WorldWideScience

Sample records for quartz tuning fork

  1. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  2. Theoretical model and optimization of a novel temperature sensor based on quartz tuning fork resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Xu; Bo, You; Xin, Li; Juan, Cui

    2007-12-01

    To accurately measure temperatures, a novel temperature sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator has been designed. The principle of the quartz tuning fork temperature sensor is that the resonant frequency of the quartz resonator changes with the variation in temperature. This type of tuning fork resonator has been designed with a new doubly rotated cut work at flexural vibration mode as temperature sensor. The characteristics of the temperature sensor were evaluated and the results sufficiently met the target of development for temperature sensor. The theoretical model for temperature sensing has been developed and built. The sensor structure was analysed by finite element method (FEM) and optimized, including tuning fork geometry, tine electrode pattern and the sensor's elements size. The performance curve of output versus measured temperature is given. The results from theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that the sensor's sensitivity can reach 60 ppm °C-1 with the measured temperature range varying from 0 to 100 °C.

  3. Dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors used in standoff photoacoustic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhouqiang; Jia, Shuhai; Ma, Binshan; Chen, Hualing [Xi' an Jiao tong University, Xi' an (China); Wei, Yuan [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, a two-degrees-of-freedom model with two coupled oscillators is established to study the dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors. Air squeeze-film damping is considered in this model. When the laser power is 40 mW and the distance between the tuning fork and detected objects is approximately 0.5 m, the resonance amplitude of the tuning fork under the electromagnetic radiation pressure of the laser can reach 0.22 pm. Electromagnetic radiation pressure and resonance amplitude have the tendency to exponentially decay along with the distance between the tuning fork and detected objects. The influence of laser power and distance between the tuning fork and detected objects on electromagnetic radiation pressure is also considered. Lastly, an experimental device is set up to verify the calculation result of the model. Analysis shows that the experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation results.

  4. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy based trace gas sensors using different quartz tuning forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Yu, Guang; Zhang, Jingbo; Yu, Xin; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-03-27

    A sensitive trace gas sensor platform based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is reported. A 1.395 μm continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback pigtailed diode laser was used as the excitation source and H2O was selected as the target analyte. Two kinds of quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with a resonant frequency (f0) of 30.72 kHz and 38 kHz were employed for the first time as an acoustic wave transducer, respectively for QEPAS instead of a standard QTF with a f0 of 32.768 kHz. The QEPAS sensor performance using the three different QTFs was experimentally investigated and theoretically analyzed. A minimum detection limit of 5.9 ppmv and 4.3 ppmv was achieved for f0 of 32.768 kHz and 30.72 kHz, respectively.

  5. The Frequency Dependence of the Added Mass of Quartz Tuning Fork Immersed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, I.; Klokol, K.; Sokolov, S.; Sheshin, G.

    2016-11-01

    We measured the dependences of the resonance frequency of tuning forks immersed in liquid helium at T = 0.365 K in the pressure interval from saturated vapor pressure to 24.8 atm. The quartz tuning forks have been studied with different resonance frequencies of 6.65, 8.46, 12.1, 25.0 and 33.6 kHz in vacuum. The measurements were taken in the laminar flow regime. The experimental data allow us to determine the added mass of a quartz tuning fork in He II. It was found that the added mass per unit length of the prong fork is frequency dependent. Some possible qualitative explanations for such dependence are proposed. In addition, we observed, at T = 0.365 K, the changes in added mass with pressure according to the pressure dependence of He II density.

  6. Fabrication of SMD 32.768 kHz tuning fork-type crystals: photolithography and selective etching of an array of quartz tuning fork resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. [Dept. of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea); Lee, J.Y.; Park, T.S. [Research and Development Center, Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea)

    2001-09-01

    Negative photoresist photolithography was used to etch array of quartz tuning forks for use in Qualcomm trademark mobile station modem (MSM)-3000{sup TM} central processing unit (CPU) chips of code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) units. It was found superior to positive photoresist photolithography. Quartz tuning fork blanks with optimum shock-resistant characteristics were designed using finite element method (FEM) and processing condition was devised for reproducible precision etching of Z-cut quartz wafer into array of tuning forks. Tuning fork pattern was transferred via ordinary photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. Tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 A chromium/gold mask is coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the backside of the wafer. With protective metallization area of tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through quartz wafer was done at 80 C in a {+-} 1.5 C controlled bath containing concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove unwanted area of the quartz wafer. Surface finish of quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used primarily affected the quality of quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching. At 80 C, selective etching of 100 {mu}m quartz wafer could be effected within 90 min. Reproducible precision selective etching method has thus been established and enables mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators photolithographically. (orig.)

  7. Multiple critical velocities in oscillatory flow of superfluid 4He due to quartz tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, D.; Jackson, M. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Človečko, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-12-01

    We report recent investigations into the transition to turbulence in superfluid 4He, realized experimentally by measuring the drag forces acting on two custom-made quartz tuning forks with fundamental resonances at 6.5 kHz and 55.5 kHz, in the temperature range 10 mK to 2.17 K. In pure superfluid in the zero temperature limit, three distinct critical velocities were observed with both tuning forks. We discuss the significance of all critical velocities and associate the third critical velocity reported here with the development of large vortical structures in the flow, which thus starts to mimic turbulence in classical fluids. The interpretation of our results is directly linked to previous experimental work with oscillators such as tuning forks, grids, and vibrating wires, focusing on the behavior of purely superfluid 4He at very low temperatures.

  8. Calibration of piezoelectric positioning actuators using a reference voltage-to-displacement transducer based on quartz tuning forks

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; 10.1017/S1431927611012839

    2012-01-01

    We use a piezoelectric quartz tuning fork to calibrate the displacement of ceramic piezoelectric scanners which are widely employed in scanning probe microscopy. We measure the static piezoelectric response of a quartz tuning fork and find it to be highly linear, non-hysteretic and with negligible creep. These performance characteristics, close to those of an ideal transducer, make quartz transducers superior to ceramic piezoelectric actuators. Furthermore, quartz actuators in the form of a tuning fork have the advantage of yielding static displacements comparable to those of local probe microscope scanners. We use the static displacement of a quartz tuning fork as a reference to calibrate the three axis displacement of a ceramic piezoelectric scanner. Although this calibration technique is a non-traceable method, it can be more versatile than using calibration grids because it enables to characterize the linear and non-linear response of a piezoelectric scanner in a broad range of displacements, spanning fro...

  9. Carbon fibre tips for scanning probe microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A; Agrait, N; Rubio-Bollinger, G, E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-04-09

    We report the fabrication and the characterization of carbon fibre tips for use in combined scanning tunnelling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. We find that the use of carbon fibre tips results in a minimum impact on the dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors, yielding a high quality factor and, consequently, a high force gradient sensitivity. This high force sensitivity, in combination with high electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance of carbon fibre tips, make them very convenient for combined and simultaneous scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Interestingly, these tips are quite robust against occasionally occurring tip crashes. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is presented that produces a sub-100-nm apex radius in a reproducible way which can yield high resolution images.

  10. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Manel Puig-Vidal; Laura Gonzalez; Jorge Otero

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by...

  11. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...... to the high aspect ratio of the CNT probe, the long-range background force was barely detectable in the solvation region. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Numerical performance analysis of quartz tuning fork-based force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2017-01-01

    Quartz tuning fork-based force sensors where one prong is immobilized onto a holder while the other one is allowed to oscillate freely (‘qPlus’ configuration) are in widespread use for high-resolution scanning probe microscopy applications. Due to the small size of the tuning forks (≈3 mm) and the complexity of the sensor assemblies, the reliable and repeatable manufacturing of the sensors has been challenging. In this paper, we investigate the contribution of the amount and location of the epoxy glue used to attach the tuning fork to its holder on the sensor’s performance. Towards this end, we use finite element analysis to model the entire sensor assembly and to perform static and dynamic numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that increasing the thickness of the epoxy layer between prong and holder results in a decrease of the sensor’s spring constant, eigenfrequency, and quality factor while showing an increasing deviation from oscillation in its primary modal shape. Adding epoxy at the sides of the tuning fork also leads to a degradation of the quality factor even though in this case, spring constant and eigenfrequency rise in tandem with a lessening of the deviation from its ideal modal shape.

  13. The Coefficient of the Voltage Induced Frequency Shift Measurement on a Quartz Tuning Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Hou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built.

  14. Vibration amplitude of a tip-loaded quartz tuning fork during shear force microscopy scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, P.; Friedt, J.-M.; Carry, É.

    2008-08-01

    This Note reports on experimental results obtained with a recently published vision method for in-plane vibration measurement [Sandoz et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 023706 (2007)]. The latter is applied to a tip-loaded quartz tuning fork frequently used in scanning probe microscopy for shear-force monitoring of the tip-sample distance. The vibration amplitude of the tip-loaded prong is compared to that of the free one and the damping induced by tip-surface interactions is measured. The tuning-fork behavior is characterized during approaches from free space to surface contact. Tip-surface contact is clearly identified by a drastic reduction in the prong vibration amplitude. However, no differences were observed between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Experiments reported here show that the vibration amplitude of the quartz tuning fork in free space is a good estimate of the vibration amplitude of the tip interacting with the sample surface during shear force sample-tip feedback. The experimental setup for measuring the amplitude is easily integrated in an inverted microscope setup on which the shear force microscope is installed for simultaneous scanning probe and optical microscopy analysis of the sample.

  15. Photolithography and Selective Etching of an Array of Quartz Tuning Fork Resonators with Improved Impact Resistance Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyu

    2001-08-01

    Quartz tuning fork blanks with improved impact-resistant characteristics for use in Qualcomm mobile station modem (MSM)-3000 central processing unit (CPU) chips for code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) systems were designed using finite element method (FEM) analysis and suitable processing conditions were determined for the reproducible precision etching of a Z-cut quartz wafer into an array of tuning forks. Negative photoresist photolithography for the additive process was used in preference to positive photoresist photolithography for the subtractive process to etch the array of quartz tuning forks. The tuning fork pattern was transferred via a conventional photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. A tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 Å chromium/gold mask was coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the back surface of the wafer. With the protective metallization area of the tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through the quartz wafer was performed at 80°C in a ± 1.5°C controlled bath containing a concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove the unwanted areas of the quartz wafer. The quality of the quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching depended primarily on the surface finish of the quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used. Selective etching of a 100 μm quartz wafer could be achieved within 90 min at 80°C. A selective etching procedure with reproducible precision has thus been established and enables the photolithographic mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators.

  16. Applications of the quartz tuning fork in classical and superfluid hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Mantia Marco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of the multitude of applications of the commercially produced quartz tuning fork in cryogenic fluid dynamics, using cold gaseous, normal liquid and superfluid 4He as working fluids with extraordinary, but well-known and tunable physical properties. While the central focus of this work is the use of the tuning fork as a detector of classical and quantum turbulence, we also report other studies and applications, mainly on cavitation, pressure-, thermo- and viscosimetry. Finally, we mention briefly our recent studies of the acoustic emission due to these high-Q oscillators and its effect on the characteristics of their resonance.

  17. Study on digital correlation demodulation technology of micro quartz tuning fork gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixiong; Feng, Lihui; Sun, Yu-Nan

    2010-11-01

    A signal demodulation scheme for micro quartz tuning fork gyroscope based on digital correlation demodulation technology is proposed. In the operation of quartz gyroscope the reference signal should be in the resonance state with steady amplitude and the reference signal should be in-phase and has the same frequency with the driving signal. The quartz gyroscope signal processing platform is designed on the foundation of DEC6713 DSP development board successfully. The adaptive algorithm including the reference signal frequency tacking, the amplitude automatic gain controlling, the reference signal phase locking, and complex correlation demodulation are devised, and the algorithm is programmed. It is proved that the digital signal process scheme is feasible by means of experimentation.

  18. Photo-thermal quartz tuning fork excitation for dynamic mode atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Teyssieux, Damien; Thiery, Laurent; Hermelin, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon (France); Friedt, Jean-Michel [SENSeOR SAS, Besançon (France)

    2014-10-13

    A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  19. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spajer, M., E-mail: michel.spajer@univ-fcomte.fr; Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon cedex (France); Jalocha, A. [CILAS, Département de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orléans (France)

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  20. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  1. Force-gradient-induced mechanical dissipation of quartz tuning fork force sensors used in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agrait, N. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA-Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio-Bollinger, G., E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We have studied the dynamics of quartz tuning fork resonators used in atomic force microscopy taking into account the mechanical energy dissipation through the attachment of the tuning fork base. We find that the tuning fork resonator quality factor changes even in the case of a purely elastic sensor-sample interaction. This is due to the effective mechanical imbalance of the tuning fork prongs induced by the sensor-sample force gradient, which in turn has an impact on dissipation through the attachment of the resonator base. This effect may yield a measured dissipation signal that can be different from the one exclusively related to the dissipation between the sensor and the sample. We also find that there is a second-order term in addition to the linear relationship between the sensor-sample force gradient and the resonance frequency shift of the tuning fork that is significant even for force gradients usually present in atomic force microscopy, which are in the range of tens of N/m. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Dynamics of miniature tuning fork force sensors: a mechanical model. {yields} Non-linear relationship between resonance frequency shift and applied force gradient. {yields} An apparent mechanical dissipation channel opens even for purely conservative tip-sample interactions. {yields} qPlus tuning forks configuration has lower Q factor but straightforward dynamics.

  2. Development of SMD 32.768 kHz tuning fork-type crystals using photolithography and selective etching process. Pt. I. Selective etching of an array of quartz tuning fork resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Ltd., Suwon City (Korea); Kang, K.M. [National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    2001-05-01

    Negative photoresist photolithography was found superior to previously used positive photoresist photolithography to etch array of quartz tuning forks for use in Qualcomm trademark mobile station modem (MSM), 3000{sup TM} central processing unit (CPU), chips of code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) units. Optimum processing condition was devised for reproducible precision etching of Z-cut quartz wafer into array of tuning forks. Tuning fork pattern was transferred via ordinary photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. A tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 A chromium/gold mask is coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the backside of the wafer. With protective metallization area of tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through quartz wafer was done at 80 C in a {+-} 1.5 C controlled bath containing concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove unwanted area of the quartz wafer. The quality of quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching depended primarily on the surface finish of quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used. At 80 C, selective etching of 100 {mu}m quartz wafer could be effected within 90 min. Reproducible precision selective etching method has thus been established and enables mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators with electrode patterns on them photolithographically. (orig.)

  3. Streaming flow due to a quartz tuning fork oscillating in normal and superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, D.; La Mantia, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2017-07-01

    We visualize the streaming flow due to a rapidly oscillating quartz tuning fork, in both normal He I and superfluid He II, by following the flow-induced motions of relatively small particles suspended in the liquid. Over the investigated temperature range, between 1.2 and 2.3 K, at the experimentally probed length scales, the streaming patterns observed in He II appear identical to those seen in He I and are very similar to those reported to occur in water, outside the Stokes boundary layer. The outcome strongly supports the view that, at scales larger than the quantum length scale of the flow, the mean distance between quantized vortices, mechanically forced turbulent coflows of He II behave classically, due to the dynamical locking of the two components of superfluid 4He by the action of the mutual friction force.

  4. Flow regimes of the superfluid helium caused by oscillating quartz tuning fork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagovets, V; Gritsenko, I; Rudavskii, E; Sheshin, G; Zadorozhko, A; Verkin, B [Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine)], E-mail: sheshin@ilt.kharkov.ua

    2009-02-01

    The laminar-turbulent flow transition in HeII was studied with an oscillating quartz tuning fork. At temperatures from 200 mK to 3.0 K a current-voltage characteristic were recorded with varying driving voltage from 10{sup -5} to 10 V. A resonance frequency and a width of the resonance curve were also registered. It is found that at temperatures below {approx} 0.8 K the laminar-turbulent transition proceeds through an intermediate region clearly seen in the current - voltage characteristic curves. In this case the resonance curve changes in its shape - there appears a plateau near the maximum. An increase in the resonance curve width suggests the existence of excess dissipation related to the generation of quantized vortices in HeII in the vicinity of the oscillating surface. Estimation of the possible size of the vortices may suggest that these are generated on the oscillating surface roughness.

  5. Nanocharacterization of soft biological samples in shear mode with quartz tuning fork probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jorge; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  6. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Puig-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  7. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko, E-mail: arai@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  8. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Falter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process.

  9. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, F-25030 Besançon (France)

    2016-06-15

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  10. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  11. Research on the influence of transparent vacuum encapsulation quartz tuning fork on the photo-thermoelastic spectroscopy of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhouqiang; Jia, Shuhai; Wang, Yonglin; Tang, Zhenhua; Wang, Fei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a transparent vacuum-encapsulated quartz tuning fork (QTF) is proposed for the first time to improve the quality factor and sensitivity of QTF sensors. Increasing the vacuum considerably improved the quality factor of QTF, and the resonance frequency was also shifted to higher values to 10 Hz. Subsequently, the spectroscopy detection of acetylene gas using an exposed QTF and a transparent vacuum-encapsulated QTF was investigated. The sensitivity of the detection system improved in the presence of the transparent vacuum-sealed QTF. The current findings represent a gateway to subsequent research in photo-thermoelastic spectroscopy.

  12. Improving the lateral resolution of quartz tuning fork-based sensors in liquid by integrating commercial AFM tips into the fiber end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez-Martín, David; Otero, Jorge; de Pablo, Pedro José; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2015-01-14

    The use of quartz tuning fork sensors as probes for scanning probe microscopy is growing in popularity. Working in shear mode, some methods achieve a lateral resolution comparable with that obtained with standard cantilevered probes, but only in experiments conducted in air or vacuum. Here, we report a method to produce and use commercial AFM tips in electrically driven quartz tuning fork sensors operating in shear mode in a liquid environment. The process is based on attaching a standard AFM tip to the end of a fiber probe which has previously been sharpened. Only the end of the probe is immersed in the buffer solution during imaging. The lateral resolution achieved is about 6 times higher than that of the etched microfiber on its own.

  13. Position-resolved Surface Characterization and Nanofabrication Using an Optical Microscop e Combined with a Nanopip ette/Quartz Tuning Fork Atomic Force Microscop e

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangmin An; Baekman Sung; Haneol Noh; Corey Stambaugh; Soyoung Kwon; Kunyoung Lee; Bongsu Kim; Qhwan Kim; Wonho Jhe

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we introduce position-resolved surface characterization and nanofabrication us-ing an optical microscope (OM) combined with a nanopipette-based quartz tuning fork atomic force micro-scope (nanopipette/QTF-AFM) system. This system is used to accurately determine substrate position and nanoscale phenomena under ambient conditions. Solutions consisting of 5 nm Au nanoparticles, nanowires, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are deposited onto the substrate through the nano/microaperture of a pulled pipette. Nano/microscale patterning is performed using a nanopipette/QTF-AFM, while position is resolved by monitoring the substrate with a custom OM. With this tool, one can perform surface characterization (force spectroscopy/microscopy) using the quartz tuning fork (QTF) sensor. Nanofabrication is achieved by accu-rately positioning target materials on the surface, and on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions for molecular architecture.

  14. SC tuning fork

    CERN Multimedia

    The tuning fork used to modulate the radiofrequency system of the synchro cyclotron (SC) from 1957 to 1973. This piece is an unused spare part. The SC was the 1st accelerator built at CERN. It operated from August 1957 until it was closed down at the end of 1990. In the SC the magnetic field did not change with time, and the particles were accelerated in successive pulses by a radiofrequency voltage of some 20kV which varied in frequency as they spiraled outwards towards the extraction radius. The frequency varied from 30MHz to about 17Mz in each pulse. The tuning fork vibrated at 55MHz in vacuum in an enclosure which formed a variable capacitor in the tuning circuit of the RF system, allowing the RF to vary over the appropriate range to accelerate protons from the centre of the macine up to 600Mev at extraction radius. In operation the tips of the tuning fork blade had an amplitude of movement of over 1 cm. The SC accelerator underwent extensive improvements from 1973 to 1975, including the installation of a...

  15. First Overtone Frequency Stimulated Quartz Tuning Fork Used for Shear-Force Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晟; 孙家林; 孙红三; 谭晓靖; 时硕; 郭继华; 赵钧

    2003-01-01

    The conventional 32.768 kHz tuning fork is stimulated at its first overtone resonant frequency of ~190 kHz for shear-force distance control.The time constant is measured to be 0.54 ms and it decreases about 40 times faster than that of the fundamental frequency(20.76ms).The cross section of a corn root with a height difference of ~ 3μm is imaged at a scan speed of 12μm/s for 256 × 256 pixels.

  16. Tuning fork tests: forgotten art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, T F; Shambaugh, G E

    1988-01-01

    Four examples are cited in which tuning fork tests helped in proper selection of patients for surgery, after audiometric air and bone tests were equivocal or gave the wrong diagnostic and prognostic indication.

  17. Ultra-high sensitive acetylene detection using quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy with a fiber amplified diode laser and a 30.72 kHz quartz tuning fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Zhang, Ligong; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2017-01-01

    An ultra-high sensitive acetylene (C2H2) Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor based on a high power laser and a quartz tuning fork with a resonance frequency f0 of 30.72 kHz was demonstrated. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) amplified distributed feedback diode laser with a center wavelength of 1.53 μm was used as the exciting source. A 33.2 ppb minimum detection limit (MDL) at 6534.37 cm-1 was achieved, and the calculated normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient was 3.54 × 10-8 cm-1 W/√Hz when the laser output power was 1500 mW. The ppb-level detection sensitivity of C2H2 validated the reported QEPAS method.

  18. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic H{sub 2}S gas sensor based on a fiber-amplifier source and a custom tuning fork with large prong spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Huadan; Yin, Xukun; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Sampaolo, Angelo [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari and Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: donglei@sxu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Patimisco, Pietro; Spagnolo, Vincenzo [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari and Politecnico di Bari, CNR-IFN UOS BARI, Via Amendola 173, Bari 70126 (Italy); Tittel, Frank K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    A quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor, employing an erbium-doped fiber amplified laser source and a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) with its two prongs spaced ∼800 μm apart, is reported. The sensor employs an acoustic micro-resonator (AmR) which is assembled in an “on-beam” QEPAS configuration. Both length and vertical position of the AmR are optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, significantly improving the QEPAS detection sensitivity by a factor of ∼40, compared to the case of a sensor using a bare custom QTF. The fiber-amplifier-enhanced QEPAS sensor is applied to H{sub 2}S trace gas detection, reaching a sensitivity of ∼890 ppb at 1 s integration time, similar to those obtained with a power-enhanced QEPAS sensor equipped with a standard QTF, but with the advantages of easy optical alignment, simple installation, and long-term stability.

