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Sample records for quenching scintillation

  1. Systematic study of particle quenching in organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, L.M.; Bagán, H. [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Tarancón, A., E-mail: alex.tarancon@ub.edu [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rauret, G.; Garcia, J.F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-01-11

    Among the different factors that affect measurements by organic scintillators, the majority of attention has been focused on those related to the scintillator (i.e., ionization, chemical, color and optical quenching), and less attention has been paid to the loss of energy before the particle (i.e., alpha or beta) arrives at the scintillator (i.e., particle quenching). This study evaluates the effect of particle quenching in different scintillation methods (i.e., using two plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm1 and PSm2), liquid scintillator and gel scintillator) by measuring solutions that contain increasing concentrations of NaCl, BaCl{sub 2} and glycerin. The results show the importance of particle quenching in PSm measurements because detection efficiency decreases with increasing concentrations of the quenching component, although the spectrum position and external standard parameter remain constant. The results have shown evidence of particle quenching, although at a lower magnitude, in the liquid scintillation or gel scintillation measurements. Moreover, the use of two PSm with different diameters and salty compound that alters the equilibrium of the liquid and gel emulsions also exemplified the importance of the transmission of optical photons through different scintillation media (i.e., optical quenching). Improvement and deterioration of the optical conditions on the scintillation media is manifested as a movement of the spectrum to higher and lower energies, respectively. The results obtained with PSm were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Oxygen quenching in LAB based liquid scintillator and nitrogen bubbling

    CERN Document Server

    Hua-Lin, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen quenching effect in Linear Alkl Benzne (LAB) based liquid scintillator (LAB+3g/L POPOP+ 15 mg Bis--MSB) was studied by measuring the light yield as the function of nitrogen bubbling time. it shows that the light yield of fully purged liquid scintillator would increase of nearly 11% in room temperature and room atmosphere pressure. A simple model of nitrogen bubbling was built to describe the relationship between relative light yield (oxygen quenching factor) and bubbling time.

  3. Quenching measurements and modeling of a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerdale, S.; Xu, J.; Shields, E.; Froborg, F.; Calaprice, F.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Back, H. O.; Casarella, C.; Fang, X.; Gupta, Y. K.; Lamere, E.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Smith, M.; Tan, W.

    2017-08-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in a wide variety of applications in experimental nuclear and particle physics. Boron-loaded scintillators are particularly useful for detecting neutron captures, due to the high thermal neutron capture cross section of 10B. These scintillators are commonly used in neutron detectors, including the DarkSide-50 neutron veto, where the neutron may produce a signal when it scatters o protons in the scintillator or when it captures on 10B. Reconstructing the energy of these recoils is complicated by scintillation quenching. Understanding how nuclear recoils are quenched in these scintillators is an important and dicult problem. In this article, we present a set of measurements of neutron-induced proton recoils in a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator at recoil energies ranging from 57-467 keV, and we compare these measurements to predictions from different quenching models. We and that a modified Birks' model whose denominator is quadratic in dE=dx best describes the measurements, with χ2/NDF = 1:6. This result will help model nuclear recoil scintillation in similar detectors and can be used to improve their neutron tagging efficiency.

  4. Quenching Measurements and Modeling of a Boron-Loaded Organic Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerdale, Shawn [Princeton U.; Xu, Jingke [Princeton U.; Shields, Emily [Princeton U.; Froborg, Francis [Princeton U.; Calaprice, Frank [Princeton U.; Alexander, Thomas [Fermilab; Aprahamian, Ani [Notre Dame U.; Back, Henning O. [Princeton U.; Casarella, Clark [Notre Dame U.; Fang, Xiao [Notre Dame U.; Gupta, Yogesh K. [Notre Dame U.; Lamere, Edward [Notre Dame U.; Liu, Qian [Notre Dame U.; Lyons, Stephanie [Notre Dame U.; Smith, Mallory [Notre Dame U.; Tan, Wanpeng [Notre Dame U.

    2017-03-18

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in a wide variety of applications in experimental nuclear and particle physics. Boron-loaded scintillators are particularly useful for detecting neutron captures, due to the high thermal neutron capture cross section of $^{10}$B. These scintillators are commonly used in neutron detectors, including the DarkSide-50 neutron veto, where the neutron may produce a signal when it scatters off protons in the scintillator or when it captures on $^{10}$B. Reconstructing the energy of these recoils is complicated by scintillation quenching. Understanding how nuclear recoils are quenched in these scintillators is an important and difficult problem. In this article, we present a set of measurements of neutron-induced proton recoils in a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillator at recoil energies ranging from 57--467 keV, and we compare these measurements to predictions from different quenching models. We find that a modified Birks' model whose denominator is quadratic in $dE/dx$ best describes the measurements, with $\\chi^2$/NDF$=1.6$. This result will help model nuclear recoil scintillation in similar detectors and can be used to improve their neutron tagging efficiency.

  5. Fitting of alpha-efficiency versus quenching parameter by exponential functions in liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Física, Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 León, Guanajuato (Mexico); Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Física Aplicada II, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Manjón, G., E-mail: manjon@us.es [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Física Aplicada II, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Mantero, J.; García-Tenorio, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Física Aplicada II, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this work is to propose an exponential fit for the low alpha-counting efficiency as a function of a sample quenching parameter using a Quantulus liquid scintillation counter. The sample quenching parameter in a Quantulus is the Spectral Quench Parameter of the External Standard (SQP(E)), which is defined as the number of channel under which lies the 99% of Compton spectrum generated by a gamma emitter ({sup 152}Eu). Although in the literature one usually finds a polynomial fitting of the alpha counting efficiency, it is shown here that an exponential function is a better description. - Highlights: • We have studied the quenching in alpha measurement by liquid scintillation counting. • We have reviewed typical fitting of alpha counting efficiency versus quenching parameter. • Exponential fitting of data is proposed as better fitting. • We consider exponential fitting has a physical basis.

  6. Quenching the scintillation in CF{sub 4} Cherenkov gas radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, T. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); D' Ambrosio, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Easo, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Eisenhardt, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Fitzpatrick, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Forty, R.; Frei, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Gibson, V. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Gys, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Harnew, N.; Hunt, P. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Jones, C.R. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Lambert, R.W. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics and VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Matteuzzi, C. [Sezione INFN di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Muheim, F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Papanestis, A., E-mail: antonis.papanestis@stfc.ac.uk [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Perego, D.L. [Sezione INFN di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Piedigrossi, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Plackett, R. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Powell, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-11

    CF{sub 4} is used as a Cherenkov gas radiator in one of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors at the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. CF{sub 4} is well known to have a high scintillation photon yield in the near and far VUV, UV and in the visible wavelength range. A large flux of scintillation photons in our photon detection acceptance between 200 and 800 nm could compromise the particle identification efficiency. We will show that this scintillation photon emission system can be effectively quenched, consistent with radiationless transitions, with no significant impact on the photons resulting from Cherenkov radiation.

  7. Scintillator Non-Proportionality and Gamma Quenching in CaWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, R F; Bauer, M; Bavykina, I; Bento, A; Brown, A; Bucci, C; Ciemniak, C; Coppi, C; Deuter, G; Von Feilitzsch, F; Hauff, D; Henry, S; Huff, P; Imber, J; Ingleby, S; Isaila, C; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kimmerle, M; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Malek, M; McGowan, R; Mikhailik, V B; Pantic, E; Petricca, F; Pfister, S; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schmaler, J; Scholl, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Tolhurst, A J B; Usherov, I; Westphal, W

    2009-01-01

    We measure and explain scintillator non-proportionality and gamma quenching of CaWO4 at low energies and low temperatures. Phonons that are created following an interaction in the scintillating crystal at temperatures of 15mK are used for a calorimetric measurement of the deposited energy, and the scintillation light is measured with a separate cryogenic light detector. Making use of radioactivity intrinsic to the scintillating crystal, the scintillator non-proportionality is mapped out to electron energies <5keV. The observed behavior is in agreement with a simple model based on Birks' law and the stopping power dE/dx for electrons. We find for Birks' constant $k_B=(18.5\\pm0.7)$nm/keV in CaWO4. Gamma lines allow a measurement of the reduced light yield of photons with respect to electrons, as expected in the presence of scintillator non-proportionality. In particular, we show that gamma-induced events in CaWO4 give only about 90 percent of the light yield of electrons, at energies between 40keV and 80keV.

  8. Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Reichhart, L; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Francis, V; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating light collection efficiency and energy resolution effects, are used to generate neutron scattering spectra which are matched to observed distributions of scintillation signals to parameterise the energy-dependent quenching factor. At energies above 300 keV the dependence is reasonably described using the semi-empirical formulation of Birks and a kB factor of (0.014+/-0.002) g/MeVcm^2 has been determined. Below that energy the measured quenching factor falls more steeply than predicted by the Birks for...

  9. Semi-empirical calculation of quenching factors for ions in scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Tretyak, V I

    2009-01-01

    Semi-empirical method of calculation of quenching factors for scintillators is described. It is based on classical Birks formula with the total stopping powers for electrons and ions which are calculated with the ESTAR and SRIM codes, respectively. Method has only one fitting parameter (the Birks factor kB) which can have different values for the same material in different conditions of measurements and data treatment. A hypothesis is used that, once the kB value is obtained by fitting data for particles of one kind and in some energy region (e.g. for a few MeV alpha particles from internal contamination of a detector), it can be applied to calculate quenching factors for particles of another kind and for another energies (e.g. for low energy nuclear recoils) if all data are measured in the same experimental conditions and are treated in the same way. Applicability of the method is demonstrated on many examples including materials with different mechanisms of scintillation: organic scintillators (solid C8H8, ...

  10. Quenching factor for alpha particles in ZnSe scintillating bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagorny, S.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Pagnanini, L.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Schaeffner, K.

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the CUPID-0 experiment, a numbers of ZnSe single crystals were produced and subjected to different thermal treatments, and later tested as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. We have found that a specific thermal treatment (24 hours under argon atmosphere at 900 °C) has a strong impact on some properties of ZnSe crystals (amplitude of signal, light yield, specific resistivity) and most interestingly, changes the quenching factor for alpha particles from values > 1 to values < 1. Thus such thermal treatment opens the possibility to modify this experimental parameter for a various applications.

  11. Measurement of proton quenching factors and PSD-parameters in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Vincenz; Winter, Juergen; Oberauer, Lothar; Meyer, Judith; Moellenberg, Randolph; Strauss, Raimund; Ciemniak, Christian; Wawoczny, Stephan; Scherzinger, Julius [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In liquid-scintillator detectors like Borexino, Double Chooz and the LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) project the inverse beta decay (IBD) is used to detect electron antineutrinos anti {nu}{sub e}. This causes a delayed coincidence signal reducing the background sources to those mimicking such a coincidence. Fast neutrons are one of the background sources by scattering off a proton followed by a capture on hydrogen or gadolinium. Therefore, it is vital to understand the nature of proton recoils in liquid scintillators. Using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) to distinguish the neutron-induced proton recoils from the prompt positron signal from the IBD this background might be reduced. Furthermore, elastic {nu}-p scattering is an important channel for neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse SN. In order to reconstruct the initial neutrino energy, the energy-dependent proton quenching factor has to be known. Therefore, a neutron scattering experiment at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching has been set up in order to understand the response of proton recoils in organic liquid scintillators.

  12. Role of quenching on alpha/beta separation in liquid scintillation counting for several high capacity cocktails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujol, L.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.-A. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias

    1997-04-01

    The optimization of alpha/beta separation in liquid scintillation using pulse shape analysis is convenient for the simultaneous determination of alpha and beta emitters in natural water and other samples. In this work, alpha/beta separation was studied for different scintillant/vial combinations and it was observed that both the optimum pulse shape discrimination level and the total interference value (that is, the summed relative interference between alpha and beta spectra) were dependent on the sample quenching and independent of the scintillant/vial combination. These results provide a simple method for modifying the counting configuration, such as a change in the cocktail, vial or sample characteristics, without the need to perform exhaustive parameter optimizations. Also, it was observed that, for our counting conditions, the combination of Ultima Gold AB scintillation cocktail with Zinsser low diffusion vials presented the lowest total interference, namely 0.94 {+-} 0.28%, which is insignificant for the counting of environmental samples. (Author).

  13. Evaluation of the ionization quenching correction for several liquid scintillators; Evaluacion de la extincion por ionizacion para diversos liquidos centelleadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Arcos, J. M.; Borras, C.

    1990-07-01

    The most appropriate computational model for the ionization quenching function Q(E) is analyzed for electrons in liquid scintillators. A numerical evaluation of Q(E) from 0.1 keV to 3 MeV which the kB parameter varying between 0.005 and 0.010 cm/MeV is presented for seven scintillators; Toluene, Toluene-Alcohol, PCS, Toluene-CCl4, INSTAGEL, Dioxane-Naphtalene and HISAFE II. The numerical result are summarized as tables of Ieast squares fitting coefficient which make easy the computation of Q(E). (Author)

  14. Chemical and colour quenching in liquid scintillation counting; Estudio de la extincion quimica y por color en centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P. E.; Grau, A.

    1987-07-01

    Chemical and colour quenching for H-3 and C-14 was studied. The method includes spectral analysis of colouring agents; methyl red, (4'-dimethylamine-azobenzene 2-carboxylic acid) dimethyl yellow (4'-dimethylamine-azobenzene) and malachite green (methane, bis .(4-dimethyl aminophenyl) - (phenyl)). External standard channels ratio was applied for the liquid scintillation counting of samples. The introduction of an isolated external standard seems to be a strong tool for the correction of chemical and colour quenching curves. (Author) 12 refs.

  15. Quenching Factor for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in a Plastic Scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Reichhart, L.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Araujo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are widely used in industry, medicine and scientific research, including nuclear and particle physics. Although one of their most common applications is in neutron detection, experimental data on their response to low-energy nuclear recoils are scarce. Here, the relative scintillation efficiency for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in a polystyrene-based plastic scintillator (UPS-923A) is presented, exploring recoil energies between 125 keV and 850 keV. Monte Carlo simula...

  16. Measurement of α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, B. von [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, M.; Liu, X.; Wright, A. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bronx Community College, Bronx, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Koegler, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, C. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Kuckert, L. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); O' Keeffe, H.M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Tseung, H.W.C. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The α-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α-particles were produced in the scintillator via {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of {sup nat}Sm providing an α-emitter, {sup 147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po provided the α-particle signal. The behavior of the observed α-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066 ± 0.0016) to (0.0076 ± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron- proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α-particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ. The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of $\\alpha$-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    CERN Document Server

    von Krosigk, B; Hans, S; Junghans, A R; Kögler, T; Kraus, C; Kuckert, L; Liu, X; Nolte, R; O'Keeffe, H M; Tseung, H S Wan Chan; Wilson, J R; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    The $\\alpha$-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, $\\alpha$-particles were produced in the scintillator via $^{12}$C($n$,$\\alpha$)$^9$Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2% of $^{\\mathrm{nat}}$Sm providing an $\\alpha$-emitter, $^{147}$Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants $^{222}$Rn, $^{218}$Po and $^{214}$Po provided the $\\alpha$-particle signal. The behavior of the observed $\\alpha$-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter $kB$ ranges from $(0.0071\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV to $(0.0076\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV. In the first approach, the $\\alpha$-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron-proto...

  18. Scintillation induced response in passively-quenched Si-based single photon counting avalanche diode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Virginia Ch; Levin, Craig S

    2011-01-17

    An optical electrical model which studies the response of Si-based single photon counting arrays, specifically silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), to scintillation light has been developed and validated with analytically derived and experimental data. The scintillator-photodetector response in terms of relative pulse height, 10%-90% rise/decay times to light stimuli of different rise times (ranging from 0.1 to 5 ns) and decay times (ranging from 1 to 50 ns), as well as for different decay times of the photodetector are compared in theory and simulation. A measured detector response is used as a reference to further validate the model and the results show a mean deviation of simulated over measured values of 1%.

  19. Luminescence and Luminescence Quenching in Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 Scintillators Doped with Ce3+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogiegło, J.M.; Katelnikovas, A.; Zych, A.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31407564X; Jüstel, T.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Ronda, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet, Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12, doped with Ce3+ are investigated as a function of the Ga/Al ratio, aimed at an improved understanding of the energy flow and luminescence quenching in these materials. A decrease of both the crystal field strength and band

  20. Luminescence and luminescence quenching in Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 scintillators doped with Ce3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiegło, Joanna M; Katelnikovas, Arturas; Zych, Aleksander; Jüstel, Thomas; Meijerink, Andries; Ronda, Cees R

    2013-03-28

    The optical properties of gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet, Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12, doped with Ce(3+) are investigated as a function of the Ga/Al ratio, aimed at an improved understanding of the energy flow and luminescence quenching in these materials. A decrease of both the crystal field strength and band gap with increasing content of Ga(3+) is observed and explained by the geometrical influence of Ga(3+) on the crystal field splitting of the 5d level in line with theoretical work of Muñoz-García et al. ( uñoz-García, A. B.; Seijo, L. Phys. Rev. B 2010, 82, 184118 ). Thermal quenching results in shorter decay times as well as reduced emission intensities for all samples in the temperature range from 100 to 500 K. An activation energy for emission quenching is calculated from the data. The band gap of the host is measured upon Ga substitution and the decrease in band gap is related to Ga(3+) substitution into tetrahedral sites after all octahedral sites are occupied in the garnet material. Based on the change in band gap and crystal field splitting, band diagrams can be constructed explaining the low thermal quenching temperatures in the samples with high Ga content. The highest luminescence intensity is found for Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 with 40% of Al(3+) replaced by Ga(3+).

  1. Luminescence and Luminescence Quenching in Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 Scintillators Doped with Ce3+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogiegło, J.M.; Katelnikovas, A.; Zych, A.K.; Jüstel, T.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet, Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12, doped with Ce3+ are investigated as a function of the Ga/Al ratio, aimed at an improved understanding of the energy flow and luminescence quenching in these materials. A decrease of both the crystal field strength and band

  2. Measurement of proton and α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillators and determination of spectral sensitivities to supernova neutrinos in the SNO+ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, Belina von

    2015-06-26

    SNO+, the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, is an upcoming low energy neutrino experiment, located in the 2 km deep laboratory SNOLAB, Canada. The spheric acrylic vessel in the detector center will contain 780 t of LAB. The main goal of SNO+ is the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te, using a novel scintillator in which {sup nat}Te is bound with an initial loading of 0.3% via water and a surfactant. Within this thesis, the first measurement of the α-particle and proton quenching parameters of loaded and unloaded LAB is described. These parameters are crucial for an efficient background suppression, necessary to reach a sensitivity above the current limit in {sup 76}Ge of T{sub 1/2}{sup 0ν}>2.1 x 10{sup 25} y (90% C.L.). For 0.3% Te-loading, the quenching parameter obtained is kB=(0.0070±0.0004) cm/MeV for α-particles and kB=(0.0090±0.0003) cm/MeV for protons. Additionally, the spectral sensitivity of SNO+ to supernova anti ν{sub e}'s and anti ν{sub μ,τ}'s is determined for the first time, using inverse beta decay and ν-p elastic scattering with the measured quenching parameters. The obtained sensitivity to the mean energy anti ν{sub e}'s is left angle E right angle =15.47{sup +1.54}{sub -2.43} MeV and of anti ν{sub μ,τ}'s is left angle E right angle =17.81{sup +3.49}{sub -3.09} MeV.

  3. Luminescence quenching and scintillation response in the Ce3+ doped GdxY3-xAl5O12 (x = 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, 2) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosiewicz, K.; Babin, V.; Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Mares, J. A.; Beitlerova, A.; Nikl, M.

    2017-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of the gadolinium yttrium aluminium garnets, (Gd,Y)3Al5O12 doped with Ce3+ are investigated as a function of the Gd/Y ratio with the aim of an improved understanding of the luminescence quenching, energy transfer and phase stability in these materials. An increase of both crystal field strength and instability of the garnet phase with increasing content of Gd3+ is observed. The instability of the garnet phase results in an appearance of the perovskite phase inclusions incorporated into the garnet phase. The luminescence features of Ce3+ in the perovskite phase inclusions and in the main garnet phase are studied separately. The thermal quenching of the 5 d → 4f emission of Ce3+ in the latter phase is determined by temperature dependence of the photoluminescence decay time. The results show that the onset of the thermal quenching is moved to lower temperatures with increasing gadolinium content. The measurements of temperature dependence of delayed radiative recombination do not reveal a clear evidence that the thermal quenching is caused by thermally induced ionization of the Ce3+ 5d1 excited state. Therefore, the main mechanism responsible for the luminescence quenching is due to the non-radiative relaxation from 5d1 excited state to 4f ground state of Ce3+. The energy transfer processes between Gd3+ and Ce3+ as well as between perovskite and garnet phases are evidenced by the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra as well as decay kinetic measurements. Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) studies in the temperature range 77-497 K and scintillation decays under γ excitation complete the material characterization.

  4. Scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, L M

    1999-01-01

    A method to evaluate the scintillation response of organic and inorganic scintillators to different heavy ionizing particles is suggested. A function describing the rate of the energy consumed as fluorescence emission is derived, i.e., the differential response with respect to time. This function is then integrated for each ion and scintillator (anthracene, stilbene and CsI(Tl)) to determine scintillation response. The resulting scintillation responses are compared to the previously reported measured responses. Agreement to within 2.5% is observed when these data are normalized to each other. In addition, conclusions regarding the quenching parameter kB dependence on the type of the particle and the computed values of kB for certain ions are included. (author)

  5. Thermal quenching and electron traps in LSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappers, L.A. E-mail: kappers@uconnvm.uconn.edu; Bartram, R.H.; Hamilton, D.S.; Lempicki, A.; Glodo, J

    2003-05-01

    It is demonstrated by comparison of thermoluminescence and scintillation light outputs of LSO as functions of radiation time that a previously suggested thermal quenching correction is inappropriate. Approximate solutions of rate equations are employed to infer absolute trap concentrations and to explore the effects of thermal quenching on the shapes of thermoluminescence glow curves.

  6. Designing an optimally proportional inorganic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai, E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia); Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-Purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-09-01

    The nonproportionality observed in the light yield of inorganic scintillators is studied theoretically as a function of the rates of bimolecular and Auger quenching processes occurring within the electron track initiated by a gamma- or X-ray photon incident on a scintillator. Assuming a cylindrical track, the influence of the track radius and concentration of excitations created within the track on the scintillator light yield is also studied. Analysing the calculated light yield a guideline for inventing an optimally proportional scintillator with optimal energy resolution is presented.

  7. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  8. Recipe for attaining optimal energy resolution in inorganic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-12-15

    Using an approximate form of the density of excitation created within the track initiated by an incident {gamma} - photon on a scintillator, the light yield is derived as a function of linear, bimolecular and Auger radiative and quenching recombination rates. The non-proportionality in the yield is analysed as a function of the bimolecular and Auger quenching rates and also its dependence on the track radius is studied. An optimal combination of these quenching rates and track radius is presented to obtain a recipe for inventing a scintillator material with optimal energy resolution. The importance of the mobility of charge carriers in minimising the non-proportionality in a scintillator is also discussed (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  10. Subnanosecond Scintillation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Hennessy, John (Inventor); Hitlin, David (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A scintillation detector, including a scintillator that emits scintillation; a semiconductor photodetector having a surface area for receiving the scintillation, wherein the surface area has a passivation layer configured to provide a peak quantum efficiency greater than 40% for a first component of the scintillation, and the semiconductor photodetector has built in gain through avalanche multiplication; a coating on the surface area, wherein the coating acts as a bandpass filter that transmits light within a range of wavelengths corresponding to the first component of the scintillation and suppresses transmission of light with wavelengths outside said range of wavelengths; and wherein the surface area, the passivation layer, and the coating are controlled to increase the temporal resolution of the semiconductor photodetector.

  11. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  12. Nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    A scintillator is a transparent material that emits a flash of light when it absorbs a γ-ray photon or an energetic particle. Scintillation crystals are widely used as spectroscopic detectors of ionizing radiation in nuclear science, space exploration, medical imaging, homeland security, etc. This t

  13. Anticoincidence scintillation counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    This anticoincidence scintillation counter will be mounted in a hydrogen target vessel to be used in a measurement of the .beta. parameter in the .LAMBDA0. decay. The geometry of the counter optimizes light collection in the central part where a scintillation disk of variable thickness can be fitted.

  14. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to (137)Cs and (60)Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators' volume. The scintillators' expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator's light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams ((137)Cs and (60)Co), the scintillators' response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators' response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a (60)Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about [Formula: see text] between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  15. SR study of scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailin, V V

    2000-01-01

    The technique and the models developed recently in Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Laboratory of Moscow University for the investigation of energy transfer processes in insulators can be applied for a detailed study of scintillator's properties. The experiments with SR in VUV and XUV regions allow to separate various processes and stages of energy transfer and help to indicate the dominating process on each stage. Thus, we can find the way to improve the properties, essential for the particular application of the scintillator: conversion efficiency, decay time, afterglow, radiation hardness, etc. The results of such a study can be used for the testing procedures in scintillator production.

  16. Scintillating properties of frozen new liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Britvich, G I; Golovkin, S V; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Penso, G; Soloviev, A S; Vasilchenko, V G

    1999-01-01

    The light emission from scintillators which are liquid at room temperature was studied in the interval between $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C and $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C, where the phase transition from liquid to solid takes place. The light yield measured at $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C is about twice as much as that observed at $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C. By cooling the scintillator from $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C to $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C and then heating it from $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C to $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C, the light yield varies in steps at well defined temperatures, which are different for the cooling and heating processes. These hysteresis phenomena appear to be related to the solvent rather than to the dopant. The decay time of scintillation light was measured at $+20$~$^{\\circ}$C and $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C. Whilst at room temperature most of the light is emitted with a decay time of 6--8 ns, at $-120$~$^{\\circ}$C a slower component, with a decay time of 25--35 ns, becomes important.

  17. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  18. Efficiency calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for {sup 90}Y Cherenkov counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaca, F. [Huelva Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electrica; Manjon, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E.T.S. de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Leon, M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes, s/n. Apartado 1061, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    1998-04-01

    In this paper a complete and self-consistent method for {sup 90}Sr determination in environmental samples is presented. It is based on the Cherenkov counting of {sup 90}Y with a conventional liquid scintillation counter. The effects of color quenching on the counting efficiency and background are carefully studied. A working curve is presented which allows to quantify the correction in the counting efficiency depending on the color quenching strength. (orig.). 6 refs.

  19. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  20. Scintillation properties of acrylate based plastic scintillator by photoploymerization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Il [Dept. of of Radiology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we prepared and characterized a acrylate based UV-curable plastic scintillator. It was used co-polymers TMPTA, DHPA and Ultima GoldTM LLT organic scintillator. The emission spectrum of the plastic scintillator was located in the range of 380⁓520 nm, peaking at 423 nm. And the scintillator is more than 50% transparent in the range of 400⁓ 800 nm. The emission spectrum is well match to the quantum efficiency of photo-multiplier tube and the fast decay time of the scintillation is 12 ns, approximately. This scintillation material provides the possibility of combining 3D printing technology, and then the applications of the plastic scintillator may be expected in human dosimetry etc.

  1. Quenching: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, D

    2000-11-01

    Fragrance chemicals are a frequently reported cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), a matter which has recently come into considerable prominence, to the point that legislation in Europe is under serious consideration. Certain skin-sensitizing fragrance chemicals have been reported by the producing industry to be rendered safe (quenched), at least in terms of ACD, when they are used in the presence of a specific quenching agent. Accordingly, it seemed timely to review this apparent quenching phenomenon, considering the available data and potential mechanistic hypotheses that might be used to explain it. If it is correct, it should be a phenomenon of potentially enormous value in the elimination of the allergenic properties of at least a proportion of common skin sensitizers. Whilst there is some evidence in man for the occurrence of quenching during the induction of skin sensitization, a much more substantial body of work has failed to find supportive evidence in various animals models, at a chemical level or at elicitation in human subjects with existing allergy. On balance, it is concluded that quenching of fragrance allergens is a phenomenon still awaiting positive evidence of existence.

  2. Implications of quenching in efficiency, spectrum shape and alpha/beta separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Castells, J; Díaz, V; Badia, A; Tent-Petrus, J; Llauradó, M

    2017-10-01

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSS) is a meaningful technique for the determination of alpha and beta emitters. However, this technique is highly affected by quenching phenomena, which reduce the counting efficiency, shift the spectra to low energies and cause misclassification problems. In this paper, a selection of chemical and colour quench agents was evaluated to study the influence of alpha and beta energy and the quenching effect on the detection efficiency, the shape of the spectra and the α/β misclassification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhomogeneous Thermal Quenches

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A

    2015-01-01

    We describe holographic thermal quenches that are inhomogeneous in space. The main characteristic of the quench is to take the system far from its equilibrium configuration. Except special extreme cases, the problem has no analytic solution. Using the numerical holography methods, we study different observables that measure thermalization such as the time evolution of the horizon, two-point Wightman function and entanglement entropy (EE). Having an extra nontrivial spacial direction, allows us to study this peculiar generalization since we categorize the problem based on whether we do the measurements along this special direction or perpendicular to it. Exciting new features appear that are absent in the common computations in the literature, the appearance of negative EE valleys surrounding the positive EE hills and abrupt quenches that occupy the whole space at their universal limit are some of the results of this paper. We have tried to provide physical explanations wherever possible. The physical picture ...

  4. The Quench Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the methodology of the Quench Action, which is an effective representation for the calculation of time-dependent expectation values of physical operators following a generic out-of-equilibrium state preparation protocol (for example a quantum quench). The representation, originally introduced in Caux and Essler (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 257203), is founded on a mixture of exact data for overlaps together with variational reasonings. It is argued to be quite generally valid and thermodynamically exact for arbitrary times after the quench (from short times all the way up to the steady state), and applicable to a wide class of physically relevant observables. Here, we introduce the method and its language, give an overview of some recent results, suggest a roadmap and offer some perspectives on possible future research directions.

  5. Quantum quenches during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Carrilho, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new technique to study fast transitions during inflation, by studying the dynamics of quantum quenches in an $O(N)$ scalar field theory in de Sitter spacetime. We compute the time evolution of the system using a non-perturbative large-$N$ limit approach. We derive the self-consistent mass equation for several physically relevant transitions of the parameters of the theory, in a slow motion approximation. Our computations reveal that the effective mass after the quench evolves in the direction of recovering its value before the quench, but stopping at a different asymptotic value, in which the mass is strictly positive. Furthermore, we tentatively find situations in which the effective mass can be temporarily negative, thus breaking the $O(N)$ symmetry of the system for a certain time, only to then come back to a positive value, restoring the symmetry. We argue the relevance of our new method in a cosmological scenario.

  6. Proton recoils in organic liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: LENA Working Group

    2012-07-01

    In liquid-scintillator detectors like the LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) project, understanding the nature of proton recoils is vital. First of all concerning the observation of the diffuse Supernova anti {nu}{sub e} background with the inverse beta decay (IBD). This signature can be mimicked by the thermalization and capture of a knockout neutron originating from inelastic NC interactions of atmospheric neutrinos on {sup 12}C. However, with the help of pulse shape discrimination between the neutron-induced proton recoils and the prompt positron signal from the IBD, this background might be reduced effectively. Furthermore, elastic {nu}-p scattering is an important channel for neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse SN. In order to reconstruct the initial neutrino energy, the energy-dependent quenching factor of proton recoils has to be known. Therefore, a neutron scattering experiment at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching has been set up in order to understand the response of proton recoils in organic liquid scintillator.

  7. Liquid Scintillation Counting

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Sten

    1993-01-01

    In liquid scintillation counting (LSC) we use the process of luminescense to detect ionising radiation emit$ed from a radionuclide. Luminescense is emission of visible light of nonthermal origin. 1t was early found that certain organic molecules have luminescent properties and such molecules are used in LSC. Today LSC is the mostwidespread method to detect pure beta-ernitters like tritium and carbon-14. 1t has unique properties in its efficient counting geometry, deteetability and the lack of...

  8. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  9. PLASTIC SCINTILLATOR FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yewon; Yoo, Hyunjun; Kim, Chankyu; Lim, Kyung Taek; Moon, Myungkook; Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic scintillators, composed of high-atomic-number materials such as the CsI(Tl) scintillator, are commonly used in commercially available a silicon diode and a scintillator embedded indirect-type electronic personal dosimeters because the light yield of the inorganic scintillator is higher than that of an organic scintillator. However, when it comes to tissue-equivalent dose measurements, a plastic scintillator such as polyvinyl toluene (PVT) is a more appropriate material than an inorganic scintillator because of the mass energy absorption coefficient. To verify the difference in the absorbed doses for each scintillator, absorbed doses from the energy spectrum and the calculated absorbed dose were compared. From the results, the absorbed dose of the plastic scintillator was almost the same as that of the tissue for the overall photon energy. However, in the case of CsI, it was similar to that of the tissue only for a photon energy from 500 to 4000 keV. Thus, the values and tendency of the mass energy absorption coefficient of the PVT are much more similar to those of human tissue than those of the CsI. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Quenched effective population size

    CERN Document Server

    Sagitov, Serik; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We study the genealogy of a geographically - or otherwise - structured version of the Wright-Fisher population model with fast migration. The new feature is that migration probabilities may change in a random fashion. Applying Takahashi's results on Markov chains with random transition matrices, we establish convergence to the Kingman coalescent, as the population size goes to infinity. This brings a novel formula for the coalescent effective population size (EPS). We call it a quenched EPS to emphasize the key feature of our model - random environment. The quenched EPS is compared with an annealed (mean-field) EPS which describes the case of constant migration probabilities obtained by averaging the random migration probabilities over possible environments.

  11. Calculating Quenching Weights

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, C A; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the probability (``quenching weight'') that a hard parton radiates an additional energy fraction due to scattering in spatially extended QCD matter. This study is based on an exact treatment of finite in-medium path length, it includes the case of a dynamically expanding medium, and it extends to the angular dependence of the medium-induced gluon radiation pattern. All calculations are done in the multiple soft scattering approximation (Baier-Dokshitzer-Mueller-Peign\\'e-Schiff--Zakharov ``BDMPS-Z''-formalism) and in the single hard scattering approximation (N=1 opacity approximation). By comparison, we establish a simple relation between transport coefficient, Debye screening mass and opacity, for which both approximations lead to comparable results. Together with this paper, a CPU-inexpensive numerical subroutine for calculating quenching weights is provided electronically. To illustrate its applications, we discuss the suppression of hadronic transverse momentum spectra in nucleus-nucleus colli...

  12. Phenomenology of Holographic Quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  13. Scintillation properties of CsI:In single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridin, S., E-mail: gridin.sergey@gmail.com [Institute for Scintillation Materials, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine); Institut Lumière Matière, Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Belsky, A. [Institut Lumière Matière, Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Moszynski, M.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Shiran, N.; Gektin, A. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-10-11

    Scintillation properties of CsI:In single crystals have been investigated. Scintillation yield of CsI:In measured with the 24 μs integration time is around 27,000 ph/MeV, reaching the saturation at 0.005 mol% of the activator. However, luminescence yield of CsI:In is close to CsI:Tl scintillation crystals, which is around 60,000 ph/MeV. This difference is explained by the presence of an ultra-long afterglow in CsI:In scintillation pulse. Thermoluminescence studies revealed a stable trap around 240 K that is supposed to be related to millisecond decay components. The best measured energy resolution of (8.5±0.3)% was achieved at 24 μs peaking time for a CsI sample doped with 0.01 mol% of In. Temperature stability of CsI:In radioluminescence intensity was found to be remarkably high. Its X-ray luminescence yield remains stable up to 600 K, whereafter thermal quenching occurs. The latter property gives CsI:In a potential to be used in well logging applications.

  14. X-ray Scintillation in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birowosuto, M. D.; Cortecchia, D.; Drozdowski, W.; Brylew, K.; Lachmanski, W.; Bruno, A.; Soci, C.

    2016-11-01

    Current technologies for X-ray detection rely on scintillation from expensive inorganic crystals grown at high-temperature, which so far has hindered the development of large-area scintillator arrays. Thanks to the presence of heavy atoms, solution-grown hybrid lead halide perovskite single crystals exhibit short X-ray absorption length and excellent detection efficiency. Here we compare X-ray scintillator characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) MAPbI3 and MAPbBr3 and two-dimensional (2D) (EDBE)PbCl4 hybrid perovskite crystals. X-ray excited thermoluminescence measurements indicate the absence of deep traps and a very small density of shallow trap states, which lessens after-glow effects. All perovskite single crystals exhibit high X-ray excited luminescence yields of >120,000 photons/MeV at low temperature. Although thermal quenching is significant at room temperature, the large exciton binding energy of 2D (EDBE)PbCl4 significantly reduces thermal effects compared to 3D perovskites, and moderate light yield of 9,000 photons/MeV can be achieved even at room temperature. This highlights the potential of 2D metal halide perovskites for large-area and low-cost scintillator devices for medical, security and scientific applications.

  15. Low-Afterglow, High-Refractive-Index Liquid Scintillators for Fast-Neutron Spectrometry and Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lauck, Ronald; Bromberger, Benjamin; Dangendorf, Volker; Goldberg, Mark B; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Vartsky, David

    2009-01-01

    For ion and neutron spectrometry and imaging applications at a high intensity pulsed laser facility, fast liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are required. Furthermore, neutron imaging with fiber (or liquid-core) capillary arrays calls for scintillation materials with high refractive index. To this end, we have examined various combinations of established mixtures of fluors and solvents, that were enriched alternatively with nitrogen or oxygen. Dissolved molecular oxygen is known to be a highly effective quenching agent, that efficiently suppresses the population of the triplet states in the fluor, which are primarily responsible for the afterglow. For measuring the glow curves of scintillators, we have employed the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique, characterized by high dynamic range of several orders of magnitude in light intensity. In this paper we outline the application for the fast scintillators, briefly present the scintillation mechanism in liquids, describe our specif...

