2 mice were crossed with ROSA26R reporter mice to render targeted mature osteoblasts and their descendents, lining cells and osteocytes, detectable by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining. Dmp1-CreERt2(+):ROSA26R mice were injected with 0.25 mg 4-OH-tamoxifen (4-OHTam) on postnatal days 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21. The animals were euthanized on postnatal day 23, 33, or 43 (2, 12, or 22 days after the last 4-OHTam injection). On day 43, mice were challenged with a subcutaneous injection of human PTH (1-34, 80 µg/kg) or vehicle once daily for 3 days. By 22 days after the last 4-OHTam injection, most X-gal (+) cells on the periosteal surfaces of the calvaria and the tibia were flat. Moreover, bone formation rate and collagen I(α1) mRNA expression were decreased at day 43 compared to day 23. After 3 days of PTH injections, the thickness of X-gal (+) cells increased, as did their expression of osteocalcin and collagen I(α1) mRNA. Electron microscopy revealed X-gal-associated chromogen particles in thin cells prior to PTH administration and in cuboidal cells following PTH administration. These data support the hypothesis that intermittent PTH treatment can increase osteoblast number by converting lining cells to mature osteoblasts in vivo.

  6. Identification of markers for quiescent pancreatic stellate cells in the normal human pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2017-01-01

    cells in the normal human pancreas and perisinusoidal cells in the normal human liver. The immunolabelling capacity was evaluated according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Double-IF of the markers of interest together with markers for other periacinar cells was performed. Moreover, the utility...... of histochemical stains for the identification of human qPSCs was examined, and their ultrastructure was revisited by electron microscopy. Adipophilin, CRBP-1, cytoglobin and vinculin were expressed in qHSCs in the liver, whereas cytoglobin and adipophilin were expressed in qPSCs in the pancreas. Adipophilin...... are markers of qPSCs in the normal human pancreas. However, the use of adipophilin as a qPSC marker may be limited due to its high dependence on optimal PATI. Cytoglobin, on the other hand, is a sensitive marker for qPSCs but is expressed in FBs as well....

  7. A septo-temporal molecular gradient of sfrp3 in the dentate gyrus differentially regulates quiescent adult hippocampal neural stem cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaqi; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Jun, Heechul; Guo, Junjie U; Sun, Gerald J; Will, Brett; Yang, Zhengang; Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-09-04

    A converging body of evidence indicates that levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis vary along the septo-temporal axis of the dentate gyrus, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this regional heterogeneity are not known. We previously identified a niche mechanism regulating proliferation and neuronal development in the adult mouse dentate gyrus resulting from the activity-regulated expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (sfrp3) by mature neurons, which suppresses activation of radial glia-like neural stem cells (RGLs) through inhibition of Wingless/INT (WNT) protein signaling. Here, we show that activation rates within the quiescent RGL population decrease gradually along the septo-temporal axis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus, as defined by MCM2 expression in RGLs. Using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified an inverse septal-to-temporal increase in the expression of sfrp3 that emerges during postnatal development. Elimination of sfrp3 and its molecular gradient leads to increased RGL activation, preferentially in the temporal region of the adult dentate gyrus. Our study identifies a niche mechanism that contributes to the graded distribution of neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus and has important implications for understanding functional differences associated with adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis.

  8. TCF21 hypermethylation in genetically quiescent clear cell sarcoma of the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooskens, Saskia L.; Gadd, Samantha; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Khan, Javed; Patidar, Rajesh; Meerzaman, Daoud; Chen, Qing Rong; Hsu, Chih Hao; Yan, Chunhua; Nguyen, Cu; Hu, Ying; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Jennings, Lawrence J.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Ross, Nicole; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney (CCSK) is a rare childhood tumor whose molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We analyzed a discovery set of 13 CCSKs for changes in chromosome copy number, mutations, rearrangements, global gene expression and global DNA methylation. No recurrent segmenta

  9. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more

  10. Delay equation formulation of a cyclin-structured cell population model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borges, Ricardo; Calsina, Angel; Cuadrado, Silvia; Diekmann, Odo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive a system of two renewal equations from individual-level assumptions concerning a cyclin-structured cell population. Nonlinearity arises from the assumption that the rate at which quiescent cells become proliferating is determined by feedback. In fact, we assume tha

  11. SURVIVIN as a marker for quiescent-breast cancer stem cells-An intermediate, adherent, pre-requisite phase of breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Sumit; Das, Sarita; Nayak, Anmada; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells drive the metastatic cascade by undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and again mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Using multiple breast cancer cell lines including cigarette smoke induced breast cancer cells and tumor derived primary cells from patient sample; we developed a breast cancer metastasis model and reported the existence of an adherent, distinct pre-metastatic phase, quiescent-breast cancer stem cells (Q-BCSCs) prior to attaining an EMT. SURVIVIN was found to be expressed in Q-BCSCs. Time dependant biphasic expression of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs reveals that Q-BCSCs is a pre-metastatic phase distinct from both epithelial and mesenchymal counterparts. SURVIVIN favours metastasis and up-regulates WNT/β-CATENIN pathway in a PI3 K/AKT-dependant manner for self-renewal. Knockdown of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs lost the metastatic property of cells by inhibiting invasion, EMT-MET, PI3 K/AKT/WNT cascade, and induced apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest the existence of a novel pre-metastatic phase (Q-BCSCs) before EMT and SURVIVIN acts as a marker for Quiescent-BCSCs.

  12. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  13. What are the Progenitors of Compace, Massive, Quiescent Galaxies at z (equals) 2.3? The Population of Massive Galaxies at z (greater than) 3 From NMBS AND CANDELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanon, Mauro; Marchesini, Danilo; Rudnick, Gregory H.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker

    2013-01-01

    Using public data from the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) and the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), we investigate the population of massive galaxies at z > 3. The main aim of this work is to identify the potential progenitors of z 2 compact, massive, quiescent galaxies (CMQGs), furthering our understanding of the onset and evolution of massive galaxies. Our work is enabled by high-resolution images from CANDELS data and accurate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) from 37-band NMBS photometry. The total number of massive galaxies at z > 3 is consistent with the number of massive, quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at z 2, implying that the SFRs for all of these galaxies must be much lower by z 2. We discover four CMQGs at z > 3, pushing back the time for which such galaxies have been observed. However, the volume density for these galaxies is significantly less than that of galaxies at z star-forming galaxies at z 3 that are compact (Re 1010.6M; these galaxies are likely to become members of the massive, quiescent, compact galaxy population at z 2. We evolve the stellar masses and SFRs of each individual z > 3 galaxy adopting five different star formation histories (SFHs) and studying the resulting population of massive galaxies at z = 2.3. We find that declining or truncated SFHs are necessary to match the observed number density of MQGs at z 2, whereas a constant delayed-exponential SFH would result in a number density significantly smaller than observed. All of our assumed SFHs imply number densities of CMQGs at z 2 that are consistent with the observed number density. Better agreement with the observed number density of CMQGs at z 2 is obtained if merging is included in the analysis and better still if star formation quenching is assumed to shortly follow the merging event, as implied by recent models of the formation of MQGs.

  14. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: a promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotou, Elena; Malas, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following SCI activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to l...

  15. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: A promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Stavros eMalas; Elena ePanayiotou

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following spinal cord injury activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient nu...

  16. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: A promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros eMalas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following spinal cord injury activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to limit the damage, rendering this physiological response mainly ineffective. Research is now focusing on the manipulation of ependymal cells to produce cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage which are primarily lost in such a situation leading to secondary neuronal degeneration. Thus, there is a need for a more focused approach to understand the molecular properties of adult ependymal cells in greater detail and develop effective strategies for guiding their response during spinal cord injury.

  17. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: a promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Elena; Malas, Stavros

    2013-11-28

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following SCI activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to limit the damage, rendering this physiological response mainly ineffective. Research is now focusing on the manipulation of ependymal cells to produce cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage which are primarily lost in such a situation leading to secondary neuronal degeneration. Thus, there is a need for a more focused approach to understand the molecular properties of adult ependymal cells in greater detail and develop effective strategies for guiding their response during SCI.

  18. THE RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL TYPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE BUILDUP OF THE QUIESCENT GALAXY POPULATION AT 0.5 < z < 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Michael; Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wel, Arjen van der [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We present the relation between galaxy structure and spectral type, using a K-selected galaxy sample at 0.5 < z < 2.0. Based on similarities between the UV-to-NIR spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we classify galaxies into 32 spectral types. The different types span a wide range in evolutionary phases, and thus—in combination with available CANDELS/F160W imaging—are ideal to study the structural evolution of galaxies. Effective radii (R{sub e}) and Sérsic parameters (n) have been measured for 572 individual galaxies, and for each type, we determine R{sub e} at fixed stellar mass by correcting for the mass-size relation. We use the rest-frame U − V versus V − J diagram to investigate evolutionary trends. When moving into the direction perpendicular to the star-forming sequence, in which we see the Hα equivalent width and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) decrease, we find a decrease in R{sub e} and an increase in n. On the quiescent sequence we find an opposite trend, with older redder galaxies being larger. When splitting the sample into redshift bins, we find that young post-starburst galaxies are most prevalent at z > 1.5 and significantly smaller than all other galaxy types at the same redshift. This result suggests that the suppression of star formation may be associated with significant structural evolution at z > 1.5. At z < 1, galaxy types with intermediate sSFRs (10{sup −11.5}–10{sup −10.5} yr{sup −1}) do not have post-starburst SED shapes. These galaxies have similar sizes as older quiescent galaxies, implying that they can passively evolve onto the quiescent sequence, without increasing the average size of the quiescent galaxy population.

  19. The MRC-5 human embryonal lung fibroblast two-dimensional gel cellular protein database: quantitative identification of polypeptides whose relative abundance differs between quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Dejgaard, K; Madsen, Peder;

    1990-01-01

    (1323 with isoelectric focusing and 572 with nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) are recorded in this database, containing quantitative and qualitative data on the relative abundance of cellular proteins synthesized by quiescent, proliferating and SV40 transformed MRC-5 fibroblasts. Of the 592...... proteins quantitated so far, the levels of 138 were up- or down-regulated (51 and 87, respectively) by two times or more in the transformed cells as compared to their normal proliferating counterparts, while only 14 behaved similarly in quiescent cells. Seven MRC-5 SV40 proteins, including plastin and two...... cells (AMA) database (Celis et al., Electrophoresis 1990, 11, 989-1071) for those polypeptides of known and unknown identity that have been matched to AMA polypeptides. As more information is gathered in this and other laboratories, including data on oncogene proteins and transcription factors...

  20. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay as an adjunctive tool for assessment of various stages of inflammation: A study of quiescent inflammatory cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Knox Van Dyke; Shaily Patel; Val Vallyathan

    2003-02-01

    A simple, fast, precise and biologically relevant toxicity assay for screening cytotoxicity of minerals would have distinct advantages due to its cost benefits and relative savings in time. Furthermore, a bioassay to differentiate acute and chronic in vivo pulmonary reactions could have potential value as predictors of fibrogenicity and pathogenicity. In this study we examined the potential use of lucigenin as a probe to evaluate the correlation between chemiluminescence (CL) generated by alveolar macrophages with the known cytotoxicity and pathogenicity by conventional bioassays. In this study, we used small doses of dust (20 g) to minimize cellular overload and to maintain homeostasis. Crystalline silica a highly fibrogenic dust was used as positive control and results are compared with those for bentonite, kaolin and talc. Among the three minerals compared with silica, bentonite was more reactive (27%) in CL assay and declined sharply compared to other minerals. This sudden decline in bentonite CL is caused by cytotoxicity leading to cell death. CL-induced by talc was comparable to silica and declines slowly. Kaolin on the other hand produced relatively a weaker (25%) CL compared to silica. Our data using relatively low doses of dust suggest that the CL assay may have a better predictive value in cytotoxicity evaluations compared to conventional toxicity assays.

  1. Characterization of Side Cell Populations Obtained from Human Amnion Mesenchymal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; PIAO Zhengfu; Mamoru Kobayashi; Koji Sasaki; DING Shu-qin; Aiko Kikuchi; Isao Kamo; Norio Sakuragawa

    2009-01-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal cells (AMCs) contain multipotent cells. To enrich such multipotent stem cells, we applied to AMCs the new method for the isolation of side population (SP) cells used for the enrichment of multipotent stem cells from many tissues. We succeeded in obtaining SP cells from AMCs (AMC-SP cells). AMC-SP cells were found in 0.2% of AMCs, irrespective of the length of pregnant period, ranging from 37 to 40 weeks. Cell cycle analyses uggested that AMC-SP cells belonged to a cell population that proliferated very slowly and/or was in a quiescent state in the amniotic membrane. Upon culturing, they proliferated with 40 to 80 cell doublings. However, they did not form colonies in a soft agarose culture, whereas HepG2 cells, representative human hepatoma cells formed many large colonies. These results suggest that AMC-SP cells that have considerable value for the use of regenerative medicine can be managed safely in vitro.

  2. Side population sorting separates subfractions of cycling and non-cycling intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. von Furstenberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here that side population (SP sorting allows for the simultaneous isolation of two intestinal stem cell (ISC subsets from wild-type (WT mice which are phenotypically different and represent cycling and non-cycling pools of cells. Following 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU injection, in the upper side population (USP the percentage of EdU+ was 36% showing this fraction to be highly proliferative. In the lower side population (LSP, only 0.4% of cells were EdU+, indicating this fraction to be predominantly non-cycling. Using Lgr5-EGFP mice, we show that Lgr5-EGFPhi cells, representing actively cycling ISCs, are essentially exclusive to the USP. In contrast, using histone 2B-YFP mice, SP analysis revealed YFP label retaining cells (LRCs in both the USP and the LSP. Correspondingly, evaluation of the SP fractions for mRNA markers by qRT-PCR showed that the USP was enriched in transcripts associated with both quiescent and active ISCs. In contrast, the LSP expressed mRNA markers of quiescent ISCs while being de-enriched for those of the active ISC. Both the USP and LSP are capable of generating enteroids in culture which include the four intestinal lineages. We conclude that sorting of USP and LSP fractions represents a novel isolation of cycling and non-cycling ISCs from WT mice.

  3. Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-01-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have identified objects that have properties similar to those of the luminous quiescent compact galaxies found at z > 2. Here we present our results of 22 galaxies between z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.9 based on observations with the Keck I, Keck II and Subaru telescopes on Mauna Kea. By exploring sizes, morphologies, and stellar populations of these galaxies, we found that most of the galaxies we identified actually formed most of their stars at z 2 in the literature. Several of these young objects appear to be disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies, which found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disks, their formation would be more likely caused by gas accretion than by major mergers. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be...

  4. N-acetyl-L-cysteine increases MnSOD activity and enhances the recruitment of quiescent human fibroblasts to the proliferation cycle during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaowei; Goswami, Monali; Kalen, Amanda L; Goswami, Prabhat C; Sarsour, Ehab H

    2016-01-01

    The rebuilding of the connective tissue during wound healing requires the recruitment of fibroblasts to the wound area as well as reentry of quiescent fibroblasts to the proliferative cycle. Whether this process can be modulated by a small molecular weight thiol antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was tested in normal human skin fibroblasts (NHFs) using a uni-directional wound healing assay. NAC treated cells demonstrated a decreased migration rate but increased number of proliferating cells recruited into the wound area post wounding. Fifteen day quiescent control and NAC treated NHFs were re-plated at a lower density and cell numbers counted at different days post-plating. Interestingly, NAC treated cells exhibited increased cellular proliferation indicated by both decreased cell population doubling time and increased S phase cells. NAC treated cells demonstrated decreased steady state levels of reactive oxygen species as well as increased protein and activity levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). NAC treatment failed to induce proliferation in quiescent cells lacking MnSOD expression. These results demonstrate that NAC enhanced the recruitment of quiescent NHFs into proliferation cycle during wound healing. Our results also suggest that the wound healing properties of NAC might be due to its ability to induce and enhance MnSOD expression and activity. Altogether, these findings suggest NAC might be potentially developed as a dietary intervention to improve tissue injury in animals and humans.

  5. Dclk1 Defines Quiescent Pancreatic Progenitors that Promote Injury-Induced Regeneration and Tumorigenesis | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The existence of adult pancreatic progenitor cells has been debated. While some favor the concept of facultative progenitors involved in homeostasis and repair, neither a location nor markers for such cells have been defined. Using genetic lineage tracing, we show that Doublecortin-like kinase-1 (Dclk1) labels a rare population of long-lived, quiescent pancreatic cells. In vitro, Dclk1+ cells proliferate readily and sustain pancreatic organoid growth. In vivo, Dclk1+ cells are necessary for pancreatic regeneration following injury and chronic inflammation.

  6. Expansion of quiescent lung adenocarcinoma CD8+ T cells by MUC1-8-mer peptide-T2 cell-β2 microglobulin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzin-Méndez, J A; López-González, J S; Báez, R; Arenas-Del Angel, M C; Montaño, L F; Silva-Adaya, D; Lascurain, R; Gorocica, P

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy requires the isolation of CD8+ T cells specific for tumor-associated antigens, their expansion in vitro and their transfusion to the patient to mediate a therapeutic effect. MUC1 is an important adenocarcinoma antigen immunogenic for T cells. The MUC1-derived SAPDTRPA (MUC1-8-mer) peptide is a potent epitope recognized by CD8+ T cells in murine models. Likewise, the T2 cell line has been used as an antigen-presenting cell to activate CD8+ T cells, but so far MUC1 has not been assessed in this context. We evaluated whether the MUC1-8-mer peptide can be presented by T2 cells to expand CD25+CD8+ T cells isolated from HLA-A2+ lung adenocarcinoma patients with stage III or IV tumors. The results showed that MUC1-8-mer peptide-loaded T2 cells activated CD8+ T cells from cancer HLA-A2+ patients when anti-CD2, anti-CD28 antibodies and IL-2 were added. The percentage of CD25+CD8+ T cells was 3-fold higher than those in the non-stimulated cells (P=0.018). HLA-A2+ patient cells showed a significant difference (2.3-fold higher) in activation status than HLA-A2+ healthy control cells (P=0.04). Moreover, 77.6% of MUC1-8-mer peptide-specific CD8+ T cells proliferated following a second stimulation with MUC1-8-mer peptide-loaded T2 cells after 10 days of cell culture. There were significant differences in the percentage of basal CD25+CD8+ T cells in relation to the cancer stage; this difference disappeared after MUC1-8-mer peptide stimulation. In conclusion, expansion of CD25+CD8+ T cells by MUC1-8 peptide-loaded T2 cells plus costimulatory signals via CD2, CD28 and IL-2 can be useful in adoptive immunotherapy.

  7. A circuit-based gatekeeper for adult neural stem cell proliferation: Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons of the dentate gyrus control the activation and proliferation of quiescent adult neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jonathan; Toni, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated in the adult hippocampus from a pool of self-renewing stem cells located in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus. Their activation, proliferation, and maturation depend on a host of environmental and cellular factors but, until recently, the contribution of local neuronal circuitry to this process was relatively unknown. In their recent publication, Song and colleagues have uncovered a novel circuit-based mechanism by which release of the neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), from parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons, can hold radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells of the adult SGZ in a quiescent state. This tonic GABAergic signal, dependent upon the activation of γ(2) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors of RGL stem cells, can thus prevent their proliferation and subsequent maturation or return them to quiescence if previously activated. PV interneurons are thus capable of suppressing neurogenesis during periods of high network activity and facilitating neurogenesis when network activity is low.

  8. Massive Quiescent Disk Galaxies in the CANDELS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesseli, Aurora; McGrath, E. J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the GOODS-S field of the CANDELS survey, we find evidence for an increasing fraction of disk-dominated galaxies at high-redshift ( 2) among the quiescent, or non-star-forming galaxy population, in agreement with a growing body of evidence from recent results in the literature. We selected all galaxies with mass M>1010 Msun within the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, and imposed a two-color selection criteria using rest-frame U, V, and J-band flux to separate quiescent from star-forming galaxies. From this sample, we performed a qualitative visual classification and a quantitative classification using the galaxy-fitting program Galfit. Of the original 140 quiescent galaxies, 23 have a disk component that contributes 50% or more of the total integrated galaxy light, and most of these are at high-redshift. At a redshift of z ~ 2 a significant fraction of all quiescent galaxies showed strong disk components with 30% being disk-dominated. We also find that massive disk galaxies seem to live in less densely populated environments while massive ellipticals live in environments with more neighbors, which leads us to believe that there are two mechanisms for the creation of massive quiescent galaxies. For the disks, the lower density environment and the disk nature of these galaxies lead us to favor cold streams over the major merger model of galaxy formation. The ellipticals, which live in higher density environments, could be assembled through major mergers of already aged stellar populations (e.g., dry mergers). This research is supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Foundation.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Ischemia-Derived Astrocytes (IDAs) with Ability to Transactivate Quiescent Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Alejandro; Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Murta, Veronica; Cadena, Vanesa; Usach, Vanina; Dodes-Traian, Martin M.; Setton-Avruj, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis H.; Ramos, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile, and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDAs) were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis. Main Points: Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA) were isolated from brain ischemic tissue IDA show reduced replicative senescence, increased cell division and spontaneous migration IDA potentiate death of oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons IDA propagate reactive gliosis on quiescent astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Inhibition of gamma secretases facilitates IDA differentiation to astrocytes PMID:27313509

  10. Isolation and characterization of ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA with ability to transactivate quiescent astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eVillarreal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis.

  11. Ultrastructure of quiescent oocytes of Cebus albifrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, B R; Hertig, A T

    1975-11-01

    Quiescent oocytes of the monkey Cebus albifrons were examined with the electron microscope. In many respects the ultrastructure of these cells was similar to that of other mammalian species. Elongate and oval mitochondria, lamellar Golgi complexes, small profiles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolar organelles were randomly distributed around a round nucleus which usually contained a nucleolus and clumps of heterochromatin. Among the unusual morphological characteristics of these oocytes are 'membranous aggregates', membrane-bound organelles containing a complex of convoluted membranes, some very dense rod-like structures and a droplet of moderate density which resembles lipid. A similar droplet is frequently found in mitochondria. Rough endoplasmic reticulum is abundant in many of these oocytes, forming parallel arrays and concentric rings around the nucleus. Folded membrane complexes, apparent elaborations of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, are frequently found in the cytoplasm in continuity with cisternae of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and associated with vesicles which often contain flocculent material. The morphology of Cebus oocytes suggests a greater rate of steroid and protein synthesis, transport, and storage than is usually indicated by the ultrastructure of other mammalian oocytes.

  12. Sub-millimeter galaxies as progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Toft, S; Magnelli, B; Karim, A; Zirm, A; Michalowski, M; Capak, P; Sheth, K; Schawinski, K; Krogager, J -K; Wuyts, S; Sanders, D; Man, A W S; Lutz, D; Staguhn, J; Berta, S; Mccracken, H; Krpan, J; Riechers, D

    2014-01-01

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z=2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3quiescent galaxies at z=2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z=3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z=2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses and internal velocities. As...

  13. The formation of massive, quiescent galaxies at cosmic noon

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic noon (z~1.5-3) marked a period of vigorous star formation for most galaxies. However, about a third of the more massive galaxies at those times were quiescent in the sense that their observed stellar populations are inconsistent with rapid star formation. The reduced star formation activity is often attributed to gaseous outflows driven by feedback from supermassive black holes, but the impact of black hole feedback on galaxies in the young Universe is not yet definitively established. We analyze the origin of quiescent galaxies with the help of ultra-high resolution, cosmological simulations that include feedback from stars but do not model the uncertain consequences of black hole feedback. We show that dark matter halos with specific accretion rates below ~0.25-0.4 per Gyr preferentially host galaxies with reduced star formation rates and red broad-band colors. The fraction of such halos in large dark matter only simulations matches the observed fraction of massive quiescent galaxies (~10^10-10^1...

  14. Forkhead Box O1 is present in quiescent pituitary cells during development and is increased in the absence of p27 Kip1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreeparna Majumdar

    Full Text Available Congenital pituitary hormone deficiencies have been reported in approximately one in 4,000 live births, however studies reporting mutations in some widely studied transcription factors account for only a fraction of congenital hormone deficiencies in humans. Anterior pituitary hormones are required for development and function of several glands including gonads, adrenals, and thyroid. In order to identify additional factors that contribute to human congenital hormone deficiencies, we are investigating the forkhead transcription factor, FOXO1, which has been implicated in development of several organs including ovary, testis, and brain. We find that FOXO1 is present in the nuclei of non-dividing pituitary cells during embryonic development, consistent with a role in limiting proliferation and/or promoting differentiation. FOXO1 is present in a subset of differentiated cells at e18.5 and in adult with highest level of expression in somatotrope cells. We detected FOXO1 in p27(Kip1-positive cells at e14.5. In the absence of p27(Kip1 the number of pituitary cells containing FOXO1 is significantly increased at e14.5 suggesting that a feedback loop regulates the interplay between FOXO1 and p27(Kip1.

  15. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tori E. Horne

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states.

  16. Constraining Metallicity and Age for Massive Quiescent Galaxies in a Redshift Range of 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Carpenter, Vicente; Papovich, Casey J.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Bridge, Joanna; Dickinson, Mark; Closson Ferguson, Henry; finlator, kristian; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Livermore, Rachael C.; Long, James; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Pirzkal, Norbert; Quadri, Ryan; Salmon, Brett W.; Tilvi, Vithal; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Using HST/WFC3 grism spectroscopy from the CANDELS Lyman-alpha Emission at Reionization (CLEAR) survey, we constrain the metallicities and ages of massive quiescent galaxies, at z ~ 1.5. CLEAR provides deep spectroscopy (12 HST orbits per pointing) with the WFC3/G102 grism over the wavelength range ~ 7,500 break, Balmer-series lines, and Hg+G features. We stack the G102 spectra of a stellar-mass limited sample of 34 quiescent galaxies, with log(M*/M⊙) > 10 and 1 10.9. The model fits favor higher metallicity for the more massive quiescent galaxies, with Z/Z⊙ ~ 1, with some systematics possibly leading from differences in the stellar population models. Therefore, there is no evidence for significant evolution in metallicity for the most massive quiescent galaxies since z ~ 1.5. The model fits to the lower mass quiescent galaxies favor lower metallicites, Z/Z⊙ ~ 0.4, with an offset of ~ 0.3 dex from the present-day relation (e.g., Galazzi et al. 2005). For quiescent galaxies in this mass range, 10.0 1), or a combination of the two.

  17. Stirring faces: mixing in a quiescent fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Brunton, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video depicts the mixing that occurs as a two-dimensional flat plate plunges sinusoidally in a quiescent fluid. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents reveal sets that are attracting or repelling. As the flow field develops, strange faces emerge.

  18. Therapeutic implications of an enriched cancer stem-like cell population in a human osteosarcoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins-Neves Sara R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is a bone-forming tumor of mesenchymal origin that presents a clinical pattern that is consistent with the cancer stem cell model. Cells with stem-like properties (CSCs have been identified in several tumors and hypothesized as the responsible for the relative resistance to therapy and tumor relapses. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize CSCs populations in a human osteosarcoma cell line and to explore their role in the responsiveness to conventional therapies. Methods CSCs were isolated from the human MNNG/HOS cell line using the sphere formation assay and characterized in terms of self-renewal, mesenchymal stem cell properties, expression of pluripotency markers and ABC transporters, metabolic activity and tumorigenicity. Cell's sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and to irradiation was analyzed and related with cell cycle-induced alterations and apoptosis. Results The isolated CSCs were found to possess self-renewal and multipotential differentiation capabilities, express markers of pluripotent embryonic stem cells Oct4 and Nanog and the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP, exhibit low metabolic activity and induce tumors in athymic mice. Compared with parental MNNG/HOS cells, CSCs were relatively more resistant to both chemotherapy and irradiation. None of the treatments have induced significant cell-cycle alterations and apoptosis in CSCs. Conclusions MNNG/HOS osteosarcoma cells contain a stem-like cell population relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and irradiation. This resistant phenotype appears to be related with some stem features, namely the high expression of the drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP and their quiescent nature, which may provide a biological basis for resistance to therapy and recurrence commonly observed in osteosarcoma.

  19. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  20. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  1. Submillimeter galaxies as progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft, S.; Zirm, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Man, A. W. S. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Mariesvej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Smolčić, V.; Krpan, J. [Physics Department, University of Zagreb, Bijenička cesta 32, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Magnelli, B.; Karim, A. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, Auf dem Hügel 71, Bonn, D-53121 (Germany); Michalowski, M. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, 314-6 Caltech, 1201 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Schawinski, K. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Staguhn, J.; Berta, S. [MPE, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Sanders, D. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Mccracken, H. [Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Riechers, D., E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 220 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    Three billion years after the big bang (at redshift z = 2), half of the most massive galaxies were already old, quiescent systems with little to no residual star formation and extremely compact with stellar mass densities at least an order of magnitude larger than in low-redshift ellipticals, their descendants. Little is known about how they formed, but their evolved, dense stellar populations suggest formation within intense, compact starbursts 1-2 Gyr earlier (at 3 < z < 6). Simulations show that gas-rich major mergers can give rise to such starbursts, which produce dense remnants. Submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) are prime examples of intense, gas-rich starbursts. With a new, representative spectroscopic sample of compact, quiescent galaxies at z = 2 and a statistically well-understood sample of SMGs, we show that z = 3-6 SMGs are consistent with being the progenitors of z = 2 quiescent galaxies, matching their formation redshifts and their distributions of sizes, stellar masses, and internal velocities. Assuming an evolutionary connection, their space densities also match if the mean duty cycle of SMG starbursts is 42{sub −29}{sup +40} Myr (consistent with independent estimates), which indicates that the bulk of stars in these massive galaxies were formed in a major, early surge of star formation. These results suggest a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent star formation through their appearance as high stellar-density galaxy cores and to their ultimate fate as giant ellipticals.

  2. Relationship between heart rate and quiescent interval of the cardiac cycle in children using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bogale, Saivivek; Golriz, Farahnaz; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2017-07-25

    Imaging the heart in children comes with the challenge of constant cardiac motion. A prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT scan allows for scanning during a predetermined phase of the cardiac cycle with least motion. This technique requires knowing the optimal quiescent intervals of cardiac cycles in a pediatric population. To evaluate high-temporal-resolution cine MRI of the heart in children to determine the relationship of heart rate to the optimal quiescent interval within the cardiac cycle. We included a total of 225 consecutive patients ages 0-18 years who had high-temporal-resolution cine steady-state free-precession sequence performed as part of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or magnetic resonance angiography study of the heart. We determined the location and duration of the quiescent interval in systole and diastole for heart rates ranging 40-178 beats per minute (bpm). We performed the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the duration of quiescent interval in systole and diastole for each heart rate group. The duration of the quiescent interval at heart rates bpm and >90 bpm was significantly longer in diastole and systole, respectively (Pbpm [P=.02]). For heart rates 80-89 bpm, diastolic interval was longer than systolic interval, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). We created a chart depicting optimal quiescent intervals across a range of heart rates that could be applied for prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT imaging of the heart. The optimal quiescent interval at heart rates bpm is in diastole and at heart rates ≥90 bpm is in systole. The period of quiescence at heart rates 80-89 bpm is uniformly short in systole and diastole.

  3. Efficient regeneration by activation of neurogenesis in homeostatically quiescent regions of the adult vertebrate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Beljajeva, Anna; Knapp, Dunja; Habermann, Bianca; Ryge, Jesper; Tanaka, Elly M; Simon, András

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders and teleost fishes can efficiently repair the adult brain. It has been hypothesised that constitutively active neurogenic niches are a prerequisite for extensive neuronal regeneration capacity. Here, we show that the highly regenerative salamander, the red spotted newt, displays an unexpectedly similar distribution of active germinal niches with mammals under normal physiological conditions. Proliferation zones in the adult newt brain are restricted to the forebrain, whereas all other regions are essentially quiescent. However, ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons in newts induced ependymoglia cells in the normally quiescent midbrain to proliferate and to undertake full dopamine neuron regeneration. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we have catalogued a set of differentially expressed genes in these activated ependymoglia cells. This strategy identified hedgehog signalling as a key component of adult dopamine neuron regeneration. These data show that brain regeneration can occur by activation of neurogenesis in quiescent brain regions.

  4. The Assembly Histories of Quiescent Galaxies since z=0.7 from Absorption Line Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jieun; Moustakas, John; Graves, Genevieve J; Holden, Bradford P; Brodwin, Mark; Brown, Michael J I; van Dokkum, Pieter G

    2014-01-01

    We present results from modeling the optical spectra of a large sample of quiescent galaxies between 0.11 indicate the inhomogeneous nature of the z<0.7 quiescent population. The data also permit the addition of newly-quenched galaxies at masses below ~10^10.5 Msun at z<0.7. Additionally, we analyze very deep Keck DEIMOS spectra of the two brightest quiescent galaxies in a cluster at z=0.83. There is tentative evidence that these galaxies are older than their counterparts in low-density environments. In an Appendix, we demonstrate that our full spectrum modeling technique allows for accurate and reliable modeling of galaxy spectra to low S/N and/or low spectral resolution.

  5. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  6. A Structured Population Model of Cell Differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Doumic, Marie; Perthame, Benoit; Zubelli, Jorge P

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several aspects of a new model for cell differentiation. It assumes that differentiation of progenitor cells is a continuous process. From the mathematical point of view, it is based on partial differential equations of transport type. Specifically, it consists of a structured population equation with a nonlinear feedback loop. This models the signaling process due to cytokines, which regulate the differentiation and proliferation process. We compare the continuous model to its discrete counterpart, a multi-compartmental model of a discrete collection of cell subpopulations recently proposed by Marciniak-Czochra et al. in 2009 to investigate the dynamics of the hematopoietic system. We obtain uniform bounds for the solutions, characterize steady state solutions, and analyze their linearized stability. We show how persistence or extinction might occur according to values of parameters that characterize the stem cells self-renewal. We also perform numerical simulations and discuss the q...

  7. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  8. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    , substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...... analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design with pH, glucose concentration and oxygen level was performed in batch cultivations using the growth reporter strains to evaluate the effect of those environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount...

  9. On the Evolution of the Central Density of Quiescent Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchella, Sandro; Carollo, C. Marcella; Faber, S. M.; Cibinel, Anna; Dekel, Avishai; Koo, David C.; Renzini, Alvio; Woo, Joanna

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the origin of the evolution of the population-averaged central stellar mass density (Σ1) of quiescent galaxies (QGs) by probing the relation between stellar age and Σ1 at z ˜ 0. We use the Zurich ENvironmental Study (ZENS), which is a survey of galaxy groups with a large fraction of satellite galaxies. QGs shape a narrow locus in the Σ1-M ⋆ plane, which we refer to as Σ1 ridgeline. Colors of (B - I) and (I - J) are used to divide QGs into three age categories: young (4 Gyr). At fixed stellar mass, old QGs on the Σ1 ridgeline have higher Σ1 than young QGs. This shows that galaxies landing on the Σ1 ridgeline at later epochs arrive with lower Σ1, which drives the zeropoint of the ridgeline down with time. We compare the present-day zeropoint of the oldest population at z = 0 with the zeropoint of the quiescent population 4 Gyr back in time, at z = 0.37. These zeropoints are identical, showing that the intrinsic evolution of individual galaxies after they arrive on the Σ1 ridgeline must be negligible, or must evolve parallel to the ridgeline during this interval. The observed evolution of the global zeropoint of 0.07 dex over the last 4 Gyr is thus largely due to the continuous addition of newly quenched galaxies with lower Σ1 at later times (“progenitor bias”). While these results refer to the satellite-rich ZENS sample as a whole, our work suggests a similar age-Σ1 trend for central galaxies.