  19. 石英音叉陀螺振动特性有限元仿真%Finite Element Simulation of the Vibratory Characteristics for Quartz Tuning Fork Gyroscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莹; 孙雨南; 秦秉坤

    2002-01-01

    The micro quartz crystal tuning fork gyroscope is a new type of vibratory gyroscope. The gyroscope should be analyzed and simulated early in the design stage in order to offer reliable basis for design and to shorten the period of development. Thus the vibratory characteristics of the gyroscope is simulated with the finite element method of coupled-field. The optimum exciting frequency and the factors which influence the gyroscope sensitivity are determined. The method for adjusting the frequency deviation between driving and detecting modes is also proposed.%石英音叉陀螺是一种新型的振动陀螺.在设计阶段必须对其性能进行分析仿真,以便为微型石英陀螺的设计提供依据,缩短开发周期.利用耦合场有限元对石英音叉陀螺的振动特性进行了仿真,确定了最佳激励信号频率和影响陀螺灵敏度的因素,并且给出了调节驱动模态与检测模态的频率差值的方法.

  20. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  1. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  2. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oiko, V. T. A., E-mail: oiko@ifi.unicamp.br; Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Univ. Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas 13083-859 (Brazil); Martins, B. V. C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Silva, P. C. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, CNPEM, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  3. A Multi-Fork Z-Axis Quartz Micromachined Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiying Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s.

  4. A multi-fork z-axis quartz micromachined gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lihui; Zhao, Ke; Sun, Yunan; Cui, Jianmin; Cui, Fang; Yang, Aiying

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s) and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s.

  5. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  6. Ten Things You Should Do with a Tuning Fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2013-01-01

    Tuning forks are wonderful tools for teaching physics. Every physics classroom should have several and every physics student should be taught how to use them. In this article, I highlight 10 enriching demonstrations that most teachers might not know, as well as provide tips to enhance the demonstrations teachers might already be doing. Some of…

  7. VIBRATION MEASUREMENT OF DOUBLE-ENDED TUNING FORKS RESONATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To enhance the coherence and reliability of the double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonator, a measurement system of resonator vibration is presented to check its dynamic characteristics. Laser Doppler techniques are utilized and the relation between DETF vibration velocity and output current of photodetector is obtained. Resonator vibration equation is also analyzed and its driving power only depends on the direct current bias voltage and the amplitude of alternative voltage. Furthermore, a special resonator driving control circuit based on measurement is designed. The amplitude and frequency of circuit is controlled by a computer so that highly stable and strong driving signal can be output. Experiments on driving and measuring double-ended tuning fork have been done. The frequency of driving signal is 8 kHz and the peak-to-peak value of driving voltage is 140 V. Experimental results indicate resonator can be drived stably by driving control circuit and dynamic characteristics of DETF may be measured in real time.

  8. Atomic Steps with tuning-fork-based noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, W.H.J.; Hulst, van N.F.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; West, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Tuning forks as tip-sample distance detectors are a promising and versatile alternative to conventional cantilevers with optical beam deflection in noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both theory and experiments are presented to make a comparison between conventional and tuning-fork-based AFM.

  9. Imaging soft samples in liquid with tuning fork based shear force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, W.H.J.; van Hulst, N.F.; Kammer, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamic behavior of tuning forks and the application of tuning fork based shear force microscopy o­n soft samples in liquid. A shift in resonance frequency and a recovery of the tip vibration amplitude have been observed upon immersion into liquid. Conservation of the

  10. A tuning fork based wide range mechanical characterization tool with nanorobotic manipulators inside a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, Juan Camilo; Hwang, Gilgueng; Regnier, Stephane [Institut des Systemes Intelligents et de Robotique Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7222 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex (France); Polesel-Maris, Jerome [CEA, IRAMIS, Service de Physique et Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-03-15

    This study proposes a tuning fork probe based nanomanipulation robotic system for mechanical characterization of ultraflexible nanostructures under scanning electron microscope. The force gradient is measured via the frequency modulation of a quartz tuning fork and two nanomanipulators are used for manipulation of the nanostructures. Two techniques are proposed for attaching the nanostructure to the tip of the tuning fork probe. The first technique involves gluing the nanostructure for full range characterization whereas the second technique uses van der Waals and electrostatic forces in order to avoid destroying the nanostructure. Helical nanobelts (HNB) are proposed for the demonstration of the setup. The nonlinear stiffness behavior of HNBs during their full range tensile studies is clearly revealed for the first time. Using the first technique, this was between 0.009 N/m for rest position and 0.297 N/m before breaking of the HNB with a resolution of 0.0031 N/m. For the second experiment, this was between 0.014 N/m for rest position and 0.378 N/m before detaching of the HNB with a resolution of 0.0006 N/m. This shows the wide range sensing of the system for potential applications in mechanical property characterization of ultraflexible nanostructures.

  11. The Sound Field around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: (1) Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound? (2) What is the role of the…

  12. RECOVERY FOLLOWING SUBARACHNOID BLOCK : EVALUATION USING 128 HZ TUNING FORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following spinal anesthesia it is very important to see complete recovery before ambulation and discharge of the patient. Conventional methods to see recovery from spinal block use different types of motor power tests like Bromage score or the Formal motor power test system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of one hundred and fifty patients of ASA grade I and II, presenting for lower segment caesarean section under spinal anesthesia were taken up for the study. We compared the use of a 128-Hz tuning fork with the results of conventional evaluation of block recovery. Conventional block recovery testing included Bromage score, Formal muscle power testing according to the British Medical Research Council, pinprick testing, and warm/cold testing. After obtaining base line values, a subarachnoid block was performed and patients were tested every 15 minutes after surgery, till the vibration score of one less than the baseline was achieved. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the results of the different methods to the time at which baseline values of vibration sense were reached. RESULTS: At the time vibration sense testing returned to baseline, 100% of the patients had attained Bromage score of 0 with no residual motor block. 98% of the patients regained foot extension and foot flexion strength completely while 92% of the patients showed complete recovery of the quadriceps strength. CONCLUSION: Recovery of vibration sense corresponds with recovery of motor block after spinal anesthesia and may serve as an easy means of documenting recovery with a single test before discharge.

  13. A Tuning Fork with a Short Fibre Probe Sensor for a Near-FieldScanning Optical Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沛; 鲁拥华; 章江英; 明海; 谢建平; 黄建文; 高宗圣; 蔡定平

    2002-01-01

    We report on a tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope. The method demonstrates how to fabricate the short fibre probe. This tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe can provide stable and high Q at the tapping frequency of the tuning fork, and can give high-quality near-field scanning optical microscope and atomic force microscope images of samples. We present the results of using the tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope performed on an eight-channel silica waveguide.

  14. Molecular recognition imaging using tuning fork-based transverse dynamic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Manuel; Adamsmaier, Stefan [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Zanten, Thomas S. van [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Chtcheglova, Lilia A. [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Manzo, Carlo [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Duman, Memed [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mayer, Barbara [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Ebner, Andreas [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Moertelmaier, Manuel; Kada, Gerald [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria); Garcia-Parajo, Maria F. [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Hinterdorfer, Peter, E-mail: peter.hinterdorfer@jku.at [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Kienberger, Ferry [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate simultaneous transverse dynamic force microscopy and molecular recognition imaging using tuning forks as piezoelectric sensors. Tapered aluminum-coated glass fibers were chemically functionalized with biotin and anti-lysozyme molecules and attached to one of the prongs of a 32 kHz tuning fork. The lateral oscillation amplitude of the tuning fork was used as feedback signal for topographical imaging of avidin aggregates and lysozyme molecules on mica substrate. The phase difference between the excitation and detection signals of the tuning fork provided molecular recognition between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme. Aggregates of avidin and lysozyme molecules appeared as features with heights of 1-4 nm in the topographic images, consistent with single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging. Recognition events between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme were detected in the phase image at high signal-to-noise ratio with phase shifts of 1-2{sup o}. Because tapered glass fibers and shear-force microscopy based on tuning forks are commonly used for near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), these results open the door to the exciting possibility of combining optical, topographic and biochemical recognition at the nanometer scale in a single measurement and in liquid conditions.

  15. A Z-axis Quartz Cross-fork Micromachined Gyroscope Based on Shear Stress Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peitao Dong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope. The sensor has a simple cross-fork structure in the x-y plane of quartz crystal. Shear stress rather than normal stress is utilized to sense Coriolis’ force generated by the input angular rate signal. Compared to traditional quartz gyroscopes, which have two separate sense electrodes on each sidewall, there is only one electrode on each sidewall of the sense beam. As a result, the fabrication of the electrodes is simplified and the structure can be easily miniaturized. In order to increase sensitivity, a pair of proof masses is attached to the ends of the drive beam, and the sense beam has a tapered design. The structure is etched from a z-cut quartz wafer and the electrodes are realized by direct evaporation using the aperture mask method. The drive mode frequency of the prototype is 13.38 kHz, and the quality factor is approximately 1,000 in air. Therefore, the gyroscope can work properly without a vacuum package. The measurement ability of the shear stress detection design scheme is validated by the Coriolis’ force test. The performance of the sensor is characterized on a precision rate table using a specially designed readout circuit. The experimentally obtained scale factor is 1.45 mV/°/s and the nonlinearity is 3.6% in range of ±200 °/s.

  16. Application of Tuning Fork Sensors for In-situ Studies of Dynamic Force Interactions Inside Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ANDZANE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts have been probed in-situ by specially developed force sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator (TF. Additional control is provided by observation of process in scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. A piezoelectric manipulator allows precise positioning of atomic force microscope (AFM probe in contact with another electrode and recording of the TF oscillation amplitude and phase while simultaneously visualizing the contact area in electron microscope. Electrostatic control of interaction between the electrodes is demonstrated during observation of the experiment in SEM. In the TEM system the TF sensor operated in shear force mode: Use of TEM allowed for direct control of separation between electrodes. New opportunities for in situ studies of nanomechanical systems using these instruments are discussed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1927

  17. Integrated tuning fork nanocavity optomechanical transducers with high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product and stress-engineered frequency tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, R; Davanco, M I; Ren, Y; Aksyuk, V; Liu, Y; Srinivasan, K

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanical systems are being widely developed for precision force and displacement measurements. For nanomechanical transducers, there is usually a trade-off between the frequency ($f_{M}$) and quality factor ($Q_{M}$), which limits temporal resolution and sensitivity. Here, we present a monolithic cavity optomechanical transducer supporting both high $f_{M}$ and high $Q_{M}$. By replacing the common doubly-clamped, Si$_3$N$_4$ nanobeam with a tuning fork geometry, we demonstrate devices with the fundamental $f_{M}\\approx29$ MHz and $Q_{M}\\approx2.2$$\\times10^5$, corresponding to an $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product of 6.35$\\times10^{12}$ Hz, comparable to the highest values previously demonstrated for room temperature operation. This high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product is partly achieved by engineering the stress of the tuning fork to be 3 times the residual film stress through clamp design, which results in an increase of $f_{M}$ up to 1.5 times. Simulations reveal that the tuning fork design simultaneously reduces the...

  18. Z-Axis Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscope with Low Air Damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a z-axis tuning fork gyroscope which has a freestanding architecture. In order to improve the performance of the tuning fork gyroscope by eliminating the influence of the squeeze-film air damping, the driving and sensing parts of the gyroscope were designed to oscillate in-plane. Furthermore, by removing the substrate underneath the device, the slide-film air damping in the gap between the proof masses and the substrate was eliminated. The proposed architecture was analyzed by the finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulated frequencies of the driving and sensing modes were 9.788 and 9.761 kHz, respectively. The gyroscope was fabricated using bulk micromachining technology. The quality factor and sensitivity of the gyroscope operating in atmospheric conditions were measured to be 111.2 and 11.56 mV/°/s, respectively.

  19. A tip-attached tuning fork sensor for the control of DNA translocation through a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; Huang, Tao; Li, Jiali

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that a tuning fork can be used as a force detecting sensor for manipulating DNA molecules and for controlling the DNA translocation rate through a nanopore. One prong of a tuning fork is glued with a probe tip which DNA molecules can be attached to. To control the motion and position of the tip, the tuning fork is fixed to a nanopositioning system which has sub-nanometer position control. A fluidic chamber is designed to fulfill many requirements for the experiment: for the access of a DNA-attached tip approaching to a nanopore, for housing a nanopore chip, and for measuring ionic current through a solid-state nanopore with a pair of electrodes. The location of a nanopore is first observed by transmission electron microscopy, and then is determined inside the liquid chambers with an optical microscope combined with local scanning the probe tip on the nanopore surface. When a DNA-immobilized tip approaches a membrane surface near a nanopore, free ends of the immobilized DNA strings can be pulled and trapped into the pore by an applied voltage across the nanopore chip, resulting in an ionic current reduction through the nanopore. The trapped DNA molecules can be lifted up from the nanopore at a user controlled speed. This integrated apparatus allows manipulation of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) attached to a probe tip with sub-nanometer precision, and simultaneously allows measurement of the biomolecules by a nanopore device.

  20. On Bandwidth Characteristics of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope with Mechanically Coupled Sense Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfang Ni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  1. On bandwidth characteristics of tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yunfang; Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  2. Performance Characteristics and Temperature Compensation Method of Fluid Property Sensor Based on Tuning-Fork Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid property sensor (FPS based on tuning-fork technology is applied to the measurement of the contaminant level of lubricant oil. The measuring principle of FPS sensor is derived and proved together with its resolution. The performance characteristics of the FPS sensor, such as sensitivity coefficient, resolution, and quality factor, are analyzed. A temperature compensation method is proposed to eliminate the temperature-dependence of the measuring parameters, and its validity is investigated by numerical simulation of sensitivity, oscillating frequency, and dielectric constant. The values of purification efficiency obtained using microwave and without microwave are compared experimentally.

  3. Silicon carbide resonant tuning fork for microsensing applications in high-temperature and high G-shock environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David R Myers; Kan Bun Cheng; Babak Jamshidi; Robert G Azevedo; Debbie G Senesky; Li Chen; Mehran Mehregany; Muthu B J Wijesundara; Albert P Pisano

    2012-01-01

    We present the fabrication and testing of a silicon carbide (SiC) balanced mass doublended tuning fork that survives harsh environments without compromising the device strain sensitivity and resolution bandwidth. The device features a material stack that survives corrosive environments and enables high-temperature operation. To perform hightemperature testing, a specialized setup was constructed that allows the tuning fork to be characterized using traditional silicon electronics. The tuning fork has been operated at 600°C in the presence of dry steam for short durations. This tuning fork has also been tested to 64 000 G using a hard-launch, soft-catch shock implemented with a light gas gun. However, the device still has a strain sensitivity of 66 Hz/μe and strain resolution of 0. 045 μe in a 10 kHz bandwidth. As such, this balanced-mass double-ended tuning fork can be used to create a variety of different sensors including strain gauges, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure transducers. Given the adaptable fabrication process flow, this device could be useful to micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) designers creating sensors for a variety of different applications.

  4. The Model Analysis of a Complex Tuning Fork Probe and Its Application in Bimodal Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electromechanical coupling model was built to quantitatively analyze the tuning fork probes, especially the complex ones. A special feature of a novel, soft tuning fork probe, that the second eigenfrequency of the probe was insensitive to the effective force gradient, was found and used in a homemade bimodal atomic force microscopy to measure power dissipation quantitatively. By transforming the mechanical parameters to the electrical parameters, a monotonous and concise method without using phase to calculate the power dissipation was proposed.

  5. Shear Force Detection Using Single-Tine Oscillating Tuning Fork for Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓靖; 孙家林; 刘晟; 郭继华; 孙红三

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to detect near-field by using a single-tine oscillating tuning fork with mechanically asymmetric excitation that exhibits the sensitivity and stability better than that by using a double-tine oscillating one. Comparison of shear forces for the two methods demonstrate that the single-tine oscillating tuning fork provides a simpler and more sensitive method for near-field measurements. A theoretical analysis is presented for explanation to the greater sensitivity. The method is demonstrated by imaging a sparse-packed layer of micro-spheres in size of 200 nm.

  6. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  7. Reliability and responsiveness of a graduated tuning fork in immune mediated polyneuropathies. The Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Rydel-Seiffer (RS) graduated tuning fork was evaluated in 113 patients with a clinically stable immune mediated polyneuropathy (83 patients who had had Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in the past, 22 with

  8. Design and simulation of a tuning fork micromachined gyroscope with slide film damping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Lu-feng; XIONG Bin; JIAO Ji-wei; WANG Yue-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel tuning fork micromachined gyroscope, based on slide-film damping, is presented. The electrostatic driving gyroscope consists of two driving masses each of which supports one sensitive mass. The angular rate is sensed by the differential capacitances consisted of movable bar electrodes and fixed bar electrodes located on the glass wafer. The gyroscope can operate at atmospheric pressure with slide film damping in the driving and sensing directions, eliminate vacuum packaging and restrain cross-axis acceleration signal. The results of design and simulation show that the driving and sensing mode frequencies are 3 106 Hz and 3 175 Hz,respectively, and the Q-values in driving and sensitive modes are 1 721 and 1 450 respectively. The design resolution is 0.025°/s.

  9. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengli Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF, the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe. Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica–silica interface.

  10. Design of a compact tuning fork-shaped notched ultrawideband antenna for wireless communication application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, M N; Moghavvemi, M; Mahadi, W N L

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33-13.8 GHz (at -10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28-6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size.

  11. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Guan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor.

  12. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanwei; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yaping

    2016-07-22

    In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG) with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor.

  13. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanwei; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG) with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor. PMID:27455272

  14. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Patimisco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  15. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-03-28

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  16. A Novel X-Axis Tuning Fork Gyroscope with "8 Vertical Springs-Proofmass" Structure on (111)-Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Fei; Wang, Yucai; Zhang, Ying; Mi, Binwei; Li, Jinpeng; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Yuelin

    2008-01-01

    A novel x-axis tuning fork MEMS gyroscope with "8 vertical springs-proofmass" structure for Coriolis effect detection is presented. Compared with the common single-plane springs, the 8 vertical springs, symmetrically located at the top and bottom sides, more stably suspend the large thick proofmass featuring large capacitance variation and low mechanical noise. A bulk-micromachining technology is applied to obtain the large proofmass and twins-like dual beams. During the fabrication process, the dimensions of the 8 vertical springs are precisely confined by thermal oxide protected limit trenches (LTs) sidewalls and the extreme slowly etched (111)-planes; therefore a small mismatch of less than 30 Hz is achieved before tuning. Initial test shows a sensitivity of 0.15mV/(deg/s) and rate resolution around 0.1deg/s under atmosphere pressure.

  17. Design and Vibration Sensitivity Analysis of a MEMS Tuning Fork Gyroscope with an Anchored Diamond Coupling Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Guan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new micromachined tuning fork gyroscope (TFG with an anchored diamond coupling mechanism is proposed while the mode ordering and the vibration sensitivity are also investigated. The sense-mode of the proposed TFG was optimized through use of an anchored diamond coupling spring, which enables the in-phase mode frequency to be 108.3% higher than the anti-phase one. The frequencies of the in- and anti-phase modes in the sense direction are 9799.6 Hz and 4705.3 Hz, respectively. The analytical solutions illustrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the in- and anti-phase modes is inversely proportional to the output induced by the vibration from the sense direction. Additionally, FEM simulations demonstrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the anchored diamond coupling TFG is 16.08 times larger than the direct coupling one while the vibration output is reduced by 94.1%. Consequently, the proposed new anchored diamond coupling TFG can structurally increase the stiffness difference ratio to improve the mode ordering and considerably reduce the vibration sensitivity without sacrificing the scale factor.

  18. Analysis of Frequency Response and Scale-Factor of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xukai Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP, which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  19. Design and Vibration Sensitivity Analysis of a MEMS Tuning Fork Gyroscope with an Anchored Diamond Coupling Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanwei; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Jin, Lei; Niu, Shaohua

    2016-04-02

    In this paper, a new micromachined tuning fork gyroscope (TFG) with an anchored diamond coupling mechanism is proposed while the mode ordering and the vibration sensitivity are also investigated. The sense-mode of the proposed TFG was optimized through use of an anchored diamond coupling spring, which enables the in-phase mode frequency to be 108.3% higher than the anti-phase one. The frequencies of the in- and anti-phase modes in the sense direction are 9799.6 Hz and 4705.3 Hz, respectively. The analytical solutions illustrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the in- and anti-phase modes is inversely proportional to the output induced by the vibration from the sense direction. Additionally, FEM simulations demonstrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the anchored diamond coupling TFG is 16.08 times larger than the direct coupling one while the vibration output is reduced by 94.1%. Consequently, the proposed new anchored diamond coupling TFG can structurally increase the stiffness difference ratio to improve the mode ordering and considerably reduce the vibration sensitivity without sacrificing the scale factor.

  20. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Lange

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements. When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111 √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  1. Analysis of frequency response and scale-factor of tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  2. A self-strain feedback tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite clamping actuator with soft matter elasticity-detecting capability for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smart tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) clamping actuator for biomedical applications. The two fingers of the actuator, which perform the clamping motion, can be electrically controlled through a unique electrode design on the IPMC material. The generated displacement or strain of the fingers can be sensed using an integrated soft strain-gage sensor. The IPMC actuator and associated soft strain gage were fabricated using a micromachining technique. A 13.5×4×2 mm(3) actuator was shaped from Nafion solution and a selectively grown metal electrode formed the active region. The strain gage consisted of patterned copper foil and polyethylene as a substrate. The relationship between the strain gage voltage output and the displacement at the front end of the actuator's fingers was characterized. The equivalent Young's modulus, 13.65 MPa, of the soft-strain-gage-integrated IPMC finger was analyzed. The produced clamping force exhibited a linear increasing rate of 1.07 mN/s, based on a dc driving voltage of 7 V. Using the developed actuator to clamp soft matter and simultaneously acquire its Young's modulus was achieved. This demonstrated the feasibility of the palpation function and the potential use of the actuator in minimally invasive surgery.

  3. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  4. Allan Deviation Plot as a Tool for Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Sensors Noise Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Marilena; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    We report here on the use of the Allan deviation plot to analyze the long-term stability of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensor. The Allan plot provides information about the optimum averaging time for the QEPAS signal and allows the prediction of its ultimate detection limit. The Allan deviation can also be used to determine the main sources of noise coming from the individual components of the sensor. Quartz tuning fork thermal noise dominates for integration times up to 275 s, whereas at longer averaging times, the main contribution to the sensor noise originates from laser power instabilities.

  5. New developments in THz quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-09-01

    We will report on new developments of quartz-enhanced photo-acoustic (QEPAS) sensor employing THz quantum cascade laser (QCLs). The extension of the QEPAS technique in the THz range was made possible by the realization of custom made QTFs. With the aim to improve the QTF acousto-electric transduction efficiency, we designed and realized new QTF designs. A detailed analysis of the quality factor, the resonance frequency and the electrical resistance of custom quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with different geometrical parameters is reported. The custom QTFs were employed in QEPAS sensors using THz QCLs as the laser excitation sources and targeting CH3OH and H2S. Minimum detection limits of a few tens of ppb and normalized noise equivalent absorption factors down to 3.75×10-11 cm-1W/Hz½ were achieved.