  16. Multilayer Scintillation Detector for Nuclear Physics Monitoring of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrin, Sergey; Mayorov, Andrey; Koldashov, Sergey; Batischev, Alexey; Lapushkin, Sergey; Gurov, Yury

    The physical characteristics of the multilayer scintillation spectrometer for identification and energy measurement of cosmic electrons, positrons and nuclei are considered in this presentation. The nuclei energy measurement range is 3-100 MeV/nucleon. This spectrometer is planning for space weather monitoring and investigation of solar-magnetospheric and geophysics effects on satellite. These characteristics were estimated by means of computer simulation. The ionization loss fluctuations, ion charge exchange during pass through detector and, especially, scintillation quenching effect (Bircs effect) were taken into account in calculations. The main results are: 1.) Ions mass identification is possible for hydrogen and helium isotopes 2.) Ions charge identification without mass identification is possible for nuclei from lithium to oxygen The preliminary estimation indicate, that including to spectrometer of thin semiconductor detector (SCD) as first layer makes possible charge identification for Z>8. This may be done by means of comparison of ion range in spectrometer with its energy loss in SCD.

  17. Characterization and Modeling of a Water-based Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Diwan, Milind V; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Kettell, Steven; Rosero, Richard; Themann, Harry W; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We have characterised Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS) using low energy protons, UV-VIS absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We have also developed and validated a simulation model that describes the behaviour of WbLS in our detector configurations for proton beam energies of 2 GeV, 475 MeV, and 210 MeV and for two WbLS compositions. Our results have enabled us to estimate the light yield and ionisation quenching of WbLS, as well as to understand the influence of the wavelength shifting of Cerenkov light on our measurements. These results are relevant to the suitability of water-based liquid scintillator materials for next generation intensity frontier experiments.

  18. Rapid determination of tritium in groundwater. Colour and chemical quenching studies - Rapid determination of tritium in groundwater. Color and chemical quenching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fons, Jordi; Diaz, Vladimir; Badia, Andrea; Tent-Petrus, Joana; Llaurado, Montserrat [Laboratori de Radiologia Ambiental, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11 3th floor, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The determination of tritium in natural waters is useful in a wide range of environmental studies such as aquifer dating. Furthermore, tritiated water is used as a substance to trace groundwater flow systems, as well as in lab or in-situ studies of sorption and diffusion of water in clays or soils. Tritium has also an important interest for human and environmental health. For this reason it is included as a parameter in international legislation on the quality of drinking water [Council Directive 98/83/EC]. Tritium determination is performed using liquid scintillation counting. Do to the fact that tritium is a low energy beta emitter, its measurement is high greatly affected by quenching. Quenching in groundwater samples may result from a wide variety of components in a sample. To avoid it, it is usual to determine tritium applying a previous distillation step but, when rapid measurement is needed, a direct method is necessary and may leave quenching agents that interfere with the measurement. In this study quench effects in tritium determination are examined in order to correct the direct measurements. To fulfil this aim, different types of quenchers had been studied. Inorganic coloured solutions, organic inks, uncoloured organic substances and acids were used as quenching agents in vials with an approximately 30 Bq of {sup 3}H activity. The measurements were performed with Ultima Gold AB as a cocktail in a Wallac Quantulus'T'M 1220 counter. Counting efficiency was related to the SQP[E] quenching parameter for each type of quenching agent. In order to validate the usefulness of these quenching curves, coloured water samples from acid metalliferous drainage collected near Barcelona were spiked with a known amount of tritium. Determination was carried out by liquid scintillation counting applying the efficiency obtained with the quenching curve for the SQP[E] for each sample. These results are in complete accordance with both the amount of tritium added

  19. Aging research of the LAB-based liquid scintillator in stainless steel container

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hai-tao; Shan, Qing; Ding, Ya-yun; Du, Bing; Liu, Shu-tong; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Jia, Wen-bao; Fang, Jian; Ye, Xing-chen; Hu, Wei; Niu, Shun-li; Yan, Jia-qing; Zhao, Hang; Zhao, Dao-jin

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steel is the material used for the storage vessels and piping systems of LAB-based liquid scintillator in JUNO experiment. Aging is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms affecting the properties of liquid scintillator. LAB-based liquid scintillator aging experiments were carried out in different material of containers (type 316 and 304 stainless steel and glass) at two different temperature (40 and 25 degrees Celsius). For the continuous liquid scintillator properties tests, the light yield and the absorption spectrum are nearly the same as that of the unaged one. The attenuation length of the aged samples is 6%~12% shorter than that of the unaged one. But the concentration of element Fe in the LAB-based liquid scintillator does not show a clear change. So the self aging has small effect on liquid scintillator, as well as the stainless steel impurity quenching. Type 316 and 304 stainless steel can be used as LAB-based liquid scintillator vessel, transportation pipeline material.

  20. GPS Scintillation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE...Depletions from 1 October 1994 2 3. GPS data from Agua Verde, Chile on the night of 1 October 1994 3 4. PL-SCINDA display of GPS ionospheric...comparison of GPS measurements with GOES8 L-band scintillation data, are discussed. 2. GPS COMPARISON WITH ALL-SKY IMAGES OVER AGUA VERDE, CHILE As

  1. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  2. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  3. Development of Radiation Hard Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Tiras, Emrah; Bilki, Burak; Winn, David; Onel, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Modern high-energy physics experiments are in ever increasing need for radiation hard scintillators and detectors. In this regard, we have studied various radiation-hard scintillating materials such as Polyethylene Naphthalate (PEN), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), our prototype material Scintillator X (SX) and Eljen (EJ). Scintillation and transmission properties of these scintillators are studied using stimulated emission from a 334 nm wavelength UV laser with PMT before and after certain amount of radiation exposure. Recovery from radiation damage is studied over time. While the primary goal of this study is geared for LHC detector upgrades, these new technologies could easily be used for future experiments such as the FCC and ILC. Here we discuss the physics motivation, recent developments and laboratory measurements of these materials.

  4. Design of Industrial Quenching Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolai. I. KOBASKO; George .E. TOTTEN

    2004-01-01

    The method of designing industrial processes of quench cooling, in particular, the speed of the conveyor movement with regard to shape and sizes of parts to be quenched, thermal and physical properties of material and cooling capacity of quenchants has been developed. The suggested designing method and databases are the basis for the complete automation of industrial processes of quench cooling, especially for continuous conveyor lines, with the purpose of making high-strength materials. The process is controlled by infrared technique.

  5. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  6. Development of a reference liquid scintillation cocktail

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyn Gaardt, WM

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available of a scintillator dissolved in an organic solvent. The so-called scintillator solute is a material which emits a weak light flash or scintillation upon interaction with a certain quanta of radiation – the intensity of this scintillation being a... to prepare preliminary liquid scintillation cocktails. Figure 3: Maximum deviations observed between repeat measurements of the same source, displayed in red for Ultima Gold, green for XP, yellow for XI and blue for XPI. Figure 4: The counting...

  7. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  8. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  9. Background characterization in a liquid scintillation spectrometer; Caracterizacion del fondo de un espectrometro de centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Los Arcos, J.M.; Jimenez de Mingo, A.

    1995-07-01

    An alternate procedure for background count rate estimation in a liquid scintillation spectrometer is presented, which does not require to measure a blank with similar composition, volume and quench, to the problem sample. The procedure is based on a double linear parameterization which was obtained from a systematic study of the background observed with glass vials, in three different windows, 0 - 20 KeV, 0 - 800 KeV and 0 - 2 MeV, for volume between 2 and 20 mi of three commercial scintillators, Hisafe II, Ultima-Gold and Instagel, and quenching degree in the interval equivalent to 50% - 3% tritium efficiency. This procedure was tested with standard samples of 3H, and led to average discrepancies less than 10% for activity {>=}0,6 Bq, against conventional methods for which the discrepancies are twice on average. (Author) 10 refs.

  10. X-ray Scintillation in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Birowosuto, M D; Drozdowski, W; Brylew, K; Lachmanski, W; Bruno, A; Soci, C

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies for X-ray detection rely on scintillation from expensive inorganic crystals grown at high-temperature, which so far has hindered the development of large-area scintillator arrays. Thanks to the presence of heavy atoms, solution-grown hybrid lead halide perovskite single crystals exhibit short X-ray absorption length and excellent detection efficiency. Here we compare X-ray scintillator characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) MAPbI3 and MAPbBr3 and two-dimensional (2D) (EDBE)PbCl4 hybrid perovskite crystals. X-ray excited thermoluminescence measurements indicate the absence of deep traps and a very small density of shallow trap states, which lessens after-glow effects. All perovskite single crystals exhibit high X-ray excited luminescence yields of >120,000 photons/MeV at low temperature. Although thermal quenching is significant at room temperature, the large exciton binding energy of 2D (EDBE)PbCl4 significantly reduces thermal effects compared to 3D perovskites, and moderate light yie...

  11. A Performance Comparison of Nine Selected Liquid Scintillation Cocktails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrezen, F.; Loots, H.; Hurtgen, Ch.

    2008-06-15

    In the selection of a suitable liquid scintillation (LSC) cocktail, the primary aspects taken into consideration are overall cocktail performance and specific laboratory needs. Overall performance of 9 selected, commercially available LSC cocktails was assessed by studying parameters of importance for the requirements of the Laboratory for Low Level Radioactivity Measurements of SCK-CEN: sample load capacity, sample compatibility, influence of sample load on counting efficiency, background count rate, figure of merit, quench resistance, sample stability and alpha/beta separation characteristics. The cocktails tested were EcoscintA, Insta Gel Plus, OptiPhase Hisafe3, OptiPhase Trisafe, Ready Gel, SafeScint 1:1, Ultima Gold, Ultima Gold LLT, and Ultima Gold XR. For the data acquisition a Packard TriCarb Model 1900CA and a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter is used. All samples were prepared in either 20 mL low potassium, borosilicate glass vials or 20 mL high density, polyethylene vials. The aim of this study was to determine a single cocktail that best suits all measurement requirements of the liquid scintillation laboratory at SCK-CEN for the determination of low levels of radioactivity in biological and environmental samples. As a conclusion, Optiphase HiSafe 3 was confirmed to be the optimal cocktail for the laboratory.

  12. SCINFI, a program to calculate the standardization curve in liquid scintillation counting; SCINFI, un programa para calcular la curva de calibracion eficiencia-extincion en centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1984-07-01

    A code, SCINFI, was developed, written in BASIC, to compute the efficiency- quench standardization curve for any radionuclide. The program requires the standardization curve for 3H and the polynomial relations between counting efficiency and figure of merit for both 3H and the problem (e.g. 14{sup C}). The program is applied to the computation of the efficiency-quench standardization curve for 14{sup c}. Five different liquid scintillation spectrometers and two scintillator solutions have bean checked. The computation results are compared with the experimental values obtained with a set of 14{sup c} standardized samples. (Author)

  13. Luminescence properties of Dy3+ doped lanthanum-calcium-silicaborate glass scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. M.; Ha, D. H.; Lee, S. W.; Chanthima, N.; Ruangtaweep, Y.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this research Dy3+-doped lanthanum-calcium-silicaborate glass scintillators, with the formula 25La2O3: 10CaO: 10SiO2: (55-x)B2O3: xDy2O3, were fabricated by using the melt-quenching technique. For the Dy3+ doping concentrations from 0.05 mol% to 0.5 mol% studied the luminescence properties of the Dy3+-doped glass scintillators with various radiation sources, such as X-ray, photo-, laser, and proton. To understand the absorption state, we measured the transmittance spectrum. Furthermore, X-ray, photo- and proton-induced emission spectra were measured to study the transition states of Dy3+-doped glass scintillators. The laser-induced emission spectra were measured at low temperatures in the range from 10 K to 300 K.

  14. Synthesis and Luminescence Properties of Transparent Nanocrystalline GdF3:Tb Glass-Ceramic Scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Savage, Nicholas; Wagner, Brent; Zhang, Yuelan; Jacobs, Benjamin; Menkara, Hisham; Summers, Christopher; Kang, Zhitao

    2013-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramic containing rare-earth doped halide nanocrystals exhibits enhanced luminescence performance. In this study, a glass-ceramic with Tb doped gadolinium fluoride nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix is investigated for X-ray imaging applications. The nanocrystalline glass-ceramic scintillator was prepared by a melt-quench method followed by an anneal. The GdF3:Tb nanocrystals precipitated within the oxide glass matrix during the processing and their lu...

  15. Growth and Characterization of Nanostructured Glass Ceramic Scintillators for Miniature High-Energy Radiation Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    DISTRIBUTION LIST, OR IF THE ADDRESSEE IS NO LONGER EMPLOYED BY YOUR ORGANIZATION. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...characterization of scintillation crystals was performed at the Los Alamos National Lab ( LANL ). Melt quenching and sol-gel synthesis were applied to prepare various...Alamos National Lab ( LANL ) under supervision of Dr. Markus Heheln. Upon receiving the funds, LANL team commenced working on the synthesis and

  16. Preparation of manganese salts of carboxylic acids labelled with ''54Mn and comparison with ''54 MnCl{sub 2} in liquid scintillation counting; Preparacion de sales manganosas de acidos alifaticos monocarboxilicos marcados con ''54 MnCl{sub 2} en medidas por centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Arcos Merino, J. M. los; Grau Malonda, A.

    1992-07-01

    Procedures for liquid scintillation sample preparation of manganese dimethylbutirate, decanoate and palmitate, labelled with 54 Mn are described. their quenching effect, spectral evolution and counting stability along several weeks are analysed in liquid scintillation measurements with Toluene. HISafe II. PCS, instagel. Dioxane-naphtalene and Toluene-alcohol. For comparison, Inorganic 54 MnCl-2 samples are also studied, resulting in acceptable counting stability but showing greater quenching and signs of little spectral degradation against the organic samples. (Author)

  17. The theory and practice of scintillation counting

    CERN Document Server

    Birks, John Bettely

    1964-01-01

    The Theory and Practice of Scintillation Counting is a comprehensive account of the theory and practice of scintillation counting. This text covers the study of the scintillation process, which is concerned with the interactions of radiation and matter; the design of the scintillation counter; and the wide range of applications of scintillation counters in pure and applied science. The book is easy to read despite the complex nature of the subject it attempts to discuss. It is organized such that the first five chapters illustrate the fundamental concepts of scintillation counting. Chapters 6

  18. Liquid Scintillation High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    2010-08-06

    The CIEMAT/NIST and the TDCR methods in liquid scintillation counting are based on the determination of the efficiency for total counting. This paper tries to expand these methods analysing the pulse-height spectrum of radionuclides. To reach this objective we have to generalize the equations used in the model and to analyse the influence of ionization and chemical quench in both spectra and counting efficiency. We present equations to study the influence of different photomultipliers response in systems with one, two or three photomultipliers. We study the effect of the electronic noise discriminator level in both spectra and counting efficiency. The described method permits one to study problems that up to now was not possible to approach, such as the high uncertainty in the standardization of pure beta-ray emitter with low energy when we apply the TDCR method, or the discrepancies in the standardization of some electron capture radionuclides, when the CIEMAT/NIST method is applied. (Author) 107 refs.

  19. Cherenkov and Scintillation Light Separation in Organic Liquid Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation experiment (CHESS) has been used to demonstrate the separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light in both linear alkylbenzene (LAB) and LAB with 2g/L of PPO as a fluor (LAB/PPO). This is the first such demonstration for the more challenging LAB/PPO cocktail and improves on previous results for LAB. A time resolution of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM results in an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov photons in LAB/PPO of 70 +/- 3% and 63 +/- 8% for time- and charge-based separation, respectively, with scintillation contamination of 36 +/- 5% and 38 +/- 4%. LAB/PPO data is consistent with a rise time of 0.75 +/- 0.25 ns.

  20. Holographic Quenches with a Gap

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Emilia; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In order to holographically model quenches with a gapped final hamiltonian, we consider a gravity-scalar theory in anti-de Sitter space with an infrared hard wall. We allow a time dependent profile for the scalar field at the wall. This induces an energy exchange between bulk and wall and generates an oscillating scalar pulse. We argue that such backgrounds are the counterpart of quantum revivals in the dual field theory. We perform a qualitative comparison with the quench dynamics of the massive Schwinger model, which has been recently analyzed using tensor network techniques. Agreement is found provided the width of the oscillating scalar pulse is inversely linked to the energy density communicated by the quench. We propose this to be a general feature of holographic quenches.

  1. Holographic quenches with a gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    In order to holographically model quenches with a gapped final hamiltonian, we consider a gravity-scalar theory in anti-de Sitter space with an infrared hard wall. We allow a time dependent profile for the scalar field at the wall. This induces an energy exchange between bulk and wall and generates an oscillating scalar pulse. We argue that such backgrounds are the counterpart of quantum revivals in the dual field theory. We perform a qualitative comparison with the quench dynamics of the massive Schwinger model, which has been recently analyzed using tensor network techniques. Agreement is found provided the width of the oscillating scalar pulse is inversely linked to the energy density communicated by the quench. We propose this to be a general feature of holographic quenches.

  2. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosero, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Yeh, Minfang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  3. New halide scintillators for gamma ray detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alekhin, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Scintillators are used for the detection of ionizing radiation. Despite decades of intensive search and numerous compounds discovered, there is still a need for materials with improved properties. Recently, several new scintillators with excellent light yield, energy resolution, and proportionality

  4. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  5. Ionospheric precursors to scintillation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.J. Spencer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillation is the rapid fluctuation of both phase and amplitude of trans-ionospheric radio waves due to small scale electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Prediction of the occurrence of scintillation at L band frequencies is needed to mitigate the disruption of space-based communication and navigation systems. The purpose of this paper is to present a method of using tomographic inversions of the ionospheric electron density obtained from ground-based GPS data to infer the location and strength of the post-sunset plasma drift vortex. This vortex is related to the pre-reversal enhancement in the eastwards electric field which has been correlated to the subsequent occurrence of scintillation.

  6. Scintillation detectors in computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1984-07-01

    A new scintillator, Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/ (BGO), was tested for use in the detection part of computerized tomographs. In comparison with the NaI(Tl) scintillator it has a three-fold mass stopping power and allows the detection of medium and high energy gamma radiation with a higher detection efficiency, i.e., for the same detection efficiency its size is much smaller. Some other mechanical, physical and optical parameters of the BGO scintillator are given. BGO is prospective for use in high energy spectrometry and may replace NaI(Tl) wherever the following parameters are significant: crystal size, detection efficiency for gamma radiation, and good spatial resolution.

  7. Scintillating Cocktail Mixtures and the Role of Water on the Optophysical Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Feng, Patrick L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mengesha, Wondwosen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Murtagh, Dustin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Anstey, Mitchell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Two types of water - containing liquid scinti llation mixtures were prepared in the present work. In the first, m ixtures of 2 - phenylethanol, water, diphenyl phosphate, sodium phenyl phosphate dibasic dihydrate, and the dye 2,5 - diphenyloxazole (PPO) have been investigated as liquid scintillators. In th e second system, nonionic and mixed surfactant systems were investigated in conjunction with water and small amounts of toluene. In both cases, increasing amounts of water led to reductions in the scintillation light yield. Understanding what factors contr ibute to this phenomenon is the focus of this report. Changes in the solution microphase structure, diminishing aromatic content of the cocktail mixtures, and inefficient energy transfer to the dye a ppear to be responsible for the decreased light yield as more water is added . In the 2 - phenylethanol system, the observed experimental results are consistent with the formation of a bicontinuous microemulsion at higher water concentrations, which incorporates PPO and shields it from the quenching effects of the increasing polar matrix. Evidence for this proposed phase chan ge c ome s from light scattering data, photo - and x - ray luminescence measurements, and optical transparency measurements . In the surfactant - based system, the quenching effect of water was found to be less than both commercially - available dioxane - naphthalene mixtures used for scintillation counting as well as the 2 - phenylethanol mixtures described above. The effect of different surfactant mixtures and concentrations were studied, revealing a benefic ial effect upon the scintillation light yield for mixed surfactant mixtures. These results are interpreted in the context of r eactive radical species formation following water ionization , which leads to light - yield quenching in aqueous systems . The presenc e of surfactant(s) in these mixtures enables the formation of organic - rich regions that are spatially separated from the

  8. Characterization of liquid scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D; Böttger, R; Klein, H; Lebreton, L; Neumann, S; Nolte, R; Pichenot, G

    2002-01-01

    Five scintillation detectors of different scintillator size and type were characterized. The pulse height scale was calibrated in terms of electron light output units using photon sources. The response functions for time-of-flight (TOF)-selected monoenergetic neutrons were experimentally determined and also simulated with the NRESP code over a wide energy range. A comparison of the measured and calculated response functions allows individual characteristics of the detectors to be determined and the response matrix to be reliably derived. Various applications are discussed.

  9. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  10. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  11. Near-infrared induced optical quenching effects on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Dingkai, E-mail: dingk1@umbc.edu; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Chen, Xing [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Cai, Hong [Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Johnson, Anthony M.; Choa, Fow-Sen [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-06-23

    In space communications, atmospheric absorption and Rayleigh scattering are the dominant channel impairments. Transmission using mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths offers the benefits of lower loss and less scintillation effects. In this work, we report the telecom wavelengths (1.55 μm and 1.3 μm) induced optical quenching effects on MIR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when QCLs are operated well above their thresholds. The QCL output power can be near 100% quenched using 20 mW of near-infrared (NIR) power, and the quenching effect depends on the input NIR intensity as well as wavelength. Time resolved measurement was conducted to explore the quenching mechanism. The measured recovery time is around 14 ns, which indicates that NIR generated electron-hole pairs may play a key role in the quenching process. The photocarrier created local field and band bending can effectively deteriorate the dipole transition matrix element and quench the QCL. As a result, MIR QCLs can be used as an optical modulator and switch controlled by NIR lasers. They can also be used as “converters” to convert telecom optical signals into MIR optical signals.

  12. The quenching time scale and quenching rate of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The average star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies has been declining since redshift of 2. A fraction of galaxies quench and become quiescent. We constrain two key properties of the quenching process: the quenching time scale and the quenching rate among galaxies. We achieve this by analyzing the galaxy number density profile in NUV-u color space and the distribution in NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram with a simple toy-model framework. We focus on galaxies in three mass bins between 10 to 10 and 10 to 10.6 solar mass. In the NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram, the red u-i galaxies exhibit a different slope from the slope traced by the star-forming galaxies. This angled distribution and the number density profile of galaxies in NUV-u space strongly suggest that the decline of the SFR in galaxies has to accelerate before they turn quiescent. We model this color-color distribution with a two-phase exponential decline star formation history. The models with an e-folding time in the second phase (the quenching p...

  13. Proton beam dosimetry: a comparison between a plastic scintillator, ionization chamber and Faraday cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Afarideh, Hossein; Ghannadi, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Ahmad; Aslani, Golam Reza; Boghrati, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a comparison was made between a plastic scintillator (BC400), a Faraday Cup (FC) and an ionization chamber (IC) used for routine proton dosimetry. Thin scintillators can be applied to proton dosimetry and consequently to proton therapy as relative dosimeters because of their water-equivalent nature, high energy-light conversion efficiency, low dimensions and good proportionality to the absorbed dose at low stopping powers. To employ such scintillators as relative dosimeters in proton therapy, the corrective factors must be applied to correct the quenching luminescence at the Bragg peak. A fine linear proportionality between the luminescence light yield Y and the proton flux in a thin (0.5 mm) scintillator for the 20 and 30 MeV proton beams were observed. The experimental peak/plateau ratios of Bragg Curve for 2, 1 and 0.5 mm scintillators with an accuracy of 0.5% were obtained to be 1.87, 1.91 and 2.30, respectively. With combination of the Markus chamber and the CR-39 detector, the peak/plateau ratio was improved to 3.26. The obtained data of the luminescence yield as a function of the specific energy loss is in agreement with the Craun-Birk's theory. Results show that the FC and Markus ionization chamber are in agreement within 4%, while the FC gives a lower dose evaluation. For a defined beam, the data for the fluence measurements are reproducible within a good accuracy.

  14. Simple model relating recombination rates and non-proportional light yield in scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Bizarri, Gregory; Singh, Jai; Vasil' ev, Andrey N.; Williams, Richard T.

    2008-09-24

    We present a phenomenological approach to derive an approximate expression for the local light yield along a track as a function of the rate constants of different kinetic orders of radiative and quenching processes for excitons and electron-hole pairs excited by an incident {gamma}-ray in a scintillating crystal. For excitons, the radiative and quenching processes considered are linear and binary, and for electron-hole pairs a ternary (Auger type) quenching process is also taken into account. The local light yield (Y{sub L}) in photons per MeV is plotted as a function of the deposited energy, -dE/dx (keV/cm) at any point x along the track length. This model formulation achieves a certain simplicity by using two coupled rate equations. We discuss the approximations that are involved. There are a sufficient number of parameters in this model to fit local light yield profiles needed for qualitative comparison with experiment.

  15. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  16. Universality in fast quantum quenches

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sumit R; Myers, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    We expand on the investigation of the universal scaling properties in the early time behaviour of fast but smooth quantum quenches in a general $d$-dimensional conformal field theory deformed by a relevant operator of dimension $\\Delta$ with a time-dependent coupling. The quench consists of changing the coupling from an initial constant value $\\lambda_1$ by an amount of the order of $\\delta \\lambda$ to some other final value $\\lambda_2$, over a time scale $\\delta t$. In the fast quench limit where $\\delta t$ is smaller than all other length scales in the problem, $ \\delta t \\ll \\lambda_1^{1/(\\Delta-d)}, \\lambda_2^{1/(\\Delta-d)}, \\delta \\lambda^{1/(\\Delta-d)}$, the energy (density) injected into the system scales as $\\delta{\\cal E} \\sim (\\delta \\lambda)^2 (\\delta t)^{d-2\\Delta}$. Similarly, the change in the expectation value of the quenched operator at times earlier than the endpoint of the quench scales as $\\langle {\\cal O}_\\Delta\\rangle \\sim \\delta \\lambda\\, (\\delta t)^{d-2\\Delta}$, with further logarithmic...

  17. Chiral Logs in Quenched QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, S J; Horváth, I; Lee, F X; Liu, K F; Mathur, N; Zhang, J B

    2003-01-01

    The quenched chiral logs are examined on a $16^3 \\times 28$ lattice with Iwasaki gauge action and overlap fermions. The pion decay constant $f_{\\pi}$ is used to set the lattice spacing, $a = 0.200(3)$ fm. With pion mass as low as $\\sim 180 {\\rm MeV}$, we see the quenched chiral logs clearly in $m_{\\pi}^2/m$ and $f_P$, the pseudoscalar decay constant. We analyze the data to determine how low the pion mass needs to be in order for the quenched one-loop chiral perturbation theory ($\\chi$PT) to apply. With the constrained curve fitting, we are able to extract the quenched chiral log parameter $\\delta$ together with the chiral cutoff $\\Lambda_{\\chi}$ and other parameters. Only for $m_{\\pi} \\leq 300 {\\rm MeV}$ do we obtain a consistent and stable fit with a constant $\\delta$ which we determine to be 0.23(2). By comparing to the $12^3 \\times 28$ lattice, we estimate the finite volume effect to be about 1.8% for the smallest pion mass. We also study the quenched non-analytic terms in the nucleon and the $\\rho$ masses...

  18. New Scintillation Detectors for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on new detection technologies that can be used in advancing nuclear medicine modalities, particularly positron emission tomography (PET). Several detection technologies are covered in this thesis. First, new Ce3+ doped rare earth trihalide scintillators that can be used

  19. New Scintillation Detectors for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on new detection technologies that can be used in advancing nuclear medicine modalities, particularly positron emission tomography (PET). Several detection technologies are covered in this thesis. First, new Ce3+ doped rare earth trihalide scintillators that can be used i

  20. Complex Dynamics of Equatorial Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Mirko; Materassi, Massimo; Forte, Biagio; Cicone, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Radio power scintillation, namely highly irregular fluctuations of the power of trans-ionospheric GNSS signals, is the effect of ionospheric plasma turbulence. The scintillation patterns on radio signals crossing the medium inherit the ionospheric turbulence characteristics of inter-scale coupling, local randomness and large time variability. On this basis, the remote sensing of local features of the turbulent plasma is feasible by studying radio scintillation induced by the ionosphere. The distinctive character of intermittent turbulent media depends on the fluctuations on the space- and time-scale statistical properties of the medium. Hence, assessing how the signal fluctuation properties vary under different Helio-Geophysical conditions will help to understand the corresponding dynamics of the turbulent medium crossed by the signal. Data analysis tools, provided by complex system science, appear to be best fitting to study the response of a turbulent medium, as the Earth's equatorial ionosphere, to the non-linear forcing exerted by the Solar Wind (SW). In particular we used the Adaptive Local Iterative Filtering, the Wavelet analysis and the Information theory data analysis tool. We have analysed the radio scintillation and ionospheric fluctuation data at low latitude focusing on the time and space multi-scale variability and on the causal relationship between forcing factors from the SW environment and the ionospheric response.

  1. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszyński, M., E-mail: M.Moszynski@ncbj.gov.pl; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  2. Quenching in coupled adiabatic coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.

    1985-03-01

    The prediction of the effects of a quench on stress and temperature is an important aspect of the design of superconducting magnets. Of particular interest, and the exclusive topic of this study, is the prediction of the effects of quenching in coupled adiabatic coils, such as the multi-section windings of a high field NMR spectrometer magnet. The predictive methods used here are based on the measurement of the time of propagation of quench between turns. From this measurement an approximate algorithum for the propagation time is used in a code which solves the linear differential equations for the coil currents and calculates the movement of normal zone boundaries and hence the associated winding resistance.

  3. Scintillation and luminescence characteristics of Ce3+doped in Li2O-Gd2O3-BaO-B2O3 scintillating glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, F.; Rooh, G.; Srisittipokakun, N.; Kim, H. J.; Kaewnuam, E.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-01-01

    Ce3+ activated Li2O-Gd2O3-BaO-B2O3glass scintillator containing neutron-capture elements (7Li, 11Band 158Gd)were developed by conventional melt-quenching technique. Luminescence spectra under UV and X-ray excitation showed Ce3+ion emission due to 5d→4f transition at 391 nm. Energy transfer from the host glass to Ce3+ions were confirmed by VUV-UV and XEL spectra. The highest emission intensity of Ce3+ions were observed at 0.5 mol%of CeF3. For the same concentration the decay time was obtained to be 19.7 ns and their mean critical distance was calculated about 22.33 Å. The observed decay constants revealed that direct electron-hole capture was a dominant scintillation process in the present glass matrix.

  4. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects due to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.

  5. Bioanalytical Applications of Fluorenscence Quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-10

    interaction of different cyclodextrin systems with the polynuclear aromatic compound, pyrene.(7 ) There are other cases where the Stern-Volmer plot deviates... encapsulated in lecithin liposomes. In this manner the fluorescence is self-quenched. When the liposomes are disrupted, the dye is released and

  6. Optimization of screening for radioactivity in urine by liquid scintillation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Reese, Robert P.; Preston, Rose T. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-01

    Numerous events have or could have resulted in the inadvertent uptake of radionuclides by fairly large populations. Should a population receive an uptake, valuable information could be obtained by using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques to quickly screen urine from a sample of the affected population. This study investigates such LSC parameters as discrimination, quench, volume, and count time to yield guidelines for analyzing urine in an emergency situation. Through analyzing variations of the volume and their relationships to the minimum detectable activity (MDA), the optimum ratio of sample size to scintillating chemical cocktail was found to be 1:3. Using this optimum volume size, the alpha MDA varied from 2100 pCi/L for a 30-second count time to 35 pCi/L for a 1000-minute count time. The typical count time used by the Sandia National Laboratories Radiation Protection Sample Diagnostics program is 30 minutes, which yields an alpha MDA of 200 pCi/L. Because MDA is inversely proportional to the square root of the count time, count time can be reduced in an emergency situation to achieve the desired MDA or response time. Note that approximately 25% of the response time is used to prepare the samples and complete the associated paperwork. It was also found that if the nuclide of interest is an unknown, pregenerated discriminator settings and efficiency calibrations can be used to produce an activity value within a factor of two, which is acceptable for a screening method.

  7. How to quench a galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Tremmel, Michael; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Saintonge, Amélie; Volonteri, Marta; Quinn, Tom; Governato, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    We show how the interplay between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and merger history determines whether a galaxy quenches star formation (SF) at high redshift. We first simulate, in a full cosmological context, a galaxy of total dynamical mass Mvir = 1012 M⊙ at z = 2. Then we systematically alter the accretion history of the galaxy by minimally changing the linear overdensity in the initial conditions. This `genetic modification' approach allows the generation of three sets of Λ CDM initial conditions leading to maximum merger ratios of 1:10, 1:5 and 2:3, respectively. The changes leave the final halo mass, large-scale structure and local environment unchanged, providing a controlled numerical experiment. Interaction between the AGN physics and mergers in the three cases leads, respectively, to a star-forming, temporarily quenched and permanently quenched galaxy. However, the differences do not primarily lie in the black hole accretion rates, but in the kinetic effects of the merger: the galaxy is resilient against AGN feedback unless its gaseous disc is first disrupted. Typical accretion rates are comparable in the three cases, falling below 0.1 M⊙ yr-1, equivalent to around 2 per cent of the Eddington rate or 10-3 times the pre-quenching star formation rate, in agreement with observations. This low level of black hole accretion can be sustained even when there is insufficient dense cold gas for SF. Conversely, supernova feedback is too distributed to generate outflows in high-mass systems, and cannot maintain quenching over periods longer than the halo gas cooling time.

  8. Characterization of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers for their usage in a particle telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruefer, Lea; Losekamm, Martin; Poeschl, Thomas; Greenwald, Daniel; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope (MAPT) is a newly developed compact charged-particle detector. It can be used for space applications, such as radiation monitoring on spacecraft or for stratospheric research balloons. Its core consists of scintillating plastic fibers coupled to silicon photomultiplier (SiPMs). The energy reconstruction of the incoming particles is based on an extended Bragg curve spectroscopy technique, requiring a good measurement of the energy deposition. Therefore, non-linearities of the measured light output -such as quenching effects of the scintillating material or saturation of the SiPMs at high light yields- have to be known quantitatively. To investigate these effects, two scaled-down prototypes were built, consisting of 128 and 16 channels. The first one was tested at a stationary proton beam at Paul Scherrer Institute. We determine Birk's coefficient describing the ionization quenching of the scintillator and calculate the characteristic photon detection efficiency of the SiPMs. We explain the results of the first prototype tests and the characterization of the SiPMs.

  9. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  10. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  11. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Tobin@epfl.ch

    2016-07-11

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  12. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  13. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  14. Characterization of scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals for the CRESST experiment using two-photon excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampf, Raphael; Dandl, Thomas; Muenster, Andrea; Oberauer, Lothar; Roth, Sabine; Schoenert, Stefan; Ulrich, Andreas [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the CRESST experiment for direct dark matter search, phonon and photon signals from cryogenic CaWO{sub 4} crystals are used to search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoil events. We present a novel table-top setup in which the scintillation of CaWO{sub 4} is induced by 0.7 ns laser pulses of 355 nm wavelength. The excitation occurs via two-photon absorption in the bulk material. The scintillation light is observed by time resolved optical spectroscopy. By varying the focusing of the laser-beam the excitation density can be made high enough to study quenching effects due to exciton-exciton annihilation. This allows to perform experiments to test models for the quenching factors of different ionizing projectiles in CaWO{sub 4} which are used to identify these projectiles on an event by event basis.

  15. Performance of two liquids scintillation and optimization of a Wallac 1411 counter in the tritium quantification in aqueous samples; Desempeno de dos centelleadores liquidos y optimizacion de un contador Wallac 1411 en la cuantificacion de tritio en muestras acuosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras de la Cruz, E. de J.; Lopez del Rio, H.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.; Pinedo V, J. L., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The optimization of a liquid scintillation counting Wallac 1411 is presented as well as the performance of the liquids scintillation miscible in water OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 and Last Gold Ab, in the tritium quantification in aqueous samples. The luminescence effect, the quenching, the solution ph and the level of pulse amplitude comparator (Pac) were evaluated in the response of both liquids scintillation in the tritium measurement. The quenching and the luminescence modify the scintillators response; in the first of them the counting efficiency decreases and the minimum detectable activity increases; the second interferes in the tritium quantification in the interest window, but the effect disappears after 4 hours of darkness of the samples. The maximum counting efficiency was of 24% for OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 and 31% for Last Gold Ab, diminishing with the quenching until values of 8 and 11%, respectively. For a counting time of 6 hours and lower quenching, the minimum detectable concentration for OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 was of 13.4 ± 0.2 Bq/L and 9.9 ± 0.1 Bq/L for Last Gold Ab. Both scintillators responded appropriately to sour and basic solutions, being only presented chemiluminescence in Last Gold Ab to ph highly basic. The Pac application that varies between 1 and 256 does not have effect in the tritium measurement until values above 90. (Author)

  16. Quench Simulation Studies: Program documentation of SPQR

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2001-01-01

    Quench experiments are being performed on prototypes of the superconducting magnets and busbars to determine the adequate design and protection. Many tests can only be understood correctly with the help of quench simulations that model the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. In some cases simulations are the only method to scale the experimental results of prototype measurements to match the situation of quenching superconducting elements in the LHC. This note introduces the theoretical quench model and the use of the simulation program SPQR (Simulation Program for Quench Research), which has been developed to compute the quench process in superconducting magnets and busbars. The model approximates the heat balance equation with the finite difference method including the temperature dependence of the material parameters. SPQR allows the simulation of longitudinal quench propagation along a superconducting cable, the transverse propagation between adjacent conductors, heat transfer i...

  17. Patient-specific quality assurance for spot scanning proton beams using a large-volume liquid scintillator detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.; Beddar, S.

    2017-05-01

    A large-volume liquid scintillator detector was used to measure individual energy layers from a clinical prostate treatment plan on a scanning proton beam system. Lateral and beam’s-eye view images of the dose distribution were acquired with two CCD cameras facing adjacent sides of a scintillator tank. The measured dose images were compared with calculated dose distributions from a validated Monte Carlo model. The measured and calculated dose distributions showed good agreement, with the exception of the Bragg peak region of the lateral view, which exhibited ionization quenching. The beam’s-eye and lateral views achieved gamma analysis passing rates of 99.7% and 92.5%, respectively, using gamma criteria of 3%, 3 mm. Large-volume scintillator detectors show promise for quick and accurate measurements of patient treatment fields for scanning proton beam systems.