  10. HAWAIIAN SKIRT regulates the quiescent center-independent meristem activity in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Sol; Choe, Goh; Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Mao, Linyong; Fei, Zhangjun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2016-06-01

    Root apical meristem (RAM) drives post-embryonic root growth by constantly supplying cells through mitosis. It is composed of stem cells and their derivatives, the transit-amplifying (TA) cells. Stem cell organization and its maintenance in the RAM are well characterized, however, their relationships with TA cells remain unclear. SHORTROOT (SHR) is critical for root development. It patterns cell types and promotes the post-embryonic root growth. Defective root growth in the shr has been ascribed to the lack of quiescent center (QC), which maintains the surrounding stem cells. However, our recent investigation indicated that SHR maintains TA cells independently of QC by modulating PHABULOSA (PHB) through miRNA165/6. PHB controls TA cell activity by modulating cytokinin levels and type B Arabidopsis Response Regulator activity, in a dosage-dependent manner. To further understand TA cell regulation, we conducted a shr suppressor screen. With an extensive mutagenesis screen followed by genome sequencing of a pooled F2 population, we discovered two suppressor alleles with mutations in HAWAIIAN SKIRT (HWS). HWS, encoding an F-box protein with kelch domain, is expressed, partly depending on SHR, in the root cap and in the pericycle of the differentiation zone. Interestingly, root growth in the shr hws was more active than the wild-type roots for the first 7 days after germination, without recovering QC. Contrary to shr phb, shr hws did not show a recovery of cytokinin signaling. These indicate that HWS affects QC-independent TA cell activities through a pathway distinctive from PHB. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  12. Behaviour of ribosomal genes and nucleolar domains during activation in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. root primordia: from the unsoaked quiescent state to the steady state of proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Acevedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the organisation of ribosomal genes and nucleolar protein components were analysed in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. cv Cristalina from the time the quiescent primordia of the radical bands of nodes were stimulated to proliferate by water imbibition, until the meristematic population reached the steady state of proliferation in the growing roots. The kinetics of proliferation was evaluated by flow cytometry, and by the mitotic indexes, in roots of different lengths. All the quiescent cells were in a pre-replicative state (G0, with a 2C DNA content. During their activation process, they progressively reached the steady state of proliferation (mitotic index 7%, with rather fixed frequencies for cells with 2C (G1, 4C (G2, and values between them corresponding to cells replicating their DNA. Decondensation of the ribosomal genes was followed by FISH with probes for the major 25S and 18S rRNAs, and variations in the numbers of nucleoli were recorded in squashed cells after silver staining. The ultrastructure of nucleoli was analysed by electron microscopy, using the EDTA regressive staining for ribonucleoproteins. Quiescent nucleoli showed a clear segregation of their main components: Fibrillar Centre, Dense Fibrillar Component and Cajal´s bodies while lacked any Granular Component. However the proliferating ones showed them highly intermingled, except for the Cajal´s bodies. Our results revealed a high plasticity of the nucleolar domains in response to cell activation, and allowed to establish a correlation between dispersion of NORs with formation of small fibrillar centers and a nucleolus with all its domains intermingled, and the activation of cell proliferation during root sprouting.

  13. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Drory, Niv; Law, David R; Masters, Karen L; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Rubin, Kate; Belfiore, Francesco; Vulcani, Benedetta; Chen, Yan-mei; Zhang, Kai; Gelfand, Joseph D; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Roman-Lopes, A; Schneider, Donald P

    2016-05-26

    Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the population of galaxies with masses above 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun; the number of quiescent galaxies has increased by a factor of about 25 over the past ten billion years (refs 1-4). Once star formation has been shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat the gas that is subsequently accreted from either stellar mass loss or mergers and that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centres of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized-gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as ten per cent of the quiescent population with masses around 2 × 10(10) times that of the Sun. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active supermassive black hole is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.

  14. Identification of a novel microRNA that regulates the proliferation and differentiation in muscle side population cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Norio; Alexander, Matthew S; Casar, Juan Carlos; Kunkel, Louis M

    2012-11-01

    Muscle satellite cells are largely responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration following injury. Side population (SP) cells, which are thought to be muscle stem cells, also contribute to muscle regeneration. SP cells exhibit high mesenchymal potential, and are a possible cell source for therapy of muscular dystrophy. However, the mechanism by which muscle SP cells are committed to differentiation is poorly understood. microRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in modulating a variety of cellular processes through repression of their mRNA targets. In skeletal muscle, miRNAs are known to be involved in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. To investigate mechanisms of SP cell regulation, we profiled miRNA expression in SP cells and main population (MP) cells in muscles using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based expression assays. We identified a set of miRNAs that was highly expressed in SP cells as compared with MP cells. One miRNA, miR-128a, was elevated in expression in SP cells, but decreased in expression during continued culture in vitro. Overexpression of miR-128a in SP cells resulted in inhibited cell proliferation. The differentiation potential of SP cells was also decreased when miR-128a was overexpressed. MiR-128a was found to regulate the target genes involved in the regulation of adipogenic-, osteogenic- and myogenic genes that include: PPARγ, Runx1, and Pax3. Overexpression of miR-128a suppressed the activity of a luciferase reporter fused to the 3'-untranslated region of each gene. These results demonstrate that miR-128a contributes to the maintenance of the quiescent state, and it regulates cellular differentiation by repressing individual genes in SP cells.

  15. Preferential gene expression in quiescent human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, D L; Kopman, C; Scandalis, S; Gilleran, S

    1993-06-01

    The exit from the proliferative cell cycle into a reversible quiescence (G0) is an active process that is not yet well understood at the molecular level. Investigation of G0-specific gene expression is an important step in studying the mechanism regulating the entrance to quiescence. Using the human embryo lung fibroblast (WI38) as a model system, we have isolated complementary DNA clones that are expressed at a higher level in quiescent cells than in logarithmically growing cells. We have identified complementary DNAs from eight genes including collagen alpha 1(VI), collagen alpha 1(III), decorin, complement C1r, collagen alpha 1(I), collagen alpha 2(I), and two novel genes, Q6 and Q10. We have named this class of quiescence-inducible genes quiescins. Expression of these genes was induced just as proliferation slowed, as indicated by the level of histone H2B mRNA, [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and cell number. The level of expression of the novel genes, Q6 and Q10, increased at the same time as the other genes. Q6 has two mRNAs of 3 and 4 kb, whereas Q10 mRNA is about 1.0 kb. The expression of the quiescins was not induced by blocking the cell cycle in S phase with aphidicolin or in G1 with lovastatin. However, the genes were highly induced by trypsinization or scraping of the cells during logarithmic growth. This induction was not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. The expression of decorin and Q6 was very low in SV40-transformed cells (VA13) either in logarithmic growth or at high density, whereas the gene Q10 was expressed more highly in VA13 than in WI38 cells. The finding that expression of some components of the extracellular matrix is induced as cells enter G0 suggests that they may have a role in both the induction and the maintenance of the quiescent state. The quiescins will serve as molecular markers for the investigation of mechanisms that regulate the onset of quiescence.

  16. Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Michoski, C E; Schmitz, P G

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(...

  17. Molecular signature and in vivo behavior of bone marrow endosteal and subendosteal stromal cell populations and their relevance to hematopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balduino, Alex, E-mail: balduino@uva.edu.br [School of Dentistry, Veiga de Almeida University, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mello-Coelho, Valeria [Biomedical Science Institute, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhou; Taichman, Russell S.; Krebsbach, Paul H. [Department of Periodontics, Prevention and Geriatrics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Becker, Kevin G. [National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mello, Wallace de [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Taub, Dennis D. [National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Borojevic, Radovan [Biomedical Science Institute, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    In the bone marrow cavity, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been shown to reside in the endosteal and subendosteal perivascular niches, which play specific roles on HSC maintenance. Although cells with long-term ability to reconstitute full hematopoietic system can be isolated from both niches, several data support a heterogenous distribution regarding the cycling behavior of HSC. Whether this distinct behavior depends upon the role played by the stromal populations which distinctly create these two niches is a question that remains open. In the present report, we used our previously described in vivo assay to demonstrate that endosteal and subendosteal stromal populations are very distinct regarding skeletal lineage differentiation potential. This was further supported by a microarray-based analysis, which also demonstrated that these two stromal populations play distinct, albeit complementary, roles in HSC niche. Both stromal populations were preferentially isolated from the trabecular region and behave distinctly in vitro, as previously reported. Even though these two niches are organized in a very close range, in vivo assays and molecular analyses allowed us to identify endosteal stroma (F-OST) cells as fully committed osteoblasts and subendosteal stroma (F-RET) cells as uncommitted mesenchymal cells mainly represented by perivascular reticular cells expressing high levels of chemokine ligand, CXCL12. Interestingly, a number of cytokines and growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-15, Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) were also found to be differentially expressed by F-OST and F-RET cells. Further microarray analyses indicated important mechanisms used by the two stromal compartments in order to create and coordinate the 'quiescent' and 'proliferative' niches in which hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors reside.

  18. PRIMUS: Effect of Galaxy Environment on the Quiescent Fraction Evolution at z < 0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Moustakas, John; Coil, Alison L; Cool, Richard J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Skibba, Ramin A; Wong, Kenneth C; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of galaxy environment on the evolution of the quiescent fraction ($f_\\mathrm{Q}$) from z =0.8 to 0.0 using spectroscopic redshifts and multi-wavelength imaging data from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) and the Sloan Digitial Sky Survey (SDSS). Our stellar mass limited galaxy sample consists of ~14,000 PRIMUS galaxies within z = 0.2-0.8 and ~64,000 SDSS galaxies within z = 0.05-0.12. We classify the galaxies as quiescent or star-forming based on an evolving specific star formation cut, and as low or high density environments based on fixed cylindrical aperture environment measurements on a volume-limited environment defining population. For quiescent and star-forming galaxies in low or high density environments, we examine the evolution of their stellar mass function (SMF). Then using the SMFs we compute $f_\\mathrm{Q}(M_{*})$ and quantify its evolution within our redshift range. We find that the quiescent fraction is higher at higher masses and in denser environments. The quie...

  19. Ovarian cancer stem cells are enriched in side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase bright overlapping population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Yasuda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiaiting cells (CICs are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity, differentiation potential and high tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs of ovarian cancer have been isolated by side population (SP analysis, ALDEFLUOR assay and using cell surface markers. However, these approaches are not definitive markers for CSCs/CICs, and it is necessary to refine recent methods for identifying more highly purified CSCs/CICs. In this study, we analyzed SP cells and aldehyde dehydrogenese bright (ALDH(Br cells from ovarian cancer cells. Both SP cells and ALDH(Br cells exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability and higher expression level of a stem cell marker, sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2, than those of main population (MP cells and ALDH(Low cells, respectively. We analyzed an SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population (SP/ALDH(Br, and the SP/ALDH(Br population exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability than that of SP cells or ALDH(Br cells, enabling initiation of tumor with as few as 10(2 cells. Furthermore, SP/ADLH(Br population showed higher sphere-forming ability, cisplatin resistance, adipocyte differentiation ability and expression of SOX2 than those of SP/ALDH(Low, MP/ALDH(Br and MP/ALDH(Low cells. Gene knockdown of SOX2 suppressed the tumor-initiation of ovarian cancer cells. An SP/ALDH(Br population was detected in several gynecological cancer cells with ratios of 0.1% for HEC-1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma cells to 1% for MCAS ovary mucinous adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, use of the SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population is a promising approach to isolate highly purified CSCs/CICs and SOX2 might be a novel functional marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs.

  20. The "quiescent" black hole in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C; Hwang, U; Canizares, C R

    1996-01-01

    It is believed that most giant elliptical galaxies possess nuclear black holes with masses in excess of $10^8\\Msun$. Bondi accretion from the interstellar medium might then be expected to produce quasar-like luminosities from the nuclei of even quiescent elliptical galaxies. It is a puzzle that such luminosities are not observed. Motivated by this problem, Fabian & Rees have recently suggested that the final stages of accretion in these objects occurs in an advection-dominated mode with a correspondingly small radiative efficiency. Despite possessing a long-known active nucleus and dynamical evidence for a black hole, the low radiative and kinetic luminosities of the core of M87 provide the best illustration of this problem. We examine an advection-dominated model for the nucleus of M87 and show that accretion at the Bondi rate is compatible with the best known estimates for the core flux from radio through to X-ray wavelengths. The success of this model prompts us to propose that FR-I radio galaxies and ...

  1. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Schweighofer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplaninhigh cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510 and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations.

  2. MOIRCS Deep Survey. X. Evolution of Quiescent Galaxies as a Function of Stellar Mass at 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Kajisawa, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Yamada, Toru; Onodera, Masato; Akiyama, Masayuki; Tanaka, Ichi

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of quiescent galaxies at 0.56 by performing SED fitting of the multi broad-band photometry from the U to Spitzer 5.8um bands with the population synthesis model of Bruzual & Charlot (2003) where exponentially decaying star formation histories are assumed. The number density of quiescent galaxies increases by a factor of ~3 from 1.0~ 1-1.5.

  3. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Edmond; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Drory, Niv; Law, David R; Masters, Karen L; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Rubin, Kate; Belfiore, Francesco; Vulcani, Benedetta; Chen, Yan-mei; Zhang, Kai; Gelfand, Joseph D; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Roman-Lopes, A; Schneider, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the galaxy population above $M_{*}\\sim 2 \\times 10^{10}~M_{\\odot}$, where their numbers have increased by a factor of $\\sim25$ since $z\\sim2$. Once star formation is initially shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat subsequently accreted gas from stellar mass loss or mergers that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centers of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally-driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies ar...

  4. Ink4a/Arf −/− and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f− quiescent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Kazuharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Arima, Yoshimi; Takamoto, Yayoi; Ohnishi, Nobuyuki; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Saya, Hideyuki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (−/−) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be...

  5. Heterogeneity and weak coupling may explain the synchronization characteristics of cells in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exhibit different types of calcium dynamics. Static vascular tone is associated with unsynchronized calcium waves and the developed force depends on the number of recruited cells. Global calcium transients synchronized among a large number of cells cause rhythmic...... are enrolled into synchronized oscillation.Simulations of coupled SMCs show that the experimentally observed cellular recruitment, the presence of quiescent cells and the variation in oscillation frequency may arise if the cell population is phenotypically heterogeneous. In this case, quiescent cells can...

  6. Apical meristem organization and lack of establishment of the quiescent center in Cactaceae roots with determinate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José Fernando; Shishkova, Svetlana; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2003-10-01

    Some species of Cactaceae from the Sonoran Desert are characterized by a determinate growth pattern of the primary root, which is important for rapid lateral-root formation and seedling establishment. An analysis of the determinate root growth can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of meristem maintenance in plants in general. Stenocereus gummosus (Engelm.) Gibson & Horak and Pachycereus pringlei (S. Watson) Britton & Rose are characterized by an open type of root apical meristem. Immunohistochemical analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into S. gummosus showed that the percentage of cells passing through the S-phase in a 24-h period is the same within the zone where a population of relatively slowly proliferating cells could be established and above this zone in the meristem. This indicated the absence of the quiescent center (QC) in S. gummosus. During the second and the third days of growth, in the distal meristem portion of P. pringlei roots, a compact group of cells that had a cell cycle longer than in the proximal meristem was found, indicating the presence of the QC. However, later in development, the QC could not be detected in this species. These data suggest that during post-germination the absence of the establishment of the QC within the apical meristem and limited proliferative activity of initial cells are the main components of a determinate developmental program and that establishment of the QC is required for maintenance of the meristem and indeterminate root growth in plants.

  7. Gene expression heterogeneities in embryonic stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Brickman, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are populations of cells that retain the capacity to populate specific lineages and to transit this capacity through cell division. However, attempts to define markers for stem cells have met with limited success. Here we consider whether this limited success reflects...... an intrinsic requirement for heterogeneity with stem cell populations. We focus on Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, in vitro derived cell lines from the early embryo that are considered both pluripotent (able to generate all the lineages of the future embryo) and indefinitely self renewing. We examine the relevance...... of recently reported heterogeneities in ES cells and whether these heterogeneities themselves are inherent requirements of functional potency and self renewal....

  8. Response of Quiescent Cerebral Cortical Astrocytes to Nanofibrillar Scaffold Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Virginia; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Xie, Kan; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I.

    2013-03-01

    We present results of an investigation to examine the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger specific signaling cascades with morphological consequences. Differences in the morphological responses of quiescent cerebral cortical astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar matrices versus poly-L-lysine functionalized glass and Aclar, and unfunctionalized Aclar surfaces were demonstrated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and phalloidin staining of F-actin. The differences and similarities of the morphological responses were consistent with differences and similarities of the surface polarity and surface roughness of the four surfaces investigated in this work, characterized using contact angle and AFM measurements. The three-dimensional capability of AFM was also used to identify differences in cell spreading. An initial quantitative immunolabeling study further identified significant differences in the activation of the Rho GTPases: Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA, which are upstream regulators of the observed morphological responses: filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  9. The assembly histories of quiescent galaxies since z = 0.7 from absorption line spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12110 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Holden, Bradford P. [UCO/Lick Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brown, Michael J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present results from modeling the optical spectra of a large sample of quiescent galaxies between 0.1 < z < 0.7 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We examine how the stellar ages and abundance patterns of galaxies evolve over time as a function of stellar mass from 10{sup 9.6}-10{sup 11.8} M {sub ☉}. Galaxy spectra are stacked in bins of mass and redshift and modeled over a wavelength range from 4000 Å to 5500 Å. Full spectrum stellar population synthesis modeling provides estimates of the age and the abundances of the elements Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca. We find negligible evolution in elemental abundances at fixed stellar mass over roughly 7 Gyr of cosmic time. In addition, the increase in stellar ages with time for massive galaxies is consistent with passive evolution since z = 0.7. Taken together, these results favor a scenario in which the inner ∼0.3-3 R {sub e} of massive quiescent galaxies have been passively evolving over the last half of cosmic time. Interestingly, the derived stellar ages are considerably younger than the age of the universe at all epochs, consistent with an equivalent single-burst star formation epoch of z ≲ 1.5. These young stellar population ages coupled with the existence of massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 indicate the inhomogeneous nature of the z ≲ 0.7 quiescent population. The data also permit the addition of newly quenched galaxies at masses below ∼10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} at z < 0.7. Additionally, we analyze very deep Keck DEIMOS spectra of the two brightest quiescent galaxies in a cluster at z = 0.83. There is tentative evidence that these galaxies are older than their counterparts in low-density environments. In the Appendix, we demonstrate that our full spectrum modeling technique allows for accurate and reliable modeling of galaxy spectra to low S/N (∼20 Å{sup –1}) and/or low spectral resolution (R ∼ 500).

  10. Distinct transcriptional networks in quiescent myoblasts: a role for Wnt signaling in reversible vs. irreversible arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sindhu; Sreenivas, Prethish; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Reddy, Vatrapu Rami; Shashidhara, Lingadahalli Subrahmanya; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Mylavarapu, Madhavi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Most cells in adult mammals are non-dividing: differentiated cells exit the cell cycle permanently, but stem cells exist in a state of reversible arrest called quiescence. In damaged skeletal muscle, quiescent satellite stem cells re-enter the cell cycle, proliferate and subsequently execute divergent programs to regenerate both post-mitotic myofibers and quiescent stem cells. The molecular basis for these alternative programs of arrest is poorly understood. In this study, we used an established myogenic culture model (C2C12 myoblasts) to generate cells in alternative states of arrest and investigate their global transcriptional profiles. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared G0 myoblasts with post-mitotic myotubes. Our findings define the transcriptional program of quiescent myoblasts in culture and establish that distinct gene expression profiles, especially of tumour suppressor genes and inhibitors of differentiation characterize reversible arrest, distinguishing this state from irreversibly arrested myotubes. We also reveal the existence of a tissue-specific quiescence program by comparing G0 C2C12 myoblasts to isogenic G0 fibroblasts (10T1/2). Intriguingly, in myoblasts but not fibroblasts, quiescence is associated with a signature of Wnt pathway genes. We provide evidence that different levels of signaling via the canonical Wnt pathway characterize distinct cellular states (proliferation vs. quiescence vs. differentiation). Moderate induction of Wnt signaling in quiescence is associated with critical properties such as clonogenic self-renewal. Exogenous Wnt treatment subverts the quiescence program and negatively affects clonogenicity. Finally, we identify two new quiescence-induced regulators of canonical Wnt signaling, Rgs2 and Dkk3, whose induction in G0 is required for clonogenic self-renewal. These results support the concept that active signal-mediated regulation of quiescence contributes to stem cell properties, and have implications for pathological

  11. Discovery of Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts in DEEP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancato, Kirsten; Chilingarian, Igor; Damjanov, Ivana; Moran, Sean; Katkov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Compact quiescent galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 histories of these objects from the high redshift z ≥ 2 Universe to the local z ~ 0 Universe. We identify the first intermediate redshift compact quiescent galaxies by searching a sample of 1,089 objects in the DEEP2 Redshift Survey that have multi-band photometry, spectral fitting, and readily available structural parameters. We find 27 compact quiescent candidates between z = 0.6 and z = 1.1 where each candidate galaxy has archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and is visually confirmed to be early-type. The candidates have half-light radii ranging from 0.83 2 which suggests these objects may be the relics of the observed high redshift compact galaxies and formation at z ≤ 2 which suggests there is an additional population of more recently formed massive compact galaxies. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. The Ultraviolet Spectral Energy Distributions of Quiescent Black Holes and Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, R. I.; Robinson, E. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys ultraviolet photometry of three quiescent black hole X-ray transients, X-ray Nova Muscae 1991 (GU Mus), GRO J0422+32 (V518 Per), and X-ray Nova Vel 1993 (MM Vel), and one neutron star system, Aql X-1. These are the first quiescent UV detections of these objects. All are detected at a much higher level than expected from their companion stars alone and are significant detections of the accretion flow. Three of the four UV excesses can be characterized by a blackbody of temperature 5000-13, 000 K, hotter than expected for the quiescent outer disk. A good fit could not be found for MM Vel. The source of the blackbody-like emission is most likely a heated region of the inner disk. Contrary to initial indications from spectroscopy, there does not appear to be a systematic difference in the UV luminosity or spectral shape between black holes and neutron star systems. However, combining our new data with earlier spectroscopy and published X-ray luminosities, there is a significant difference in the X-ray to UV flux ratios, with the neutron stars exhibiting L X/L UV about 10 times higher than the black hole systems. This is consistent with earlier comparisons based on estimating non-stellar optical light, but since both bandpasses we use are expected to be dominated by accretion light, we present a cleaner comparison. This suggests that the difference in X-ray luminosities cannot simply reflect differences in quiescent accretion rates and so the UV/X-ray ratio is a more robust discriminator between the black hole and neutron star populations than the comparison of X-ray luminosities alone.

  13. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  14. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  15. Three maize root-specific genes are not correctly expressed in regenerated caps in the absence of the quiescent center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, G; Luján, R; Campos, M E; Reyes, A; Nieto-Sotelo, J; Feldman, L J; Cassab, G I

    2000-06-01

    The quiescent center is viewed as an architectural template in the root apical meristem of all angiosperm and gymnosperm root tips. In roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the quiescent center inhibits differentiation of contacting initial cells and maintains the surrounding initial cells as stem cells. Here, the role of the quiescent center in the development of the maize (Zeca mays L.) root cap has been further explored. Three maize root-specific genes were identified. Two of these were exclusively expressed in the root cap and one of them encoded a GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase. Most likely these two genes are structural, tissue-specific markers of the cap. The third gene, a putative glycine-rich cell wall protein, was expressed in the cap and in the root epidermis and, conceivably is a positional marker of the cap. Microsurgical and molecular data indicate that the quiescent center and cap initials may regulate the positional and structural expression of these genes in the cap and thereby control root cap development.

  16. On interfaces between cell populations with different mobilities

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzi, Tommaso

    2016-11-18

    Partial differential equations describing the dynamics of cell population densities from a fluid mechanical perspective can model the growth of avascular tumours. In this framework, we consider a system of equations that describes the interaction between a population of dividing cells and a population of non-dividing cells. The two cell populations are characterised by different mobilities. We present the results of numerical simulations displaying two-dimensional spherical waves with sharp interfaces between dividing and non-dividing cells. Furthermore, we numerically observe how different ratios between the mobilities change the morphology of the interfaces, and lead to the emergence of finger-like patterns of invasion above a threshold. Motivated by these simulations, we study the existence of one-dimensional travelling wave solutions.

  17. A focus on parietal cells as a renewing cell population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherif; M; Karam

    2010-01-01

    The fact that the acidsecreting parietal cells undergo continuous renewal has been ignored by many gastroenterologists and cell biologists. In the past, it was thought that these cells were static. However, by using 3Hthymidine radioautography in combination with electron microscopy, it was possible to demonstrate that parietal cells belong to a continuously renewing epithelial cell lineage. In the gastric glands, stem cells anchored in the isthmus region are responsible for the production of parietal cells...

  18. Controlling the diversity of cell populations in a stem cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  19. Controlling the diversity of cell populations in a stem cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  20. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorz, Alexander; Larsen, Annette K.; de Almeida, Luís Neves; Escargueil, Alexandre; Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  1. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan, CNRS, Cachan 94230 Cedex, France & INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Chisholm, Rebecca H. [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Lorz, Alexander; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Clairambault, Jean [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, F-75005, Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 938, Laboratory of “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, F-75012, Paris (France)

    2016-06-08

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  2. Spatial Damping of Linear Compressional Magnetoacoustic Waves in Quiescent Prominences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. A. P. Singh

    2006-06-01

    We study the spatial damping of magnetoacoustic waves in an unbounded quiescent prominence invoking the technique of MHD seismology. We consider Newtonian radiation in the energy equation and derive a fourth order general dispersion relation in terms of wavenumber . Numerical solution of dispersion relation suggests that slow mode is more affected by radiation. The high frequency waves have been found to be highly damped. The uncertainty in the radiative relaxation time, however, does not allow us to conclude if the radiation is a dominant damping mechanism in quiescent prominence.

  3. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, Tom E. C.; Faas, Marijke M.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Prins, Jelmer R.

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the

  4. Concise Review: Stem Cell Population Biology: Insights from Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Adam L; Lo Celso, Cristina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to human life and offer great therapeutic potential, yet their biology remains incompletely-or in cases even poorly-understood. The field of stem cell biology has grown substantially in recent years due to a combination of experimental and theoretical contributions: the experimental branch of this work provides data in an ever-increasing number of dimensions, while the theoretical branch seeks to determine suitable models of the fundamental stem cell processes that these data describe. The application of population dynamics to biology is amongst the oldest applications of mathematics to biology, and the population dynamics perspective continues to offer much today. Here we describe the impact that such a perspective has made in the field of stem cell biology. Using hematopoietic stem cells as our model system, we discuss the approaches that have been used to study their key properties, such as capacity for self-renewal, differentiation, and cell fate lineage choice. We will also discuss the relevance of population dynamics in models of stem cells and cancer, where competition naturally emerges as an influential factor on the temporal evolution of cell populations. Stem Cells 2017;35:80-88. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell lines derived from the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Fu FANG; Fan JIN; Hui GAI; Ying CHEN; Li WU; Ai Lian LIU; Bin CHEN; Hui Zhen SHENG

    2005-01-01

    Six human embryonic stem cell lines were established from surplus blastocysts. The cell lines expressed alkaline phosphatase and molecules typical of primate embryonic stem cells, including Oct-4, Nanog, TDGF1, Sox2, EBAF,Thy-1, FGF4, Rex-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Five of the six lines formed embryoid bodies that expressed markers of a variety of cell types; four of them formed teratomas with tissue types representative of all three embryonic germ layers. These human embryonic stem cells are capable of producing clones of undifferentiated morphology, and one of them was propagated to become a subline. Human embryonic stem cell lines from the Chinese population should facilitate stem cell research and may be valuable in studies of population genetics and ecology.

  7. Suppressing star formation in quiescent galaxies with supermassive black hole winds

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Edmond; Bundy, Kevin; Cappellari, Michele; Peirani, Sébastien; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Renbin; Bershady, Matthew; Greene, Jenny E.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Masters, Karen L.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by the Nature Publishing Group. Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the galaxy population above M∗ ∼ 2×10^10 M , where their numbers have increased by a factor of ∼ 25 since z ∼ 2. Once star formation is initially shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat subseq...

  8. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  9. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzi Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate an individual-based model and an integro-differential model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  10. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that t

  11. Distinct types of glial cells populate the Drosophila antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhaveri Dhanisha

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of nervous systems involves reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia. In the Drosophila olfactory system, peripheral glial cells arise from sensory lineages specified by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Atonal. These glia wrap around the developing olfactory axons early during development and pattern the three distinct fascicles as they exit the antenna. In the moth Manduca sexta, an additional set of central glia migrate to the base of the antennal nerve where axons sort to their glomerular targets. In this work, we have investigated whether similar types of cells exist in the Drosophila antenna. Results We have used different P(Gal4 lines to drive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP in distinct populations of cells within the Drosophila antenna. Mz317::GFP, a marker for cell body and perineural glia, labels the majority of peripheral glia. An additional ~30 glial cells detected by GH146::GFP do not derive from any of the sensory lineages and appear to migrate into the antenna from the brain. Their appearance in the third antennal segment is regulated by normal function of the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor and small GTPases. We denote these distinct populations of cells as Mz317-glia and GH146-glia respectively. In the adult, processes of GH146-glial cells ensheath the olfactory receptor neurons directly, while those of the Mz317-glia form a peripheral layer. Ablation of GH146-glia does not result in any significant effects on the patterning of the olfactory receptor axons. Conclusion We have demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct populations of glial cells within the Drosophila antenna. GH146-glial cells originate in the brain and migrate to the antenna along the newly formed olfactory axons. The number of cells populating the third segment of the antenna is regulated by signaling through the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor. These glia share several features of the sorting

  12. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  13. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    CERN Document Server

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age velocity dispersion relation of the Solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that ...

  14. Fundamental limits to collective concentration sensing in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Fancher, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a tradeoff between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that autocrine signaling allows more precise sensing than juxtacrine signaling for sufficiently large populations. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  15. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  16. A massive, quiescent galaxy at a redshift of 3.717

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazebrook, Karl; Schreiber, Corentin; Labbé, Ivo; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Oesch, Pascal A.; Papovich, Casey; Spitler, Lee R.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2017-04-01

    Finding massive galaxies that stopped forming stars in the early Universe presents an observational challenge because their rest-frame ultraviolet emission is negligible and they can only be reliably identified by extremely deep near-infrared surveys. These surveys have revealed the presence of massive, quiescent early-type galaxies appearing as early as redshift z ≈ 2, an epoch three billion years after the Big Bang. Their age and formation processes have now been explained by an improved generation of galaxy-formation models, in which they form rapidly at z ≈ 3-4, consistent with the typical masses and ages derived from their observations. Deeper surveys have reported evidence for populations of massive, quiescent galaxies at even higher redshifts and earlier times, using coarsely sampled photometry. However, these early, massive, quiescent galaxies are not predicted by the latest generation of theoretical models. Here we report the spectroscopic confirmation of one such galaxy at redshift z = 3.717, with a stellar mass of 1.7 × 1011 solar masses. We derive its age to be nearly half the age of the Universe at this redshift and the absorption line spectrum shows no current star formation. These observations demonstrate that the galaxy must have formed the majority of its stars quickly, within the first billion years of cosmic history in a short, extreme starburst. This ancestral starburst appears similar to those being found by submillimetre-wavelength surveys. The early formation of such massive systems implies that our picture of early galaxy assembly requires substantial revision.

  17. A probabilistic model for cell population phenotyping using HCS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Pauwels

    Full Text Available High Content Screening (HCS platforms allow screening living cells under a wide range of experimental conditions and give access to a whole panel of cellular responses to a specific treatment. The outcome is a series of cell population images. Within these images, the heterogeneity of cellular response to the same treatment leads to a whole range of observed values for the recorded cellular features. Consequently, it is difficult to compare and interpret experiments. Moreover, the definition of phenotypic classes at a cell population level remains an open question, although this would ease experiments analyses. In the present work, we tackle these two questions. The input of the method is a series of cell population images for which segmentation and cellular phenotype classification has already been performed. We propose a probabilistic model to represent and later compare cell populations. The model is able to fully exploit the HCS-specific information: "dependence structure of population descriptors" and "within-population variability". The experiments we carried out illustrate how our model accounts for this specific information, as well as the fact that the model benefits from considering them. We underline that these features allow richer HCS data analysis than simpler methods based on single cellular feature values averaged over each well. We validate an HCS data analysis method based on control experiments. It accounts for HCS specificities that were not taken into account by previous methods but have a sound biological meaning. Biological validation of previously unknown outputs of the method constitutes a future line of work.

  18. The evolution of star formation histories of quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pacifici, Camilla; Weiner, Benjamin J; Holden, Bradford; Gardner, Jonathan P; Faber, Sandra M; Ferguson, Henry C; Koo, David C; Primack, Joel R; Bell, Eric F; Dekel, Avishai; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Rafelski, Marc; Simons, Raymond C; Barro, Guillermo; Croton, Darren J; Dave, Romeel; Fontana, Adriano; Grogin, Norman A; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lee, Seong-Kook; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel; Behroozi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been much progress in understanding how galaxies evolve, we still do not understand how and when they stop forming stars and become quiescent. We address this by applying our galaxy spectral energy distribution models, which incorporate physically motivated star formation histories (SFHs) from cosmological simulations, to a sample of quiescent galaxies at $0.2quiescent galaxies with multi-band photometry spanning rest-frame ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths are selected from the CANDELS dataset. We compute median SFHs of these galaxies in bins of stellar mass and redshift. At all redshifts and stellar masses, the median SFHs rise, reach a peak, and then decline to reach quiescence. At high redshift, we find that the rise and decline are fast, as expected because the Universe is young. At low redshift, the duration of these phases depends strongly on stellar mass. Low-mass galaxies ($\\log(M_{\\ast}/M_{\\odot})\\sim9.5$) grow on average slowly, take a lo...

  19. Human lymphocyte sub-populations and K cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, G; Gray, K; Cooney, A; Froebel, K; Anderson, J R

    1976-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 19 normal subjects were examined for surface Ig (SIg) and capacity to form rosettes with normal and neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes and with chicken erythrocytes sensitised with IgG antibody. Information on the relationship between the presence of SIg and capacity to form rosettes was obtained by combined tests and depletion experiments. By these means, a population of lymphocytes with Fc receptors, but lacking SIg (mean 14.6%) was defined and shown to correlate closely with cytotoxic activity for antibody-sensitised target cells. Indirect evidence was also obtained that these lymphocytes, which are regarded as the major population of antibody-dependent cytotoxic cells, are capable of forming rosettes with normal and neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes. The nature of these cells is briefly discussed.