  6. SPECTRAL PHASE: FROM BASICS TO VIDEO-RATE APPLICATION TO TUNING-FORK RESONANCE CHARACTERIZATION // ESPECTRO DE FASE: DE LAS IDEAS BÁSICAS A LA APLICACIÓN EN UN VIDEO DE LA RESONANCIA DE UN DIAPASÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sandoz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Whereas graduated students are usually familiar with Fourier spectra, the spectral phase remains often mysterious to them. This paper proposes a “hands on.approach of discrete Fourier transform (DFT and spectral phase. In a first part, basics of DFT are explored through elementary simulations. The variation of digital parameters allows the identification of sampled frequencies las well as their relation with the size of the sampled window. The significance of the spectrum phase is also illustrated experimentally to demonstrate the useful relationship between a displacement and the spectral phase. In a second part, these properties are put in application for the characterization of tuning-fork resonance by means of video-rate analysis of the spectral phase. Experimental hardware is reduced to elementary devices and remains affordable while involving all aspects of a measurement chain. The proposed progression constitutes a practical approach to discrete Fourier transform and spectral phase properties. At the end, the resonance curve of a tuning-fork is recorded in only a few minutes. The Shannon sampling theorem as well as the uncertainty relation linking the resolutions achieved in the direct and reciprocal domains, are also considered practically throughout this work. Keywords: Fast Fourier Transform, Fourier Phase, tuning fork.// RESUMEN Mientras que los estudiantes graduados están familiarizados con el espectro de Fourier, la fase espectral a menudo se mantiene misteriosa. Este artículo propone una aproximación practica a la Transformada de Fourier Discreta (TFD y a la fase espectral. En una primera parte, se exploran las bases de TFD mediante simulaciones elementales. La variación de parámetros digitales permite la identificación de frecuencias de muestreo y su relación con el tamaño de la ventana muestreada. La importancia del espectro de fase también se ilustra experimentalmente para demostrar la utilidad de la relaci

  7. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongning Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 compared with the original signal, which was acquired without resonators or a prism. In addition, the system noise was reduced a little with double resonators due to the Q factor decrease. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was greatly improved. Additionally, a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA of 5.8 × 10−8 W·cm−1·Hz−1/2 was achieved for water vapor detection in the atmosphere.

  8. Flip Chip Bonding of a Quartz MEMS-Based Vibrating Beam Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel method to assemble a micro-accelerometer by a flip chip bonding technique is proposed and demonstrated. Both the main two parts of the accelerometer, a double-ended tuning fork and a base-proof mass structure, are fabricated using a quartz wet etching process on Z cut quartz wafers with a thickness of 100 μm and 300 μm, respectively. The finite element method is used to simulate the vibration mode and optimize the sensing element structure. Taking advantage of self-alignment function of the flip chip bonding process, the two parts were precisely bonded at the desired joint position via AuSn solder. Experimental demonstrations were performed on a maximum scale of 4 × 8 mm2 chip, and high sensitivity up to 9.55 Hz/g with a DETF resonator and a Q value of 5000 in air was achieved.

  9. Flip Chip Bonding of a Quartz MEMS-Based Vibrating Beam Accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinxing; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Ling; Dong, Yuan; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2015-09-02

    In this study, a novel method to assemble a micro-accelerometer by a flip chip bonding technique is proposed and demonstrated. Both the main two parts of the accelerometer, a double-ended tuning fork and a base-proof mass structure, are fabricated using a quartz wet etching process on Z cut quartz wafers with a thickness of 100 μm and 300 μm, respectively. The finite element method is used to simulate the vibration mode and optimize the sensing element structure. Taking advantage of self-alignment function of the flip chip bonding process, the two parts were precisely bonded at the desired joint position via AuSn solder. Experimental demonstrations were performed on a maximum scale of 4 × 8 mm² chip, and high sensitivity up to 9.55 Hz/g with a DETF resonator and a Q value of 5000 in air was achieved.

  10. [Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy trace gas detection system based on the Fabry-Perot demodulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Zhu, Yong; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Li; Xu, Zu-Wen

    2013-05-01

    An all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system, based on the F-P demodulation, for trace gas detection in the open environment was proposed. In quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), an optical fiber Fabry-Perot method was used to replace the conventional electronic demodulation method. The photoacoustic signal was obtained by demodulating the variation of the Fabry-Perot cavity between the quartz tuning fork side and the fiber face. An experimental system was setup. The experiment for detection of water vapour in the open environment was carried on. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 2.80 x 10(-7) cm(-1) x W x Hz(-1/2) was achieved. The result demonstrated that the sensitivity of the all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is about 2.6 times higher than that of the conventional QEPAS system. The all-optical quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy system is immune to electromagnetic interference, safe in flammable and explosive gas detection, suitable for high temperature and high humidity environments and realizable for long distance, multi-point and network sensing.

  11. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of ethylene using a 10.5 μm quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Li, Zhili; Ren, Wei

    2016-02-22

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor has been developed for the sensitive detection of ethylene (C2H4) at 10.5 µm using a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. At this long-wavelength infrared, the key acoustic elements of quartz tuning fork and micro-resonators were optimized to improve the detection signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of >4. The sensor calibration demonstrated an excellent linear response (R2>0.999) to C2H4 concentration at the selected operating pressure of 500 and 760 Torr. With a minimum detection limit of 50 parts per billion (ppb) achieved at an averaging time of 70 s, the sensor has been deployed for measuring the C2H4 efflux during the respiration of biological samples in an agronomic environment.

  12. Clinical Study of the Value of PCT, ABI and 128 Hz Tuning Fork Combined with 10 g Monofilament in Evaluating the Prognosis of Diabetic Foot%PCT、 ABI、128 Hz音叉联合10克单丝对糖尿病足预后评估价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 游东; 梁永

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨降钙素原(PCT)、踝肱指数(ABI)、 Rydel-seifer分级音叉(128 Hz音叉)联合10 g单丝对糖尿病足预后评估的临床价值。方法选择243例糖尿病患者,其中观察组为糖尿病足患者50例,对照组为非糖尿病足183例,对其临床资料进行回顾性分析糖尿病足的相关因素。根据患者预后分为两组,比较其PCT水平、 ABI、128 Hz音叉联合10 g单丝结果。结果多因素 Logistic 回归分析显示,肥胖、空腹血糖、128 Hz音叉及PCT升高、 ABI、10 g单丝降低是糖尿病足的危险因素。截肢组患者PCT水平及128 Hz音叉结果高于非截肢组, ABI、10 g单丝结果低于非截肢组,两组比较,差异具有统计学意义, P<0.05。结论肥胖、空腹血糖、128 Hz音叉及PCT升高、 ABI、10 g单丝降低在糖尿病的进展过程中起着重要作用,应给予足够重视,积极对症治疗,降低其截肢率。%Objective To investigate the clinical value of procalcitonin (PCT), ankle brachial index (ABI) and Rydel-seifer tuning fork rating (128 Hz tuning fork) combined with 10 g monofilament in evaluating the prognosis of diabetic foot. Methods 243 cases of patients with diabetes were selected, the observation group of 50 patients with diabetic foot, compared with the control group of 183 cases of non diabetic foot. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed and the related factors of diabetic foot were analyzed by SPSS19. 0 statistics software. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the prognosis of the patients and the results of the level of PCT, ABI, and 128 Hz fork combined with 10g monofilament. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the increase of obesity, fasting blood glucose, 128 Hz tuning fork and PCT and the decrease of ABI and 10 g monofilament were the risk factors for diabetic foot. The scores of the level of PCT level and 128 Hz tuning fork of the patients in amputation group

  13. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1 degree C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273 degrees C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and…

  14. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  15. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...

  16. On non-forking spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem; Shelah, Saharon

    2012-01-01

    Non-forking is one of the most important notions in modern model theory capturing the idea of a generic extension of a type (which is a far-reaching generalization of the concept of a generic point of a variety). To a countable first-order theory we associate its non-forking spectrum - a function of two cardinals kappa and lambda giving the supremum of the possible number of types over a model of size lambda that do not fork over a sub-model of size kappa. This is a natural generalization of the stability function of a theory. We make progress towards classifying the non-forking spectra. On the one hand, we show that the possible values a non-forking spectrum may take are quite limited. On the other hand, we develop a general technique for constructing theories with a prescribed non-forking spectrum, thus giving a number of examples. In particular, we answer negatively a question of Adler whether NIP is equivalent to bounded non-forking. In addition, we answer a question of Keisler regarding the number of cut...

  17. Discrimination method of forked larch trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wen-bin; Sun Ren-shan; Liu Xu-hua; Liu Yong

    2006-01-01

    For the demands of automatíc pruning, an effective discrimination rule of the forked and non-forked larch trees is established. First, information of trunk and branch diameters of a larch plantations was collected from the west mountain of Beijing. The growth characteristics of the forked and non-forked trees were studied. Given the statistical characteristics of the trunk and branch diameters, a discriminant function of the forked branch and non-forked larch trees was established statistically. Excellent discrimination results were obtained by the function and the rule. The study presents an effective discrimination rule to separate forked trees from straight trees for automatic pruning.

  18. Simulation of quartz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, M.; Radius, R.; Mohr, R.

    Quartz resonators are suitable as novel sensor elements in the field of profilometry and three dimensional measurement techniques. This application requires a tailoring of the oscillator circuit which is performed by a network analysis program. The equivalent network parameters are computed by a finite element analysis. The mechanical loading of the quartz is modeled by a viscous damping approach.

  19. Radiation Damage of Quartz Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Hagopian, V

    1999-01-01

    Quartz fibers are used in high energy physics experiments as the active medium in high radiation area calorimetry. Quartz fibers are also used in the transmission of optical signals. Even though quartz does not damage by moderate amounts of irradiation, the clad of the fibers and the protective coating ( buffer) do damage reducing light transmission. Various types of quartz fibers have been irradiated and measured for light transmission. The most radiation hard quartz fibers are those with quartz clad and aluminum buffer.

  20. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  1. Vacuum electrolysis of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James Claude

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure is directed to a method for processing quartz used in fabricating crystal resonators such that transient frequency change of resonators exposed to pulse irradiation is virtually eliminated. The method involves heating the crystal quartz in a hydrogen-free atmosphere while simultaneously applying an electric field in the Z-axis direction of the crystal. The electric field is maintained during the cool-down phase of the process.

  2. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Mistrik, Martin; Neelsen, Kai J

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression...... a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks....... of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity...

  3. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Quartz crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  5. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxamusa, S H

    2011-11-16

    We are using a Qpod quartz crystal microbalance (manufactured by Inficon) for use as a low-volume non-volatile residue analysis tool. Inficon has agreed to help troubleshoot some of our measurements and are requesting to view some sample data, which are attached. The basic principle of an NVR analysis is to evaporate a known volume of solvent, and weigh the remaining residue to determine the purity of the solvent. A typical NVR analysis uses 60 g of solvent and can measure residue with an accuracy of +/- 0.01 mg. The detection limit is thus (0.01 mg)/(60 g) = 0.17 ppm. We are attempting to use a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to make a similar measurement. The attached data show the response of the QCM as a 5-20 mg drop of solvent evaporates on its surface. The change in mass registered by the QCM after the drop evaporates is the residue that deposits on the crystal. On some measurements, the change in mass in less than zero, which is aphysical since the drop will leave behind {>=}0 mass of residue. The vendor, Inficon, has agreed to look at these data as a means to help troubleshoot the cause.

  6. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  7. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Fugger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity, is required for early phosphorylation of ATM substrates such as CHK2 and CtIP as well as hyperphosphorylation of RPA. These phosphorylations occur prior to apparent DNA double-strand break formation. Furthermore, FBH1-dependent signaling promotes checkpoint control and preserves genome integrity. We propose a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks.

  8. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Wastewater Management Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    denitrification or clinoptilolite ion exchange is required to meet the ammonia and total nitrogen levels. The effluent from these unit processes would be filtered...32 45 Dissolved Oxygen (mg/1) At Grand Forks 6.0 7.0 8.6 i0.0 12.1 At East Grand Forks 6.5 7.4 9.0 11.4 12.7 Ammonia Nitrogen (mg/i) At Grand Forks...Concentration (mg/i) Total Solids 700 Dissolved Solids 500 Suspended Solids 200 BOD5 200 COD 500 Total Nitrogen 40 Organic Nitrogen 15 Ammonia Nitrogen

  9. Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Nanobalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzelt, György

    The method of piezoelectric microgravimetry (nanogravimetry) using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) or nanobalance (EQCN) can be considered as a novel and much more sensitive version of electrogravimetry. The EQCN technique has become a widely used technique in several areas of electrochemistry, electroanalytical chemistry, bioelectrochemistry, etc. [1-10]. Obviously, mass changes occurring during adsorption, sorption, electrosorption, electrodeposition, or spontaneous deposition can be followed, which is very helpful for the elucidation of reaction mechanism via identification of the species accumulated on the surface. These investigations include metal and alloy deposition, underpotential deposition, electroplating, synthesis of conducting polymers by electropolymerization, adsorption of biologically active materials, and analytical determination of small ions and biomolecules. Of course, the opposite processes, i.e., spontaneous dissolution, electrodissolution, corrosion, can also be studied. Electrochemical oscillations, in which the formation and oxidation of chemisorbed molecular fragments play a determining role, have been studied, too. The majority of the investigations have been devoted to ion and solvent transport associated with the redox transformations of electrochemically active polymers. Similar studies have been carried out regarding polynuclear surface layers such as metal hexacyanometalates as well as inorganic and organic microcrystals of different compositions.

  10. Forks impacts and motivations in free and open source projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Viseur

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Forking is a mechanism of splitting in a community and is typically found in the free and open source software field. As a failure of cooperation in a context of open innovation, forking is a practical and informative subject of study. In-depth researches concerning the fork phenomenon are uncommon. We therefore conducted a detailed study of 26 forks from popular free and open source projects. We created fact sheets, highlighting the impact and motivations to fork. We particularly point to the fact that the desire for greater technical differentiation and problems of project governance are major sources of conflict.

  11. Ground-Tracking With a Forked Tongue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists since Aristotle’s day have wondered why the tongues of snakes and many lizards——are forked, a trait that dates from at least the Cretaceous,more than 65 million years ago.Now Kurt Schwenk,a University of Connecticut evolutionary biologist, thinks he knows the answer. "It gives them the abil-

  12. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  13. Homologous recombination as a replication fork escort: fork-protection and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-12-27

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  14. Code Forking, Governance, and Sustainability in Open Source Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Lindman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The right to fork open source code is at the core of open source licensing. All open source licenses grant the right to fork their code, that is to start a new development effort using an existing code as its base. Thus, code forking represents the single greatest tool available for guaranteeing sustainability in open source software. In addition to bolstering program sustainability, code forking directly affects the governance of open source initiatives. Forking, and even the mere possibility of forking code, affects the governance and sustainability of open source initiatives on three distinct levels: software, community, and ecosystem. On the software level, the right to fork makes planned obsolescence, versioning, vendor lock-in, end-of-support issues, and similar initiatives all but impossible to implement. On the community level, forking impacts both sustainability and governance through the power it grants the community to safeguard against unfavourable actions by corporations or project leaders. On the business-ecosystem level forking can serve as a catalyst for innovation while simultaneously promoting better quality software through natural selection. Thus, forking helps keep open source initiatives relevant and presents opportunities for the development and commercialization of current and abandoned programs.

  15. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  16. Needs assessment for the Greenway Grand Forks-East Grand Forks development and public education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munski, Laura

    Following the flood of 1997, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers included the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks (the Greenway) as a flood control measure for Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. It extends along both the Red River of the North and the Red Lake River, encompassing 2200 acres of land. The cities of Grand Forks and East Grand Forks hired consultants to assist with the postflood planning process. The planning process culminated with the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report (Flink, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine if the development of the Greenway addressed the objectives of the planning report. The history of the land adjacent to the rivers was reviewed to document the progression of riverfront development. Anecdotal evidence was collected, field observations were made, city council minutes were reviewed, Greenway Technical Committee members were interviewed, Greenway Technical Committee minutes were reviewed, and the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks survey results were reviewed to determine if the objectives of the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report were addressed. A cross section survey was designed by Laura Munski for this dissertation research. The survey was approved by the Greenway Technical Committee. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data from the community. The purpose of the survey portion of the research project was to ascertain how residents were kept informed of activities on the Greenway and what amenities residents were using on the Greenway and to solicit their comments regarding the Greenway. The results of the survey research were used in both marketing and event planning for the Greenway. The singular qualitative survey question gave respondents an opportunity to share their comments regarding the Greenway. The qualitative data analysis provided insight to the amenities and educational programs desired by respondents, their concerns regarding the

  17. Code forking in open-source software: a requirements perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ernst, Neil A; Mylopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    To fork a project is to copy the existing code base and move in a direction different than that of the erstwhile project leadership. Forking provides a rapid way to address new requirements by adapting an existing solution. However, it can also create a plethora of similar tools, and fragment the developer community. Hence, it is not always clear whether forking is the right strategy. In this paper, we describe a mixed-methods exploratory case study that investigated the process of forking a project. The study concerned the forking of an open-source tool for managing software projects, Trac. Trac was forked to address differing requirements in an academic setting. The paper makes two contributions to our understanding of code forking. First, our exploratory study generated several theories about code forking in open source projects, for further research. Second, we investigated one of these theories in depth, via a quantitative study. We conjectured that the features of the OSS forking process would allow new...

  18. Evolution of tail fork depth in genus Hirundo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masaru; Arai, Emi; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    A classic example of a sexually selected trait, the deep fork tail of the barn swallow Hirundo rustica is now claimed to have evolved and be maintained mainly via aerodynamic advantage rather than sexually selected advantage. However, this aerodynamic advantage hypothesis does not clarify which flight habits select for/against deep fork tails, causing diversity of tail fork depth in hirundines. Here, by focusing on the genus Hirundo, we investigated whether the large variation in tail fork depth could be explained by the differential flight habits. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we found that migrant species had deeper fork tails, but less colorful plumage, than the other species, indicating that migration favors a specific trait, deep fork tails. At the same time, tail fork depth but not plumage coloration decreased with increasing bill size - a proxy of prey size, suggesting that foraging on larger prey items favors shallower fork tails. Variation of tail fork depth in the genus Hirundo may be explained by differential flight habits, even without assuming sexual selection.

  19. Electromodulated absorption in smoky quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, W.E. van den; Volger, J.

    1974-01-01

    The optical absorption coefficient of “smoky” quartz (containing aluminium) can be modulated by applying an electric field. The effect saturates at high fields and low temperatures and reaches a maximum at 535 nm. The results are discussed in terms of a model consisting of a colour centre, dipolar i

  20. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  1. Greatly improved small inductance measurement using quartz crystal parasitic capacitance compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matko, Vojko; Jezernik, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Generally, quartz crystal inductance frequency pulling in oscillators is very low and therefore is not often used in practice. The new method of improving frequency pullability uses inductance to compensate for quartz stray capacitances. To this end, a special AT fundamental quartz crystal working near the antiresonance frequency is selected. By modifying its equivalent circuit with load inductance and series tuning capacitance, the magnetic sensing of the circuit can be highly improved. The experimental results show that the new approach using the quartz crystal stray capacitance compensation method increases the frequency pulling range (from ≅2 kHz/μH to ≅600 kHz/μH) by ×300 depending on the type of oscillator, making possible the measurement of nano-magnetic changes.

  2. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Social and Environmental Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    character- ized by wide variations in temperature, light to moderate precipitation, plentiful sunshine and nearly continuous air movement. Weather patterns...Forks Bicentennial Committee for its photo of the University of North Dakota’s Eternal Flame Memorial. 2. To Mr. Dan Metz for the use of his wildlife

  3. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  4. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the season of navigation, parties engaged in...

  5. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  6. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  7. Self-tuning tuned mass damper (TMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) are heavily damped resonant devices which add damping to lightly damped, vibrational modes of a structure by dynamically coupling into the lightly damped modes. In practice, a TMD is a damped spring/mass resonator that is tuned so that its frequency is close to a lightly damped mode on the host structure. The TMD is attached to the host structure at a location of large amplitude motion for the mode to be dampened, and its motion is coupled into the host structure's motion. If the TMD is tuned correctly, two damped vibrational modes result, which take the place of the original lightly damped mode of the host structure and heavily damped mode of the TMD. Since aerospace structures tend to respond unfavorably at lightly damped modes in the presence of a dynamic disturbance environment, introduction of one or several TMDs can greatly reduce the dynamic response of a structure by damping problematic modes. A self-tuning TMD is described that can perform all the steps necessary to automatically tune itself and minimize the response of a structure with lightly damped modes and a dynamic excitation. The self-tuning TMD concept introduced here uses a voice coil / magnet combination as -an actuator which enables an innovative stiffness adjustment mechanism -a loss mechanism for the tuned mass damper -a means of excitation for identifying lightly damped modes of the host structure Along with an accelerometer and a tethered power supply/computer, the self-tuning TMD can automatically identify and damp lightly damped modes.

  8. The Trail Inventory of Deep Fork NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  9. Inventory and Monitoring Plan for Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Inventory and Monitoring Plan (IMP) is prepared to document the inventory and monitoring surveys that will, or could be conducted at Deep Fork National Wildlife...

  10. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  11. An inventory of wildlife resources, Marsh Fork, summer 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contracted us to do a wildlife resource inventory of the Marsh Fork in summer, 1973. We had planned the inventory in two...

  12. Environmental Assessment: Demolish 452 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants thriving in this...native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View Nature 32 Preserve in the...characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. 31 Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in drainage

  13. Development of Quartz Fiber Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD40 \\\\ \\\\ Very Forward Calorimeters (VFCs) in LHC detectors should cover the pseudorapidity range from $\\eta$~=~2.5 to at least $\\eta$~=~5 in order to compute missing transverse energy and for jet tagging. Operation at such high rapidity requires the use of a calorimetry technique that is very radiation resistant, fast and insensitive to radioactivity (especially to neutrons). This can be accomplished through the Quartz-Calorimeter~(Q-Cal) concept of embedding silica core fibers, that resist to the Gigarad radiation level, into an absorber. In this calorimeter the shower particles produce light through the Cherenkov effect generating a signal less than 10~ns in duration. Unique to this new technology the visible energy of hadronic showers has a transverse dimension nearly an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional calorimeters, enabling precise spatial resolution, sharper isolation cuts and better jet recognition against the minimum bias events background. Last but not least, most radioactive ...