  18. Scintillation mechanism and radiation damage in Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}F{sub 3} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Wisniewski, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)]|[N. Copernicus Univ., Torun (Poland); Lempicki, A.; Brecher, C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Bartram, R.H. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Woody, C.; Levy, P.; Stoll, S.; Kierstead, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Pedrini, C. [CNRS, Villeurbanne (France)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    Recent spectroscopic and radiation damage experiments on a series of Ce{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}F{sub 3} crystals suggest that the scintillation light output is limited by an unusual quenching mechanism, which also plays a major role in minimizing radiation-induced damage. The intensity of the radiation-induced absorptions is a strong function of the Ce content x, reaching a maximum for x = 0.03 and a minimum for x = 1. This peculiar dependence appears to be due to the influence of deep-lying Ce levels on both scintillation mechanism and radiation damage. The authors suggest that various charge transfer processes can explain many aspects of the performance of Ce{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}F{sub 3} scintillators.

  19. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence - Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Gardés, E; Ban-d'Etat, B; Cassimi, A; Durantel, F; Grygiel, C; Madi, T; Monnet, I; Ramillon, J -M; Ropars, F; Lebius, H

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study the dynamics of UV-visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our instrument, called SPORT, on a fast plastic scintillator (BC-400) irradiated with 27-MeV Ar ions having high mean electronic stopping power of 2.6 MeV/\\mu m. As a consequence of increasing permanent radiation damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity together with, thanks to the time-resolved measurement, a decrease in the decay constant of the scintillator. This combination indicates that luminescence degradation processes by both dynamic and static quenching, the latter mechanism being predominant. Under such high density excitation, the scintillation deterioration of BC-400 is significantly enhanced compared to that observed in previous investigations, mainly performed using light ions. The observed non-linear behaviour implies that the dose at which luminescence starts deteri...

  20. Characterization of a new plastic scintillation material and comparison with liquid BC-501A scintillator

    OpenAIRE

    Poleshchuk, Oleksii

    2015-01-01

    In this work the capability of various scintillation materials to discriminate gamma rays and neutrons were studied. Also such basic properties of scintillators as light emission spectrum and light output were determined. The studied materials were BC-501A liquid scintillator and a plastic scintillator provided by CEA. An experimental setup consisting of detector shielding, analog and digital electronics and data acquisition system was built to study the neutron-gamma discrimination propertie...

  1. Scintillation in the Circinus Galaxy water megamasers

    CERN Document Server

    McCallum, J N

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of the 22 GHz water vapor megamasers in the Circinus galaxy made with the Tidbinbilla 70m telescope. These observations confirm the rapid variability seen earlier by Greenhill et al (1997). We show that this rapid variability can be explained by interstellar scintillation, based on what is now known of the interstellar scintillation seen in a significant number of flat spectrum AGN. The observed variability cannot be fully described by a simple model of either weak or diffractive scintillation.

  2. General optical scintillation in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhong Rao

    2008-01-01

    A general expression of the scintillation index is proposed for optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere under arbitrary fluctuation conditions. The expression depends on extreme behaviors of the scintillation indices under both weak and strong fluctuations. The maximum scintillation index in the onset region and the corresponding Rytov index can be evaluated from the general expression. Plane and spherical waves in the cases of zero and non-zero turbulence inner scale are given as examples for illustration of the general behaviors of scintillation indices.

  3. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-07-18

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  4. High-symmetry organic scintillator systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Patrick L.

    2017-09-05

    An ionizing radiation detector or scintillator system includes a scintillating material comprising an organic crystalline compound selected to generate photons in response to the passage of ionizing radiation. The organic compound has a crystalline symmetry of higher order than monoclinic, for example an orthorhombic, trigonal, tetragonal, hexagonal, or cubic symmetry. A photodetector is optically coupled to the scintillating material, and configured to generate electronic signals having pulse shapes based on the photons generated in the scintillating material. A discriminator is coupled to the photon detector, and configured to discriminate between neutrons and gamma rays in the ionizing radiation based on the pulse shapes of the output signals.

  5. Quenched Reinforcement Exposed to Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2006-01-01

    Idealized data are derived for the tensile strength of quenched and tempered prestressing steel and of quenched and self-tempered reinforcing bars for fire safety design. 0.2% stresses are derived as a function of the maximum temperature and in addition, 2.0% stresses are provided. A strain of 2.......0% is seldom found in “slack” (not prestressed) reinforcement, but 2.0% stresses might be relevant for reinforcement in T shaped cross sections and for prestressed structures, where large strains can be applied. All data are provided in a “HOT” condition during a fire and in a “COLD” condition after a fire....... The COLD condition is relevant for analyses of residual load bearing capacity of a structure after a fire exposure. It is also relevant for analyses of concrete structures exposed to fully developed fire courses. The reason is that compression zones of concrete are always the weakest in the cooling phase...

  6. Holographic quenches and anomalous transport

    CERN Document Server

    Ammon, Martin; Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Macedo, Rodrigo P; Melgar, Luis

    2016-01-01

    We study the response of the chiral magnetic effect due to continuous quenches induced by time dependent electric fields within holography. Concretely, we consider a holographic model with dual chiral anomaly and compute the electric current parallel to a constant, homogeneous magnetic field and a time dependent electric field in the probe approximation. We explicitly solve the PDEs by means of pseudospectral methods in spatial and time directions and study the transition to an universal "fast" quench response. Moreover, we compute the amplitudes, i.e.,~residues of the quasi normal modes, by solving the (ODE) Laplace transformed equations. We investigate the possibility of considering the asymptotic growth rate of the amplitudes as a well defined notion of initial time scale for linearized systems. Finally, we highlight the existence of Landau level resonances in the electrical conductivity parallel to a magnetic field at finite frequency and show explicitly that these only appear in presence of the anomaly. ...

  7. Quench cooling under reduced gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chatain, D; Nikolayev, V S; Beysens, D

    2013-01-01

    We report the quench cooling experiments performed with liquid O2 under different levels of gravity simulated with the magnetic gravity compensation. A copper disk is quenched from 270K to 90K. It is found that the cooling time in microgravity is very long in comparison with any other gravity level. This phenomenon is explained by the isolation effect of the gas surrounding the disk. The liquid subcooling is shown to drastically improuve the heat exchange thus reducing the cooling time (about 20 times). The effect of subcooling on the heat transfer is analyzed at different gravity levels. It is shown that such type of experiments cannot be used for the analysis of the critical heat flux (CHF) of the boiling crisis. The minimum heat flux (MHF) of boiling is analyzed instead.

  8. Quenched Reinforcement Exposed to Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2006-01-01

    Idealized data are derived for the tensile strength of quenched and tempered prestressing steel and of quenched and self-tempered reinforcing bars for fire safety design. 0.2% stresses are derived as a function of the maximum temperature and in addition, 2.0% stresses are provided. A strain of 2.......0% is seldom found in “slack” (not prestressed) reinforcement, but 2.0% stresses might be relevant for reinforcement in T shaped cross sections and for prestressed structures, where large strains can be applied. All data are provided in a “HOT” condition during a fire and in a “COLD” condition after a fire....... The COLD condition is relevant for analyses of residual load bearing capacity of a structure after a fire exposure. It is also relevant for analyses of concrete structures exposed to fully developed fire courses. The reason is that compression zones of concrete are always the weakest in the cooling phase...

  9. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  10. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the experimental aspects of jet-quenching and correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Emphasis is put on correlation measurements, namely jet-like correlations with anisotropic flow subtraction in heavy-ion collisions and long-range pseudorapidity correlations in small systems. Future path on correlation studies is envisioned which may elucidate jet–medium interactions and the properties of the hot dense medium in QCD.

  11. The LHC quench protection system

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new quench protection system (QPS) has the crucial roles of providing an early warning for any part of the superconducting coils and busbars that develop high resistance, as well as triggering the switch-off of the machine. Over 2000 new detectors will be installed around the LHC to make sure every busbar segment between magnets is monitored and protected. One of the major consolidation activities for the LHC is the addition of two new detectors to the quench protection system. A magnet quench occurs when part of the superconducting cable becomes normally-conducting. When the protection system detects an increased resistance the huge amount of energy stored in the magnet chains is safely extracted and ‘dumped’ into specially designed resistors. In the case of the main dipole chain, the stored energy in a single LHC sector is roughly the same as the kinetic energy of a passenger jet at cruising speed. The first new detector is designed to monitor the superconducting...

  12. How to quench a galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V; Saintonge, Amélie; Volonteri, Marta; Quinn, Tom; Governato, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    We show how the interplay between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and merger history determines whether a galaxy quenches star formation at high redshift. We first simulate, in a full cosmological context, a galaxy of total dynamical mass $10^{12}\\,M_{\\odot}$ at $z=2$. Then we systematically alter the accretion history of the galaxy by minimally changing the linear overdensity in the initial conditions. This "genetic modification" approach allows the generation of three sets of $\\Lambda$CDM initial conditions leading to maximum merger ratios of 1:10, 1:5 and 2:3 respectively. The changes leave the final halo mass, large scale structure and local environment unchanged, providing a controlled numerical experiment. Interaction between the AGN physics and mergers in the three cases lead respectively to a star-forming, temporarily-quenched and permanently-quenched galaxy. However the differences do not primarily lie in the black hole accretion rates, but in the kinetic effects of the merger: the galaxy is resilient a...

  13. FInal Report: First Principles Modeling of Mechanisms Underlying Scintillator Non-Proportionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberg, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sadigh, Babak [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhou, Fei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This final report presents work carried out on the project “First Principles Modeling of Mechanisms Underlying Scintillator Non-Proportionality” at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 2013-2015. The scope of the work was to further the physical understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind scintillator nonproportionality that effectively limits the achievable detector resolution. Thereby, crucial quantitative data for these processes as input to large-scale simulation codes has been provided. In particular, this project was divided into three tasks: (i) Quantum mechanical rates of non-radiative quenching, (ii) The thermodynamics of point defects and dopants, and (iii) Formation and migration of self-trapped polarons. The progress and results of each of these subtasks are detailed.

  14. Quantum quench and scaling of entanglement entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputa, Paweł; Das, Sumit R.; Nozaki, Masahiro; Tomiya, Akio

    2017-09-01

    Global quantum quench with a finite quench rate which crosses critical points is known to lead to universal scaling of correlation functions as functions of the quench rate. In this work, we explore scaling properties of the entanglement entropy of a subsystem in a harmonic chain during a mass quench which asymptotes to finite constant values at early and late times and for which the dynamics is exactly solvable. When the initial state is the ground state, we find that for large enough subsystem sizes the entanglement entropy becomes independent of size. This is consistent with Kibble-Zurek scaling for slow quenches, and with recently discussed ;fast quench scaling; for quenches fast compared to physical scales, but slow compared to UV cutoff scales.

  15. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Balogh, Michael L; Smith, Russell J; Power, Chris; Krane, Brad

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation within rich clusters, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from lambdaCDM cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. The orbits are combined with models of star formation followed by quenching in the cluster environment to predict colours and spectroscopic line indices of satellite galaxies. Simple models with only halo mass-dependent quenching and without environmental (i.e. cluster-dependent) quenching fail to reproduce the observed cluster-centric colour and absorption linestrength gradients. Models in which star formation is instantly quenched at the virial radius also fail to match the observations. Better matches to the data are achieved by more complicated bulge-disc models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc quenching depends on the cluster environment. In the most successful models quenching begins at pericentre, operating on an exponential timescale of 2 -- 3...

  16. Photodetectors for scintillator proportionality measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov; Choong, Woon-Seng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, John D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2009-10-21

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  17. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  18. Performance and characteristics of a new scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czirr, J.B. [Mission Support Incorporated, Provo, Utah (United States); MacGillivray, G.M. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada); MacGillivray, R.R. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada); Seddon, P.J. [Nray Services Inc., RP no. 1 Black Bay Road, Petawawa, Ont. K8H2W8 (Canada)

    1999-11-03

    A new class of scintillators for neutron imaging, based upon lithium gadolinium borate, is described. These scintillators offer the ability to tailor their response to the neutron spectrum by varying the relative absorption of neutrons by the key constituents (lithium, gadolinium and boron). The isotopic compositions of each constituent can be varied in order to change the spectral response.

  19. Performance and characteristics of a new scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Czirr, J B; MacGillivray, R R; Seddon, P J

    1999-01-01

    A new class of scintillators for neutron imaging, based upon lithium gadolinium borate, is described. These scintillators offer the ability to tailor their response to the neutron spectrum by varying the relative absorption of neutrons by the key constituents (lithium, gadolinium and boron). The isotopic compositions of each constituent can be varied in order to change the spectral response.

  20. Mounting LHCb hadron calorimeter scintillating tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Scintillating tiles are carefully mounted in the hadronic calorimeter for the LHCb detector. These calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  1. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  2. TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST Liquid Scintillation Methods applied to the Radionuclide Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, P. A. L.; da Silva, C. J.; Iwahara, A.; Loureiro, J. S.; De Oliveira, A. E.; Tauhata, L.; Lopes, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST methods of liquid scintillation implemented in National Institutes of Metrology for activity standardization of radionuclides, which decay by beta emission and electron capture. The computer codes used to calculate the detection efficiency take into account: decay schemes, beta decay theory, quenching parameter evaluation, Poisson statistic model and Monte Carlo simulation for photon and particle interactions in the detection system. Measurements were performed for pure emitters 3H, 14C, 99Tc and for 68Ge/68Ga which decay by electron capture and positron emission, with uncertainties smaller than 1% (k = 1).

  3. TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation methods applied to the radionuclide metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Paulo A.L. da; Silva, Carlos J. da; Iwahara, Akira; Loureiro, Jamir S.; Oliveira, Antonio E. de; Tauhata, Luiz, E-mail: palcruz@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo T. [Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In this work are presented TDCR and CIEMAT/NIST methods of liquid scintillation implemented in National Institutes of Metrology for activity standardization of radionuclides which decay by beta emission and electron capture. The computer codes to calculate the detection efficiency take into account: decay schemes, beta decay theory, quenching parameter evaluation, Poisson statistic model and Monte Carlo simulation for photon and particle interactions in the detection system. Measurements were performed for {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 99}Tc pure beta emitters in a large energy range, and {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga which decay by electron capture and positron emission, with uncertainties smaller than 1% (k = 1). (author)

  4. Extensive studies of MRS APDs for plastic scintillator muon veto detectors of cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, R., E-mail: falkenst@pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.de [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, L.B. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Freund, K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Golovin, A.V.; Golovin, V.M. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grabmayr, P.; Jochum, J. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lubsandorzhiev, B.K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lubsandorzhiev, N.B.; Poleshuk, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polyansky, I.N. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ritter, F.; Sailer, C. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Shaibonov, B.A.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-11

    Low background experiments need active muon veto detectors to shield them from cosmic muons. Plastic scintillator panels with WLS fiber and multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes readout are widely used in such experiments due to their compactness and robustness. In this paper, results from the study of the basic MRS APD parameters, such as breakdown voltages, quenching resistors, internal gain and dark count rates are presented, as well as temperature dependencies of some of these parameters. In a small fraction of the MRS APDs, some strange dips in the I-V curves just preceding the breakdown voltage point have been observed.

  5. Extensive studies of MRS APDs for plastic scintillator muon veto detectors of cryogenic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstein, R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Freund, K.; Golovin, A. V.; Golovin, V. M.; Grabmayr, P.; Jochum, J.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N. B.; Poleshuk, R. V.; Polyansky, I. N.; Ritter, F.; Sailer, C.; Shaibonov, B. A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Low background experiments need active muon veto detectors to shield them from cosmic muons. Plastic scintillator panels with WLS fiber and multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes readout are widely used in such experiments due to their compactness and robustness. In this paper, results from the study of the basic MRS APD parameters, such as breakdown voltages, quenching resistors, internal gain and dark count rates are presented, as well as temperature dependencies of some of these parameters. In a small fraction of the MRS APDs, some strange dips in the I-V curves just preceding the breakdown voltage point have been observed.

  6. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  7. Inorganic-organic rubbery scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gektin, A V; Pogorelova, N; Neicheva, S; Sysoeva, E; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    Spectral-kinetic luminescence properties of films, containing homogeneously dispersed scintillation particles of CsI, CsI:Tl, CsI:Na, and NaI:Tl in optically transparent organosiloxane matrix, are presented. Material is flexible and rubbery and in consequence the detectors of convenient shapes can be produced. It is found that luminescence spectra of the received films are identical whereas decay times are much shorter compared to the same ones of the corresponding single crystals. Layers with pure CsI demonstrate only the fast UV emission (307 nm, 10 ns) without blue microsecond afterglow typical for crystals. The films containing NaI:Tl are non-hygroscopic and preserve scintillation properties for a long time in humid atmosphere unlike single crystals. Organosiloxane layers with CsI:Tl particles provide high light output with good energy resolution for sup 5 sup 5 Fe, sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources, and are capable of detecting both X-rays and alpha-, beta-particles.

  8. Jet quenching via jet collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, J; Wiedemann, U

    2011-01-01

    The strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions measured by ATLAS and CMS provide important constraints on the dynamical mechanisms underlying jet quenching. In this work, we show that the transport of soft gluons away from the jet cone - jet collimation - can account for the observed dijet asymmetry with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude. Further, we show that the energy loss attained through this mechanism results in a very mild distortion of the azimuthal angle dijet distribution.

  9. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  10. High-Z Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposites for Gamma-Ray Scintillation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao

    An affordable and reliable solution for spectroscopic gamma-ray detection has long been sought after due to the needs from research, defense, and medical applications. Scintillators resolve gamma energy by proportionally converting a single high-energy photon into a number of photomultiplier-tube-detectable low-energy photons, which is considered a more affordable solution for general purposes compared to the delicate semiconductor detectors. An ideal scintillator should simultaneously exhibit the following characteristics: 1) high atomic number (Z) for high gamma stopping power and photoelectron production; 2) high light yield since the energy resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of light yield; 3) short emission decay lifetime; and 4) low cost and scalable production. However, commercial scintillators made from either inorganic single crystals or plastics fail to satisfy all requirements due to their intrinsic material properties and fabrication limitations. The concept of adding high-Z constituents into plastic scintillators to harness high Z, low cost, and fast emission in the resulting nanocomposite scintillators is not new in and of itself. Attempts have been made by adding organometallics, quantum dots, and scintillation nanocrystals into the plastic matrix. High-Z organometallics have long been used to improve the Z of plastic scintillators; however, their strong spin-orbit coupling effect entails careful triplet energy matching using expensive triplet emitters to avoid severe quenching of the light yield. On the other hand, reported quantum dot- and nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites suffer from moderate Z and high optical loss due to aggregation and self-absorption at loadings higher than 10 wt%, limiting their potential for practical application. This dissertation strives to improve the performance of nanoparticle-based nanocomposite scintillators. One focus is to synthesize transparent nanocomposites with higher loadings of high

  11. Holographic quenches and anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, Martin; Grieninger, Sebastian; Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Macedo, Rodrigo P.; Melgar, Luis

    2016-09-01

    We study the response of the chiral magnetic effect due to continuous quenches induced by time dependent electric fields within holography. Concretely, we consider a holographic model with dual chiral anomaly and compute the electric current parallel to a constant, homogeneous magnetic field and a time dependent electric field in the probe approximation. We explicitly solve the PDEs by means of pseudospectral methods in spatial and time directions and study the transition to an universal "fast" quench response. Moreover, we compute the amplitudes, i.e., residues of the quasi normal modes, by solving the (ODE) Laplace transformed equations. We investigate the possibility of considering the asymptotic growth rate of the amplitudes as a well defined notion of initial time scale for linearized systems. Finally, we highlight the existence of Landau level resonances in the electrical conductivity parallel to a magnetic field at finite frequency and show explicitly that these only appear in presence of the anomaly. We show that the existence of these resonances induces, among others, a long-lived AC electric current once the electric field is switched off.

  12. Neural Variability Quenching Predicts Individual Perceptual Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazi, Ayelet; Censor, Nitzan; Dinstein, Ilan

    2017-01-04

    Neural activity during repeated presentations of a sensory stimulus exhibits considerable trial-by-trial variability. Previous studies have reported that trial-by-trial neural variability is reduced (quenched) by the presentation of a stimulus. However, the functional significance and behavioral relevance of variability quenching and the potential physiological mechanisms that may drive it have been studied only rarely. Here, we recorded neural activity with EEG as subjects performed a two-interval forced-choice contrast discrimination task. Trial-by-trial neural variability was quenched by ∼40% after the presentation of the stimulus relative to the variability apparent before stimulus presentation, yet there were large differences in the magnitude of variability quenching across subjects. Individual magnitudes of quenching predicted individual discrimination capabilities such that subjects who exhibited larger quenching had smaller contrast discrimination thresholds and steeper psychometric function slopes. Furthermore, the magnitude of variability quenching was strongly correlated with a reduction in broadband EEG power after stimulus presentation. Our results suggest that neural variability quenching is achieved by reducing the amplitude of broadband neural oscillations after sensory input, which yields relatively more reproducible cortical activity across trials and enables superior perceptual abilities in individuals who quench more.

  13. Measuring the attenuation length in liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Dominikus; Oberauer, Lothar; Prummer, Sabrina; Sawatzki, Julia; Zimmer, Vincenz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E15, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Departement E12, James Franck Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The next generation of liquid scintillator detectors like the proposed LENA detector or the planned JUNO detector will feature diameters of order 30 m. Due to this vast size, the optical quality of the scintillator is of crucial importance. To determine the attenuation length of liquid scintillators, an experiment with a 5 m long measurement section was set-up in the underground laboratory in Garching. The current set-up of the experiment is presented along with a discussion of the results of the first measurements. Additionally, there is an outlook towards possible upgrades of the experiment in the future.

  14. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Scintillating track image camera-SCITIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Akira; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iwata, Soma; Kadowaki, Tetsuhito; Kurosawa, Maki; Nagae, Tomohumi; Nakai, Kozi

    2004-01-01

    A new type of track detector, scintillating track image camera (SCITIC) has been developed. Scintillating track images of particles in a scintillator are focused by an optical lens system on a photocathode on image intesifier tube (IIT). The image signals are amplified by an IIT-cascade and stored by a CCD camera. The performance of the detector has been tested with cosmic-ray muons and with pion- and proton-beams from the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Data of the test experiments have shown promising features of SCITIC as a triggerable track detector with a variety of possibilities. 7 Refs.

  16. Light Pulses to Photomultipliers from Extended Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Boemi, D; CERN. Geneva; Costa, S; Insolia, A; Panebianco, S; Potenza, R; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Romanski, J; Russo, G V; Tuvé, C

    1994-01-01

    Light pulses received by photomultipliers coupled to scintillators are investigated in the cases of long scintillator slats or rods as well as large disc-shaped ones and compared with pulses from point-like scintillators. Results of experimental tests for the disc-shaped configuration performed with the single photon counting technique are presented and compared with numerical calculations. The calculations were done describing light pulse shape by means of a quite new general analytical method based on virtual light paths and images from geometrical optics. The associated electric pulses from the photomultipliers are then discussed and their dependence from source-photocathode distance are put in light.

  17. Measurement of Radiation Damage of Water-based Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Bignell, Lindsey J; Hans, Sunej; Jaffe, David E; Rosero, Richard; Vigdor, Steven; Viren, Brett; Worcester, Elizabeth; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of $5\\%$ scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of $1.74 \\pm 0.55 \\%$ and $1.31 \\pm 0.59 \\%$ after $\\approx$ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Whilst some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical conte...

  18. Testing gravity with pulsar scintillation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2017-04-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Compared to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve an accuracy of one part in a thousand within one wave period, which means picosecond scale resolution in time, due to the effect of multipath interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B 0834 +06 have hours of data acquisition, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring the effect of gravity or other mechanisms on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining the scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  19. Testing Gravity with Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 10^5 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B0834+06 have data acquisition for hours, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  20. Effect Factors of Liquid Scintillation Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Over the past decades, the liquid scintillation analysis (LSA) technique remains one of the most popular experimental tools used for the quantitative analysis of radionuclide, especially low-energy β

  1. Pulsar Scintillation and the Local Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R; Rao, A P; Gupta, Yashwant

    1998-01-01

    We present here the results from an extensive scintillation study of twenty pulsars in the dispersion measure (DM) range 3 - 35 pc cm^-3 caried out using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) at 327 MHz, to investigate the distribution of ionized material in the local interstellar medium. Observations were made during the period January 1993 to August 1995, in which the dynamic scintillation spectra of these pulsars were regularly monitored over 10 - 90 epochs spanning 100 days. Reliable and accurate estimates of strengths of scattering have been deduced from the scintillation parameters averaged out for their long-term fluctuations arising from refractive scintillation (RISS) effects. Our analysis reveals several anomalies in the scattering strength, which suggest tht the distribution of scattering material in the Solar neighborhood is not uniform. We have modelled these anomalous scattering effects in terms of inhomogeneities in the distribution of electron dnsity fluctuations in the local interstellar medium (LIS...

  2. Pulse-shape discrimination with Cs2HfCl6 crystal scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, C.; Burger, A.; Goodwin, B.; Groza, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Nagorny, S.; Rowe, E.

    2017-10-01

    The results of investigation into cesium hafnium chloride (Cs2HfCl6) scintillating crystals as a promising detector to search for rare nuclear processes occurring in Hf isotopes is reported. The light output, quenching factor, and pulse-shape characteristics have been investigated at room temperature. The scintillation response of the crystal induced by α-particles and γ-quanta were studied to determine possibility of particle discrimination. Using the optimal filter method we obtained clear separation between signals with a factor of merit (FOM) = 9.3. This indicates that we are able to fully separate signals originating from α-particles and γ-quanta. Similar fruitful discrimination power was obtained by applying the mean time method (FOM = 7) and charge integration method (FOM = 7.5). The quenching factor for collimated 4 MeV α-particles is found to be 0.36, showing that α-particles generate more than a third of the light compared to γ-quanta at the same energy.

  3. Quenched QCD near the chiral limit

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Petters, D; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G

    2000-01-01

    A numerical study of quenched QCD for light quarks is presented using O(a)improved fermions. Particular attention is paid to the possible existence anddetermination of quenched chiral logarithms. A `safe' region to use for chiralextrapolations appears to be at and above the strange quark mass.

  4. Monte Carlo Tools for Jet Quenching

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Korinna

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of jet quenching on the basis of multi-particle final states and jet observables requires new theoretical tools. This talk summarises the status and propects of the theoretical description of jet quenching in terms of Monte Carlo generators.

  5. Quenched chiral perturbation theory to one loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Pallante, Elisabetta

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the divergences of the generating functional of quenched chiral perturbation theory at one loop, and renormalize the theory by an appropriate definition of the counterterms. We show that the quenched chiral logarithms can be accounted for by defining a renormalized B0 parameter which, a

  6. Quenched Chiral Perturbation Theory to one loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, G.; Pallante, E.

    1998-01-01

    The divergences of the generating functional of quenched Chiral Perturbation theory (qCHPT) to one loop are computed in closed form. We show how the quenched chiral logarithms can be reabsorbed in the renormalization of the B0 parameter of the leading order Lagrangian. Finally, we do the chiral powe

  7. MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Laboratory is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified, all without the interference of a container or data-gathering instrument. The ESL main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to 8 quench vessels can be loaded into the quench wheel, which is indexed with LabVIEW control software. This allows up to 8 samples to be rapidly quenched before having to open the chamber. The system has been tested successfully on several zirconium samples. Future work will be done with other materials using different quench mediums. Microstructural analysis will also be done on successfully quench samples.

  8. Spectrometric characteristics of polystyrene scintillation films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, A R; Gavalyan, V B; Gavalyan, V G

    1999-01-01

    The spectrometric characteristics of five types of polystyrene scintillation films with thicknesses of 10, 30, 50 and 80 mu m and of analogous 250 mu m thick plates irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu and sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra sources of alpha-particles have been studied. The prospects of utilization of scintillation films as radiators for detection of heavy charged particles and measurement of their energy was experimentally shown.

  9. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  10. Transient Loschmidt echo in quenched Ising chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Carla; Schiró, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We study the response to sudden local perturbations of highly excited quantum Ising spin chains. The key quantity encoding this response is the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write as a transient Loschmidt Echo. Its asymptotics at long time differences contain crucial information about the structure of the highly excited nonequilibrium environment induced by the quench. We compute the echo perturbatively for a weak local quench but for arbitrarily large global quench, using a cumulant expansion. Our perturbative results suggest that the echo decays exponentially, rather than power law as in the low-energy orthogonality catastrophe, a further example of quench-induced decoherence already found in the case of quenched Luttinger liquids. The emerging decoherence scale is set by the strength of the local potential and the bulk excitation energy.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Metal Quenching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方刚; 曾攀

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the phase transformation and the resulting internal stresses and strains in metallic parts during quenching were modeled numerically. The numerical simulation of the metal quenching process was based on the metallo-thermo-mechanical theory using the finite element method to couple the temperature, phase transformation, and stress-strain fields. The numerical models are presented for the heat treatment and kinetics of the phase transformation. The finite element models and the phase transition kinetics accurately predict the distribution of the microstructure volume fractions, the temperature, the distortion, and the stress-strain relation during quenching. The two examples used to validate the models are the quenching of a small gear and of a large turbine rotor. The simulation results for the martensite phase volume fraction, the stresses, and the distortion in the gear agree well with the experimental data. The models can be used to optimize the quenching conditions to ensure product quality.

  12. Quench Heater Studies for the LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Mateos, F

    2001-01-01

    About 2000 LHC (CERN's Large Hadron Collider) superconducting magnets will be protected with quench heaters against development of excessive voltage and overheating after a resistive transition. The quench heater strips are powered by capacitor bank discharge power supplies. The strips are made of stainless steel partially plated with copper to reduce their resistance and to allow for the connection of quench heaters in series. The strips are embedded in between two polyimide foils. The initial power density and the current decay time determine the quench heater effectiveness. Since only one type of heater power supply will be available, the copper plating cycle is adapted for the various magnet types to keep the resistance of the heater circuit constant. Different quench heater designs have been tested on various prototype magnets to optimise the copper-plating cycle and the electric insulation of the heater strip. This paper summarises the experimental results and computations that allowed to finalise the h...

  13. QUENCH STUDIES AND PREHEATING ANALYSIS OF SEAMLESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Eremeev, Grigory [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    One of the alternative manufacturing technologies for SRF cavities is hydroforming from seamless tubes. Although this technology has produced cavities with gradient and Q-values comparable to standard EBW/EP cavities, a few questions remain. One of these questions is whether the quench mechanism in hydroformed cavities is the same as in standard electron beam welded cavities. Towards this effort Jefferson Lab performed quench studies on 2 9 cell seamless hydroformed cavities. These cavities include DESY's - Z163 and Z164 nine-cell cavities hydroformed at DESY. Initial Rf test results Z163 were published in SRF2011. In this report we will present post JLAB surface re-treatment quench studies for each cavity. The data will include OST and T-mapping quench localization as well as quench location preheating analysis comparing them to the observations in standard electron beam welded cavities.

  14. Ionospheric scintillation effects on single frequency GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C. G.; Groves, K. M.

    2008-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active within, although not limited to, a belt encircling the Earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increase, so does the potential for degraded precision and availability from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning 7 years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/American longitudinal sector as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K. in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at 1 min resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  15. Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailik, V B

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of th...

  16. Temperature dependence of scintillation properties of SrMoO4

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailik, V B; Kraus, H; Kim, H J; Kapustianyk, V; Panasyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the X-ray luminescence and scintillation properties of a SrMoO4 crystal as function of temperature down to T=10 K have been carried out. The luminescence in SrMoO4 is quenched at room temperature, but below T<200 K the crystal exhibits a broad emission band with a maximum at a wavelength of 520 nm. The emission is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons and defects acting as traps for the exactions at low temperatures. Such complex character of radiative decay is reflected in the kinetics which contains several components plus a contribution from delayed recombination at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of scintillation light output of SrMoO4 was studied. Comparing with a reference ZnWO4 crystal measured under the same experimental conditions it was found that the light output of SrMoO4 is 15+-5%. It is suggested, therefore, that there is scope for optimisation of strontium molybdate for application as scintillator in cryogenic rare event searches

  17. Temperature dependence of scintillation properties of SrMoO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Elyashevskyi, Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics of Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sangyeok-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kapustianyk, V.; Panasyuk, M. [Scientific-technical and Educational Centre of Low Temperature Studies, I. Franko National University of Lviv, 50 Dragomanova Str., 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-08-21

    Studies of the X-ray luminescence and scintillation properties of a SrMoO{sub 4} crystal as function of temperature down to T=10 K have been carried out. The luminescence in SrMoO{sub 4} is quenched at room temperature, but below T<200 K the crystal exhibits a broad emission band with a maximum at a wavelength of 520 nm. The emission is attributed to the radiative decay of self-trapped excitons and defects acting as traps for the exactions at low temperatures. Such complex character of radiative decay is reflected in the kinetics which contains several components plus a contribution from delayed recombination at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of scintillation light output of SrMoO{sub 4} was studied. Comparing with a reference ZnWO{sub 4} crystal measured under the same experimental conditions it was found that the light output of SrMoO{sub 4} is 15±5%. It is suggested, therefore, that there is scope for optimisation of strontium molybdate for application as scintillator in cryogenic rare event searches.

  18. In situ determination of quenching factors in Cresst-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, Andreas; Ertl, Andreas; Guetlein, Achim; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Muenster, Andrea; Potzel, Walter; Sivers, Moritz von; Strauss, Raimund; Roth, Sabine; Wawoczny, Stephan; Willers, Michael; Wuestrich, Marc [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15 (Germany); Jochum, Josef [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Proebst, Franz [Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Scholl, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15 (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The CRESST-II experiment is searching for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) via their elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} single crystals at low temperatures. Each particle interaction in CaWO{sub 4} produces a phonon as well as a light signal. The ratio between the recorded light and phonon signal - the Quenching Factor (QF) - is a crucial parameter to discriminate very efficiently between electron recoils from radioactive e/γ background and nuclear recoils, e.g. WIMP events. Moreover, to some extent, the different types of recoiling nuclei (O,Ca,W) can be distinguished, if the QFs are known accurately enough. The QF cannot only be extracted from dedicated experiments but also from calibration data, gathered with an AmBe-source placed inside and outside the neutron shielding of CRESST-II. In this talk we present a method to determine the QFs of CaWO{sub 4} in situ from these calibration data.

  19. Linear energy transfer effects on time profiles of scintillation of Ce-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Takayuki [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama-Cho, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Koshimizu, Masanori [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-07 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kurashima, Satoshi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kimura, Atsushi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Fujimoto, Yutaka; Asai, Keisuke [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-07 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    We measured temporal profiles of the scintillation of Ce-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} scintillator crystals at different linear energy transfers (LETs). Based on the comparison of high-LET temporal profiles with those at low LET, a fast component was observed only at low LET. The disappearance of the fast component at high LET is tentatively ascribed to the quenching of excited states at crystal defects owing to the interaction between excited states via the Auger process. In addition, the rise and the initial decay behavior were dependent on the LET. This LET-dependent behavior is explained by an acceleration process and a deceleration process in energy transfer at high LET. The LET-dependent temporal profiles provide the basis for a discrimination technique of gamma-ray and neutron detection events using these scintillators based on the nuclear reaction, {sup 6}Li(n,α)t.

  20. Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times in high pressure xenon and xenon methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pushkin, K. N.; Akimov, D. Y.; Burenkov, A. A.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Kuznetsov, I. S.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tezuka, C.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2007-01-01

    Scintillation light, ionization yield and scintillation decay times have been measured in xenon and in its mixture with a 0.05% concentration of methane as a function of the reduced electric field (E/N)-the ratio of the electric field strength to the number density of gas-at a pressure of 21 atm. Th

  1. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Jet quenching from QCD evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Emerman, Alexander; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in soft-collinear effective theory with Glauber gluons have led to the development of a new method that gives a unified description of inclusive hadron production in reactions with nucleons and heavy nuclei. We show how this approach, based on the generalization of the DGLAP evolution equations to include final-state medium-induced parton shower corrections for large Q2 processes, can be combined with initial-state effects for applications to jet quenching phenomenology. We demonstrate that the traditional parton energy loss calculations can be regarded as a special soft-gluon emission limit of the general QCD evolution framework. We present phenomenological comparison of the SCETG -based results on the suppression of inclusive charged hadron and neutral pion production in √{sNN }=2.76 TeV lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider to experimental data. We also show theoretical predictions for the upcoming √{sNN }≃5.1 TeV Pb +Pb run at the LHC.

  3. Optical properties of Ce3+ doped fluorophosphates scintillation glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongxin; Liu, Liwan; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Danping; Fang, Yongzheng; Zhao, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Fluorophosphates (P2O5-BaO-BaF2-Al2O3-Gd2O3-Ce2O3) glasses with different Gd2O3 and BaF2 concentrations have been prepared by a melt quenching method. The effect of Gd2O3 and BaF2 on the glass performance including the density, absorption as well as luminescence properties under both ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray excitation was studied systematically. Energy transfer from Gd3+ to Ce3+ plays an important role in the scintillation mechanism of these glasses and the optimum concentration of Gd2O3 is found to be approximately 3 mol%. The highest integrated light emission intensity of these glass samples excited by X-ray is 25% of BGO and the decay time constants are in the range of 25-35 ns, much shorter than the 300 ns decay time of BGO. Meanwhile, replacing lighter compound BaO with the BaF2 can increase the density of the glasses and also improve the light yield.