  20. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  1. Quiescent Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) as Cosmic Chronometers: on the Significance of the Mass and Environmental Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Gaochao; Xie, Lizhi; Chen, Xuelei; Zhao, Yongheng

    2016-01-01

    Massive luminous red galaxies (LRGs) are believed to be evolving passively and can be used as cosmic chronometers to estimate the Hubble constant. However, different LRGs may locate in different environments. The environmental effects may limit the use of the LRGs as cosmic chronometers. We aim to investigate the environmental and mass dependence of the formation of "quiescent" LRGs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Date Release 8 and to pave the way for using the LRGs as cosmic chronometers. Using the population synthesis software STARLIGHT, we derive the stellar populations in each LRG through the full spectrum fitting and obtain the mean age distribution and the mean star formation history (SFH) of those LRGs. We find that there is no apparent dependence of the mean age and the SFH of quiescent LRGs on their environment, while the ages of those quiescent LRGs weakly depend on their mass. We compare the SFHs of the SDSS LRGs with those obtained from a semi-analytical galaxy formation model, and fin...

  2. The evolution of the stellar mass functions of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/ultraVISTA survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzzin, Adam; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefano, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 Ks -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stella...

  3. Unmasking Chaotic Attributes in Time Series of Living Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michel; Deschatrette, Jean; Wolfrom, Claire M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-range oscillations of the mammalian cell proliferation rate are commonly observed both in vivo and in vitro. Such complicated dynamics are generally the result of a combination of stochastic events and deterministic regulation. Assessing the role, if any, of chaotic regulation is difficult. However, unmasking chaotic dynamics is essential for analysis of cellular processes related to proliferation rate, including metabolic activity, telomere homeostasis, gene expression, and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a simple, original, nonlinear method based on return maps, we previously found a geometrical deterministic structure coordinating such fluctuations in populations of various cell types. However, nonlinearity and determinism are only necessary conditions for chaos; they do not by themselves constitute a proof of chaotic dynamics. Therefore, we used the same analytical method to analyze the oscillations of four well-known, low-dimensional, chaotic oscillators, originally designed in diverse settings and all possibly well-adapted to model the fluctuations of cell populations: the Lorenz, Rössler, Verhulst and Duffing oscillators. All four systems also display this geometrical structure, coordinating the oscillations of one or two variables of the oscillator. No such structure could be observed in periodic or stochastic fluctuations. Conclusion/Significance Theoretical models predict various cell population dynamics, from stable through periodically oscillating to a chaotic regime. Periodic and stochastic fluctuations were first described long ago in various mammalian cells, but by contrast, chaotic regulation had not previously been evidenced. The findings with our nonlinear geometrical approach are entirely consistent with the notion that fluctuations of cell populations can be chaotically controlled. PMID:20179755

  4. Unmasking chaotic attributes in time series of living cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Laurent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-range oscillations of the mammalian cell proliferation rate are commonly observed both in vivo and in vitro. Such complicated dynamics are generally the result of a combination of stochastic events and deterministic regulation. Assessing the role, if any, of chaotic regulation is difficult. However, unmasking chaotic dynamics is essential for analysis of cellular processes related to proliferation rate, including metabolic activity, telomere homeostasis, gene expression, and tumor growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple, original, nonlinear method based on return maps, we previously found a geometrical deterministic structure coordinating such fluctuations in populations of various cell types. However, nonlinearity and determinism are only necessary conditions for chaos; they do not by themselves constitute a proof of chaotic dynamics. Therefore, we used the same analytical method to analyze the oscillations of four well-known, low-dimensional, chaotic oscillators, originally designed in diverse settings and all possibly well-adapted to model the fluctuations of cell populations: the Lorenz, Rössler, Verhulst and Duffing oscillators. All four systems also display this geometrical structure, coordinating the oscillations of one or two variables of the oscillator. No such structure could be observed in periodic or stochastic fluctuations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Theoretical models predict various cell population dynamics, from stable through periodically oscillating to a chaotic regime. Periodic and stochastic fluctuations were first described long ago in various mammalian cells, but by contrast, chaotic regulation had not previously been evidenced. The findings with our nonlinear geometrical approach are entirely consistent with the notion that fluctuations of cell populations can be chaotically controlled.

  5. Accretion and nuclear activity of quiescent supermassive black holes. II: optical study and interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, R; Fabbiano, G; Baldi, A; Elvis, M; Jerjen, H; Pellegrini, S; Siemiginowska, A; Soria, Roberto; Graham, Alister W.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Baldi, Alessandro; Elvis, Martin; Jerjen, Helmut; Pellegrini, Silvia; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2006-01-01

    Our X-ray study of the nuclear activity in a new sample of six quiescent early-type galaxies, and in a larger sample from the literature, confirmed (Soria et al., Paper I) that the Bondi accretion rate of diffuse hot gas is not a good indicator of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) X-ray luminosity. Here we suggest that a more reliable estimate of the accretion rate must include the gas released by the stellar population inside the sphere of influence of the SMBH, in addition to the Bondi inflow of hot gas across that surface. We use optical surface-brightness profiles to estimate the mass-loss rate from stars in the nuclear region: we show that for our sample of galaxies it is an order of magnitude higher (~ 10^{-4} - 10^{-3} M_sun/yr) than the Bondi inflow rate of hot gas, as estimated from Chandra (Paper I). Only by taking into account both sources of fuel can we constrain the true accretion rate, the accretion efficiency, and the power budget. Radiatively efficient accretion is ruled out, for quiescent SM...

  6. Timing the Evolution of Quiescent and Star-forming Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Oh, Sree; Oh, Kyuseok; Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-06-01

    Constraining the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that regulate their evolution. Here, we combine multi-wavelength (ultraviolet, optical, and infrared) measurements of a very large sample of galaxies (˜230,000) at z motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to extract constraints on galaxy physical parameters (such as stellar mass and star formation rate) as well as individual SFHs. In particular, we set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form a certain percentage of their total stellar mass (namely, 10%, 50%, and 90%). The large statistics allows us to average such measurements over different populations of galaxies (quiescent and star-forming) and in narrow ranges of stellar mass. As in the downsizing scenario, we confirm that low-mass galaxies have more extended SFHs than high-mass galaxies. We also find that at the same observed stellar mass, galaxies that are now quiescent evolve more rapidly than galaxies that are currently still forming stars. This suggests that stellar mass is not the only driver of galaxy evolution, but plays along with other factors such as merger events and other environmental effects.

  7. The Fundamental Plane of massive quiescent galaxies out to z~2

    CERN Document Server

    van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Bezanson, Rachel; van Dokkum, Pieter G

    2014-01-01

    The Fundamental Plane (FP) of early-type galaxies, relating the effective radius, velocity dispersion, and surface brightness, has long been recognized as a unique tool for analyzing galaxy structure and evolution. With the discovery of distant quiescent galaxies and the introduction of high sensitivity near-infrared spectrographs, it is now possible to explore the FP out to z~2. In this Letter we study the evolution of the FP out to z~2 using kinematic measurements of massive quiescent galaxies ($M_{*}>10^{11} M_{\\odot}$). We find preliminary evidence for the existence of an FP out to z~2. The scatter of the FP, however, increases from z~0 to z~2, even when taking into account the larger measurement uncertainties at higher redshifts. We find a strong evolution of the zero point from z~2 to z~0: $\\Delta\\log_{10}M/L_g\\propto(-0.49\\pm0.03)~z$. In order to assess whether our spectroscopic sample is representative of the early-type galaxy population at all redshifts, we compare their rest-frame g-z colors with th...

  8. Timing the evolution of quiescent and star-forming local galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pacifici, Camilla; Oh, Kyuseok; Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies is crucial to understanding the mechanisms that regulate their evolution. Here, we combine multi-wavelength (ultraviolet, optical, and infrared) measurements of a very large sample of galaxies (~230,000) at z<0.16, with physically motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to extract constraints on galaxy physical parameters (such as stellar mass and star formation rate) as well as individual SFHs. In particular, we set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form a certain percentage of their total stellar mass (namely, 10, 50 and 90%). The large statistics allows us to average such measurements over different populations of galaxies (quiescent and star-forming) and in narrow ranges of stellar mass. As in the downsizing scenario, we confirm that low-mass galaxies have more extended SFHs than high-mass galaxies. We also find that at the same observed stellar mass, galaxies that are now quiescent evolve more rapidl...

  9. Identification of a population of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma cells with enhanced potential for tumor formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Adhikary

    Full Text Available Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is among the most common cancers in humans. These tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of cells that display varying potential for proliferation and differentiation. An important goal is identifying cells from this population that drive tumor formation. To enrich for tumor-forming cells, cancer cells were grown as spheroids in non-attached conditions. We show that spheroid-selected cells form faster growing and larger tumors in immune-compromised mice as compared to non-selected cells. Moreover, spheroid-selected cells gave rise to tumors following injection of as few as one hundred cells, suggesting these cells have enhanced tumor-forming potential. Cells isolated from spheroid-selected tumors retain an enhanced ability to grow as spheroids when grown in non-attached culture conditions. Thus, these tumor-forming cells retain their phenotype following in vivo passage as tumors. Detailed analysis reveals that spheroid-selected cultures are highly enriched for expression of epidermal stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, keratin 15, CD200, keratin 19, Oct4, Bmi-1, Ezh2 and trimethylated histone H3. These studies indicate that a subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like properties and express stem cell markers can be derived from human epidermal cancer cells and that these cells display enhanced ability to drive tumor formation.

  10. Reconstruction of endometrium from human endometrial side population cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available Endometrial regeneration is mediated, at least in part, by the existence of a specialized somatic stem cell (SSC population recently identified by several groups using the side population (SP technique. We previously demonstrated that endometrial SP displays genotypic, phenotypic and the functional capability to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. We have now established seven human endometrial SP (hESP cell lines (ICE 1-7: four from the epithelial and three from the stromal fraction, respectively. SP cell lines were generated under hypoxic conditions based on their cloning efficiency ability, cultured for 12-15 passages (20 weeks and cryopreserved. Cell lines displayed normal 46XX karyotype, intermediate telomerase activity pattern and expressed mRNAs encoding proteins that are considered characteristic of undifferentiated cells (Oct-4, GDF3, DNMT3B, Nanog, GABR3 and those of mesodermal origin (WT1, Cardiac Actin, Enolase, Globin, REN. Phenotype analysis corroborated their epithelial (CD9+ or stromal (vimentin+ cell origin and mesenchymal (CD90+, CD73+ and CD45⁻ attributes. Markers considered characteristic of ectoderm or endoderm were not detected. Cells did not express either estrogen receptor alpha (ERα or progesterone receptor (PR. The hESP cell lines were able to differentiate in vitro into adipocytes and osteocytes, which confirmed their mesenchymal origin. Finally, we demonstrated their ability to generate human endometrium when transplanted beneath the renal capsule of NOD-SCID mice. These findings confirm that SP cells exhibit key features of human endometrial SSC and open up new possibilities for the understanding of gynecological disorders such as endometriosis or Asherman syndrome. Our cell lines can be a valuable model to investigate new targets for endometrium proliferation in endometriosis.

  11. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model...... of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate......Despite traditionally regarded as identical, cells in a microbial cultivation present a distribution of phenotypic traits, forming a heterogeneous cell population. Moreover, the degree of heterogeneity is notably enhanced by changes in micro-environmental conditions. A major development...

  12. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Di Felice

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+ and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+ cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  13. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Felice, V; Zummo, G

    2013-05-09

    Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+) and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+)/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  14. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  15. Identification of side population cells in chicken embryonic gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, Elodie; Raucci, Franca; Montillet, Guillaume; Pain, Bertrand

    2015-02-01

    The side population (SP) phenotype, defined by the ability of a cell to efflux fluorescent dyes such as Hoechst, is common to several stem/progenitor cell types. In avian species, SP phenotype has been identified in pubertal and adult testes, but nothing is known about its expression during prenatal development of a male gonad. In this study, we characterized the Hoechst SP phenotype via the cytofluorimetric analysis of disaggregated testes on different days of chicken embryonic development. Male prenatal gonads contained a fraction of SP cells at each stage analyzed. At least two main SP fractions, named P3 and P4, were identified. The percentage of P3 fraction decreased as development proceeds, whereas P4 cell number was not affected by gonad growth. Functional inhibition of BCRP1 channel membrane using Verapamil and/or Ko143 showed that P3, but not P4 phenotype, was dependent on BCRP1 activity. Molecular analysis of both P3- and P4-sorted fractions revealed a differential RNA expression pattern, indicating that P3 cells mainly contained germinal stem cell markers, whereas P4 was preferentially composed of both Sertoli and Leydig cell progenitor markers. Finally, these findings provided evidence that the SP phenotype is a common feature of both germ and somatic cells detected in chicken developing testis.

  16. Compact E+A Galaxies as a Progenitor of Massive Compact Quiescent Galaxies at 0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zahid, H Jabran; Geller, Margaret J; Damjanov, Ivana; Chillingarian, Igor; Sohn, Jubee; Salmi, Fadia; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    We search the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey to identify ~5500 massive compact quiescent galaxy candidates at 0.2population ages and kinematics of galaxies in the sample and show that the physical properties of compact E+A galaxies suggest that they are a progenitor of massive compact quiescent galaxies. Thus, two separate classes of objects-compact E+A and compact quiescent galaxies-may be linked by a common evolutionary sequence. The typical stellar population age of compact E+A galaxies is <1 Gyr. The existence of compact E+A galaxies with young stellar populations at 0.2quiescent galaxies first appear at intermediate redshifts. We derive a lower limit for the number density of compact E+A galaxies. Assuming passive evolution, we convert this number density into an app...

  17. Mathematical determination of cell population doubling times for multiple cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukste, Liene; Basse, Britta; Baguley, Bruce C; Wall, David J N

    2012-10-01

    Cell cycle times are vital parameters in cancer research, and short cell cycle times are often related to poor survival of cancer patients. A method for experimental estimation of cell cycle times, or doubling times of cultured cancer cell populations, based on addition of paclitaxel (an inhibitor of cell division) has been proposed in literature. We use a mathematical model to investigate relationships between essential parameters of the cell division cycle following inhibition of cell division. The reduction in the number of cells engaged in DNA replication reaches a plateau as the concentration of paclitaxel is increased; this can be determined experimentally. From our model we have derived a plateau log reduction formula for proliferating cells and established that there are linear relationships between the plateau log reduction values and the reciprocal of doubling times (i.e. growth rates of the populations). We have therefore provided theoretical justification of an important experimental technique to determine cell doubling times. Furthermore, we have applied Monte Carlo experiments to justify the suggested linear relationships used to estimate doubling time from 5-day cell culture assays. We show that our results are applicable to cancer cell populations with cell loss present.

  18. Measles virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer into quiescent lymphocytes requires binding to both SLAM and CD46 entry receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecha, Cecilia; Lévy, Camille; Costa, Caroline; Nègre, Didier; Amirache, Fouzia; Buckland, Robin; Russell, Steven J; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer into quiescent T and B cells is of importance for gene therapy and immunotherapy approaches to correct hematopoietic disorders. Previously, we generated lentiviral vectors (LVs) pseudotyped with the Edmonston measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins (Hgps and Fgps) (H/F-LVs), which, for the first time, allowed efficient transduction of quiescent human B and T cells. These target cells express both MV entry receptors used by the vaccinal Edmonston strain, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Interestingly, LVs pseudotyped with an MV Hgp, blind for the CD46 binding site, were completely inefficient for resting-lymphocyte transduction. Similarly, SLAM-blind H mutants that recognize only CD46 as the entry receptor did not allow stable LV transduction of resting T cells. The CD46-tropic LVs accomplished vector-cell binding, fusion, entry, and reverse transcription at levels similar to those achieved by the H/F-LVs, but efficient proviral integration did not occur. Our results indicate that both CD46 and SLAM binding sites need to be present in cis in the Hgp to allow successful stable transduction of quiescent lymphocytes. Moreover, the entry mechanism utilized appears to be crucial: efficient transduction was observed only when CD46 and SLAM were correctly engaged and an entry mechanism that strongly resembles macropinocytosis was triggered. Taken together, our results suggest that although vector entry can occur through the CD46 receptor, SLAM binding and subsequent signaling are also required for efficient LV transduction of quiescent lymphocytes to occur.

  19. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre A. Nelson

    2013-04-01

    Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells; cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells; and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis.

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  1. Genome-wide Gene Expression Analysis of Mucosal Colonic Biopsies and Isolated Colonocytes Suggests a Continuous Inflammatory State in the Lamina Propria of Patients with Quiescent Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    colonocytes from UC patients and controls in order to identify the cell types responsible for the continuous inflammatory state. Methods: Adjacent mucosal colonic biopsies were obtained endoscopically from the descending colon in patients with active UC (n = 8), quiescent UC (n = 9), and with irritable bowel......Background: Genome-wide gene expression (GWGE) profiles of mucosal colonic biopsies have suggested the existence of a continuous inflammatory state in quiescent ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of this study was to use DNA microarray-based GWGE profiling of mucosal colonic biopsies and isolated...

  2. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszewski, Damian J.; Carolina Wählby; Jordi Carreras Puigvert; Ida-Maria Sintorn

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell mea...

  3. Fine structure and oscillations of a quiescent prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N.; Duchlev, P.; Rompolt, B.; Rudawy, P.

    Series of H_alpha spectra and slit-jaw H_alpha filtergrams of a quiescent prominence (QP) taken at Pic du Midi Observatory on 7 November 1977 are studied. The image processing of the H_alpha filtergrams reveals an internal structure of the prominence consisting of several arches. Series of high-resolution H_alpha spectra obtained with the slit located on selected parts of one of the prominence arches chosen for Doppler shift analysis. The prominence arch show cyclic displacement along the line-of-sight (L.O.S.) direction implying Alfven string-mode oscillations.

  4. Structure, internal motion and oscillation of a quiescent prominence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermendjiev, V. N.; Detchev, M.; Petrov, N.; Rompolt, B.

    Series of Hα spectra and slit-jaw Hα filtergrams of a quiescent prominence are studied. The prominence consists of several arches. One of the arches oscillates with a frequency ω = 3·10-4s and shows displacement of ±55.8 km in the line of sight direction. Its internal velocity variations are larger near the periphery of the arch. The sign and magnitude of the velocity depend strongly on the position along the slit. For interpretation of these results a model of secondary plasma flow generated by bending oscillation propagating along the arch is developed.

  5. Settling of an asymmetric dumbbell in a quiescent fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Candelier, F

    2015-01-01

    We compute the hydrodynamic torque on a dumbbell (two spheres linked by a massless rigid rod) settling in a quiescent fluid at small but finite Reynolds number. The spheres have the same mass densities but different sizes. When the sizes are quite different the dumbbell settles vertically, the largest sphere first. But when the size difference is sufficiently small then its steady-state angle is determined by a competition between the size difference and the Reynolds number. When the sizes of the spheres are exactly equal we recover a result derived by Khayat & Cox (1989) for slender bodies: the dumbbell settles horizontally owing to fluid inertia effects.

  6. Stellar Velocity Dispersion for a Strongly-Lensed, Intermediate-Mass Quiescent Galaxy at z=2.8

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Allison R; Franx, Marijn; van de Sande, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Measuring stellar velocity dispersions of quiescent galaxies beyond $z\\sim2$ is observationally challenging. Such measurements require near-infrared spectra with a continuum detection of at least moderate signal-to-noise, often necessitating long integrations. In this paper, we present deep X-Shooter spectroscopy of one of only two known gravitationally-lensed massive quiescent galaxies at $z>2$. This galaxy is quadruply imaged, with the brightest images magnified by a factor of $\\sim5$. The total exposure time of our data is 9.8 hours on-source; however the magnification, and the slit placement encompassing 2 images, provides a total equivalent exposure time of 215 hours. From this deep spectrum we measure a redshift ($z_{\\mathrm{spec}}=2.756\\pm0.001$), making this one of the highest redshift quiescent galaxies that is spectroscopically confirmed. We simultaneously fit both the spectroscopic and photometric data to determine stellar population parameters and conclude this galaxy is relatively young, intermed...

  7. CANDELS+3D-HST: compact SFGs at z~2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Pacifici, C; Trump, J R; Koo, D C; Wuyts, S; Guo, Y; Bell, E; Dekel, A; Porter, L; Primack, J; Ferguson, H; Ashby, M; Caputi, K; Ceverino, D; Croton, D; Fazio, G; Giavalisco, M; Hsu, L; Kocevski, D; Koekemoer, A; Kurczynski, P; Kollipara, P; Lee, J; McIntosh, D; McGrath, E; Moody, C; Somerville, R; Papovich, C; Salvato, M; Santini, P; Williams, C C; Willner, S; Zolotov, A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either expon...

  8. Extracellular matrix stiffness modulates VEGF calcium signaling in endothelial cells: individual cell and population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derricks, Kelsey E; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    Vascular disease and its associated complications are the number one cause of death in the Western world. Both extracellular matrix stiffening and dysfunctional endothelial cells contribute to vascular disease. We examined endothelial cell calcium signaling in response to VEGF as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. We developed a new analytical tool to analyze both population based and individual cell responses. Endothelial cells on soft substrates, 4 kPa, were the most responsive to VEGF, whereas cells on the 125 kPa substrates exhibited an attenuated response. Magnitude of activation, not the quantity of cells responding or the number of local maximums each cell experienced distinguished the responses. Individual cell analysis, across all treatments, identified two unique cell clusters. One cluster, containing most of the cells, exhibited minimal or slow calcium release. The remaining cell cluster had a rapid, high magnitude VEGF activation that ultimately defined the population based average calcium response. Interestingly, at low doses of VEGF, the high responding cell cluster contained smaller cells on average, suggesting that cell shape and size may be indicative of VEGF-sensitive endothelial cells. This study provides a new analytical tool to quantitatively analyze individual cell signaling response kinetics, that we have used to help uncover outcomes that are hidden within the average. The ability to selectively identify highly VEGF responsive cells within a population may lead to a better understanding of the specific phenotypic characteristics that define cell responsiveness, which could provide new insight for the development of targeted anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies.

  9. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N.; McGinnis, Christopher S.; Zhou, Joseph X.; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or “tipping point” at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations. PMID:28167799

  10. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  11. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    the extracellular medium, thus reducing the complexity of the problem without sacrificing the biochemical realism. The parameters of the model can be derived by a systematic expansion from any full-scale model of the yeast cell kinetics with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Some parameter values can also......The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation...... be obtained directly from analysis of perturbation experiments. In the mean-field limit, equations for the study of populations having a distribution of frequencies are used to simulate the effect of the inherent variations between cells....

  12. Ices in the Quiescent IC 5146 Dense Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Chiar, J E; Allamandola, L J; Boogert, A C A; Ennico, K; Greene, T P; Geballe, T R; Keane, J V; Lada, C J; Mason, R E; Roellig, T L; Sandford, S A; Tielens, A G G M; Werner, M W; Whittet, D C B; Decin, L; Eriksson, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents spectra in the 2 to 20 micron range of quiescent cloud material located in the IC 5146 cloud complex. The spectra were obtained with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) SpeX instrument and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrometer. We use these spectra to investigate dust and ice absorption features in pristine regions of the cloud that are unaltered by embedded stars. We find that the H2O-ice threshold extinction is 4.03+/-0.05 mag. Once foreground extinction is taken into account, however, the threshold drops to 3.2 mag, equivalent to that found for the Taurus dark cloud, generally assumed to be the touchstone quiescent cloud against which all other dense cloud and embedded young stellar object observations are compared. Substructure in the trough of the silicate band for two sources is attributed to CH3OH and NH3 in the ices, present at the ~2% and ~5% levels, respectively, relative to H2O-ice. The correlation of the silicate feature with the E(J-K) color excess is found...

  13. The Fraction of Quiescent Massive Galaxies in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fontana, A; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Fiore, F; Castellano, M; Giallongo, E; Menci, N; Salimbeni, S; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to collect a complete, mass--selected sample of galaxies with very low specific star formation rate, for a comparison with the prediction of recent theoretical models. Method: We use the 24/K flux ratio, complemented by the SED fitting to the full 0.35-8.0 mum spectral distribution, to select quiescent galaxies from z~0.4 to z~4 in the GOODS--MUSIC sample. Our observational selection can be translated into thresholds on the specific star formation rate SFR/M_*, that can be used to compare with the theoretical predictions. Results: We find that, in the framework of the well known global decline of the quiescent fraction with redshift, a non-negligible fraction ~15-20% of massive galaxies with very low specific star formation rate exists up to z~4, including a tail of "Red&Dead" galaxies with SFR/M_*<10^{-11}/yr. Recent theoretical models vary to a large extent in the prediction of the fraction of galaxies with very low specific star formation rates, and are unable to provid...

  14. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, A. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Science, Northumbria University, Pandon Building, Camden Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Erdélyi, R., E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000 s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23 km s{sup –1}. The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7 mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency.

  15. Concise Review: Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Cells Are a Primitive Stromal Cell Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Deryl L.; Weiss, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Here, the literature was reviewed to evaluate whether a population of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from Wharton’s jelly cells (WJCs) is a primitive stromal population. A clear case can be made for WJCs as a stromal population since they display the characteristics of MSCs as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy; for example, they grow as adherent cells with mesenchymal morphology, they are self-renewing, they express cell surface markers displayed by MSCs, and they may be differentiated into bone, cartilage, adipose, muscle, and neural cells. Like other stromal cells, WJCs support the expansion of other stem cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells, are well-tolerated by the immune system, and they have the ability to home to tumors. In contrast to bone marrow MSCs, WJCs have greater expansion capability, faster growth in vitro, and may synthesize different cytokines. WJCs are therapeutic in several different pre-clinical animal models of human disease such as neurodegenerative disease, cancer, heart disease, etc. The preclinical work suggests that the WJCs are therapeutic via trophic rescue and immune modulation. In summary, WJCs meet the definition of MSCs. Since WJCs expand faster and to a greater extent than adult-derived MSCs, these findings suggest that WJCs are a primitive stromal cell population with therapeutic potential. Further work is needed to determine whether WJCs engraft long-term and display self-renewal and multipotency in vivo and, as such, demonstrate whether Wharton’s jelly cells are a true stem cell population. PMID:18065397

  16. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Matuszewski

    Full Text Available Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  17. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  18. Incidencia de infecciones quiescentes de Botrytis cinerea en flores y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MolinaG. Gilma Sandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Se aisló Botrytis cinerea de flores y frutos asintomáticos de mora de castilla ( Rubus glaucus Benth. en  seis estados fenológicos desde botón cerrado hasta fruto maduro. Estas infecciones quiescentes ocurrieron raramente en botones florales cerrados, pero cuando éstos abren las estructuras florales aparecen colonizadas. La alta frecuencia de infecciones quiescentes en frutos en desarrollo y frutos maduros es atribuible a infecciones tempranas en estructuras florales. Inoculaciones hechas con conidias de B. cinerea marcadas con calcofluor produjeron infecciones en todos los estados fenológicos; la germinación de conidias en los seis estados fenológicos se inició a las 10 horas después de

  19. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2......- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells that were labeled with different isotopes revealed cell-specific tyrosine phosphorylation events. Functional associations between these phosphotyrosine signaling networks and cell sorting were established with small interfering RNA screening. Data-driven network modeling...

  20. Clonal, self-renewing and differentiating human and porcine urothelial cells, a novel stem cell population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans M Larsson

    Full Text Available Although urothelial progenitor-like cells have been described in the human urinary tract, the existence of stem cells remains to be proven. Using a culture system that favors clonogenic epithelial cell growth, we evaluated and characterized clonal human urothelial cells. We isolated human urothelial cells that were clonogenic, capable of self-renewal and could develop into fully differentiated urothelium once re-implanted into the subcapsular space of nude mice. In addition to final urothelial cell differentiation, spontaneous formation of bladder-like microstructures was observed. By examining an epithelial stem cell signature marker, we found p63 to correlate with the self-renewal capacity of the isolated human urothelial clonal populations. Since a clinically relevant, long-term model for functional reconstitution of human cells does not exist, we sought to establish a culture method for porcine urothelial cells in a clinically relevant porcine model. We isolated cells from porcine ureter, urethra and bladder that were clonogenic and capable of self-renewal and differentiation into fully mature urothelium. In conclusion, we could isolate human and porcine cell populations, behaving as urothelial stem cells and showing clonogenicity, self-renewal and, once re-implanted, morphological differentiation.

  1. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation......, and consequently it cannot be addressed at the level of a single enzyme or a single chemical species. In this paper it is shown how this system in a CSTR (continuous flow stirred tank reactor) can be modelled quantitatively as a population of Stuart-Landau oscillators interacting by exchange of metabolites through...

  2. Spectral Distribution of Transport Operator Arising in Growing Cell Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport equation with partly smooth boundary conditions arising in growing cell populations is studied in Lp  (1

  3. Multi-population model of a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Escapa, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a multi-population dynamic model of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The model describes the growth and metabolic activity of fermentative, electricigenic, methanogenic acetoclastic, and methanogenic hydrogenophilic microorganisms and is capable of simulating hydrogen production in a MEC fed with complex organic matter, such as wastewater. The model parameters were estimated with the experimental results obtained in continuous flow MECs fed with acetate or synthetic wastewater. Following successful model validation with an independent data set, the model was used to analyze and discuss the influence of applied voltage and organic load on hydrogen production and COD removal.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs) has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods: Side population(SP) cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results: Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM) as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion: SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of

  5. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2010-01-01

    Objective:There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs)has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods:Side population(SP)cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS)was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results:Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM)as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion:SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of cancer stem

  6. Lattice Boltzmann method with the cell-population equilibrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Yang; Cheng Bing; Shi Bao-Chang

    2008-01-01

    The central problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is to construct a discrete equilibrium.In this paper,a multi-speed 1D cell-model of Boltzmann equation is proposed,in which the cell-population equilibrium,a direct nonnegative approximation to the continuous Maxwellian distribution,plays an important part.By applying the explicit one-order Chapman-Enskog distribution,the model reduces the transportation and collision,two basic evolution steps in LBM,to the transportation of the non-equilibrium distribution.Furthermore,1D dam-break problem is performed and the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions.

  7. Isolation of Side Population Cells and Detection of ABCG2 from SW480

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-guang; PAN Yi-fei; GUO Gui-long; HU Xiao-qu; HUANG Ka-te; ZHANG Xiao-hua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Side population cells (SP cells) are a new type of stem cells. They mainly express ABCG2/BCRP1 and have the ability to eliminate DNA dye Hoechst33342. Many studies showed that side population cells were able of self-renewal, differentiation and carcinogenesis in cancers. Our investigation aimed at isolation of side population cells and ABCG2 positive subpopulation from colon cancer cell line SW480 and identification of their characteristics of cancer stem cells. Methods: side population cells and non-side population cells of colon cancer cell line SW480 were isolated with DNA dye Hoechst33342 and their cell cycles were measured by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCG2 of SW480 was measured by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and its proportion was measured by flow cytometry. Results: SW480 contained 2.29% side population cells. The fraction of side population cells decreased greatly to 0.40% by treatment with verapamil. The fraction of side population cells in S-G2M cell cycle was 16.14%, which was much lower than the fraction (34.05%) of non-side population cells in S-G2M. In SW480, ABCG2 positive cells, which proportion was 9.66%, were small, circular or oval, lack of psuedopods, similar to poor differentiation. On the contrary, the ABCG2 negative cells were large, polygonal, with many psuedopods, similar to high differentiation. Conclusion: our assay identified that side population cells did exist in SW480 and had a quiescence characteristic of stem cells. ABCG2 positive subpopulation occupied about 9.66% of SW480 and may have the ability to promote cell self-renewal and inhibit cell differentiation. Therefore, to isolate ABCG2 positive subpopulation from side population cells may be an alternative to study colorectal cancer stem cells.

  8. [Th17 cells, a novel proinflammatory effector CD4 T cell population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Guerder, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    After more than 20 years of hegemony, the Th1-Th2 paradigm was recently shaken by the discovery of a novel population of CD4 effector T cells, the Th17 cells. Th17 effector cells produce IL-17 and IL-22 and thus have pro-inflammatory properties notably favoring neutrophils recruitment and thus control of extracellular bacteria mainly at the epithelium surface. Th17 cells appear also as the major inducer of organ specific autoimmune pathologies such as EAE or rheumatoid arthritis, a function previously attributed to Th1 effector cells. The discovery of Th17 cells further supports the notion that effector CD4 T cells responses are diverse in vivo and that fine tuning of these different effector cells is critical to maintain tissue integrity.

  9. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  10. Isolation of a mesenchymal cell population from murine dermis that contains progenitors of multiple cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigler, Lauren; Kazhanie, Amita; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Zakhari, Julia; Anders, Joanna; Taylor, Barbara; Virador, Victoria M

    2007-07-01

    The skin contains two known subpopulations of stem cells/epidermal progenitors: a basal keratinocyte population found in the interfollicular epithelium and cells residing in the bulge region of the hair follicle. The major role of the interfollicular basal keratinocyte population may be epidermal renewal, whereas the bulge population may only be activated and recruited to form a cutaneous epithelium in case of trauma. Using 3-dimensional cultures of murine skin under stress conditions in which only reserve epithelial cells would be expected to survive and expand, we demonstrate that a mesenchymal population resident in neonatal murine dermis has the unique potential to develop an epidermis in vitro. In monolayer culture, this dermal subpopulation has long-term survival capabilities in restricted serum and an inducible capacity to evolve into multiple cell lineages, both epithelial and mesenchymal, depending on culture conditions. When grafted subcutaneously, this dermal subpopulation gave rise to fusiform structures, reminiscent of disorganized muscle, that stained positive for smooth muscle actin and desmin; on typical epidermal grafts, abundant melanocytes appeared throughout the dermis that were not associated with hair follicles. The multipotential cells can be repeatedly isolated from neonatal murine dermis by a sequence of differential centrifugation and selective culture conditions. These results suggest that progenitors capable of epidermal differentiation exist in the mesenchymal compartment of an abundant tissue source and may have a function in mesenchymal-epithelial transition upon insult. Moreover, these cells could be available in sufficient quantities for lineage determination or tissue engineering applications.

  11. Dynamic equilibrium of reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quigley, John

    2010-12-01

    Clonal dominance in hematopoietic stem cell populations is an important question of interest but not one we can directly answer. Any estimates are based on indirect measurement. For marked populations, we can equate empirical and theoretical moments for binomial sampling, in particular we can use the well-known formula for the sampling variation of a binomial proportion. The empirical variance itself cannot always be reliably estimated and some caution is needed. We describe the difficulties here and identify ready solutions which only require appropriate use of variance-stabilizing transformations. From these we obtain estimators for the steady state, or dynamic equilibrium, of the number of hematopoietic stem cells involved in repopulating the marrow. The calculations themselves are not too involved. We give the distribution theory for the estimator as well as simple approximations for practical application. As an illustration, we rework on data recently gathered to address the question as to whether or not reconstitution of marrow grafts in the clinical setting might be considered to be oligoclonal.

  12. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  13. Single-cell protein dynamics reproduce universal fluctuations in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Rotella, James S; Salman, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Protein fluctuations in cell populations have recently been shown to exhibit a universal distribution shape under a broad range of biological realizations. Here, measuring protein content in individual bacteria continuously over ~70 generations, we show that single-cell trajectories fluctuate around their average with the same distribution shape as the population, i.e. their relative fluctuations are ergodic. Analysis of these temporal trajectories reveals that one effective random variable, sampled once each cell cycle, suffices to reconstruct the distribution from the trajectory. This in turn implies that cellular microscopic processes are strongly buffered and population-level protein distributions are insensitive to details of the intracellular dynamics. Probing them thus requires searching for novel universality-breaking experimental perturbations.