  14. The Quartz Analog Watch: A Wonder Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes how a quartz watch works. Discusses the quartz crystal, its form, and how its frequency is set to a standard; the integrated circuit chip that drives the crystal in vibration, scales its frequency down, and forms pulses that turn the motor; and the motor that drives the gear train that turns the hands. (ZWH)

  15. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  16. Fabrication of tuning-fork based AFM and STM tungsten probe

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Falih, Hisham

    2011-12-01

    We compare the sharpness of tungsten probe tips produced by the single-step and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching processes. A small radius of curvature (RoC) of 25 nm or less was routinely obtained when the two-step electrochemical etching (TEE) process was adopted, while the smallest achievable RoC was ∼10 nm, rendering it suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) applications. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Mitochondrial retrograde regulation tuning fork in nuclear genes expressions of higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Yang; Mingfang Zhang; Jingquan Yu

    2008-01-01

    In plant cells, there are three organelles: the nucleus, chloroplast, and mitochondria that store genetic information. The nucleus possesses the majority of genetic information and controls most aspects of organelles gene expression, growth, and development. In return,organdies also send signals back to regulate nuclear gene expression, a process defined as retrograde regulation. The best studies of organelles to nucleus retrograde regulation exist in plant chloroplast-to-nuclear regulation and yeast mitochondria-to-nuclear regulation. In this review, we summarize the recent understanding of mitochondrial retrograde regulation in higher plant, which involves multiple potential signaling pathway in relation to cytoplasmic male-sterility, biotic stress, and abiotie stress. With respect to mitochondrial retrograde regulation signal pathways involved in cytoplasmic male-sterility, we consider that nuclear transcriptional factor genes are the targeted genes regulated by mitoehondria to determine the abnormal reproductive development, and the MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in this regulation in Brassica juncea. When plants suffer biotic and abiotie stress, plant cells will initiate cell death or other events directed toward recovering from stress. During this process, we propose that mitochondria may determine how plant cell responds to a given stress through retrograde regulation. Meanwhile, several transducer molecules have also been discussed here. In particular, thePaepe research group reported that leaf mitochondrial modulated whole cell redox homeostasis, set antioxidant capacity, and determinedstress resistance through altered signaling and diurnal regulation, which is an indication of plant mitochondria with more active function than ever.

  18. Back to basics in diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy with the tuning fork!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JWG; Smit, AJ; Lefrandt, JD; van der Hoeven, JH; Hoogenberg, K; Links, TP

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- Several national and international scoring systems are used to diagnose diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP). The variety in these scores and the lack of data on validity and predictive value has led to a comparison and validation of the scores with clinical standards for PNP to determine the mo

  19. Design and Analysis of a New Tuning Fork Structure for Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a micromachined resonant pressure sensor. The sensor is designed to optimize the sensitivity and reduce the cross-talk between the driving electrodes and sensing electrodes. The relationship between the sensitivity of the sensor and the main design parameters is analyzed both theoretically and numerically. The sensing and driving electrodes are optimized to get both high sensing capacitance and low cross-talk. This sensor is fabricated using a micromachining process based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI wafer. An open-loop measurement system and a closed-loop self-oscillation system is employed to measure the characteristics of the sensor. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a pressure sensitivity of about 29 Hz/kPa, a nonlinearity of 0.02%FS, a hysteresis error of 0.05%FS, and a repeatability error of 0.01%FS. The temperature coefficient is less than 2 Hz/°C in the range of −40 to 80 °C and the short-term stability of the sensor is better than 0.005%FS.

  20. Teaching about Mechanical Waves and Sound with a Tuning Fork and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Silvio; Colantonio, Arturo; Puddu, Emanuella; Galano, Silvia; Testa, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Literature in "Physics Education" has shown that students encounter many difficulties in understanding wave propagation. Such difficulties lead to misconceptions also in understanding sound, often used as context to teach wave propagation. To address these issues, we present in this paper a module in which the students are engaged in…

  1. Teaching about Mechanical Waves and Sound with a Tuning Fork and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Silvio; Colantonio, Arturo; Puddu, Emanuella; Galano, Silvia; Testa, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Literature in "Physics Education" has shown that students encounter many difficulties in understanding wave propagation. Such difficulties lead to misconceptions also in understanding sound, often used as context to teach wave propagation. To address these issues, we present in this paper a module in which the students are engaged in…

  2. Fascin, may the Forked be with you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Llimargas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The FGFR pathway triggers a wide range of key biological responses. Among others, the Breathless (Btl, Drosophila FGFR1) receptor cascade promotes cell migration during embryonic tracheal system development. However, how the actin cytoskeleton responds to Btl pathway activation to induce cell migration has remained largely unclear. Our recent results shed light into this issue by unveiling a link between the actin-bundling protein Singed (Sn) and the Btl pathway. We showed that the Btl pathway regulates sn, which leads to the stabilization of the actin bundles required for filopodia formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. This regulation contributes to tracheal migration, tracheal branch fusion and tracheal cell elongation. Parallel actin bundles (PABs) are usually cross-linked by more than one actin-bundling protein. Accordingly, we have also shown that sn synergistically interacts with forked (f), another actin crosslinker. In this Extra View we extend f analysis and hypothesize how both actin-bundling proteins may act together to regulate the PABs during tracheal embryonic development. Although both proteins are required for similar tracheal events, we suggest that Sn is essential for actin bundle initiation and stiffening, while F is required for the lengthening and further stabilization of the PABs.

  3. Tuning Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bradley

    2011-03-01

    In April 2009, the Lumina Foundation launched its Tuning USA project. Faculty teams in selected disciplines from Indiana, Minnesota, and Utah started pilot Tuning programs at their home institutions. Using Europe's Bologna Process as a guide, Utah physicists worked to reach a consensus about the knowledge and skills that should characterize the 2-year, batchelor's, and master's degree levels. I will share my experience as a member of Utah's physics Tuning team, and describe our progress, frustrations, and evolving understanding of the Tuning project's history, methods, and goals.

  4. Mechanical twinning in small quartz crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, J. W.; Newnham, R. E.; Cross, L. E.

    1982-02-01

    Quartz is known to be ferrobielastic; that is, quartz crystals have domain states (Dauphiné twins) which differ in their elastic compliance values and which can be switched by an appropriately oriented stress. Polycrystalline quartz has also been reported (Tullis 1970) to show preferential orientation of these domains following application of large uniaxial stresses. These experiments were designed to study twinning of synthetic quartz “grains” (minimum size 0.07×0.07×0.02 cm) in specially-constructed composites and of grains in three natural quartz aggregates — a quartzite, a novaculite, and a jasper. Backreflection X-ray techniques were used to verify twinning in the composite grains, while special electroding and electrical detection allowed the twinning processes to be examined in “real time.” Small synthetic quartz crystals were found to behave identically to the massive samples previously studied. Electrical pulses due to the reversal of piezoelectric coefficient d 11 in twinned quartz were detected from quartzite and from the man-made composites. Novaculite also gave electrical pulses which were probably from twinning (evidenced by the correlation of expected and observed pulse sizes and shapes), while no pulses from the jaspers indicative of twinning were detected. Grain size distribution differences are considered the main structural reason for the different behaviors.

  5. More forks on the road to replication stress recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chris Allen; Amanda K. Ashley; Robert Hromas; Jac A. Nickoloff

    2011-01-01

    High-fidelity replication of DNA, and its accurate segregation to daughter cells, is critical for maintaining genome stability and suppressing cancer. DNA replication forks are stalled by many DNA lesions, activating checkpoint proteins that stabilize stalled forks.Stalled forks may eventually collapse, producing a broken DNA end. Fork restart is typically mediated by proteins initially identified by their rotes in homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In recent years, several proteins involved in DSB repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) have been implicated in the replication stress response, including DNA-PKcs, Ku,DNA Ligase IV-XRCC4, Artemis, XLF and Metnase. It is currently unclear whether NHEJ proteins are involved in the replication stress response through indirect (signaling) roles, and/or direct roles involving DNA end joining. Additional complexity in the replication stress response centers around RPA, which undergoes significant post-translational modification after stress, and RAD52, a conserved HR protein whose role in DSB repair may have shifted to another protein in higher eukaryotes, such as BRCA2, but retained its rote in fork restart. Most cancer therapeutic strategies create DNA reputation stress. Thus, it is imperative to gain a better understanding of replication stress response proteins and pathways to improve cancer therapy.

  6. OK - Establishing a mussel monitoring program to evaluate point-source discharges into Deep Fork NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study incorporating several investigative methods was conducted at the Deep Fork River, Okmulgee, Oklahoma in and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  7. SAW Temperature Sensor on Quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhgoon, Sergei; Shvetsov, Alexander; Ancev, Ivan; Bogoslovsky, Sergei; Sapozhnikov, Gennadiy; Trokhimets, Konstantin; Derkach, Mikhail

    2015-06-01

    For biomedical applications, narrow temperature range and high sensor accuracy requirements define the need for high temperature sensitivity. Wireless SAW sensors connected to antennas need a reference element to account for changes in electromagnetic coupling between the transmitter and receiver antennas. A pair of sensors with different temperature sensitivities may serve as a self-referenced sensor assembly. This justifies the need for materials with useful SAW resonator properties and with the largest difference between temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) for a resonator pair on a single substrate. We have identified several cuts of quartz having useful properties with a TCF difference up to 140 ppm/°C for a pair of resonators on a single substrate. As a rule, placing such resonators on a single substrate requires their rotation by up to 90° relative to each other. The limited range of cuts presents a unique opportunity to place both resonators along the X+90° direction with one resonator using Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu (BGS) waves (with electrodes placed along the x-axis) and the other one (with electrodes inclined by about ±10° to the x-axis) using quasi-Rayleigh waves. These cuts are close to the 70°Y cut where a high TCF difference is reached together with acceptable characteristics of the resonators. Resonators were designed for all useful cuts (including the 70°Y cut) and tested. The use of different periods in reflectors and interdigital transducer (IDT) together with individual choice of gaps between reflectors and IDT meant achieving low spurious content in resonator responses. The quality factors reached values up to 3500 at central frequencies around 915 MHz for both BGS and quasi-Rayleigh types of waves. The measured difference of the TCF is about 138 ppm/°C on 70°Y cut that is close to the calculated value.

  8. Electronic dipole resonance in smoky quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssen, J.; Volger, J.

    1967-01-01

    Microwave absorption in smoky quartz mono-crystal is ascribed to resonance transitions of trapped electrons between initially configurational degenerated states, which are Stark-splitted by a polarizing electric field.

  9. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  10. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance;

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show...... that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation...... of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA...

  11. Geometric Metasurface Fork Gratings for Vortex Beam Generation and Manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shumei; Li, Guixin; Zhang, Shuang; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, optical vortex beams possessing orbital angular momentum have caught much attention due to their potential for high capacity optical communications. This capability arises from the unbounded topological charges of orbital angular momentum (OAM) that provides infinite freedoms for encoding information. The two most common approaches for generating vortex beams are through fork diffraction gratings and spiral phase plates. While realization of conventional spiral phase plate requires complicated 3D fabrication, the emerging field of metasurfaces has provided a planar and facile solution for generating vortex beams of arbitrary orbit angular momentum. Here we realize a novel type of geometric metasurface fork grating that seamlessly combine the functionality of a metasurface phase plate for vortex beam generation, and that of a linear phase gradient metasurface for controlling the wave propagation direction. The metasurface fork grating is therefore capable of simultaneously controlling both the...

  12. Intensity of quartz cathodoluminescence and trace-element content in quartz from the porphyry copper deposit at Butte, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, B.G.; Reed, M.H.; Dilles, J.H.; Kent, A.J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Textures of hydrothermal quartz revealed by cathodoluminescence using a scanning electron microscope (SEM-CL) reflect the physical and chemical environment of quartz formation. Variations in intensity of SEM-CL can be used to distinguish among quartz from superimposed mineralization events in a single vein. In this study, we present a technique to quantify the cathodoluminescent intensity of quartz within individual and among multiple samples to relate luminescence intensity to specific mineralizing events. This technique has been applied to plutonic quartz and three generations of hydrothermal veins at the porphyry copper deposit in Butte, Montana. Analyzed veins include early quartz-molybdenite veins with potassic alteration, pyrite-quartz veins with sericitic alteration, and Main Stage veins with intense sericitic alteration. CL intensity of quartz is diagnostic of each mineralizing event and can be used to fingerprint quartz and its fluid inclusions, isotopes, trace elements, etc., from specific mineralizing episodes. Furthermore, CL intensity increases proportional to temperature of quartz formation, such that plutonic quartz from the Butte quartz monzonite (BQM) that crystallized at temperatures near 750 ??C luminesces with the highest intensity, whereas quartz that precipitated at ???250 ??C in Main Stage veins luminesces with the least intensity. Trace-element analyses via electron microprobe and laser ablation-ICP-MS indicate that plutonic quartz and each generation of hydrothermal quartz from Butte is dominated by characteristic trace amounts of Al, P, Ti, and Fe. Thus, in addition to CL intensity, each generation of quartz can be distinguished based on its unique trace-element content. Aluminum is generally the most abundant element in all generations of quartz, typically between 50 and 200 ppm, but low-temperature, Main Stage quartz containing 400 to 3600 ppm Al is enriched by an order of magnitude relative to all other quartz generations. Phosphorous

  13. Java performance tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Shirazi, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Performance has been an important issue for Java developers ever since the first version hit the streets. Over the years, Java performance has improved dramatically, but tuning is essential to get the best results, especially for J2EE applications. You can never have code that runs too fast. Java Peformance Tuning, 2nd edition provides a comprehensive and indispensable guide to eliminating all types of performance problems. Using many real-life examples to work through the tuning process in detail, JPT shows how tricks such as minimizing object creation and replacing strings with arrays can

  14. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01

    Wendy Lopez and Associates, Inc. (WLA) was asked to provide a conservation and ecological restoration overview for the City of Dallas as part of an Elm Fork Floodplain Management Study. This study encompasses a unique portion of the main stem of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas, Texas. The project area includes approximately 8.5 square miles, half of which lie within a 100-year floodplain. Approximately 15% of the project area is mature bottomland hardwood forest and s...

  15. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juachi U. Dimude

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism.

  16. Forked and Integrated Variants In An Open-Source Firmware Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Schulze, Sandro; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    and interactive source management platforms such as Github. We study advantages and disadvantages of forking using the case of Marlin, an open source firmware for 3D printers. We find that many problems and advantages of cloning do translate to forking. Interestingly, the Marlin community uses both forking...

  17. TUNE: Compiler-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Mary [University of Utah

    2014-09-18

    This project has developed compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 Jaguar system at Oak Ridge, which has multi-core Opteron nodes with SSE-3 SIMD extensions, and the Cray XE6 Hopper system at NERSC. To achieve this goal, we combined compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation, which have been developed by the PIs over the past several years. We examined DOE Office of Science applications to identify performance bottlenecks and apply our system to computational kernels that operate on dense arrays. Our goal for this performance-tuning technology has been to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, we aim to make our technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  18. Robust Self Tuning Controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis concerns robustness properties of adaptive controllers. It is addressed to methods for robustifying self tuning controllers with respect to abrupt changes in the plant parameters. In the thesis an algorithm for estimating abruptly changing parameters is presented. The estimator...... has several operation modes and a detector for controlling the mode. A special self tuning controller has been developed to regulate plant with changing time delay....

  19. Accurate aging of juvenile salmonids using fork lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Suresh; Gerken, Jonathon; Ashline, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile salmon life history strategies, survival, and habitat interactions may vary by age cohort. However, aging individual juvenile fish using scale reading is time consuming and can be error prone. Fork length data are routinely measured while sampling juvenile salmonids. We explore the performance of aging juvenile fish based solely on fork length data, using finite Gaussian mixture models to describe multimodal size distributions and estimate optimal age-discriminating length thresholds. Fork length-based ages are compared against a validation set of juvenile coho salmon, Oncorynchus kisutch, aged by scales. Results for juvenile coho salmon indicate greater than 95% accuracy can be achieved by aging fish using length thresholds estimated from mixture models. Highest accuracy is achieved when aged fish are compared to length thresholds generated from samples from the same drainage, time of year, and habitat type (lentic versus lotic), although relatively high aging accuracy can still be achieved when thresholds are extrapolated to fish from populations in different years or drainages. Fork length-based aging thresholds are applicable for taxa for which multiple age cohorts coexist sympatrically. Where applicable, the method of aging individual fish is relatively quick to implement and can avoid ager interpretation bias common in scale-based aging.

  20. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  1. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  2. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  3. The new piezoelectric single crystal obtained by the Ge doping in the α-quartz structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclau, M.; Grozescu, A.; Bucur, R.; Poienar, M.; Vlazan, P.; Grozescu, I.; Miclau, N.; Muscutariu, I.

    2009-03-01

    The most interesting properties of the quartz-like crystals are its piezoelectric properties, which are strongly influenced by the intrinsic structural distortions of the material and the crystal growth conditions. Thus, physical properties such as coupling coefficient, the αβ transition can be directly related to structural distortions in terms of the bridging angle. We propose a new way to increase the structural distortion, using Ge to dope the SiO2 structure with respect to α-quartz structure type. Growth of α -SixGe1-xO2 crystal was realized hydrothermally using a temperature gradient method. Single crystals were investigated by electron microprobe analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results open the possibility to tune the piezoelectric properties of these materials by varying the chemical composition.

  4. Estimating Quartz Reserves Using Compositional Kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Taboada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine spatial distribution and volume of four commercial quartz grades, namely, silicon metal, ferrosilicon, aggregate, and kaolin (depending on content in impurities in a quartz seam. The chemical and mineralogical composition of the reserves in the seam were determined from samples collected from outcrops, blasting operations, and exploratory drilling, and compositional kriging was used to calculate the volume and distribution of the reserves. A more accurate knowledge of the deposit ensures better mine planning, leading to higher profitability and an improved relationship with the environment.

  5. Complier-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning (TUNE) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chame, Jacqueline [USC-ISI

    2013-06-07

    TUNE was created to develop compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 system at Oak Ridge. TUNE combines compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation. The goal of this performance-tuning technology is to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, TUNE aims to make compiler technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  6. Complier-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning (TUNE) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chame, Jacqueline [USC-ISI

    2013-06-07

    TUNE was created to develop compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 system at Oak Ridge. TUNE combines compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation. The goal of this performance-tuning technology is to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, TUNE aims to make compiler technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  7. Data Acquisition System for Quartz Crystal Microbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Romero Felizardo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a data acquisition system used in a mass sensor: quartz crystal microbalance. This system reads the frequency of this sensor along the time and sends the collected data to the computer through a serial interface.

  8. Bubble Formation in Silicon-Quartz Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kakimoto, K.; EGUCHI, M.; Ozoe, H.

    1997-01-01

    Bubble formation at an interface between silicon melt and a quartz crucible was studied by thermodynamical calculation and visualization of bubble formation using X-ray radiography. A phase diagram of silicon-oxygen (Si-O) system is also calculated from the reported thermodynamical data. Critical temperature and radius of bubble formation at the interface was discussed.

  9. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  10. Planck-LFI radiometers tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttaia, F; Stringhetti, L; Terenzi, L; Villa, F; Butler, R C; Franceschi, E [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, INAF, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mennella, A; Tomasi, M; Bersanelli, M; Cappellini, B; Franceschet, C; Hoyland, R [Universita degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maris, M; Frailis, M [INAF / OATS, via Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy); Cuevas, L P [Research and Scientific Support Department of ESA, ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20013 Milano (Italy); Davis, R; Lowe, S [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gregorio, A [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Leonardi, R, E-mail: cuttaia@iasfbo.inaf.i [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes the Planck Low Frequency Instrument tuning activities performed through the ground test campaigns, from Unit to Satellite Levels. Tuning is key to achieve the best possible instrument performance and tuning parameters strongly depend on thermal and electrical conditions. For this reason tuning has been repeated several times during ground tests and it has been repeated in flight before starting nominal operations. The paper discusses the tuning philosophy, the activities and the obtained results, highlighting developments and changes occurred during test campaigns. The paper concludes with an overview of tuning performed during the satellite cryogenic test campaign (Summer 2008) and of the plans for the just started in-flight calibration.

  11. Arrays of optical vortices formed by "fork" holograms

    CERN Document Server

    Bekshaev, A Ya; Mohammed, K A

    2014-01-01

    Singular light beams with optical vortices (OV) are often generated by means of thin binary gratings with groove bifurcation ("fork holograms") that produce a set of diffracted beams with different OV charges. Usually, only single separate beams are used and investigated; here we consider the whole set of diffracted OV beams that, at certain conditions, are involved in efficient mutual interference to form a characteristic pattern where the ring-like structure of separate OV beams is replaced by series of bright and dark lines between adjacent diffraction orders. This pattern, well developed for high diffraction orders, reflects the main spatial properties of the diffracted beams as well as of the fork grating used for their generation. In particular, it confirms the theoretical model for the diffracted beams (Kummer beam model) and enables to determine the sign and the absolute value of the phase singularity embedded in the hologram.

  12. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia;

    2016-01-01

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3....../4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  13. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.;

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...... that the large aliquot data are more likely to be correct. We conclude that a comparison of quartz and feldspar doses provides a useful independent method for identifying well-bleached quartz samples, and that it is unwise to apply statistical models to dose distributions without clear evidence for the physical...

  14. Environmental Assessment: Demolish 934 of Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    the “ Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region...buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...identified as jurisdictional. Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands, and they are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the

  15. Environmental Assessment - Demolish 934 of Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    in the “ Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region...buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...identified as jurisdictional. Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands, and they are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the

  16. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddall, Phoebe

    1992-04-01

    In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

  17. 68erne – en forkælet generation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas Ekman; L. B. Jensen, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Kronikken gennemgår beskyldningerne mod 1968erne for at være en forkælet generation, der sidder på magten og pengene i Danmark. De væsentligste argumenter er, at de samfundsændringer, '1968' afstedkom, gav gode chancer for højtuddannede fra alle generationer. Til gengæld har de forringet chancerne...

  18. Environmental Assessment Housing Transfer at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-27

    of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky ...little bluestem, Indian grass, switchgrass, blue gramma, buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. 35 Two hundred and fifty five taxa...were identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid

  19. Environmental Assessment Tent City at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-15

    legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet...bluestem, Indian grass, switchgrass, blue gramma, buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. Two hundred and fifty five taxa were...identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid species are

  20. Molecular clock fork phylogenies: closed form analytic maximum likelihood solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Benny; Snir, Sagi

    2004-12-01

    Maximum likelihood (ML) is increasingly used as an optimality criterion for selecting evolutionary trees, but finding the global optimum is a hard computational task. Because no general analytic solution is known, numeric techniques such as hill climbing or expectation maximization (EM) are used in order to find optimal parameters for a given tree. So far, analytic solutions were derived only for the simplest model-three-taxa, two-state characters, under a molecular clock. Quoting Ziheng Yang, who initiated the analytic approach,"this seems to be the simplest case, but has many of the conceptual and statistical complexities involved in phylogenetic estimation."In this work, we give general analytic solutions for a family of trees with four-taxa, two-state characters, under a molecular clock. The change from three to four taxa incurs a major increase in the complexity of the underlying algebraic system, and requires novel techniques and approaches. We start by presenting the general maximum likelihood problem on phylogenetic trees as a constrained optimization problem, and the resulting system of polynomial equations. In full generality, it is infeasible to solve this system, therefore specialized tools for the molecular clock case are developed. Four-taxa rooted trees have two topologies-the fork (two subtrees with two leaves each) and the comb (one subtree with three leaves, the other with a single leaf). We combine the ultrametric properties of molecular clock fork trees with the Hadamard conjugation to derive a number of topology dependent identities. Employing these identities, we substantially simplify the system of polynomial equations for the fork. We finally employ symbolic algebra software to obtain closed formanalytic solutions (expressed parametrically in the input data). In general, four-taxa trees can have multiple ML points. In contrast, we can now prove that each fork topology has a unique(local and global) ML point.