  4. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  5. Evaluation of different parameters affecting the liquid scintillation spectrometry measurement of gross alpha and beta index in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion. Servicio Radioisotopos. Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Casacuberta, N. [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals-Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. Spain (Spain); Penalver, A.; Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Aguilar, C., E-mail: carme.aguilar@urv.cat [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry is a fast competitive technique for the simultaneous evaluation of gross alpha and beta indexes. However, the implementation of this technique should not be considered as straightforward, and the pre-concentration methods to decrease the detection limit together with quenching and alpha, and beta crossover corrections should be carefully chosen according to the needs of the laboratory. Both aspects are being approached in this work as to find an easy and robust method for alpha/beta measurement in water samples, taking into account the quenching and alpha/beta crossover interferences effects. Results showed that most of the pre-concentration methods increased the quenching in the measurement, although HNO{sub 3} 0.05 M points to be the best solution for pre-concentration and re-dissolution of the sample as converges into low quenching and maximum recovery. Subsequently, in the measurement of water samples with different conductivities, the analysis of the raw counts to obtain gross alpha and beta indexes was carried out using different approaches to implement quenching and interference corrections. If quenching and salt content in the sample are relatively low, interference and quenching-efficiency corrections do not improve the accuracy of the results within the usual precision assumed for a result of gross alpha and beta index (25%). Special attention must be paid when corrections are applied to high quenched or saline samples and when alpha and beta activities values are different in several orders of magnitude. - Highlights: > Developed method for simultaneously quantifying gross alpha and gross beta indexes based on LSC was as accurate and precise as the results obtained from methods based on gas proportional counting and ZnS alpha counting. > Alpha/beta crossover and/or quenching corrections were applied and the results obtained did not improve accuracy within 25% dispersion, a widespread acceptance limit for gross alpha and

  6. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  7. Scintillation properties of selected oxide monocrystals activated with Ce and Pr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Andrzej J.; Drozdowski, Winicjusz; Wisniewski, Dariusz; Lefaucheur, Jean-Luc; Galazka, Zbigniew; Gou, Zhenhui; Lukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Kisielewski, Jaroslaw

    2006-01-01

    advantages and, after a likely improvement of some parameters, may also present a viable and desired alternative in applications that require high counting rates or better time resolution. Unfortunately, LuAP:Pr, although the fastest among all the materials studied, may be seriously limited in its achievable light yield by inherent physical processes that are responsible for nonradiative quenching of scintillation light in this material.

  8. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V S; Elouadhiri, L; Ghoshal, P K; Kashy, D; Makarov, A; Pastor, O; Quettier, L; Velev, G; Wiseman, M

    2014-06-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  9. Temperature Profiles During Quenches in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets Protected by Quench Heaters

    CERN Document Server

    Maroussov, V; Siemko, A

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of the magnet protection by quench heaters was studied using a novel method which derives the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet during a quench from measured voltage signals. In several Large Hadron Collider single aperture dipole models, temperature profiles and temperature gradients in the magnet coil have been evaluated in the case of protection by different sets of quench heaters and different powering and protection parameters. The influence of the insulation thickness between the quench heaters and the coil has also been considered. The results show clear correlation between the positions of quench heaters, magnet protection parameters and temperature profiles. This study allowed a better understanding of the quench process mechanisms and the efficiency assessment of the different protection schemes.

  10. Primary and secondary scintillation measurements in a Xenon Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Monteiro, C M B; Santos, J M F dos [Instrumentation Centre, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ball, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Yahlali, N [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Nygren, D, E-mail: pancho@gian.fis.uc.p [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC. The detector requires excellent energy resolution, which can be achieved in a Xe TPC with electroluminescence readout. Hamamatsu R8520-06SEL photomultipliers are good candidates for the scintillation readout. The performance of this photomultiplier, used as VUV photosensor in a gas proportional scintillation counter, was investigated. Initial results for the detection of primary and secondary scintillation produced as a result of the interaction of 5.9 keV X-rays in gaseous xenon, at room temperature and at pressures up to 3 bar, are presented. An energy resolution of 8.0% was obtained for secondary scintillation produced by 5.9 keV X-rays. No significant variation of the primary scintillation was observed for different pressures (1, 2 and 3 bar) and for electric fields up to 0.8 V cm{sup -1} torr{sup -1} in the drift region, demonstrating negligible recombination luminescence. A primary scintillation yield of 81 {+-} 7 photons was obtained for 5.9 keV X-rays, corresponding to a mean energy of 72 {+-} 6 eV to produce a primary scintillation photon in xenon.

  11. Scintillation-Induced Intermittency in SETI

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Sagan, Carl Edward; Cordes, James M.; Sagan, Carl

    1997-01-01

    We consider interstellar scintillations as a cause of intermittency in radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). We demonstrate that scintillations are very likely to allow initial detections of narrowband signals from distant sources (> 100 pc), while making redetections improbable. We consider three models in order to assess the non-repeating, narrowband events found in recent SETI and to analyze large surveys in general: (I) Radiometer noise; (II) A population of constant Galactic sources undergoing interstellar scintillation,; and (III) Real, transient signals (or hardware errors) of either terrestrial or ET origin. We apply likelihood and Bayesian tests of the models to The Planetary Society/Harvard META data. We find that Models II and III are both highly preferred to Model I, but that Models II and III are about equally likely. Ruling out Model II in favor of Model III requires many more reobservations than were conducted in META *or* the reobservation threshold must be much lower than wa...

  12. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, W W

    2002-01-01

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4) has been developed for high-energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu sub 2 SiO sub 5 :Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr sub 3 :Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency.

  13. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  14. Characterization of the new scintillator CLYC

    CERN Document Server

    Kui-Nian, Li; Qiang, Gui; Peng, Jin; Geng, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The first domestic inorganic scintillator CLYC was grown in Beijing Glass Research Instituteusing the vertical Bridgman method. In this work, we evaluated the performance of this new CLYC crystal in terms of gamma-ray energy resolution and pulse shape discrimination(PSD)capability between neutrons and gamma-rays. The decay times occurred throughdifferent scintillation mechanisms were achievedby fitting decay functions to the neutron and gamma-ray waveform structures. We found an energy resolution of 4.5% for 662-keV gamma-rays and efficient neutron/gamma PSD withFoM 2.6. Under gamma-ray excitation, there is ultrafast scintillation mechanism in CLYC, with a decay time about 2 ns,whereasthere is no evidence of ultrafast decay under thermal neutron excitation. This work contributes to promote domestic development of CLYC.

  15. The surprising inefficiency of dwarf satellite quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, Coral; Cooper, Michael C; Boylan-Kolchin, Mike; Bullock, James S

    2014-01-01

    We study dwarf satellite galaxy quenching using observations from the Geha et al. (2012) NSA/SDSS catalog together with LCDM cosmological simulations to facilitate selection and interpretation. We show that fewer than 30% of dwarfs (M* ~ 10^8.5-10^9.5 Msun) identified as satellites within massive host halos (Mhost ~ 10^12.5-10^14 Msun) are quenched, in spite of the expectation from simulations that half of them should have been accreted more than 6 Gyr ago. We conclude that whatever the action triggering environmental quenching of dwarf satellites, the process must be highly inefficient. We investigate a series of simple, one-parameter quenching models in order understand what is required to explain the low quenched fraction and conclude that either the quenching timescale is very long (> 9.5 Gyr, a "slow starvation" scenario) or that the environmental trigger is not well matched to accretion within the virial volume. We discuss these results in light of the fact that most of the low mass dwarf satellites in ...

  16. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefodiev, A. V., E-mail: Mefodiev@inr.ru; Kudenko, Yu. G. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  17. Combined scintillation detector for gamma dose rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L.; Novakova, O.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1990-01-01

    The specifications are described of a newly developed scintillation detector, essentially consisting of a plastic scintillator completed with inorganic scintillators ZnS(Ag) and NaI(Tl). The gamma dose rate is derived from the photomultiplier anode current. The composition and sizes of the scintillators and the capsule are selected so as to minimise the energy dependence errors and directional dependence errors of the detector response over a wide range of energies and/or angles. (author).

  18. Preparation of 45Ca(HDEHP)n and (CaH{sub 1}50{sub 2})2 samples for liquid scintillation counting, compared to 45caCl{sub 2} results; Preparacion de Ca (HDEHP)n y (C{sub 8}H{sub 1}50{sub 2})2 marcados con 45Ca y estudio comparativo con 4 5ca Cl2 en medidas por centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L.; Arcos, J. M. los; Grau Malonda, A.

    1994-07-01

    A procedure for preparation of liquid scintillation counting organic samples of the Di-2-ethylhexyl phosphate calcium complex and the 2-ethylhexanoate calcium salt, labelled with 45Ca, is described. The chemical quench, the counting stability and spectral evolution of both compounds is studied in six scintillators,Toluene-alcohol, Dioxane-naphtalene, Hi safe II, Ultimate-Gold and Instagel, and compared to results obtained from a commercial solution of 4 5CaCl2. (Author) 7 refs.

  19. Scintillation and luminescence properties of Sm3+-activated Lu2O3-CaO-SiO2-B2O3 (LuCSB) scintillating glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdsiri, K.; Kaewkhao, J.; Park, J. M.; Ha, D. H.

    2016-09-01

    Lutetium (Lu) is a high atomic number material and readily interacts with X-rays, which makes it a good scintillation material. In this work, Lu-glass scintillators from the series xSm2O3: 25Lu2 O3: 10SiO2: 10CaO: (55- x)B2O3 (LuCSB) were synthesized at 1500 ° C by using a simple melt quenching technique. The influence of the Sm3+ ion on their physical, optical, photo-, X-rayand proton-induced properties has been characterized. The amorphous nature of the samples was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction. The density and the molar volume were found to be increased at higher concentrations of Sm3+. The X-ray- and the proton-induced emission spectra of the Sm3+:LuCSB glasses showed an intense reddish-orange emission around 604 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2), which matched the photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum well. Among the prepared glasses, the 1.0-mol% Sm3+ ion-activated LuCSB glass exhibited the highest value of the characteristic emission parameters. The X-ray-induced luminescence of the LuCSB glass was also compared with that of a commercial bismuth germinate Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal.

  20. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  1. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  2. Radiation tolerance tests of scintillating fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavardi, Laura; Albrecht, Johannes [TU Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An upgrade of the LHCb detector is planned during the shutdown which will take place from mid 2018 to the end of 2019. The proposed upgrade for the tracking system is a detector composed of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers. The tracking detector will be working in an environment exposed to radiation, so that the resistance of the fibres to radiation is an important quality, which needs to be investigated. In this talk tests of scintillating fibres tolerance to radiation will be presented.

  3. Recent measurements on scintillator-photodetector systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, E.

    1987-02-01

    The pulse height distributions from eleven kinds of scintillators coupled with a photomultiplier (PMT) and with a silicon photodiode were measured for gamma-ray energies between 14 keV and 1836 keV and compared. The numbers of photoelectrons from the PMT photocathode and those of electron-hole pairs in the photodiode were obtained. The intrinsic pulse height broadening was clearly demonstrated in NaI(T1), CsI(Na), CsI(T1) and CsI(pure) scintillators.

  4. Quality study of the purified liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Kibe, Y.

    2008-07-01

    We have been distilling the KamLAND liquid scintillator (LS) for the low energy solar neutrino observation. The distillation removes radioactive impurities from LS efficiently. We developed two types of high sensitivity radon detectors to monitor 222Rn contamination which causes a primary background source 210Pb. Their required sensitivity is several mBq/m3. The features and the measurement results of these detectors are presented. We also report the study of liquid scintillator properties after the distillation: attenuation length, light output and PPO density.

  5. International Colloquium on Scattering and Scintillation in Radio Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W A; Rickett, B J; Bird, M K; Efimov, A I; Samoznaev, L N; Rudash, V K; Chashei, I V; Plettemeier, D; Spangler, S R; Tokarev, Y; Belov, Y; Boiko, G; Komrakov, G; Chau, J; Harmon, J; Sulzer, M; Kojima, M; Tokumaru, M; Fujiki, K; Janardhan, P; Jackson, B V; Hick, P P; Buffington, A; Olyak, M R; Fallows, R A; Nechaeva, M B; Gavrilenko, V G; Gorshenkov, Yu N; Alimov, V A; Molotov, I E; Pushkarev, A B; Shanks, R; Tuccari, G; Lotova, N A; Vladimirski, K V; Obridko, V N; Gubenko, V N; Andreev, V E; Stinebring, D R; Gwinn, C; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Senkbeil, C; Shabala, S; Bignall, H E; MacQuart, J P; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Smirnova, T V; Malofeev, V M; Malov, O I; Tyulbashev, S A; Jessner, A; Sieber, W; Wielebinski, R; Scattering and Scintillation in Radio Astronomy

    2006-01-01

    Topics of the Colloquium: a) Interplanetary scintillation b) Interstellar scintillation c) Modeling and physical origin of the interplanetary and the interstellar plasma turbulence d) Scintillation as a tool for investigation of radio sources e) Seeing through interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media Ppt-presentations are available on the Web-site: http://www.prao.ru/conf/Colloquium/main.html

  6. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  7. Plastic scintillators modifications for a selective radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, Matthieu; Bertrand, Guillaume H.V.; Carrel, Frederick; Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan; Montbarbon, Eva; Sguerra, Fabien [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs and Architectures electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from January 2000 to June 2015. All examples are distributed into the main application, i.e. how the plastic scintillator was modified to enhance the detection towards a given radiation particle. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. (authors)

  8. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic as a nanocomposite scintillator for x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Struebing, Christian; Wagner, Brent; Summers, Christopher; Ding, Yong; Bryant, Alex; Thadhani, Naresh; Shedlock, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-05-20

    Transparent glass ceramics with embedded light-emitting nanocrystals show great potential as low-cost nanocomposite scintillators in comparison to single crystal and transparent ceramic scintillators. In this study, cubic structure BaGdF5:Tb nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix are reported for potential high performance MeV imaging applications. Scintillator samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared by a simple conventional melt-quenching method followed by annealing. Optical, structural and scintillation properties were characterized to guide the design and optimization of selected material systems, aiming at the development of a system with higher crystal volume and larger crystal size for improved luminosity. It is observed that enhanced scintillation performance was achieved by tuning the glass matrix composition and using GdF3 in the raw materials, which served as a nucleation agent. A 26% improvement in light output was observed from a BaGdF5:Tb glass ceramic with addition of GdF3.

  10. SPORT: A new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study swift heavy ion-beam induced luminescence - Application to luminescence degradation of a fast plastic scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardés, E.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Cassimi, A.; Durantel, F.; Grygiel, C.; Madi, T.; Monnet, I.; Ramillon, J.-M.; Ropars, F.; Lebius, H.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new sub-nanosecond time-resolved instrument to study the dynamics of UV-visible luminescence under high stopping power heavy ion irradiation. We applied our instrument, called SPORT, on a fast plastic scintillator (BC-400) irradiated with 27-MeV Ar ions having high mean electronic stopping power of 2.6 MeV/μm. As a consequence of increasing permanent radiation damages with increasing ion fluence, our investigations reveal a degradation of scintillation intensity together with, thanks to the time-resolved measurement, a decrease in the decay constant of the scintillator. This combination indicates that luminescence degradation processes by both dynamic and static quenching, the latter mechanism being predominant. Under such high density excitation, the scintillation deterioration of BC-400 is significantly enhanced compared to that observed in previous investigations, mainly performed using light ions. The observed non-linear behaviour implies that the dose at which luminescence starts deteriorating is not independent on particles' stopping power, thus illustrating that the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators can be strongly weakened under high excitation density in heavy ion environments.

  11. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nygren, D. R.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Renner, J.

    2016-03-01

    The gaseous Xenon(Xe) time projection chamber (TPC) is an attractive detector technique for neutrinoless double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. While it is less dense compared to Liquid Xe detectors, it has intrinsic advantages in tracking capability and better energy resolution. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which is expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). In order to test the feasibility of the performance improvements with TMA, we made the first direct measurement of Penning and fluorescence transfer efficiency with gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA. While we observed a Penning transfer efficiency up to ~35%, we found strong suppression of primary scintillation light with TMA. We also found that the primary scintillation light with Xe and TMA mixture can be well characterized by ~3% fluorescence transfer from Xe to TMA, with further suppression due to TMA self-quenching. No evidence of the scintillation light produced by recombination of TMA ions was found. This strong suppression of scintillation light makes dark matter searches quite challenging, while the possibility of improved neutrinoless double beta decay searches remains open. This work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  12. Secondary Heating Under Quenching Cooling of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukrov, S. L.; Ber, L. B.

    2017-07-01

    Variants of secondary heating of aluminum alloys are considered, i.e., under quenching of plates in a water tank or on a horizontal quenching unit with water jet cooling, under continuous quenching of strips, and under quenching of tubes in vertical furnaces. Recommendation are given for removal or substantial reduction of the intensity of secondary heating under industrial conditions.

  13. Development of new Polysiloxane Based Liquid Scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento,Via Sommarive, 9, 38123 Trento (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Carturan, S.; Collazuol, G.; Checchia, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro,Viale dell' Universita, 2, 35020 Legnaro - Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Degerlier, M. [Department of Physics, Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University, Science and Art Faculty, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, attention toward neutron detection has been growing in the scientific community, driven by new requirements in different fields of application ranging from homeland security to medical and material analysis, from research physics, to nuclear energy production. So far neutron detection, with particular attention to fast neutrons, has been mainly based on organic liquid scintillators, owing to their good efficiency and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability. Most of these liquids have however some main drawbacks given by toxicity, flammability, volatility and sensitivity to dissolved oxygen that limits the duration and the quality of their performances with worse handiness and increased costs. Phenyl-substituted polysiloxanes could address most of these issues, being characterized by low toxicity, low volatility and low flammability. Their optical properties can be tailored by changing the phenyl distribution and concentration thus allowing to increase the solubility of organic dyes, to modify the fluorescence spectra and to vary the refractive index of the medium. Furthermore, polysiloxanes have been recently exploited for the production of plastic scintillators with very good chemical and thermal stability and very good radiation hardness and the development of polysiloxane liquid scintillators could allow to combine these interesting properties with the supremacy of liquid scintillators as regarding PSD over plastics. For these reasons, the properties of several phenyl-substituted polysiloxane with different phenyl amounts and different viscosities have been investigated, with particular attention to the scintillation response and the pulse shape discrimination capability, and the results of the investigation are reported in this work. More in details, the scintillation light yield towards gamma rays ({sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs) of several polysiloxane liquids has been analyzed and compared with the light yield of a commercial non

  14. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  15. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jingke; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-01-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3keV$_{\\text{nr}}$ to 52keV$_{\\text{nr}}$, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for light WIMP interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies, but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  16. Scintillation Efficiency Measurement of Na Recoils in NaI(Tl) Below the DAMA/LIBRA Energy Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jingke [Princeton U.; Shields, Emily [Princeton U.; Calaprice, Frank [Princeton U.; Westerdale, Shawn [Princeton U.; Froborg, Francis [Princeton U.; Suerfu, Burkhant [Princeton U.; Alexander, Thomas [Fermilab; Aprahamian, Ani [Notre Dame U.; Back, Henning O. [Princeton U.; Casarella, Clark [Notre Dame U.; Fang, Xiao [Notre Dame U.; Gupta, Yogesh K. [Notre Dame U.; Ianni, Aldo [Gran Sasso; Lamere, Edward [Notre Dame U.; Lippincott, W. Hugh [Fermilab; Liu, Qian [Notre Dame U.; Lyons, Stephanie [Notre Dame U.; Siegl, Kevin [Notre Dame U.; Smith, Mallory [Notre Dame U.; Tan, Wanpeng [Notre Dame U.; Kolk, Bryant Vande [Notre Dame U.

    2015-07-30

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3 to 52 keVnr, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for dark matter-Na scattering interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  17. Studies of scintillator optical properties, electronics simulation and data analysis for the BOREXINO neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewke, Timo

    2013-10-18

    Borexino is a state-of-the-art low-energy neutrino detector. Many results, like the first real-time measurement of {sup 7}Be neutrinos and the detection of pep neutrinos, could be reported. However, still some parts of the solar neutrino spectrum remain unseen. With a better detector understanding and monitoring these unexploited regions could be investigated. The results achieved in course of the present thesis account for accomplishing these improvements. First, the ionization quenching for electrons in liquid scintillators is investigated using a specially designed and build experiment. This effect is especially interesting for low-energy events and, therefore, has a direct influence on the possibility to detect CNO and pp neutrinos. With a coincidence circuit and the properties of Compton scattering the quenching is analysed. Further, the so-called Birks factor kB is measured for the scintillator used in the running Borexino experiment. As the Birks factor is also an important input parameter to simulations of the future large scale neutrino experiment LENA, the Birks factor of LENA's most probable scintillator is determined as well. Second, as muons are responsible for a large amount of background, an excellent working muon veto is essential. During this thesis, it was achieved to monitor the muon tagging stability and efficiency for a long period of time. Further, to verify the muon track reconstruction Monte Carlo simulations are needed. For the Inner Detector of Borexino the simulation is fully operable. In course of this thesis the complete electronics system of the Outer Detector is included into the simulation tool. In this way, a functioning simulation mimicking real physical events is generated. In addition, the output of the simulation can now be accessed and evaluated by the normal data handling system of Borexino. A comparison to real data and, therefore, validating the muon track reconstruction is now possible. Last, to check the neutron

  18. Quench Protection of DI-BSCCO Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ueno, E.; Kato, T.; Hayashi, K.

    Quench protection is one of the most important requirements for the practical application of high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) coils. Quench protection requires that early detection of a developing quench event is followed by rapid reduction of the operating current. However, such quench detection is very difficult because HTS wire produces heat only locally due to the very slow propagation velocity of a normal zone. Excellent high voltage insulation performance is required if the current is to be reduced rapidly in a large-scale superconducting application with very large inductance. Thus it is important to investigate the behavior of coils with various decay time constants, and to detect voltages on very short time scales. This goal remains to be achieved. In the present study we built test coil and a full-scale pole coil for a 20 MW motor for use in experiments on quench protection, and parameterized the relation between the decay time constant and the detecting voltage, using a conventional balance circuit to detect the quench, which was generated by gradually raising the temperature of the coils. The results verify that a balance circuit can be used for quench detection. For example, when the current decay time constant is 4 seconds, the test coil can be protected even with a detecting voltage of 0.15 volts, despite a significant heat production rate of 126 W. We also confirmed that the full-scale pole coil, with a decay time constant of 20 seconds, can be protected with a detecting voltage of 0.06 V.

  19. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  20. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  1. Liquid scintillation counting standardization of 125I in organic and inorganic samples by the CIEMAT/NIST method; Calibracion por centelleo liquido del 125I en muestras inorganicas y organicas, mediante el metodo CIEMAT/NIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Grau Carles, A.

    1994-07-01

    The liquid scintillation counting standardization of organic and inorganic samples of ''I25I by the CIEMAT/NIST method using five different scintillators is described. The discrepancies between experimental and computed efficiencies are lower than 1.4% and 1.7%, for inorganic and organic samples, respectively, in the interval 421-226 of quenching parameter. Both organic and inorganic solutions have been standardized in terms of activity concentration to an overall uncertainty of 0.76%. (Author) 14 refs.

  2. C/NOFS: a mission to forecast scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Beaujardière, O.; the C/NOFS Science Definition Team

    2004-11-01

    This article describes the science to be pursued during the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory. The primary purpose of C/NOFS is to forecast the presence of ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems. A satellite, scheduled for launch in May 2005 into a low inclination (13∘), elliptical (˜375×710 km) orbit, is the most significant component of the C/NOFS program. Complementary ground-based measurements are also critical to the success of the mission. C/NOFS science objectives may be organized into three categories: (1) to understand physical processes active in the background ionosphere and thermosphere in which plasma instabilities grow; (2) to identify mechanisms that trigger or quench the plasma irregularities responsible for signal degradation; and (3) to determine how the plasma irregularities affect the propagation of electro-magnetic waves. C/NOFS is the first satellite solely dedicated to forecasting ionospheric irregularities and radio wave scintillations. It will be equipped with sensors that measure the following parameters: ambient and fluctuating electron densities; ion and electron temperatures; AC and DC electric fields; magnetic fields; neutral winds; ionospheric scintillations; and electron content along the lines of sight between C/NOFS and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Thus, the sensor suite on C/NOFS is richer than on any previously flown equatorial satellite. A broad range of ground-based measurements will complement the space data. In addition, data from several other satellites and rocket experiments will augment the C/NOFS observations. Several campaigns are planned to validate operational forecasts, acquire data to achieve the science goals, and test the theoretical models. We anticipate that by the end of the C/NOFS mission, our understanding of the physics controlling the equatorial ionosphere will have advanced to

  3. Neutron/gamma discrimination properties of composite scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwanowska, J; Swiderski, L; Moszynski, M; Szczesniak, T; Sibczynski, P [The Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk, PL-05-400 Poland (Poland); Galunov, N Z; Karavaeva, N L, E-mail: j.iwanowska@ipj.gov.pl [The Institute for Scintillation Materials of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Ave., 61001, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    A composite scintillator is a solid solution, which contains the grains of organic molecular single crystal introduced into a polymer matrix and placed inside the housing. Hereunder, we present n/{gamma} discrimination properties of four composite scintillators; two of the them are based on p-terphenyl and two others-on stilbene. The results obtained with a stilbene single crystal and a liquid scintillator BC501A are shown as a comparison. Initial conclusion, which is drawn from the paper, is that composite scintillators could be an alternative substitution for commonly used liquid scintillators.

  4. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  5. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, C; Wagner, S

    2015-01-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  6. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mufson, S., E-mail: mufson@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Baugh, B.; Bower, C. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Coan, T.E. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Cooper, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Corwin, L. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Karty, J.A. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Mason, P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37916 (United States); Messier, M.D. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Pla-Dalmau, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Proudfoot, M. [Renkert Oil, Morgantown, PA 19543 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  7. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on QCD penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2002-01-01

    We point out that chiral transformation properties of penguin operators change in the transition from unquenched to (partially) quenched QCD. The way in which this affects the lattice determination of weak matrix elements can be understood in the framework of (partially) quenched chiral perturbation

  8. Quench absorption coils: a quench protection concept for high-field superconducting accelerator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M.; Salmi, T.

    2017-06-01

    A quench protection concept based on coupled secondary coils is studied for inductively transferring energy out of a quenching superconducting dipole and thus limiting the peak hotspot temperature. So-called ‘quench absorption coils’ are placed in close proximity to the superconducting coils and are connected in series with a diode for the purpose of preventing current transformation during regular operation. During a quench, current is then transformed into the quench absorption coils so that a significant fraction of the stored magnetic energy is dissipated in the these coils. Numerical calculations are performed to determine the impact of such a concept and to evaluate the dimensions of the quench absorption coils needed to obtain significant benefits. A previously constructed 15 T Nb3Sn block coil is taken as a reference layout. Finite-element calculations are used to determine the combined inductive and thermal response of this system and these calculations are validated with a numerical model using an adiabatic approximation. The calculation results indicate that during a quench the presence of the quench absorption coils reduces the energy dissipated in the superconducting coils by 45% and reduces the hotspot temperature by over 100 K. In addition, the peak resistive voltage over the superconducting coils is significantly reduced. This suggests that this concept may prove useful for magnet designs in which the hotspot temperature is a design driver.

  9. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  10. Thallium bromide photodetectors for scintillation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hitomi, K; Shoji, T; Hiratate, Y; Ishibashi, H; Ishii, M

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandgap compound semiconductor, TlBr, has been investigated as a blue sensitive photodetector material for scintillation detection. The TlBr photodetectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals grown by the TMZ method using materials purified by many pass zone refining. The performance of the photodetectors has been evaluated by measuring their leakage current, quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity, direct X-ray detection and scintillation detection characteristics. The photodetectors have shown high quantum efficiency for the blue wavelength region and high spatial uniformity for their optical response. In addition, good direct X-ray detection characteristics with an energy resolution of 4.5 keV FWHM for 22 keV X-rays from a sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd radioactive source have been obtained. Detection of blue scintillation from GSO and LSO scintillators irradiated with a sup 2 sup 2 Na radioactive source has been done successfully by using the photodetectors at room temperature. A clear full-energy pea...

  11. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  12. Light transport in long, plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierlik, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland)], E-mail: m.gierlik@ipj.gov.pl; Batsch, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Moszynski, M.; Sworobowicz, T. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL 05-400 Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    2008-08-11

    As a form of the input into the collaboration the group from the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies undertook a task of investigating the validity of the design of a compact detector for Gamma Ray Bursts photon polarization measurements, known as POLAR. The authors focused at the scintillation and light transport properties of (200x6x6)mm{sup 3} BC400 plastic bars as well as of other samples of BC408 plastic in the attempt to determine whether the assembled instrument is going to achieve the performance criteria bestowed upon it by the project. The investigation revealed a strong dependence between the amplitude of a signal and distance between the precursor interaction in a scintillator and the photodetector. Accordingly to this finding an attempt has been made to determine the influence of the surface polishing quality on the overall scintillator performance. The authors consider that proper machining of scintillator pieces, adequate choice of their packaging, and proper software analysis may overcome the revealed disadvantages.

  13. Improved light yield of lead tungstate scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Hofstäetter, A; Korzhik, M V; Ligun, V; Lecoq, P; Missevitch, O V; Novotny, R; Peigneux, J P

    2000-01-01

    The application at medium and low energies of lead tungstate scintillators, so far optimized for the ECAL calorimeter of CMS for the future LHC, is strongly limited by their poor light yield. Suitable dopants like molybdenum and terbium can help to overcome this problem. Concepts, results, advantages and drawbacks of this approach are discussed. (11 refs).

  14. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  15. Scintillation properties of YAG:Yb crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, P; Carugno, Giovanni; Iannuzzi, D

    2001-01-01

    We report on measurements of the light yield, emission spectrum, and time response of YAG:Yb crystals. The temperature dependence of light yield was investigated. Data show that YAG:Yb crystals are good scintillators, suitable for applications to neutrino detection and spectroscopy.

  16. Acrylamide-quenching of Rhizomucor miehei lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobiecka, Agnieszka

    2005-07-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence-quenching measurements have been performed to study multitryptophan lipase from filamentous fungus Rhizomucor miehei. Using the steady-state acrylamide fluorescence quenching data and the fluorescence-quenching-resolved-spectra (FQRS) method, the total emission spectrum of native ("closed-lid") lipase has been decomposed into two distinct spectral components accessible to acrylamide. According to FQRS analysis, more quenchable component has a maximum of fluorescence emission at about 352 nm whereas less quenchable component emits at about 332 nm. The redder component participates in about 60-64% of the total lipase fluorescence and may be characterized by the dynamic and static quenching constants equal to K(1) = 3.75 M(-1) and V(1) = 1.12 M(-1), respectively. The bluer component is quenchable via dynamic mechanism with K(2) = 1.97 M(-1). Significant difference in the values of acrylamide bimolecular rate quenching constants estimated for redder and bluer component (i.e., k(q) = 1.2 x 10 (9) M(-1)s (-1) vs. k(q) = 4.3 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively), suggests that tryptophan residues in fungal lipase are not uniformly exposed to the solvent.

  17. Topological blocking in quantum quench dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kells, G.; Sen, D.; Slingerland, J. K.; Vishveshwara, S.

    2014-06-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of quenching through a quantum critical point in topological systems, focusing on one of their defining features: ground-state degeneracies and associated topological sectors. We present the notion of "topological blocking," experienced by the dynamics due to a mismatch in degeneracies between two phases, and we argue that the dynamic evolution of the quench depends strongly on the topological sector being probed. We demonstrate this interplay between quench and topology in models stemming from two extensively studied systems, the transverse Ising chain and the Kitaev honeycomb model. Through nonlocal maps of each of these systems, we effectively study spinless fermionic p-wave paired topological superconductors. Confining the systems to ring and toroidal geometries, respectively, enables us to cleanly address degeneracies, subtle issues of fermion occupation and parity, and mismatches between topological sectors. We show that various features of the quench, which are related to Kibble-Zurek physics, are sensitive to the topological sector being probed, in particular, the overlap between the time-evolved initial ground state and an appropriate low-energy state of the final Hamiltonian. While most of our study is confined to translationally invariant systems, where momentum is a convenient quantum number, we briefly consider the effect of disorder and illustrate how this can influence the quench in a qualitatively different way depending on the topological sector considered.

  18. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for the collection and direct measurement of adsorbed alpha-emitting radionuclides from environmental waters by liquid scintillation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, Matthew J.; Addleman, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive contamination in the environment, be it from accidental or intentional release, can create an urgent need to assess water and food supplies, the environment, and monitor human health. Alpha-emitting radionuclides represent the most ionizing, and therefore the most damaging, form of radiation when internalized. Additionally, because of its ease of energy attenuation in solids or liquids, alpha emissions cannot be reliably monitored using non-destructive means. In the event of such an emergency, rapid and efficient methods will be needed to screen scores of samples (food, water, and human excreta) within a short time window. Unfortunately, the assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides using traditional radioanalytical methods is typically labor intensive and time consuming. The creation of analytical counting sources typically requires a series of chemical treatment steps to achieve well performing counting sources. In an effort to devise radioanalytical methods that are fast, require little labor, and minimize the use of toxic or corrosive agents, researchers at PNNL have evaluated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as extracting agents for alpha-emitting radionuclides from chemically unmodified aqueous systems. It is demonstrated that bare magnetic nanoparticles exhibit high affinity for representative α-emitting radionuclides (241Am and 210Po) from representative aqueous matrices: river and ground water. Furthermore, use of the magnetic properties of these materials to concentrate the sorbed analyte from the bulk aqueous solution has been demonstrated. The nanoparticle concentrate can be either directly dispensed into scintillation cocktail, or first dissolved and then added to scintillation cocktail as a solution for alpha emission assay by liquid scintillation analysis. Despite the extreme quench caused by the metal oxide suspensions, the authors have demonstrated that quench correction features available on modern liquid scintillation analyzers can be

  19. Assessment of scintillation proxy maps for a scintillation study during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions over Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is demonstrate the validity and usefulness of scintillation proxies derived from IGS data, through its comparison with data from dedicated scintillation monitors and its application to GNSS scintillation patterns. The paper presents scintillation patterns developed by using data from the dedicated scintillation monitors of the scintillation network decision aid (SCINDA) network, and proxy maps derived from IGS GPS data for 2011 and 2012 over low latitude stations in Uganda. The amplitude and phase scintillation indicies (S4 and σΦ) were obtained from the Novatel GSV4004B ionospheric scintillation and total electron content (TEC) monitor managed by SCINDA at Makerere (0.340N, 32.570E). The corresponding IGS GPS proxy data were obtained from the receivers at Entebbe (0.040N, 32.440E) and Mbarara (0.600S, 30.740E). The derived amplitude (S4p) and phase (sDPR) scintillation proxy maps were compared with maps of S4 and σΦ during geomagnetic storms (moderate and strong) and geomagnetically quiet conditions. The scintillation patterns using S4 and σΦ and their respective proxies revealed similar diurnal and seasonal patterns of strong scintillation occurrence. The peaks of scintillation occurrence with mean values in the range 0.3 geomagnetically disturbed (moderate and strong) and quiet conditions over the Ugandan region. The results show that SCINDA and IGS based scintillation patterns reveal the same nighttime and seasonal occurrence of irregularities over Uganda irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions. Therefore, the amplitude and phase scintillation proxies presented here can be used to fill gaps in low-latitude data where there are no data available from dedicated scintillation receivers, irrespective of the geomagnetic conditions.

  20. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mufson, S; Bower, C; Coan, T; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Karty, J; Mason, P; Pla-Dalmau, A; Proudfoot, M

    2015-01-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator to its detectors as its active detector medium. The composition of the scintillator was developed to meet the requirements of the experiment. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA near and far detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers. A rigorous set of quality control procedures were put in place to assure that the liquid scintillator was blended to satisfy the transparency, light yield, and conductivity requirements. The incoming components, the blended scintillator, and the scintillator in the transport tanker trailers were all qualified with these procedures, which ensured that the NOvA scintillator was high quality and met its performance requirements.

  1. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sexton, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Velten, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  2. Scintillation mechanism in stoichiometric cerium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Lempicki, A.; Berman, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31

    These materials constitute a new class of scintillator media, with high speed and high light output. This is illustrated using CeF{sub 3}, and CeP{sub 5}O{sub l4}. While speed, being limited by a radiative lifetime of an allowed d-f transition on the Ce{sup +3} ion, cannot be improved (without loss of the light output), the light output in both cases falls significantly below the estimated theoretical limit. To explain this we propose a mechanism of scintillation process, in which transfer of excitation energy from the lattice to the d-f electronic structure of Ce{sup +3} ions is absent and the light output of the scintillator is limited to the excitation energy directly intercepted by Ce ions. The efficiency depends, therefore, on the competition for holes between Ce{sup +3} ions and anions, determining the share of the total energy deposited by a high energy particle, which can be transformed into scintillation photons. The mechanism requires that the Ce ion has a stable 4+ charge state. Ionization of Ce{sup +3} is followed by capturing of an electron and creation of the Ce bound exciton. In the next step the energy of the bound exciton is transferred to the d-f structure of the Ce ion and, in the final step, a scintillation photon is emitted. The relatively high light output characteristic of these materials is due to the high concentration of Ce ions. The reasons for the lack of efficient energy transfer from the lattice may reside in large relaxation energies of lattice excitations. We use this model to discuss potential improvements in the light output of CeF{sub 3}.

  3. Thermal quench at finite 't Hooft coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ebrahim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using holography we have studied thermal electric field quench for infinite and finite 't Hooft coupling constant. The set-up we consider here is D7-brane embedded in (α′ corrected AdS-black hole background. It is well-known that due to a time-dependent electric field on the probe brane, a time-dependent current will be produced and it will finally relax to its equilibrium value. We have studied the effect of different parameters of the system on equilibration time. As the most important results, for massless fundamental matter, we have observed a universal behaviour in the rescaled equilibration time in the very fast quench regime for different values of the temperature and α′ correction parameter. It seems that in the slow quench regime the system behaves adiabatically. We have also observed that the equilibration time decreases in finite 't Hooft coupling limit.