  14. Stability of nanofluids in quiescent and shear flow fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Haisheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An experimental study was conducted to investigate the structural stability of ethylene glycol-based titanium dioxide nanoparticle suspensions (nanofluids prepared by two-step method. The effects of particle concentration, fluid temperature, shear rate and shear duration were examined. Particle size and thermal conductivity measurements in quiescent state indicated the existence of aggregates and that they were stable in temperatures up to 60°C. Shear stability tests suggested that the structure of nanoparticle aggregates was stable in a shear interval of 500-3000 s-1 measured over a temperature range of 20-60°C. These findings show directions to resolve controversies surrounding the underlying mechanisms of thermal conduction and convective heat transfer of nanofluids.

  15. Volatilization of hydrogen sulfide from a quiescent surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cassia Feroni, Rita; Santos, Jane Meri; Reis, Neyval Costa

    2012-01-01

    Air-water mass transfer of hydrogen sulfide from a shallow tank with a quiescent surface under the influence of weak wind stress on the water surface was studied numerically using a two-dimensional model. The flow field in the tank was investigated using a computational code based on a finite volume, which is used to numerically solve momentum, mass and continuity conservation equations. The results show that water phase flow field is strongly dependent on the wind-induced surface velocity and the aspect ratio of the tank. Based on the numerical study, the liquid-side mass transfer coefficient is correlated with Reynolds number (R(e)), tank aspect ratio (AR) and Schmidt number (S(c)). Overall mass transfer coefficient (K(L)) values extend further downstream as the R(e) number increases.

  16. PHABULOSA controls the quiescent center-independent root meristem activities in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR and SCARECROW (SCR are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB, under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain.

  17. PHABULOSA controls the quiescent center-independent root meristem activities in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Jose; Ryu, Kook Hui; Zhou, Jing; Tarkowská, Danuše; Tarkowski, Petr; Cho, Young-Hee; Yoo, Sang-Dong; Kim, Eun-Sol; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-03-01

    Plant growth depends on stem cell niches in meristems. In the root apical meristem, the quiescent center (QC) cells form a niche together with the surrounding stem cells. Stem cells produce daughter cells that are displaced into a transit-amplifying (TA) domain of the root meristem. TA cells divide several times to provide cells for growth. SHORTROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of the stem cell niche. Cytokinin controls TA cell activities in a dose-dependent manner. Although the regulatory programs in each compartment of the root meristem have been identified, it is still unclear how they coordinate one another. Here, we investigate how PHABULOSA (PHB), under the posttranscriptional control of SHR and SCR, regulates TA cell activities. The root meristem and growth defects in shr or scr mutants were significantly recovered in the shr phb or scr phb double mutant, respectively. This rescue in root growth occurs in the absence of a QC. Conversely, when the modified PHB, which is highly resistant to microRNA, was expressed throughout the stele of the wild-type root meristem, root growth became very similar to that observed in the shr; however, the identity of the QC was unaffected. Interestingly, a moderate increase in PHB resulted in a root meristem phenotype similar to that observed following the application of high levels of cytokinin. Our protoplast assay and transgenic approach using ARR10 suggest that the depletion of TA cells by high PHB in the stele occurs via the repression of B-ARR activities. This regulatory mechanism seems to help to maintain the cytokinin homeostasis in the meristem. Taken together, our study suggests that PHB can dynamically regulate TA cell activities in a QC-independent manner, and that the SHR-PHB pathway enables a robust root growth system by coordinating the stem cell niche and TA domain.

  18. How Dead are Dead Galaxies? Mid-Infrared Fluxes of Quiescent Galaxies at Redshift 0.3Star Formation Rates and Dust Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; vanDokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; DaCunha, Elisabete; FoersterSchreiber, Natascha M.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 star formation rates for quiescent galaxies (sSFR approx. 10(exp -12)/yr. However, SED fitting can miss star formation if it is hidden behind high dust obscuration and ionizing radiation is re-emitted in the mid-infrared. It is therefore fundamental to measure the dust-obscured SFRs with a mid-IR indicator. We stack the MIPS-24 micron images of quiescent objects in five redshift bins centered on z = 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, 1.7, 2.2 and perform aperture photometry. Including direct 24 micron detections, we find sSFR approx. 10(exp -11.9) × (1 + z)(sup 4)/yr. These values are higher than those indicated by SED fitting, but at each redshift they are 20-40 times lower than those of typical star forming galaxies. The true SFRs of quiescent galaxies might be even lower, as we show that the mid-IR fluxes can be due to processes unrelated to ongoing star formation, such as cirrus dust heated by old stellar populations and circumstellar dust. Our measurements show that star formation quenching is very efficient at every redshift. The measured SFR values are at z > 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  19. Side Population Cells as Prototype of Chemoresistant, Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinitha Richard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classically, isolation of CSCs from tumors exploits the detection of cell surface markers associated with normal stem cells. Invariable expression of these cell surface markers in almost all proliferating tumor cells that albeit impart specific functionality, the universality, and clinical credibility of CSC phenotype based on markers is still dubious. Side Population (SP cells, as defined by Hoechst dye exclusion in flow cytometry, have been identified in many solid tumors and cell lines and the SP phenotype can be considered as an enriched source of stem cells as well as an alternative source for the isolation of cancer stem cells especially when molecular markers for stem cells are unknown. SP cells may be responsible for the maintenance and propagation of tumors and the proportion of SP cells may be a predictor of patient outcome. Several of these markers used in cell sorting have emerged as prognostic markers of disease progression though it is seen that the development of new CSC-targeted strategies is often hindered by poor understanding of their regulatory networks and functions. This review intends to appraise the experimental progress towards enhanced isolation and drug screening based on property of acquired chemoresistance of cancer stem cells.

  20. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  1. Sickle cell disease in the Kurdish population of northern Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Nerwey, Farida F; Al-Sayan, Galawezh O O; Al-Zebari, Sahima S M; Alshingaly, Awny A; Markous, Raji D; Jubrael, Jaladet M S; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that sickle cell disease patients are clustered in two geographical areas in Iraq, one among the Arabs in the extreme south, another among the Kurdish population in the extreme north, where they constitute major health problems. However, no studies have focused on the genotypes responsible for sickle cell disease or the β-globin gene haplotypes associated with it. For the latter purpose, a total of 103 unrelated Kurdish sickle cell disease patients were evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the sickle cell mutation, followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization for β- and α-thalassemia (β- and α-thal) mutations, whenever indicated. Results showed that the most common genotype was sickle cell anemia (68.0%) followed by Hb S/β(0)-thal and Hb S/β(+)-thal at frequencies of 24.2 and 7.8%, respectively. Eight β-thal mutations were associated with the latter two genotypes including: IVS-II-1 (G>A), IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 8 (-AA), codon 44 (-C), codon 22 (-7 bp), IVS-I-1 (G>A), codon 30 (G>C) and IVS-I-6 (T>C). In Hb SS patients, the -α(3.7) deletion was documented in 10.0% and was the only α-thal mutation detected. Furthermore, 5' β-globin gene cluster haplotyping of 128 β(S) chromosomes revealed that the most common haplotype seen in 69.5% was the Benin haplotype, followed by the Arab-Indian haplotype in 12.5%. These latter findings closely resemble reports from neighboring Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Mediterranean countries, suggesting a possible common origin, but are in contrast to findings from the Eastern Arabian Peninsula and Iran.

  2. Quiescent X-ray emission from Cen X-4: a variable thermal component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Cackett; E.F. Brown; J.M. Miller; R. Wijnands

    2010-01-01

    The nearby neutron star low-mass X-ray binary, Cen X-4, has been in a quiescent state since its last outburst in 1979. Typically, quiescent emission from these objects consists of thermal emission (presumably from the neutron star surface) with an additional hard power-law tail of unknown nature. Va

  3. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Glatman Zaretsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived plasma cells (PCs in the bone marrow (BM are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP+ cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  4. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Do [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won-Bong [Division of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong, E-mail: ghpark@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  5. Effect of Bcl-2 and Bax on survival of side population cells from hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the role and significance of side population (SP) cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatocarcinogenesis, development, relapse and metastasis, we simulated the denutrition conditions that cancer cells experience in clinical therapy, observed the different anti-apoptosis ability of SP cells and non-SP cells under such conditions, and established the possible effects of P53, Bcl-2 and Bax on survival of SP cells.METHODS: We used flow cytometry to analyze and sort the SP and non-SP cells in established HCC lines MHCC97and hHCC. We evaluated cell proliferation by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and investigated the expression of p53, bd-2 and bax genes during denutrition,by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining.RESULTS: The percentage of SP cells in the two established HCC lines was 0.25% and 0.5%, respectively.SP cells had greater anti-apoptosis and proliferation ability than non-SP cells. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in SP and non-SP cells differed during denutrition. The former was up-regulated in SP cells, and the latter was up-regulated in non-SP cells.CONCLUSION: It may be that different upstream molecules acted and led to different expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in these two cell lines. There was a direct relationship between up-regulation of Bcl-2 and down-regulation of Bax and higher anti-apoptosis ability in SP cells. It may be that the existence and activity of SP cells are partly responsible for some of the clinical phenomena which are seen in HCC, such as relapse or metastasis. Further research on SP cells may have potential applications in the field of anticancer therapy.

  6. Translokin (Cep57) interacts with cyclin D1 and prevents its nuclear accumulation in quiescent fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Miró, Maria; Colomina, Neus; Fernández, Rita M H; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 because of altered trafficking or degradation is thought to contribute directly to neoplastic transformation and growth. Mechanisms of cyclin D1 localization in S phase have been studied in detail, but its control during exit from the cell cycle and quiescence is poorly understood. Here we report that translokin (Tlk), a microtubule-associated protein also termed Cep57, interacts with cyclin D1 and controls its nucleocytoplasmic distribution in quiescent cells. Tlk binds to regions of cyclin D1 also involved in binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), and a fraction of cyclin D1 associates to the juxtanuclear Tlk network in the cell. Downregulation of Tlk levels results in undue nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 and increased Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB under quiescence conditions. In turn, overexpression of Tlk prevents proper cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus of proliferating cells in an interaction-dependent manner, inhibits Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB and hinders cell cycle progression to S phase. We propose that the Tlk acts as a key negative regulator in the pathway that drives nuclear import of cyclin D1, thus contributing to prevent pRB inactivation and to maintain cellular quiescence.

  7. Origin of the concept of the quiescent centre of plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Peter W

    2016-09-01

    Concepts in biology feed into general theories of growth, development and evolution of organisms and how they interact with the living and non-living components of their environment. A well-founded concept clarifies unsolved problems and serves as a focus for further research. One such example of a constructive concept in the plant sciences is that of the quiescent centre (QC). In anatomical terms, the QC is an inert group of cells maintained within the apex of plant roots. However, the evidence that established the presence of a QC accumulated only gradually, making use of strands of different types of observations, notably from geometrical-analytical anatomy, radioisotope labelling and autoradiography. In their turn, these strands contributed to other concepts: those of the mitotic cell cycle and of tissue-related cell kinetics. Another important concept to which the QC contributed was that of tissue homeostasis. The general principle of this last-mentioned concept is expressed by the QC in relation to the recovery of root growth following a disturbance to cell proliferation; the resulting activation of the QC provides new cells which not only repair the root meristem but also re-establish a new QC.

  8. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  9. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  10. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  11. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  12. Side population rather than CD133+ cells distinguishes enriched tumorigenicity in hTERT-immortalized primary prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Karen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subpopulations of cancer cells with the capacity of generating solid tumors have been characterized. In various cancer types, including prostate cancer cells, a side population (SP and CD133-expressing cells have been proposed as containing a population cancer cells with stem-like ability. Therefore the aim of this work was to determine, in prostate cancer cell lines, the frequency and tumorigenic potential of SP and CD133+ cells. Results In vitro 2D colony-forming assay and sphere-forming assay, Flow cytometry analysis and magnetic cell sorting were utilized to sort CD133+, CD133- and Side population (SP cells. Our findings indicate that CD44 and integrin α-6 are uniformly expressed in the hTERT cell lines; however, CD133 is expressed only in a small population (in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, for the hTERT cells, SP rather than CD133 expression showed an 8-fold enhanced tumorigenic potential. The data suggest that SP cells, rather than those with CD133 marker, contain the rare population of CSC capable of producing prostate tumors. Conclusion Collectively, our data suggest that although CD133 is expressed only in a small population of hTERT-immortalized prostate cancer cells, it is not likely to be associated with stem cells, as CD133- and CD133+ cells exhibited similar tumorigenicity. However, SP isolated cells, appear to be enriched with tumorigenic stem-like cells capable of generating palpable tumors.

  13. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  14. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Maher, Travis J.; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration. PMID:26573225

  15. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  16. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Mercedes B; Rossi, Lucas E; Peralta, Carlos M; Cabrera, Hugo N; Allevato, Miguel A; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2011-01-01

    The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA) is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ abTCR and gdTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-g secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease-induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi) remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples) as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis), premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis) and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  17. Quiescent and proliferative fibroblasts exhibit differential p300 HAT activation through control of 5-methoxytryptophan production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Hsuan Cheng

    Full Text Available Quiescent fibroblasts possess unique genetic program and exhibit high metabolic activity distinct from proliferative fibroblasts. In response to inflammatory stimulation, quiescent fibroblasts are more active in expressing cyclooxygenase-2 and other proinflammatory genes than proliferative fibroblasts. The underlying transcriptional mechanism is unclear. Here we show that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and cytokines increased p300 histone acetyltransferase activity to a higher magnitude (> 2 fold in quiescent fibroblasts than in proliferative fibroblasts. Binding of p300 to cyclooxygenase-2 promoter was reduced in proliferative fibroblasts. By ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer and enzyme-immunoassay, we found that production of 5-methoxytryptophan was 2-3 folds higher in proliferative fibroblasts than that in quiescent fibroblasts. Addition of 5-methoxytryptophan and its metabolic precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan, to quiescent fibroblasts suppressed PMA-induced p300 histone acetyltransferase activity and cyclooxygenase-2 expression to the level of proliferative fibroblasts. Silencing of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 or hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase in proliferative fibroblasts with siRNA resulted in elevation of PMA-induced p300 histone acetyltransferase activity to the level of that in quiescent fibroblasts, which was rescued by addition of 5-hydroxytryptophan or 5-methoxytryptophan. Our findings indicate that robust inflammatory gene expression in quiescent fibroblasts vs. proliferative fibroblasts is attributed to uncontrolled p300 histone acetyltransferase activation due to deficiency of 5-methoxytryptophan production. 5-methoxytryptophan thus is a potential valuable lead compound for new anti-inflammatory drug development.

  18. The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Functions of Star-Forming and Quiescent Galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Muzzin, Adam; Stefanon, Mauro; Franx, Marijn; McCracken, Henry J; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S; Fynbo, J P U; Fevre, Olivier Le; Brammer, Gabriel; Labbe, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95 675 galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. Sources have been selected from the DR1 UltraVISTA K_{s}-band imaging which covers a unique combination of a wide area (1.62 deg^2), to a significant depth (K_{s,tot} = 23.4). The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10% and 1% of its current value at z ~ 1.0, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing by 2.71^{+0.93}_{-0.22} dex since z = 3.5. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a nonzero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the K_{s}-selected star-forming galaxy SMFs to UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of ind...

  19. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  20. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  1. The Hβ Chromospheric Magnetic Field in a Quiescent Filament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We observed the line-of-sight magnetic field in the chromosphereandphotosphere of a large quiescent filament on the solar disk on September 6, 2001using the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope in Huairou Solar Observing Station. Thechromospheric and photospheric magnetograms together with Hβ filtergrams of thefilament were examined. The filament was located on the neutral line of the largescale longitudinal magnetic field in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Thelateral feet of the filament .were found to be related to magnetic structures with op-posite polarities. Two small lateral feet are linked to weak parasitic polarity. Thereis a negative magnetic structure in the photosphere under a break of the filament.At the location corresponding to the filament in the chromospheric magnetograms,the magnetic strength is found to be about 40-70 Gauss (measuring error about 39Gauss). The magnetic signal indicates the amplitude and orientation of the internalmagnetic field in the filament. We discuss several possible causes which may pro-duce such a measured signal. A twisted magnetic configuration inside the filamentis suggested .

  2. Synchronous observation of rising soluble bubble through quiescent solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifu ZHANG; Shuai TIAN; Weizhong LI; Yongchen SONG

    2009-01-01

    An experimental method using computer image processing technology (CIPT) was proposed to observe and investigate the velocity, deformation, heat and mass transfer, etc. of a rising soluble gas (CO2) bubble through a quiescent hot water. A model was set up to describe the behavior of the bubble in a visual experi-mental system in which a high-speed camera rose instantaneously with the movement of the bubble. A series of trajectory videos about the bubble were recorded by a computer linked to the camera. The trajectory, volume changes and rate of mass transfer of the bubble were obtained by the CIPT. It is found that the single bubble follows a rolling trajectory at the initial stage when there is mass transfer. With the volume decreasing, the disturbed behavior of the bubble becomes tempered. When the rising velocity of the bubble reaches the maximum, the velocity is nearly at a constant. The experimental and analysis results show that this method is useful for the research on the mass transfer and the movement of rising bubbles in liquid.

  3. An autonomous sperm-like propulsor in a quiescent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boyoung; Park, Sung Goon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Flapping motions of flexible fins are widespread in nature. Birds, fish, and insects use their wings, fins, or bodies to stay afloat and to advance forward in the surrounding fluids. It is important to understand the physics of the flapping motions to utilize them for the biomimetic machines. In the present study, we introduce a sperm-like propulsor that consists of a rigid head containing genetic information and a flapping flexible tail for propulsion. The head gives a sinusoidal torque to the leading edge of the tail, and the flexible tail flaps along the leading edge. In other words, the sperm-like propulsor is moved by an oscillating relative angle between the head and the leading edge of the tail. Unlike self-propelled heaving and pitching fins, the 'autonomous' sperm-like propulsor has no prescribed motion or constraint referenced from outside coordinates. The penalty method and the immersed boundary method are used to solve the autonomous sperm-like propulsor in a quiescent flow. The cruising speed and the propulsive efficiency of the propulsor are explored as a function of the head size (D/ L) , the pitching angle (θ0) , the pitching frequency (f) , and the distance from the wall (G/ L) .

  4. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in LMXBs

    CERN Document Server

    Turlione, Anabela; Pons, José A

    2013-01-01

    The quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in x-rays (outbursts) has been monitored. The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust and envelope composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. We perform numerical simulations of the neutron star crust thermal evolution and compare them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, EXO 0748-676, XTE J1701-462 and IGR J17480-2446. We also present stationary envelope models to be used as a boundary condition for the crustal cooling models. We obtain a relation between the mass accretion rate and the temperature reached at the crust-envelope interface at the end of the active phase that accounts for early observations and reduces the number of free parameters of the problem. With this relation we are also able to set constraints to the env...

  5. Bubble entrapment during sphere impact onto quiescent liquid surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2011-06-20

    We report observations of air bubble entrapment when a solid sphere impacts a quiescent liquid surface. Using high-speed imaging, we show that a small amount of air is entrapped at the bottom tip of the impacting sphere. This phenomenon is examined across a broad range of impact Reynolds numbers, 0.2 a Re = (DU0/Il) a 1.2\\' 105. Initially, a thin air pocket is formed due to the lubrication pressure in the air layer between the sphere and the liquid surface. As the liquid surface deforms, the liquid contacts the sphere at a finite radius, producing a thin sheet of air which usually contracts to a nearly hemispherical bubble at the bottom tip of the sphere depending on the impact parameters and liquid properties. When a bubble is formed, the final bubble size increases slightly with the sphere diameter, decreases with impact speed but appears independent of liquid viscosity. In contrast, for the largest viscosities tested herein, the entrapped air remains in the form of a sheet, which subsequently deforms upon close approach to the base of the tank. The initial contact diameter is found to conform to scalings based on the gas Reynolds number whilst the initial thickness of the air pocket or adimplea scales with a Stokes\\' number incorporating the influence of the air viscosity, sphere diameter and impact speed and liquid density. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  6. CANDELS: The progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Koo, David C; Williams, Christina C; Kocevski, Dale D; Trump, Jonathan R; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F; Croton, Darren J; Dekel, Avishai; Ashby, M L N; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P; Hopkins, Philip F; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Newman, Jeffrey A; Porter, Lauren A; Primack, Joel R; Ryan, Russell E; Rosario, David; Somerville, Rachel S

    2012-01-01

    We combine high-resolution HST/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (log(M*) > 10) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4 - 3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5 - 3. At z > 2 most cSFGs have specific star-formation rates (sSFR = 10^-9 yr^-1) half that of typical, massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous AGN 30 times (~30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10^8 yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2 - 3 and fade to cQGs by z = 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are r...

  7. UV Extinction Towards a Quiescent Molecular Cloud in the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz

    2012-01-01

    Context: The mean UV extinction law for the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is usually taken as a template for low-metallicity galaxies. However, its current derivation is based on only five stars, thus placing doubts on its universality. An increase in the number of targets with measured extinction laws in the SMC is necessary to determine its possible dependence on parameters such as metallicity and star-forming activity. Aims: To measure the UV extinction law for several stars in the quiescent molecular cloud SMC B1-1. Methods: We obtained HST/STIS slitless UV spectroscopy of a 25"x25" field of view and we combined it with ground-based NIR and visible photometry of the stars in the field. The results were processed using the Bayesian photometric package CHORIZOS to derive the visible-NIR extinction values for each star. The unextinguished Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) obtained in this way were then used to derive the UV extinction law for the four most extinguished stars. We also recalculated the visib...

  8. What Turns Galaxies Off? the Different Morphologies of Star-Forming and Quiescent Galaxies Since z Approximates 2 from CANDELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Eric F.; VanDerWel, Arjen; Papovich, Casey; Kocevski, Dale; Lotz, Jennifer; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Harry; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman; Wuyts, Stijn; Cheung, Edmong; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dunlop, James S.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Herrington, Jessica; Koo, David; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; DeMello, Duilia; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robaina, Aday R.; Williams, Christina C.

    2011-01-01

    We use HST/WFC3 imaging from the CANDELS multicyc1e treasury survey, in conjunction with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, to explore the evolution of galactic structure for galaxies with stellar masses > 3 x 10(exp 10) Solar Mass from Z= 2.2 to the present epoch, a time span of 10 Gyr. We explore the relationship between rest-frame optical color, stellar mass, star formation activity and the structural parameters of galaxies as determined from parametric fits to the surface brightness profiles of galaxies. We confirm the dramatic evolution from z= 2.2 to the present day in the number density of non-star-forming galaxies above 3 x 10(exp 10) Solar Mass reported by other authors. We find that the vast majority of these quiescent systems have concentrated light profiles, as parameterized by the Sersic index, and the population of concentrated galaxies grows similarly rapidly. We examine the joint distribution of star formation activity, Sersic index, stellar mass, mass divided by radius (a proxy for velocity dispersion), and stellar surface density. Quiescence correlates poorly with stellar mass at all z galaxy structure: while the vast majority of quiescent galaxies have prominent bulges, many of them have significant disks, and a number of bulge-dominated galaxies have significant star formation. Noting the rarity of quiescent galaxies without prominent bulges, we argue that a prominent bulge (and, perhaps by association, a supermassive black hole) is a necessary but not sufficient condition for quenching star formation on galactic scales over the last 10 Gyr; such a result is qualitatively consistent with the expectations of the AGN feedback paradigm.

  9. Fgf10-positive cells represent a progenitor cell population during lung development and postnatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Agha, Elie; Herold, Susanne; Al Alam, Denise; Quantius, Jennifer; MacKenzie, BreAnne; Carraro, Gianni; Moiseenko, Alena; Chao, Cho-Ming; Minoo, Parviz; Seeger, Werner; Bellusci, Saverio

    2014-01-01

    The lung mesenchyme consists of a widely heterogeneous population of cells that play crucial roles during development and homeostasis after birth. These cells belong to myogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, neuronal and other lineages. Yet, no clear hierarchy for these lineages has been established. We have previously generated a novel Fgf10(iCre) knock-in mouse line that allows lineage tracing of Fgf10-positive cells during development and postnatally. Using these mice, we hereby demonstrate the presence of two waves of Fgf10 expression during embryonic lung development: the first wave, comprising Fgf10-positive cells residing in the submesothelial mesenchyme at early pseudoglandular stage (as well as their descendants); and the second wave, comprising Fgf10-positive cells from late pseudoglandular stage (as well as their descendants). Our lineage-tracing data reveal that the first wave contributes to the formation of parabronchial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as lipofibroblasts at later developmental stages, whereas the second wave does not give rise to smooth muscle cells but to lipofibroblasts as well as an Nkx2.1(-) E-Cad(-) Epcam(+) Pro-Spc(+) lineage that requires further in-depth analysis. During alveologenesis, Fgf10-positive cells give rise to lipofibroblasts rather than alveolar myofibroblasts, and during adult life, a subpopulation of Fgf10-expressing cells represents a pool of resident mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) (Cd45(-) Cd31(-) Sca-1(+)). Taken together, we show for the first time that Fgf10-expressing cells represent a pool of mesenchymal progenitors in the embryonic and postnatal lung. Our findings suggest that Fgf10-positive cells could be useful for developing stem cell-based therapies for treating interstitial lung diseases.

  10. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  11. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eDromard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the stromal vascular fraction. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  12. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredict...

  13. Peripheral monocyte functions and activation in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schwarzmaier

    Full Text Available Recent developments suggest a causal link between inflammation and impaired bacterial clearance in Crohn's disease (CD due to alterations of intestinal macrophages. Studies suggest that excessive inflammation is the consequence of an underlying immunodeficiency rather than the primary cause of CD pathogenesis. We characterized phenotypic and functional features of peripheral blood monocytes of patients with quiescent CD (n = 18 and healthy controls (n = 19 by analyses of cell surface molecule expression, cell adherence, migration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and cytokine expression and secretion with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS priming. Peripheral blood monocytes of patients with inactive CD showed normal expression of cell surface molecules (CD14, CD16, CD116, adherence to plastic surfaces, spontaneous migration, chemotaxis towards LTB4, phagocytosis of E. coli, and production of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, peripheral blood monocytes of CD patients secreted higher levels of IL1β (p<.05. Upon LPS priming we found a decreased release of IL10 (p<.05 and higher levels of CCL2 (p<.001 and CCL5 (p<.05. The expression and release of TNFα, IFNγ, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL13, IL17, CXCL9, and CXCL10 were not altered compared to healthy controls. Based on our phenotypic and functional studies, peripheral blood monocytes from CD patients in clinical remission were not impaired compared to healthy controls. Our results highlight that defective innate immune mechanisms in CD seems to play a role in the (inflamed intestinal mucosa rather than in peripheral blood.

  14. Distinct population of highly malignant cells in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line established by xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Chia-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progression and metastasis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, have been related to the behavior of a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells. Here, we have established a highly malignant HNSCC cell line, SASVO3, from primary tumors using three sequential rounds of xenotransplantation. SASVO3 possesses enhanced tumorigenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SASVO3 exhibits properties of cancer stem cells, including that increased the abilities of sphere-forming, the number of side population cells, the potential of transplanted tumor growth and elevated expression of the stem cell marker Bmi1. Injection of SASVO3 into the tail vein of nude mice resulted in lung metastases. These results are consistent with the postulate that the malignant and/or metastasis potential of HNSCC cells may reside in a stem-like subpopulation.

  15. Multilineage Potential and Self-Renewal Define an Epithelial Progenitor Cell Population in the Adult Thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlia Wong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are critical for T cell development and self-tolerance but are gradually lost with age. The existence of thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPCs in the postnatal thymus has been inferred, but their identity has remained enigmatic. Here, we assessed the entire adult TEC compartment in order to reveal progenitor capacity is retained exclusively within a subset of immature thymic epithelium displaying several hallmark features of stem/progenitor function. These adult TEPCs generate mature cortical and medullary lineages in a stepwise fashion, including Aire+ TEC, within fetal thymus reaggregate grafts. Although relatively quiescent in vivo, adult TEPCs demonstrate significant in vitro colony formation and self-renewal. Importantly, 3D-cultured TEPCs retain their capacity to differentiate into cortical and medullary TEC lineages when returned to an in vivo thymic microenvironment. No other postnatal TEC subset exhibits this combination of properties. The characterization of adult TEPC will enable progress in understanding TEC biology in aging and regeneration.

  16. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  17. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  18. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  19. Tendon repair augmented with a novel circulating stem cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Robert J; Chahine, Nadeen O; Razzano, Pasquale; Patwa, Sohum A; Sgaglione, Nicholas J; Grande, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are common sports-related injuries that are often treated surgically by the use of sutures followed by immobilization. However, tendon repair by standard technique is associated with long healing time and often suboptimal repair. Methods to enhance tendon repair time as well as the quality of repair are currently unmet clinical needs. Our hypothesis is that the introduction of a unique stem cell population at the site of tendon transection would result in an improved rate and quality of repair. Achilles tendons of fifty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and suture-repaired. In half of the rats, a biodegradable scaffold seeded with allogenic circulating stem cells was placed as an onlay to the defect site in addition to the suture repair. The other half was treated with suture alone to serve as the control group. Animals were randomized to a two-, four-, or six-week time group. At the time of necropsy, tendons were harvested and prepared for either biomechanical or histological analysis. Histological slides were evaluated in a blinded fashion with the use of a grading scale. By two weeks, the experimental group demonstrated a significant improvement in repair compared to controls with no failures. Average histological scores of 0.6 and 2.6 were observed for the experimental and control group respectively. The experimental group demonstrated complete bridging of the transection site with parallel collagen fiber arrangement. By four weeks, both groups showed a continuing trend of healing, with the scaffold group exceeding the histological quality of the tissue repaired with suture alone. Biomechanically, the experimental group had a decreasing cross-sectional area with time which was also associated with a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of the tendons, reaching 4.2MPa by six weeks. The experimental group also achieved a significantly higher elastic toughness by six weeks and saw an increase in the tensile modulus, reaching

  20. Development of a novel cell sorting method that samples population diversity in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Geoffrey W; Andersen, Stacey B; Battye, Francis L

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry based electrostatic cell sorting is an important tool in the separation of cell populations. Existing instruments can sort single cells into multi-well collection plates, and keep track of cell of origin and sorted well location. However currently single sorted cell results reflect the population distribution and fail to capture the population diversity. Software was designed that implements a novel sorting approach, "Slice and Dice Sorting," that links a graphical representation of a multi-well plate to logic that ensures that single cells are sampled and sorted from all areas defined by the sort region/s. Therefore the diversity of the total population is captured, and the more frequently occurring or rarer cell types are all sampled. The sorting approach was tested computationally, and using functional cell based assays. Computationally we demonstrate that conventional single cell sorting can sample as little as 50% of the population diversity dependant on the population distribution, and that Slice and Dice sorting samples much more of the variety present within a cell population. We then show by sorting single cells into wells using the Slice and Dice sorting method that there are cells sorted using this method that would be either rarely sorted, or not sorted at all using conventional single cell sorting approaches. The present study demonstrates a novel single cell sorting method that samples much more of the population diversity than current methods. It has implications in clonal selection, stem cell sorting, single cell sequencing and any areas where population heterogeneity is of importance.

  1. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  2. Bubble formation in a quiescent pool of gold nanoparticle suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Saeid; Wen, Dongsheng

    2010-08-11

    This paper begins with an extensive review of the formation of gas bubbles, with a particular focus on the dynamics of triple lines, in a pure liquid and progresses into an experimental study of bubble formation on a micrometer-sized nozzle immersed in a quiescent pool of aqueous gold nanofluid. Unlike previous studies of triple line dynamics in a nanofluid under evaporation or boiling conditions, which are mainly caused by the solid surface modification due to particle sedimentation, this work focuses on the roles of nanoparticles suspended in the liquid phase. The experiments are conducted under a wide range of flow rates and nanoparticle concentrations, and many interesting phenomena are revealed. It is observed that nanofluids prevent the spreading of the triple line during bubble formation, i.e. the triple line is pinned somewhere around the middle of the tube wall during the rapid bubble formation stage whereas it spreads to the outer edge of the tube for pure water. A unique 'stick-slip' movement of the triple line is also observed for bubbles forming in nanofluids. At a given bubble volume, the radius of the contact line is found to be smaller for higher particle concentrations, but a reverse trend is found for the dynamic bubble contact angle. With the increase of particle concentration, the bubble frequency is raised and the bubble departure volume is decreased. The bubble shape is found to be in a good agreement with the prediction from Young-Laplace equation for given flow rates. The influence of nanoparticles on other detailed characteristics related to bubble growth inside, including the variation of bubble volume expansion rate, the radius of the curvature at the apex, the bubble height and bubble volume, is revealed. It is suggested that the variation of surface tensions and the resultant force balance at the triple line might be responsible for the modified dynamics of the triple line.

  3. Characterisation of plasma synthetic jet actuators in quiescent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Haohua; Kotsonis, Marios

    2016-08-01

    An experimental characterisation study of a large-volume three-electrode plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) is presented. A sequential discharge power supply system is used to activate the PSJA. Phase-locked planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and time-resolved Schlieren imaging are used to characterise the evolution of the induced flow field in quiescent flow conditions. The effect of orifice diameter is investigated. Results indicate three distinct features of the actuator-induced flow field. These are the initial shock waves, the high speed jet and vortex rings. Two types of shock waves with varied intensities, namely a strong shock wave and a weak shock wave, are issued from the orifice shortly after the ignition of the discharge. Subsequently, the emission of a high speed jet is observed, reaching velocities up to 130 m s-1. Pronounced oscillation of the exit velocity is caused by the periodical behaviour of capacitive discharge, which also led to the formation of vortex ring trains. Orifice diameter has no influence on the jet acceleration stage and the peak exit velocity. However, a large orifice diameter results in a rapid decline of the exit velocity and thus a short jet duration time. Vortex ring propagation velocities are measured at peak values ranging from 55 m s-1-70 m s-1. In the case of 3 mm orifice diameter, trajectory of the vortex ring severely deviates from the actuator axis of symmetry. The development of this asymmetry in the flow field is attributed to asymmetry in the electrode configuration.

  4. Using large galaxy surveys to distinguish z~0.5 quiescent galaxy models

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, J D

    2013-01-01

    One of the most striking properties of galaxies is the bimodality in their star-formation rates. A major puzzle is why any given galaxy is star-forming or quiescent, and a wide range of physical mechanisms have been proposed as solutions. We consider how observations, such as might be available in upcoming large galaxy surveys, might distinguish different galaxy quenching scenarios. To do this, we combine an N-body simulation and multiple prescriptions from the literature to create several quiescent galaxy mock catalogues. Each prescription uses a different set of galaxy properties (such as history, environment, centrality) to assign individual simulation galaxies as quiescent. We find how and how much the resulting quiescent galaxy distributions differ from each other, both intrinsically and observationally. In addition to tracing observational consequences of different quenching mechanisms, our results indicate which sorts of quenching models might be most readily disentangled by upcoming observations and w...

  5. Time Variation of SiO Masers in VX Sagittarii over an Optically Quiescent Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamohara, Ryuichi; Deguchi, Shuji; Miyoshi, Makoto; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2005-04-01

    The time variation of SiO masers in a semi-regular variable, VX Sgr, was investigated in the period between 1994 and 2004 when the optical light curve exhibited an ˜6-yr quiescent phase intercepting a regularly pulsating era. The quiescent period occurred with a delay of several years after a decrease in the SiO maser flux. VLBA observations of SiO masers made during this period showed no drastic spatial variation except for emission features being shifted from south-west to north-east. The SiO maser flux decrease, and a succeeding optical quiescent phase, may indicate that the stellar mass-loss rate diminished over a few years around 1994. A SiO maser flare occurring in 1999 may be a reminiscence of a final gas blow, which resulted in the optically quiescent period.