  1. Stalled replication forks within heterochromatin require ATRX for protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, M S; Ivanochko, D; Hashem, L E; Curtin, M; Delorme, M; Goodall, E; Yan, K; Picketts, D J

    2016-05-12

    Expansive growth of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is a prerequisite to the temporal waves of neuronal differentiation that generate the six-layered neocortex, while also placing a heavy burden on proteins that regulate chromatin packaging and genome integrity. This problem is further reflected by the growing number of developmental disorders caused by mutations in chromatin regulators. ATRX gene mutations cause a severe intellectual disability disorder (α-thalassemia mental retardation X-linked (ATRX) syndrome; OMIM no. 301040), characterized by microcephaly, urogenital abnormalities and α-thalassemia. Although the ATRX protein is required for the maintenance of repetitive DNA within heterochromatin, how this translates to disease pathogenesis remain poorly understood and was a focus of this study. We demonstrate that Atrx(FoxG1Cre) forebrain-specific conditional knockout mice display poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) hyperactivation during neurogenesis and generate fewer late-born Cux1- and Brn2-positive neurons that accounts for the reduced cortical size. Moreover, DNA damage, induced Parp-1 and Atm activation is elevated in progenitor cells and contributes to their increased level of cell death. ATRX-null HeLa cells are similarly sensitive to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress, accumulate DNA damage and proliferate poorly. Impaired BRCA1-RAD51 colocalization and PARP-1 hyperactivation indicated that stalled replication forks are not efficiently protected. DNA fiber assays confirmed that MRE11 degradation of stalled replication forks was rampant in the absence of ATRX or DAXX. Indeed, fork degradation in ATRX-null cells could be attenuated by treatment with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, or exacerbated by inhibiting PARP-1 activity. Taken together, these results suggest that ATRX is required to limit replication stress during cellular proliferation, whereas upregulation of PARP-1 activity functions as a compensatory mechanism to protect stalled forks

  2. Timing, coordination, and rhythm: Acrobatics at the DNA replication fork

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Samir

    2010-04-09

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In several prokaryotic systems studied so far, this problem is solved by the formation of a loop in the lagging strand of the replication fork to reorient the lagging-strand DNA polymerase so that it advances in parallel with the leading-strand polymerase. The replication loop grows and shrinks during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The timing of Okazaki fragment synthesis and loop formation is determined by a subtle interplay of enzymatic activities at the fork. Recent developments in single-molecule techniques have enabled the direct observation of these processes and have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the replication fork. Here, we will review recent experimental advances, present the current models, and discuss some of the exciting developments in the field. 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Sánchez

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors are a major source of genome instability in all organisms. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the DNA damage response protein Brc1 binds phospho-histone H2A (γH2A-marked chromatin during S-phase, but how Brc1 protects genome integrity remains unclear. Here we report that the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ protein Ku becomes critical for survival of replication stress in brc1∆ cells. Ku's protective activity in brc1∆ cells does not involve its canonical NHEJ function or its roles in protecting telomeres or shielding DNA ends from Exo1 exonuclease. In brc1∆ pku80∆ cells, nuclear foci of Rad52 homologous recombination (HR protein increase and Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase becomes critical, indicating increased replication fork instability. Ku's localization at a ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier associated with frequent replisome-transcriptosome collisions increases in brc1∆ cells and increased collisions correlate with an enhanced requirement for Brc1. These data indicate that Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

  4. Millimeter And Submillimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits On Quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Imran; Mazed, Mohammad; Siegel, Peter; Smith, R. Peter

    1995-01-01

    Proposed Quartz substrate Upside-down Integrated Device (QUID) relies on UV-curable adhesive to bond semiconductor with quartz. Integrated circuits including planar GaAs Schottky diodes and passive circuit elements (such as bandpass filters) fabricated on quartz substrates. Circuits designed to operate as mixers in waveguide circuit at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Integrated circuits mechanically more robust, larger, and easier to handle than planar Schottky diode chips. Quartz substrate more suitable for waveguide circuits than GaAs substrate.

  5. Reduced rate of DNA replication fork movement in megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, R G; Hoffbrand, A V

    1980-01-01

    Chromatography on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose has been used to fractionate fully double-stranded from partially single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA was extracted from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with megaloblastic anemia resulting from vitamin B12 or folate deficiency after pulse-labeling the cells with [3H]thymidine for 5 min and chasing in unlabeled medium for 24 h. No gross accumulation of partially single-stranded material was observed in the DNA of these cells when compared with DNA from similarly labeled control cells obtained by the addition of 5-formyl tetrahydrofolic acid to the culture medium. When DNA from lymphocytes labeled with a 5-min pulse of [3H]thymidine and sheared to fragments of an average length of 18 micrometer was chromatographed on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose, approximately 80% of the label was recovered in the partially single-stranded fraction. After chasing in unlabeled medium the label was progressively transferred to the double-stranded fraction over a period of 2--3 h. The rate of transfer was slower in megaloblastic lymphocytes than in controls. The difference in rate suggested a slower rate of replication fork movement in megaloblastic lymphocytes and so the density shift technique of Painter and schaeffer (J. Mol. Biol. 45: 467--479, 1969) was used to measure the fork rate directly. [3H]Deoxycytidine was used as the labeled nucleoside to avoid possible complications arising from [3H]thymidine labeling of megaloblastic cells. Investigations on the lymphocytes from four patients showed that the replication fork rate in vitamin-treated control lyphocytes was about 1 micrometer/min. The fork rates in the corresponding untreated cells were invariably lower and rates ranging from 40 to 92% of those of controls were observed. Normal lymphocytes treated with the deoxynucleotide pool-depleting drugs methotrexate or hydroxyurea displayed defects in DNA synthesis similar to those of

  6. Take It Slow: can feedback from a smart fork reduce eating speed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Hermsen

    2015-09-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a smart fork that helps people to eat more slowly. This adapted fork records eating speed and delivers vibrotactile feedback if users eat too quickly. In two studies, we tested the acceptability and user experience of the fork (Study 1, and its effect on eating rate and satiety levels in a controlled lab-setting (Study 2. Method: In study 1, 11 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a meal using the fork in our laboratory and used the fork for three consecutive days in their home setting. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews after the first meal and upon returning the fork, covering perceived effect on eating rate, comfort of use, accuracy, and motivational and social aspects of fork use. Interviews were coded and a thematic classification analysis was performed. In study 2, 128 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a standardized meal using the fork in our laboratory. We used a between-participants design with 2 conditions; participants ate their meal either with vibrotactile feedback from the fork (experimental condition or ate their meal without vibrotactile feedback (control condition. Eating rate, meal duration, error rate (number of bites taken faster than 10 seconds after previous bite, total food intake, and satiety were recorded for every participant. Results: Study 1: All participants felt that the feedback was generally accurate and consistent. Fork size, weight, and intensity of the feedback were seen as comfortable and acceptable. All participants reported a heightened awareness of eating rate and all but one participant reported eating more slowly with the fork. Study 2: Participants in the experimental condition ate significantly slower, and with a lower error rate than those in the control condition. Feedback did not significantly affect the amount of food eaten. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that this smart fork is an acceptable and effective tool to disrupt and

  7. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress.

  8. Adaptive Tuning Algorithm for Performance tuning of Database Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Rodd, S F

    2010-01-01

    Performance tuning of Database Management Systems(DBMS) is both complex and challenging as it involves identifying and altering several key performance tuning parameters. The quality of tuning and the extent of performance enhancement achieved greatly depends on the skill and experience of the Database Administrator (DBA). As neural networks have the ability to adapt to dynamically changing inputs and also their ability to learn makes them ideal candidates for employing them for tuning purpose. In this paper, a novel tuning algorithm based on neural network estimated tuning parameters is presented. The key performance indicators are proactively monitored and fed as input to the Neural Network and the trained network estimates the suitable size of the buffer cache, shared pool and redo log buffer size. The tuner alters these tuning parameters using the estimated values using a rate change computing algorithm. The preliminary results show that the proposed method is effective in improving the query response tim...

  9. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 and 70 deg by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected medium-width filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  10. Axiomatic Design of Micro Quartz Rate Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yang-he; ZHANG Hong-hai; LIU Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Quartz rate sensors (QRS) made out of one single piece of quartz crystal are inertial devices which can be used for general rate control, stabilization, automotive and aerospace/defense markets,etc. The mechanical design of the QRS has been investigated based on axiomatic design. The axiomatic design matrix of the mechanical structure of Coriolis Vibratory Gyroscopes (CVG) has been proposed. The mechanical function of QRS is divided into three Function Requirements ( FR ) , i. e. , FR1 is the drive mode, FR2 is the sense mode, FR3 is a coupled connection where the Coriolis force can couple the two modes with a term proportional to the rotational rate. A new QRS which is easy to be fabricated has been put forward. Furthermore, the new QRS indicated that the axiomatic design is a help to functional design of products.

  11. The CMS forward calorimeter with quartz fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Part of the forward hadron calorimeter for the CMS experiment at the LHC is seen here. The calorimeter will be placed at the ends of the experiment barrel to measure the energy of particles produced in the 14 TeV proton-proton collisions. In consists of an iron absorber and specially designed radiation-hard quartz so that it survives the high radiation levels produced by collisions.

  12. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  13. Force chain forming quartz in an ultramylonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Peters, Max

    2014-05-01

    Polymineralic ultramylonites often show microstructures indicative of grain size sensitive creep with dissolution precipitation or diffusion accommodated grain boundary sliding. Typically phases show an anticorrelated distribution, the grain size is small and a crystallographic preferred orientation is absent. The latter observation is usually thought to originate from rigid body rotation of grains because flow dominated by diffusion creep operates at differential stresses, which are too low to activate crystal-plastic mechanisms. Here, we present quartz texture measurements from a natural ultramylonite, deformed under upper amphibolite facies conditions from the Nordmannvik Nappe, Upper Allochton of the Norwegian Caledonides. The ultramylonite has a mean grain size crystal-plastic processes. Alternative texture forming processes (e.g. growth textures) are also discussed. The texture in the foliation parallel clusters is thought to be an inherited texture from lower strain stages in the ultramylonite, as it is mostly present in the least deformed parts of the ultramylonite. However, we suggest that the texture formed in the foliation oblique clusters is related to a dynamic formation of force chains between quartz grains, where differential stresses become high enough for plastic yielding. The presence of force chains questions whether ultramylonites necessarily need to possess a linear viscous rheology, even if microstructures would indicate a diffusion creep mechanism. Pennacchioni G., Menegon L., Leiss B., Nestola F., Bromiley G., 2010: Development of crystallographic preferred orientation and microstructure during plastic deformation of natural coarse?grained quartz veins. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B12405

  14. A Petrographic Study of the Three Forks Formation (Upper Devonian, Williston Basin, North Dakota: Based on Thin Section Analysis, XRD and SEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deeply buried below 8,000 ft, the Three Forks Formation in North Dakota displays a variety of interesting diagenetic characteristics including dolomitization and hematite precipitation. Samples from three lithofacies are analyzed by thin section and SEM petrography and combined bulk and clay XRD analyses. Key aspects controlling the porosity and permeability of this formation are revealed by focusing on the detail mineralogy, rock type and diagenetic mineral distribution, and overall reservoir quality. Results prove that the Three Forks mineralogy is dominated by dolomite, along with substantial hematite, monocrystalline quartz, and mica flakes with trace feldspar, calcite, and pyrite. Clays mainly consist of illite together with minor chlorite and kaolinite and are associated with the scattered clasts. The reservoir quality is controlled by intercrystalline, rare microvuggy, and microporosity types that result from diagenetic and depositional events. Three stages of the dolomitization process are identified and discussed. Our hypothesis is that dolomitization commenced soon after deposition and was pervasive as no original carbonate texture is detectable.

  15. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz as a result of annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Mejdahl, V.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders of magni......Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders...... of magnitude less per unit radiation than that for heated material. The reason these temperature-induced sensitivity changes occur in quartz is presently not well understood. This phenomenon is also seen in the related area of luminescence dating in which sedimentary quartz and quartz from heated...

  16. Effects of citric acid on separation of sillimanite from quartz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晔; 雷东升; 鲁巍; 许时

    2002-01-01

    Quartz is the main gangue mineral of sillimanite. The results show that Al3+ and Fe3+ ion can activate the floatation of quartz and make the separation of quartz and sillimanite difficult when anion collector is used, and citric acid can inhibit the quartz activated by metallic ion and have slight influence on the sillimanite. X-ray photoelectronic energy spectrum analysis indicates that there are obvious electronic energy peaks on the surface of the quartz before citric acid is added into the ore pulp in presence of Al3+ and Fe3+, and after citric acid is added, the energy peak vanished. So citric acid can make Al3+ and Fe3+ on the surface of quartz solve and decrease the active points on the surface of quartz which can adsorb anion collector.

  17. Amorphization of α-Quartz under Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, L.; Duraud, J. P.

    1996-12-01

    The course of radiation induced damage produced in α-quartz by neutrons, ions, electrons or photons — commonly known as metamictization — has been re-analyzed by careful comparison of available experimental data. Specific interest was devoted to confront experimental metamict state features with current structural models. It comes out that the metamict state of irradiated quartz should exhibit some structural characteristics of the modulated structure proposed for vitreous silica. The metamictization process is consistent with a structural relaxation process of a highly defective quartz matrix. According to this new point defect analysis, structural relaxation should be triggered by a critical concentration of oxygen vacancy point defects likely to significantly lower the connectivity of the SiO{2} network. Various experimental results are interpreted by incorporating the influence of the SiO{2} crystalline polymorph and the influence of the nature of the irradiating particle to the point defect model. Nous avons étudié les modifications de propriétés et de structures de monocristaux de quartz α, consécutives à une irradiation sévère par des neutrons, des ions, des électrons ou des photons. Ce phénomène d'altération du quartz sous irradiation porte le nom de métamictisation. Notre travail exploite les recoupements de travaux antérieurs. Une attention particulière a été portée à la confrontation entre les données structurales expérimentales disponibles sur l'état métamicte du quartz et les modèles structuraux proposés. L'état métamicte du quartz présente ainsi les caractéristiques structurales du modèle de structure modulée, avancé pour décrire la structure de la silice thermique. Le mécanisme de métamictisation procéderait par relaxation de la matrice cristalline fortement endommagée. Ce phénomène de relaxation serait initié par l'apparition de concentration critique de défauts ponctuels de type lacunes d

  18. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  19. %191200 TUNE DEAFNESS [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TONE DEAFNESS FIELD TX DESCRIPTION Tune deafness, or congenital amusia, is a lifelong deficient in music per...retz et al., 2009). See 159300 for an opposite situation, that of musical perfect pitch. CLINICAL FEATURES P...icits, brain lesions, hearing loss, or socioaffective disturbances, and was exposed to music as a child. She... did not like to listen to music because it sounded to her like noise and induced stress. Detailed tests sho...hat fine-grained pitch perception is an essential component around which the musical system develops in a no

  20. Implementing farm-to-fork traceability in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Dyk, FE

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available .csir.co.za Implementing farm-to-fork traceability in Tanzania Esbeth van Dyk CSIR Centre for Logistics ORSSA/SAIIE August 2005 Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Structure • Why traceability? • Legislation • Tanzania project • Recordkeeping in coffee...” Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Tanzania project Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Tanzania project • DANIDA funded (Danish government) • Business Sector Programme Support II • 4 components: Improved access to markets • 3 sub-components...

  1. Ideal synchronizer for marked pairs in fork-join network

    CERN Document Server

    Vyshenski, S V; Dubenskaya, Yu Yu

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new functional element (synchronizer for marked pairs) meant to join results of parallel processing in two-branch fork-join queueing network. Approximations for distribution of sojourn time at the synchronizer are derived along with a validity domain. Calculations are performed assuming that: arrivals to the network form a Poisson process, each branch operates like an M/M/N queueing system. It is shown that a mean quantity of jobs in the synchronizer is bounded below by the value, defined by parameters of the network (which contains the synchronizer) and does not depend upon performance and particular properties of the synchronizer.

  2. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... National Recreation Area, TN/KY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby given that the...] Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park... visitor services within Big South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky, for a term not...

  3. 76 FR 6114 - Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Forest Service Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use... Ruidoso (the applicant) for continued operation of their municipal water supply wells on the North Fork of... portion of their water rights for these wells to locations off of National Forest System land; and...

  4. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  5. AEROSOL FILTRATION USING QUARTZ SAND FILTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas H. Sulaymon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry is the major source of cement dust which contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead, chromium, arsenic and hazardous substances like dioxins and furans. Exposure to these substances can cause health problems to human, animals and vegetation. A continuous pilot scale quartz sand filter was constructed and uses to study the effect of important design parameters (temperature, pre-loaded dust on the collector, diameter of the filter, bed depth, collector size and superficial velocity on its performance for cleaning of cement dust from air. Initial penetration and initial pressure drop (after 180s were measured and compared for different variables used in this study. The dirty bed was cleaned by means of reverse air flow when the pressure drop across the filter rises to 20 cmH2O. A macroscopic model describes the filter clogging was used to predict the effluent histories based on initial collection efficiency (η0exp which was determined from experimental data. A removal efficiency of more than 99% was obtained. The results show that 0.4% of cement dust still adheres on the quartz sand bed after 5 min of cleaning cycle. The presence of 0.4% of pre-load dust on the quartz sand filter enhanced the efficiency and low initial penetration, moderate initial pressure drop was obtained. At given Empty Bed Contact Time (EBCT, with different filter diameters 30 and 15 cm, a sharp decrease in initial penetration from 0.41-0.03 was obtained respectively. A nonlinear relationship between penetration and temperature was found. The initial penetration can be reduced by using smaller filter diameter, small collector size and collector with pre-load dust with 0.4%. The experiment that operates at a filter diameter of 15 cm and temperature of 25°C represent the minimum penetration among all the experiments.

  6. Kinetics of the coesite to quartz transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenfelder, J.L.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The survival of coesite in ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks has important implications for the exhumation of subducted crustal rocks. We have conducted experiments to study the mechanism and rate of the coesite ??? quartz transformation using polycrystalline coesite aggregates, fabricated by devitrifying silica glass cylinders containing 2850H/106 Si at 1000??C and 3.6 GPa for 24h. Conditions were adjusted following synthesis to transform the samples at 700-1000??C at pressures 190-410 MPa below the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary. Reaction proceeds via grain-boundary nucleation and interface-controlled growth, with characteristic reaction textures remarkably similar to those seen in natural UHP rocks. We infer that the experimental reaction mechanism is identical to that in nature, a prerequisite for reliable extrapolation of the rate data. Growth rates obtained by direct measurement differ by up to two orders of magnitude from those estimated by fitting a rate equation to the transformation-time data. Fitting the rates to Turnbull's equation for growth therefore yields two distinct sets of parameters with similar activation energies (242 or 269 kJ/mol) but significantly different pre-exponential constants. Extrapolation based on either set of growth rates suggests that coesite should not be preserved on geologic time scales if it reaches the quartz stability field at temperatures above 375-400??C. The survival of coesite has previously been linked to its inclusion in strong phases, such as garnet, that can sustain a high internal pressure during decompression. Other factors that may play a crucial role in preservation are low fluid availability - possibly even less than that of our nominally "dry" experiments - and the development of transformation stress, which inhibits nucleation and growth. These issues are discussed in the context of our experiments as well as recent observations from natural rocks. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  8. Quartz resonator instabilities under cryogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbe, Philippe; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Grop, Serge; Dubois, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    The phase noise of a quartz crystal resonator working at liquid helium temperatures is studied. Measurement methods and the device environment are explained. The phase noise is measured for different resonance modes, excitation levels, amount of operating time, device orientations in relation to the cryocooler vibration axis, and temperatures. Stability limits of a frequency source based on such devices are evaluated in the present measurement conditions. The sources of phase flicker and white noises are identified. Finally, the results are compared with previous works.

  9. 59 FR- Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic River Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-15

    ... INTERIOR [OR-030-03-1220-04: GS-043] Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and... and restrictions within the boundaries of the West Little and North Fork Owyhee Rivers as established in the Main, West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic Rivers Management...

  10. MRX protects fork integrity at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence causes checkpoint activation dependent on chromatin context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Iben Bach; Nielsen, Ida; Lisby, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To address how eukaryotic replication forks respond to fork stalling caused by strong non-covalent protein–DNA barriers, we engineered the controllable Fob-block system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system allows us to strongly induce and control replication fork barriers (RFB) at their natural...

  11. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  12. Tuning of Fuzzy PID Controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Since fuzzy controllers are nonlinear, it is more difficult to set the controller gains compared to proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers. This research paper proposes a design procedure and a tuning procedure that carries tuning rules from the PID domain over to fuzzy single......-loop controllers. The idea is to start with a tuned, conventional PID controller, replace it with an equivalent linear fuzzy controller, make the fuzzy controller nonlinear, and eventually fine-tune the nonlinear fuzzy controller. This is relevant whenever a PID controller is possible or already implemented....

  13. Aqueous Wetting Films on Fused Quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoco; Wayner

    1999-06-15

    Using an image analyzing interferometer, IAI, the interfacial characteristics of an isothermal constrained vapor bubble, CVB, in a quartz cuvette were studied as a precursor to heat transfer research. The effects of pH and electrolyte concentration on the meniscus properties (curvature and adsorbed film thickness) and the stability of the aqueous wetting films were evaluated. The surface potential in the electric double layer was a function of the cleaning and hydroxylation of the quartz surface. The disjoining pressure isotherm for pure water was very close to that predicted by the Langmuir equation. For aqueous solutions of moderate electrolyte concentration, the Gouy-Chapman theory provided a good representation of the electrostatic effects in the film. The effect of temperature on the film properties of aqueous solutions and pure water was also evaluated: The meniscus curvature decreased with increasing temperature, while Marangoni effects, intermolecular forces, and local evaporation and condensation enhanced waves on the adsorbed film layer. Pure water wetting films were mechanically metastable, breaking into droplets and very thin films (less than 10 nm) after a few hours. Aqueous wetting films with pH 12.4 proved to be stable during a test of several months, even when subjected to temperature and mechanical perturbations. The mechanical stability of wetting films can explain the reported differences between the critical heat fluxes of pure water and aqueous solutions. The IAI-CVB technique is a simple and versatile experimental technique for studying the characteristics of interfacial systems. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Production of quartz plates for CMS-CASTOR Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adiguzel, Aytul; Ayhan, Aydin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Basegmez, Suzan; Beaumont, Willem; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; De Paula Carvalho, W; Çerçi, Salim; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Dogangün, O; Dumanoglu, Isa; d'Enterria, David; Erchov, Y; Eskut, Eda; Figueiredo, D; Girgis, Semiray; Göttlicher, P; Gouskos, Loukas; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Katkov, Igor; Katsas, Panagiotis; Khein, Lev; Knutsson, Albert; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Lebeau, Michel; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Muhl, Carsten; Musienko, Yuri; Ochesanu, Silvia; Onengüt, G; Onengut, G Jr; Ozdemir, Kadri; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Polatoz, A; Ripert, Marion; Shileev, K; Sogut, Kenan; Tiflov, B TaliV; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Uzun, Dilber

    2008-01-01

    Light transmission rate performance of $102$ irradiated quartz samples was measured to select the best quartz plates for CMS-CASTOR calorimeter. All the produced quartz plates were originally used in a previous CERN experiment, DELPHI. Three different doses of $^{60}$Co source were used with the collaboration of PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland.) to study the transmission rate performance of the quartz samples after irradiation for different incident light, ranging from $250$ to $700$ nm in $5$ nm increasing steps. All samples show different decrease in the rate with wavelength for different doses. Three different steps were followed before irradiation to find out the best way of cleaning the original DELPHI Cu/Cr tracks on the samples. Results of these measurements presented here correspond to the quartz plates that will be used in one hadronic sector of CASTOR calorimeter until end of 2008. For the full calorimeter new quartz plates will be installed. We also present the light transmi...