  4. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  5. Quench in high temperature superconductor magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, J

    2013-01-01

    High field superconducting magnets using high temperature superconductors are being developed for high energy physics, nuclear magnetic resonance and energy storage applications. Although the conductor technology has progressed to the point where such large magnets can be readily envisioned, quench protection remains a key challenge. It is well-established that quench propagation in HTS magnets is very slow and this brings new challenges that must be addressed. In this paper, these challenges are discussed and potential solutions, driven by new technologies such as optical fiber based sensors and thermally conducting electrical insulators, are reviewed.

  6. Quench propagation analysis in adiabatic superconducting windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, A.; Matsumura, H.; Takita, W. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Waseda Univ., Tokyo (JP)); Iwasa, Y (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports the basic postulate of the author's quench simulation code, developed to analyze normal-zone propagation in adiabatic magnets which is the code's computation may be immensely simplified without sacrifice in accuracy by aggregating all thermal properties of the winding affecting normal-zone propagation into a single parameter of the transverse quench velocity. In order to verify this postulate, a finite element method (FEM) analysis has been applied to solve the temporal and spatial evolution of temperature within a section of an adiabatic magnet winding.

  7. Event-Shape Engineering and Jet Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Event-Shape Engineering (ESE) is a tool that enables some control of the initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions in a similar way as the centrality enables some control of the number of participants. Utilizing ESE, the path length in and out-of plane can be varied while keeping the medium properties (centrality) fixed. In this proceeding it is argued that this provides additional experimental information about jet quenching. Finally, it is suggested that if ESE studies are done in parallel for light and heavy quarks one can determine, in a model independent way, if the path-length dependence of their quenching differs.

  8. Investigating jet quenching on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Panero, Marco; Schäfer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Due to the dynamical, real-time, nature of the phenomenon, the study of jet quenching via lattice QCD simulations is not straightforward. In this contribution, however, we show how one can extract information about the momentum broadening of a hard parton moving in the quark-gluon plasma, from lattice calculations. After discussing the basic idea (originally proposed by Caron-Huot), we present a recent study, in which we estimated the jet quenching parameter non-perturbatively, from the lattice evaluation of a particular set of gauge-invariant operators.

  9. Temperature dependence of the scintillation properties of Ce:GSO and Ce:GSOZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Shunsuke, E-mail: kurosawa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Sugiyama, Makoto [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), 6-6-10 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Yokota, Yuui [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), 6-6-10 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-10-21

    The light output and decay times of Ce:GSO and Ce:GSOZ scintillators depend on Ce concentration and temperature. We investigated the temperature dependence of the light output and the decay time for Ce:GSO and Ce:GSOZ doped with 0.3 (only GSO), 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mol% Ce. These samples were measured with a ruggedized photomultiplier (PMT) (Hamamatsu R6877A) at 175 Degree-Sign C (in the thermostat chamber). Up to 100 Degree-Sign C, the relative light output of all of the samples remained within 10% after correcting the PMT gain, which depends on the temperature. The decay times of the GSO and GSOZ samples with the identical Ce concentrations were equal. Moreover, the quenching energy values for all the samples were equivalent.

  10. A scintillating GEM for 2D-dosimetry in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Timmer, J; Bom, V; Eijk, C W; Haas, J D; Schippers, J M

    2002-01-01

    The first results of a study on the properties of a gaseous scintillation detector based on a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) are reported. The detector is designed for use in position-sensitive dosimetry applications in radiation therapy. A double GEM system, operating in a 90-10% Ar-CO sub 2 gas mixture at a gas amplification factor of approx 3000, emits a sufficient amount of detectable light to perform measurements of approx 1 Gy doses in two dimensions. The light yield does not suffer from quenching processes when particles with high stopping power are detected. This operation mode of GEMs offers the dosimetric advantages of a gas-filled detector and the 2D read-out can be performed with a CCD camera. Compared to the existing dosimeters, this system is relatively simple and no complex multi-electrode read-out is necessary.

  11. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter to assess tritium levels in various samples

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Haddad, M N; Abu-Jarad, F A

    1999-01-01

    An LKB-Wallac 1217 Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) was calibrated with a newly adopted cocktail. The LSC was then used to measure tritium levels in various samples to assess the compliance of tritium levels with the recommended international levels. The counter was calibrated to measure both biological and operational samples for personnel and for an accelerator facility at KFUPM. The biological samples include the bioassay (urine), saliva, and nasal tests. The operational samples of the light ion linear accelerator include target cooling water, organic oil, fomblin oil, and smear samples. Sets of standards, which simulate various samples, were fabricated using traceable certified tritium standards. The efficiency of the counter was obtained for each sample. The typical range of the efficiencies varied from 33% for smear samples down to 1.5% for organic oil samples. A quenching curve for each sample is presented. The minimum detectable activity for each sample was established. Typical tritium levels in bio...

  12. Fluorescence quenching of TMR by guanosine in oligonucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide-specific fluorescence quenching in fluorescently labeled DNA has many applications in biotechnology. We have studied the inter-and intra-molecular quenching of tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) by nucleotides to better understand their quenching mechanism and influencing factors. In agreement with previous work, dGMP can effectively quench TMR, while the quenching of TMR by other nucleotides is negligible. The Stern-Volmer plot between TMR and dGMP delivers a bimolecular quenching constant of Ks=52.3 M-1. The fluorescence of TMR in labeled oligonucleotides decreases efficiently through photoinduced electron transfer by guanosine. The quenching rate constant between TMR and guanosine was measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In addition, our data show that the steric hindrance by bases around guanosine has significant effect on the G-quenching. The availability of these data should be useful in designing fluorescent oligonucleotides and understanding the G-quenching process.

  13. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers

  14. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  15. Application of Best Estimate Approach for Modelling of QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Kaliatka

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 experiments are modelled using ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAPSIM codes. For the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, SUSA3.5 and SUNSET tools were used. The article demonstrates that applying the best estimate approach, it is possible to develop basic QUENCH input deck and to develop the two sets of input parameters, covering maximal and minimal ranges of uncertainties. These allow simulating different (but with the same nature tests, receiving calculation results with the evaluated range of uncertainties.

  16. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  17. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  18. Combustion water purification techniques influence on OBT analysing using liquid scintillation counting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlam, C.; Vagner, I.; Faurescu, I.; Faurescu, D. [National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies, Valcea (Romania)

    2015-03-15

    In order to determine organically bound tritium (OBT) from environmental samples, these must be converted into water, measurable by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). For this purpose we conducted some experiments to determine OBT level of a grass sample collected from an uncontaminated area. The studied grass sample was combusted in a Parr bomb. However usual interfering phenomena were identified: color or chemical quench, chemiluminescence, overlap over tritium spectrum because of other radionuclides presence as impurities ({sup 14}C from organically compounds, {sup 36}Cl as chloride and free chlorine, {sup 40}K as potassium cations) and emulsion separation. So the purification of the combustion water before scintillation counting appeared to be essential. 5 purification methods were tested: distillation with chemical treatment (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4}), lyophilization, chemical treatment (Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} and KMnO{sub 4}) followed by lyophilization, azeotropic distillation with toluene and treatment with a volcanic tuff followed by lyophilization. After the purification step each sample was measured and the OBT measured concentration, together with physico-chemical analysis of the water analyzed, revealed that the most efficient method applied for purification of the combustion water was the method using chemical treatment followed by lyophilization.

  19. Bis(pinacolato)diboron as an additive for the detection of thermal neutrons in plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahl, Adam [Department of Physics and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NuSEC), Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Yemam, Henok A.; Stuntz, John [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry and the Materials Science Program Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Remedes, Tyler [Department of Physics and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NuSEC), Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Sellinger, Alan [Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry and the Materials Science Program Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Greife, Uwe, E-mail: ugreife@mines.edu [Department of Physics and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NuSEC), Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    A readily available and inexpensive boron compound was tested as an additive for the detection of thermal neutrons in plastic scintillators. Bis(pinacolato)diboron (B{sub 2}Pin{sub 2}) was determined to be a compatible boron source (8.51 wt% boron, 1.70 wt% {sup 10}B) in poly(vinyltoluene) based matrices. Plastic scintillator blends of 1–20 wt% 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO), 0.1 wt% 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) benzene (POPOP) and 1–15 wt% B{sub 2}Pin{sub 2} were prepared that provided optical clarity, good mechanical properties, and the capability of thermal neutron detection. Independent of B{sub 2}Pin{sub 2} concentration, strong {sup 10}B neutron capture signals around 90 keV{sub ee} were observed at essentially constant light output. Increasing PPO concentration allowed for the use of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in both fast and thermal neutron detection. High PPO concentrations appear to cause additional alpha quenching that affected the {sup 10}B neutron capture signal. Aging effects after storage in air for several months were observed, which led to degradation of performance and in some samples of mechanical stability.

  20. Toward a user's toolkit for modeling scintillator proportionality and light yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi

    Intrinsic nonproportionality is a material-dependent phenomenon that sets an ultimate limit on energy resolution of radiation detectors. In general, anything that causes light yield to change along the particle track (e.g., the primary electron track in gamma-ray detectors) contributes to nonproportionality. Most of the physics of nonproportionality lies in the host-transport and transfer-to-activator term. The main physical phenomena involved are carrier diffusion, trapping, drift in internal electric fields, and nonlinear rates of radiative and nonradiative recombination. Some complexity is added by the now well-established fact that the electron temperature is changing during important parts of the physical processes listed above. It has consequences, but is tractable by application of electron-phonon interaction theory and first-principles calculation of trap structures checked by experiment. Determination of coefficients and rate "constants" as functions of electron temperature T e for diffusion, D(Te( t)); capture on multiple (i) radiative and nonradiative centers, Ali(Te(t)); bimolecular exciton formation, B2(T e(t)); and nonlinear quenching, K2( Te(t)), K3( Te(t)) in specific scintillator materials will enable computational prediction of energy-dependent response from standard rate equations solved in the electron track for initial excitation distributions calculated by standard methods such as Geant4. Te( t) itself is a function of time. Determination of these parameters can be combined with models describing carrier transport in scintillators, which is able to build a user's toolkit for analyzing any existing and potential scintillators. In the dissertation, progress in calculating electronic structure of traps and activators, diffusion coefficients and rate functions, and testing the model will be described.

  1. Quenched heavy-light decay constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, R.M.; Booth, S.P.; Bowler, K.C.; Collins, S.; Henty, D.S.; Kenway, R.D.; Richards, D.G.; Shanahan, H.P.; Simone, J.N.; Simpson, A.D.; Wilkes, B.E. (Department of Physics, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)); Ewing, A.K.; Lellouch, L.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Wittig, H. (Physics Department, The University, Southampton SO9 5NH (United Kingdom)); (UKQCD Collaboration)

    1994-02-01

    We present results for heavy-light decay constants, using both propagating quarks and the static approximation, in [ital O]([ital a])-improved, quenched lattice QCD. At [beta]=6.2 on a 24[sup 3][times]48 lattice we find [ital f][sub [ital D

  2. LHC BFPP Quench Test with Ions (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Bahamonde Castro, Cristina; Auchmann, Bernhard; Chetvertkova, Vera; Giachino, Rossano; Jowett, John; Kalliokoski, Matti; Lechner, Anton; Mertens, Tom; Ponce, Laurette; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Pb-Pb collision run of the LHC operated at a beam energy of 6.37Z TeV. The power of the secondary beams emitted from the interaction point by the bound-free pair production (BFPP) process reached new levels while the propensity of the bending magnets to quench is higher at the new magnetic field levels. This beam power is about 70 times greater than that contained in the luminosity debris and is focussed on a specific location. As long foreseen, orbit bumps were introduced in the dispersion suppressors around the highest luminosity experiments to mitigate the risk of quenches by displacing and spreading out these losses. Because the impact position and intensity of these secondary beams is well known and can be tracked easily with the Beam Loss Monitors (BLMs), the BFPP1 beam (208Pb81+ ions), which is the most intense, provides a tool to accurately measure the steady state quench limit of the LHC main dipoles. At the moment the exact quench limit is not known, but this knowledge is important to asses...

  3. Lattice QCD simulations beyond the quenched approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukawa, A. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.)

    1989-07-01

    Present status of lattice QCD simulations incorporating the effects of dynamical quarks is presented. After a brief review of the formalism of lattice QCD, the dynamical fermion algorithms in use today are described. Recent attempts at the hadron mass calculation are discussed in relation to the quenched results, and current understanding on the finite temperature behavior of QCD is summarized. (orig.).

  4. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, H; Avetisyan, R; Back, H O; Cocco, A G; DeJongh, F; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Grandi, L; Guardincerri, Y; Kendziora, C; Lippincott, W H; Love, C; Lyons, S; Manenti, L; Martoff, C J; Meng, Y; Montanari, D; Mosteiro, P; Olvitt, D; Pordes, S; Qian, H; Rossi, B; Saldanha, R; Sangiorgio, S; Siegl, K; Strauss, S Y; Tan, W; Tatarowicz, J; Walker, S; Wang, H; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Yoo, J

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrowband neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation and ionization yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.2 keV and for applied electric fields from 0 to 1000 V/cm. We also report the observation of an anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anti-correlation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. A comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field yielded a first evidence of sensitivity to direct...

  5. Primary and secondary scintillation measurements in a xenon Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, L M P; Ball, M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Monteiro, C M B; Yahlali, N; Nygren, D; Santos, J M F dos

    2010-01-01

    NEXT is a new experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay using a 100 kg radio-pure high-pressure gaseous xenon TPC. The detector requires excellent energy resolution, which can be achieved in a Xe TPC with electroluminescence readout. Hamamatsu R8520-06SEL photomultipliers are good candidates for the scintillation readout. The performance of this photomultiplier, used as VUV photosensor in a gas proportional scintillation counter, was investigated. Initial results for the detection of primary and secondary scintillation produced as a result of the interaction of 5.9 keV X-rays in gaseous xenon, at room temperature and at pressures up to 3 bar, are presented. An energy resolution of 8.0% was obtained for secondary scintillation produced by 5.9 keV X-rays. No significant variation of the primary scintillation was observed for different pressures (1, 2 and 3 bar) and for electric fields up to 0.8 V cm-1 torr-1 in the drift region, demonstrating negligible recombination luminescence. A primary scinti...

  6. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  7. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezeshkian, Yousef [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahmanabadi, Mahmud, E-mail: bahmanabadi@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasian Motlagh, Mehdi; Rezaie, Masume [Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30×40 m{sup 2} will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50×50 cm{sup 2}). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by the Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between the extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  8. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  9. Ultra-fast timing with plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoischen, Robert [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, Stephane; Prokopowicz, Wawrzyniec; Schaffner, Henning; Gerl, Juergen; Wollersheim, Hans Juergen; Kurz, Nikolaus [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, Dirk [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Fast timing detectors for time-of-flight measurements are essential identification tools for isotopes studied at fragment separators at major heavy-ion research facilities. While today's standard technique of utilizing a plastic scintillator read out by few photomultiplier tubes proofs to be efficient, it does not provide the required time resolution for future key experiments at, for example, the Super-FRS at FAIR. A common present-day approach is to use diamond detectors instead. While they do provide a better time resolution compared to scintillators, they are more difficult to use and far more expensive. Results from tests using a new design approach with standard materials will be presented. This leads to a much improved performance, but remains both cost-efficient, compact, and reliable. The design goals and how to accomplish them will be exemplified by the LYCCA (Lund-York-Cologne CAlorimeter) detector aiming for fast-beam experiments at HISPEC within NUSTAR.

  10. Effect of shallow traps on scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempicki, A. [Department of Chemistry, Metcalf Ctr Science and Engineering, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Bartram, R.H. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1999-01-04

    The paper establishes the mathematical connection between the process of scintillation in Ce-doped materials and their thermoluminescence. A set of kinetic equations describes the competing processes of radiative recombination and trapping by a single trap. The more general case of second-order kinetics is simplified to first order, allowing an analytic solution. Second-order kinetics is also solved numerically without such simplification and both are successfully applied to explain the temperature dependence of the scintillation light output on temperature, in the range where glow peaks occur. The order of the kinetics predicts rather different shapes of decay, but are difficult to distinguish experimentally. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  12. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  13. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  14. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pezeshkian, Yousef; Motlagh, Mehdi Abbasian; Rezaie, Masoume

    2014-01-01

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30$\\times$40 m$^{2}$ will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50$\\times$50 cm$^{2}$). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  15. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  16. A comparative study of 19-iodo cholesterol-125I 3-acetate and Na 125I in liquid scintillation measurements; Estudio comparativo del acetato de 19-iodocolesterol- -125I con Nal25I en medidas por centelleo liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Grau Carles, A.

    1994-07-01

    A comparative study of performance of 19-iodo cholesterol {sup 1}25I 3-acetate and sodium iodide samples labeled with 125I is presented for liquid scintillation counting measurements. Quench effect, count rate stability and spectral evolution of samples have been followed for several weeks in Toluene, Hisafe II, Instagel, Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol scintillators. Organic samples have negligible quench effect in the interval of I concentration of 0-90 {mu}g and inorganic samples only show a very small variation, lower than 12%, for Dioxane-naphthalene, in the same range of concentration. Satisfactory stability is obtained in general for both, organic and inorganic samples, but small counting losses, 0.03% for 19-iodocholesterol 1 I 3-acetate samples in Tolue ne-alcohol and 0 .04% for Na 125I samples in Dioxane-naphthalene and Toluene-alcohol, have been reported. (Author) 8 refs.

  17. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  18. Sorohalide scintillators, phosphors, and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pin; Deng, Haoran; Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiaowang

    2016-05-10

    The present invention relates to sorohalide compounds having formula A.sub.3B.sub.2X.sub.9, where A is an alkali metal, B is a rare earth metal, and X is a halogen. Optionally, the sorohalide includes a dopant D. Such undoped and doped sorohalides are useful as scintillation materials or phosphors for any number of uses, including for radiation detectors, solid-state light sources, gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, and drilling applications.

  19. Scintillation Detectors in Experiments on Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Kublikov, R V; Nechaev, B A; Padalko, V M; Parzhitski, S S; Smirnov, V S; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    The gating circuits for photomultipliers of scintillation detectors operating in powerful pulsed electromagnetic and nuclear radiation fields are investigated. PMTs with the jalousie-type dynode system and with the linear dynode system are considered. The basic gating circuits of the photomultipliers involving active and resistor high-voltage dividers are given. The results of the investigations are important for experiments in which it is necessary to discriminate in time the preceding background radiation and the process of interest.

  20. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  1. Simulation of the Quench-06 experiment with Scdapsim; Simulacion del experimento Quench-06 con Scdapsim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel M, E. del; Nunez C, A.; Amador G, R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan No. 779, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: edangelm@cnsns.gob.mx

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes the pattern of the called Quench installation developed and used by the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS) for their participation in the International Standard Problem 45 (ISP), organized by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The exercise consisted on the simulation of the denominated experiment Quench-06 carried out in the experimental installation Quench located in the Forschungszentrum laboratory in Karlsruhe, Germany. The experiment Quench-06 consisted on simulating the sudden and late injection of water in a fuel assemble for a pressurized reactor (PWR). The CNSNS uses the version bd of the SCDAPSIM code developed by the company Innovative Software Systems (ISS) to simulate this experiment. The obtained results showed that the code is able to predict the experiment partially when overestimating the hydrogen production and of the partial fused of some fuel pellets, but predicting correctly the damage in the shroud. (Author)

  2. Scintillation counter with MRS APD light readout

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00061314; Malkevich, D.; Martemyanov, A.; Ryabinin, M.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V.; Grigoriev, E.

    2005-01-01

    START, a high-efficiency and low-noise scintillation detector for ionizing particles, was developed for the purpose of creating a high-granular system for triggering cosmic muons. Scintillation light in START is detected by MRS APDs (Avalanche Photo-Diodes with Metal-Resistance-Semiconductor structure), operated in the Geiger mode, which have 1 mm^2 sensitive areas. START is assembled from a 15 x 15 x 1 cm^3 scintillating plastic plate, two MRS APDs and two pieces of wavelength-shifting optical fiber stacked in circular coils inside the plastic. The front-end electronic card is mounted directly on the detector. Tests with START have confirmed its operational consistency, over 99% efficiency of MIP registration and good homogeneity. START demonstrates a low intrinsic noise of about 10^{-2} Hz. If these detectors are to be mass-produced, the cost of a mosaic array of STARTs is estimated at a moderate level of 2-3 kUSD/m^2.

  3. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb-1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  4. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  5. Scintillation spectroscopy for beta ray dose measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapirev, E.I.; Jordanov, T.; Amin, S.; Stoilov, N.; Georgieva, K. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-11-01

    Two methods have been developed and tested for the measurement of beta ray dose with a scintillation probe. According to the first method the energy absorbed in plastic filters is calculated from the difference between the energy E of the incident and filtered beta spectrum with an expression of the type E {approx} c{Sigma}iN(i)/{Delta}m, where c is a calibration constant (keV per channel), i is the channel number, N(i) is the detected beta spectrum, and {Delta}m is the filter thickness. According to the second `dE/dx` method the energy deposited in the surface layer of the scintillator is calculated by E {approx} c{Sigma}dE/dx(i)N(i), where dE/dx is the specific energy loss for tissue-equivalent media. The methods were tested for the cases of normally incident electrons and surface contamination. The scintillation probe used is stillbene and the test sources are thin {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 137}Cs. The results are close to the expected doses as calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. (Author).

  6. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W; Maya, L; Sloop, F V J

    2003-01-01

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon respons...

  7. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  8. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  9. B-Loaded Plastic Scintillator on the Base of Polystyrene

    CERN Document Server

    Brudanin, V B; Nemchenok, I B; Smolnikov, A A

    2000-01-01

    A method to produce polystyrene-based plastic scintillators with boron concentration from 0.38 to 5.0% of boron have been developed. o-Carborane was used as B-containing additive. The results of investigations of the optical, spectral and scintillation characteristics are presented and discussed. It is shown that 5% B-loaded scintillator has a light output as much as 70% relative to the unloaded one. High efficiency for thermal neutron registration achieved for produced samples makes it possible to use such scintillators in complex neutron high sensitive spectrometers. Measured level of radioactive contamination in this scintillation materials is good enough for using the B-loaded scintillators in the proposed large scale neutrino experiments.

  10. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  11. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  12. Measurements of proportional scintillation in liquid xenon using thin wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Goetzke, L W; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Messina, M; Naganoma, J; Plante, G; Rizzo, A; Shagin, P; Wall, R

    2014-01-01

    Proportional scintillation in liquid xenon has a promising application in the field of direct dark matter detection, potentially allowing for simpler, more sensitive detectors. However, knowledge of the basic properties of the phenomenon as well as guidelines for its practical use are currently limited. We report here on measurements of proportional scintillation light emitted in liquid xenon around thin wires. The maximum proportional scintillation gain of $287^{+97}_{-75}$ photons per drift electron was obtained using 10 $\\mu$m diameter gold plated tungsten wire. The thresholds for electron multiplication and proportional scintillation are measured as $725^{+48}_{-139}$ and $412^{+10}_{-133}$ kV/cm, respectively. The threshold for proportional scintillation is in good agreement with a previously published result, while the electron multiplication threshold represents a novel measurement. A complete set of parameters for the practical use of the electron multiplication and proportional scintillation processe...

  13. Pulsar scintillations from corrugated reconnection sheets in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Pen, Ue-Li

    2013-01-01

    We show that surface waves along interstellar current sheets closely aligned with the line of sight lead to pulsar scintillation properties consistent with those observed. By contrast with previously considered scintillation drivers, our mechanism naturally produces the length and density scales of the ISM scattering lenses that are required to explain the magnitude and dynamical spectrum of the scintillations. In our picture, the parts of warm ionized interstellar medium that are responsible for the scintillations are relatively quiescent, with scintillation and scattering resulting from weak waves propagating along magnetic domain boundary current sheets, which are both expected from helicity conservation and have been observed in numerical simulations. The model quantitatively predicts the spacing and amplitudes of inverted parabolic arcs seen in Fourier-transformed dynamical spectra of strongly scintillating pulsars. Multi-frequency, multi-epoch low frequency VLBI observations can quantitatively test this...

  14. Characteristics of plastic scintillators fabricated by a polymerization reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three plastic scintillators of 4.5 cm diameter and 2.5-cm length were fabricated for comparison with commercial plastic scintillators using polymerization of the styrene monomer 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis benzene (POPOP). Their maximum emission wavelengths were determined at 426.06 nm, 426.06 nm, and 425.00 nm with a standard error of 0.2% using a Varian spectrophotometer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Compton edge spectra were measured using three gamma ray sources [i.e., cesium 137 ({sup 137}Cs), sodium 22 ({sup 22}Na), and cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co)]. Energy was calibrated by analyzing the Compton edge spectra. The fabricated scintillators possessed more than 99.7% energy linearity. Light output was comparable to that of the BC-408 scintillator (Saint-Gobain, Paris, France). The fabricated scintillators showed a light output of approximately 59–64% of that of the BC-408 scintillator.

  15. Separation of Scintillation and Cherenkov Lights in Linear Alkyl Benzene

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Mohan; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay researches. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator being developed. In this paper we observed a good separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in an LAB sample. The rising and decay times of the scintillation light of the LAB were measured to be $(7.7\\pm3.0)\\ \\rm{ns}$ and $(36.6\\pm2.4)\\ \\rm{ns}$, respectively, while the full width [-3$\\sigma$, 3$\\sigma$] of the Cherenkov light was 12 ns dominated by the time resolution of our photomultiplier tubes. The light yield of the scintillation was measured to be $(1.01\\pm0.12)\\times10^3\\ \\rm{photons}/\\rm{MeV}$.

  16. A Model for the Secondary Scintillation Pulse Shape from a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazkaz, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in currents detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric fi...

  17. Simulation of bundle test Quench-12 with integral code MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duspiva, J. [Nuclear Research Inst., Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The past NRI analyses cover the Quench-01, Quench-03 and Quench-06 with version MELCOR 1.8.5 (including reflood model), and Quench-01 and Quench-11 tests with the latest version MELCOR 1.8.6. The Quench-12 test is specific, because it has different bundle configuration related to the VVER bundle configuration with hexagonal grid of pins and also used E110 cladding material. Specificity of Quench-12 test is also in the used material of fuel rod cladding - E110. The test specificities are a reason for the highest concern, because the VVER reactors are operated in the Czech Republic. The new input model was developed with the taking into account all experience from previous simulations of the Quench bundle tests. The recent version MELCOR 1.8.6 YU{sub 2}911 was used for the simulation with slightly modified ELHEAT package. Sensitivity studies on input parameters and oxidation kinetics were performed. (author)

  18. Rare-earth loaded liquid scintillator (for LENS experiment)

    CERN Document Server

    Barabanov, I R; Kornoukhov, V N; Yanovich, E A; Zatsepin, G T; Danilov, N A; Korpusov, G V; Kostukova, G V; Krylov, Y S; Yakshin, V V

    1999-01-01

    Rare-earth (Yb/Gd) complexes with neutral organophosphorus ligands are briefly discussed for their application in liquid scintillation technique. To evaluate the principal feasibility of rare-earth loaded scintillator, the ytterbium chloride complexes with tri-isoamylphosphine oxides were synthesized. Relative scintillation efficiency (RSE) for two Yb concentrations (78 and 88 g/L) was measured by means of the internal conversion exitation from Cs-137. The results obtained were 50 and 40% respectively.

  19. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Gastler, D; Hime, A; Stonehill, L C; Seibert, S; Klein, J; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.02 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  20. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E P Jacosalem; S Iba; N Nakajima; H Ono; A L C Sanchez; A M Bacala; H Miyata; GLD Calorimeter Group

    2007-12-01

    A new sampling calorimeter using very thin scintillators and the multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) has been proposed to produce better position resolution for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment. As part of this R & D study, small plastic scintillators of different sizes, thickness and wrapping reflectors are systematically studied. The scintillation light due to beta rays from a collimated 90Sr source are collected from the scintillator by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber and converted into electrical signals at the PMT. The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an average of 9.2 photoelectrons. It is observed that light yield slightly increases with scintillator length, but increases to about 100% when WLS fiber diameter is increased from 1.0 mm to 1.6 mm. The position dependence measurement along the strip scintillator showed the uniformity of light transmission from the sensor to the PMT. A dip across the strip is observed which is 40% of the maximum pulse height. The block type scintillator pulse height, on the other hand, is found to be almost proportional to scintillator thickness.

  1. Investigation of Novel Glass Scintillators for Gamma Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    EMPLOYED BY YOUR ORGANIZATION. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704·0188 The public roponin; burden for this collection of...efforts at LANL made significant progress during .this period. We have seen an optimization of both photo-luminescence and scintillation properties of...investigating Ce:GNS glass scintillators synthesized by our collaborators at LANL . The scintillation traces after ultrashort XUV excitation are shown

  2. Single photon detection with self-quenching multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A photoelectronic device and an avalanche self-quenching process for a photoelectronic device are described. The photoelectronic device comprises a nanoscale semiconductor multiplication region and a nanoscale doped semiconductor quenching structure including a depletion region and an undepletion region. The photoelectronic device can act as a single photon detector or a single carrier multiplier. The avalanche self-quenching process allows electrical field reduction in the multiplication region by movement of the multiplication carriers, thus quenching the avalanche.

  3. Spectrum library concept and pulse shape analysis in liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihola, L. [Wallac Oy, Turku (Finland)

    1997-03-01

    Wallac introduced in 1990 a new absolute liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method, Digital Overlay Technique (DOT) to correct for quench. This method allows quantization of multilabel samples by referring to library spectra which are generated against chemical and color quench indices at the factory. The libraries can further be expanded to any beta emitter by user with a method called fine tuning, which can be carried out even with a single sample. Spectrum libraries are created over the whole spectrum range of the radionuclide and allow automatic identification of a single label beta emitting radionuclide, called Easy Count method. Another improvement in LSC is commercial introduction of Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) in 1986 by Wallac. This method recognizes alpha particle decay by pulse shape and leads to excellent sensitivity in alpha counting because most of the background signal in LSC comprises of short or beta like pulses. PSA detects alpha events in the presence of high excess of beta activity over alphas, up to a ratio 100000 to 1. (orig.)

  4. Liquid scintillation counting methodology for 99Tc analysis. A remedy for radiopharmaceutical waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Mumtaz [Univ. of Science and Technology, Gyeongbuk (Korea); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-13

    This paper presents a new approach for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) analysis of single-radionuclide samples containing appreciable organic or inorganic quench. This work offers better analytical results than existing LSC methods for technetium-99 (99gTc) analysis with significant savings in analysis cost and time. The method was developed to quantify 99gTc in environmental liquid and urine samples using LSC. Method efficiency was measured in the presence of 1.9 to 11,900 ppm total dissolved solids. The quench curve was proved to be effective in the case of spiked 99gTc activity calculation for deionized water, tap water, groundwater, seawater, and urine samples. Counting efficiency was found to be 91.66% for Ultima Gold LLT (ULG-LLT) and Ultima Gold (ULG). Relative error in spiked 99gTc samples was ±3.98% in ULG and ULG-LLT cocktails. Minimum detectable activity was determined to be 25.3 mBq and 22.7 mBq for ULG-LLT and ULG cocktails, respectively. A pre-concentration factor of 1000 was achieved at 100°C for 100% chemical recovery.

  5. Ionospheric scintillation observations over Kenyan region - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwendo, O. J.; Xiao, Yu; Ming, Ou

    2016-11-01

    Ionospheric scintillation refers to the rapid fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of a satellite signal as it passes through small-scale plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. By analyzing ionospheric scintillation observation datasets from satellite signals such as GPS signals we can study the morphology of ionospheric bubbles. At low latitudes, the diurnal behavior of scintillation is driven by the formation of large-scale equatorial density depletions which form one to two hours after sunset via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism near the magnetic equator. In this work we present ionospheric scintillation activity over Kenya using data derived from a newly installed scintillation monitor developed by CRIRP at Pwani University (39.78°E, 3.24°S) during the period August to December, 2014. The results reveal the scintillation activity mainly occurs from post-sunset to post-midnight hours, and ceases around 04:00 LT. We also found that the ionospheric scintillation tends to appear at the southwest and northwest of the station. These locations coincide with the southern part of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly crest over Kenya region. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  6. Measurement of Compton edge position in low-Z scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiderski, Lukasz, E-mail: l.swiderski@ipj.gov.p [Department of Nuclear Detectors and Electronics, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Moszynski, Marek; Czarnacki, Wieslaw; Iwanowska, Joanna; Syntfeld-Kazuch, Agnieszka; Szczesniak, Tomasz [Department of Nuclear Detectors and Electronics, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Pausch, Guntram; Plettner, Cristina; Roemer, Katja [ICx Technologies GmbH, Piepersberg 12, Solingen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    A method based on a Compton coincidence technique was applied to measure in a wide energy range the position of Compton edge in organic scintillators. The experimental setup comprised a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector and a tested scintillator coupled to a PMT. The detectors were set in a face-to-face geometry and the source was placed between them. Thus gating on events backscattered in the tested scintillator and detected in HPGe allowed measuring of Compton edge position for a given {gamma}-ray energy. The presented method provides a valuable tool for energy calibration of low-Z scintillators.

  7. Liquid xenon scintillators for imaging of positron emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, L

    The current understanding of xenon scintillation physics is summarized and keyed to the use of xenon as a gamma-ray detector in medical radioisotope imaging systems. Liquid xenon has a short scintillation pulse (approximately 10(8) sec) and high gamma-ray absorption and scintillation efficiencies. The fast pulse may facilitate imaging in vivo distributions of hot positron sources and allow recovery of additional spatial information by time-of-flight techniques. We begin by describing our own study of the feasibility of making a practical positron scanning system, and consider the problems of scintillation decay time, linearity, efficiency, purity, and electricfield amplifcation. The prospects for a practical instrument are considered.

  8. Properties of Quantum-Dot-Doped Liquid Scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Novel scintillators based on semiconducting nanocrystals called quantum dots have unique optical and chemical properties that make them interesting for future neutrino experiments especially those searching for neutrino-less double beta decay. In this talk, we report the results of laboratory-scale measurements for three candidate quantum-dot-doped scintillators. We focus on the key properties required for large-scale neutrino experiments, which are the emission spectrum, the attenuation length and the stability. I would like to follow the talk by Andrey Elagin on directionality in scintillators and precede Athena Ierokomos' talk on light yield in scintillators.

  9. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P. [Princeton University Princeton, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  11. Preliminary investigations on the determination of three-dimensional dose distributions using scintillator blocks and optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Florian; Karsch, Leonhard [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, Jörg [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    dose profiles are in agreement with reference measurements. An inherent drawback of the scintillator is the nonlinear light output for high stopping-power radiation due to the quenching effect. It impacts the depth dose curves measured with the dosimeter. For single Bragg peak distributions this leads to a peak to plateau ratio of 2.8 instead of 4.5 for the reference ionization chamber measurement. Furthermore, the transmission of the clinical bremsstrahlung beams through the scintillator leads to the saturation of one camera, making dose reconstructions in that case presently not feasible.Conclusions: It is shown that distributions of scintillation light generated by proton or electron beams can be reconstructed by the dosimetry system within minutes. The quenching apparent for proton irradiation, and the yet not precisely determined position dependency of the imaging scale, require further investigation and corrections. Upgrading the prototype with larger or inorganic scintillators would increase the detectable proton and electron energy range. The presented results show that the determination of 3D dose distributions using scintillator blocks and optical tomography is a promising dosimetry method.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.675 - CLD quench verification calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... verification calculations. Perform CLD quench-check calculations as follows: (a) Perform a CLD analyzer quench... water content in combustion air, fuel combustion products, and dilution air (if applicable). If you... the maximum expected CO2 content in fuel combustion products and dilution air. (d) Calculate quench...

  13. Static and dynamic quenching of luminescent species in polymer media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, P; Leiner, M J; Lippitsch, M E

    1994-12-01

    A method developed for quantitative determination of static and dynamic contributions to luminescence quenching is applied to Ru(II) complexes in polymer matrices (silica gel and polystyrene), quenched by oxygen. This method is based on both intensity and lifetime quenching experiments. The curvature of intensity Stern-Volmer plots is related to the results.

  14. First experience with the new coupling loss induced quench system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, E.; Datskov, V.I.; Dudarev, A.V.; Kirby, G.; Sperin, K.A.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    New-generation high-field superconducting magnets pose a challenge relating to the protection of the coil winding pack in the case of a quench. The high stored energy per unit volume calls for a very efficient quench detection and fast quench propagation in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A

  15. Collapse and Revival in Holographic Quenches

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Emilia; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  16. Quench from Mott Insulator to Superfluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziarmaga, Jacek [Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiello´nskiego; Tylutki, Marek [Instytut Fizyki Uniwersytetu Jagiello´nskiego

    2012-06-01

    We study a linear ramp of the nearest-neighbor tunneling rate in the Bose-Hubbard model driving the system from the Mott insulator state into the superfluid phase. We employ the truncated Wigner approximation to simulate linear quenches of a uniform system in 1...3 dimensions, and in a harmonic trap in 3 dimensions. In all these setups the excitation energy decays like one over third root of the quench time. The -1/3 scaling is explained by an impulse-adiabatic approximation - a variant of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism - describing a crossover from non-adiabatic to adiabatic evolution when the system begins to keep pace with the increasing tunneling rate.

  17. Energy upgrade as regards quench performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W.W.; Tepikian, S.

    2011-01-01

    Since the cross section for W production increases rapidly with energy, we consider the possibility of increasing the collision energy of polarized protons at RHIC. The limits of present hardware are examined with a particular emphasis on the quench training performance of magnets. Ignoring the limits of the DX magnets, the short-sample currents for the main arc (8 cm) dipoles could allow an increase of more than 30%, however we estimate 400 to 500 training quenches for the just 8 cm dipoles to reach this level. We propose that a 10% increase in energy might be achieved with the present hardware configuration. Raising the beam energy to 275 GeV ({radical}s = 550 GeV) should increase the W production rate by almost 50% from the 250 GeV level for the same optics with identical {beta}*'s at the collision points.

  18. Quench dynamics in silver coated YBCO tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, R. C.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Lue, J. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Lee, D. F.; Kroeger, D. M.