  6. Heterogeneity and weak coupling may explain the synchronization characteristics of cells in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjaer, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Nilsson, Holger; Freiberg, Jacob J; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2008-10-13

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exhibit different types of calcium dynamics. Static vascular tone is associated with unsynchronized calcium waves and the developed force depends on the number of recruited cells. Global calcium transients synchronized among a large number of cells cause rhythmic development of force known as vasomotion. We present experimental data showing a considerable heterogeneity in cellular calcium dynamics in the vascular wall. In stimulated vessels, some SMCs remain quiescent, whereas others display waves of variable frequency. At the onset of vasomotion, all SMCs are enrolled into synchronized oscillation. Simulations of coupled SMCs show that the experimentally observed cellular recruitment, the presence of quiescent cells and the variation in oscillation frequency may arise if the cell population is phenotypically heterogeneous. In this case, quiescent cells can be entrained at the onset of vasomotion by the collective driving force from the synchronized oscillations in the membrane potential of the surrounding cells. Partial synchronization arises with an increase in the concentration of cyclic guanosine monophosphate, but in a heterogeneous cell population complete synchronization also requires a high-conductance pathway that provides strong coupling between the cells.

  7. Cellular heterogeneity in the mouse esophagus implicates the presence of a nonquiescent epithelial stem cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWard, Aaron D; Cramer, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-10-23

    Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  8. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Mouse Esophagus Implicates the Presence of a Nonquiescent Epithelial Stem Cell Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. DeWard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  9. Functional characterization and multimodal imaging of treatment-naive "quiescent" choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querques, Giuseppe; Srour, Mayer; Massamba, Nathalie; Georges, Anouk; Ben Moussa, Naima; Rafaeli, Omer; Souied, Eric H

    2013-10-21

    To investigate the multimodal morphological and functional characteristics of treatment-naïve "quiescent" choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to AMD. Eleven patients with treatment-naïve "quiescent" CNV that consecutively presented over a 6-month period, underwent multimodal morphological and functional assessment (including indocyanine green angiography [ICGA], spectral-domain optical coherence tomography [SD-OCT], microperimetry, and preferential hyperacuity perimeter [PHP]). For the purpose of this study, asymptomatic previously untreated CNVs showing absence of intraretinal/subretinal exudation in two consecutive visits (at least 6 months apart) were defined as treatment-naïve "quiescent" CNV. Eleven eyes of 11 patients (9 females; mean age 76.5 ± 8.5 years) were included. On fluorescein angiography (FA), "quiescent" CNVs appeared as late speckled hyperfluorescent lesions lacking well-demarcated borders. Mid-late phase ICGA allowed visualizing the hyperfluorescent "quiescent" CNV network and delineating the plaque. Mean lesion area (mid-late phase ICGA) appeared larger compared with earliest previous examination performed 23.8 ± 16.0 months before (3.24 ± 2.51 mm(2) vs. 3.52 ± 2.46 mm(2), respectively; P = 0.01). SD-OCT revealed, at the site of "quiescent" CNV, an irregularly slightly elevated RPE, without hyporeflective intraretinal/subretinal fluid, showing a major axis in the horizontal plane, which was characterized by collections of moderately reflective material in the sub-RPE space and clear visualization of the hyperreflective Bruch's membrane. Hypergeometric distribution revealed a significant correlation between microperimetry and PHP with respect to locations of "affected areas" (P = 0.001). "Quiescent" CNVs are sub-RPE CNVs secondary to AMD, showing absence of intraretinal/subretinal exudation on repeated OCT. "Quiescent" CNVs enlarge over time and may contribute to local reduced retinal sensitivity and metamorphopsia.

  10. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity.

  11. The ALHAMBRA survey: B-band luminosity function of quiescent and star-forming galaxies at 0.2 ≤ z < 1 by PDF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Tempel, E.; Benítez, N.; Molino, A.; Viironen, K.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Santos, W. A.; Varela, J.; Cenarro, A. J.; Moles, M.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Ascaso, B.; Montero-Dorta, A. D.; Pović, M.; Martínez, V. J.; Nieves-Seoane, L.; Stefanon, M.; Hurtado-Gil, Ll.; Márquez, I.; Perea, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Masegosa, J.; del Olmo, A.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Our goal is to study the evolution of the B-band luminosity function (LF) since z 1 using ALHAMBRA data. Methods: We used the photometric redshift and the I-band selection magnitude probability distribution functions (PDFs) of those ALHAMBRA galaxies with I ≤ 24 mag to compute the posterior LF. We statistically studied quiescent and star-forming galaxies using the template information encoded in the PDFs. The LF covariance matrix in redshift - magnitude - galaxy type space was computed, including the cosmic variance. That was estimated from the intrinsic dispersion of the LF measurements in the 48 ALHAMBRA sub-fields. The uncertainty due to the photometric redshift prior is also included in our analysis. Results: We modelled the LF with a redshift-dependent Schechter function affected by the same selection effects than the data. The measured ALHAMBRA LF at 0.2 ≤ zjB of star-forming galaxies, and a factor 1.25 ± 0.16 increase in the jB of quiescent ones since z = 1, confirming the continuous build-up of the quiescent population with cosmic time. The contribution of the faint quiescent population to jB increases from 3% at z = 1 to 6% at z = 0. The developed methodology will be applied to future multi-filter surveys such as J-PAS. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto (CAHA), jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) at Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC)

  12. A cell sorting protocol for selecting high-producing sub-populations of Sf9 and High Five™ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Fernandes, Fabiana; Patrone, Marco; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Cláudia; Gardner, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2013-12-01

    Insect cell lines such as Sf9 and High Five™ have been widely used to produce recombinant proteins mostly by the lytic baculovirus vector system. We have recently established an expression platform in Sf9 cells using a fluorescence-based recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) strategy which has similar development timelines but avoids baculovirus infection. To expedite cell engineering efforts, a robust fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) protocol optimized for insect cells was developed here. The standard sorting conditions used for mammalian cells proved to be unsuitable, resulting in post-sorting viabilities below 10% for both cell lines. We found that the extreme sensitivity to the shear stress displayed by Sf9 and High Five™ cells was the limiting factor, and using Pluronic F-68 in the cell suspension could increase post-sorting viabilities in a dose dependent manner. The newly developed protocol was then used to sort stable populations of both cell lines tagged with a DsRed-expressing cassette. Before sorting, the average fluorescence intensity of the Sf9 cell population was 3-fold higher than that of the High Five™ cell population. By enriching with the 10% strongest DsRed-fluorescent cells, the productivity of both cell populations could be successfully improved. The established sorting protocol potentiates the use of RMCE technology for recombinant protein production in insect cells.

  13. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  14. Medullospheres from DAOY, UW228 and ONS-76 cells: increased stem cell population and proteomic modifications.

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    Cristina Zanini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medulloblastoma (MB is an aggressive pediatric tumor of the Central Nervous System (CNS usually treated according to a refined risk stratification. The study of cancer stem cells (CSC in MB is a promising approach aimed at finding new treatment strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The CSC compartment was studied in three characterized MB cell lines (DAOY, UW228 and ONS-76 grown in standard adhesion as well as being grown as spheres, which enables expansion of the CSC population. MB cell lines, grown in adherence and as spheres, were subjected to morphologic analysis at the light and electron microscopic level, as well as cytofluorimetric determinations. Medullospheres (MBS were shown to express increasingly immature features, along with the stem cells markers: CD133, Nestin and β-catenin. Proteomic analysis highlighted the differences between MB cell lines, demonstrating a unique protein profile for each cell line, and minor differences when grown as spheres. In MBS, MALDI-TOF also identified some proteins, that have been linked to tumor progression and resistance, such as Nucleophosmin (NPM. In addition, immunocytochemistry detected Sox-2 as a stemness marker of MBS, as well as confirming high NPM expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Culture conditioning based on low attachment flasks and specialized medium may provide new data on the staminal compartment of CNS tumors, although a proteomic profile of CSC is still elusive for MB.

  15. Stochastic multi-scale models of competition within heterogeneous cellular populations: Simulation methods and mean-field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Roberto de la; Guerrero, Pilar; Spill, Fabian; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-10-21

    We propose a modelling framework to analyse the stochastic behaviour of heterogeneous, multi-scale cellular populations. We illustrate our methodology with a particular example in which we study a population with an oxygen-regulated proliferation rate. Our formulation is based on an age-dependent stochastic process. Cells within the population are characterised by their age (i.e. time elapsed since they were born). The age-dependent (oxygen-regulated) birth rate is given by a stochastic model of oxygen-dependent cell cycle progression. Once the birth rate is determined, we formulate an age-dependent birth-and-death process, which dictates the time evolution of the cell population. The population is under a feedback loop which controls its steady state size (carrying capacity): cells consume oxygen which in turn fuels cell proliferation. We show that our stochastic model of cell cycle progression allows for heterogeneity within the cell population induced by stochastic effects. Such heterogeneous behaviour is reflected in variations in the proliferation rate. Within this set-up, we have established three main results. First, we have shown that the age to the G1/S transition, which essentially determines the birth rate, exhibits a remarkably simple scaling behaviour. Besides the fact that this simple behaviour emerges from a rather complex model, this allows for a huge simplification of our numerical methodology. A further result is the observation that heterogeneous populations undergo an internal process of quasi-neutral competition. Finally, we investigated the effects of cell-cycle-phase dependent therapies (such as radiation therapy) on heterogeneous populations. In particular, we have studied the case in which the population contains a quiescent sub-population. Our mean-field analysis and numerical simulations confirm that, if the survival fraction of the therapy is too high, rescue of the quiescent population occurs. This gives rise to emergence of resistance

  16. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a comprehensi

  17. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high......-content analysis and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. RESULTS: In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts...

  18. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high......-content analysis and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. RESULTS: In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts...

  19. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  20. Identification of various testicular cell populations in pubertal and adult cockerels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precise identification of the male germinal stem cell population is important for their practical use in programs dedicated to the integration of exogenous genetic material in testicular tissues. In the present study, our aim was to identify germinal cell populations in the testes of pubertal and ad...

  1. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration.

  2. Fundamental Limits to Collective Concentration Sensing in Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Sean; Mugler, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a trade-off between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that sparsely packed communicating cells sense concentrations more precisely than densely packed communicating cells. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  3. Functional single-cell analyses: flow cytometry and cell sorting of microbial populations and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Susann; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    The still poorly explored world of microbial functioning is about to be uncovered by a combined application of old and new technologies. Bacteria, especially, are still in the dark with respect to their phylogenetic affiliations as well as their metabolic capabilities and functions. However, with the advent of sophisticated flow cytometric and cell sorting technologies in microbiological labs, there is now the possibility to gain this knowledge at the single-cell level without cumbersome cultivation approaches. Cytometry also facilitates the understanding of physiological diversity in seemingly likewise acting populations. Both individuality and diversity lead to the complex and concerted actions of microbial consortia. This review provides an overview of the state of the art in the field. It deals with the handling of microorganisms from the very beginning (i.e. sampling, and detachment and fixation procedures) and goes on to discuss the pitfalls and problems in analysing cells without any further treatment. If information cannot be gained by specific staining procedures, phylogenetic technologies, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches may be options for achieving advanced insights. All in all, flow cytometry will be a mediator technology to gain a deeper insight into the heterogeneity of populations and the functioning of microbial communities.

  4. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Akrap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ERα+ tumors featured a clear hierarchical organization with switch-like and gradual transitions between different clusters, illustrating how breast cancer cells transfer between discrete differentiation states in a sequential manner. ERα− breast cancer showed less prominent clustering but shared a quiescent cancer stem cell pool with ERα+ cancer. The cellular organization model was supported by single-cell data from primary tumors. The findings allow us to understand the organization of breast cancers at the single-cell level, thereby permitting better identification and targeting of cancer stem cells.

  5. Establishment and characterization of primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao ZHENG; Yi-hua SUN; Xiao-lei YE; Hai-quan CHEN; Hong-bin JI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To establish and characterize primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population.Methods: Lung cancer specimens or pleural effusions were collected from Chinese lung cancer patients and cultured in vitro with ACL4 medium (for non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC)) or HITES medium (for small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC)) supplemented with 5%FBS. All cell lines were maintained in culture for more than 25 passages. Most of these cell lines were further analyzed for oncogenic mutations, karyotype, cell growth kinetics, and tumorigenicity in nude mice.Results: Eight primary cell lines from Chinese lung cancer patients were established and characterized, including seven NSCLC cell lines and one SCLC cell line. Five NSCLC cell lines were found to harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain mutations.Conclusion: These well-characterized primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population provide a unique platform for future studies of the ethnic differences in lung cancer biology and drug response.

  6. Characterization of metabolically quiescent Leishmania parasites in murine lesions using heavy water labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Kloehn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Information on the growth rate and metabolism of microbial pathogens that cause long-term chronic infections is limited, reflecting the absence of suitable tools for measuring these parameters in vivo. Here, we have measured the replication and physiological state of Leishmania mexicana parasites in murine inflammatory lesions using 2H2O labeling. Infected BALB/c mice were labeled with 2H2O for up to 4 months, and the turnover of parasite DNA, RNA, protein and membrane lipids estimated from the rate of deuterium enrichment in constituent pentose sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids, respectively. We show that the replication rate of parasite stages in these tissues is very slow (doubling time of ~12 days, but remarkably constant throughout lesion development. Lesion parasites also exhibit markedly lower rates of RNA synthesis, protein turnover and membrane lipid synthesis than parasite stages isolated from ex vivo infected macrophages or cultured in vitro, suggesting that formation of lesions induces parasites to enter a semi-quiescent physiological state. Significantly, the determined parasite growth rate accounts for the overall increase in parasite burden indicating that parasite death and turnover of infected host cells in these lesions is minimal. We propose that the Leishmania response to lesion formation is an important adaptive strategy that minimizes macrophage activation, providing a permissive environment that supports progressive expansion of parasite burden. This labeling approach can be used to measure the dynamics of other host-microbe interactions in situ.

  7. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K., E-mail: mishima-k@dent.showa-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  8. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  9. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Cramer

    Full Text Available The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  10. A mammary repopulating cell population characterized in mammary anlagen reveals essential mammary stroma for morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiazhe; Xue, Kai; She, Ji; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Shangguan, Rulan; Dai, Yunping; Du, Liying; Li, Ning

    2014-09-10

    The cells with mammary repopulating capability can achieve mammary gland morphogenesis in a suitable cellular microenvironment. Using cell surface markers of CD24, CD29 and CD49f, mouse mammary repopulating unit (MRU) has been identified in adult mammary epithelium and late embryonic mammary bud epithelium. However, embryonic MRU remains to be fully characterized at earlier mammary anlagen stage. Here we isolated discrete populations of E14.5 mouse mammary anlagen cells. Only Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was predicted as E14.5 MRU by examining their capacities of forming mammosphere and repopulating cleared mammary fat pad in vivo. However, when we characterized gene expressions of this E14.5 cell population by comparing with adult mouse MRU (Lin(-)CD24(+)CD29(hi)), the gene profiling of these two cell populations exhibited great differences. Real-time PCR and immunostaining assays uncovered that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was a heterogeneous stroma-enriched cell population. Then, limiting dilutions and single-cell assays also confirmed that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population possessed low proportion of stem cells. In summary, heterogeneous Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population exhibited mammary repopulating ability in E14.5 mammary anlagen, implying that only suitable mammary stroma could enable mammary gland morphogenesis, which relied on the interaction between rare stem cells and microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Rich z=1.80 Galaxy Cluster JKCS 041 Using the WFC3 Grism: Environmental Trends in the Ages and Structure of Quiescent Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Andrew B; Andreon, Stefano; Treu, Tommaso; Raichoor, Anand; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2013-01-01

    We present HST/WFC3 imaging and grism spectroscopy of the distant galaxy cluster JKCS041. Our survey yields 98 redshifts whose precision is typically ~20x better than photometric estimates. We confirm that JKCS041 is a rich cluster and derive a redshift z=1.80 via the identification of 19 member galaxies, of which 15 are quiescent. These members are spatially aligned with diffuse X-ray emission seen by Chandra. As JKCS041 is the most distant known cluster with such a large and spectroscopically-confirmed quiescent population, it provides an unique opportunity to study the effect of the environment on galaxy properties at early epochs. We construct composite spectra of the quiescent members that clearly reveal Balmer and metallic absorption lines. From these, we infer that the more massive members (log M*>11) have a mean stellar age of 1.4+0.3-0.2 Gyr, whereas lower-mass examples (log M*=10.5-11) have a younger mean age of 0.9+0.2-0.1 Gyr. These ages agree closely with those inferred by Whitaker et al. for sim...

  12. The UVJ Selection of Quiescent and Star Forming Galaxies: Separating Early and Late-Type Galaxies and Isolating Edge-on Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shannon G; Kelson, Daniel D; Franx, Marijn; van der Wel, Arjen; Illingworth, Garth D

    2011-01-01

    We utilize for the first time HST ACS imaging to examine the structural properties of galaxies in the rest-frame U-V versus V-J diagram (i.e., the UVJ diagram) using a sample at 0.610.25). The use of the UVJ diagram as a tool to distinguish quiescent galaxies from star forming galaxies (SFGs) is becoming more common due to its ability to separate red quiescent galaxies from reddened SFGs. Quiescent galaxies occupy a small and distinct region of UVJ color space and we find most of them to have concentrated profiles with high Sersic indices (n>2.5) and smooth structure characteristic of early-type systems. SFGs populate a broad, but well-defined sequence of UVJ colors and are comprised of objects with a mix of Sersic indices. Interestingly, most UVJ-selected SFGs with high Sersic indices also display structure due to dust and star formation typical of the n<2.5 SFGs and late-type systems. Finally, we find that the position of a SFG on the sequence of UVJ colors is determined to a large degree by the mass of ...

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  14. Imbalance of placental regulatory T cell and Th17 cell population dynamics in the FIV-infected pregnant cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudreaux Crystal E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An appropriate balance in placental regulatory T cells (Tregs, an immunosuppressive cell population, and Th17 cells, a pro-inflammatory cell population, is essential in allowing tolerance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. TGF-β and IL-6 are cytokines that promote differentiation of Tregs and Th17 cells from a common progenitor; aberrant expression of the cytokines may perturb the balance in the two cell populations. We previously reported a pro-inflammatory placental environment with decreased levels of FoxP3, a Treg marker, and increased levels of IL-6 in the placentas of FIV-infected cats at early pregnancy. Thus, we hypothesized that FIV infection in the pregnant cat causes altered placental Treg and Th17 cell populations, possibly resulting in placental inflammation. Methods We examined the effect of FIV infection on Treg and Th17 populations in placentas at early pregnancy using quantitative confocal microscopy to measure FoxP3 or RORγ, a Th17 marker, and qPCR to quantify expression of the key cytokines TGF-β and IL-6. Results FoxP3 and RORγ were positively correlated in FIV-infected placentas at early pregnancy, but not placentas from normal cats, indicating virus-induced alteration in the balance of these cell populations. In control cats the expression of IL-6 and RORγ was positively correlated as predicted, but this relationship was disrupted in infected animals. TGF-β was reduced in infected queens, an occurrence that could dysregulate both Treg and Th17 cell populations. Co-expression analyses revealed a highly significant positive correlation between IL-6 and TGF-β expression in control animals that did not occur in infected animals. Conclusion Collectively, these data point toward potential disruption in the balance of Treg and Th17 cell populations that may contribute to FIV-induced inflammation in the feline placenta.

  15. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  16. A subpopulation of adult skeletal muscle stem cells retains all template DNA strands after cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheteau, Pierre; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Siegl-Cachedenier, Irene; Blasco, Maria A; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-01-20

    Satellite cells are adult skeletal muscle stem cells that are quiescent and constitute a poorly defined heterogeneous population. Using transgenic Tg:Pax7-nGFP mice, we show that Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells are less primed for commitment and have a lower metabolic status and delayed first mitosis compared to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells. Pax7-nGFP(Hi) can give rise to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells after serial transplantations. Proliferating Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells exhibit lower metabolic activity, and the majority performs asymmetric DNA segregation during cell division, wherein daughter cells retaining template DNA strands express stem cell markers. Using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that all chromatids segregate asymmetrically, whereas Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells perform random DNA segregation. Therefore, quiescent Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells represent a reversible dormant stem cell state, and during muscle regeneration, Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells generate distinct daughter cell fates by asymmetrically segregating template DNA strands to the stem cell. These findings provide major insights into the biology of stem cells that segregate DNA asymmetrically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP-, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population.

  18. Analysing the Influence of the Spontaneous Aneuploidy Frequency on the Cell Population System Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Nefedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a qualitative analysis of M.S. Vinogradova's nonlinear model for dynamics of the cell population system. This system describes the stem cells cultivation in vitro under resource constraints. The system consists of two populations, namely: population of normal cells and population of abnormal cells. Resource constraints are considered as linear dependences of mitosis parameters on the normalized densities of each population.One of the key parameters that effects on the realization of the system evolution scenarios is a parameter that determines a share of the normal cells, which pass, when dividing, into population of the abnormal cells. The paper analyses both the existence conditions of the rest points and the changes of the evolution scenarios of population system with changing abovementioned parameter and other system parameters held fixed. It is shown that there is a saddle-node bifurcation in the system; the bifurcation value of the parameter is found. The paper shows the interval of parameter values in which the favorable scenarios of population system evolution are implemented. It also presents results of mathematical modeling.

  19. Evolution of cell populations in vitro: peculiarities, driving forces, mechanisms and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunakh V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review outlines the major features and distinctions of cell populations, types and directions of selection in such populations. Population-genetic basis for cell adaptation to growth conditions in vitro is elucidated; in particular, peculiarities of genome evolution in the course of cell dedifferentiation and further cell adaptation to growth conditions in passaged culture are evaluated. Main factors of variation and selection in cell populations in vitro, influence of growth conditions on structure of cell populations and some regularities of cultured cells and regenerated plants are considered. Details of creation of stable cell lines-producers of biologically active substances are presented. Views and suppositions of author resulting from analysis of both literature data and own multiyear studies on cell population genetics are set forth. Among others are substantiated such key statements: cell culture in vitro presents dynamically-heterogeneous biological system, clone population, which is developing (evolving as a result of major driving factors of evolution – variation, heredity, selection and drift of genes (genotypes; interaction between these processes determines the biological characteristics of each particular cell line grown in specific conditions; in adaptation of cells to growth conditions in vitro one can single out three periods: the initial population of isolated cells, the period of strain (cell line formation and the established strain. The division into periods is determined by the type, direction and intensity of «natural» selection that acts in cell population. The formed (adapted to growth in vitro strains are genetically heterogeneous, they are characterized by the presence of physiological and genetic homeostasis, which are mostly caused by the action of stabilizing selection; cultured cells of higher plants are able to synthesize practically all classes of secondary (specialized compounds (alkaloids, steroids

  20. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K.; Prick, Janine C.M.; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K.; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AADdim fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information. PMID:26051918

  1. Investigating Variability of Quiescent Neutron Stars in the Globular Clusters NGC 6440 and Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, A R; Bernardini, F

    2014-01-01

    The quiescent spectrum of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries typically consists of two components - a thermal component associated with emission from the neutron star surface, and a non-thermal power-law component whose origin is not well understood. Spectral fitting of neutron star atmosphere models to the thermal component is one of the leading methods for measuring the neutron star radius. However, it has been known for years that the X-ray spectra of quiescent neutron stars vary between observations. While most quiescent variability is explained through a variable power-law component, the brightest and best-studied object, Cen X-4, requires a change in the thermal component and such thermal variability could be a problem for measuring neutron star radii. In this paper, we significantly increase the number of sources whose quiescent spectra have been studied for variability. We examine 9 potential quiescent neutron stars with luminosities <1E34 erg/s over the course of multiple Chandra observations of...

  2. Quiescent and Active Tear Protein Profiles to Predict Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Micera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC is a chronic recurrent bilateral inflammation of the conjunctiva associated with atopy. Several inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors contribute to VKC disease. The aim is to provide a chip-based protein analysis in tears from patients suffering from quiescent or active VKC. Methods. This study cohort included 16 consecutive patients with VKC and 10 controls. Participants were subjected to clinical assessment of ocular surface and tear sampling. Total protein quantification, total protein sketch, and protein array (sixty protein candidates were evaluated. Results. An overall increased Fluorescent Intensity expression was observed in VKC arrays. Particularly, IL1β, IL15, IL21, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, ICAM2, βNGF, NT4, BDNF, βFGF, SCF, MMP1, and MMP2 were increased in quiescent VKC. Of those candidates, only IL1β, IL15, IL21, βNGF, SCF, MMP2, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, and ICAM2 were increased in both active and quiescent VKC. Finally, NT4, βFGF, and MMP1 were highly increased in active VKC. Conclusion. A distinct “protein tear-print” characterizes VKC activity, confirming some previously reported factors and highlighting some new candidates common to quiescent and active states. Those candidates expressed in quiescent VKC might be considered as predictive indicators of VKC reactivation and/or exacerbation out-of-season.

  3. Quiescent and Active Tear Protein Profiles to Predict Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, Alessandra; Di Zazzo, Antonio; Esposito, Graziana; Sgrulletta, Roberto; Calder, Virginia L.; Bonini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic recurrent bilateral inflammation of the conjunctiva associated with atopy. Several inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors contribute to VKC disease. The aim is to provide a chip-based protein analysis in tears from patients suffering from quiescent or active VKC. Methods. This study cohort included 16 consecutive patients with VKC and 10 controls. Participants were subjected to clinical assessment of ocular surface and tear sampling. Total protein quantification, total protein sketch, and protein array (sixty protein candidates) were evaluated. Results. An overall increased Fluorescent Intensity expression was observed in VKC arrays. Particularly, IL1β, IL15, IL21, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, ICAM2, βNGF, NT4, BDNF, βFGF, SCF, MMP1, and MMP2 were increased in quiescent VKC. Of those candidates, only IL1β, IL15, IL21, βNGF, SCF, MMP2, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, and ICAM2 were increased in both active and quiescent VKC. Finally, NT4, βFGF, and MMP1 were highly increased in active VKC. Conclusion. A distinct “protein tear-print” characterizes VKC activity, confirming some previously reported factors and highlighting some new candidates common to quiescent and active states. Those candidates expressed in quiescent VKC might be considered as predictive indicators of VKC reactivation and/or exacerbation out-of-season. PMID:26989694

  4. Colors, Star formation Rates, and Environments of Star forming and Quiescent Galaxies at the Cosmic Noon

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the SFRs, stellar masses, galaxy colors, and dust extinctions of galaxies in massive (10^12.5-10^13.5 M_sun) halos at z~2 in high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations as part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The simulations do not model feedback from AGN but reproduce well the observed relations between stellar and halo mass and between stellar mass and SFR. About half of the simulated massive galaxies at z~2 have broad-band colors classifying them as `quiescent', and the fraction of quiescent centrals is steeply decreasing towards higher redshift, in agreement with observations. However, our simulations do not reproduce the reddest of the quiescent galaxies observed at z~2. While simulated quiescent galaxies are less dusty than star forming galaxies, their broad band colors are often affected by moderate levels of interstellar dust. The star formation histories of the progenitors of z~2 star forming and quiescent galaxies are typically bursty, especially at early t...

  5. HOX and TALE signatures specify human stromal stem cell populations from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchi, Jacopo; Trombi, Luisa; Spugnesi, Laura; Barachini, Serena; Maroni, Giorgia; Brodano, Giovanni Barbanti; Boriani, Stefano; Valtieri, Mauro; Petrini, Mario; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Human stromal stem cell populations reside in different tissues and anatomical sites, however a critical question related to their efficient use in regenerative medicine is whether they exhibit equivalent biological properties. Here, we compared cellular and molecular characteristics of stromal stem cells derived from the bone marrow, at different body sites (iliac crest, sternum, and vertebrae) and other tissues (dental pulp and colon). In particular, we investigated whether homeobox genes of the HOX and TALE subfamilies might provide suitable markers to identify distinct stromal cell populations, as HOX proteins control cell positional identity and, together with their co-factors TALE, are involved in orchestrating differentiation of adult tissues. Our results show that stromal populations from different sources, although immunophenotypically similar, display distinct HOX and TALE signatures, as well as different growth and differentiation abilities. Stromal stem cells from different tissues are characterized by specific HOX profiles, differing in the number and type of active genes, as well as in their level of expression. Conversely, bone marrow-derived cell populations can be essentially distinguished for the expression levels of specific HOX members, strongly suggesting that quantitative differences in HOX activity may be crucial. Taken together, our data indicate that the HOX and TALE profiles provide positional, embryological and hierarchical identity of human stromal stem cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that cell populations derived from different body sites may not represent equivalent cell sources for cell-based therapeutical strategies for regeneration and repair of specific tissues.

  6. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  7. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  8. A synthetic circuit for selectively arresting daughter cells to create aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Bruno; Silver, Pamela A; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M

    2010-05-01

    The ability to engineer genetic programs governing cell fate will permit new safeguards for engineered organisms and will further the biological understanding of differentiation and aging. Here, we have designed, built and implemented a genetic device in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls cell-cycle progression selectively in daughter cells. The synthetic device was built in a modular fashion by combining timing elements that are coupled to the cell cycle, i.e. cell-cycle specific promoters and protein degradation domains, and an enzymatic domain which conditionally confers cell arrest. Thus, in the presence of a drug, the device is designed to arrest growth of only newly-divided daughter cells in the population. Indeed, while the engineered cells grow normally in the absence of drug, with the drug the engineered cells display reduced, linear growth on the population level. Fluorescence microscopy of single cells shows that the device induces cell arrest exclusively in daughter cells and radically shifts the age distribution of the resulting population towards older cells. This device, termed the 'daughter arrester', provides a blueprint for more advanced devices that mimic developmental processes by having control over cell growth and death.

  9. GADD45β Determines Chemoresistance and Invasive Growth of Side Population Cells of Human Embryonic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Inowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Side population (SP cells are an enriched population of stem, and the existence of SP cells has been reported in human cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed an SP analysis using 11 human cancer cell lines and confirmed the presence of SP cells in an embryonic carcinoma cell line, NEC8. NEC8 SP cells showed characteristics of cancer stem cells, such as high growth rate, chemoresistance and high invasiveness. To further characterize the NEC8 SP cells, we used DNA microarrays. Among 38,500 genes, we identified 12 genes that were over-expressed in SP cells and 1 gene that was over-expressed in non-SP cells. Among these 13 genes, we focused on GADD45b. GADD45b was over-expressed in non-SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b had no effect on non-SP cells. Paradoxically, the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced the viability of NEC8 SP cells. The inhibition of ABCG2, which determines the SP phenotype, had no effect on the invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced invasiveness. These results suggest that GADD45b, but not ABCG2, might determine the cancer stem cell-like phenotype, such as chemoresistance and the high invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, and might be a good therapeutic target.

  10. In Vivo Monitoring of Multiple Circulating Cell Populations Using Two-photon Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, Eric R; Zhong, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey; Cao, Zhengyi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Norris, Theodore B; Baker, James R

    2008-02-15

    To detect and quantify multiple distinct populations of cells circulating simultaneously in the blood of living animals, we developed a novel optical system for two-channel, two-photon flow cytometry in vivo. We used this system to investigate the circulation dynamics in live animals of breast cancer cells with low (MCF-7) and high (MDA-MB-435) metastatic potential, showing for the first time that two different populations of circulating cells can be quantified simultaneously in the vasculature of a single live mouse. We also non-invasively monitored a population of labeled, circulating red blood cells for more than two weeks, demonstrating that this technique can also quantify the dynamics of abundant cells in the vascular system for prolonged periods of time. These data are the first in vivo application of multichannel flow cytometry utilizing two-photon excitation, which will greatly enhance our capability to study circulating cells in cancer and other disease processes.

  11. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Rodrigues, L C; Holmes, K E; Thompson, V; Newton, M A; Stein, T J

    2017-03-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  13. Stem cell-like differentiation potentials of endometrial side population cells as revealed by a newly developed in vivo endometrial stem cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Miyazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP, but not endometrial main population cells (EMP, exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom, a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo

  14. CANDELS+3D-HST: Compact SFGs at z ∼ 2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barro, G.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Guo, Y. [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Pérez-González, P. G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, F. CC. Físicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pacifici, C. [Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Trump, J. R. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wuyts, S.; Hsu, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bell, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dekel, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Porter, L.; Primack, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ferguson, H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Caputi, K. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Ceverino, D. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Giavalisco, M. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/M{sub ☉}) >10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2 < z < 3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN). In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs, which typically are disk-like and sometimes clumpy or irregular. Most compact SFGs lie either within the star formation rate (SFR)-mass main sequence (65%) or below it (30%), on the expected evolutionary path toward quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (τ) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically motivated SFHs drawn from semianalytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ∼2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the τ models. Both models yield good spectral energy distribution fits, indicating that the systematic uncertainty in the age due to degeneracies in the SFH is of that order of magnitude. However, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-mass main sequence. Contrary to expectations, some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/M{sub ☉}) =10-10.6) have younger ages but lower specific SFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers

  15. Are quiescent galaxies truly devoid of star formation? The mid-, far-infrared and radio properties of quiescent galaxies at z = 0.1 - 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Allison W. S.

    Quiescent galaxy candidates are typically identified by their low unobscured star formation rates from deep field photometric surveys. However, their selection technique relies on the assumption of a universal dust attenuation curve. It is important to verify the selection through independent SFR indicators at longer wavelengths. Current mid-, far-infrared and radio surveys are limited to detecting only galaxies with very strong star formation or AGN activity. Here, I present the first comprehensive stacking results across mid-, far-infrared and radio wavelengths using Spitzer, Herschel and VLA data in the COSMOS field (Man et al. 2014). We find that the rest-frame NUV-r and r-J color criteria, combined with low 24 μm emission, provides a robust selection of truly quiescent galaxies out to z = 3. Additionally, we find evidence of radio emission in excess of the expected total star formation in quiescent galaxies at z ~ 0-1.5, indicative of a ubiquitous presence of low-luminosity radio AGN among them.

  16. Muscle Stem Cell Fate Is Controlled by the Cell-Polarity Protein Scrib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ono

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells that supply myonuclei for homeostasis, hypertrophy, and repair in adult muscle. Scrib is one of the major cell-polarity proteins, acting as a potent tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. Here, we show that Scrib also controls satellite-cell-fate decisions in adult mice. Scrib is undetectable in quiescent cells but becomes expressed during activation. Scrib is asymmetrically distributed in dividing daughter cells, with robust accumulation in cells committed to myogenic differentiation. Low Scrib expression is associated with the proliferative state and preventing self-renewal, whereas high Scrib levels reduce satellite cell proliferation. Satellite-cell-specific knockout of Scrib in mice causes a drastic and insurmountable defect in muscle regeneration. Thus, Scrib is a regulator of tissue stem cells, controlling population expansion and self-renewal with Scrib expression dynamics directing satellite cell fate.

  17. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, J H; Mounce, G; McGee, K; Elghajiji, A; Brosens, J; Quenby, S; Child, T; Granne, I

    2017-01-23

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM.