  15. Nanoplasmonics tuned ``click chemistry''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijunelyte, I.; Guenin, E.; Lidgi-Guigui, N.; Colas, F.; Ibrahim, J.; Toury, T.; Lamy de La Chapelle, M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised ``click'' reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the ``click'' chemistry.Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised ``click'' reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the ``click'' chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMR study on reaction initiation, SERS spectra and temperature calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09018k

  16. Modeling by regression for laser cutting of quartz crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the theoretical models built by analysis of the mechanism of laser cutting of quartz crystal and re gression of test results for the laser cutting of quartz crystal, and comparative analysis of calculation errors for these models, and concludes with test results that these models comprehensively reflect the physical features of laser cutting of quartz crystal and satisfy the industrial production requirements, and they can be used to select right parameters for improvement of productivity and quality and saving of energy.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: cultured quartz crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article presents information on cultured quartz crystals, a mineral used in mobile phones, computers, clocks and other devices controlled by digital circuits. Cultured quartz, which is synthetically produced in large pressurized vessels known as autoclaves, is useful in electronic circuits for precise filtration, frequency control and timing for consumer and military use. Several ingredients are used in producing cultured quartz, including seed crystals, lascas, a solution of sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate, lithium salts and deionized water.

  18. Trace elements in quartz shed light on sediment provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Michael R.; Tailby, Nicholas D.; Watson, E. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Quartz is one of the most common minerals on the surface of the earth, and is a primary rock-forming mineral across the rock cycle. These two factors make quartz an obvious target for sediment provenance studies. Observations from experimental and natural samples demonstrate that the trace element content of quartz often reflects the conditions of quartz formation. When quartz is weathered from its primary crystallization setting (i.e., quartz from a granitoid) it can retain many chemical signatures of formation throughout the sedimentation processes. These geochemical signatures can be used to understand the primary source of individual quartz grains within a sediment. Here we present a case study from the Bega River catchment to demonstrate that quartz grains in sediments at the mouth of the Bega River are sourced from granitoids within the drainage basin. Data presented here also indicate that a portion of the beach sediment is also derived from either (i) sedimentary rocks within the basin or; (ii) mixing with sediments at the mouth of the river. The Bega River catchment was selected for this study because it is both small and has a well-constrained bedrock lithology, making it an ideal location to test the utility of this provenance technique. However, quartz trace element provenance has broad applications to modern and ancient sediments and can be used in lieu of, or in conjunction with, other provenance techniques to elucidate sediment transport through time.

  19. 水气含量对基于QEPAS甲烷气体探测性能的影响%Impact of Water on Quartz Enhanced Photo-Acoustic Absorption Spectroscopy Methane Senor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙善文; 易红明; 王贵师; 汪磊; 谈图; 刘锟; 高晓明

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of measurement is affected by the variation of water vapor concentration when a quartz enhanced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is used for real-time trace-gas monitoring. A QEPAS based methane sensor is developed at 1.653 pern and the influence of water vapor on the performances of QEPAS methane sensor including second harmonic signal, resonance frequency, Q factor are investigated experimentally. Measurements are carried out under different absolute humidities which are obtained by bubbling method combined with hygrometer at atmosphere pressure. The results suggest that the water vapor could impact both on relaxation time of methane and the parameters of quarts tuning fork in practical application. The smallest detective mass concentration of the sensor is found to be about 0.57 mg/m3 at different atmosphere pressures with an absolute humidity of 2.34%.%由于气体的湿度对分子振动弛豫有着较大的影响,利用石英音叉增强型光声光谱(QEPAS)技术作为甲烷气体传感,在实际应用中,空气的水气浓度变化将会使光声测量气体浓度的信号强度发生变化.实验中采用鼓泡法结合湿度计来改变探测气体中的湿度,测量了常压下1.653μm波长处甲烷的二次谐波信号,系统地研究了探测气体中水气浓度的变化对石英音叉Q值、共振频率f0等参数的影响.实验结果表明,水气对基于QEPAS技术甲烷气体传感器的实际应用有着很大的影响,主要表现在甲烷分子振动弛豫和探测系统性能两个方面.当实际大气中绝对湿度为2.34%时,获得的系统最小可探测质量浓度为0.57mg/m3.

  20. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression.

  1. Diagenetic Quartz Morphologies and Zeolite formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Hansen, Rikke Weibel; Friis, Henrik

    ; the core of the zeolite crystals appears to have been more unstable than the rim and dissolved first.  Later the entire crystal dissolved and left an impression of the euhedral zeolite crystal in the microquartz coating.  Such openings in the microquartz coating are nucleation points for macroquartz.  Thus......, the precipitation of zeolite may later facilitate further quartz cementation, which might otherwise be retarded by the presence of disordered microquartz. The silica activity of pore fluids can influence zeolite precipitation.  Although zeolite formation is clearly related to volcanic ash, zeolite has also formed...... are abundant in some of associated shales; and 2) volcanic ash. The dissolution of biogenic silica may result in a rapid release of silica thereby promoting the formation of diagenetic opal/microquartz, but there may be a limited release of Al. A limited release of Al may result in precipitation of Si...

  2. Plasmonic color tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  3. Wavelike movement of bedload sediment, East Fork River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Bedload is moved down the East Fork River in distinct wavelike pulses that have the form of composite dune fields The moving material consists mostly of coarse sand and fine gravel The wavelengths of the pulses are about 500-600 m, a distance that is predetermined by the pattern of stoage of bed sediment in the river during low water As the river discharge increases, the bed sediment is scoured from the storage areas, and it is moved onto and across the interventing riffles As the river discharge decreases, the bed sediment is scoured off the riffles and moved into the next storage area downstream Each successive pulse of water discharge sets into motion a wave of bedload that continues to move unitil it reaches the next storage area ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  4. Valences temporal tuning fork in novel One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria BARAGA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Class time is experiencing a particularly wide spread in different spheres of human manifestation: in science and art, religion and everyday life. During World Literature the time becomes subject to interest. Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez in his creation, but especially in the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, with great talent show time category. In the present investigation, based on the content quality of time and in the figurative image of the movement, we deduced the most representative forms of temporal in garciamarquezian novel. We disclose specifics forms of macondiene time: Time of sacred history, time of eternal return, historical time and Apocalyptic time. Originality of macondian time consists of temporal relationship between these forms, the magic of virtualization game and their updates. And while macondian prodigious time impresses just by strength revealing of the imaginary area.

  5. A new irradiated quartz for beta source calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vicki; Murray, Andrew Sean; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter;

    2015-01-01

    laboratories have used the various different batches of Risø calibration quartz for the calibration of beta and X-ray sources, but these have been largely undescribed. Here we describe in detail the preparation and luminescence characteristics of a new quartz standard, based on a North Sea beach sand collected...

  6. Quartz exposure in agriculture: literature review and South African survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanepoel, A.J.; Rees, D.; Renton, K.; Swanepoel, C.; Kromhout, H.; Gardiner, K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the published literature on respirable quartz exposure and associated disease in agricultural related settings systematically and to describe personal respirable dust and quartz measurements collected on a sandy soil farm in the Free State province of South Africa. METHODS: The

  7. Thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz samples of various origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, B. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece); Oniya, E. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Physics and Electronics Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 01, Akungba Akoko (Nigeria); Polymeris, G.S. [ISIK University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, 34980-Sile, Istanbul (Turkey); Afouxenidis, D.; Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute (C.E.T.I.), R.C. ' Athena' , Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G., E-mail: gkitis@auth.g [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124-Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    The effect of thermal quenching stands among the most important properties in the thermoluminescence (TL) of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. Since the quartz samples used in various applications are all of different origin it is useful to investigate whether the values of the thermal quenching parameters, i.e. the activation energy for thermal quenching W and a parameter C which describes the ratio of non-radiative to radiative luminescence transitions, evaluated mainly in specific quartz samples can be extrapolated to quartz samples of unknown origin as well as to quartz samples which are annealed at high temperatures. In the present work the TL glow curve of a series of un-annealed and annealed natural and synthetic quartz samples were studied as a function of the heating rate between 0.25 K/s and 16 K/s. Using an indirect fitting method it was found that the thermal quenching parameters W and C in most of the quartz samples are very similar to the values accepted in the literature. Furthermore, in some cases the thermal quenching parameters W and C are not the same for all TL glow-peaks in the same glow-curve. Finally, the strong external treatment of annealing the quartz samples at very high temperature can also influence at least one of the thermal quenching parameters.

  8. Recent developments of OSL techniques for dating quartz and feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.; Mejdahl, V.

    1993-01-01

    The construction of a unit for measuring optically stimulated luminescence from quartz and feldspar is described. The light sources used for stimulation are infrared diodes for feldspar and green light from a halogen lamp (obtained with a system of filters) for both quartz and feldspar. The unit ...

  9. Speciation and phase separation of water in quartz (A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation and phase separation of water in quartz (A review) ... of quartz at temperatures in excess of 500 °C. leading to decomposition of the ... The nucleation is a first order phase transition of creating liquid nucleus within the vapour phase, ...

  10. Removal of Ozone by Carbon Nanotubes/Quartz Fiber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shen; Nie, Jingqi; Wei, Fei; Yang, Xudong

    2016-09-01

    Ozone is recognized as a harmful gaseous pollutant, which can lead to severe human health problems. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested as a new approach for ozone removal. The CNTs/quartz fiber film was fabricated through growth of CNTs upon pure quartz fiber using chemical vapor deposition method. Ozone conversion efficiency of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was tested for 10 h and compared with that of quartz film, activated carbon (AC), and a potassium iodide (KI) solution under the same conditions. The pressure resistance of these materials under different airflow rates was also measured. The results showed that the CNTs/quartz fiber film had better ozone conversion efficiency but also higher pressure resistance than AC and the KI solution of the same weight. The ozone removal performance of the CNTs/quartz fiber film was comparable with AC at 20 times more weight. The CNTs played a dominant role in ozone removal by the CNTs/quartz fiber film. Its high ozone conversion efficiency, lightweight and free-standing properties make the CNTs/quartz fiber film applicable to ozone removal. Further investigation should be focused on reducing pressure resistance and studying the CNT mechanism for removing ozone.

  11. Analysis of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock in the Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskova, Marina; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Zhelannoe high purity quartz deposit is located on the western slope of the Polar Urals. It is one of the largest deposits of vein quartz and rock crystal in Russia. Most of the mineralization is hosted within a single horizon of very firm quartz-sandstone, where plastic deformation did not occur almost entirely. All tectonic stress was released by the development of numerous thrust faults of different scales. Cavities formed during this process were later filled with quartz and rock crystal. In order to obtain more details on conditions under which mineralization took place, analysis of trace element contents in vein quartz and host rocks, and the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz have been carried out. The trace element composition of vein quartz and of the host rock has been determined by ICP-MS. The results have shown that concentrations of most of the 46 studied elements in quartz are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and more than three orders of magnitude lower than in the upper crust. Even though Pb and Li have the highest concentrations in quartz samples, levels are only nearly comparable in chondrite, and substantially lower in the upper crust. At the same time, negative anomalies of Pb and Li concentrations in the host rock may indicate the removal of these elements during vein quartz formation. Contents of most REEs are two orders of magnitude lower than in chondrite, and three orders of magnitude lower than in the host rock. Generally, the patterns of REE distribution in vein quartz and the host rock express a clear correlation; confirming the genetic link between vein quartz and quartz-sandstone host rock. However, the process of quartz recrystallization led to an intense decrease of REEs content, and of all other impurities, which consequently influenced industrial value of the Zhelannoe deposit. As a result of the micro-thermometric study of fluid inclusions in quartz, the following physical

  12. Amplitude dependent closest tune approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Franchi, Andrea; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations in the LHC point to the existence of an amplitude dependent closest tune approach. However this dynamical behavior and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This effect is highly relevant for the LHC as an unexpectedly closest tune approach varying with amplitude modifies the frequency content of the beam and, hence, the Landau damping. Furthermore the single particle stability would also be affected by this effect as it would modify how particles with varying amplitudes approach and cross resonances. We present analytic derivations that lead to a mechanism generating an amplitude dependent closest tune approach.

  13. Physical Habitat Characteristics on the North Fork Shenandoah River, VA in 2002-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was collected with a PLGR government-issue GPS, and through manual measurement in the field. Points were gathered while canoeing along the North Fork...

  14. Geographic distribution of mercury in asiatic clams, Corbicuia plumihea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study was conducted quantifying mercury concentrations in the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia. The purpose of this...

  15. Assessment of contaminant loads at the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish, sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrate communities were sampled on and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. Collections...

  16. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  17. Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan 1999-2009 and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Deep Fork NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  18. Environmental Assessment: Demolish CASS Switch Stations Buildings 644, 645, 646 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants...grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager and volunteers installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie ...are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in

  19. Environmental Assessment: Demolish Buildings 212, 218, 819, 820 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-31

    View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants thriving in...and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager and volunteers installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in drainage

  20. Take It Slow: can feedback from a smart fork reduce eating speed?

    OpenAIRE

    Sander Hermsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reductions in eating rate have been recommended as potential behavioural strategies to prevent and treat overweight [1–4]. Unfortunately, eating rate is difficult to modify, due to its highly automatic nature [5]. Training people to eat more slowly in everyday eating contexts, therefore, requires creative and engaging solutions. Aim: The present study examines the efficacy of a smart fork that helps people to eat more slowly. This adapted fork records eating speed ...

  1. Environmental Assessment: Construct Miscellaneous Services Recreation Area at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-15

    DATA OS Nov03 1ST AJ< ’IT"’"< ~.CL~ "VVI GRANO FORKS AFB, NORTH DAKOTA A TV Trainin /Misc. Services Recreation/ Land Use Chan e/Mass Parkin NA N...PF(AMC) FY 2004 MILITARY CONSTRUCTION DATA 05 Nov03 AS!" .IlLlA TIONNO lCCAliOH GRANO FORKS AFB. NORTH DAKOTA ATV Trainin /Misc. Services

  2. Environmental Assessment: Armory Addition to CATM with Parking at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa. Herbaceous plants include little bluestem, goldenrod, green... wildflower species. Two hundred and fifty five taxa were identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update...for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid species are known to exist on Grand Forks AFB, the Large and Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper, identified

  3. Environmental Assessment: Construct a CDC Main Entry Addition at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants...Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous...LAND USE Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops with remaining land used for pasture and hay, urban development

  4. Environmental Assessment: Construct Airfield Lighting Vault and Demolish Building 531 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included...in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous plants...These are buildings 313, 606, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, and 714. 3.9 LAND USE Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops

  5. Oracle SQL Tuning pocket Reference

    CERN Document Server

    Gurry, Mark

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important challenges faced by Oracle database administrators and Oracle developers is the need to tune SQL statements so that they execute efficiently. Poorly tuned SQL statements are one of the leading causes of substandard database performance and poor response time. SQL statements that perform poorly result in frustration for users, and can even prevent a company from serving its customers in a timely manner

  6. Disformally self-tuning gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Emond, William T

    2015-01-01

    We extend a previous self-tuning analysis of the most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity in four dimensions with second order field equations by considering a generalized coupling to the matter sector. Through allowing a disformal coupling to matter we are able to extend the Fab Four model and construct a new class of theories that are able to tune away the cosmological constant on Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker backgrounds.

  7. Disformally self-tuning gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, William T.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    We extend a previous self-tuning analysis of the most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity in four dimensions with second order field equations by considering a generalized coupling to the matter sector. Through allowing a disformal coupling to matter we are able to extend the Fab Four model and construct a new class of theories that are able to tune away the cosmological constant on Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker backgrounds.

  8. Adaptive Self-Tuning Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, H. A.; Draelos, T.; Young, C. J.; Lawry, B.; Chael, E. P.; Faust, A.; Peterson, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of automatic detections from seismic sensor networks depends on a large number of data processing parameters that interact in complex ways. The largely manual process of identifying effective parameters is painstaking and does not guarantee that the resulting controls are the optimal configuration settings. Yet, achieving superior automatic detection of seismic events is closely related to these parameters. We present an automated sensor tuning (AST) system that learns near-optimal parameter settings for each event type using neuro-dynamic programming (reinforcement learning) trained with historic data. AST learns to test the raw signal against all event-settings and automatically self-tunes to an emerging event in real-time. The overall goal is to reduce the number of missed legitimate event detections and the number of false event detections. Reducing false alarms early in the seismic pipeline processing will have a significant impact on this goal. Applicable both for existing sensor performance boosting and new sensor deployment, this system provides an important new method to automatically tune complex remote sensing systems. Systems tuned in this way will achieve better performance than is currently possible by manual tuning, and with much less time and effort devoted to the tuning process. With ground truth on detections in seismic waveforms from a network of stations, we show that AST increases the probability of detection while decreasing false alarms.

  9. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bradley, Alison Sylvia; Le Masson, Marie; Tsaneva, Irina; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-03-07

    RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs) respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  10. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  11. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel M A; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin A M; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify downstream neighbor of SON (DONSON) as a novel fork protection factor and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilizes forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-dependent signaling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity and the potentiation of chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations in DONSON substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in cells from patients, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we have identified mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism and established DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability.

  12. Intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borri, S., E-mail: simone.borri@ino.it; Galli, I.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; De Natale, P. [CNR-INO UOS Sesto Fiorentino and LENS, via Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino FI (Italy); Patimisco, P.; Scamarcio, G.; Spagnolo, V. [CNR-IFN UOS Bari and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari e Politecnico di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari BA (Italy); Akikusa, N. [Development Bureau Laser Device R and D Group, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Yamanishi, M. [Central Research Laboratories, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We report on a spectroscopic technique named intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS) employed for sensitive trace-gas detection in the mid-infrared spectral region. It is based on a combination of QEPAS with a buildup optical cavity. The sensor includes a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.33 μm. We achieved a laser optical power buildup factor of ∼500, which corresponds to an intracavity laser power of ∼0.75 W. CO{sub 2} has been selected as the target molecule for the I-QEPAS demonstration. We achieved a detection sensitivity of 300 parts per trillion for 4 s integration time, corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.4 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 3.2 × 10{sup −10} W cm{sup −1} Hz{sup −1/2}.

  13. Identification of color development potential of quartz by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkmim, Danielle G.; Lameiras, Fernando S.; Almeida, Frederico O.T., E-mail: alkmia@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro e Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horionte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Colorless quartz is usually exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma rays or high energy electron beams) to acquire different colors for jewelry. Color development is due to the presence of traces of some elements such as aluminum, iron, hydrogen, lithium, or sodium. Most quartz crystals are extracted colorless from nature and it is necessary to separate those that can develop colors from those that cannot. Irradiation tests can be used to accomplish this separation, but they take a long time. Infrared signature of colorless quartz can also be used. However, infrared spectroscopy is quite expensive, especially when using portable devices. Raman spectroscopy is now available as an inexpensive and portable technique that could provide identification of the samples of colorless quartz still in the field, facilitating the prediction for their economic exploitation. In addition, Raman spectroscopy usually requires a minimum or no sample preparation. This paper presents an investigation of the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy as a substitute for infrared spectroscopy to predict the potential for color development of quartz. A band at 3595 cm{sup -1} in the Raman shift spectrum was observed only along the c axis of a prasiolite excited by a high power 514 nm laser. This band was not observed in quartz samples that do not develop color after irradiation. Further studies are required to identify the potential for color development by Raman spectroscopy of other types of colorless quartz. (author)

  14. Ultrasonic superlensing jets and acoustic-fork sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org

    2017-05-18

    Focusing acoustical (and optical) beams beyond the diffraction limit has remained a major challenge in imaging instruments and systems, until recent advances on “hyper” or “super” lensing and higher-resolution imaging techniques have shown the counterintuitive violation of this rule under certain circumstances. Nonetheless, the proposed technologies of super-resolution acoustical focusing beyond the diffraction barrier require complex tools such as artificially engineered metamaterials, and other hardware equipment that may not be easily synthesized or manufactured. The present contribution therefore suggests a simple and reliable method of using a sound-penetrable circular cylinder lens illuminated by a nonparaxial Gaussian acoustical sheet (i.e. finite beam in 2D) to produce non-evanescent ultrasonic superlensing jets (or bullets) and acoustical ‘snail-fork’ shaped wavefronts with limited diffraction. The generalized (near-field) scattering theory for acoustical sheets of arbitrary wavefronts and incidence is utilized to synthesize the incident beam based upon the angular spectrum decomposition method and the multipole expansion method in cylindrical wave functions to compute the scattered pressure around the cylinder with particular emphasis on its physical properties. The results show that depending on the beam and lens parameters, a tight focusing (with dimensions much smaller than the beam waist) can be achieved. Subwavelength resolution can be also achieved by selecting a lens material with a speed of sound exceeding that of the host fluid medium. The ultrasonic superlensing jets provide the impetus to develop improved subwavelength microscopy and acoustical image-slicing systems, cell lysis and surgery, and photoacoustic imaging to name a few examples. Moreover, an acoustical fork-sheet generation may open innovative avenues in reconfigurable on-chip micro/nanoparticle tweezers and surface acoustic waves devices. - Highlights: • Ultrasonic

  15. A spectroscopic method for determining thickness of quartz wave plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Feng; Lihuang Lin; Ligang Chen; Huafeng Zhu; Ruxin Li; Zhizhan Xu

    2006-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to determine thickness of quartz wave plate is presented. The method is based on chromatic polarization interferometry. With the polarization-resolved transmission spectrum (PRTS)curve, the phase retardation of quartz wave plate can be determined at a wide spectral range from 200 to2000 nm obviously. Through accurate judgment of extreme points of PRTS curve at long-wave band, the physical thickness of quartz wave plates can be obtained exactly. We give a measuring example and the error analysis. It is found that the measuring precision of thickness is mainly determined by the spectral resolution of spectrometer.