    2002-05-01

    The role of silver in the quench dynamics of RABiTS-processed YBCO tapes was examined. The voltage distribution along the 20 cm long YBCO tapes with silver thickness between two and eight micrometers was measured when different transport current pulses were applied. Measurements on each sample were performed in a conduction-cooling environment at approximately 50 K. After normal regions were induced in the sample by short over-current pulses, an operating current was applied to monitor the sample recovery or quench. When scaled to the lowest critical current, a thermal runaway current was identified and found to increase with increasing silver thickness. A simple one-dimensional model of the system supported this trend. [This paper is also published in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Volume 47A, AIP Conference Proceedings Volume 613, pp. 449-456.

  19. Quench dynamics of the anisotropic Heisenberg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshuo; Andrei, Natan

    2014-06-27

    We develop an analytical approach for the study of the quench dynamics of the anisotropic Heisenberg model (XXZ model) on the infinite line. We present the exact time-dependent wave functions after a quench in an integral form for any initial state and for any anisotropy Δ by means of a generalized Yudson contour representation. We calculate the evolution of several observables from two particular initial states: starting from a local Néel state we calculate the time evolution of the antiferromagnetic order parameter-staggered magnetization; starting from a state with consecutive flipped spins (1) we calculate the evolution of the local magnetization and express it in terms of the propagation of magnons and bound state excitations, and (2) we predict the evolution of the induced spin currents. These predictions can be confronted with experiments in ultracold gases in optical lattices. We also show how the "string" solutions of Bethe ansatz equations emerge naturally from the contour approach.

  20. Collapse and revival in holographic quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  1. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy quenching of alpha particles in Cs$_2$LiLaBr$_6$:Ce$^{3+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Mesick, Katherine E; Stonehill, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Cs$_2$LiLaBr$_6$:Ce$^{3+}$ (CLLB) is an elpasolite scintillator that offers excellent linearity and gamma-ray energy resolution and sensitivity to thermal neutrons with the ability to perform pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) to distinguish gammas and neutrons. Our investigation of CLLB has indicated the presence of intrinsic radioactive alpha background that we have determined to be from actinium contamination of the lanthanum component. We measured the pulse shapes for gamma, thermal neutron, and alpha events and determined that PSD can be performed to separate the alpha background with a moderate figure of merit of 0.98. We also measured the electron-equivalent-energy of the alpha particles in CLLB and simulated the intrinsic alpha background from $^{227}$Ac to determine the quenching factor of the alphas. A linear quenching relationship $L_{\\alpha} = E_{\\alpha} \\times q + L_0$ was found at alpha particle energies above 5 MeV, with a quenching factor $q = 0.71$ MeVee/MeV and an offset $L_0 = - 1.19$ MeVee.

  2. Reductive fluorescence quenching of DMP with aniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha Jhonsi, M. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Vandalur, Chennai 600048, Tamil Nadu (India); Kathiravan, A., E-mail: akathir23@hotmail.com [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai 600113, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-01-15

    The photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between 8-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,5-di[(E)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]-1,2,3,5,6, 7-hexahydrodicyclopenta[b,e]pyridine (DMP) and aniline is studied in acetonitrile medium by using steady state and time resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Bimolecular quenching rate constants (k{sub q}) were calculated from the obtained linear Stern–Volmer plots from both steady state and time resolved measurements. The rate constant (k{sub q}) for PET between DMP and aniline is 1.4×10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is in diffusion control limit. The free energy change (ΔG{sup 0}) has been evaluated by using Rehm–Weller equation for the evidence of electron transfer from aniline to DMP. Direct evidence for the electron transfer reaction in the present system has been obtained by characterizing the aniline cation radical using nanosecond time resolved absorption measurements in the visible region. Further, this quenching mechanism is attributed to be reductive in nature i.e. electron transfer occurs from ground state aniline to excited DMP. This is the first example of reductive fluorescence quenching of DMP with aniline in acetonitrile ever known. -- Highlights: • Photoinduced electron transfer between DMP and aniline using time resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy has been investigated. • Reductive quenching behavior was observed. • Direct evidence for the ET reaction in the present system has been obtained by characterizing the aniline cation radical.

  3. Quenching of the Deuteron in Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Dillig, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the Lorentz contraction of a deuteron in flight. Our starting point is the Blankenbecler-Sugar projection of the Bethe-Salpeter equation to a 3-dimensional quasi potential equation, wqhich we apply for the deuteron bound in an harmonic oscillator potential (for an analytical result) and by the Bonn NN potential for a more realistic estimate. We find substantial quenching with increasing external momenta and a significant modification of the high momentum spectrum of the deuteron.

  4. Successful magnet quench test for CAST.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice Maximilien

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) consists of a prototype LHC dipole magnet with photon detectors at each end. It searches for very weakly interacting neutral particles called axions, which should originate in the core of the Sun. The telescope, located at Point 8, can move vertically within its wheeled platform, which travels horizontally along tracks in the floor. In this way, the telescope can view the Sun at sunrise through one end and at sunset through the other end. It has been cooled down to below 1.8 K and reached ~95% of its final magnetic field of 9 tesla before a quench was induced to test the whole cryogenic system under such conditions. The cryogenic system responded as expected to the magnet quench and CAST is now ready to start its three-year search for solar axions. Photos 01 & 02 : Members of the LHC cryogenics team pose in front of the axion telescope on the day of the first quench test, together with some of the CAST collaboration.

  5. The Mass Dependence of Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.

    2014-09-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M sstarf 5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  6. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  7. Eu2+ concentration effects in KCa0.8Sr0.2I3:Eu2+: A novel high-performance scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuntao; Zhuravleva, Mariya; Lindsey, Adam C.; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We report here the effect of Eu2+ concentration in KCa0.8Sr0.2I3:Eu2+ single crystal scintillators. KCa0.8Sr0.2I3:Eu2+ single crystals doped with 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 7 mol% Eu2+ were grown by the Bridgman method. The effects of varying Eu2+concentration and crystal volume on the scintillation properties, including light yield, energy resolution, nonproportionality, scintillation decay time and afterglow level, were systematically investigated. For 5 mm×5 mm×5 mm samples, the best light yield of 86,000±4000 photons/MeV was achieved with a content of 5 mol% Eu2+; its energy resolution of 2.5% at 662 keV was comparable to that of LaBr3:Ce3+ and SrI2:Eu2+. With larger samples of about 2.2 cm3, the best performances achieved were for 3 mol% Eu2+ concentration, i.e. a light yield of 76,000±4000 photons/MeV and an energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV. A direct correlation between nonproportionality and Eu2+ concentration was found. A continuous lengthening of scintillation decay time and x-ray induced afterglow level with increasing Eu2+ concentration was observed. The self-absorption effect was evaluated by using the Stokes shift and the temperature dependence of the photoluminescence decay (PL) of the Eu2+ centers. The sample with the highest dopant concentration had more severe temperature quenching of the Eu2+5d-4f emission than the sample with the lowest dopant concentration, which could be ascribed to the thermally activated concentration quenching.

  8. Application of best estimate approach for modelling of QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, Tadas; Kaliatka, Algirdas; Vileiniskis, Virginijus [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos (Lithuania)

    2016-04-15

    One of the important severe accident management measures in the Light Water Reactors is water injection to the reactor core. The related phenomena are investigated by performing experiments and computer simulations. One of the most widely known is the QUENCH test-program. A number of analyses on QUENCH tests have also been performed by different computer codes for code validation and improvements. Unfortunately, any deterministic computer simulation is not free from the uncertainties. To receive the realistic calculation results, the best estimate computer codes should be used for the calculation with combination of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of calculation results. In this article, the QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 experiments are modelled using ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAPSIM codes. For the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, SUSA3.5 and SUNSET tools were used. The article demonstrates that applying the best estimate approach, it is possible to develop basic QUENCH input deck and to develop the two sets of input parameters, covering maximal and minimal ranges of uncertainties. These allow simulating different (but with the same nature) tests, receiving calculation results with the evaluated range of uncertainties.

  9. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  10. AA, beam stopper with scintillator screen

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    An insertable steel-plate beam stopper was located after nearly a full turn downstream of the injection point. It was fitted with a scintillator screen, a thin plate of Cr-doped alumina, imprinted with a grid and reference points. The screen was illuminated through a window and observed with a highly sensitive TV camera plus image intensifier. This allowed observation of beam position and size of a proton test beam and of the beam from the target, which consisted not only of antiprotons but contained as well electrons, pions and muons of the same momentum.

  11. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  12. Scintillating bolometers for Double Beta Decay search

    CERN Document Server

    Gironi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In the field of Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, the use of high resolution detectors in which background can be actively discriminated is very appealing. Scintillating bolometers containing a Double Beta Decay emitter can largely fulfill this very interesting possibility. In this paper we present the latest results obtained with CdWO4 and CaMoO4 crystals. Moreover we report, for the first time, a very interesting feature of CaMoO4 bolometers: the possibility to discriminate beta-gamma events from those induced by alpha particles thanks to different thermal pulse shape.

  13. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  14. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  15. A multidetector scintillation camera with 254 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinsdottir, E; Larsen, B; Rommer, P

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based scintillation camera has been designed for both dynamic and static radionuclide studies. The detecting head has 254 independent sodium iodide crystals, each with a photomultiplier and amplifier. In dynamic measurements simultaneous events can be recorded, and 1 million total counts...... per second can be accommodated with less than 0.5% loss in any one channel. This corresponds to a calculated deadtime of 5 nsec. The multidetector camera is being used for 133Xe dynamic studies of regional cerebral blood flow in man and for 99mTc and 197 Hg static imaging of the brain....

  16. Terbium-activated heavy scintillating glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fu,J.; Kobayashi, M.; Parker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Tb-activated scintillating glasses with high Ln2O3 (Ln=Gd, Y, Lu) concentration up to 40mol% have been prepared. The effects of Ln3+ ions on the density, thermal properties, transmission and luminescence properties under both UV and X-ray excitation have been investigated. The glasses containing Gd2O3 or Lu2O3 exhibit a high density of more than 6.0g/cm3. Energy transfer from Gd3+ to Tb3+ takes place in Gd-containing glass and as a result the Gd-containing glass shows a light yield 2.5 times ...

  17. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; DeJongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V / cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V / cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83 m Kr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207 Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons ( N ex ) and ion pairs ( N i ) and their ratio ( N ex / N i ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  18. Statistical characteristics of low-latitude ionospheric scintillation over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kangkang; Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Li, Hongke

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) L-band ionospheric scintillation produced by electron density irregularities in the ionospheric E- and F-regions, is mainly a low- and high-latitude phenomenon. In this study, the statistical behavior of GPS ionospheric scintillation over a Chinese low-latitude station Sanya (18.3°N, 109.6°E; dip lat: 12.8°N) has been investigated. A detailed study on the seasonal and solar activity dependence of scintillation occurrence during July 2004-December 2012 show that the amplitude scintillation pattern, with a maximum occurrence during equinox of solar maximum, agrees with plasma bubble observations by in situ satellites in this longitude. A few daytime periodic scintillation events are found during June solstice months of solar minimum. Interestingly, a significant equinoctial asymmetry of scintillation onset time is found in 2011-2012. The initiation of scintillation during September-October is on average earlier than that of March-April about 25 min. Meanwhile, the zonal drifts of irregularities estimated using two spatially separated GPS receivers over Sanya show a similar behavior during the two equinoxes, slowly decreasing from 150 m/s at post-sunset to 50 m/s near midnight. The possible mechanisms responsible for the occurrence characteristics of GPS scintillation over Sanya, and relevant aspects of the zonal drifts of the irregularities are discussed.

  19. Study on Signal Processing Circuit Based on Scintillation Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Yong-gang; DENG; Chang-ming; LI; Jian-wei; XIAO; Cai-jin; ZHANG; Gui-ying; WANG; Ping-sheng; WANG; Xing-hua; JIN; Xiang-chun; HUA; Long; YUAN; Guo-jun; NI; Bang-fa

    2013-01-01

    Compared with silicon semiconductor detector,higher energy resolution and together with the high detection efficiency,big sensitive volume,good adaptability to environment and high sensitivityespecially in nature background environment are the characteristics of scintillation detector.The most widely applied scintillator includes inorganic crystals,of which sodium iodide is the favorite and

  20. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  1. Microprocessor-based single particle calibration of scintillation counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, G. K. D.; Pathak, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    A microprocessor-base set-up is fabricated and tested for the single particle calibration of the plastic scintillator. The single particle response of the scintillator is digitized by an A/D converter, and a 8085 A based microprocessor stores the pulse heights. The digitized information is printed. Facilities for CRT display and cassette storing and recalling are also made available.

  2. TOF-PET detector concept based on organic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new concept of the large acceptance detector systems based on organic scintillators which may allow for simultaneous diagnostic of large fraction of the human body. Novelty of the concept lies in employing large blocks of polymer scintillators instead of crystals as detectors of annihilation quanta, and in using predominantly the timing of signals instead of their amplitudes.

  3. Minimum Quench Energy and Early Quench Development in NbTi Superconducting Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Breschi, M; Boselli, M; Bottura, Luca; Devred, Arnaud; Ribani, P L; Trillaud, F

    2007-01-01

    The stability of superconducting wires is a crucial task in the design of safe and reliable superconducting magnets. These magnets are prone to premature quenches due to local releases of energy. In order to simulate these energy disturbances, various heater technologies have been developed, such as coated tips, graphite pastes, and inductive coils. The experiments studied in the present work have been performed using a single-mode diode laser with an optical fiber to illuminate the superconducting strand surface. Minimum quench energies and voltage traces at different magnetic flux densities and transport currents have been measured on an LHC-type, Cu/NbTi wire bathed in pool boiling helium I. This paper deals with the numerical analysis of the experimental data. In particular, a coupled electromagnetic and thermal model has been developed to study quench development and propagation, focusing on the influence of heat exchange with liquid helium.

  4. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island’s GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica. PMID:28085087

  5. Interstellar Refractive Scintillation and Intraday Polarization Angle Swings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Jie Qian; Xi-Zhen Zhang; A. Kraus

    2005-01-01

    Intraday polarization angle swings of ~180° observed in two sources (QSO 0917+624 and QSO 1150+812) are discussed in the framework of refractive interstellar scintillation by a continuous interstellar medium. Model-fits to the I-,Q- and U- light curves were made for both sources. It is shown that for the case of 0917+624 both the intraday intensity variations and the polarization angle swing of ~180° could be explained consistently in terms of a four-component model, which comprises one steady and two scintillating polarized components and one further non-polarized scintillating component. The polarization angle swing of ~180° observed in 1150+812, which occurred when the polarized flux density was almost constant, could not be explained in terms of refractive scintillation by a continuous medium and might be due to other mechanisms (e.g., scintillation by interstellar clouds).

  6. Screening Method of New Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Megan

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined. The promising samples are also being evaluated for exact luminosity through spectroscopy.

  7. Screening Method of Inorganic Scintillators for Photon Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M.

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic scintillators play an important role in detection and visualization of ionizing radiation. A scintillator with both high light yield and fast response has yet to be found. These methods are useful in detector applications for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation. New scintillators are necessary to improve radiation detectors for detection of fissile materials specifically when shielded. At ORNL, several new inorganic scintillators including various versions of ZnO, and SnO2 are being evaluated to determine light yield and decay times. Crystals are grown here, doped or painted with metals such as Al, Cd, Sn or Ga and measured. The photons emitted from a scintillator from a single incident alpha or neutron can be counted and graphed, allowing the luminosity and decay constants to be determined

  8. An Experiment to Demonstrate Cherenkov / Scintillation Signal Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Wallig, J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 +/- 1% and 81 +/- 1...

  9. BL LAC PKSB1144-379 an extreme scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, R J; Shabala, S S; Blanchard, J; Lovell, J E J; McCallum, J N; Cimo, G

    2012-01-01

    Rapid variability in the radio flux density of the BL Lac object PKSB1144-379 has been observed at four frequencies, ranging from 1.5 to 15 GHz, with the VLA and the University of Tasmania's Ceduna antenna. Intrinsic and line of sight effects were examined as possible causes of this variability, with interstellar scintillation best explaining the frequency dependence of the variability timescales and modulation indices. This scintillation is consistent with a compact source 20-40 microarcseconds, or 0.15-0.3 pc in size. The inferred brightness temperature for PKSB1144-379 (assuming that the observed variations are due to scintillation) is 6.2e12 K at 4.9 GHz, with approximately 10 percent of the total flux in the scintillating component. We show that scintillation surveys aimed at identifying variability timescales of days to weeks are an effective way to identify the AGN with the highest brightness temperatures.

  10. Scintillation properties of TGG and TSAG crystals for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Kojima, Takahiro; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ushizawa, Jisaburou; Kawano, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Noriaki

    2017-08-01

    Optical and scintillation properties of TGG (Tb3Ga5O12) and TSAG (Tb3Sc2Al3O12) crystals were investigated, and capabilities to be used as a scintillator screen were demonstrated. In photoluminescence (PL) spectra, some emission lines due to Tb3+4f-4f transitions appeared from 500 to 700 nm. PL quantum yields of TGG and TSAG were 6.5% and 50.9%, respectively. When irradiated by X-rays, these crystals showed intense scintillation, and the emission wavelengths were the same as those in PL spectra. The scintillation decay times of TGG and TSAG were 94 and 678 μs, respectively. Further, we have demonstrated X-ray imaging using both TSGG and TSAG crystal plates and confirmed a capability as scintillator screens.

  11. Optimization of light collection from crystal scintillators for cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-04-21

    High light collection efficiency is an important requirement in any application of scintillation detectors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility for improving this parameter in cryogenic scintillation bolometers, which can be considered as promising detectors in experiments investigating neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter. Energy resolutions and relative pulse amplitudes of scintillation detectors using ZnWO{sub 4} scintillation crystals of different shapes (cylinder ∅ 20×20 mm and hexagonal prism with diagonal 20 mm and height 20 mm), reflector materials and shapes, optical contact and surface properties (polished and diffused) were measured at room temperature. Propagation of optical photons in these experimental conditions was simulated using Geant4 and ZEMAX codes. The results of the simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other and with direct measurements of the crystals. This could be applied to optimize the geometry of scintillation detectors used in the cryogenic experiments.

  12. Visible scintillation photodetector device incorporating chalcopyrite semiconductor crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold

    2017-04-04

    A photodetector device, including: a scintillator material operable for receiving incident radiation and emitting photons in response; a photodetector material coupled to the scintillator material operable for receiving the photons emitted by the scintillator material and generating a current in response, wherein the photodetector material includes a chalcopyrite semiconductor crystal; and a circuit coupled to the photodetector material operable for characterizing the incident radiation based on the current generated by the photodetector material. Optionally, the scintillator material includes a gamma scintillator material and the incident radiation received includes gamma rays. Optionally, the photodetector material is further operable for receiving thermal neutrons and generating a current in response. The circuit is further operable for characterizing the thermal neutrons based on the current generated by the photodetector material.

  13. Comparison of tropospheric scintillation prediction models of the Indonesian climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng Yee; Singh, Mandeep Jit

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric scintillation is a phenomenon that will cause signal degradation in satellite communication with low fade margin. Few studies of scintillation have been conducted in tropical regions. To analyze tropospheric scintillation, we obtain data from a satellite link installed at Bandung, Indonesia, at an elevation angle of 64.7° and a frequency of 12.247 GHz from 1999 to 2000. The data are processed and compared with the predictions of several well-known scintillation prediction models. From the analysis, we found that the ITU-R model gives the lowest error rate when predicting the scintillation intensity for fade at 4.68%. However, the model should be further tested using data from higher-frequency bands, such as the K and Ka bands, to verify the accuracy of the model.

  14. Measurement of Quenching Factor for Nuclear Recoils in CsI(Tl) Crystal%CsI(Tl)晶体中反冲Cs和I核Quenching Factor的测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳骞; 李金; 刘延; 李浩斌; 王子敬; 王名儒

    2002-01-01

    Detection of dark matter using CsI(Tl) scintillating crystal as the detector has gathered more and more interests. In this paper, the quenching factor of nuclear recoils induced by incident neutron beam was measured based on Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) method to identify events of nuclear recoils from background. It is shown that the quenching factor increases with the decreased recoil energy in the range of 7 keV to 132 keV. This result shows the great advantage of CsI(Tl) crystal detector in detecting of dark matter.%许多实验对用CsI(Tl)闪烁晶体作为探测器来寻找和探测暗物质的可行性进行了研究. 本工作利用8MeV单能中子轰击CsI(Tl)晶体探测器来研究Cs核和I核的Quenching Factor. 在数据处理中,运用脉冲形状甄别(PSD)方法来分辨反冲核信号和本底信号. 实验结果表明,在7keV到132keV的能区中,Quenching Factor随着反冲核能量的减少而增加. 在探测暗物质的实验中,这一性质对于CsI(Tl)晶体探测器获得较低的能量阈值是很有利的.

  15. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  16. A novel segmented-scintillator antineutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Y.; Amhis, Y.; Arnold, L.; Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Bongrand, M.; Boursette, D.; Buhour, J. M.; Castle, B. C.; Clark, K.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Cussans, D.; De Roeck, A.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Ghys, L.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Ihantola, S.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Kalousis, L. N.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Lehaut, G.; Mermans, J.; Michiels, I.; Moortgat, C.; Newbold, D.; Park, J.; Petridis, K.; Piñera, I.; Pommery, G.; Popescu, L.; Pronost, G.; Rademacker, J.; Reynolds, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Saunders, D.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Schune, M.-H.; Scovell, P. R.; Simard, L.; Vacheret, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Van Mulders, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vercaemer, S.; Waldron, A.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of very-short-baseline reactor experiments will require compact detectors operating at surface level and close to a nuclear reactor. This paper presents a new detector concept based on a composite solid scintillator technology. The detector target uses cubes of polyvinyltoluene interleaved with 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) phosphor screens to detect the products of the inverse beta decay reaction. A multi-tonne detector system built from these individual cells can provide precise localisation of scintillation signals, making efficient use of the detector volume. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a neutron capture efficiency of over 70 % is achievable with a sufficient number of 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) screens per cube and that an appropriate segmentation enables a measurement of the positron energy which is not limited by γ-ray leakage. First measurements of a single cell indicate that a very good neutron-gamma discrimination and high neutron detection efficiency can be obtained with adequate triggering techniques. The light yield from positron signals has been measured, showing that an energy resolution of 14%/√E(MeV) is achievable with high uniformity. A preliminary neutrino signal analysis has been developed, using selection criteria for pulse shape, energy, time structure and energy spatial distribution and showing that an antineutrino efficiency of 40% can be achieved. It also shows that the fine segmentation of the detector can be used to significantly decrease both correlated and accidental backgrounds.

  17. Fast Scintillating Paddles for DarkLight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The DarkLight experiment proposes to search for a dark photon in the 10-100 MeV mass range via its production in fixed-target electron-proton collisions. The experimental design is driven by the desire to detect the complete final state including the recoiling proton, while also sustaining a very high luminosity in order to search for this rare process. Although the final design of the DarkLight experiment calls for fully streamed detector readout, initial studies will rely on traditional, triggered approaches. In order to facilitate precision measurements at high rate, a fast, thin, finely-segmented trigger detector based on plastic scintillating paddles and custom amplifiers was developed. I will discuss this design and its performance in recent DarkLight beam studies, as well as the work we have done to develop detectors using individual scintillating fibers. The DarkLight project is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-94ER40818.

  18. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, R. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); De Donato, C.; D' Olivo, J.C.; Guzman, A.; Medina-Tanco, G. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, E. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, E. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Salazar Ibarguen, H. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Sanchez, F.A., E-mail: federico.sanchez@nucleares.unam.m [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Supanitsky, A.D. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Valdes-Galicia, J.F. [Inst. de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Vargas Trevino, A.D.; Vergara Limon, S. [Fac. de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Villasenor, L.M. [Inst. de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas Hidalgo Morelia (Mexico); Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304 (5613) Malarguee, Prov. Mendoza (Argentina)

    2010-05-21

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm{sup 2}. Each layer is 4m{sup 2} and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cmx2m, oriented at a 90{sup 0} angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4x4cm{sup 2}. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2{mu}s data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  19. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; de Donato, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Guzmán, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Paic, G.; Patiño Salazar, E.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Sánchez, F. A.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vargas Treviño, A. D.; Vergara Limón, S.; Villaseñor, L. M.; Auger Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm2. Each layer is 4m2 and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cm×2m, oriented at a 90∘ angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4×4cm2. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2μs data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  20. Effects of hadron irradiation on scintillating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atac, M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Buchanan, C.; Chrisman, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Kubic, J.; Park, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Baumbaugh, A.; Binkley, M.; Bross, A.D.; Finley, D.; Elias, J.; Foster, G.W.; Kephart, R.; Kephart, R.; Kim, C.; Park, H.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rivetta, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Wagner, R. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Jeskik, R.; Margulies, S.; Mendez, H.; Solomon, J.; Vaca, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kelley, C. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.; Cason, N.; Jacques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kenney, V.; LoSecco, J.; Ruchti, R.; Shephard, W.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Marchant, J.; Mountain, R.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)); Davis, D.; Vandergriff, D. (O

    1993-08-01

    Trackers based on scintillating-fiber technology are being considered by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at SSC and the D[phi] collaboration at Fermilab. An important issue is the effect of the radiation existing in the detector cores on fiber properties. Most studies of radiation damage in scintillators have irradiated small bulk samples rather than fibers, and have used X-rays, [sup 60]Co gammas, or electron beams, often at accelerated rates. The authors have irradiated some 600 fibers in the Fermilab Tevatron C[phi] area, thereby obtaining a hadronic irradiation at realistic rates. Four-meter-long samples of ten Bicron polystyrene-based fiber types, maintained in air, dry nitrogen, argon, and vacuum atmospheres within stainless-steel tubes, were irradiated for seven weeks at various distances from the accelerator beam pipes. Maximum doses, measured by thermoluminescence detectors, were about 80 Krad. Fiber properties, particularly light yield and attenuation length, have been measured over a one-year period. A description of the work together with the results is presented. At the doses achieved, corresponding to a few years of actual fiber-tracking detector operation, little degradation is observed. In addition, recovery after several days' exposure to air has been noted. Properties of unirradiated samples kept in darkness show no changes after one year.

  1. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Richard S., E-mail: richard.woolf@nrl.navy.mil [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hutcheson, Anthony L., E-mail: anthony.hutcheson@nrl.navy.mil [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Gwon, Chul, E-mail: chul.gwon@nrl.navy.mil [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Phlips, Bernard F., E-mail: bernard.phlips@nrl.navy.mil [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Wulf, Eric A., E-mail: eric.wulf@nrl.navy.mil [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction (Q-value: –1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5–3.2 MeV neutrons in 200–300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (E{sub e.e.}) vs. proton equivalent energy (E{sub p.e.}), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5–35% reduction for 2.5–3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry

  2. Quenching effect in an optical fiber type small size dosimeter irradiated with 290 MeV·u{sup -1} carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yuho; Watanabe, Kenichi; Uritani, Akira; Yamazaki, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Koba, Yusuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    We are developing a small size dosimeter for dose estimation in particle therapies. The developed dosimeter is an optical fiber based dosimeter mounting an radiation induced luminescence material, such as an OSL or a scintillator, at a tip. These materials generally suffer from the quenching effect under high LET particle irradiation. We fabricated two types of the small size dosimeters. They used an OSL material Eu:BaFBr and a BGO scintillator. Carbon ions were irradiated into the fabricated dosimeters at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The small size dosimeters were set behind the water equivalent acrylic phantom. Bragg peak was observed by changing the phantom thickness. An ion chamber was also placed near the small size dosimeters as a reference. Eu:BaFBr and BGO dosimeters showed a Bragg peak at the same thickness as the ion chamber. Under high LET particle irradiation, the response of the luminescence-based small size dosimeters deteriorated compared with that of the ion chamber due to the quenching effect. We confirmed the luminescence efficiency of Eu:BaFBr and BGO decrease with the LET. The reduction coefficient of luminescence efficiency was different between the BGO and the Eu:BaFBr. The LET can be determined from the luminescence ratio between Eu:BaFBr and BGO, and the dosimeter response can be corrected. We evaluated the LET dependence of the luminescence efficiency of the BGO and Eu:BaFBr as the quenching effect. We propose and discuss the correction of the quenching effect using the signal intensity ratio of the both materials. Although the correction precision is not sufficient, feasibility of the proposed correction method is proved through basic experiments.

  3. Effects of thermal quenching on the breakup of pyroclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Manga, M.; Carey, R. J.; Degruyter, W.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is often assumed that magma fragments when it contacts water. Obsidian chips and glass spheres crack when quenched. Vesicular pyroclasts are made of similar glass, so thermal quenching may cause them to break more easily. We performed a set of experiments on air fall pumice from Medicine Lake, California. Density and texture of similar samples are described in Manga et al., Bull Volc 2010. We made "quenched" samples by heating natural pyroclasts to 600 °C, quenching them in water at 21 °C, drying them at 105 °C, and then cooling them to room temperature. We compare these samples with untreated air fall pumice from the same deposit, hereafter referred to as "regular" pumice. We tested whether quenched pumice would 1) shatter more easily in collisions and 2) abrade faster. Our collision experiment methods are described in Dufek et al., Nature Geoscience 2012. Our abrasion experiment methods are described in Manga et al., Bull Volc 2010. We also tested whether individual clasts lose mass upon quenching and whether they increase in effective wet density. Effective wet density is defined as underwater density of a clast when water occupies part of the pore space. Effective wet density, measured as a function of time after immersion, indicates the volume fraction of the pore space that becomes occupied by water. We compare effective wet density of individual clasts pre-quenching with effective wet density after having been quenched, thoroughly dried and then cooled to room temperature. An increase in effective wet density would suggest that bubble walls had been damaged during quenching, allowing water to occupy the pore space faster. We also compare pre-quenching and post-quenching textures using X-Ray Tomography (XRT) and SEM images. Results from collision experiments show no obvious difference between quenched pumice and regular pumice. Quenched pumice abraded more quickly than regular pumice. We find that 1 to 2 % of mass was lost during quenching. Effective

  4. Explaining jet quenching with perturbative QCD alone

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna C; Wiedemann, Urs A

    2011-01-01

    We present a new formulation of jet quenching in perturbative QCD beyond the eikonal approximation. Multiple scattering in the medium is modelled through infra-red-continued (2 -> 2) scattering matrix elements in QCD and the parton shower describing further emissions. The interplay between these processes is arranged in terms of a formation time constraint such that coherent emissions can be treated consistently. Emerging partons are hadronised by the Lund string model, tuned to describe LEP data in conjunction with the parton shower. Based on this picture we obtain a good description of the nuclear modification factor R_AA at RHIC and LHC.

  5. Quench modeling of the ATLAS superconducting toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilin, A V; ten Kate, H H J

    2001-01-01

    Details of the normal zone propagation and the temperature distribution in the coils of ATLAS toroids under quench are presented. A tailor-made mathematical model and corresponding computer code enable obtainment of computational results for the propagation process over the coils in transverse (turn-to-turn) and longitudinal directions. The slow electromagnetic diffusion into the pure aluminum stabilizer of the toroid's conductor, as well as the essentially transient heat transfer through inter-turn insulation, is appropriately included in the model. The effect of nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field and the thermal links to the coil casing on the temperature gradients within the coils is analyzed in full. (5 refs).

  6. Quenching simulation of steel grinding balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Hernandez, O.; Reyes, L. A.; Camurri, C.; Carrasco, C.; Garza-Monte-de-Oca, F.; Colas, R.

    2015-07-01

    The phase transformations of high carbon steel during quenching and equalizing were modelled using commercial computer packages based on the finite element method and the kinetic transformation of steel. The model was used to predict the temperature and microstructural changes taking place within balls of two different sizes that are used for grinding mineral ores. A good correlation between the temperatures measured by inserted thermocouples and those predicted by the model was obtained after modifying the thermal conductivity of the steel within the temperature domain at which mixed phases are present. The phase transformations predicted were confirmed by metallographic analyses. (Author)

  7. Jet Quenching Measurements with ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, W K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    A broad program of measurements is planned for heavy ion collisions in ATLAS. With up to a factor of 30 increase in collision energy compared to existing data, significant new insights are anticipated to be obtained with the first data measured. Global features of the LHC collisions will be accessible with the early data and will set the stage for the precision measurements to follow. ATLAS is particularly well suited for exploration of "jet quenching," the extinction of energetic jets in the hot dense medium. Observations of heavy quark jet suppression will be possible with unprecedented energy reach and statistical precision, potentially yielding new insights into the basic mechanisms involved.

  8. $B_{K}$ from quenched overlap QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Garron, N; Hölbling, C; Lellouch, L P; Rebbi, C

    2003-01-01

    We present an exploratory calculation of the standard model Delta S=2 matrix element relevant for indirect CP violation in K -> pi pi decays. The computation is performed with overlap fermions in the quenched approximation at beta=6.0 on a 16^3x32 lattice. The resulting bare matrix element is renormalized non-perturbatively. Our preliminary result is B_K^{NDR}(2 GeV)=0.61(7), where the error does not yet include an estimate of systematic uncertainties.

  9. Quench dynamics in SRF cavities: can we locate the quench origin with 2nd sound?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximenko, Yulia; /Moscow, MIPT; Segatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A newly developed method of locating quenches in SRF cavities by detecting second-sound waves has been gaining popularity in SRF laboratories. The technique is based on measurements of time delays between the quench as determined by the RF system and arrival of the second-sound wave to the multiple detectors placed around the cavity in superfluid helium. Unlike multi-channel temperature mapping, this approach requires only a few sensors and simple readout electronics; it can be used with SRF cavities of almost arbitrary shape. One of its drawbacks is that being an indirect method it requires one to solve an inverse problem to find the location of a quench. We tried to solve this inverse problem by using a parametric forward model. By analyzing the data we found that the approximation where the second-sound emitter is a near-singular source does not describe the physical system well enough. A time-dependent analysis of the quench process can help us to put forward a more adequate model. We present here our current algorithm to solve the inverse problem and discuss the experimental results.

  10. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hannan, Bruce W [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Riedel, Richard A [ORNL; Wang, Cai-Lin [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  11. Holographic quenches towards a Lifshitz point

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, Giancarlo; Abdalla, Elcio

    2015-01-01

    We use the holographic duality to study quantum quenches of a strongly coupled CFT that drive the theory towards a non-relativistic fixed point with Lifshitz scaling. We consider the case of a Lifshitz dynamical exponent $z$ close to unity, where the non-relativistic field theory can be understood as a specific deformation of the corresponding CFT and, hence, the standard holographic dictionary can be applied. On the gravity side this amounts to finding a dynamical bulk solution which interpolates between AdS and Lishitz spacetimes as time evolves. We show that an asymptotically Lifshitz black hole is always formed in the final state. This indicates that it is impossible to reach the vacuum state of the Lifshitz theory from the CFT vacuum as a result of the proposed quenching mechanism. The nonequilibrium dynamics following the breaking of the relativistic scaling symmetry is also probed using both local and non-local observables. In particular, we conclude that the equilibration process happens in a top-down...

  12. Heat transfer model for quenching by submerging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarella, D N; Varas, F [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada II, E.T.S. de Ing. de Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); MartIn, E B, E-mail: diego@dma.uvigo.es, E-mail: fvaras@uvigo.es, E-mail: emortega@uvigo.es [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, E.T.S. de Ing. Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In quenching by submerging the workpiece is cooled due to vaporization, convective flow and interaction of both mechanisms. The dynamics of these phenomena is very complex and the corresponding heat fluxes are strongly dependent on local flow variables such as velocity of fluid and vapor fraction. This local dependence may produce very different cooling rates along the piece, responsible for inappropriate metallurgical transformations, variability of material properties and residual stresses. In order to obtain an accurate description of cooling during quenching, a mathematical model of heat transfer is presented here. The model is based on the drift-flux mixture-model for multiphase flows, including an equation of conservation of energy for the liquid phase and specific boundary conditions that account for evaporation and presence of vapor phase on the surface of the piece. The model was implemented on Comsol Multiphysics software. Generation of appropriate initial and boundary conditions, as well as numerical resolution details, is briefly discussed. To test the model, a simple flow condition was analyzed. The effect of vapor fraction on heat transfer is assessed. The presence of the typical vapor blanket and its collapse can be recovered by the model, and its effect on the cooling rates on different parts of the piece is analyzed. Comparisons between numerical results and data from literature are made.

  13. Quench thresholds in operational superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allinger, J; Danby, G; Foelsche, H; Jackson, J; Lowenstein, D; Prodell, A; Weng, W

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting magnets exposed to intense primary proton beams in high energy physics applications are subject to potentially extreme heat deposition. The beam power density, its duration and spatial distribution, the current density in the superconductor and, potentially, in the normal metal substrate, as well as the construction and cooling details of the magnet, are all relevant parameters. An extension of some earlier work is discussed in which 28.5 GeV/c proton beams with up to 50 k joules of energy were targeted upstream from a 4 m long, 4 T dipole magnet used to deflect the protons through an angle of 8/sup 0/. Quench thresholds much greater than the enthalpy limit of the magnet materials were observed. In the beam exposure experiment described, intense beams of 1.5 GeV/c protons have been deflected directly into the magnet coil at relatively steep angles of incidence. The magnet quench threshold was studied by varying the beam currents and beam sizes.

  14. Quorum Quenching Revisited—From Signal Decays to Signalling Confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In a polymicrobial community, while some bacteria are communicating with neighboring cells (quorum sensing, others are interrupting the communication (quorum quenching, thus creating a constant arms race between intercellular communication. In the past decade, numerous quorum quenching enzymes have been found and initially thought to inactivate the signalling molecules. Though this is widely accepted, the actual roles of these quorum quenching enzymes are now being uncovered. Recent evidence extends the role of quorum quenching to detoxification or metabolism of signalling molecules as food and energy source; this includes “signalling confusion”, a term coined in this paper to refer to the phenomenon of non-destructive modification of signalling molecules. While quorum quenching has been explored as a novel anti-infective therapy targeting, quorum sensing evidence begins to show the development of resistance against quorum quenching.