  18. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, S; Tanaka, J; Okada, S; Isobe, T; Yamamoto, G; Yasuhara, R; Irie, T; Akiyama, C; Kohno, Y; Tachikawa, T; Mishima, K

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for widespread active galactic nucleus activity among massive quiescent galaxies at z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K.P.; Rasmussen, J.; Toft, S.;

    2013-01-01

    We quantify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a mass-complete (M > 5 × 10 M ) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 = z = 2.5, using X-ray data from the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. 41% ± 7% of the galaxies are detected directly in X-rays, 22% ± ......%-65%). Our discovery of the ubiquity of AGNs in massive, quiescent z ~ 2 galaxies provides observational support for the importance of AGNs in impeding star formation during galaxy evolution. © 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.....

  20. Characterization of mitochondrial populations during stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerscher, Petra; Bussie, Blakely S; DeSimone, Katherine M; Dunn, David A; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in numerous physiological and pathophysiological phenomena in the developing and adult human heart. Alterations in structural aspects of cellular mitochondrial composition as a function of changes in physiology can easily be visualized using fluorescence microscopy. Commonly, mitochondrial location, number, and morphology are reported qualitatively due to the lack of automated and user-friendly computer-based analysis tools. Mitochondrial Quantification using MATLAB (MQM) is a computer-based tool to quantitatively assess these parameters by analyzing fluorescently labeled mitochondria within the cell; in particular, MQM provides numerical information on the number, area, and location of mitochondria within a cell in a time-efficient, automated, and unbiased way. This chapter describes the use of MQM's capabilities to quantify mitochondrial changes during human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) differentiation into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes (SC-CMs), which follows physiological pathways of human heart development.

  1. Population red blood cell folate concentrations for prevention of neural tube defects: bayesian model

    OpenAIRE

    MOLLOY, ANNE

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED OBJECTIVE: To determine an optimal population red blood cell (RBC) folate concentration for the prevention of neural tube birth defects. DESIGN: Bayesian model. SETTING: Data from two population based studies in China. PARTICIPANTS: 247,831 participants in a prospective community intervention project in China (1993-95) to prevent neural tube defects with 400 μg/day folic acid supplementation and 1194 participants in a population based randomized trial (20...

  2. Identification and clonal characterisation of a progenitor cell sub-population in normal human articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Articular cartilage displays a poor repair capacity. The aim of cell-based therapies for cartilage defects is to repair damaged joint surfaces with a functional replacement tissue. Currently, chondrocytes removed from a healthy region of the cartilage are used but they are unable to retain their phenotype in expanded culture. The resulting repair tissue is fibrocartilaginous rather than hyaline, potentially compromising long-term repair. Mesenchymal stem cells, particularly bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC, are of interest for cartilage repair due to their inherent replicative potential. However, chondrocyte differentiated BMSCs display an endochondral phenotype, that is, can terminally differentiate and form a calcified matrix, leading to failure in long-term defect repair. Here, we investigate the isolation and characterisation of a human cartilage progenitor population that is resident within permanent adult articular cartilage. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human articular cartilage samples were digested and clonal populations isolated using a differential adhesion assay to fibronectin. Clonal cell lines were expanded in growth media to high population doublings and karyotype analysis performed. We present data to show that this cell population demonstrates a restricted differential potential during chondrogenic induction in a 3D pellet culture system. Furthermore, evidence of high telomerase activity and maintenance of telomere length, characteristic of a mesenchymal stem cell population, were observed in this clonal cell population. Lastly, as proof of principle, we carried out a pilot repair study in a goat in vivo model demonstrating the ability of goat cartilage progenitors to form a cartilage-like repair tissue in a chondral defect. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we propose that we have identified and characterised a novel cartilage progenitor population resident in human articular cartilage which will greatly benefit future cell

  3. In vitro expansion of the mammary stem/progenitor cell population by xanthosine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Ratan K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary stem cells are critical for growth and maintenance of the mammary gland and therefore are of considerable interest for improving productivity and efficiency of dairy animals. Xanthosine treatment has been demonstrated to promote expansion of putative mammary stem cells in vivo, and hepatic and hair follicle stem cells in vitro. In the latter, xanthosine promoted the symmetrical division of hepatic and hair follicle stem cells. The objective of this study was to determine if treating primary cultures of bovine mammary epithelial cells (MEC with xanthosine increases the stem/progenitor cell population by promoting symmetrical division of mammary stem cells. Results In vitro treatment with xanthosine increased the population of MEC during the exponential phase of cell growth, reducing the doubling time from 86 h in control cultures to 60 h in xanthosine-treated cultures. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeling index and the proportion of MEC in S-phase both were increased by xanthosine treatment, indicating that increased cell accretion was due to increased cell proliferation. Analysis of daughter-pairs indicated that xanthosine promoted a shift from asymmetric to symmetric cell division. Moreover, the 30 % increase in symmetric cell division was concomitant with an increase in the proportion of MEC that were positive for a putative stem cell marker (FNDC3B and a trend toward increased telomerase activity. These results suggest that xanthosine treatment in vitro can increase cell proliferation, promote symmetric cell division and enhance stem/progenitor cell activity. Conclusions Xanthosine treatment increased the proliferation rate of bovine MEC in vitro. This was likely to be mediated by an increase in the proportion of stem/progenitor cells in the MEC population due to promotion of symmetrical stem cell division by xanthosine.

  4. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways.

  5. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was performed to investigate the ability of two different embryonic stem (ES cell-derived neural precursor populations to generate functional neuronal networks in vitro. The first ES cell-derived neural precursor population was cultivated as free-floating neural aggregates which are known to form a developmental niche comprising different types of neural cells, including neural precursor cells (NPCs, progenitor cells and even further matured cells. This niche provides by itself a variety of different growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor and progenitor cells. The second population was cultivated adherently in monolayer cultures to control most stringently the extracellular environment. This population comprises highly homogeneous NPCs which are supposed to represent an attractive way to provide well-defined neuronal progeny. However, the ability of these different ES cell-derived immature neural cell populations to generate functional neuronal networks has not been assessed so far. Results While both precursor populations were shown to differentiate into sufficient quantities of mature NeuN+ neurons that also express GABA or vesicular-glutamate-transporter-2 (vGlut2, only aggregate-derived neuronal populations exhibited a synchronously oscillating network activity 2–4 weeks after initiating the differentiation as detected by the microelectrode array technology. Neurons derived from homogeneous NPCs within monolayer cultures did merely show uncorrelated spiking activity even when differentiated for up to 12 weeks. We demonstrated that these neurons exhibited sparsely ramified neurites and an embryonic vGlut2 distribution suggesting an inhibited terminal neuronal maturation. In comparison, neurons derived from heterogeneous populations within neural aggregates appeared as fully mature with a dense neurite network and punctuated

  6. HLA-targeted flow cytometric sorting of blood cells allows separation of pure and viable microchimeric cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabbels, Jos J M; van de Keur, Carin; Kemps, Berit M; Mulder, Arend; Scherjon, Sicco A; Claas, Frans H J; Eikmans, Michael

    2011-11-10

    Microchimerism is defined by the presence of low levels of nonhost cells in a person. We developed a reliable method for separating viable microchimeric cells from the host environment. For flow cytometric cell sorting, HLA antigens were targeted with human monoclonal HLA antibodies (mAbs). Optimal separation of microchimeric cells (present at a proportion as low as 0.01% in artificial mixtures) was obtained with 2 different HLA mAbs, one targeting the chimeric cells and the other the background cells. To verify purity of separated cell populations, flow-sorted fractions of 1000 cells were processed for DNA analysis by HLA-allele-specific and Y-chromosome-directed real-time quantitative PCR assays. After sorting, PCR signals of chimeric DNA markers in the positive fractions were significantly enhanced compared with those in the presort samples, and they were similar to those in 100% chimeric control samples. Next, we demonstrate applicability of HLA-targeted FACS sorting after pregnancy by separating chimeric maternal cells from child umbilical cord mononuclear cells. Targeting allelic differences with anti-HLA mAbs with FACS sorting allows maximal enrichment of viable microchimeric cells from a background cell population. The current methodology enables reliable microchimeric cell detection and separation in clinical specimens.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF THE STELLAR MASS FUNCTIONS OF STAR-FORMING AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES TO z = 4 FROM THE COSMOS/UltraVISTA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Labbé, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 06520 (United States); Stefanon, Mauro [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); McCracken, Henry J. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Dunlop, James S. [SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 K{sub s} -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10%, and 1% of its current value at z ∼ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing as ρ{sub star}∝(1 + z){sup –4.7±0.4} since z = 3.5, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies increases as ρ{sub star}∝(1 + z){sup –2.3±0.2}. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a non-zero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the K{sub s} -selected star-forming galaxy SMFs with UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 < z < 4 show reasonable agreement and suggest that UV-selected samples are representative of the majority of the stellar mass density at z > 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with log(M{sub star}/M{sub ☉}) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0 (3.5), whereas those with log(M{sub star}/M{sub ☉}) = 10.5 have grown by >1.0 dex since z = 2. At z < 2, the time derivatives of the mass growth are always larger for lower-mass galaxies, which demonstrates that the mass growth in galaxies since that redshift is mass-dependent and primarily bottom-up. Lastly, we examine potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the SMFs and find that those from photo-z templates, stellar population synthesis modeling, and the definition of quiescent galaxies dominate the total error budget in the SMFs.

  8. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. Walker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1 is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways.

  9. VLT/X-SHOOTER NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND HST IMAGING OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED z ∼ 2 COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, S.; Man, A. W. S.; Krühler, T.; Toft, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Richard, J. [Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint Genis Laval (France); Marchesini, D., E-mail: sgeier@astro.ku.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 06520 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Quiescent massive galaxies at z ∼ 2 are thought to be the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals. Observations revealed them to be extraordinarily compact. Until now, the determination of stellar ages, star formation rates, and dust properties via spectroscopic measurements has been feasible only for the most luminous and massive specimens (∼3 × M*). Here we present a spectroscopic study of two near-infrared-selected galaxies that are close to the characteristic stellar mass M* (∼0.9 × M* and ∼1.3 × M*) and whose observed brightness has been boosted by the gravitational lensing effect. We measure the redshifts of the two galaxies to be z = 1.71 ± 0.02 and z = 2.15 ± 0.01. By fitting stellar population synthesis models to their spectrophotometric spectral energy distributions we determine their ages to be 2.4{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} Gyr and 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr, respectively, which implies that the two galaxies have higher mass-to-light ratios than most quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies in other studies. We find no direct evidence for active star formation or active galactic nucleus activity in either of the two galaxies, based on the non-detection of emission lines. Based on the derived redshifts and stellar ages we estimate the formation redshifts to be z=4.3{sup +3.4}{sub -1.2} and z=4.3{sup +1.0}{sub -0.6}, respectively. We use the increased spatial resolution due to the gravitational lensing to derive constraints on the morphology. Fitting Sérsic profiles to the de-lensed images of the two galaxies confirms their compactness, with one of them being spheroid-like and the other providing the first confirmation of a passive lenticular galaxy at a spectroscopically derived redshift of z ∼ 2.

  10. Infection Spread and Virus Release in Vitro in Cell Populations as a System with Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    The comprehension of the innate immune system of cell populations is not only of interest to understand systems in vivo but also in vitro, for example, in the control of the release of viral particles for the production of vaccines. In this report I introduce a model, based on dynamical networks, that simulates the cell signaling responsible for this innate immune response and its effect on the infection spread and virus production. The central motivation is to represent a cell population that is constantly mixed in a bio-reactor where there is a cell-to-cell signaling of cytokines (which are proteins responsible for the activation of the antiviral response inside the cell). Such signaling allows the definition of clusters of linked immune cells. Additionally, depending on the density of links, it is possible to identify critical threshold parameters associated to a percolation phase transition. I show that the control of this antiviral response is equivalent to a percolation process.

  11. Columnar structure formation of a dilute suspension of settling spherical particles in a quiescent fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Sander G.; Barois, Thomas; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Chouippe, Agathe; Doychev, Todor; Huck, Peter; Morales, Carla E. Bello; Uhlmann, Markus; Volk, Romain

    2016-11-01

    The settling of heavy spherical particles in a column of quiescent fluid is investigated. The performed experiments cover a range of Galileo numbers (110 ≤Ga≤310 ) for a fixed density ratio of Γ =ρp/ρf=2.5 . In this regime the particles are known to show a variety of motions [Jenny, Dušek, and Bouchet, Instabilities and transition of a sphere falling or ascending freely in a Newtonian fluid, J. Fluid Mech. 508, 201 (2004), 10.1017/S0022112004009164]. It is known that the wake undergoes several transitions for increasing Ga resulting in particle motions that are successively vertical, oblique, oblique oscillating, and finally chaotic. Not only does this change the trajectory of single, isolated, settling particles, but it also changes the dynamics of a swarm of particles as collective effects become important even for dilute suspensions with volume fraction up to ΦV=O (10-3) , which are investigated in this work. Multicamera recordings of settling particles are recorded and tracked over time in three dimensions. A variety of analyses are performed and show a strong clustering behavior. The distribution of the cell areas of the Voronoï tessellation in the horizontal plane is compared to that of a random distribution of particles and shows clear clustering. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between the Voronoï area and the particle velocity; clustered particles fall faster. In addition, the angle between adjacent particles and the vertical is calculated and compared to a homogeneous distribution of particles, clear evidence of vertical alignment of particles is found. The experimental findings are compared to simulations.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushaj, Entela B., E-mail: lushaj@surgery.wisc.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Lozonschi, Lucian; Barnes, Maria; Anstadt, Emily; Kohmoto, Takushi [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.

  13. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D; Cameron, David R; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A; Qu, Yue

    2015-12-21

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of "persister cells" were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics.

  14. Reduced satellite cell population may lead to contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas R; Chambers, Henry G; Lieber, Richard L

    2013-03-01

    Satellite cells are the stem cells residing in muscle responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair. Skeletal muscle in cerebral palsy (CP) has impaired longitudinal growth that results in muscle contractures. We hypothesized that the satellite cell population would be reduced in contractured muscle. We compared the satellite cell populations in hamstring muscles from participants with CP contracture (n=8; six males, two females; age range 6-15y; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels II-V; 4 with hemiplegia, 4 with diplegia) and from typically developing participants (n=8; six males, two females, age range 15-18y). Muscle biopsies were extracted from the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles and mononuclear cells were isolated. Cell surface markers were stained with fluorescently conjugated antibodies to label satellite cells (neural cell adhesion molecule) and inflammatory and endothelial cells (CD34 and CD4 respectively). Cells were analyzed using flow cytometry to determine cell populations. After gating for intact cells a mean of 12.8% (SD 2.8%) were determined to be satellite cells in typically developing children, but only 5.3% (SD 2.3%; p0.05) suggesting the isolation procedure was valid. A reduced satellite cell population may account for the decreased longitudinal growth of muscles in CP that develop into fixed contractures or the decreased ability to strengthen muscle in CP. This suggests a unique musculoskeletal disease mechanism and provides a potential therapeutic target for debilitating muscle contractures. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  15. Rapid G0/1 transition and cell cycle progression in CD8(+) T cells compared to CD4(+) T cells following in vitro stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Takuya; Fukaya, Shotaro; Toda, Shoko; Ando, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Inobe, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    T cell population consists of two major subsets, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which can be distinguished by the expression of CD4 or CD8 molecules, respectively. Although they play quite different roles in an immune system, many of their basic cellular processes such as proliferation following stimulation are presumably common. In this study, we have carefully analyzed time course of G0/1 transition as well as cell cycle progression in the two subsets of quiescent T cell population following in vitro growth stimulation. We found that CD8(+) T cells promote G0/1 transition more rapidly and drive their cell cycle progression faster compared to CD4(+) T cells. In addition, expression of CD25 and effects of its blockade revealed that IL-2 is implicated in the rapid progression, but not the earlier G0/1 transition, of CD8(+) T cells.

  16. In situ localization of epidermal stem cells using a novel multi epitope ligand cartography approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetze, Martin; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Deppert, Wolfgang; Knott, Anja

    2010-06-01

    Precise knowledge of the frequency and localization of epidermal stem cells within skin tissue would further our understanding of their role in maintaining skin homeostasis. As a novel approach we used the recently developed method of multi epitope ligand cartography, applying a set of described putative epidermal stem cell markers. Bioinformatic evaluation of the data led to the identification of several discrete basal keratinocyte populations, but none of them displayed the complete stem cell marker set. The distribution of the keratinocyte populations within the tissue was remarkably heterogeneous, but determination of distance relationships revealed a population of quiescent cells highly expressing p63 and the integrins alpha(6)/beta(1) that represent origins of a gradual differentiation lineage. This population comprises about 6% of all basal cells, shows a scattered distribution pattern and could also be found in keratinocyte holoclone colonies. The data suggest that this population identifies interfollicular epidermal stem cells.

  17. The soft quiescent spectrum of the transiently accreting 11-Hz X-ray pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Degenaar; R. Wijnands

    2011-01-01

    We report on the quiescent X-ray properties of the recently discovered transiently accreting 11-Hz X-ray pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Using two archival Chandra observations, we demonstrate that the quiescent spectrum of this neutron star low-mass X-ray binary is soft and can be fit to a

  18. PLGA-encapsulated perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for simultaneous visualization of distinct cell populations by (19)F MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivas, M.; Tel, J.; Schreibelt, G.; Bonetto, F.J.; Cruz, L.J.; Amiri, H.; Heerschap, A.; Figdor, C.G.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2015-01-01

    AIM: In vivo imaging using (19)F MRI is advantageous, due to its ability to quantify cell numbers, but is limited for a lack of suitable labels. Here, we formulate two stable and clinically applicable labels for tracking two populations of primary human dendritic cells (DCs) simultaneously. MATERIAL

  19. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  20. The epidermis comprises autonomous compartments maintained by distinct stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Page, Mahalia E; Lombard, Patrick; Ng, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    populations. In contrast, upon wounding, stem cell progeny from multiple compartments acquire lineage plasticity and make permanent contributions to regenerating tissue. We further show that oncogene activation in Lrig1(+ve) cells drives hyperplasia but requires auxiliary stimuli for tumor formation...

  1. Bacterial Programmed Cell Death as a Population Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    GFP), under the control of the lexA operator, lexO. In this system, under uninduced conditions, LexA represses gfp transcription by binding to the...host- associated prokaryotes . Nuc. Acids Res. 33, 966-976. 21) Davies, B.W. et al. (2009) Hydroxyurea induces hydroxyl radical-mediated cell death in...lambda: two genes under three-way control. Gene 20,11–24. 32) Hayes, S., Szybalski, W .(1973) Control of short leftward transcripts from the immunity

  2. Ordered mesoporous silica prepared by quiescent interfacial growth method - effects of reaction chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsyouri, Hatem M.; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba A.; Alassali, Ayah; Lin, Jerry YS

    2013-11-01

    Acidic interfacial growth can provide a number of industrially important mesoporous silica morphologies including fibers, spheres, and other rich shapes. Studying the reaction chemistry under quiescent (no mixing) conditions is important for understanding and for the production of the desired shapes. The focus of this work is to understand the effect of a number of previously untested conditions: acid type (HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4), acid content, silica precursor type (TBOS and TEOS), and surfactant type (CTAB, Tween 20, and Tween 80) on the shape and structure of products formed under quiescent two-phase interfacial configuration. Results show that the quiescent growth is typically slow due to the absence of mixing. The whole process of product formation and pore structuring becomes limited by the slow interfacial diffusion of silica source. TBOS-CTAB-HCl was the typical combination to produce fibers with high order in the interfacial region. The use of other acids (HNO3 and H2SO4), a less hydrophobic silica source (TEOS), and/or a neutral surfactant (Tweens) facilitate diffusion and homogenous supply of silica source into the bulk phase and give spheres and gyroids with low mesoporous order. The results suggest two distinct regions for silica growth (interfacial region and bulk region) in which the rate of solvent evaporation and local concentration affect the speed and dimension of growth. A combined mechanism for the interfacial bulk growth of mesoporous silica under quiescent conditions is proposed.

  3. Evidence for Widespread AGN Activity among Massive Quiescent Galaxies at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Karen Pardos; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew W

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the presence of Active Galactic nuclei (AGN) in a mass-complete (M_* >5e10 M_sun) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 3e42 ergs/s). The latter fraction is similar for star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and does not depend on galaxy stellar mass, suggesting that perhaps luminous AGN are triggered by external effects such as mergers. We detect significant mean X-ray signals in stacked images for both the individually non-detected star-forming and quiescent galaxies, with spectra consistent with star formation only and/or a low luminosity AGN in both cases. Comparing star formation rates inferred from the 2-10 keV luminosities to those from rest-frame IR+UV emission, we find evidence for an X-ray excess indicative of low-luminosity AGN. Among the quiescent galaxies, the excess suggests that as many as 70-100% of these contain low- or high-luminosity AGN, while the corresponding fraction is lower among star-forming galaxies (43-65%). The ubiquitous presence of AGN in massive, q...

  4. The Quiescent Neutron Star and Hierarchical Triple, 4U2129+47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilms, Joern; Kühnel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    4U 2129+47 is a quiescent, eclipsing neutron star that 35 years ago showed typical "Accretion Disk Corona" (ADC) behavior akin to the prototype of the class, X1822-371. Now faded, 4U 2129+47 provides tests of neutron star quiescent emission. It has shown low temperature thermal emission (the neutron star surface), a power law tail (of unknown origin, although possibly due to a pulsar wind interacting with an incoming accretion stream; Campana et al. 1998), and sinusoidally modulated absorption (the disk) as well as periodic X-ray eclipses. Subsequent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, taken 2007 through Fall 2015, indicate that the hard tail and sinusoidal modulation disappeared, as if the accretion stream and disk have vanished. With the intiial loss of the hard tail, the soft X-ray flux also dropped, but since has remained steady, showing no signs of further neutron star cooling in the subsequent 8 years. We compare this behavior to recent NuSTAR observations of the quiescent neutron star Cen X-4, where the hard tail seems to persist over a wider range of quiescent flux, and correlate with the soft X-ray. It also has been speculated that 4U 2129+47 is part of a hierarchical triple system, with the third body in a much longer orbit. We use the Chandra and XMM-Newton eclipse ephemeris residuals to describe this third body orbit.

  5. Vortex flow formation during dielectric barrier discharge initiation in quiescent air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golub, V. V.; Saveliev, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of vortex flows generated by dielectric barrier discharge initiated in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure has been studied by the methods of particle image velocimetry and schlieren photography. The flow parameters have been measured as functions of the time past the electric discha

  6. Detection of abundant CO2 ice in the quiescent dark cloud medium toward Elias 16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittet, DCB; Gerakines, PA; Tielens, AGGM; Adamson, AJ; Boogert, ACA; Chiar, JE; de Graauw, T; Ehrenfreund, P; Prusti, T; Schutte, WA; Vandenbussche, B; van Dishoeck, EF

    1998-01-01

    We report the first detection of solid carbon dioxide (CO2) in quiescent regions of a dark cloud in the solar neighborhood, a result that has important implications for models of ice formation and evolution in the interstellar medium. The K-type field star Elias 16 was previously known to display

  7. Being WISE II: Reducing the Influence of Star Formation History on the Mass-to-Light Ratio of Quiescent Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Mark A; Schinnerer, Eva; Crain, Robert A; Meidt, Sharon; Groves, Brent; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Stellar population synthesis models can now reproduce the photometry of old stellar systems (age $>$ 2 Gyr) in the near-infrared (NIR) bands at 3.4 and 4.6$\\mu$m (WISE W1 $\\&$ W2 or IRAC 1 $\\&$ 2). In this paper we derive stellar mass-to-light ratios for these and optical bands, and confirm that the NIR M/L shows dramatically reduced sensitivity to both age and metallicity compared to optical bands, and further, that this behavior leads to significantly more robust stellar masses for quiescent galaxies with [Fe/H] > -0.5 regardless of star formation history (SFH). We then use realistic early-type galaxy SFHs and metallicity distributions from the EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation to investigate two methods to determine the appropriate M/L for a galaxy: 1) We show that the uncertainties introduced by an unknown SFH can be largely removed using a spectroscopically inferred luminosity-weighted age and metallicity for the population to select the appropriate single stellar population (SSP) equivalent ...

  8. Optimized Stem Cell Detection Using the DyeCycle-Triggered Side Population Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Boesch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue and cancer stem cells are highly attractive target populations for regenerative medicine and novel potentially curative anticancer therapeutics. In order to get a better understanding of stem cell biology and function, it is essential to reproducibly identify these stem cells from biological samples for subsequent characterization or isolation. ABC drug transporter expression is a hallmark of stem cells. This is utilized to identify (cancer stem cells by exploiting their dye extrusion properties, which is referred to as the “side population assay.” Initially described for high-end flow cytometers equipped with ultraviolet lasers, this technique is now also amenable for a broader scientific community, owing to the increasing availability of violet laser-furnished cytometers and the advent of DyeCycle Violet (DCV. Here, we describe important technical aspects of the DCV-based side population assay and discuss potential pitfalls and caveats helping scientists to establish a valid and reproducible DCV-based side population assay. In addition, we investigate the suitability of blue laser-excitable DyeCycle dyes for side population detection. This knowledge will help to improve and standardize detection and isolation of stem cells based on their expression of ABC drug transporters.

  9. Calcium Imaging Reveals Coordinated Simple Spike Pauses in Populations of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Ramirez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s control of movement is thought to involve coordinated activity between cerebellar Purkinje cells. The results reported here demonstrate that somatic Ca2+ imaging is a faithful reporter of Na+-dependent “simple spike” pauses and enables us to optically record changes in firing rates in populations of Purkinje cells in brain slices and in vivo. This simultaneous calcium imaging of populations of Purkinje cells reveals a striking spatial organization of pauses in Purkinje cell activity between neighboring cells. The source of this organization is shown to be the presynaptic gamma-Aminobutyric acid producing (GABAergic network, and blocking ionotropic gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAARs abolishes the synchrony. These data suggest that presynaptic interneurons synchronize (inactivity between neighboring Purkinje cells, and thereby maximize their effect on downstream targets in the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  10. Notch inhibition suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma by depleting cancer stem-like side population cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shudong; Zhang, Ruxin; Liu, Fenye; Wang, Hong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yanqing

    2012-08-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) is responsible for the initiation, proliferation and radiation resistance. Side population (SP) cells are a rare subset of cells enriched with CSCs. The targeting of key signaling pathways that are active in CSCs is a therapeutic approach to treating cancer. Notch signaling is important for the self-renewal and maintenance of stem cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that downregulation of Notch signaling could enhance radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. In this study, we found that Notch signaling was highly activated in SP cells compared with that of non-SP (NSP) cells of NPC. Therefore, Notch inhibition could reduce the proportion of SP cells. As SP cells decreased, proliferation, anti-apoptosis and tumorigenesis were also decreased. This study shows that Notch inhibition may be a promising clinical approach in CSC-targeting therapy for NPC.

  11. Dysregulated Lymphoid Cell Populations in Mouse Models of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groof, Aurélie; Hémon, Patrice; Mignen, Olivier; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Wakeland, Edward K; Renaudineau, Yves; Lauwerys, Bernard R

    2017-05-13

    Biases in the distribution and phenotype of T, B, and antigen-presenting cell populations are strongly connected to mechanisms of disease development in mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we describe longitudinal changes in lymphoid and antigen-presenting cell subsets in bone marrow, blood and spleen from two lupus-prone strains (MRL/lpr and B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 tri-congenic mice), and how they integrate in our present understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. In particular, we focus on (autoreactive) T cell activation patterns in lupus-prone mice. Break of T cell tolerance to chromatin constituents (histone peptides) is key to the development of the disease and is related to T cell intrinsic defects, contributed by genetic susceptibility factors and by extrinsic amplificatory mechanisms, in particular over-stimulation by antigen-presenting cells. We also describe shifts in B cell sub-populations, going from skewed immature B cell populations as an indication of disturbed central and peripheral tolerance checkpoints, to enriched long-lived plasma cells, which are key to persistent autoantibody production in the disease. B cell activation mechanisms in SLE are both T cell-dependent (break of tolerance and production of specific autoantibodies) and -independent (polyclonal B cell activation, production of autoantibodies by long-lived plasma cells). By providing a comprehensive evaluation of B and T cell surface markers in two major mouse models of SLE and a description of their changes before and after disease onset, this review illustrates how the study of lymphoid cell phenotype delivers key information regarding pathogenic pathways and supplies tools to assess the beneficial effects of novel therapeutic interventions.

  12. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations.

  13. Evidence of distinct tumour-propagating cell populations with different properties in primary human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colombo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODS: After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ/⁻ mice. RESULTS: The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3 and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8 differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features. CONCLUSIONS: Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution.

  14. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  15. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  16. Fundamental Plane of Black Hole Activity in the Quiescent Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2017-02-01

    A correlation among the radio luminosity ({L}{{R}}), X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}), and black hole (BH) mass ({M}{BH}) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and BH binaries is known to exist and is called the “fundamental plane” of BH activity. Yuan & Cui predict that the radio/X-ray correlation index, {ξ }{{X}}, changes from {ξ }{{X}}≈ 0.6 to {ξ }{{X}}≈ 1.2{--}1.3 when {L}{{X}}/{L}{Edd} decreases below a critical value of ∼ {10}-6. While many works favor such a change, there are also several works claiming the opposite. In this paper, we gather from the literature the largest quiescent AGN (defined as {L}{{X}}/{L}{Edd}≲ {10}-6) sample to date, consisting of 75 sources. We find that these quiescent AGNs follow a {ξ }{{X}}≈ 1.23 radio/X-ray relationship, in excellent agreement with the Yuan & Cui prediction. The reason for the discrepancy between the present result and some previous works is that their samples contain not only quiescent sources but also “normal” ones (i.e., {L}{{X}}/{L}{Edd}≳ {10}-6). In this case, the quiescent sources will mix up with those normal ones in {L}{{R}} and {L}{{X}}. The value of {ξ }{{X}} will then be between 0.6 and ∼1.3, with the exact value being determined by the sample composition, i.e., the fraction of the quiescent and normal sources. Based on this result, we propose that a more physical way to study the fundamental plane is to replace {L}{{R}} and {L}{{X}} with {L}{{R}}/{L}{Edd} and {L}{{X}}/{L}{Edd}, respectively.

  17. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY AMONG MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Karen P.; Rasmussen, Jesper; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew W., E-mail: karen@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-02-10

    We quantify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a mass-complete (M {sub *} > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 {<=} z {<=} 2.5, using X-ray data from the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. 41% {+-} 7% of the galaxies are detected directly in X-rays, 22% {+-} 5% with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV luminosities consistent with hosting luminous AGNs (L {sub 0.5-8keV} > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). The latter fraction is similar for star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and does not depend on galaxy stellar mass, suggesting that perhaps luminous AGNs are triggered by external effects such as mergers. We detect significant mean X-ray signals in stacked images for both the individually non-detected star-forming and quiescent galaxies, with spectra consistent with star formation only and/or a low-luminosity AGN in both cases. Comparing star formation rates inferred from the 2-10 keV luminosities to those from rest-frame IR+UV emission, we find evidence for an X-ray excess indicative of low-luminosity AGNs. Among the quiescent galaxies, the excess suggests that as many as 70%-100% of these contain low- or high-luminosity AGNs, while the corresponding fraction is lower among star-forming galaxies (43%-65%). Our discovery of the ubiquity of AGNs in massive, quiescent z {approx} 2 galaxies provides observational support for the importance of AGNs in impeding star formation during galaxy evolution.

  18. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  19. Characterization of immune cell populations in oral mucosal tissue of healthy adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Day, M J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the leucocyte subsets present in the oral mucosa of healthy cats. Immunohistochemical labelling and computer-assisted morphometric analysis was used to identify expression of MHC class II, CD3, CD79a, IgG, IgM, IgA, and leucocyte antigen L1 (L1) by cells in sections from 19 cats, and expression of CD4 and CD8 by cells in sections from 17 cats. Mast cells were detected by toluidine blue staining. In the epithelial compartment, CD3(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes were detected, and CD8(+) cells were more common than CD4(+) cells. MHC class II labelling revealed intraepithelial and subepithelial cells with a characteristic dendritic morphology. In some sections these dendritic cells were closely associated with subepithelial clusters of CD3(+) T cells containing both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In the lamina propria and submucosal compartments, the cells most commonly identified were mast cells. CD3(+) T-lymphocytes were also observed, and CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were detected in similar numbers. L1(+) and CD79(+) cells were detected least frequently. The few plasma cells present were generally found to be either IgG(+) or IgA(+). Within the stroma surrounding the salivary glands, CD79a(+) and IgA(+) cells predominated. Slight epithelial labelling for L1 was seen in some sections. The normal feline oral mucosa clearly contains a range of immune cell populations.

  20. Uncovering stem-cell heterogeneity in the microniche with label-free microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Lydia L.

    2013-03-01

    Better suited for large number of cells from bulk tissue, traditional cell-screening techniques, such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), cannot easily screen stem or progenitor cells from minute populations found in their physiological niches. Furthermore, they rely upon irreversible antibody binding, potentially altering cell properties, including gene expression and regenerative capacity. We have developed a label-free, single-cell analysis microfluidic platform capable of quantifying cell-surface marker expression of functional organ stem cells directly isolated from their micro-anatomical niche. With this platform, we have screened single quiescent muscle stem (satellite) cells derived from single myofibers, and we have uncovered an important heterogeneity in the surface-marker expression of these cells. By sorting the screened cells with our microfluidic device, we have determined what this heterogeneity means in terms of muscle stem-cell functionality. For instance, we show that the levels of beta1-integrin can predict the differentiation capacity of quiescent satellite cells, and in contrast to recent literature, that some CXCR4 + cells are not myogenic. Our results provide the first direct demonstration of a microniche-specific variation in gene expression in stem cells of the same lineage. Overall, our label-free, single-cell analysis and cell-sorting platform could be extended to other systems involving rare-cell subsets. This work was funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation, NIH, and California Institute of Regenerative Medicine

  1. Different populations of Wnt-containing vesicles are individually released from polarized epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuhong; Takada, Ritsuko; Noda, Chiyo; Kobayashi, Satoru; Takada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes are heterogeneous in molecular composition and physical properties. Here we examined whether epithelial cells secrete a heterogeneous population of exosomes, and if that is the case, whether epithelial cell polarity affects release of different populations of exosomes, especially that of those carrying Wnt. Sucrose-density ultracentrifugation and molecular marker analysis revealed that different populations of exosomes or exosome-like vesicles were released from MDCK cells depending on the cell polarity. Wnt3a associated with these vesicles were detectable in culture media collected from both apical and basolateral sides of the cells. Basolaterally secreted Wnt3a were co-fractionated with a typical exosomal protein TSG101 in fractions having typical exosome densities. In contrast, most of apically secreted Wnt3a, as well as Wnt11, were co-fractionated with CD63 and Hsp70, which are also common to the most exosomes, but recovered in higher density fractions. Wnt3a exhibiting similar floatation behavior to the apically secreted ones were also detectable in the culture media of Wnt3a-expressing L and HEK293 cells. The lipidation of Wnt3a was required for its basolateral secretion in exosomes but was dispensable for the apical one. Thus, epithelial cells release Wnt via distinct populations of vesicles differing in secretion polarity and lipidation dependency. PMID:27765945

  2. Influence of molecular noise on the growth of single cells and bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischa Schmidt

    Full Text Available During the last decades experimental studies have revealed that single cells of a growing bacterial population are significantly exposed to molecular noise. Important sources for noise are low levels of metabolites and enzymes that cause significant statistical variations in the outcome of biochemical reactions. In this way molecular noise affects biological processes such as nutrient uptake, chemotactic tumbling behavior, or gene expression of genetically identical cells. These processes give rise to significant cell-to-cell variations of many directly observable quantities such as protein levels, cell sizes or individual doubling times. In this study we theoretically explore if there are evolutionary benefits of noise for a growing population of bacteria. We analyze different situations where noise is either suppressed or where it affects single cell behavior. We consider two specific examples that have been experimentally observed in wild-type Escherichia coli cells: (i the precision of division site placement (at which molecular noise is highly suppressed and (ii the occurrence of noise-induced phenotypic variations in fluctuating environments. Surprisingly, our analysis reveals that in these specific situations both regulatory schemes [i.e. suppression of noise in example (i and allowance of noise in example (ii] do not lead to an increased growth rate of the population. Assuming that the observed regulatory schemes are indeed caused by the presence of noise our findings indicate that the evolutionary benefits of noise are more subtle than a simple growth advantage for a bacterial population in nutrient rich conditions.