  16. Using a titanium-in-quartz geothermometer for crystallization temperature estimation of the Palaeoproterozoic Suursaari quartz porphyry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairi Ehrlich

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Suursaari volcanic sequence represents volcanic activity related to Wiborg Batholith rapakivi intrusions in the southern part of the Fennoscandian Shield. The estimated pressure conditions for batholith granitic rocks are 1–5 kbar and crystallization temperatures range from 670 to 890 °C. To describe the temperature regime of the Suursaari volcanic system, a rock sample was taken from the Mäkiinpäällys Mountain outcrop and analysed with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Sample spots were selected from quartz phenocrysts and groundmass. Quartz crystallization temperatures were calculated by the Ti-in-quartz method that takes into account rutile equilibrium and Ti activity in each phase. The calculated crystallization temperatures of the Suursaari quartz porphyry are in the range of 647–738 °C. The results show that the Suursaari quartz porphyry contains two generations of quartz which can be distinguished on the basis of crystallization temperatures: phenocrysts crystallized at higher and groundmass quartz at lower temperature.

  17. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  18. Soil Investigation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Earles, Jennifer E [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    Mercury is regarded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management as a priority contaminant on the Oak Ridge Reservation because of the environmental risks associated with substantial losses from buildings, soils, and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). As a result of historical releases of mercury from Y-12 primarily in the 1950s and early 1960s, the lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) stream channel and bank soil margins are contaminated with mercury (Brooks and Southworth 2011; Tennessee Valley Authority 1985b, a). A Mercury Remediation Technology Development project is underway to evaluate the nature of downstream mercury contamination and to develop targeted site-specific remedial technologies that can mitigate mercury release and biological uptake. It is known that mercury concentration varies longitudinally and with depth in LEFPC bank soils; however, soil types and soil physical properties are not well known, especially relative to the zones of mercury contamination. Moreover, there are no soil maps for the downstream reaches of LEFPC in Roane County (i.e. from the Chestnut Hill Road downstream) and this work represents the first ever soil mapping along this section of LEFPC.

  19. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  20. Failure analysis of axle shaft of a fork lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Das

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An axle shaft of fork lift failed at operation within 296 h of service. The shaft transmits torque from discrepancy to wheel through planetary gear arrangement. A section of fractured axle shaft made of induction-hardened steel was analyzed to determine the root cause of the failure. Optical microscopies as well as field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM along with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were carried out to characterize the microstructure. Hardness profile throughout the cross-section was evaluated by micro-hardness measurements. Chemical analysis indicated that the shaft was made of 42CrMo4 steel grade as per specification. Microstructural analysis and micro-hardness profile revealed that the shaft was improperly heat treated resulting in a brittle case, where crack was found to initiate from the case in a brittle mode in contrast to ductile mode within the core. This behaviour was related to differences in microstructure, which was observed to be martensitic within the case with a micro-hardness equivalent to 735 HV, and a mixture of non-homogeneous structure of pearlite and ferrite within the core with a hardness of 210 HV. The analysis suggests that the fracture initiated from the martensitic case as brittle mode due to improper heat treatment process (high hardness. Moreover the inclusions along the hot working direction i.e. in the longitudinal axis made the component more susceptible to failure.

  1. Tuning a Tetrahertz Wire Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/ or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique 'wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is much much less than lambda. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of approximately equal to 137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at approximately equal to 3.8 THz.

  2. The Fine-Tuning Argument

    CERN Document Server

    Landsman, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Our laws of nature and our cosmos appear to be delicately fine-tuned for life to emerge, in way that seems hard to attribute to chance. In view of this, some have taken the opportunity to revive the scholastic Argument from Design, whereas others have felt the need to explain this apparent fine-tuning of the clockwork of the Universe by proposing the existence of a `Multiverse'. We analyze this issue from a sober perspective. Having reviewed the literature and having added several observations of our own, we conclude that cosmic fine-tuning supports neither Design nor a Multiverse, since both of these fail at an explanatory level as well as in a more quantitative context of Bayesian confirmation theory (although there might be other reasons to believe in these ideas, to be found in religion and in inflation and/or string theory, respectively). In fact, fine-tuning and Design even seem to be at odds with each other, whereas the inference from fine-tuning to a Multiverse only works if the latter is underwritten...

  3. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Dissected caldera structures expose thick intracaldera tuff and, uncommonly, cogenetic shallow plutons, while remnants of correlative outflow tuffs deposited on the pre-eruption ground surface record elements of ancient landscapes. The Middle Fork caldera encompasses a 10 km × 20 km area of rhyolite welded tuff and granite porphyry in east-central Alaska, ∼100 km west of the Yukon border. Intracaldera tuff is at least 850 m thick. The K-feldspar megacrystic granite porphyry is exposed over much of a 7 km × 12 km area having 650 m of relief within the western part of the caldera fill. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe with reverse geometry (SHRIMP-RG) analyses of zircon from intracaldera tuff, granite porphyry, and outflow tuff yield U-Pb ages of 70.0 ± 1.2, 69.7 ± 1.2, and 71.1 ± 0.5 Ma (95% confidence), respectively. An aeromagnetic survey indicates that the tuff is reversely magnetized, and, therefore, that the caldera-forming eruption occurred in the C31r geomagnetic polarity chron. The tuff and porphyry have arc geochemical signatures and a limited range in SiO2 of 69 to 72 wt%. Although their phenocrysts differ in size and abundance, similar quartz + K-feldspar + plagioclase + biotite mineralogy, whole-rock geochemistry, and analytically indistinguishable ages indicate that the tuff and porphyry were comagmatic. Resorption of phenocrysts in tuff and porphyry suggests that these magmas formed by thermal rejuvenation of near-solidus or solidified crystal mush. A rare magmatic enclave (54% SiO2, arc geochemical signature) in the porphyry may be similar to parental magma and provides evidence of mafic magma and thermal input.

  4. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuezhong; Wang, Haoxu; Xie, Liqiang; Dong, Peitao

    2014-03-01

    Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  5. Origin of organism-dependent biogenic silica quartz formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2011-12-15

    Organism-dependent biogenic quartz formation in the steady-state environment is a phenomenon that can address the global environmental issues such as diagenetic evolution, biogeochemical cycling, and reservoir formation, but detailed studies have not been performed so far. Here, steady-state quartz formation is studied for amorphous silica of different biogenic origin on the basis of the recently established mechanistic model [Sato et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 18131]. Amorphous silica originated from rice husks possesses angstrom-scale pores larger by 1.3 Å than those originated from diatom algae. The slight difference of pore size dramatically reduces activation energies of water diffusion by 78% and reactions of water molecules at pore surfaces by 47%, resulting in the reduction of activation energy of biogenic quartz formation by 64%. The present findings evidence that angstrom-scale pores intrinsically residing in the amorphous matrix are the organism-dependent origin of steady-state biogenic quartz formation.

  6. Degradation of glycine and alanine on irradiated quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  7. Quartz Fibers For Laser Therapy In Tissue Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, P.; Sabber, G.; Lambert, R.; Berger, F.

    1984-03-01

    Quartz fibers not protected by a gas stream and used in tissue contact can work virtually indefinitely due to "self cleaning" and "regeneration". Tissue lesions are similar to those obtained with conventional devices.

  8. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  9. Low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    A review of numerous genetic interpretations of the individual low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz shows that there is no consensus concerning their formation mechanisms. Therefore, we introduce a new, purely descriptive terminology for the three categories of

  10. The Characteristics of the Shear-Vibrating Quartz Crystal Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjie Tian; Lingling Liu; Junling Lu; Fuxue Zhang

    2006-01-01

    According to the piezoelectric equation and the vibration theory of the quartz crystal, the relations between the vibrating frequency and structural parameters under the thickness-shear-vibration of AT-cut quartz crystal have been studied.The frequency conditions under which quartz crystal resonator formed stationary wave inside the electrode district and the transmission characteristics of wave outside the electrode district have also been discussed. A quartz crystal resonator was developed based on this analysis. The experiment showed that the force-sensing characteristics were independent of the fixation of the crystal edge. The detecting distinguish ability was up to 0.001 °, and the short-term frequency stability was up to 1.38x 10-10/min.

  11. Influence of quartz particles on wear in vertical roller mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lucas R.D.; Friis, Henrik; Fundal, Erling;

    2010-01-01

    statistical planning, a total of 10 tests were arried out with two different limestones and one type of quartz sand. The size distributions were kept constant and only the mixing ratios were varied. It appears from the investigation that mixtures consisting of minerals with different grindabilities result...... in an increased concentration of abrasive particles in the grinding bed ðR2 > 0:99Þ. The present study shows that the quartz concentration in the grinding bed is determining the wear rate....

  12. Average life of oxygen vacancies of quartz in sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIAO; Shaobo(刁少波); YE; Yuguang(业渝光)

    2002-01-01

    Average life of oxygen vacancies of quartz in sediments is estimated by using the ESR (electron spin resonance) signals of E( centers from the thermal activation technique. The experimental results show that the second-order kinetics equation is more applicable to the life estimation compared with the first order equation. The average life of oxygen vacancies of quartz from 4895 to 4908 deep sediments in the Tarim Basin is about 1018 a at 27℃.

  13. Integrated unaligned resonant modulator tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-10-03

    Methods and systems for tuning a resonant modulator are disclosed. One method includes receiving a carrier signal modulated by the resonant modulator with a stream of data having an approximately equal number of high and low bits, determining an average power of the modulated carrier signal, comparing the average power to a predetermined threshold, and operating a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the comparison of the average power and the predetermined threshold. One system includes an input structure, a plurality of processing elements, and a digital control element. The input structure is configured to receive, from the resonant modulator, a modulated carrier signal. The plurality of processing elements are configured to determine an average power of the modulated carrier signal. The digital control element is configured to operate a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the average power of the modulated carrier signal.

  14. Interaction Between Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles and Quartz Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirelis, Nikolaos P; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-11-17

    In this study, the influence of pH, ionic strength (IS), and temperature on graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles attachment onto quartz sand were investigated. Batch experiments were conducted at three controlled temperatures (4, 12, and 25 °C) in solutions with different pH values (pH 4, 7, and 10), and ionic strengths (IS = 1.4, 6.4, and 21.4 mM), under static and dynamic conditions. The surface properties of GO nanoparticles and quartz sand were evaluated by electrophoretic mobility measurements. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential energy profiles were constructed for the experimental conditions, using measured zeta potentials. The experimental results showed that GO nanoparticles were very stable under the experimental conditions. Both temperature and pH did not play a significant role in the attachment of GO nanoparticles onto quartz sand. In contrast, IS was shown to influence attachment. The attachment of GO particles onto quartz sand increased significantly with increasing IS. The experimental data were fitted nicely with a Freundlich isotherm, and the attachment kinetics were satisfactorily described with a pseudo-second-order model, which implies that the quartz sand exhibited substantial surface heterogeneity and that GO retention was governed by chemisorption. Furthermore, thermodynamic analysis revealed that the attachment process was nonspontaneous and endothermic, which may be associated with structural changes of the sand surfaces due to chemisorption. Therefore, secondary minimum interaction may not be the dominant mechanism for GO attachment onto the quartz sand under the experimental conditions.

  15. Basic characteristics of quartz crystal sensor with interdigitated electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Muramatsu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes basic characteristics of the quartz crystal sensor with interdigitated electrodes (IDE quartz crystal sensor which is for simultaneous monitoring of mass, viscosity, conductivity and dielectric changes of liquids or thin films. As the IDE quartz crystal sensor has three terminals for a pair of IDEs on the one side and a counter electrode on the other side, the resonance properties have been analyzed using the electrical equivalent circuit models and measured experimentally for all connecting types of electrode pairs. The IDE quartz crystal has shown clear resonance curves for calculating the resonance frequency and resonance resistance values as well as normal quartz crystal in the air and in contact with liquid. Small shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance resistance depending on the connecting types have been obtained and analyzed using the equivalent circuit models. We have found the integrated quartz crystal and IDE sensors could be monitored simultaneously by only one impedance analyzer. Finally, two types of measuring systems have been demonstrated for continuous measuring methods.

  16. Automatic tuning of myoelectric prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonivento, C; Davalli, A; Fantuzzi, C; Sacchetti, R; Terenzi, S

    1998-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a software package for the automatic tuning of myoelectric prostheses. The package core consists of Fuzzy Logic Expert Systems (FLES) that embody skilled operator heuristics in the tuning of prosthesis control parameters. The prosthesis system is an artificial arm-hand system developed at the National Institute of Accidents at Work (INAIL) laboratories. The prosthesis is powered by an electric motor that is controlled by a microprocessor using myoelectric signals acquired from skin-surface electrodes placed on a muscle in the residual limb of the subject. The software package, Microprocessor Controlled Arm (MCA) Auto Tuning, is a tool for aiding both INAIL expert operators and unskilled persons in the controller parameter tuning procedure. Prosthesis control parameter setup and subsequent recurrent adjustments are fundamental for the correct working of the prosthesis, especially when we consider that myoelectric parameters may vary greatly with environmental modifications. The parameter adjustment requires the end-user to go to the manufacturer's laboratory for the control parameters setup because, generally, he/she does not have the necessary knowledge and instruments to do this at home. However, this procedure is not very practical and involves a waste of time for the technicians and uneasiness for the clients. The idea behind the MCA Auto Tuning package consists in translating technician expertise into an FLES knowledge database. The software interacts through a user-friendly graphic interface with an unskilled user, who is guided through a step-by-step procedure in the prosthesis parameter tuning that emulates the traditional expert-aided procedure. The adoption of this program on a large scale may yield considerable economic benefits and improve the service quality supplied to the users of prostheses. In fact, the time required to set the prosthesis parameters are remarkably reduced, as is the technician

  17. PID Tuning Using Extremum Seeking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingsworth, N; Krstic, M

    2005-11-15

    Although proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process industry, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. Manual tuning of PID controllers, which requires optimization of three parameters, is a time-consuming task. To remedy this difficulty, much effort has been invested in developing systematic tuning methods. Many of these methods rely on knowledge of the plant model or require special experiments to identify a suitable plant model. Reviews of these methods are given in [1] and the survey paper [2]. However, in many situations a plant model is not known, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identification. Thus a method for tuning PID parameters within a closed-loop setting is advantageous. In relay feedback tuning [3]-[5], the feedback controller is temporarily replaced by a relay. Relay feedback causes most systems to oscillate, thus determining one point on the Nyquist diagram. Based on the location of this point, PID parameters can be chosen to give the closed-loop system a desired phase and gain margin. An alternative tuning method, which does not require either a modification of the system or a system model, is unfalsified control [6], [7]. This method uses input-output data to determine whether a set of PID parameters meets performance specifications. An adaptive algorithm is used to update the PID controller based on whether or not the controller falsifies a given criterion. The method requires a finite set of candidate PID controllers that must be initially specified [6]. Unfalsified control for an infinite set of PID controllers has been developed in [7]; this approach requires a carefully chosen input signal [8]. Yet another model-free PID tuning method that does not require opening of the loop is iterative feedback tuning (IFT). IFT iteratively optimizes the controller parameters with respect to a cost function derived from the output signal of the closed-loop system, see [9

  18. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  19. Synkinematic quartz cementation in partially open fractures in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Laubach, Stephen E.; Fall, Andras; Eichhubl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Faults and networks of naturally open fractures can provide open conduits for fluid flow, and may play a significant role in hydrocarbon recovery, hydrogeology, and CO2 sequestration. However, sandstone fracture systems are commonly infilled, at least to some degree, by quartz cement, which can stiffen and occlude fractures. Such cement deposits can systematically reduce the overall permeability enhancement due to open fractures (by reducing open fracture length) and result in permeability anisotropies. Thus, it is important to identify the factors that control the precipitation of quartz in fractures in order to identify potential fluid conduits under the present-day stress field. In many sandstones, quartz nucleates syntaxially on quartz grain or cement substrate of the fracture wall, and extends between fracture walls only locally, forming pillars or bridges. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images reveal that the core of these bridges are made up of bands of broken and resealed cement containing wall-parallel fluid inclusion planes. The fluid inclusion-rich core is usually surrounded by a layer of inclusion-poor clear quartz that comprises the lateral cement. Such crack-seal textures indicate that this phase was precipitating while the fractures were actively opening (synkinematic growth). Rapid quartz accumulation is generally believed to require temperatures of 80°C or more. Fluid inclusion thermometry and Raman spectroscopy of two-phase aqueous fluid-inclusions trapped in crack-seal bands may be used to track the P-T-X evolution of pore fluids during fracture opening and crack-seal cementation of quartz. Quartz cement bridges across opening mode fractures in the Cretaceous Travis Peak Formation of the tectonically quiescent East Texas Basin indicate individual fractures opened over a 48 m.y. time span at rates of 16-23 µm/m.y. Similarly, the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance Basin, Colorado contains fractures that

  20. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    unexplored. Accordingly, we present information for practitioners on the behaviour of Brown clustering in order to assist hyper-parametre tuning, in the form of a theoretical model of Brown clustering utility. This model is then evaluated empirically in two sequence labelling tasks over two text types. We...

  1. Political Tunings of the Piano

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    and appearance, we develop Morton’s understanding of the ambient to include an ambiguous play between content and frame. Reflected through the presented theoretical framework, the paper seeks to initiate a discussion of varied piano pieces by La Monte Young, Peter Ablinger and Richard James (Aphex Twin......) as unfolding the ambiguity of various political tunings of the piano....

  2. Quartz concentration trends in metal and nonmetal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Winthrop F; Huynh, Tran B; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2012-01-01

    From 1974 through 2010, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) collected nearly 147,000 respirable dust samples with a mass of at least 0.1 mg and a minimum of 1% quartz. These samples represent about 50% of all respirable dust compliance samples collected by MSHA. Analysis of these data shows that pockets of high concentrations and overexposure continue to exist. At underground mines, from 2005 to 2010, occupations with >20% of the samples exceeding the permissible exposure limit (PEL) and geometric mean quartz concentrations exceeding the ACGIH threshold limit value of 25 μg/m(3) included mucking, crusher operator, general laborer/utility, and front-end loader operator. During the same period, stone and rock saw operators and bagger and packers working at surface mines and mills also had >20% of the samples exceeding the PEL and geometric mean quartz concentrations >25 μg/m(3). Regardless of mine type or location, slow but steady improvement in exposure levels is seen in jobs involving crushing operations, which are widespread in the mining industry. Crusher operators are more likely to work in an enclosed area where it is easier to apply dust controls and air conditioning. A downward trend is also observed for vehicle equipment operators who drive load-haul-dumps, front-end loaders, trucks, and similar equipment. Crusher operators and vehicle equipment operators represent occupational categories that are widely sampled by MSHA inspectors. A small but statistically significant reduction in the overall mean respirable quartz dust and quartz concentrations from 1993 to 2010 was observed in most commodity groups. Variability from year to year and between commodities is high. Reduction in respirable quartz dust concentration does not necessarily correspond to a reduction in quartz concentration within the same commodity group. These trends are consistent with those reported in previous studies.

  3. Treated and untreated rock dust: Quartz content and physical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Chisholm, William P; Farcas, Daniel; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Harper, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Rock dusting is used to prevent secondary explosions in coal mines, but inhalation of rock dusts can be hazardous if the crystalline silica (e.g., quartz) content in the respirable fraction is high. The objective of this study is to assess the quartz content and physical characteristics of four selected rock dusts, consisting of limestone or marble in both treated (such as treatment with stearic acid or stearates) and untreated forms. Four selected rock dusts (an untreated and treated limestone and an untreated and treated marble) were aerosolized in an aerosol chamber. Respirable size-selective sampling was conducted along with particle size-segregated sampling using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were used to determine quartz mass and particle morphology, respectively. Quartz percentage in the respirable dust fraction of untreated and treated forms of the limestone dust was significantly higher than in bulk samples, but since the bulk percentage was low the enrichment factor would not have resulted in any major change to conclusions regarding the contribution of respirable rock dust to the overall airborne quartz concentration. The quartz percentage in the marble dust (untreated and treated) was very low and the respirable fractions showed no enrichment. The spectra from SEM-EDX analysis for all materials were predominantly from calcium carbonate, clay, and gypsum particles. No free quartz particles were observed. The four rock dusts used in this study are representative of those presented for use in rock dusting, but the conclusions may not be applicable to all available materials.

  4. Coating Characterization with the Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdy, Lauren F.

    The quartz crystal microbalance is a sensitive tool that can be used to measure the mass, modulus and phase angle of films of appropriate thicknesses. It is can be applied to systems with very varied properties, from liquid to solid, and under many different conditions. In this thesis its capabilities have been used to study the properties of several different systems of relevance to the coatings, art conservation, and rubber communities, in the process of which new techniques and tools were developed to analyze data and improve QCM data collection and experimental design. Alkyd resins, which have been used in artists' paints since the twentieth century, are the subject of the first studies. Alkyds are oil-modified polyesters. These resins are of interest because of their relatively recent use in art and how little is known of the mechanical properties in the early stages of cure. The QCM was shown to be sensitive to the curing process, changes in temperature, and mass change due to exposure to water. Kinetic studies during the first days of curing showed that the curing process can be divided into three regions. The first is dominated by solvent evaporation. In the second, oxygen absorption dominates and the mechanical properties change rapidly. The final stage extends from when the film is touch dry after about a day to years and is characterized by mass loss and continued increases in the modulus. Studying the curing at different temperatures revealed that the reactions do proceed much more rapidly at higher temperatures and an overall energy of activation was calculated for the curing process. The mechanical properties of alkyd resins containing zinc oxide, a white pigment, were studied with the QCM, nanoindentation and dynamic mechanical analysis. These measurements showed increases in the modulus with the inclusion of zinc oxide, and the QCM data showed that the second region started at earlier times as the pigment concentration was increased. Linseed oil is

  5. The DNA damage checkpoint response to replication stress: A Game of Forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJossen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions challenging replication fork progression, collectively referred to as replication stress, represent a major source of genomic instability and are associated to cancer onset. The replication checkpoint, a specialized branch of the DNA damage checkpoint, monitors fork problems and triggers a cellular response aimed at preserving genome integrity. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the replication checkpoint monitors and responds to replication stress, focusing on the checkpoint-mediated pathways contributing to protect replication fork integrity. We discuss how cells achieve checkpoint signaling inactivation once replication stress is overcome and how a failure to timely revert checkpoint-mediated changes in cellular physiology might impact on replication dynamics and genome integrity. We also highlight the checkpoint function as an anti-cancer barrier preventing cells malignant transformation following oncogene-induced replication stress.

  6. Pathological Changes of von Economo Neuron and Fork Neuron in Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-ning; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhu, Ming-wei

    2016-02-01

    von Economo neuron (VEN) is a bipolar neuron characterized by a large spindle-shaped soma. VEN is generally distributed in the layer V of anterior insular lobe and anterior cingulate cortex. Fork neuron is another featured bipolar neuron. In recent years,many studies have illustrated that VEN and fork neurons are correlated with complicated cognition such as self-consciousness and social emotion. Studies in the development and morpholigies of these two neurons as well as their pathological changes in various neurological and psychiatric disorders have found that the abnormal number and functions of VEN can cause corresponding dysfunctions in social recognition and emotions both during the neuro-developmental stages of childhood and during the nerve degeneration in old age stage. Therefore, more attentions should be paid on the research of VEN and fork neurons in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  7. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-01-14

    Replication-transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription-replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription-replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability.