  15. System and method for quench protection of a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianrui; Sivasubramaniam, Kiruba Haran; Bray, James William; Ryan, David Thomas

    2008-03-11

    A system and method for protecting a superconductor from a quench condition. A quench protection system is provided to protect the superconductor from damage due to a quench condition. The quench protection system comprises a voltage detector operable to detect voltage across the superconductor. The system also comprises a frequency filter coupled to the voltage detector. The frequency filter is operable to couple voltage signals to a control circuit that are representative of a rise in superconductor voltage caused by a quench condition and to block voltage signals that are not. The system is operable to detect whether a quench condition exists in the superconductor based on the voltage signal received via the frequency filter and to initiate a protective action in response.

  16. Bridging global and local quantum quenches in conformal field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Xueda

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement evolutions after a global quantum quench and a local quantum quench in 1+1 dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) show qualitatively different behaviors, and are studied within two different setups. In this work, we bridge global and local quantum quenches in (1+1)-d CFTs in the same setup, by studying the entanglement evolution from a specific inhomogeneous initial state. By utilizing conformal mappings, this inhomogeneous quantum quench is analytically solvable. It is found that the entanglement evolution shows a global quantum quench feature in the short time limit, and a local quantum quench feature in the long time limit. The same features are observed in single-point correlation functions of primary fields. We provide a clear physical picture for the underlying reason.

  17. Variation of Quench Propagation Velocities in YBCO Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Härö, E.; Stenvall, A.; 10.1007/s10948-015-2976-y

    2015-01-01

    changes during the quench. Due to the large temperature margin between the operation and the current sharing temperatures, the normal zone does not propagate with the temperature front. This means that the temperature will rise in a considerably larger volume when compared to the quenched volume. Thus, the evolution of the temperature distribution below current sharing temperature Tcs after the quench onset affects the normal zone propagation velocity in HTS more than in LTS coils. This can be seen as an acceleration of the quench propagation velocities while the quench evolves when margin to Tcs is high. In this paper we scrutinize quench propagation in a stack of YBCO cables with an in-house finite element method software which solves the heat diffusion equation. We compute the longitudinal and transverse normal zone propagation velocities at various distances from the hot spot to demonstrate the distance-variation...

  18. Detecting alpha radiation by scintillation in porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keillor, M.E. [McClellan Central Lab., McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Burggraf, L.W. [Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a study of some parameters essential to the development of a heterogeneous scintillation detector with improved alpha energy resolution and detection efficiency. Such a detector with better than 10% alpha energy resolution could provide in situ capability to identify and quantify important alpha-emitting radionuclides in dilute aqueous solutions. Nanoporous gel-silica is a potential scintillation matrix with the promise of improved energy resolution and 100% detection efficiency. Scintillating gel-silica made by a sol-gel process is under development. As a step toward realizing the system described, the dependence of alpha detection efficiency and intrinsic energy resolution in particulate and porous glass scintillation detectors is examined. The two main areas of this research are: (1) computer modeling of the geometric detection efficiency and energy dispersion in particulate and porous glass scintillation detectors and (2) experiments to test model predictions for detection of alphas in liquid-infiltrated porous glass structures. To confirm the predicted alpha energy deposition, the authors measured scintillation in nanoporous gel-silica infiltrated with an organic liquid scintillator. Results show that phase dimensions must be considered in constructing a heterogeneous detector for alpha spectroscopy. Nanometer-scale dimensions available in gel-silica essentially eliminate degradation of energy resolution due to energy dispersion of alpha particles within the liquid sample, while providing 100% detection efficiency.

  19. Preparation and properties of scintillating glass doped with organic activators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; ZHAO Hong-sheng; ZHOU Wan-cheng

    2006-01-01

    A series of scintillating glasses were developed by doping organic activators into low melting temperature glasses according to different ratios. The fluorescence spectra and the transmission spectra of some scintillating glasses were explored and the actual concentration organic in scintillating glass was estimated. The results show that it is feasible to prepare the scintillating glass by doing organic scintillating activators into the low-melting glasses. There are two main reasons for the weak optical properties of the scintillation glasses: one is that the actual concentration of organic activators doped in the glasses is very low,and the other is the existence of lots of defects formed in the scintillating glasses due to the evaporation of organic activator,lowering the transmission of glasses. The fluorescence emission peaks of the glasses move to a longer wavelength compared with those in organic matrixes. To increase the light output of the glass,the optical transmittance of the glasses must be improved and the concentration of activators in the glasses must be increased.

  20. Study on Growth and Optical, Scintillation Properties of Thallium Doped Cesium Iodide –Scintillator Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal of Thallium doped cesium Iodide –Scintillator crystal was grown using vertical Bridgeman technique. The grown crystal was included for cutting and polishing for the characterization purpose and this crystal was studied by optical transmission properties, photo luminescence and thermally luminescence characteristics. Gamma-ray detectors were fabricated using the grown crystal that showed good linearity and nearly 7.5% resolution at 662 keV.

  1. Holographic study on the jet quenching parameter in anisotropic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Luying

    2016-01-01

    We first calculate the jet quenching parameter of an anisotropic plasma with a U(1) chemical potential via the AdS/CFT duality. The effects of charge, anisotropy parameter and quark motion direction on the jet quenching parameter are investigated. We then discuss the situation of anisotropic black brane in the IR region. We study both the jet quenching parameters along the longitudinal direction and transverse plane.

  2. Holographic study of the jet quenching parameter in anisotropic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Luying [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Wu, Shang-Yu [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Hsinchu (China)

    2016-11-15

    We first calculate the jet quenching parameter of an anisotropic plasma with a U(1) chemical potential via AdS/CFT duality. The effects of charge, anisotropy parameter, and quark motion direction on the jet quenching parameter are investigated. We then discuss the situation of an anisotropic black brane in the IR region. We study both the jet quenching parameters along the longitudinal direction and the transverse plane. (orig.)

  3. Scintillation properties of N2 and CF4 and performances of a scintillating ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehaut, G.; Salvador, S.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we studied the emission yields, decay times and coincidence resolving times (CRT) of two gases, nitrogen (N2) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), used for particle detection in the context of fission products measurement. The set-up was made of an ionization chamber and two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) placed front-to-front on each side of the active zone of the chamber. Using the photomultiplier tubes, the number of photoelectrons (phe) converted at the photocathodes from the scintillation processes in each gas was quantified and the scintillation time spectra were recorded. A scintillation emission yield of 24 phe MeV-1 with a decay time of τd = 2.5 ns in N2, and 225 phe MeV-1 with τd = 6.2 ns for CF4, has been measured. With our set-up, the coincidence resolving time (σ values) between the two PMTs have been measured using alpha particles at 1.4 ns and 0.34 ns for N2 and CF4, respectively.

  4. GAGG:ce single crystalline films: New perspective scintillators for electron detection in SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bok, Jan, E-mail: bok@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, Kralovopolska 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lalinský, Ondřej [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, Kralovopolska 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Hanuš, Martin; Onderišinová, Zuzana [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic); Kelar, Jakub [Dept. of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Kučera, Miroslav [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-04-15

    Single crystal scintillators are frequently used for electron detection in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We report gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG:Ce) single crystalline films as a new perspective scintillators for the SEM. For the first time, the epitaxial garnet films were used in a practical application: the GAGG:Ce scintillator was incorporated into a SEM scintillation electron detector and it showed improved image quality. In order to prove the GAGG:Ce quality accurately, the scintillation properties were examined using electron beam excitation and compared with frequently used scintillators in the SEM. The results demonstrate excellent emission efficiency of the GAGG:Ce single crystalline films together with their very fast scintillation decay useful for demanding SEM applications. - Highlights: • First practical application of epitaxial garnet films demonstrated in SEM. • Improved image quality of SEM equipped with GAGG:Ce single crystalline thin film scintillator. • Scintillation properties of GAGG:Ce films compared with standard bulk crystal scintillators.

  5. CsI(Tl) infrared scintillation light yield and spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Belogurov, S; Carugno, Giovanni; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission from CsI(Tl) excited by approx 70 keV electrons was detected with an InGaAs PIN photodiode. Some parameters of infrared scintillation were studied. The emission spectrum is located between 1.55 and 1.70 mu m with a maximum at 1.60 mu m. The light yield of infrared scintillation is (4.9+-0.3)x10 sup 3 photons/MeV. Infrared scintillation caused by 3 MeV alpha-particles is detected as well.

  6. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  7. Alpha counting and spectrometry using liquid scintillation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W J

    1986-01-01

    The material in this report is intended to be a practical introduction and guide to the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. Other works devoted to the development of the theory of liquid scintillation exist and a minimum of such material is repeated here. Much remains to be learned and many improvements remain to be made in the use of liquid scintillation for alpha counting and spectrometry. It is hoped that this modest work will encourage others to continue development in the field.

  8. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J., E-mail: jrenner@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gehman, V.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Shuman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Álvarez, V. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Borges, F.I.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cárcel, S. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Castel, J.; Cebrián, S. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Calle Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cervera, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC & Universitat de València, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Conde, C.A.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  9. Scintillations of higher order laser beams in anisotropic atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya; Luo, Yujuan; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-11-20

    The scintillation index of higher order laser beams is examined when such beams propagate in anisotropic atmospheric turbulence. Anisotropy is introduced through non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. The scintillation index results are obtained by employing the Rytov method solution; thus the results are valid for weak anisotropic atmospheric turbulence and for horizontal links. Variations in the scintillations are shown for various higher order laser modes against the changes in the optical source size, power law exponent of anisotropic non-Kolmogorov spectrum, anisotropic factors, and link length. Our results can be used in the design of optical wireless communication systems used between airplanes.

  10. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Renner, J; Goldschmidt, A; Matis, H S; Miller, T; Nakajima, Y; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Shuman, D; Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gil, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot-Guinot, M; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope $\\alpha$-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  11. The theory of scintillation with applications in remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Rino, Charles

    2011-01-01

    "In order to truly understand data signals transmitted by satellite, one must understand scintillation theory in addition to well established theories of EM wave propagation and scattering. Scintillation is a nuisance in satellite EM communications, but it has stimulated numerous theoretical developments with science applications. This book not only presents a thorough theoretical explanation of scintillation, but it also offers a complete library of MATLAB codes that will reproduce the book examples. The library includes GPS coordinate manipulations, satellite orbit prediction, and earth mean magnetic field computations. The subect matter is for EM researchers; however, also theory is relevant to geophysics, acoustics, optics and astoronomy"--Provided by publisher.

  12. Design and Prototyping of a High Granularity Scintillator Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutshi, Vishnu [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-03-27

    A novel approach for constructing fine-granularity scintillator calorimeters, based on the concept of an Integrated Readout Layer (IRL) was developed. The IRL consists of a printed circuit board inside the detector which supports the directly-coupled scintillator tiles, connects to the surface-mount SiPMs and carries the necessary front-end electronics and signal/bias traces. Prototype IRLs using this concept were designed, prototyped and successfully exposed to test beams. Concepts and implementations of an IRL carried out with funds associated with this contract promise to result in the next generation of scintillator calorimeters.

  13. Design of tissue equivalent scintillators for precise dosimetry purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, R.T.; Bonzi, E.V. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica; Martinez, V.D. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Medicina

    1997-08-01

    A tissue equivalent plastic scintillator containing chlorine has been designed through Monte Carlo simulations and mass energy transfer coefficient calculations, searching for the optimum concentration of that element whose role is to make the value of the absorbed radiation energy equal in tissue and plastic scintillators. The plastic is obtained by mixing the base component of most current plastic scintillators, Poly-Vinyl-Toluene, with Vinyl-Benzyl-Chloride. In addition, we propose two kinds of plastics, one for diagnostic X-rays and another one for therapy. (author).

  14. Light output of EJ228 scintillation neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L., E-mail: luca.stevanato@pd.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Hao, Xin [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    The light output of neutron detectors based on the plastic scintillator EJ228 is studied as a function of neutron energy using a time tagged {sup 252}Cf source. Calibration of the light output scale is performed by fitting the experimental distribution of Compton scattering events of photons from a {sup 22}Na source with a response function obtained by Gaussian smearing of the predicted line-shape. The light output curve as well as the pulse height resolution for the EJ228 scintillators is very close (within 5%) to those recently reported for NE213 type organic liquid scintillators.

  15. A new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Qi; Xie Zhong Shen; Cao Jin Yun; Niu Shen Gli; Ouyang Xia Opin

    2002-01-01

    A new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector has been developed. The detector consists of a bee-hive-shaped lead absorber, a scintillating fiber array, a light guide, a filter and a photomultiplier tube. The experimental results show that the new detector's neuron-to-gamma sensitivity ratio is improved about six times compared to traditional plastic scintillation detectors to 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1.25 MeV gamma rays. Hence, the detector should be very useful in the measurements of pulsed neutrons from fission reactions in a neutron-gamma mixed field.

  16. X-ray Scintillation in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Birowosuto, M. D.; Cortecchia, D.; Drozdowski, W.; K. Brylew; Łachmański, W.; A. Bruno; Soci, C.

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies for X-ray detection rely on scintillation from expensive inorganic crystals grown at high-temperature, which so far has hindered the development of large-area scintillator arrays. Thanks to the presence of heavy atoms, solution-grown hybrid lead halide perovskite single crystals exhibit short X-ray absorption length and excellent detection efficiency. Here we compare X-ray scintillator characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) MAPbI3 and MAPbBr3 and two-dimensional (2D) (...

  17. Scintillation yield of liquid xenon at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: ueshima@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Abe, K.; Iida, T.; Ikeda, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Minamino, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nakajima, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamashita, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kaneyuki, K. [Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Doke, T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8555 (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-09-01

    The intensity of scintillation light emission from liquid xenon at room temperature was measured. The scintillation light yield at 1{sup 0}C was measured to be 0.64{+-}0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.06 (sys.) of that at -100{sup 0}C. Using the reported light yield at -100{sup 0}C (46 photons/keV), the measured light yield at 1{sup 0}C corresponds to 29 photons/keV. This result shows that liquid xenon scintillator provides high light yield even at room temperature.

  18. Quenching of porous silicon photoluminescence by deposition of metal adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andsager, D.; Hilliard, J.; Hetrick, J.M.; AbuHassan, L.H.; Plisch, M.; Nayfeh, M.H. (Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Various metals were deposited on luminescent porous silicon (PS) by immersion in metal ion solutions and by evaporation. The photoluminescence (PL) was quenched upon immersion in ionic solutions of Cu, Ag, and Au but not noticeably quenched in other ionic solutions. Evaporation of 100 A of Cu or 110 A of Au was not observed to quench PL. Auger electron spectroscopy performed on samples quenched and then immediately removed from solution showed a metallic concentration in the PS layer of order 10 at.%, but persisting to a depth of order 3000 A.

  19. Luminescence Decay Times and Bimolecular Quenching: An Ultrafast Kinetics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the theory, apparatus, and procedure for an experiment that measures the bimolecular quenching constant for the deactivation of an excited ruthenium ion complex using dissolved oxygen. (MLH)

  20. Quench Analysis of the PANDA Target Spectrometer Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Deelen, Nikkie

    2014-01-01

    A quench analysis of the PANDA Target Solenoid has been performed. The characteristic time of the fast discharge is $12\\ \\text{s}$. The peak temperature and peak voltage during a quench are $30\\ \\text{K}$ and $160\\ \\text{V}$ respectively. During a quench the energy stored in the magnetic field is mostly dissipated in the dump resistor. The slow discharge of the PANDA solenoid takes approximately $1950\\ \\text{s}$ during which nearly all the energy is dissipated in the diodes of the quench protection circuit.

  1. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, J; Pang, S

    1997-04-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical charactcristics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quenchtr between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (K(sv); K(q),). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was observed in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB- was found to arise from an electron transfer from excited trytophan to HB.

  2. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐加昌; 庞素珍

    1997-01-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical characteris-tics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quencher between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (Ksv; Kq). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was ob-served in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB" was found to arise from an electron transfer from ex-cited trytophan to HB.

  3. Optimising Gas Quenching Technology through Modelling of Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florent Chaffotte; Linda L(e)fevre; Didier Domergue; Aymeric Goldsteinas; Xavier Doussot; Qingfei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Gas Quenching represents an environmentally friendly alternative to more commonly-used oil quenching. Yet,the performances of this technology remain limited in terms of cooling rates reached compared to oil quenching. Distortion and process homogeneity also have to be controlled carefully. The efficiency of the gas quenching process fully depends on the heat transfer between the gas and the quenched parts. The goal of this study is the optimisation of the gas quenching process efficiency through a better understanding of the heat transfer phenomena involved. The study has been performed with modelling means and validated by an experimental approach. The configuration of the gas flow has a major influence on the heat transfer phenomena between the gas and the parts. The fluid dynamics modelling approach performed in this study allows to optimise the heat transfer phenomena. New gas quenching processes allowing enhanced gas quenching performance through higher cooling rates can be thereby identified. The new solutions have been validated in experimental and industrial conditions. Results obtained allow to expect significant improvement of high pressure gas quenching technology.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Carburizing and Quenching of Gear Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The carburizing process of the gear ring was simulated by taking into account the practical carburizing and quenching techniques of the gear ring and by solving the diffusion equation. The carbon content distribution in the carburized layer was obtained. Based on the results, the quenching process of the gear ring was then simulated using the metallic thermodynamics and FEM; it was found that the carburization remarkably affects the quenching process.Microstructures and stress distributions of the gear ring in the quenching process were simulated, and the results are confirmed by experiments.

  5. Optimising Gas Quenching Technology through Modelling of Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FiorentChaffotte; LindaLefevre; DidierDomergue; AymericGoidsteinas; XavierDoussot; QingfeiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Gas Quenching represents an environmentally friendly alternative to more commonly-used oil quenching. Yet,the performances of this technology remain limited in terms of cooling rates reached compared to oil quenching. Distortion and process homogeneity also have to be controlled carefully. The efficiency of the gas quenching process fully depends on the heat transfer between the gas and the quenched parts. The goal of this study is the optimisation of the gas quenching process efficiency through a better understanding of the heat transfer phenomena involved. The study has been performed with modelling means and validated by an experimental approach. ThE configuration of the gas flow has a major influence on the heat transfer phenomena between the gas and the parts. The fluid dynamics modelling approach performed in this study allows to optimise the heat transfer phenomena. New gas quenching processes allowing enhanced gas quenching performance through higher cooling rates can be thereby identified. The new solutions have been validated in experimental and industrial conditions. Results obtained allow to expect significant improvement of high pressure gas quenching technology.

  6. Study Performance of Liquid Scintillation Fiber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yongpeng; Lu, Haoqi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Chengcai; Yang, Changgen

    2016-01-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) with optical fiber detector (LSOF detector) is a new type of detector, which has been applied in large-scale particle physics experiments in recent years. We were proposing LSOF detector as one option of top veto detector in Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. The prototype detector was located in laboratory of the institute of high energy physics (IHEP). From prototype study, we found that the detector have a good performance and can satisfy JUNO requirement. The detection efficiency of cosmic ray muon is greater than 98% and can collect 58 photon electrons (p.e.) when muon is going through the detector. Further more, the relationship between p.e., material reflectivity and LS depth are studied. We also compared the data with Monte Carlo simulation, and they have a good agreement with each other.

  7. Modelling of an IR scintillation counter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, M M F; Policarpo, Armando

    2000-01-01

    A systematic study of the excitation and de-excitation mechanisms in ternary gas mixtures Ar+CO sub 2 +N sub 2 is presented regarding the possibility of developing a proportional scintillation counter based on the detection of the infrared molecular emissions associated with the lowest vibrational states of molecules. The use of visible or near-infrared photons (lambda<1 mu m) for applications like imaging and quality control of microstructure detectors has been reported. In view of these applications we analyse the processes leading to near-infrared emissions in pure argon and give an estimation of the number of photons emitted per electron, at several pressures, as a function of the charge gain.

  8. Radon measurement using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Sohei (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.); Mifune, Masaki; Konishi, Masanobu; Shirai, Chiaki

    1992-12-01

    A convenient radon detecting device for the purpose of estimating natural radiation exposure is described. The [alpha] radioactivity of radon gas absorbed in fine active carbon particles exposed to air is measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer (Packard-PICO-RAD system). Its detection limits are 2mBq/l in air and 0.5 Bq/l in water with an accuracy of about 10 %. Radon concentrations at Misasa hot springs in Tottori prefecture were measured using this method. They were 0.16 [approx] 7.7 Bq/l in a bath room and 0.057 [approx] 0.36 Bq/l outdoors. Radon concentrations of the hot springs were 82 [approx] 1,700 Bq/l. (author).

  9. Bulk semiconducting scintillator device for radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2016-08-30

    A bulk semiconducting scintillator device, including: a Li-containing semiconductor compound of general composition Li-III-VI.sub.2, wherein III is a Group III element and VI is a Group VI element; wherein the Li-containing semiconductor compound is used in one or more of a first mode and a second mode, wherein: in the first mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to an electrical circuit under bias operable for measuring electron-hole pairs in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of neutrons and the Li-containing semiconductor compound is also coupled to current detection electronics operable for detecting a corresponding current in the Li-containing semiconductor compound; and, in the second mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to a photodetector operable for detecting photons generated in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of the neutrons.

  10. Properties of Yb:YAG scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, P; Bressi, G; Carugno, Giovanni; Santilli, P

    2002-01-01

    Relative light yield (LY) dependence on temperature for Yb:YAG crystals containing from 10% to 100% of Yb dopant is studied for gamma and alpha excitations. The maximum LY is achieved at 120 Kscintillation properties on concentration of Yb and purity is discussed.

  11. Sound and light from fractures in scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantot, A; Santucci, S; Ramos, O; Deschanel, S; Verdier, M-A; Mony, E; Wei, Y; Ciliberto, S; Vanel, L; Di Stefano, P C F

    2013-10-11

    Prompted by intriguing events observed in certain particle-physics searches for rare events, we study light and acoustic emission simultaneously in some inorganic scintillators subject to mechanical stress. We observe mechanoluminescence in Bi4Ge3O12, CdWO4, and ZnWO4, in various mechanical configurations at room temperature and ambient pressure. We analyze the temporal and amplitude correlations between the light emission and the acoustic emission during fracture. A novel application of the precise energy calibration of Bi4Ge3O12 provided by radioactive sources allows us to deduce that the fraction of elastic energy converted to light is at least 3×10(-5).

  12. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  13. Experimental methods for quenching structures in lunar-analog silicate melts: Variations as a function of quench media and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Compositions analogous to lunar green, organge, and brown glasses were synthesized under consistent conditions, then quenched into a variety of different media when the samples were removed from the furnace. Iron valence and coordination are a direct function of quench media used, spanning the range from brine/ice (most effective quench), water, butyl phthalate, silicone oil, liquid nitrogen, highly reducing CO-CO2 gas, to air (least efficient quench). In the green and brown glasses, Fe(3+) in four-fold and six-fold coordination is observed in the slowest-quenched samples; Fe(2+) coordination varies directly with quench efficiency. Less pronounced changes were observed in the Ti-rich orange glass. Therefore the remote-sensed spectrum of a glass-bearing regolith on the Moon may be influenced by the process by which the glass cooled, and extreme caution must be used when comparing spectra of synthetic glass analogs with real lunar glasses.

  14. Experimental methods for quenching structures in lunar-analog silicate melts - Variations as a function of quench media and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Compositions analogous to lunar green, orange, and brown glasses were synthesized under consistent conditions, then quenched into a variety of different media when the samples were removed from the furnace. Iron valence and coordination are a direct function of quench media used, spanning the range from brine/ice (most effective quench), water, butyl phthalate, silicone oil, liquid nitrogen, highly reducing CO-CO2 gas, to air (least efficient quench). In the green and brown glasses, Fe(3+) in four-fold and six-fold coordination is observed in the slowest-quenched samples; Fe(2+) coordination varies directly with quench efficiency. Less pronounced changes were observed in the Ti-rich orange glass. Therefore the remote-sensed spectrum of a glass-bearing regolith on the moon may be influenced by the process by which the glass cooled, and extreme caution must be used when comparing spectra of synthetic glass analogs with real lunar glasses.

  15. Luminescence and light yield of (Gd2Y)(Ga3Al2)O12:Pr3+ single crystal scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertloypanyachai, Prapon; Pathumrangsan, Nichakorn; Sreebunpeng, Krittiya; Pattanaboonmee, Nakarin; Chewpraditkul, Weerapong; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kamada, Kei; Nikl, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Praseodymium-doped (Gd2Y)(Ga3Al2)O12 (GYGAG: Pr) single crystals are grown by the micro-pulling down method with different Pr concentrations. The energy transfer process between Pr3+ and Gd3+ is investigated by photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectra measurements. Photoelectron yield measurements are carried out using photomultiplier. At 662 keV γ-rays, photoelectron yield of 2520 phe/MeV obtained for the GYGAG: Pr (0.01%) sample is larger than that of 1810 phe/MeV obtained for BGO crystal. Light yield degradation for the GYGAG: Pr scintillators is presumably due to the energy transfer from 5d state of Pr3+ to 4f state of Gd3+ together with the concentration quenching in the Gd3+-sublattice.

  16. Thermal quenching of Ce{sup 3+} emission in PrX{sub 3} (X = Cl, Br) by intervalence charge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birowosuto, M D [Radiation Detection and Matter, Department of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Dorenbos, P [Radiation Detection and Matter, Department of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Eijk, C W E van [Radiation Detection and Matter, Department of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Kraemer, K W [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, 3000 Bern 9 (Switzerland); Guedel, H U [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Freiestrasse 3, 3000 Bern 9 (Switzerland)

    2007-06-27

    The cause of the relatively low scintillation light yield of PrBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+} is investigated by means of optical spectroscopy, the temperature dependence of scintillation properties and the temperature dependence of optically excited decay curves of undoped and Ce{sup 3+}-doped PrCl{sub 3} and PrBr{sub 3}. The integrated intensity of x-ray excited luminescence of PrBr{sub 3}:5% Ce{sup 3+} shows that the light yield at room temperature (RT) is two times less than at 80 K. The decay time of Ce{sup 3+} emission optically excited to its 5d band in PrBr{sub 3}:5% Ce{sup 3+} has a single exponential decay of 11.0 {+-} 1.1 and 6.0 {+-} 0.6 ns at 10 K and RT, respectively. It is proposed that Ce{sup 3+} emission is quenched by a metal-to-metal charge transfer of Ce{sup 3+}+Pr{sup 3+}{yields}Ce{sup 4+}+Pr{sup 2+} followed by 4f {yields}4f emission of Pr{sup 3+} which is strongly concentration quenched.

  17. Production of the Large-area Plastic Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we prepared a plastic scintillator whose manufacturing process is simple and can be freely shaped. A thin plate of the plastic scintillator was manufactured using epoxy resin as a polymer. The plastic scintillator was made by mixing epoxy resin and organic scintillators under various conditions. The optimal mixture ratio to prepare the plastic scintillator was derived from the above results. Using the derived results, we made the large-area plastic scintillator which can quickly measure the contamination site and evaluated characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator in the laboratory. A thin plate of a plastic scintillator with a simple preparation process can be freely shaped using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as PPO and POPOP. PPO emits scintillation of light in the ultraviolet range, and POPOP is a wave shifter for moving the wavelength responsible for the PMT. The mixture ratio of PPO and POPOP was determined using their emission spectra. The optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in an organic scintillator was determined to be 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. Based on the above results, the large-area plastic scintillator of the window size of a typical pancake-type αβ surface contamination counter was prepared. We want to evaluate the characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. However, there were the difficulties in evaluating characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. The cross-sectional area of the large-area plastic scintillator is significantly different to PMT.

  18. A perturbative framework for jet quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna C; Wiedemann, Urs A

    2013-01-01

    We present a conceptually new framework for describing jet evolution in the dense medium produced in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions using perturbative QCD and its implementation into the Monte Carlo event generator JEWEL. The rescattering of hard partons in the medium is modelled by infrared continued pQCD matrix elements supplemented with parton showers. The latter approximate higher order real-emission matrix elements and thus generate medium-induced gluon emissions. The interplay between different emissions is governed by their formation times. The destructive interference between subsequent scattering processes, the non-Abelian version of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect, is also taken into account. In this way the complete radiation pattern is consistently treated in a uniform way. Results obtained within this minimal and theoretically well constrained framework are compared with a variety of experimental data susceptible to jet-quenching effects at both RHIC and the LHC. Overall, a go...

  19. Response functions after a quantum quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, Matteo; Gambassi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    The response of physical systems to external perturbations can be used to probe both their equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics. While response and correlation functions are related in equilibrium by fluctuation-dissipation theorems, out of equilibrium they provide complementary information on the dynamics. In the past years, a method has been devised to map the quantum dynamics of an isolated extended system after a quench onto a static theory with boundaries in imaginary time; up to now, however, the focus was entirely on symmetrized correlation functions. Here we provide a prescription which, in principle, allows one to retrieve the whole set of relevant dynamical quantities characterizing the evolution, including linear response functions. We illustrate this construction with some relevant examples, showing in the process the emergence of light-cone effects similar to those observed in correlation functions.

  20. How Cosmic Web Detachment Drives Galaxy Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We present the Cosmic Web Detachment (CWD) model, a conceptual framework to interpret galaxy evolution in a cosmological context, providing a direct link between the star formation history of galaxies and the cosmic web. The CWD model unifies several mechanism known to disrupt or stop star formation into one single physical process and provides a natural explanation for a wide range of galaxy properties. Galaxies begin accreting star-forming gas at early times via a network of primordial highly coherent filaments. The efficient star formation phase ends when non-linear interactions with other galaxies or elements of the cosmic web detach the galaxy from its network of primordial filaments, thus ending the efficient accretion of cold gas. The stripping of the filamentary web around galaxies is the physical process responsible of star formation quenching in gas stripping, harassment, strangulation and starvation. Being a purely gravitational/mechanical process CWD acts at a more fundamental level than internal ...

  1. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...... of these processes is, in general, thermally dependent, and leads either to enhancement or quenching of the luminescence with increasing temperature. Previous studies have measured the combined thermal activation characteristics of all three processes, and show a strong dependence on stimulation energy....... In this article, an initial attempt is made to isolate only the recombination part of the luminescence cycle, and determine its thermal characteristics separately. A Variety of luminescence transitions are examined in a range of both alkali and plagioclase feldspars; three distinct emission types are identified...

  2. Charmonium properties in hot quenched lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, H -T; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Satz, H; Soeldner, W

    2012-01-01

    We study the properties of charmonium states at finite temperature in quenched QCD on large and fine isotropic lattices. We perform a detailed analysis of charmonium correlation and spectral functions both below and above $T_c$. Our analysis suggests that both S wave states ($J/\\psi$ and $\\eta_c$) and P wave states ($\\chi_{c0}$ and $\\chi_{c1}$) disappear already at about $1.5 T_c$. The charm diffusion coefficient is estimated through the Kubo formula and found to be compatible with zero below $T_c$ and approximately $1/\\pi T$ at $1.5 T_c\\lesssim T\\lesssim 3 T_c$.

  3. Charmonium properties in hot quenched lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, H. -T.; Francis, A.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Satz, H.; Soeldner, W.

    2012-07-01

    We study the properties of charmonium states at finite temperature in quenched QCD on large and fine isotropic lattices. We perform a detailed analysis of charmonium correlation and spectral functions both below and above Tc. Our analysis suggests that both S wave states (J/ψ and ηc) and P wave states (χc0 and χc1) disappear already at about 1.5Tc. The charm diffusion coefficient is estimated through the Kubo formula and found to be compatible with zero below Tc and approximately 1/πT at 1.5Tc≲T≲3Tc.

  4. Thermal dilepton rates from quenched lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, H -T; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Mukherjee, S; Müller, M; Soeldner, W

    2013-01-01

    We present new lattice results on the continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function. Lattice calculations have been carried out in the deconfined phase at a temperature of 1.1 Tc, extending our previous results at 1.45 Tc, utilizing quenched non-perturbatively clover-improved Wilson fermions and light quark masses. A systematic analysis on multiple lattice spacings allows to perform the continuum limit of the correlation function and to extract spectral properties in the continuum limit. Our current analysis suggests the results for the electrical conductivity are proportional to the temperature and the thermal dilepton rates in the quark gluon plasma are comparable for both temperatures. Preliminary results of the continuum extrapolated correlation function at finite momenta, which relates to thermal photon rates, are also presented.

  5. Quenching Simulation of PM Coated Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AxelHoftert; WernerTheisen; ChristophBroeckmann

    2004-01-01

    HIP cladding is a powder metallurgical coating technique used in the production of wear parts and tools. In many cases the composite components consist of carbide-free hot-work steel as base material and wear resistant carbide-rich PM cold-work steel as coating material. To ensure operativeness a heat tleatment matched to the substrate and coating material is required. Dissimilar phase tlansformation behaviour and different thermal expansion coefficients of layer and substrate entail inner stresses affecting the tlansformation kinetics in tam. In order to get a deeper insight into these effects Finite Element simulation tools are used. On the one hand, the tlansient heat conduction problem of the quenching process has to be solved. Non-linear boundary conditions and phase transformation of both, substrate and layer are considered. On the other hand, the mechanical response is calculated. The overall aim of the investigation is an improvement of common heat treatment techniques used for HIP cladded wear parts.

  6. Quenching Simulation of PM Coated Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Axel H(o)fter; Werner Theisen; Christoph Broeckmann

    2004-01-01

    HIP cladding is a powder metallurgical coating technique used in the production of wear parts and tools. In many cases the composite components consist of carbide-free hot-work steel as base material and wear resistant carbide-rich PM cold-work steel as coating material. To ensure operativeness a heat treatment matched to the substrate and coating material is required. Dissimilar phase transformation behaviour and different thermal expansion coefficients of layer and substrate entail inner stresses affecting the transformation kinetics in turn. In order to get a deeper insight into these effects Finite Element simulation tools are used. On the one hand, the transient heat conduction problem of the quenching process has to be solved. Non-linear boundary conditions and phase transformation of both, substrate and layer are considered. On the other hand, the mechanical response is calculated. The overall aim of the investigation is an improvement of common heat treatment techniques used for HIP cladded wear parts.

  7. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in quenched carburized steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Campos, M F; Santos, R; Da Silva, F S; Lins, J F C [PUVR- Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av dos Trabalhadores 420, Vila Santa Cecilia, Volta Redonda, RJ, 27255-125 (Brazil); Franco, F A; Ribeiro, S B; Padovese, L R, E-mail: mcampos@metal.eeimvr.uff.br, E-mail: mfdcampo@uol.com.br [Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-06

    Steels with different carbon content, 0.11%C and 0.48%C were submitted to a heat treatment for carburization in the surface. The samples were analyzed after several types of heat treatment, including quenching for producing martensite. The Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) is directly related to the microstructure. Samples with lower carbon content, have ferrite, a constituent where domain walls can move freely and present higher amplitude in the envelope of MBN. It is also found that the MBN peaks are quite distinct for the samples with martensite, which have lower permeability, and the results suggest that domain rotation contributes as mechanism for reversal of magnetization in martensite. The results also indicate that MBN is very suitable for monitoring the carburizing heat treatment.

  8. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in quenched carburized steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, M. F.; Franco, F. A.; Santos, R.; da Silva, F. S.; Ribeiro, S. B.; Lins, J. F. C.; Padovese, L. R.

    2011-07-01

    Steels with different carbon content, 0.11%C and 0.48%C were submitted to a heat treatment for carburization in the surface. The samples were analyzed after several types of heat treatment, including quenching for producing martensite. The Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) is directly related to the microstructure. Samples with lower carbon content, have ferrite, a constituent where domain walls can move freely and present higher amplitude in the envelope of MBN. It is also found that the MBN peaks are quite distinct for the samples with martensite, which have lower permeability, and the results suggest that domain rotation contributes as mechanism for reversal of magnetization in martensite. The results also indicate that MBN is very suitable for monitoring the carburizing heat treatment.

  9. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  10. Thermal quenching of fluorescence in condensed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Miguel; Paredes, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    Environmental factors strongly affect the features of the electromagnetic spectra of fluorescent compounds hosted by material media. The shape of the absorption and emission peaks, their characteristic asymmetry and breadth, the Stokes shift and quantum yield are generally temperature dependent and heavily influenced by both the local and extended physical properties of the medium. The theoretical method used before to obtain the lineshape function is extended here to other terms of the interaction energy between the optically sensitive orbital and the hosting medium, which become significant when the spectral feature is broad. An analytical expression for the temperature dependent decay rate by non-radiative processes is obtained by this way. Comparison with experiment on thermal quenching gives agreement within the experimental uncertainty. The solvent polarity, its protic or aprotic character, hydrogen bonds, proximity effects and presence of quenchers are expected to enter through the coupling constants of the corresponding energy terms.

  11. Orientifold Planar Equivalence: The Quenched Meson Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    A numerical study of Orientifold Planar Equivalence is performed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories for N=2,3,4,6. Quenched meson masses are extracted in the antisymmetric, symmetric and adjoint representations for the pseudoscalar and vector channels. An extrapolation of the vector mass as a function of the pseudoscalar mass to the large-N limit shows that the numerical results agree within errors for the three theories, as predicted by Orientifold Planar Equivalence. As a byproduct of the extrapolation, the size of the corrections up to O(1/N^3) are evaluated. A crucial prerequisite for the extrapolation is the determination of an analytical relationship between the corrections in the symmetric and in the antisymmetric representations, order by order in a 1/N expansion.

  12. Quenched mesonic spectrum at large N

    CERN Document Server

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We compute the masses of the $\\pi$ and of the $\\rho$ mesons in the quenched approximation on a lattice with fixed lattice spacing $a \\simeq 0.145 \\ \\mathrm{fm}$ for SU($N$) gauge theory with $N = 2,3,4,6$. We find that a simple linear expression in $1/N^2$ correctly captures the features of the lowest-lying meson states at those values of $N$. This enables us to extrapolate to $N = \\infty$ the behaviour of $m_{\\pi}$ as a function of the quark mass and of $m_{\\rho}$ as a function of $m_{\\pi}$. Our results for the latter agree within 5% with recent predictions obtained in the AdS/CFT framework.