  3. Selective isolation and differentiation of a stromal population of human embryonic stem cells with osteogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda M; Mahmood, Amer; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of osteogenic cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) has been hampered by the absence of easy and reproducible protocols. hESC grown in feeder-free conditions, often show a sub population of fibroblast-like, stromal cells growing between the colonies. Thus, we examined...... the possibility that these cells represent a population of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hESC-stromal). Two in house derived hES cell lines (Odense3 and KMEB3) as well as an externally derived cell line (Hues8) were transitioned to feeder-free conditions. A sub population of fibroblast-like cells established...... between the hESC colonies were isolated by selective adherence to hyaluronic acid-coated plates (100μg/ml) and were characterized using a combination of FACS analysis and staining. The cells were CD44(+), CD29(+), CD73(+), CD166(+), CD146(+), and CD105(+); and, Oct4(-), CD34(-), CD45(-) and CXCR4(-). When...

  4. Preparation of single cells from aggregated Taxus suspension cultures for population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naill, Michael C; Roberts, Susan C

    2004-06-30

    A method for the isolation of single plant cells from Taxus suspension cultures has been developed for the analysis of single cells via rapid throughput techniques such as flow cytometry. Several cell wall specific enzymes, such as pectinase, pectolyase Y-23, macerozyme, Driselase(R), and cellulase were tested for efficacy in producing single cell suspensions. The method was optimized for single cell yield, viability, time, and representivity of aggregated cell cultures. The best combination for single cell isolation was found to be 0.5% (w/v) pectolyase Y-23 and 0.04% (w/v) cellulase. High viability (>95%) and high yields of single cell aggregates (>90%) were obtained following 4 hours of digestion for four separate Taxus cell lines. In addition, methyl jasmonate elicitation (200 microM) was found to have no effect on three of the four tested Taxus lines. Isolated single cells were statistically similar to untreated cell cultures for peroxidase activity (model cell wall protein) and paclitaxel content (secondary metabolite produced in Taxus cell cultures). In comparison, protoplasts showed marked changes in both peroxidase activity and paclitaxel content as compared to untreated cultures. The use of flow cytometry was demonstrated with isolated cells that were found to have > 99% viability upon staining with fluorescein diacetate. The development of a method for the isolation of single plant cells will allow the study of population dynamics and culture variability on a single cell level for the development of population models of plant cell cultures and secondary metabolism. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii Stimulates Immunity to Pancreatic Cancer by Manipulation of Myeloid Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kiah L; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-08-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8(+) T-cell populations. Although CD4(+) T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4(+) T cells as well as natural killer cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8(+) T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer.

  6. Role of heterogeneous cell population on modulation of dendritic cell phenotype and activation of CD8 T cells for use in cell-based immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Hannah; Park, Jaehyung; Comandante Lou, Natacha; Woodrow, Kim A

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapies have much utility in their ability to prime antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. However, there does not yet exist a consensus standard to how DCs should be primed. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of heterogeneous co-cultures, composed of both CD11c+ (DCs) and CD11c- cells, in combination with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) stimulation on DC phenotype and function. Upon DC priming in different co-culture ratios, we observed reduced expression of MHCII and CD86 and increased antigen uptake among CD11c+ cells in a CD11c- dependent manner. DCs from all culture conditions were induced to mature by MPLA treatment, as determined by secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α. Antigen-specific stimulation of CD4+ T cells was not modulated by co-culture composition, in terms of proliferation nor levels of IFN-γ. However, the presence of CD11c- cells enhanced cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells compared to purified CD11c+ cells, resulting in increased cell proliferation along with higher IFN-γ production. These findings demonstrate the impact of cell populations present during DC priming, and point to the use of heterogeneous cultures of DCs and innate immune cells to enhance cell-mediated immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Side population analysis using a violet-excited cell-permeable DNA binding dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G; Bradford, Jolene; Godfrey, William; Robey, Robert W; Bates, Susan E

    2007-04-01

    Hoechst 33342 side population (SP) analysis is a common method for identifying stem cells in mammalian hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues. Although widely employed for stem cell analysis, this method requires an ultraviolet (UV) laser to excite Hoechst 33342. Flow cytometers equipped with UV sources are not common because of the cost of both the laser and optics that can transmit light UV light. Violet laser sources are inexpensive and are now common fixtures on flow cytometers, but have been previously shown to provide insufficient Hoechst dye excitation for consistent resolution of SP cells. One solution to this problem is to identify additional fluorescent substrates with the same pump specificity as Hoechst 33342, but with better violet excitation characteristics. DyeCycle Violet reagent has emission characteristics similar to those of Hoechst 33342, but with a longer wavelength excitation maxima (369 nm). When this dye is loaded into hematopoietic cells, a sharply resolved side population was also observed, similar in appearance to that seen with Hoechst 33342. Unlike Hoechst SP, DCV SP was similar in appearance with both violet and UV excitation. DCV SP could be inhibited fumitremorgin C, and showed the same membrane pump specificity as Hoechst 33342. Simultaneous immunophenotyping with stem cell markers in mouse bone marrow demonstrated that DCV SP was restricted to the stem cell lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-kit(+) cells population, as is Hoechst SP. Pending confirmation by functional analysis of DCV SP cells, these results suggest that DCV efflux identified approximately the same stem cell population as did Hoechst 33342 efflux. Substituting DCV for Hoechst 33342 in the SP technique may, therefore, allow side population analysis on flow cytometers with violet lasers.

  8. QUIESCENT NUCLEAR BURNING IN LOW-METALLICITY WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Althaus, Leandro G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); García-Berro, Enrique [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades 5, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)

    2013-09-20

    We discuss the impact of residual nuclear burning in the cooling sequences of hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs with very low metallicity progenitors (Z = 0.0001). These cooling sequences are appropriate for the study of very old stellar populations. The results presented here are the product of self-consistent, fully evolutionary calculations. Specifically, we follow the evolution of white dwarf progenitors from the zero-age main sequence through all the evolutionary phases, namely the core hydrogen-burning phase, the helium-burning phase, and the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase to the white dwarf stage. This is done for the most relevant range of main-sequence masses, covering the most usual interval of white dwarf masses—from 0.53 M {sub ☉} to 0.83 M {sub ☉}. Due to the low metallicity of the progenitor stars, white dwarfs are born with thicker hydrogen envelopes, leading to more intense hydrogen burning shells as compared with their solar metallicity counterparts. We study the phase in which nuclear reactions are still important and find that nuclear energy sources play a key role during long periods of time, considerably increasing the cooling times from those predicted by standard white dwarf models. In particular, we find that for this metallicity and for white dwarf masses smaller than about 0.6 M {sub ☉}, nuclear reactions are the main contributor to the stellar luminosity for luminosities as low as log (L/L {sub ☉}) ≅ –3.2. This, in turn, should have a noticeable impact in the white dwarf luminosity function of low-metallicity stellar populations.

  9. [Heterocysts with reduced cell walls in populations of cycad cyanobionts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulina, O I; Lobakova, E S

    2003-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the cyanobionts of the greenhouse-grown cycads Cycads circinalis, Ceratozamia mexicana, and Encephalartos villosus was studied. In addition to heterocysts with the typical ultrastructure, the cyanobiont microcolonies also contained altered heterocysts with reduced cell walls, which might dominate in all regions of the coralloid roots. The altered heterocysts represented a protoplast enclosed in a heterocyst-specific envelope with additional layers. Some heterocysts contained an additional reticular protoplast-enclosing sheath below the heterocyst-specific envelope, whereas the other heterocysts contained an additional electron-opaque outer layer. The substance of the inner sheath of the former heterocysts resembled the polysaccharides of mucilage, which fills the intercellular space of plant tissues, whereas the electron-opaque outer layer of the latter heterocysts probably had a protein nature. The substances that constitute the sheath and the outer layer are likely to be synthesized intracellularly and then released with the aid of membrane-bounded vesicles or by channels in the cytoplasmic membrane.

  10. The effect of EIF dynamics on the cryopreservation process of a size distributed cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, S; Briesen, H; Cincotti, A

    2011-06-01

    Typical mathematical modeling of cryopreservation of cell suspensions assumes a thermodynamic equilibrium between the ice and liquid water in the extracellular solution. This work investigates the validity of this assumption by introducing a population balance approach for dynamic extracellular ice formation (EIF) in the absence of any cryo-protectant agent (CPA). The population balance model reflects nucleation and diffusion-limited growth in the suspending solution whose driving forces are evaluated in the relevant phase diagram. This population balance description of the extracellular compartment has been coupled to a model recently proposed in the literature [Fadda et al., AIChE Journal, 56, 2173-2185, (2010)], which is capable of quantitatively describing and predicting internal ice formation (IIF) inside the cells. The cells are characterized by a size distribution (i.e. through another population balance), thus overcoming the classic view of a population of identically sized cells. From the comparison of the system behavior in terms of the dynamics of the cell size distribution it can be concluded that the assumption of a thermodynamic equilibrium in the extracellular compartment is not always justified. Depending on the cooling rate, the dynamics of EIF needs to be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2015-08-12

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  12. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jamie I; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-30

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation.

  13. Effects of beta interferon on human fibroblasts at different population doubling levels. Proliferation, cell volume, thymidine uptake, and DNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Cellular aging had no effect on the ability of beta interferon to increase cell volume and population doubling time in 76-109 cells, a line of human skin fibroblasts. However, DNA synthesis in cells at high population doubling levels (PDL 55-70) was inhibited after 72 h of beta interferon treatment (1,000 U/ml) while no inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed in cells at middle population doubling levels (PDL 30-40).

  14. Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Roland, Joseph T; Barlow, Brittney J; O'Neal, Ryan; Rich, Amy E; Nam, Ki Taek; Shi, Chanjuan; Goldenring, James R

    2014-11-01

    The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach. We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors. The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum. Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Population dynamics during cell proliferation and neuronogenesis in the developing murine neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Richard S.; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Takahashi, Takao; Hayes, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    During the development of the neocortex, cell proliferation occurs in two specialized zones adjacent to the lateral ventricle. One of these zones, the ventricular zone, produces most of the neurons of the neocortex. The proliferating population that resides in the ventricular zone is a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) that looks uniform in routine histological preparations, but is, in fact, an active and dynamically changing population. In the mouse, over the course of a 6-day period, the PVE produces approximately 95% of the neurons of the adult neocortex. During this time, the cell cycle of the PVE population lengthens from about 8 h to over 18 h and the progenitor population passes through a total of 11 cell cycles. This 6-day, 11-cell cycle period comprises the "neuronogenetic interval" (NI). At each passage through the cell cycle, the proportion of daughter cells that exit the cell cycle (Q cells) increases from 0 at the onset of the NI to 1 at the end of the NI. The proportion of daughter cells that re-enter the cell cycle (P cells) changes in a complementary fashion from 1 at the onset of the NI to 0 at the end of the NI. This set of systematic changes in the cell cycle and the output from the proliferative population of the PVE allows a quantitative and mathematical treatment of the expansion of the PVE and the growth of the cortical plate that nicely accounts for the observed expansion and growth of the developing neocortex. In addition, we show that the cells produced during a 2-h window of development during specific cell cycles reside in a specific set of laminae in the adult cortex, but that the distributions of the output from consecutive cell cycles overlap. These dynamic events occur in all areas of the PVE underlying the neocortex, but there is a gradient of maturation that begins in the rostrolateral neocortex near the striatotelencephalic junction and which spreads across the surface of the neocortex over a period of 24-36 h. The

  16. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  17. First results from the VIRIAL survey: the stellar content of $UVJ$-selected quiescent galaxies at $1.5 < z < 2$ from KMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Mendel, J Trevor; Bender, Ralf; Beifiori, Alessandra; Chan, Jeffrey; Fossati, Matteo; Wilman, David J; Bandara, Kaushala; Brammer, Gabriel B; Schreiber, Natascha M Förster; Galametz, Audrey; Kulkarni, Sandesh; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Nelson, Erica J; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Whitaker, Katherine E; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the stellar populations of 25 massive, galaxies ($\\log[M_\\ast/M_\\odot] \\geq 10.9$) at $1.5 < z < 2$ using data obtained with the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) on the ESO VLT. Targets were selected to be quiescent based on their broadband colors and redshifts using data from the 3D-HST grism survey. The mean redshift of our sample is $\\bar{z} = 1.75$, where KMOS YJ-band data probe age- and metallicity-sensitive absorption features in the rest-frame optical, including the $G$ band, Fe I, and high-order Balmer lines. Fitting simple stellar population models to a stack of our KMOS spectra, we derive a mean age of $1.03^{+0.13}_{-0.08}$ Gyr. We confirm previous results suggesting a correlation between color and age for quiescent galaxies, finding mean ages of $1.22^{+0.56}_{-0.19}$ Gyr and $0.85^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ Gyr for the reddest and bluest galaxies in our sample. Combining our KMOS measurements with those obtained from previous studies at $0.2 < z < 2$ we find evidence for a...

  18. Confirmation of the remarkable compactness of massive quiescent galaxies at z~2.3: early-type galaxies did not form in a simple monolithic collapse

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Kriek, Mariska; Holden, Bradford; Illingworth, Garth; Magee, Daniel; Bouwens, Rychard; Marchesini, Danilo; Quadri, Ryan; Rudnick, Greg; Taylor, Edward; Toft, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Using deep near-infrared spectroscopy Kriek et al. (2006) found that ~45% of massive galaxies at z~2.3 have evolved stellar populations and little or no ongoing star formation. Here we determine the sizes of these quiescent galaxies using deep, high-resolution images obtained with HST/NIC2 and laser guide star-assisted Keck/AO. Considering that their median stellar mass is 1.7x10^11 Solar masses the galaxies are remarkably small, with a median effective radius of 0.9 kpc. Galaxies of similar mass in the nearby Universe have sizes of ~5 kpc and average stellar densities which are two orders of magnitude lower than the z~2.3 galaxies. These results extend earlier work at z~1.5 and confirm previous studies at z>2 which lacked spectroscopic redshifts and imaging of sufficient resolution to resolve the galaxies. Our findings demonstrate that fully assembled early-type galaxies make up at most ~10% of the population of K-selected quiescent galaxies at z~2.3, effectively ruling out simple monolithic models for their...

  19. Sorting and biological characteristics analysis for side population cells in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yegui; Gao, Hucheng; Liu, Mingdong; Mao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of the tumor worldwide, its incidence is increasing year by year. This study aims to investigate the sorting and biological characteristics of side population (SP) cells. Human HCC tissues used were obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection. SP cells were sorted using flow cytometry. Cell cycle assay, apoptosis assay and colony formation assay were performed to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis. Invasion assay was employed to examine SP cell invasion. Tumorigenicity assay was used to evaluate tumorigenicity. HCC related microRNAs (miRNA) were analyzed using Micro-array analysis. Target genes were predicted using miRNA database. GO analsis was employed to predict target gene function. Apoptosis percentage was lower and cell viability was higher in SP cells than non-SP (NSP) cells. Colony forming ability of SP cells was significantly higher than NSP cells. Transwell assay positive cells in SP cells were higher significantly than NSP cells. Tumorigenicity of SP cells was higher significantly than NSP cells. 107 differentially expression miRNA were discovered, including 45 up-expressed miRNAs and 62 down-expressed miRNAs in SP cells. Up-regulated hsa-miR-193b-3p and hsa-miR-505-3p predict 25 and 35 target genes, and correlated with 4 and 42 GO terms, respectively. Down-regulated hsa-miR-200a-3p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-130b-3p predict 133, 48 and 127 target genes, and correlate with 10, 7 and 109 GO terms, respectively. In conclusion, proliferation, colony formation, anti-apoptosis, self-renewal capavility, invasive characteristic and tumorigenicity in SP cells isolated from HCC tissues was higher compared to NSP cells. Therefore, sorted SP cells could characterize with biological functions of cancer stem cells.

  20. Quiescent nuclear burning in low-metallicity white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller; Garcia-Berro, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the impact of residual nuclear burning in the cooling sequences of hydrogen-rich DA white dwarfs with very low metallicity progenitors ($Z=0.0001$). These cooling sequences are appropriate for the study of very old stellar populations. The results presented here are the product of self-consistent, fully evolutionary calculations. Specifically, we follow the evolution of white dwarf progenitors from the zero-age main sequence through all the evolutionary phases, namely the core hydrogen-burning phase, the helium-burning phase, and the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase to the white dwarf stage. This is done for the most relevant range of main sequence masses, covering the most usual interval of white dwarf masses --- from $0.53\\, M_{\\sun}$ to $0.83\\, M_{\\sun}$. Due to the low metallicity of the progenitor stars, white dwarfs are born with thicker hydrogen envelopes, leading to more intense hydrogen burning shells as compared with their solar metallicity counterparts. We study the phase ...

  1. Label-free detection of neuronal differentiation in cell populations using high-throughput live-cell imaging of PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weber

    Full Text Available Detection of neuronal cell differentiation is essential to study cell fate decisions under various stimuli and/or environmental conditions. Many tools exist that quantify differentiation by neurite length measurements of single cells. However, quantification of differentiation in whole cell populations remains elusive so far. Because such populations can consist of both proliferating and differentiating cells, the task to assess the overall differentiation status is not trivial and requires a high-throughput, fully automated approach to analyze sufficient data for a statistically significant discrimination to determine cell differentiation. We address the problem of detecting differentiation in a mixed population of proliferating and differentiating cells over time by supervised classification. Using nerve growth factor induced differentiation of PC12 cells, we monitor the changes in cell morphology over 6 days by phase-contrast live-cell imaging. For general applicability, the classification procedure starts out with many features to identify those that maximize discrimination of differentiated and undifferentiated cells and to eliminate features sensitive to systematic measurement artifacts. The resulting image analysis determines the optimal post treatment day for training and achieves a near perfect classification of differentiation, which we confirmed in technically and biologically independent as well as differently designed experiments. Our approach allows to monitor neuronal cell populations repeatedly over days without any interference. It requires only an initial calibration and training step and is thereafter capable to discriminate further experiments. In conclusion, this enables long-term, large-scale studies of cell populations with minimized costs and efforts for detecting effects of external manipulation of neuronal cell differentiation.

  2. Persistence of side population cells with high drug efflux capacity in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Chun-You; Liu, Tao; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Feng; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Wu, He-Shui; Tao, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Ming; Gou, Shan-Miao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the persistence of side population (SP) cells in pancreatic cancer and their role and mechanism in the drug resistance. METHODS: The presentation of side population cells in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its proportion change when cultured with Gemcitabine, was detected by Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis. The expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 was detected by real-time PCR in either SP cells or non-SP cells. RESULTS: SP cells do exist in PANC-1, with a median of 3.3% and a range of 2.1-8.7%. After cultured with Gemcitabine for 3 d, the proportion of SP cells increased significantly (3.8% ± 1.9%, 10.7% ± 3.7%, t = 4.616, P = 0.001 < 0.05). ABCB1 and ABCG2 expressed at higher concentrations in SP as compared with non-SP cells (ABCB1: 1.15 ± 0.72, 5.82 ± 1.16, t = 10.839, P = 0.000 < 0.05; ABCG2: 1.16 ± 0.75, 5.48 ± 0.94, t = 11.305, P = 0.000 < 0.05), which may contribute to the efflux of fluorescent staining and drug resistance. CONCLUSION: SP cells with inherently high resistance to chemotherapeutic agents do exist in pancreatic cancers, which may be candidate cancer stem cells contributing to the relapse of the tumor. PMID:18240351

  3. CANDELS: Elevated Black Hole Growth in the Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies at z ∼ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, S. M.; Dekel, Avishai; Somerville, Rachel S.; Young, Joshua A.; Williams, Christina C.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hasinger, Guenther; Nandra, Kirpal; Civano, Francesca; Alexander, David M.; Almaini, Omar; Conselice, Christopher J.; Donley, Jennifer L.; Ferguson, Harry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Hawkins, Matthew; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Mobasher, Bahram; Pérez González, Pablo G.; Pforr, Janine; Primack, Joel R.; Santini, Paola; Stefanon, Mauro; Trump, Jonathan R.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Yan, Haojing

    2017-09-01

    We examine the fraction of massive ({M}* > {10}10 {M}ȯ ) compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at z∼ 2. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that {39.2}-3.6+3.9 % (65/166) of cSFGs at 1.4number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.

  4. Quiescent Giant Molecular Cloud Cores in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, D. C.; Serabyn, E.; Zylka, R.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to map the far-infrared continuum emission (45-175 micrometer) toward several massive Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) cores located near the Galactic center. The observed far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions imply low temperatures (approx. 15 - 22 K) for the bulk of the dust in all the sources, consistent with external heating by the diffuse ISRF and suggest that these GMCs do not harbor high- mass star-formation sites, in spite of their large molecular mass. Observations of FIR atomic fine structure lines of C(sub II) and O(sub I) indicate an ISRF enhancement of approx. 10(exp 3) in the region. Through continuum radiative transfer modeling we show that this radiation field strength is in agreement with the observed FIR and submillimeter spectral energy distributions, assuming primarily external heating of the dust with only limited internal luminosity (approx. 2 x 10(exp 5) solar luminosity). Spectroscopic observations of millimeter-wave transitions of H2CO, CS, and C-34S carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and the Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30-meter telescope indicate a gas temperature of approx. 80 K, significantly higher than the dust temperatures, and density of approx. 1 x 10(exp 5)/cc in GCM0.25 + 0.01, the brightest submillimeter source in the region. We suggest that shocks caused by cloud collisions in the turbulent interstellar medium in the Galactic center region are responsible for heating the molecular gas. This conclusion is supported by the presence of wide-spread emission from molecules such as SiO, SO, and CH3OH, which are considered good shock tracers. We also suggest that the GMCs studied here are representative of the "typical", pre-starforming cloud population in the Galactic center.

  5. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-02-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population.

  6. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-01-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population. PMID:28165017

  7. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantization of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen-culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator-producing cells from nonproducing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one other.

  8. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo eRusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD is to convert glutamate in -aminobutyric acid (GABA.GAD exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67,.that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  9. Stem Leydig cell differentiation: gene expression during development of the adult rat population of Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Erin L; Johnston, Daniel S; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Chen, Haolin; Ge, Ren-Shan; Zirkin, Barry R; Jelinsky, Scott A

    2011-12-01

    Leydig cells are the testosterone-producing cells in the adult male. Adult Leydig cells (ALCs) develop from stem Leydig cells (SLCs) through at least two intermediate cells, progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) and immature Leydig cells (ILCs). Microarray gene expression was used to identify the transcriptional changes that occur with the differentiation of SLCs to PLCs and, thus, with the entry of SLCs into the Leydig cell lineage; to comprehensively examine differentiation through the development of ALCs; and to relate the pattern of gene expression in SLCs to that in a well-established stem cell, bone marrow stem cells (BSCs). We show that the pattern of gene expression by SLCs was more similar to the expression by BSCs, an established stem cell outside the male reproductive tract, than to any of the cells in the Leydig cell developmental lineage. These results indicated that the SLCs have many of the molecular characteristics of other stem cells. Pathway analysis indicated that development of Leydig cells from SLCs to PLCs was associated with decreased expression of genes related to adhesion and increased expression of genes related to steroidogenesis. Gene expression changes between PLCs and ILCs and between ILCs and ALCs were relatively minimal, suggesting that these cells are highly similar. In contrast, gene expression changes between SLCs and ALCs were quite distinct.

  10. Taxonomic separation of hippocampal networks: principal cell populations and adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelof Maarten evan Dijk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non

  11. Peripheral Immune Cell Populations Associated with Cognitive Deficits and Negative Symptoms of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Fernandez-Egea

    Full Text Available Hypothetically, psychotic disorders could be caused or conditioned by immunological mechanisms. If so, one might expect there to be peripheral immune system phenotypes that are measurable in blood cells as biomarkers of psychotic states.We used multi-parameter flow cytometry of venous blood to quantify and determine the activation state of 73 immune cell subsets for 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia (17 treated with clozapine, and 18 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, BMI and smoking. We used multivariate methods (partial least squares to reduce dimensionality and define populations of differentially co-expressed cell counts in the cases compared to controls.Schizophrenia cases had increased relative numbers of NK cells, naïve B cells, CXCR5+ memory T cells and classical monocytes; and decreased numbers of dendritic cells (DC, HLA-DR+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Likewise, within the patient group, more severe negative and cognitive symptoms were associated with decreased relative numbers of dendritic cells, HLA-DR+ Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Motivated by the importance of central nervous system dopamine signalling for psychosis, we measured dopamine receptor gene expression in separated CD4+ cells. Expression of the dopamine D3 (DRD3 receptor was significantly increased in clozapine-treated schizophrenia and covaried significantly with differentiated T cell classes in the CD4+ lineage.Peripheral immune cell populations and dopaminergic signalling are disrupted in clozapine-treated schizophrenia. Immuno-phenotypes may provide peripherally accessible and mechanistically specific biomarkers of residual cognitive and negative symptoms in this treatment-resistant subgroup of patients.

  12. Pure populations of murine macrophages from cultured embryonic stem cells. Application to studies of chemotaxis and apoptotic cell clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lihui; Pound, John D; Willems, Jorine J L P; Taylor, A Helen; Forrester, Lesley M; Gregory, Christopher D

    2012-11-30

    Embryonic stem cells provide a potentially convenient source of macrophages in the laboratory. Given the propensity of macrophages for plasticity in phenotype and function, standardised culture and differentiation protocols are required to ensure consistency in population output and activity in functional assays. Here we detail the development of an optimised culture protocol for the production of murine embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM). This protocol provides improved yields of ESDM and we demonstrate that the cells are suitable for application to the study of macrophage responses to apoptotic cells. ESDM so produced were of higher purity than commonly used primary macrophage preparations and were functional in chemotaxis assays and in phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Maturation of ESDM was found to be associated with reduced capacity for directed migration and increased capacity for phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. These results show ESDM to be functionally active in sequential phases of interaction with apoptotic cells and establish these macrophage populations as useful models for further study of molecular mechanisms underlying the recognition and removal of apoptotic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photospheric flows around a quiescent filament and CALAS first results .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondi, S.; Roudier, Th.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Malherbe, J. M.; Schmieder, B.; Meunier, N.; Rieutord, M.; Beigbeder., F.

    The horizontal photospheric flows below and around a filament are one of the components in the formation and evolution of filaments. Few studies have been done so far because this requires multiwalength time sequences with high spatial resolution. We present observations obtained in 2004 during the international JOP 178 campaign in which eleven instruments were involved, from space and ground based observatories. Several supergranulation cells are crossing the Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) allowing the transport of magnetic flux through the PIL, in particular the parasitic polarities. Before the filament eruptive phase, parasitic and normal polarities are swept by a continuous diverging horizontal flow located in the filament gap where the disappearance of the filament starts. In the future, observations at high spatial resolution on a large field-of-view would be very useful to study filaments, as they are very large structures. We also present the first images obtained with the use of our new 14 MPixel camera CALAS (CAmera for the LArge Scales of the Solar Surface) (10 arcmin× 6.7 arcmin) . These are the first large-scale and high-resolution images of the solar surface ever made.

  14. ABCB5 identifies a therapy-refractory tumor cell population in colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Gasser, Martin; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R.; Schanche, Robin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gold, Jason S.; Huang, Qin; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.; Frank, Natasha Y.

    2012-01-01

    Identification and reversal of treatment resistance mechanisms of clinically refractory tumor cells is critical for successful cancer therapy. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients following fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy and provide evidence for a functional role of ABCB5 in colorectal cancer 5-FU resistance. Examination of human colon and colorectal cancer specimens revealed ABCB5 to be expressed only on rare cells within healthy intestinal tissue, whereas clinical colorectal cancers exhibited substantially increased levels of ABCB5 expression. Analysis of successive, patient-matched biopsy specimens obtained prior to and following neoadjuvant 5-FU-based chemoradiation therapy in a series of colorectal cancer patients revealed markedly enhanced abundance of ABCB5-positive tumor cells when residual disease was detected. Consistent with this finding, the ABCB5-expressing tumor cell population was also treatment-refractory and exhibited resistance to 5-FU-induced apoptosis in a colorectal cancer xenograft model of 5-FU monotherapy. Mechanistically, shRNA-mediated ABCB5 knockdown significantly inhibited tumorigenic xenograft growth and sensitized colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU-induced cell killing. Our results identify ABCB5 as a novel molecular marker of therapy-refractory tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients and point to a need for consistent eradication of ABCB5-positive resistant tumor cell populations for more effective colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:21652540

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND KINETICS OF 2 RECENTLY BONE-MARROW-DERIVED B-CELL POPULATIONS IN PERIPHERAL LYMPHOID-TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KROESE, FGM; DEBOER, NK; DEBOER, T; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KANTOR, AB; DEENEN, GJ

    1995-01-01

    In rats, the glycoprotein Thy-1 is expressed on recently bone marrow (BM)-generated B cells but not on mature recirculating follicular (RF) B cells. Here we demonstrate that Thy-1(+) B cells consist of two phenotypically distinct, but developmentally related, populations: a population of newly forme

  16. Approaches for cytogenetic and molecular analyses of small flow-sorted cell populations from childhood leukemia bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obro, Nina Friesgaard; Madsen, Hans O.; Ryder, Lars Peter;

    2011-01-01

    defined cell populations with subsequent analyses of leukemia-associated cytogenetic and molecular marker. The approaches described here optimize the use of the same tube of unfixed, antibody-stained BM cells for flow-sorting of small cell populations and subsequent exploratory FISH and PCR-based analyses....

  17. IDENTIFICATION AND KINETICS OF 2 RECENTLY BONE-MARROW-DERIVED B-CELL POPULATIONS IN PERIPHERAL LYMPHOID-TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KROESE, FGM; DEBOER, NK; DEBOER, T; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KANTOR, AB; DEENEN, GJ

    1995-01-01

    In rats, the glycoprotein Thy-1 is expressed on recently bone marrow (BM)-generated B cells but not on mature recirculating follicular (RF) B cells. Here we demonstrate that Thy-1(+) B cells consist of two phenotypically distinct, but developmentally related, populations: a population of newly forme

  18. A mutation-promotive role of nucleotide excision repair in cell cycle-arrested cell populations following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Erich; Eisler, Herfried; Lengheimer, Theresia; Dorninger, Petra; Steinboeck, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Growing attention is paid to the concept that mutations arising in stationary, non-proliferating cell populations considerably contribute to evolution, aging, and pathogenesis. If such mutations are beneficial to the affected cell, in the sense of allowing a restart of proliferation, they are called adaptive mutations. In order to identify cellular processes responsible for adaptive mutagenesis in eukaryotes, we study frameshift mutations occurring during auxotrophy-caused cell cycle arrest in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous work has shown that an exposure of cells to UV irradiation during prolonged cell cycle arrest resulted in an increased incidence of mutations. In the present work, we determined the influence of defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway on the incidence of UV-induced adaptive mutations in stationary cells. The mutation frequency was decreased in Rad16-deficient cells and further decreased in Rad16/Rad26 double-deficient cells. A knockout of the RAD14 gene, the ortholog of the human XPA gene, even resulted in a nearly complete abolishment of UV-induced mutagenesis in cell cycle-arrested cells. Thus, the NER pathway, responsible for a normally accurate repair of UV-induced DNA damage, paradoxically is required for the generation and/or fixation of UV-induced frameshift mutations specifically in non-replicating cells.

  19. Microelectromechanical System-Based Sensing Arrays for Comparative in Vitro Nanotoxicity Assessment at Single Cell and Small Cell-Population Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratikkumar; Zhu, Xuena; Zhang, Xueji; He, Jin; Li, Chen-zhong

    2016-03-01

    The traditional in vitro nanotoxicity assessment approaches are conducted on a monolayer of cell culture. However, to study a cell response without interference from the neighbor cells, a single cell study is necessary; especially in cases of neuronal, cancerous, and stem cells, wherein an individual cell's fate is often not explained by the whole cell population. Nonetheless, a single cell does not mimic the actual in vivo environment and lacks important information regarding cell communication with its microenvironment. Both a single cell and a cell population provide important and complementary information about cells' behaviors. In this research, we explored nanotoxicity assessment on a single cell and a small cell population using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device. We demonstrated a controlled capture of PC12 cells in different-sized microwells (to capture a different number of cells) using a combined method of surface functionalization and dielectrophoresis. The present approach provides a rapid nanotoxicity response as compared to other conventional approaches. This is the first study, to our knowledge, which demonstrates a comparative response of a single cell and small cell colonies on the same MEMS platform, when exposed to metaloxide nanoparticles. We demonstrated that the microenvironment of a cell is also accountable for cells' behaviors and their responses to nanomaterials. The results of this experimental study open up a new hypothesis to be tested for identifying the role of cell communication in spreading toxicity in a cell population.

  20. Culture of isolated single cells from Taxus suspensions for the propagation of superior cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naill, Michael C; Roberts, Susan C

    2005-11-01

    Single cells isolated from aggregated Taxus cuspidata cultures via enzymatic digestion were grown in suspension culture. High seeding density (4 x 10(5 )cells/ml) and the addition of cell-free conditioned medium were essential for growth. Doubling the concentration of the nutrients [ascorbic acid (150 g/l), glutamine (6.25 mM: ), and citric acid (150 g/l)] had no effect on single cell growth or viability. A specific growth rate of 0.11 days(-1) was achieved, which is similar to the observed growth rate of aggregated Taxus suspensions. The biocide, Plant Preservative Mixture, added at 0.2% (v/v) to all single cell cultures to prevent microbial contamination, had no significant effect on growth or viability. Following cell sorting, single cell cultures can be used to establish new cell lines for biotechnology applications or provide cells for further study.

  1. CD133 positive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma stem-like cell population is enriched in rhabdospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Walter

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been identified in a number of solid tumors, but not yet in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, the most frequently occurring soft tissue tumor in childhood. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify and characterize a CSC population in RMS using a functional approach. We found that embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS cell lines can form rhabdomyosarcoma spheres (short rhabdospheres in stem cell medium containing defined growth factors over several passages. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we demonstrate that a 100 fold less sphere cells result in faster tumor growth compared to the adherent population suggesting that CSCs were enriched in the sphere population. Furthermore, stem cell genes such as oct4, nanog, c-myc, pax3 and sox2 are significantly upregulated in rhabdospheres which can be differentiated into multiple lineages such as adipocytes, myocytes and neuronal cells. Surprisingly, gene expression profiles indicate that rhabdospheres show more similarities with neuronal than with hematopoietic or mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of these profiles identified the known CSC marker CD133 as one of the genes upregulated in rhabdospheres, both on RNA and protein levels. CD133(+ sorted cells were subsequently shown to be more tumorigenic and more resistant to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Using a tissue microarray (TMA of eRMS patients, we found that high expression of CD133 correlates with poor overall survival. Hence, CD133 could be a prognostic marker for eRMS. These experiments indicate that a CD133(+ CSC population can be enriched from eRMS which might help to develop novel targeted therapies against this pediatric tumor.

  2. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Chaperones Accelerates Evolutionary Dynamics in Adapting Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cetinbaş; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly f...

  3. The Notch Pathway Is Important in Maintaining the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Ethan V.; Kim, Edward J.; Jingjiang Wu; Mark Hynes; Filip Bednar; Erica Proctor; Lidong Wang; Dziubinski, Michele L; Simeone, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized. Methods Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) that inhi...

  4. Normalizing for individual cell population context in the analysis of high-content cellular screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Bettina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-content, high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi offers unprecedented possibilities to elucidate gene function and involvement in biological processes. Microscopy based screening allows phenotypic observations at the level of individual cells. It was recently shown that a cell's population context significantly influences results. However, standard analysis methods for cellular screens do not currently take individual cell data into account unless this is important for the phenotype of interest, i.e. when studying cell morphology. Results We present a method that normalizes and statistically scores microscopy based RNAi screens, exploiting individual cell information of hundreds of cells per knockdown. Each cell's individual population context is employed in normalization. We present results on two infection screens for hepatitis C and dengue virus, both showing considerable effects on observed phenotypes due to population context. In addition, we show on a non-virus screen that these effects can be found also in RNAi data in the absence of any virus. Using our approach to normalize against these effects we achieve improved performance in comparison to an analysis without this normalization and hit scoring strategy. Furthermore, our approach results in the identification of considerably more significantly enriched pathways in hepatitis C virus replication than using a standard analysis approach. Conclusions Using a cell-based analysis and normalization for population context, we achieve improved sensitivity and specificity not only on a individual protein level, but especially also on a pathway level. This leads to the identification of new host dependency factors of the hepatitis C and dengue viruses and higher reproducibility of results.

  5. A host-parasite model for a two-type cell population

    CERN Document Server

    Alsmeyer, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    A host-parasite model is considered for a population of cells that can be of two types, A or B, and exhibits unilateral reproduction: while a B-cell always splits into two cells of the same type, the two daughter cells of an A-cell can be of any type. The random mechanism that describes how parasites within a cell multiply and are then shared into the daughter cells is allowed to depend on the hosting mother cell as well as its daughter cells. Focusing on the subpopulation of A-cells and its parasites, the model differs from the single-type model recently studied by Bansaye (2008) in that the sharing mechanism may be biased towards one of the two types. Main results are concerned with the nonextinctive case and provide information on the behavior, as $n\\to\\infty$, of the number A-parasites in generation n and the relative proportion of A- and B-cells in this generation which host a given number of parasites. As in (Bansaye,2008), proofs will make use of a so-called random cell line which, when conditioned to ...

  6. Identification of a novel population of human cord blood cells with hematopoietic and chondrocytic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen E JAY; Anne ROULEAU; T Michael UNDERHILL; Mickie BHATIA

    2004-01-01

    With the exception of mature erythrocytes, cells within the human hematopoietic system are characterized by the cell surface expression of the pan-leukocyte receptor CD45. Here, we identify a novel subset among mononuclear cord blood cells depleted of lineage commitment markers (Lin-) that are devoid of CD45 expression. Surprisingly, functional examination of Lin-CD45- cells also lacking cell surface CD34 revealed they were capable of multipotential hematopoietic progenitor capacity. Co-culture with mouse embryonic limb bud cells demonstrated that Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were capable of contributing to cartilage nodules and differentiating into human chondrocytes. BMP-4, a mesodermal factor known to promote chondrogenesis, significantly augmented Lin-CD45-CD34- differentiation into chondrocytes.Moreover, unlike CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells, Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were unable to proliferate or survive in liquid cultures, whereas single Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were able to chimerize the inner cell mass (ICM) of murine blastocysts and proliferate in this embryonic environment. Our study identifies a novel population of Lin-CD45-CD34-cells capable of commitment into both hematopoietic and chondrocytic lineages, suggesting that human cord blood may provide a more ubiquitous source of tissue with broader developmental potential than previously appreciated.

  7. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  8. Increased autophagic response in a population of metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y I; Libby, Emily Falk; Lewis, Monica J; Liu, Jianzhong; Shacka, John J; Hurst, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer cells are heterogeneous in their ability to invade and fully metastasize, and thus also in their capacity to survive the numerous stresses encountered throughout the multiple steps of the metastatic cascade. Considering the role of autophagy as a survival response to stress, the present study hypothesized that distinct populations of breast cancer cells may possess an altered autophagic capacity that influences their metastatic potential. It was observed that a metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, that was sensitive to autophagic induction additionally possessed the ability to proliferate following nutrient deprivation. Furthermore, a selected subpopulation of these cells that survived multiple exposures to starvation conditions demonstrated a heightened response to autophagic induction compared to their parent cells. Although this subpopulation maintained a more grape-like pattern in three-dimensional culture compared to the extended spikes of the parent population, autophagic induction in this subpopulation elicited an invasive phenotype with extended spikes. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagic induction may contribute to the ability of distinct breast cancer cell populations to survive and invade.

  9. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  10. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  11. Differential Clonal Expansion in an Invading Cell Population: Clonal Advantage or Dumb Luck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgreen, Donald F; Zhang, Dongcheng; Cheeseman, Bevan L; Binder, Benjamin J; Landman, Kerry A

    2017-01-01

    In neoplastic cell growth, clones and subclones are variable both in size and mutational spectrum. The largest of these clones are believed to represent those cells with mutations that make them the most "fit," in a Darwinian sense, for expansion in their microenvironment. Thus, the degree of quantitative clonal expansion is regarded as being determined by innate qualitative differences between the cells that originate each clone. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling and clonal labelling experiments applied to the developmental model system of the forming enteric nervous system, we describe how cells which are qualitatively identical may consistently produce clones of dramatically different sizes: most clones are very small while a few clones we term "superstars" contribute most of the cells to the final population. The basis of this is minor stochastic variations ("luck") in the timing and direction of movement and proliferation of individual cells, which builds a local advantage for daughter cells that is cumulative. This has potentially important consequences. In cancers, especially before strongly selective cytotoxic therapy, the assumption that the largest clones must be the cells with deterministic proliferative ability may not always hold true. In development, the gradual loss of clonal diversity as "superstars" take over the population may erode the resilience of the system to somatic mutations, which may have occurred early in clonal growth.

  12. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectral Energy Distribution of Markarian 501: Quiescent State Versus Extreme Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciari, V. A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huang, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Paneque, D.; Hayashida, M.

    2011-03-01

    The very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) has a well-studied history of extreme spectral variability and is an excellent laboratory for studying the physical processes within the jets of active galactic nuclei. However, there are few detailed multiwavelength studies of Mrk 501 during its quiescent state, due to its low luminosity. A short-term multiwavelength study of Mrk 501 was coordinated in 2009 March, focusing around a multi-day observation with the Suzaku X-ray satellite and including γ-ray data from VERITAS, MAGIC, and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with the goal of providing a well-sampled multiwavelength baseline measurement of Mrk 501 in the quiescent state. The results of these quiescent-state observations are compared to the historically extreme outburst of 1997 April 16, with the goal of examining variability of the spectral energy distribution (SED) between the two states. The derived broadband SED shows the characteristic double-peaked profile. We find that the X-ray peak shifts by over two orders of magnitude in photon energy between the two flux states while the VHE peak varies little. The limited shift in the VHE peak can be explained by the transition to the Klein-Nishina (KN) regime. Synchrotron self-Compton models are matched to the data and the implied KN effects are explored.

  14. Spectral Energy Distribution of Markarian 501: Quiescent State vs. Extreme Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huang, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B; Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Paneque, D; Hayashida, M

    2010-01-01

    The very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 has a well-studied history of extreme spectral variability and is an excellent laboratory for studying the physical processes within the jets of active galactic nuclei. However, there are few detailed multiwavelength studies of Markarian 501 during its quiescent state, due to its low luminosity. A short-term multiwavelength study of Markarian 501 was coordinated in March 2009, focusing around a multi-day observation with the Suzaku X-ray satellite and including {\\gamma}-ray data from VERITAS, MAGIC, and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with the goal of providing a well-sampled multiwavelength baseline measurement of Markarian 501 in the quiescent state. The results of these quiescent-state observations are compared to the historically extreme outburst of April 16, 1997, with the goal of examining variability of the spectral energy distribution between the two states. The derived broadband spectral energy distribution shows the characteristic doub...

  15. Evaluation of bacteriology of middle ear in early quiescent stage of chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Bhandari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine whether any organism does exist in middle ear cavity during the early quiescent stage of chronic otitis media and to isolate their types. Materials and methods Forty-seven patients of age 13 years and above with diagnosis of chronic otitis media mucosal type in early quiescent stage were included. Swab was collected from middle ear cavity for culture and sensitivity in operation theatre prior to middle ear surgery and brought to microbiology laboratory within half an hour to inoculate in Blood agar, Chocolate agar and Mac Conkey agar. The isolates were identified with the use of standard bacteriological technique. Results Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 15 cases (31.9%. Staphylococcus aureus isolated in 12(80%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2(13.3% and E. coli in 1(6.7%. Conclusion Aerobic bacteria were isolated from middle ear cavity in quiescent stage of chronic otitis media in 15(32% cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2012, Vol-8, No-4, 22-26 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i4.8696

  16. ONE PLANE FOR ALL: MASSIVE STAR-FORMING AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES LIE ON THE SAME MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE AT z ∼ 0 AND z ∼ 0.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezanson, Rachel [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Franx, Marijn [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Scaling relations between galaxy structures and dynamics have been studied extensively for early- and late-type galaxies, both in the local universe and at high redshifts. The abundant differences between the properties of disky and elliptical, or star-forming and quiescent, galaxies seem to be characteristic of the local universe; such clear distinctions begin to disintegrate as observations of massive galaxies probe higher redshifts. In this paper we investigate the existence of the mass fundamental plane of all massive galaxies (σ ≳ 100 km s{sup –1}). This work includes local galaxies (0.05 < z < 0.07) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, in addition to 31 star-forming and 72 quiescent massive galaxies at intermediate redshift (z ∼ 0.7) with absorption-line kinematics from deep Keck-DEIMOS spectra and structural parameters from Hubble Space Telescope imaging. In two-parameter scaling relations, star-forming and quiescent galaxies differ structurally and dynamically. However, we show that massive star-forming and quiescent galaxies lie on nearly the same mass fundamental plane, or the relationship between stellar mass surface density, stellar velocity dispersion, and effective radius. The scatter in this relation (measured about log σ) is low: 0.072 dex (0.055 dex intrinsic) at z ∼ 0 and 0.10 dex (0.08 dex intrinsic) at z ∼ 0.7. This 3D surface is not unique: virial relations, with or without a dependence on luminosity profile shapes, can connect galaxy structures and stellar dynamics with similar scatter. This result builds on the recent finding that mass fundamental plane has been stable for early-type galaxies since z ∼ 2. As we now find that this also holds for star-forming galaxies to z ∼ 0.7, this implies that these scaling relations of galaxies will be minimally susceptible to progenitor biases owing to the evolving stellar populations, structures, and dynamics of galaxies through cosmic time.

  17. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem

  18. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in a Population of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    African Health Sciences Vol 7 No 3 September 2007. 129. Human T-cell ... The results of this study thus show that HTLV infection is active in the population although higher in pregnant .... Software Version 2.0 running on a window NT platform.

  19. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem cel

  20. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  1. Numerically exploring habitat fragmentation effects on populations using cell-based coupled map lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bevers; Curtis H. Flather

    1999-01-01

    We examine habitat size, shape, and arrangement effects on populations using a discrete reaction-diffusion model. Diffusion is modeled passively and applied to a cellular grid of territories forming a coupled map lattice. Dispersal mortality is proportional to the amount of nonhabitat and fully occupied habitat surrounding a given cell, with distance decay. After...

  2. Two developmentally distinct populations of neural crest cells contribute to the zebrafish heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Ann M; Huang, Jie; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2015-08-15

    Cardiac neural crest cells are essential for outflow tract remodeling in animals with divided systemic and pulmonary circulatory systems, but their contributions to cardiac development in animals with a single-loop circulatory system are less clear. Here we genetically labeled neural crest cells and examined their contribution to the developing zebrafish heart. We identified two populations of neural crest cells that contribute to distinct compartments of zebrafish cardiovascular system at different developmental stages. A stream of neural crest cells migrating through pharyngeal arches 1 and 2 integrates into the myocardium of the primitive heart tube between 24 and 30 h post fertilization and gives rise to cardiomyocytes. A second wave of neural crest cells migrating along aortic arch 6 envelops the endothelium of the ventral aorta and invades the bulbus arteriosus after three days of development. Interestingly, while inhibition of FGF signaling has no effect on the integration of neural crest cells to the primitive heart tube, it prevents these cells from contributing to the outflow tract, demonstrating disparate responses of neural crest cells to FGF signaling. Furthermore, neural crest ablation in zebrafish leads to multiple cardiac defects, including reduced heart rate, defective myocardial maturation and a failure to recruit progenitor cells from the second heart field. These findings add to our understanding of the contribution of neural crest cells to the developing heart and provide insights into the requirement for these cells in cardiac maturation.

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Oral Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Iranian Population: a 20-year Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with unknown pathogenesis and is characterized by local or disseminated proliferation of Langerhans cells. There is no previous investigation on prevalence of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian population. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an Iranian population and to compare the data with previous reports. Materials and Method: Pathology files of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from 1992 to 2012 were searched for cases recorded as oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A total number of 20 cases were found and the clinical information of patients was recorded. Results: The relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis was 0.34% and the most common location was the posterior mandible. In addition, the mean age of patients was 27 years and there was a definite male predominance. Most lesions were localized and tooth mobility was the most common oral presentation. Conclusion: In Iranian population as in many other countries, the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis is low. Moreover, tooth mobility and periodontal lesions are the frequent early signs of disease. Therefore, in patients with periodontal problems, good oral health, and no response to the treatment; Langerhans cell histiocytosis must be considered. Additionally, although most cases of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis are localized, systemic involvement must also be considered and dental professionals have an important role in early detection of the disease.

  4. A Retrospective Analysis of Oral Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Iranian Population: a 20-year Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Piroozhashemi, Batool; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with unknown pathogenesis and is characterized by local or disseminated proliferation of Langerhans cells. There is no previous investigation on prevalence of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian population. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an Iranian population and to compare the data with previous reports. Materials and Method Pathology files of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from 1992 to 2012 were searched for cases recorded as oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A total number of 20 cases were found and the clinical information of patients was recorded. Results The relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis was 0.34% and the most common location was the posterior mandible. In addition, the mean age of patients was 27 years and there was a definite male predominance. Most lesions were localized and tooth mobility was the most common oral presentation. Conclusion In Iranian population as in many other countries, the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis is low. Moreover, tooth mobility and periodontal lesions are the frequent early signs of disease. Therefore, in patients with periodontal problems, good oral health, and no response to the treatment; Langerhans cell histiocytosis must be considered. Additionally, although most cases of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis are localized, systemic involvement must also be considered and dental professionals have an important role in early detection of the disease. PMID:26535408

  5. Fundamental trade-offs between information flow in single cells and cellular populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderman, Ryan; Bachman, John A; Smith, Adam; Sorger, Peter K; Deeds, Eric J

    2017-05-30

    Signal transduction networks allow eukaryotic cells to make decisions based on information about intracellular state and the environment. Biochemical noise significantly diminishes the fidelity of signaling: networks examined to date seem to transmit less than 1 bit of information. It is unclear how networks that control critical cell-fate decisions (e.g., cell division and apoptosis) can function with such low levels of information transfer. Here, we use theory, experiments, and numerical analysis to demonstrate an inherent trade-off between the information transferred in individual cells and the information available to control population-level responses. Noise in receptor-mediated apoptosis reduces information transfer to approximately 1 bit at the single-cell level but allows 3-4 bits of information to be transmitted at the population level. For processes such as eukaryotic chemotaxis, in which single cells are the functional unit, we find high levels of information transmission at a single-cell level. Thus, low levels of information transfer are unlikely to represent a physical limit. Instead, we propose that signaling networks exploit noise at the single-cell level to increase population-level information transfer, allowing extracellular ligands, whose levels are also subject to noise, to incrementally regulate phenotypic changes. This is particularly critical for discrete changes in fate (e.g., life vs. death) for which the key variable is the fraction of cells engaged. Our findings provide a framework for rationalizing the high levels of noise in metazoan signaling networks and have implications for the development of drugs that target these networks in the treatment of cancer and other diseases.

  6. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

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    Newman Mark J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at http://epitope.liai.org:8080/tools/population. Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine, and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups.

  7. Analysis of in vitro secretion profiles from adipose-derived cell populations

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    Blaber Sinead P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose tissue is an attractive source of cells for therapeutic purposes because of the ease of harvest and the high frequency of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Whilst it is clear that MSCs have significant therapeutic potential via their ability to secrete immuno-modulatory and trophic cytokines, the therapeutic use of mixed cell populations from the adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF is becoming increasingly common. Methods In this study we have measured a panel of 27 cytokines and growth factors secreted by various combinations of human adipose-derived cell populations. These were 1. co-culture of freshly isolated SVF with adipocytes, 2. freshly isolated SVF cultured alone, 3. freshly isolated adipocytes alone and 4. adherent adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs at passage 2. In addition, we produced an ‘in silico’ dataset by combining the individual secretion profiles obtained from culturing the SVF with that of the adipocytes. This was compared to the secretion profile of co-cultured SVF and adipocytes. Two-tailed t-tests were performed on the secretion profiles obtained from the SVF, adipocytes, ADSCs and the ‘in silico’ dataset and compared to the secretion profiles obtained from the co-culture of the SVF with adipocytes. A p-value of  Results A co-culture of SVF and adipocytes results in a distinct secretion profile when compared to all other adipose-derived cell populations studied. This illustrates that cellular crosstalk during co-culture of the SVF with adipocytes modulates the production of cytokines by one or more cell types. No biologically relevant differences were detected in the proteomes of SVF cultured alone or co-cultured with adipocytes. Conclusions The use of mixed adipose cell populations does not appear to induce cellular stress and results in enhanced secretion profiles. Given the importance of secreted cytokines in cell therapy, the use of a mixed cell population such as the

  8. microRNA Expression Profiling of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Cancer and Preliminary Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    XU, XIAOTAO; Xiao LU; Sun, Jing; Shu, Yongqian

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective Recent studies indicate that the side population (SP) which is an enriched source of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is the root cause of tumor growth and development. SP appears to be highly resistant to chemo- and radio-therapy which becomes an important factor in tumor recurrence and metastasis. The aim of this study is to determine the difference of microRNA expression profiles between SP cells and non-SP cells so as to lay necessary basis for research on the function of...

  9. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

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    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  10. The effect of the prior flow velocity on the structural organization of aggregated erythrocytes in the quiescent blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, Alexander; Meyerstein, Dan; Meyerstein, Naomi

    2011-02-01

    Usually, investigations of erythrocyte aggregation at rest are focused on effects of the strength of erythrocyte-erythrocyte attractive interactions and the volume fraction of the cells, whereas the role of prior flow velocity has not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study is to fill this gap. The main conclusions extracted from time records of the complex admittance of blood are as follows: (1) Dispersion of blood in a prior flow into discrete aggregates increases the mesh size of network, which, as has been recently shown, is formed in the quiescent blood. (2) If the energy of the flow field is sufficient to prevent the formation of face-to-side intercellular links, so that the dispersed phase consists of linear rouleaux, changes in the mesh size correlate positively with the length of rouleaux. (3) At slower prior flow velocities, the cells are combined into branched aggregates. As the degree of branching increases, the effect becomes less important. (4) The effects of the length of linear rouleaux and the degree of branching of ramified aggregates on the mesh size are qualitatively similar for suspensions with different aggregating media. (5) Erythrocytes suspended in strongly aggregating media form at low flow conditions a network-like structure. In this case, unlike high and moderate prior flow regimes, the mesh size of RBC network at rest is less than that formed after the stoppage of completely dispersed blood.

  11. Malignant behaviorial characteristics of CD133(+/-) glioblastoma cells from a Northern Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhongmin; Wang, Junfei; Su, Zhiguo; Li, Gang; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Zhenlin

    2013-01-01

    Following emergence of the tumor stem cell theory, the increasing number of related studies demonstrates the theory's growing importance in cancer research and its potential for clinical applications. Few studies have addressed the in vitro or in vivo properties of glioma stem cells from a Han Chinese population. In the present study, surgically obtained glioblastoma tissue was classified into two subtypes, CD133(+) and CD133(-). The hierarchy, invasiveness, growth tolerance under low nutrient conditions and colony forming abilities of the tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, the characteristics of tumor cells transplanted subcutaneously or re-transplanted into nude mice were observed. The results demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells derived from Han Chinese glioma specimens were more prone to primitive cell differentiation and more invasive than CD133(-) glioblastoma cells, leading to increased tumor malignancy compared with CD133(-) cells. The tumor formation rates of CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells in mice were 26/30 and 2/30, respectively. A comparison of tumor subtypes demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells had a lower incidence of cell apoptosis in the tumor tissue and higher protein expression levels of Oct4, Sox2, PCNA, EGFR, Ang2, MMP2 and MMP9 compared with CD133(-) cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in the CD133(+) and CD133(-) glioblastoma cell-induced tumors, the percentage of CD133(+) cells was 2.47±0.67 and 0.44±0.14%, respectively. The tumor formation rates following the re-transplantation of CD133(+) or CD133(-) tumors into nude mice were 10/10 and 4/10, respectively. These findings suggest that the CD133(+) glioblastoma cell subpopulation has a stronger malignant cell phenotype than the CD133(-) subpopulation and that its recurrence rate is increased compared with the primitive tumorigenic rate following in vivo transplantation.

  12. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

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    Christopher M Penton

    Full Text Available Muscle side population (SP cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45 and vascular (CD31 markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Molecular and functional heterogeneity of early postnatal porcine satellite cell populations is associated with bioenergetic profile

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    Miersch, Claudia; Stange, Katja; Hering, Silvio; Kolisek, Martin; Viergutz, Torsten; Röntgen, Monika

    2017-01-01

    During postnatal development, hyperplastic and hypertrophic processes of skeletal muscle growth depend on the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and fusion of satellite cells (SC). Therefore, molecular and functional SC heterogeneity is an important component of muscle plasticity and will greatly affect long-term growth performance and muscle health. However, its regulation by cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is far from clear. In particular, there is only minor information on the early postnatal period which is critical for muscle maturation and the establishment of adult SC pools. Here, we separated two SC subpopulations (P40/50, P50/70) from muscle of 4-day-old piglets. Our results characterize P40/50 as homogeneous population of committed (high expression of Myf5), fast-proliferating muscle progenitors. P50/70 constituted a slow-proliferating phenotype and contains high numbers of differentiated SC progeny. During culture, P50/70 is transformed to a population with lower differentiation potential that contains 40% Pax7-positive cells. A reversible state of low mitochondrial activity that results from active down-regulation of ATP-synthase is associated with the transition of some of the P50/70 cells to this more primitive fate typical for a reserve cell population. We assume that P40/50 and P50/70 subpopulations contribute unequally in the processes of myofiber growth and maintenance of the SC pool. PMID:28344332

  14. Pentoxifylline Inhibits WNT Signalling in β-Cateninhigh Patient-Derived Melanoma Cell Populations.

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    Beata Talar

    Full Text Available The heterogeneity of melanoma needs to be addressed and combination therapies seem to be necessary to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to newly developed immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Although the role of WNT/β-catenin pathway in melanoma was early demonstrated, its contribution to the lack of the melanoma patient response to treatment was only recently recognized. Using patient-derived melanoma cell populations, we investigated the influence of pentoxifylline on melanoma cells with either high or low expression of β-catenin.Our results indicate that pentoxifylline inhibits the activity of the canonical WNT pathway in melanoma cell populations with high basal activity of this signalling. This is supported by lowered overall activity of transcription factors TCF/LEF and reduced nuclear localisation of active β-catenin. Moreover, treatment of β-cateninhigh melanoma cell populations with pentoxifylline induces downregulation of genes that are targets of the WNT/β-catenin pathway including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M, a melanocyte- and melanoma cell-specific regulator.These results suggest that pentoxifylline, a drug approved by the FDA in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, might be tested in a subset of melanoma patients with elevated activity of β-catenin. This pharmaceutical might be tested as an adjuvant drug in combination therapies when the response to immunotherapy is prevented by high activity of the WNT/β-catenin pathway.

  15. Pentoxifylline Inhibits WNT Signalling in β-Cateninhigh Patient-Derived Melanoma Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talar, Beata; Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Talar, Marcin; Chouaib, Salem; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background The heterogeneity of melanoma needs to be addressed and combination therapies seem to be necessary to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to newly developed immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Although the role of WNT/β-catenin pathway in melanoma was early demonstrated, its contribution to the lack of the melanoma patient response to treatment was only recently recognized. Using patient-derived melanoma cell populations, we investigated the influence of pentoxifylline on melanoma cells with either high or low expression of β-catenin. Findings Our results indicate that pentoxifylline inhibits the activity of the canonical WNT pathway in melanoma cell populations with high basal activity of this signalling. This is supported by lowered overall activity of transcription factors TCF/LEF and reduced nuclear localisation of active β-catenin. Moreover, treatment of β-cateninhigh melanoma cell populations with pentoxifylline induces downregulation of genes that are targets of the WNT/β-catenin pathway including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M), a melanocyte- and melanoma cell-specific regulator. Conclusions These results suggest that pentoxifylline, a drug approved by the FDA in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, might be tested in a subset of melanoma patients with elevated activity of β-catenin. This pharmaceutical might be tested as an adjuvant drug in combination therapies when the response to immunotherapy is prevented by high activity of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27351373

  16. Doped overoxidized polypyrrole microelectrodes as sensors for the detection of dopamine released from cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Luigi; Heiskanen, Arto; Diazzi, Francesco; Dimaki, Maria; Castillo-León, Jaime; Vergani, Marco; Landini, Ettore; Raiteri, Roberto; Ferrari, Giorgio; Carminati, Marco; Sampietro, Marco; Svendsen, Winnie E; Emnéus, Jenny

    2013-07-07

    A surface modification of interdigitated gold microelectrodes (IDEs) with a doped polypyrrole (PPy) film for detection of dopamine released from populations of differentiated PC12 cells is presented. A thin PPy layer was potentiostatically electropolymerized from an aqueous pyrrole solution onto electrode surfaces. The conducting polymer film was doped during electropolymerization by introducing counter-ions in the monomer solution. Several counter-ions were tested and the resulting electrode modifications were characterized electrochemically to find the optimal dopant that increases sensitivity in dopamine detection. Overoxidation of the PPy films was shown to contribute to a significant enhancement in sensitivity to dopamine. The changes caused by overoxidation in the electrochemical behavior and electrode morphology were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and SEM as well as AFM, respectively. The optimal dopant for dopamine detection was found to be polystyrene sulfonate anion (PSS(-)). Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, a suitable model to study exocytotic dopamine release, were differentiated on IDEs functionalized with an overoxidized PSS(-)-doped PPy film. The modified electrodes were used to amperometrically detect dopamine released by populations of cells upon triggering cellular exocytosis with an elevated K(+) concentration. A comparison between the generated current on bare gold electrodes and gold electrodes modified with overoxidized doped PPy illustrates the clear advantage of the modification, yielding 2.6-fold signal amplification. The results also illustrate how to use cell population based dopamine exocytosis measurements to obtain biologically significant information that can be relevant in, for instance, the study of neural stem cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons.

  17. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genes in the Italian Caucasian population

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    Mariani M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 217 unrelated healthy Italian individuals from 22 immunogenetics laboratories, located in the northern, central and southern regions of Italy. Methods Two hundred and seventeen DNA samples were studied by a low resolution PCR-SSP kit designed to identify all KIR genes. Results All 17 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies than other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations; framework genes KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR2DL4 and KIR3DL2 were present in all individuals. Sixty-five different profiles were found in this Italian population study. Haplotype A remains the most prevalent and genotype 1, with a frequency of 28.5%, is the most commonly observed in the Italian population. Conclusion The Italian Caucasian population shows polymorphism of the KIR gene family like other Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Although 64 genotypes have been observed, genotype 1 remains the most frequent as already observed in other populations. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation.

  18. Responses of retinal ganglion cells to extracellular electrical stimulation, from single cell to population: model-based analysis.

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    David Tsai

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, which survive in large numbers following neurodegenerative diseases, could be stimulated with extracellular electric pulses to elicit artificial percepts. How do the RGCs respond to electrical stimulation at the sub-cellular level under different stimulus configurations, and how does this influence the whole-cell response? At the population level, why have experiments yielded conflicting evidence regarding the extent of passing axon activation? We addressed these questions through simulations of morphologically and biophysically detailed computational RGC models on high performance computing clusters. We conducted the analyses on both large-field RGCs and small-field midget RGCs. The latter neurons are unique to primates. We found that at the single cell level the electric potential gradient in conjunction with neuronal element excitability, rather than the electrode center location per se, determined the response threshold and latency. In addition, stimulus positioning strongly influenced the location of RGC response initiation and subsequent activity propagation through the cellular structure. These findings were robust with respect to inhomogeneous tissue resistivity perpendicular to the electrode plane. At the population level, RGC cellular structures gave rise to low threshold hotspots, which limited axonal and multi-cell activation with threshold stimuli. Finally, due to variations in neuronal element excitability over space, following supra-threshold stimulation some locations favored localized activation of multiple cells, while others favored axonal activation of cells over extended space.

  19. Cell cycle behavior of laboratory and field populations of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dolah, Frances M.; Leighfield, Tod A.; Kamykowski, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    As a component of the ECOHAB Florida Regional Field Program, this study addresses cell cycle behavior and its importance to bloom formation of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. The cell cycle of K. brevis was first studied by flow cytometry in laboratory batch cultures, and a laboratory mesocosm column, followed by field populations over the 5-year course of the ECOHAB program. Under all conditions studied, K. brevis displayed diel phased cell division with S-phase beginning a minimum of 6 h after the onset of light and continuing for 12-14 h. Mitosis occurred during the dark, and was generally completed by the start of the next day. The timing of cell cycle phases relative to the diel cycle did not differ substantially in bloom populations displaying radically different growth rates ( μmin 0.17-0.55) under different day lengths and temperature conditions. The rhythm of cell cycle progression is independent from the rhythm controlling vertical migration, as similar cell cycle distributions are found at all depths of the water column in field samples. The implications of these findings are discussed in light of our current understanding of the dinoflagellate cell cycle and the development of improved models for K. brevis bloom growth.

  20. Probiotic feeding affects T cell populations in blood and lymphoid organs in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, F; Madjd, Z; Falak, R; Bahar, M A; Nasrabadi, M Heydari; Raiani, M; Shekarabi, M

    2016-11-30

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria as a probiotic on chicken T cell subset populations in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. Thirty chickens were divided into three groups and fed sterilised cow milk, a mixture of milk and L. acidophilus (probiotic), or neither, as the control group. Chickens were euthanised after 14 and 21 days, and whole blood and ileal, bursal, and caecal tonsillar tissues were collected. The populations of T cell subsets, including CD4(+), CD8(+), and TCR1(+) cells, were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. After 21 days of treatment the percentage of blood CD4(+), CD8(+), and TCR1(+) cells was significantly higher in the probiotic-fed group than in the control group. After 14 days of treatment, a significantly greater number of CD4(+) T cells were found in the ileum of probiotic-fed chickens than in chickens from the other two groups. This difference was even greater after 21 days. In addition, after 21 days, a significantly greater number of TCR1(+) cells were found in the caecal tonsils of milk-fed chickens than in chickens from the control group. The findings indicate that probiotics may alter the distribution of T cells in the blood and lymphoid tissues in young chickens; however, transient changes in lymphoid tissues indicate that probiotics likely do not permanently affect mucosal immunity.

  1. Changes in the neuroglial cell populations of the rat spinal cord after local X-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, B M; Hopewell, J W

    1979-10-01

    A 16 mm length of cervical spinal cord of young adult female rats was irradiated with 4000 rad of 250 kV X rays. Counts of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte nuclei were made in the dorsal columns of both irradiated and control cervical cords during the latent period before the onset of radionecrosis. The numbers of both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte nuclei were reduced one month after exposure to radiation. Both cell populations showed an apparent recovery but this was subsequently followed by a rapid loss of cells prior to the development of white-matter necrosis. The oligodendrocyte population in unirradiated spinal cords increased with age, and mitotic figures were observed among the neuroglia of both irradiated and control cervical spinal cords. A slow, natural turnover of neuroglial cells in the cervical spinal cord is proposed and the relevance of this to the manifestation of delayed white matter necrosis is discussed.

  2. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    )). Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells...... and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were...... environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount of living cells. A highly dynamic behavior with regard to subpopulation distribution during the different growth stages was seen for the batch cultivations. Moreover, it could be demonstrated that the glucose concentration had a clear influence...

  3. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  4. Flow cytometry analysis of cell population dynamics and cell cycle during HIV-1 envelope-mediated formation of syncytia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Castro, Israel; Cortés-Rubio, César N; Sandoval, Guadalupe; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Larralde, Carlos; Huerta, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Cell fusion occurs in physiological and pathological conditions and plays a role in regulation of cell fate. The analysis of cell population dynamics and cell cycle in cell-cell fusion experiments is necessary to determine changes in the quantitative equilibrium of cell populations and to identify potential bystander effects. Here, using cocultures of Jurkat HIV-1 envelope expressing cells and CD4(+) cells as a model system and flow cytometry for the analysis, the number, viability, and cell cycle status of the populations participating in fusion were determined. In 3-day cocultures, a sustained reduction of the number of CD4(+) cells was observed while they showed high viability and normal cell cycle progression; fusion, but not inhibition of proliferation or death, accounted for their decrease. In contrast, the number of Env(+) cells decreased in cocultures due to fusion, death, and an inherent arrest at G1. Most of syncytia formed in the first 6 h of coculture showed DNA synthesis activity, indicating that the efficient recruitment of proliferating cells contributed to amplify the removal of CD4(+) cells by syncytia formation. Late in cocultures, approximately 50% of syncytia were viable and a subpopulation still underwent DNA synthesis, even when the recruitment of additional cells was prevented by the addition of the fusion inhibitor T-20, indicating that a population of syncytia may progress into the cell cycle. These results show that the quantitative analysis of cellular outcomes of cell-cell fusion can be performed by flow cytometry.

  5. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  6. IL-35-mediated induction of a potent regulatory T cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L; Giacomin, Paul R; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J; Brown, Scott A; Rehg, Jerold E; Jones, Michael L; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A A

    2010-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) have a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Here we show that treatment of naive human or mouse T cells with IL-35 induced a regulatory population, which we call 'iT(R)35 cells', that mediated suppression via IL-35 but not via the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We found that iT(R)35 cells did not express or require the transcription factor Foxp3, and were strongly suppressive and stable in vivo. T(reg) cells induced the generation of iT(R)35 cells in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro and induced their generation in vivo under inflammatory conditions in intestines infected with Trichuris muris and within the tumor microenvironment (B16 melanoma and MC38 colorectal adenocarcinoma), where they contributed to the regulatory milieu. Thus, iT(R)35 cells constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance and contribute to T(reg) cell