  13. Inorganic Scintillators for Detector Systems Physical Principles and Crystal Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068219; Gektin, Alexander; Korzhik, Mikhail; Pédrini, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The development of new scintillators as components of modern detector systems is increasingly defined by the end user's needs. This book provides an introduction to this emerging topic at the interface of physics and materials sciences, with emphasis on bulk inorganic scintillators. After surveying the end user's needs in a vast range of applications, ranging from astrophysics to industrial R & D, the authors move on to review scintillating mechanisms and the properties of the most important materials used. A chapter on crystal engineering and examples of recent developments in the field of high-energy physics and medical imaging introduce the reader to the practical aspects. This book will benefit researchers and scientists working in academic and industrial R & D related to the development of scintillators.

  14. Broadband Meter-Wavelength Observations of Ionospheric Scintillation

    CERN Document Server

    Fallows, R A; McKay, D; Vierinen, J; Virtanen, I I; Postila, M; Ulich, Th; Enell, C-F; Kero, A; Iinatti, T; Lehtinen, M; Orispää, M; Raita, T; Roininen, L; Turunen, E; Brentjens, M; Ebbendorf, N; Gerbers, M; Grit, T; Gruppen, P; Meulman, H; Norden, M; de Reijer, J-P; Schoenmakers, A; Stuurwold, K

    2015-01-01

    Intensity scintillations of cosmic radio sources are used to study astrophysical plasmas like the ionosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium. Normally these observations are relatively narrow band. With Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) technology at the Kilpisj\\"arvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) station in northern Finland we have observed scintillations over a 3 octave bandwidth. ``Parabolic arcs'', which were discovered in interstellar scintillations of pulsars, can provide precise estimates of the distance and velocity of the scattering plasma. Here we report the first observations of such arcs in the ionosphere and the first broad-band observations of arcs anywhere, raising hopes that study of the phenomenon may similarly improve the analysis of ionospheric scintillations. These observations were made of the strong natural radio source Cygnus-A and covered the entire 30-250\\,MHz band of KAIRA. Well-defined parabolic arcs were seen early in the observations, before transit, and disapp...

  15. Improved Scintillator Materials For Compact Electron Antineutrino Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter; Wortche, Heinrich J.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments provide new components holding the potential to improve the performance of liquid scintillation electron antineutrino detectors used as nuclear reactors monitors. Current systems raise issues regarding size, quantum efficiency, stability, and spatial resolution of the vertex dete

  16. Scintillation Velocity of PSR B0329+54

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. X. Zhou; N. Wang; Z. Y. Liu; X. Liu

    2011-03-01

    We monitored PSR B0329+54 for one year using the Nanshan 25-m radio telescope, the scintillation velocity VISS shows evidence of systematic variation with the day of the year. States of interstellar medium (ISM) are discussed.

  17. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  18. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  19. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Stoykov, A; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the "lens light guide" is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3K is demonstrated.

  20. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O' Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  1. Subnanosecond scintillation detector for high energy cosmic rays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task objective is to develop a gamma ray scintillator technology with subnanosecond temporal resolution and the capability to withstand unprecedented rates and...

  2. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... used regular scintillators with similar resolution an efficiency increase by a factor 4 has been found for the structured scintillator....

  3. Radio Scintillation due to Discontinuities in the Interstellar Plasma Density

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, H; Lambert, Hendrik; Rickett, Barney

    1999-01-01

    We develop the theory of interstellar scintillation as caused by an irregular plasma having a power-law spatial density spectrum with a spectral exponent of 4 corresponding to a medium with abrupt changes in its density. An ``outer scale'' is included in the model representing the typical scale over which the density of the medium remains uniform. Such a spectrum could be used to model plasma shock fronts in supernova remnants or other plasma discontinuities. We investigate and develop equations for the decorrelation bandwidth of diffractive scintillations and the refractive scintillation index and compare our results with pulsar measurements. We consider both a medium concentrated in a thin layer and an extended irregular medium. We conclude that the discontinuity model gives satisfactory agreement for many diffractive measurements, in particular the VLBI meaurements of the structure function exponent between 5/3 and 2. However, it gives less satisfactory agreement for the refractive scintillation index than...

  4. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  5. Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, Arno Richard

    A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

  6. The response of a BGO scintillator to relativistic heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Matsufuji, N; Komami, H; Kohno, T

    1999-01-01

    The response of a BGO scintillator to He, C, Ne, Si and Ar ions has been studied at incident energies from 120 MeV up to 18 GeV for the first time. The energy of incident beam was changed by inserting an absorber of various thicknesses made of PMMA plates. The primary particles were identified and separated from projectile fragments by using the DELTA E-E counter telescope method. A thin NE102A plastic scintillator and a BGO scintillator were used as a DELTA E counter and a residual E detector, respectively. The energy of the primary particles was deduced by comparing the depth-dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber to those by a theoretical calculation. The light output of the BGO scintillator was found to be linear in this energy region. The dependency of the light output on the particle species was well indexed as a function of log (AZ sup 2).

  7. Search of new scintillation materials for nuclear medicine application

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, M V

    2000-01-01

    Oxide crystals have a great potential to develop new advanced scintillation materials which are dense, fast, and bright. This combination of parameters, when combined to affordable price, gives a prospect for materials to be applied in nuclear medicine devices. Some of them have been developed for the last two decades along the line of rear-earth (RE) garnet (RE/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/) oxiorthosilicate (RE/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/) and perovskite (REAlO/sub 3/) crystals doped with Ce ions. Among recently developed oxide materials the lead tungstate scintillator (PWO) becomes the most used scintillation material in high energy physics experiments due to its application in CMS and ALICE experiments at LHC. In this paper we discuss scintillation properties of some new heavy compounds doped with Ce as well as light yield improvement of PWO crystals to apply them in low energy physics and nuclear medicine. (18 refs).

  8. Large liquid-scintillator trackers for neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L; D'Ambrosio, N; Déclais, Y; Dupraz, J P; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Fanti, V; Forton, E; Frekers, D; Frenkel, A; Girerd, C; Golovkin, S V; Grégoire, G; Harrison, K; Jonkmans, G; Jonsson, P; Katsanevas, S; Kreslo, I; Marteau, J; Martellotti, G; Martínez, S; Medvedkov, A M; Moret, G; Niwa, K; Novikov, V; Van Beek, G; Penso, G; Vasilchenko, V G; Vuilleumier, J L; Wilquet, G; Zucchelli, P; Kreslo, I E

    2002-01-01

    Results are given on tests of large particle trackers for the detection of neutrino interactions in long-baseline experiments. Module prototypes have been assembled using TiO$_2$-doped polycarbonate panels. These were subdivided into cells of $\\sim 1$~cm$^2$ cross section and 6~m length, filled with liquid scintillator. A wavelength-shifting fibre inserted in each cell captured a part of the scintillation light emitted when a cell was traversed by an ionizing particle. Two different fibre-readout systems have been tested: an optoelectronic chain comprising an image intensifier and an Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD); and a hybrid photodiode~(HPD). New, low-cost liquid scintillators have been investigated for applications in large underground detectors. Testbeam studies have been performed using a commercially available liquid scintillator. The number of detected photoelectrons for minimum-ionizing particles crossing a module at different distances from the fibre readout end was 6 to 12 with the EBCCD chain and ...

  9. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoykov, A; Scheuermann, R; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K, E-mail: alexey.stoykov@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8 mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1 mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the 'lens light guide' is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3 K is demonstrated.

  10. Experimental efforts and results in finding new heavy scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1992-09-01

    New heavy scintillators are being discovered with increasing frequency. In recent years NaI(Tl) (with its high light output and energy resolution) has been joined by BGO (with its high stopping power), BaF{sub 2} (with its excellent timing resolution), and CeF{sub 3} (with its speed and short Moliere radius). More than 10 potentially useful scintillators have been under development in the past five years, such as PbSO{sub 4} and Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce). We tabulate the characteristics of these and other scintillators, including wavelength, luminous efficiency, decay time, and initial intensity. We describe a search strategy and the prospects for finding the ``ideal`` heavy scintillator, which would combine the light output of NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl), the stopping power of BGO, and the speed of BaF{sub 2} and ZnO(Ga).

  11. Rational design of binary halide scintillators via data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Chang Sun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States)

    2012-07-11

    We introduce a new search strategy for the development of novel inorganic scintillators. For designing new scintillation host media having the improved properties, the potential candidate materials were chosen by using a chemical selection scheme based on a multi-dimensional similarity metric. For the quantitative assessment of the chosen materials, predictive models based on informatics were built by correlating a set of key parameters which reflect the features of the host materials with the performance of inorganic scintillators. The resulting design rules generated from the relationships serve as a guide to identify HfI{sub 4} and TaI{sub 5} as two new host lattices with high light yield. The method we have outlined here serves as a new computational template based statistical learning method to search for new inorganic scintillators with targeted properties.

  12. Light pulses to photomultiplier tubes from extended scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albergo, S. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Boemi, D. [CSFNeSM, I-95129 Catania (Italy); Caccia, Z. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Costa, S. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Insolia, A. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Panebianco, S. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Potenza, R. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Randazzo, N. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Reito, S. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Romanski, J. [The Svedberg Laboratory, University of Uppsala, S751-21 Uppsala (Sweden); Russo, G.V. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Tuve, C. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1995-08-15

    Light pulses seen by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) after propagation within long scintillator slats or rods, or large disc-shaped scintillators are investigated and compared with those from point-like scintillators. Results of experimental tests for the disc-shaped configuration, performed with the single photon counting technique, are presented and compared with numerical calculations. These calculations were performed describing the light pulse shape by means of a new, quite general analytical method based on the geometrical optics concepts of virtual light paths and images. The associated electric pulses produced by the PMTs coupled to the scintillators are then discussed with particular emphasis on their dependence on the distance between light source and photocathode. (orig.).

  13. Reactor Neutrino Experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, J F; Merle, A; Rolinec, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss several new ideas for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector. We consider two different scenarios for a measurement of the small mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a mobile $\\bar{\

  14. Fine grained electromagnetic lead-liquid scintillator calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, L.; Fluri, L.; Perrin, D.; Vuilleumier, J.M. (Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland)); Bonesini, M.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Tamborini, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy))

    1983-02-15

    A new technique using liquid scintillator contained in teflon tubes to build a low cost high spatial resolution electromagnetic sampling calorimeter is described. Test results and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation are presented.

  15. Fast scintillation counters for the D0 muon system upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V. [and others

    1999-08-01

    The design and main parameters of the completely redesigned D0 Forward Angle Muon System (FAMUS: 1.0 < {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} < 2.0) for the next high luminosity Tevatron Collider run are reported. Results of the studies of trigger scintillation counters based on fast scintillator Bicron 404A and WLS bars SOFZ-105 are presented. The authors report about results of test beam studies of prototype counters including minimum ionizing particles detection efficiency, time resolution and amplitude response. Radiation ageing of scintillating materials for the doses up to 1 Mrad, phototubes magnetic shielding in the fields of up to 700 G and ageing of phototubes are presented. All tests show robustness of scintillation counters as triggering detector of the new muon system for a long period.

  16. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  17. Research to Operations of Ionospheric Scintillation Detection and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Scro, K.; Payne, D.; Ruhge, R.; Erickson, B.; Andorka, S.; Ludwig, C.; Karmann, J.; Ebelhar, D.

    Ionospheric Scintillation refers to random fluctuations in phase and amplitude of electromagnetic waves caused by a rapidly varying refractive index due to turbulent features in the ionosphere. Scintillation of transionospheric UHF and L-Band radio frequency signals is particularly troublesome since this phenomenon can lead to degradation of signal strength and integrity that can negatively impact satellite communications and navigation, radar, or radio signals from other systems that traverse or interact with the ionosphere. Although ionospheric scintillation occurs in both the equatorial and polar regions of the Earth, the focus of this modeling effort is on equatorial scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation model is data-driven in a sense that scintillation observations are used to perform detection and characterization of scintillation structures. These structures are then propagated to future times using drift and decay models to represent the natural evolution of ionospheric scintillation. The impact on radio signals is also determined by the model and represented in graphical format to the user. A frequency scaling algorithm allows for impact analysis on frequencies other than the observation frequencies. The project began with lab-grade software and through a tailored Agile development process, deployed operational-grade code to a DoD operational center. The Agile development process promotes adaptive promote adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, regular collaboration with the customer, and encourage rapid and flexible response to customer-driven changes. The Agile philosophy values individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to change over following a rigid plan. The end result was an operational capability that met customer expectations. Details of the model and the process of

  18. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周爱芝; 吴鑫基; 艾力·伊沙木丁

    2003-01-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys.J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  19. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Wallny, R

    2014-01-01

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy. 2012 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record

  20. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Wallny, R

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.

  1. Continuing Studies on Lead/Scintillating Fibres Calorimetry (LFC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Starting from the results obtained in the framework of the LAA Project~2B, we propose a continuation of the R&D on lead/scintillating fibres calorimetry (``spaghetti calorimetry''), including further tests on the old calorimeter prototypes and the construction and testing of new prototypes. The main results we pursue concern the performances of a projective calorimeter built with new, cheaper, techniques and the radiation hardness of the scintillating fibres, the optimization of a preshower detector system is also studied.

  2. Scintillation of liquid neon from electronic and nuclear recoils

    CERN Document Server

    Nikkel, J A; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the time dependence of scintillation light from electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid neon, finding a slow time constant of 15.4+-0.2 us. Pulse shape discrimination is investigated as a means of identifying event type in liquid neon. Finally, the nuclear recoil scintillation efficiency is measured to be 0.26+-0.03 for 387 keV nuclear recoils.

  3. Secondary scintillation in Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Beschi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In order to build a optical time projection chamber that can be used as a tracking detector, it is necessary to study the scintillation proprieties of gases in order to optimize the light emission. A detailed study of the scintillation of Ar-CF$_4$ mixtures at different concentrations has been performed to study the light emission of the gas in a triple GEM detector.

  4. Li-containing scintillating bolometers for low background physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattavina, L

    2013-01-01

    We present the performances of Li-based compounds used as scintillating bolometer for rare decay studies such as double-beta decay and direct dark matter investigations. The compounds are tested in a dilution refrigerator installed in the underground laboratory of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). Low temperature scintillating properties are investigated by means of different radioactive sources, and the radio-purity level for internal contaminations are estimated for possible employment for next generation experiments.

  5. Lanthanum halide nanoparticle scintillators for nuclear radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, Paul; Guise, Ronald [Remote Sensing Laboratory, P.O. Box 98521, M/S RSL-48, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Yuan Ding [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, P.O. Box 809, M/S LAO/C320, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews, Building 1783, Arnold Avenue Andrews AFB, Maryland 20762 (United States); O' Brien, Robert; Lowe, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Kang Zhitao; Menkara, Hisham [Georgia Tech Research Institute, 925 Dalney St., Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Nagarkar, Vivek V. [RMD, Inc., 44 Hunt Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472 (United States)

    2013-02-14

    Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum trifluoride. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

  6. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létant, S E; Wang, T-F

    2006-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma irradiation and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of americium-241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon-transport models.

  7. Scintillation of thin tetraphenyl butadiene films under alpha particle excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollmann, Tina, E-mail: tina@owl.phy.queensu.c [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Boulay, Mark; Kuzniak, Marcin [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics, and Astronomy, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2011-04-11

    The alpha induced scintillation of the wavelength shifter 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB) was studied to improve the understanding of possible surface alpha backgrounds in the DEAP dark matter search experiment. We found that vacuum deposited thin TPB films emit 882{+-}210 photons per MeV under alpha particle excitation. The scintillation pulse shape consists of a double exponential decay with lifetimes of 11{+-}5 and 275{+-}10ns.

  8. Li-containing scintillating bolometers for low background physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattavina L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the performances of Li-based compounds used as scintillating bolometer for rare decay studies such as double-beta decay and direct dark matter investigations. The compounds are tested in a dilution refrigerator installed in the underground laboratory of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy. Low temperature scintillating properties are investigated by means of different radioactive sources, and the radio-purity level for internal contaminations are estimated for possible employment for next generation experiments.

  9. Structural Origins of Scintillation: Metal Organic Frameworks as a Nanolaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    orientation of scintillating groups has a direct effect upon the observed spectral and timing characteristics. A 2-dimensional layered MOF based...states and to elucidate the factors that contribute to favorable scintillation properties such as high luminosity, low self-absorption, and fast timing ...exhibit wavelength-dependent emission characteristics, longer emission decay time constants, and radioluminescence spectra that are red-shifted relative to

  10. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrodán Undagoitia, T; von Feilitzsch, F; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Ulrich, A; Winter, J; Wurm, M

    2009-04-01

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p-->K(+)nu is evaluated in this work.

  11. A Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter with krypton filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mano, R. D. P.; Barata, E. C. G. M.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Freitas, E. D. C.

    2016-12-01

    A Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter filled with pure krypton was studied. Energy resolution below 10% for 5.9-keV X-rays was obtained with this prototype. This value is much better than the energy resolution obtained with proportional counters or other MPGDs with krypton filling. The krypton electroluminescence scintillation and ionisation thresholds were found to be about 0.5 and 3.5 kV cm-1bar-1, respectively.

  12. Scintillation properties of rare-earth doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuro, Tomoaki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-12-01

    We systematically investigated photoluminescence (PL), scintillation and dosimeter properties of rare-earth (RE) doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 (NAP) glasses. The NAP glasses doped with a series of RE ions (La-Yb, except Pm) with a consistent concentration (0.3 wt%) were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The PL and scintillation decay time profiles showed fast (ns) and slow (μs or ms) components: the fast components from 15 to 100 ns were due to the host or 5d-4f transition emission, and the slow components from 15 μs to 5 ms were due to the 4f-4f transitions of RE. The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) was evaluated as a dosimeter property, and glow peaks appeared around 400 °C in all the samples. The TSL dose response function was examined in the dose range from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. Among the samples tested, Nd and Tb doped glasses showed higher signal by at least one order of magnitude than those of non-doped and other RE-doped samples. Over the dose range tested, the TSL signals are linearly related with the incident X-ray dose, showing a potential for practical applications.

  13. Stability and quench development study in small HTSC magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyin, Yu. A.; Vysotski, V.S.; Kiss, T.; Takeo, M.; Okamoto, H.; Irie, F.

    2001-01-01

    Stability and quench development in a HTSC magnet have been experimentally studied with the transport current in the magnet being below or above the “thermal quench current” level. The magnet was tested at both cryocooler cooling and liquid nitrogen cooling, with and without background magnetic fiel

  14. The quenched generating functional for hadronic weak interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallante, E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultraviolet behaviour of the generating functional for hadronic weak interactions with |ΔS| = 1, 2 is investigated to one loop for a generic number of flavours and in the quenched approximation. New quenched chiral logarithms generated by the weak interactions can be accounted for via a redefin

  15. Stability and quench development study in small HTSC magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyin, Y.; Vysotski, V.S.; Kiss, T.; Takeo, M.; Okamoto, H.; Irie, F.

    2001-01-01

    Stability and quench development in a HTSC magnet have been experimentally studied with the transport current in the magnet being below or above the “thermal quench current” level. The magnet was tested at both cryocooler cooling and liquid nitrogen cooling, with and without background magnetic

  16. QUENCHING PROBLEMS OF DEGENERATE FUNCTIONAL REACTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the quenching problem of a degenerate functional reaction-diffusion equation. The quenching problem and global existence of solution for the reaction-diffusion equation are derived and, some results of the positive steady state solutions for functional elliptic boundary value are also presented.

  17. Quenched transmission of light through ultrathin metal films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2011-01-01

    We discuss optical properties of ultrathin metal films, with particular attention to the phenomenon of quenched transmission. Transmission of light through an optically ultrathin metal film with a thickness comparable to its skin depth is significant. We demonstrate the quenched transmission thro...

  18. Chiral and continuum extrapolation of partially quenched lattice results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Allton; W. Armour; D.B. Leinweber; A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-04-01

    The vector meson mass is extracted from a large sample of partially quenched, two-flavor lattice QCD simulations. For the first time, discretization, finite-volume and partial quenching artifacts are treated in a unified chiral effective field theory analysis of the lattice simulation results.

  19. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  20. An instrument for measuring scintillators efficiently based on silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M J; Zhang, Z M; Wang, Y J; Li, D W; Zhou, W; Tang, H H; Liu, Y T; Chai, P; Shuai, L; Huang, X C; Liu, S Q; Zhu, M L; Jiang, X P; Zhang, Y W; Li, T; Ma, B; Sun, S F; Sun, L Y; Wang, Q; Lu, Z R; Zhang, T; Wei, L

    2016-11-01

    An instrument used for measuring multiple scintillators' light output and energy resolution was developed. The instrument consisted of a light sensor array which was composed of 64 discrete SiPMs (Silicon Photomultipliers), a corresponding individual channel readout electronics system, and a data processing algorithm. A Teflon grid and a large interval between adjacent SiPMs were employed to eliminate the optical cross talk among scintillators. The scintillators' light output was obtained by comparing with a reference sample with known light output. Given the SiPM temperature dependency and the difference among each SiPM, a temperature offset correction algorithm and a non-uniformity correction algorithm were added to the instrument. A positioning algorithm, based on nine points, was designed to evaluate the performance of a scintillator array. Tests were performed to evaluate the instrument's performance. The uniformity of 64 channels for light output measurement was better than 98%, the stability was better than 98% when temperature varied from 15 °C to 40 °C, and the nonlinearity under 511 keV was better than 2%. This instrument was capable of selecting scintillators and evaluating the packaging technology of scintillator arrays with high efficiency and accuracy.

  1. Stimulated scintillation emission depletion X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, M S; Patton, G; Dujardin, C; Douissard, P-A; Lebugle, M; Novotny, L; Stampanoni, M

    2017-01-23

    X-ray microtomography is a widely applied tool for noninvasive structure investigations. The related detectors are usually based on a scintillator screen for the fast in situ conversion of an X-ray image into an optical image. Spatial resolution of the latter is fundamentally diffraction limited. In this work, we introduce stimulated scintillation emission depletion (SSED) X-ray imaging where, similar to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a depletion beam is applied to the scintillator screen to overcome the diffraction limit. The requirements for the X-ray source, the X-ray flux, the scintillator screen, and the STED beam were evaluated. Fundamental spatial resolution limits due to the spread of absorbed X-ray energy were estimated with Monte Carlo simulations. The SSED proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated 1) depletion of X-ray excited scintillation, 2) partial confinement of scintillating regions to sub-diffraction sized volumes, and 3) improvement of the imaging contrast by applying SSED.

  2. An instrument for measuring scintillators efficiently based on silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M. J.; Zhang, Z. M.; Wang, Y. J.; Li, D. W.; Zhou, W.; Tang, H. H.; Liu, Y. T.; Chai, P.; Shuai, L.; Huang, X. C.; Liu, S. Q.; Zhu, M. L.; Jiang, X. P.; Zhang, Y. W.; Li, T.; Ma, B.; Sun, S. F.; Sun, L. Y.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Z. R.; Zhang, T.; Wei, L.

    2016-11-01

    An instrument used for measuring multiple scintillators' light output and energy resolution was developed. The instrument consisted of a light sensor array which was composed of 64 discrete SiPMs (Silicon Photomultipliers), a corresponding individual channel readout electronics system, and a data processing algorithm. A Teflon grid and a large interval between adjacent SiPMs were employed to eliminate the optical cross talk among scintillators. The scintillators' light output was obtained by comparing with a reference sample with known light output. Given the SiPM temperature dependency and the difference among each SiPM, a temperature offset correction algorithm and a non-uniformity correction algorithm were added to the instrument. A positioning algorithm, based on nine points, was designed to evaluate the performance of a scintillator array. Tests were performed to evaluate the instrument's performance. The uniformity of 64 channels for light output measurement was better than 98%, the stability was better than 98% when temperature varied from 15 °C to 40 °C, and the nonlinearity under 511 keV was better than 2%. This instrument was capable of selecting scintillators and evaluating the packaging technology of scintillator arrays with high efficiency and accuracy.

  3. Characteristics of Plastic Scintillators Fabricated by a Polymerization Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Ho Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three plastic scintillators of 4.5 cm diameter and 2.5-cm length were fabricated for comparison with commercial plastic scintillators using polymerization of the styrene monomer 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO and 1,4-bis benzene (POPOP. Their maximum emission wavelengths were determined at 426.06 nm, 426.06 nm, and 425.00 nm with a standard error of 0.2% using a Varian spectrophotometer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA. Compton edge spectra were measured using three gamma ray sources [i.e., cesium 137 (137Cs, sodium 22 (22Na, and cobalt 60 (60Co]. Energy was calibrated by analyzing the Compton edge spectra. The fabricated scintillators possessed more than 99.7% energy linearity. Light output was comparable to that of the BC-408 scintillator (Saint-Gobain, Paris, France. The fabricated scintillators showed a light output of approximately 59–64% of that of the BC-408 scintillator.

  4. A multipurpose test stand for scintillator decay lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Tymothy; P-23, Neutron Science; Technology Team

    2016-09-01

    We built a prototype test stand in order to measure novel scintillator materials' decay lifetimes. Radiography and imaging are valuable diagnostic tools for studying dynamic experiments, thus new scintillator materials are needed to improve the resolution of the current observational systems. A collaborative effort by the neutron imaging and x-ray radiography teams is underway to study the novel scintillator materials developed at LANL and by outside collaborators. Decay lifetimes are an important characteristic of a scintillator material and so by developing this prototype we have provided an avenue to further scintillator development. We confirmed the effectiveness of this prototype by comparing known scintillator decay lifetimes of LYSO and polystyrene samples. In our proof-of-concept prototype we use an 80 Gs/s oscilloscope. With future implementation of a fully developed test stand, we will use a digital data acquisition system to record complete waveforms to conduct a post-processing analysis of the decay times. Results of the prototype test and potential improvements to final test stand design will be presented. LA-UR-16-25229 Los Alamos National Lab, Physics Division.

  5. Chiral Loops and Ghost States in the Quenched Scalar Propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Bardeen; A. Duncan; E. Eichten; N. Isgur; H. Thacker

    2001-06-01

    The scalar, isovector meson propagator is analyzed in quenched QCD, using the MQA pole-shifting ansatz to study the chiral limit. In addition to the expected short-range exponential falloff characteristic of a heavy scalar meson, the propagator also exhibits a longer-range, negative metric contribution which becomes pronounced for smaller quark masses. We show that this is a quenched chiral loop effect associated with the anomalous structure of the eta' propagator in quenched QCD. Both the time dependence and the quark mass dependence of this effect are well-described by a chiral loop diagram corresponding to an eta'-pi intermediate state, which is light and effectively of negative norm in the quenched approximation. The relevant parameters of the effective Lagrangian describing the scalar sector of the quenched theory are determined.

  6. Dynamics of Holographic Entanglement Entropy Following a Local Quench

    CERN Document Server

    Rangamani, Mukund; Vincart-Emard, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the behaviour of holographic entanglement entropy following a local quench in 2+1 dimensional strongly coupled CFTs. The entanglement generated by the quench propagates along an emergent light-cone, reminiscent of the Lieb-Robinson light-cone propagation of correlations in non-relativistic systems. We find the the speed of propagation is bounded from below by the entanglement tsunami velocity obtained earlier for global quenches in holographic systems, and from above by the speed of light. The former is realized for sufficiently broad quenches, while the latter pertains for well localized quenches. The non-universal behavior in the intermediate regime appears to stem from finite-size effects. We also note that the entanglement entropy of subsystems reverts to the equilibrium value exponentially fast, in contrast to a much slower equilibration seen in certain spin models.

  7. ITER Side Correction Coil Quench model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Gauthier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-12-01

    Previous thermohydraulic studies performed for the ITER TF, CS and PF magnet systems have brought some important information on the detection and consequences of a quench as a function of the initial conditions (deposited energy, heated length). Even if the temperature margin of the Correction Coils is high, their behavior during a quench should also be studied since a quench is likely to be triggered by potential anomalies in joints, ground fault on the instrumentation wires, etc. A model has been developed with the SuperMagnet Code (Bagnasco et al., 2010) for a Side Correction Coil (SCC2) with four pancakes cooled in parallel, each of them represented by a Thea module (with the proper Cable In Conduit Conductor characteristics). All the other coils of the PF cooling loop are hydraulically connected in parallel (top/bottom correction coils and six Poloidal Field Coils) are modeled by Flower modules with equivalent hydraulics properties. The model and the analysis results are presented for five quench initiation cases with/without fast discharge: two quenches initiated by a heat input to the innermost turn of one pancake (case 1 and case 2) and two other quenches initiated at the innermost turns of four pancakes (case 3 and case 4). In the 5th case, the quench is initiated at the middle turn of one pancake. The impact on the cooling circuit, e.g. the exceedance of the opening pressure of the quench relief valves, is detailed in case of an undetected quench (i.e. no discharge of the magnet). Particular attention is also paid to a possible secondary quench detection system based on measured thermohydraulic signals (pressure, temperature and/or helium mass flow rate). The maximum cable temperature achieved in case of a fast current discharge (primary detection by voltage) is compared to the design hot spot criterion of 150 K, which includes the contribution of helium and jacket.

  8. Precision Measurements of Light Quenching in CaWO$_4$ Crystals at mK Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Strauss, R; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Carli, W; Ciemniak, C; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hagn, H; Hauff, D; Hellgartner, D; Jochum, J; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Scholl, S; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Sivers, M v; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2014-01-01

    Scintillating CaWO$_4$ single crystals are a promising multi-element target for rare-event searches and are currently used in the direct Dark Matter experiment CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers). The relative light output of different particle interactions in CaWO$_4$ is quantified by Quenching Factors (QFs). These are essential for an active background discrimination and the identification of a possible signal induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). We present the first precise measurements of the QFs of O, Ca and W at mK temperatures by irradiating a cryogenic detector with a fast neutron beam. A clear energy dependence of the QFs and a variation between different CaWO$_4$ single crystals were observed for the first time. For typical CRESST detectors the QFs in the region-of-interest (10-40$\\,$keV) are $QF_O^{ROI}=(11.2\\pm0.5)\\,$%, $QF_{Ca}^{ROI}=(5.94\\pm0.49)\\,$% and $QF_W^{ROI}=(1.72\\pm0.21)\\,$%. The latest CRESST data (run32) is reanalyzed using these ...

  9. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  10. Lanthanum scintillation crystals for gamma ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, R.; Bennati, P.; Betti, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Pellegrini, R.; Mattioli, M.; Orsolini Cencelli, V.; Navarria, F.; Bollini, D.; Moschini, G.; Garibaldi, F.; de Notaristefani, F.

    2006-11-01

    Over the last 3 years, there has been a growing interest in the development of a new class of fast scintillators such as LaCl 3:Ce and LaBr 3:Ce. Their superior energy resolution is opening an easier way to improve spatial resolution. In this paper we present the results obtained from the first LaBr 3:Ce small gamma camera. It is based on continuous 50×50 mm 2 crystal, 5 mm thick, integral assembled with a Hamamatsu Flat panel PMT. This detector configuration permits the narrowest light distribution with the highest light output in order to obtain the best spatial and energy resolution values, respectively. At the same time, 5 mm crystal thickness carries out 80% efficiency at 140 keV photon energy. Measurements of spatial resolution are also compared with the analogous ones obtained from another 50×50 mm 2 LaBr 3:Ce crystal, assembled with a 3 mm glass optical window. Energy resolution values have been furtherly compared with ones obtained from a LaBr 3:Ce 1 in. diameter and thickness optimized for spectrometric measurements. The first LaBr 3:Ce gamma camera shows excellent intrinsic spatial resolution values such as 0.9 mm, with a best energy resolution value of 6.5% at 140 keV photon energy.

  11. The LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Leverington, Blake D

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2018 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). The operation and the results obtained from the data collected 2011 and 2012 demonstrate that the current detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of O ( 1 fb-1) of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. This will be achieved using 25 ns bunch spacing with the average number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing n = 7 : 6. Collecting data at this luminosity will only be possible if the detector is improved by increasing the readout of the front-end electronics to 40MHz and implementing a more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency. The increase in interactions per bunch crossing will result in an increased occupancy in the tracking detectors and will exceed the operational occupancy for the Outer Tracker. Here we presen...

  12. The LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Leverington, Blake D

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2018 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). The operation and the results obtained from the data collected 2011 and 2012 demonstrate that the current detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of O ( 1 fb-1) of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. This will be achieved using 25 ns bunch spacing with the average number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing n = 7 : 6. Collecting data at this luminosity will only be possible if the detector is improved by increasing the readout of the front-end electronics to 40MHz and implementing a more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency. The increase in interactions per bunch crossing will result in an increased occupancy in the tracking detectors and will exceed the operational occupancy for the Outer Tracker. Here we presen...

  13. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  14. Quench Protection and Magnet Supply Requirements for the MICEFocusingand Coupling Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Witte, Holger

    2005-06-08

    This report discusses the quench protection and power supply requirements of the MICE superconducting magnets. A section of the report discusses the quench process and how to calculate the peak voltages and hotspot temperature that result from a magnet quench. A section of the report discusses conventional quench protection methods. Thermal quench back from the magnet mandrel is also discussed. Selected quench protection methods that result in safe quenching of the MICE focusing and coupling magnets are discussed. The coupling of the MICE magnets with the other magnets in the MICE is described. The consequences of this coupling on magnet charging and quenching are discussed. Calculations of the quenching of a magnet due quench back from circulating currents induced in the magnet mandrel due to quenching of an adjacent magnet are discussed. The conclusion of this report describes how the MICE magnet channel will react when one or magnets in that channel are quenched.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.370 - CLD CO2 and H2O quench verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... analyzer uses quench compensation algorithms that utilize H2O and/or CO2 measurement instruments, evaluate quench with these instruments active and evaluate quench with the compensation algorithms applied....

  16. Comparisons of four quench methods for high temperature Syngas-Exergy Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. H.; Chen, W.; Che, D. F.; Cao, Z. D.

    2010-03-01

    Entrained flow slagging gasifiers have been found in many applications, one of which is IGCC. The quench of high temperature syngas from first stage of entrained flow slagging gasifiers is of great importance for the availability of gasifiers, and it influences the economical running of utilization system. Four kinds of quench methods including water quench, gas quench, radiant quench and chemical quench, are investigated by Gibbs free energy minimization and exergy analyses. The exergy distributions of the streams into and out of each quench system are obtained. The results show that exergy loss of water quench is the biggest, and the exergy loss of chemical quench is the least and can be neglectable. The exergy losses of the other two quench methods are comparable, which are only 1/3 smaller than that of water quench. Chemical quench not only features in lower oxygen consumption as well as a higher cold gas efficiency, but also has high exergy efficiency.

  17. A perturbative framework for jet quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Korinna C.; Krauss, Frank; Wiedemann, Urs A.

    2013-03-01

    We present a conceptually new framework for describing jet evolution in the dense medium produced in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions using perturbative QCD and its implementation into the Monte Carlo event generator Jewel. The rescattering of hard partons in the medium is modelled by infrared continued pQCD matrix elements supplemented with parton showers. The latter approximate higher order real-emission matrix elements and thus generate medium-induced gluon emissions. The interplay between different emissions is governed by their formation times. The destructive interference between subsequent scattering processes, the non-Abelian version of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect, is also taken into account. In this way the complete radiation pattern is consistently treated in a uniform way. Results obtained within this minimal and theoretically well constrained framework are compared with a variety of experimental data susceptible to jet-quenching effects at both RHIC and the LHC. Overall, a good agreement between data and simulation is found. This new framework also allows to identify and quantify the dominant uncertainties in the simulation, and we show some relevant examples for this.

  18. Quenched Heavy-Light Decay Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, R M; Bowler, K C; Collins, S; Henty, D S; Kenway, R D; Richards, D G; Shanahan, H P; Simone, J N; Simpson, A D; Wilkes, B E; Ewing, A K; Lellouch, L P; Sachrajda, Christopher T C; Wittig, H

    1994-01-01

    We present results for heavy-light decay constants, using both propagating quarks and the static approximation, in O(a)-improved, quenched lattice QCD. At beta=6.2 on a 24^3x48 lattice we find f_D=185 +4-3(stat)+42-7(syst) MeV, f_B=160 +6-6 +53-19 MeV, f_{D_s}/f_D=1.18 +2-2 and f_{B_s}/f_B=1.22 +4-3, in good agreement with earlier studies. From the static theory we obtain f_B^stat=253 +16-15 +105-14 MeV. We also present results from a simulation at beta=6.0 on a 16^3x48 lattice, which are consistent with those at beta=6.2. In order to study the effects of improvement, we present a direct comparison of the results using both the Wilson and the improved action at beta=6.0.

  19. Nonequilibrium States of a Quenched Bose Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Yin and Radzihovsky [Phys. Rev. A 88, 063611 (2014)] recently developed a self-consistent extension of a Bogoliubov theory, in which the condensate number density, nc, is treated as a mean field that changes with time in order to analyze a JILA experiment by Makotyn et al. [Nature Physics doi:10.1038/nphys2850 (2014)] on a 85Rb Bose gas following a deep quench to a large scattering length. We apply this theory to construct a set of closed equations that highlight the role of dnc/dt, which is to induce an effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the dnc/dt-induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can affect experimentally measurable quantities such as Tan's contact. This work is supported in part by the US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-10-1-0096 and in part by the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-25915.

  20. Quenching parameter in a holographic thermal QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Binoy Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the quenching parameter, $\\hat{q}$ in a model-independent way using the gauge-gravity duality. In earlier calculations, the geometry in the gravity side at finite temperature was usually taken as the pure AdS blackhole metric for which the dual gauge theory becomes conformally invariant unlike QCD. Therefore we use a metric which incorporates the fundamental quarks by embedding the coincident D7 branes in the Klebanov-Tseytlin background and a finite temperature is switched on by inserting a black hole into the background, known as OKS-BH metric. Further inclusion of an additional UV cap to the metric prepares the dual gauge theory to run similar to thermal QCD. Moreover $\\hat{q}$ is usually defined in the literature from the Glauber-model perturbative QCD evaluation of the Wilson loop, which has no reasons to hold if the coupling is large and is thus against the main idea of gauge-gravity duality. Thus we use an appropriate definition of $\\hat{q}$: $\\hat{q} L^- = 1/L^2$, where $L$ is the s...