  8. 77 FR 66865 - Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River....C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Oil and Gas Management Plan (Plan) for Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area...

  9. 76 FR 50171 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Henrys Fork Salinity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan, Sweetwater and Uinta Counties, WY; Daggett and Summit... Statement (EIS) for the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan (SCPP). The NRCS will be the lead agency... Improvements'' alternative assumes a salinity control project will be implemented. Existing financial...

  10. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  11. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  12. Chemical etching of deformation sub-structures in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, M. W.; Christie, J. M.

    1983-02-01

    Chemical etching of dislocations has been studied in natural and synthetic quartz single crystals, in deformed synthetic quartz and in naturally and experimentally deformed quartzites. The ability of different etchants to produce polished or preferentially etched surfaces on quartz is described. Dislocation etching was achieved on all crystal planes examined by using a saturated solution of ammonium bifluoride as the etchant. Appropriate etching times were determined for etching quartzites for grain size, subgrain boundaries, deformation lamellae, dislocations and twins. Growth and polished surfaces of synthetic single crystal quartz were similarly etched and dislocation etch pits, characteristic of various orientations were found. The use of ammonium bifluoride proved to be expecially advantageous for the basal plane, producing a polished surface with etch pits, suitable for dislocation etch pit counting. “Double” etch pits have been found on Dauphiné twin boundaries on the basal plane and the first order prism, using this etchant. Slip lines and deformation bands were suitably etched on deformed synthetic crystal surfaces for identification of the slip planes. Other acidic etchants have been explored and their application to the study of deformation structures in quartz crystals is discussed.

  13. Multiple genetic pathways for restarting DNA replication forks in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, S J

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the primosome assembly proteins, PriA, PriB, PriC, DnaT, DnaC, DnaB, and DnaG, are thought to help to restart DNA replication forks at recombinational intermediates. Redundant functions between priB and priC and synthetic lethality between priA2::kan and rep3 mutations raise the possibility that there may be multiple pathways for restarting replication forks in vivo. Herein, it is shown that priA2::kan causes synthetic lethality when placed in combination with either Delt...

  14. Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra Quadrangle, central Alaska, 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max G.; Stevens, John M.

    1953-01-01

    Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra quadrangle, central Alaska, in 1949 disclosed the occurrence of allanite in sampled containing as much as 0.05 percent equivalent uranium from the dump of the Whalen mine; the presence of radioactive parisite (a rare-earth fluocarbonate) in a highly altered limestone containing about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium near the Whalen shaft; and radioactive idocrase in samples of altered garnet rock with about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium, form the Crystal shaft of the Nixon Fork mine. This radioactivity is due mostly to thorium rather than uranium. Placer concentrates

  15. Summary of ATLAS Pythia 8 tunes

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the latest ATLAS Pythia 8 minimum bias and underlying event tunes. The Pythia 8 MPI tunes in this note have been constructed for nine different PDFs, making use of a new x-dependent hadronic matter distribution model.

  16. Self-tuning regulators. [adaptive control research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrom, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a research project are discussed for self-tuning regulators for active control. An algorithm for the self-tuning regulator is described as being stochastic, nonlinear, time variable, and not trivial.

  17. ELASTIC: A Large Scale Dynamic Tuning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectacular growth in the number of cores in current supercomputers poses design challenges for the development of performance analysis and tuning tools. To be effective, such analysis and tuning tools must be scalable and be able to manage the dynamic behaviour of parallel applications. In this work, we present ELASTIC, an environment for dynamic tuning of large-scale parallel applications. To be scalable, the architecture of ELASTIC takes the form of a hierarchical tuning network of nodes that perform a distributed analysis and tuning process. Moreover, the tuning network topology can be configured to adapt itself to the size of the parallel application. To guide the dynamic tuning process, ELASTIC supports a plugin architecture. These plugins, called ELASTIC packages, allow the integration of different tuning strategies into ELASTIC. We also present experimental tests conducted using ELASTIC, showing its effectiveness to improve the performance of large-scale parallel applications.

  18. Data Driven Tuning of Inventory Controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Santacoloma, Paloma Andrade; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2007-01-01

    A systematic method for criterion based tuning of inventory controllers based on data-driven iterative feedback tuning is presented. This tuning method circumvent problems with modeling bias. The process model used for the design of the inventory control is utilized in the tuning...... as an approximation to reduce time required on experiments. The method is illustrated in an application with a multivariable inventory control implementation on a four tank system....

  19. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, N; Mauz, B; Michael, C T

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870 +/- 230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095 +/- 190 a.

  20. Dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from fired materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluszcz, A.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes an examination of the dosimetric properties of natural quartz grains extracted from ancient fired materials. Eleven samples of different origin were tested for their TL and GLSL (green light stimulated luminescence) sensitivities within the mGy dose range. Very promising results...... were obtained showing the possibility of measuring the doses of around 10 mGy with 1% precision using GLSL or TL and using the single aliquot technique for natural quartz as a dosimeter. The lowest detectable dose was estimated to be lower than 500 mu Gy. The results obtained indicate that natural...... quartz grains from selected materials could be used for the dosimetry of environmental gamma radiation for the purposes of paleodosimetric dating methods as well as for accident dosimetry....

  1. Water weakening in experimentally deformed milky quartz single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunitz, H.; Thust, A.; Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Behrens, H.; Tarantola, A.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of recycling of H2O between FI´s, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FI´s during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  2. Ductile Regime Single Point Diamond Turning of Quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Deepak; Patten, John

    2011-01-01

    Quartz (fused silica) is one of the advanced engineered ceramic materials designed to operate in extreme environments. The mechanics of material removal in glass (Quartz) can be classified in two categories; brittle fracture and ductile plastic deformation. Good optical quality surfaces can be achieved by removing the material in a ductile manner. The strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the work piece material are the governing factors that control the extent of brittle fracture. The main goal of the subject research is to improve the surface quality of Quartz to be used as an optic device (mirrors and windows) via single point diamond turning (SPDT). Surface roughness (Ra) values of less than 50 nm without sub surface damage were obtained.

  3. New multiphase equation of state for polycrystalline quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettger, J.C.; Lyon, S.P.

    1990-10-01

    We have generated separate equations of state (EOS's) for the alpha quartz, coesite, and stishovite phases of polycrystalline quartz (SiO{sub 2}) using the computer program GRIZZLY. We also modified the program GRIZZLY to combine two single-phase EOS's for a given material into a single two-phase EOS via minimization of the Gibbs free energy. This new version of GRIZZLY has been used to generate a three-phase SESAME type EOS for polycrystalline quartz using the three EOS's mentioned above. All four of the EOS's produced for SiO{sub 2} are now available on request. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Periodic Error Compensation for Quartz MEMS Gyroscope Drift of INS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jianmao; Zhang Haipeng; Sun Junzhong

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the navigation accuracy of an inertial navigation system (INS), composed of quartz gyroscopes, the existing real-time compensation methods for periodic errors in quartz gyroscope drift and the periodic error term relationship between sampled original data and smoothed data are reviewed. On the base of the results, a new compensation method called using former period characteristics to compensate latter smoothness data (UFCL for short) method is proposed considering the INS working characteristics. This new method uses the original data without smoothing to work out an error conversion formula at the INS initial alignment time and then compensate the smoothed data errors by way of the formula at the navigation time. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate that this method is able to cut down on computational time and raise the accuracy which makes it a better real-time compensation approach for periodic error terms of quartz micro electronic mechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope's zero drift.

  5. Properties and behavior of quartz for the silicon process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasly, Kurt

    2008-07-01

    This PhD-thesis is a result of the study on important properties of quartz as a raw material for the metallurgical production of ferrosilicon and silicon metal. This includes defining mechanical properties important for the size reduction experienced during transport and storage and thermo-mechanical properties of quartz that is important for how the quartz reacts to the high temperatures experienced as it is charged on the furnace. Additionally, softening properties of quartz have been briefly discussed in some of the papers. Another important goal has been to test analytical and experimental methods for investigating the various properties. The investigations of important factors for the mechanical properties of ores and industrial minerals have been carried out as a literature study. The mining operation and transport from mine to smelter has been discussed and several factors that are significant for achieving best possible mechanical properties of the quartz have been identified. The most important factors are related to production in the mine and processing plant, which should be carefully planned to minimize the amount of blast-induced damage in the rock and thus achieve the best possible mechanical strength of the raw material. The amount of fines can be minimized by controlling the handling of the raw materials during the transport and storage. It is especially important to avoid high drops, both high single drops and accumulated height of all the drops in total. Investigations of the thermo-mechanical properties of quartz have been carried out by using different experimental and characterization methods. The petrographic investigations of the raw materials by polarized light microscopy have been important. Thermo-mechanical investigations have been high-temperature microthermometry and shock heating of quartz samples in an induction furnace with subsequent investigations of the heated material. The subsequent investigation included polarized- and

  6. Tuning Properties in Silver Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Joshi, Chakra Prasad

    2015-07-09

    The properties of Ag nanoclusters are not as well understood as those of their more precious Au cousins. However, a recent surge in the exploration of strategies to tune the physicochemical characteristics of Ag clusters addresses this imbalance, leading to new insights into their optical, luminescence, crystal habit, metal-core, ligand-shell and environmental properties. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of the latest strategies along with a brief introduction of the theoretical framework necessary to understand the properties of silver nanoclusters and the basis for their tuning. The advances in cluster research and the future prospects presented in this Perspective will eventually guide the next large systematic study of nanoclusters, resulting in a single collection of data similar to the periodic table of elements.

  7. Tuned mass absorber on a flexible structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2014-01-01

    The classic design of a tuned mass absorber is based on a simple two-mass analogy in which the tuned mass is connected to the structural mass with a spring and a viscous damper. In a flexible multi-degree-of-freedom structure the tuned mass absorber is typically introduced to provide damping of a...

  8. Radioluminescence of synthetic quartz related to alkali ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, M., E-mail: m.martini@unimib.it [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Fasoli, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Galli, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fotonica e Nanostrutture, IFN-CNR (Italy); Villa, I. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Guibert, P. [IRAMAT-CRP2A (Institut de recherche sur les Archeomateriaux), UMR no. 5060, CNRS-Universite Bordeaux III, F-33607 Pessac (France)

    2012-04-15

    The radioluminescence (RL) of synthetic quartzes (GEMMA Quartz and Crystal Company) has been measured at room temperature. Some samples were treated by electrodiffusion ('sweeping') in order to change the concentrations of alkali ions, mainly Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}, which in quartz are known to be linked to Al ions, substitutional for Si ions. The RL emission spectra show evidence of a role of alkali ions in affecting some specific emissions. All the spectra could be analysed as composed of four bands in the blue and UV region. Specifically, the well known blue emission at around 470 nm was seen to be composed by two bands at 430 nm (2.86 eV) and at 485 nm (2.53 eV). Effects of irradiation, during the RL measurements, were clearly seen only in the 'Li swept in' sample, namely an increase in the 485 nm band intensity and a decrease in the 430 nm band one. The previously reported UV emission was detected at 355 nm (3.44 eV) in all the samples, being the most intense band in the 'swept out' sample. A further UV emission was detected at 315 nm (3.94 eV), more intense in untreated samples. Possible assignments of the detected emission bands are discussed in relation to the defects of quartz, specifically focusing on the Al centres that are most affected by sweeping procedures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contribution to the understanding of relationships between defects in quartz and luminescence emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of charge compensators at substitutional Al sites in the optical properties of quartz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence of the double nature of the 'blue emission' (around 470 nm).

  9. Cosine tuning minimizes motor errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2002-06-01

    Cosine tuning is ubiquitous in the motor system, yet a satisfying explanation of its origin is lacking. Here we argue that cosine tuning minimizes expected errors in force production, which makes it a natural choice for activating muscles and neurons in the final stages of motor processing. Our results are based on the empirically observed scaling of neuromotor noise, whose standard deviation is a linear function of the mean. Such scaling predicts a reduction of net force errors when redundant actuators pull in the same direction. We confirm this prediction by comparing forces produced with one versus two hands and generalize it across directions. Under the resulting neuromotor noise model, we prove that the optimal activation profile is a (possibly truncated) cosine--for arbitrary dimensionality of the workspace, distribution of force directions, correlated or uncorrelated noise, with or without a separate cocontraction command. The model predicts a negative force bias, truncated cosine tuning at low muscle cocontraction levels, and misalignment of preferred directions and lines of action for nonuniform muscle distributions. All predictions are supported by experimental data.

  10. Chiral habit selection on nanostructured epitaxial quartz films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero-Genevrier, Adrián; Gich, Martí; Picas, Laura; Sanchez, Clément; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the crystallization of enantiomorphically pure systems can be relevant to diverse fields such as the study of the origins of life or the purification of racemates. Here we report on polycrystalline epitaxial thin films of quartz on Si substrates displaying two distinct types of chiral habits that never coexist in the same film. We combine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis and computer-assisted crystallographic calculations to make a detailed study of these habits of quartz. By estimating the surface energies of the observed crystallites we argue that the films are enantiomorphically pure and we briefly outline a possible mechanism to explain the habit and chiral selection in this system.

  11. Bonding energy of Sylgard on fused quartz: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.

    2015-02-01

    The bonding energy between the polymer Sylgard and fused quartz is determined experimentally using a miniature bulge test combined with three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC). Based on the experimental observation, Mindlin plate theory is used to compute the bonding energy (adhesive energy or surface energy) between the Sylgard and the fused quartz. The experimental results demonstrate that the combination of the miniature bulge test and the 3D-DIC provides a viable tool to directly measure interfacial and bonding properties.

  12. Pressure effect on the sensitivity of quartz Bourdon tube gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The sensitivity change for a commercial fused quartz Bourdon tube precision pressure gauge, due to a change in absolute pressure level, has been analytically computed and experimentally confirmed. The computed differential pressure error is 2.5% of full scale at a 100 atm absolute pressure level. The experimental method compared the fused quartz Bourdon tube gauge digital output to the results obtained from a nitrogen gas pressure system which had a high pressure, well-type mercury manometer as the differential pressure reference.

  13. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz in Different Gas Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Guangqing; Tang, Kai; Ostrovski, Oleg; Tronstad, Ragnar

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the influence of gas atmosphere on the synthesis of silicon carbide by carbothermal reduction of quartz. The quartz was crushed to Synthesis of silicon carbide in hydrogen was close to completion in 270 minutes at 1673 K (1400 °C), 140 minutes at 1773 K (1500 °C), and 70 minutes at 1873 K (1600 °C). Faster carbothermal reduction rate in hydrogen was attributed to the involvement of hydrogen in the reduction reactions by directly reducing silica and/or indirectly, by reacting with graphite to form methane as an intermediate reductant.

  14. ST Quartz Acoustic Wave Sensors with Sectional Guiding Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen McHale

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of removing a section of guiding layer from the propagation paths of ST-quartz Love wave sensors; this offers the ease of fabrication of a polymer guiding layer whilst retaining the native surface of the quartz which may then be used for the attachment of a sensitizing layer. Data is presented for the rigid and viscous loading, which indicates a small reduction in mass sensitivity compared to a Love wave device. Biosensing capabilities of these discontinuous ‘sectional’ guiding layer devices are demonstrated using protein adsorption from solution.

  15. Eighth-Grade Violinists' Instrument Tuning Ability: A Comparison of Pitch Perception and Tuning Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between eighth-grade violinists' pitch perception and instrument tuning skill. The perceptual task was a researcher-developed computer-based Violin Tuning Perception Test. The instrument tuning task involved tuning two violins, one mistuned flat and the other mistuned sharp. Participants (N…

  16. Integrated Analogic Filter Tuning System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters of integrated analog filters can vary due to temperatu-re change, IC process variation and therefore they should have dedicated tuning circuits that compensate these imperfections. A method is proposed that speeds up switched resistor bank design while taking into account the required tuning range and step size. A novel counter structure is used in the tuning circuit that is ba-sed on successive approximation approach. The proposed swit-ched resistor design method and tuning circuit are designed in 0.18 μm CMOS technology and verified. Results are compared to existing tuning circuit designs.

  17. Oracle SQL tuning with Oracle SQLTXPLAIN

    CERN Document Server

    Charalambides, Stelios

    2013-01-01

    Oracle SQL Tuning with SQLTXPLAIN is a practical guide to SQL tuning the way Oracle's own experts do it, using a freely downloadable tool called SQLTXPLAIN. Using this simple tool you'll learn how to tune even the most complex SQL, and you'll learn to do it quickly, without the huge learning curve usually associated with tuning as a whole.  Firmly based in real world problems, this book helps you reclaim system resources and avoid the most common bottleneck in overall performance, badly tuned SQL.  You'll learn how the optimizer works, how to take advantage of its latest features, and when it'

  18. 76 FR 46721 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem Restoration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... this project area to improve the health of the ecosystem and reach the desired future condition. DATES...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem... the potential for large-scale, high-intensity wildfires that threaten human life, property, and...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  20. 77 FR 71611 - Land Acquisitions; North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Tribe's current government headquarters, which are located in the town of North Fork, Madera County, California, described as: Real property in the City of UNINCORPORATED AREA, County of Madera, State of..., AND 8 of PARCEL MAP 3426 IN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF THE COUNTY OF MADERA, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS...

  1. From farm to fork and further. Research tackling the grand challenge of food safety in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de; Polchar, J.; Gehem, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study From Farm to Fork and Further shows how, as traditional causes of food safety problems such as basic hygiene are successfully dealt with, future food safety risks become ever harder to manage. European countries may have the highest food safety standards, however the trends that go hand in

  2. Environmental Assessment, Demolition of Alpha Ramp Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    support active cultivation of grass and alfalfa hay, and other areas are undergoing rehabilitation for future haying operations. Any cropping practices...January 2004). 3.10 Land Use Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops, including spring wheat, barley, sunflowers

  3. Final Environmental Assessment Demolition of Alpha Ramp, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    unimproved areas at GFAFB have been used to support active cultivation of grass and alfalfa hay, and other areas are undergoing rehabilitation for...Native American areas of concern on GFAFB (USAF, January 2004). 3.10 Land Use Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops

  4. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depl...

  5. Bending Forks and Wagging Dogs--It's about the DNA 3' Tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Tainer, John A

    2015-06-18

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find that unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA's 3'-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bending forks and wagging dogs – it’s about the DNA 3′ tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Tainer, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA’s 3′-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. PMID:26091346

  7. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  8. New tuning method for PID controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing-Chung

    2002-10-01

    In this paper, a tuning method for proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and the performance assessment formulas for this method are proposed. This tuning method is based on a genetic algorithm based PID controller design method. For deriving the tuning formula, the genetic algorithm based design method is applied to design PID controllers for a variety of processes. The relationship between the controller parameters and the parameters that characterize the process dynamics are determined and the tuning formula is then derived. Using simulation studies, the rules for assessing the performance of a PID controller tuned by the proposed method are also given. This makes it possible to incorporate the capability to determine if the PID controller is well tuned or not into an autotuner. An autotuner based on this new tuning method and the corresponding performance assessment rules is also established. Simulations and real-time experimental results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of these formulas.

  9. SUMO modification regulates BLM and RAD51 interaction at damaged replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J Ouyang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gene mutated in Bloom's syndrome, BLM, is important in the repair of damaged replication forks, and it has both pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in homologous recombination (HR. At damaged forks, BLM interacts with RAD51 recombinase, the essential enzyme in HR that catalyzes homology-dependent strand invasion. We have previously shown that defects in BLM modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO cause increased gamma-H2AX foci. Because the increased gamma-H2AX could result from defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage, we hypothesized that SUMO modification regulates BLM's function in HR repair at damaged forks. To test this hypothesis, we treated cells that stably expressed a normal BLM (BLM+ or a SUMO-mutant BLM (SM-BLM with hydroxyurea (HU and examined the effects of stalled replication forks on RAD51 and its DNA repair functions. HU treatment generated excess gamma-H2AX in SM-BLM compared to BLM+ cells, consistent with a defect in replication-fork repair. SM-BLM cells accumulated increased numbers of DNA breaks and were hypersensitive to DNA damage. Importantly, HU treatment failed to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in SM-BLM cells compared to BLM+ cells, indicating a specific defect in HR repair and suggesting that RAD51 function could be compromised. Consistent with this hypothesis, RAD51 localization to HU-induced repair foci was impaired in SM-BLM cells. These data suggested that RAD51 might interact noncovalently with SUMO. We found that in vitro RAD51 interacts noncovalently with SUMO and that it interacts more efficiently with SUMO-modified BLM compared to unmodified BLM. These data suggest that SUMOylation controls the switch between BLM's pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in HR. In the absence of BLM SUMOylation, BLM perturbs RAD51 localization at damaged replication forks and inhibits fork repair by HR. Conversely, BLM SUMOylation relieves its inhibitory effects on HR, and it promotes RAD51 function.

  10. Evaluation of trapping parameters of annealed natural quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rui [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Shisanling Seismic Station, Institute of Earthquake Science, CEA, 102200 Beijing (China); Wei, Ming-Jian, E-mail: weimj@cnu.edu.cn [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Song, Bo [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); Beijing Jing Yuan School, 100040 Beijing (China); Zhang, Yan [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China); School of TaiPingqiao, Nan Lu of West Railway Station, 100073 Beijing (China); Zhao, Qiu-Yue [Key Laboratory of Tourism and Resources Environment in Universities of Shandong, Taishan University, 271000 Tai’an (China); Pan, Bao-Lin; Li, Teng-Fei [College of Resources, Environment & Tourism, Capital Normal University, 100048 Beijing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The thermoluminescence (TL) trapping parameters of annealed quartz have been investigated. The apparent TL peaks observed at temperatures of 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C and 405 °C, respectively, were named Peak I, Peak II, Peak III and Peak IV. The T{sub m} − T{sub stop} method is applied to investigate the number of peaks and their positions, and to obtain the trap distributions in the quartz. Peak shape (PS), Hoogenstraaten method (Various Heating Rates Method, VHR), and Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) are used to evaluate the trapping parameters of the annealed quartz. The glow curve can be considered as a superposition of at least nine overlapping peaks. These peaks show up at 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C, 308 °C, 333 °C, 384 °C, 441 °C, 466 °C and 484 °C. The PS method can be only used in evaluating the parameters for Peaks I. The VHR method can be used in evaluating the trapping parameters for the first three peaks. CGCD method is complementary to obtaining parameters for the sub-peaks, and the thermal quenching correction with the Urbach’s method is necessary. The Urbach’s coefficient for the quartz is 30.03 kT{sub m}.

  11. Quartz-like Crystals Found in Planetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has, for the first time, detected tiny quartz-like crystals sprinkled in young planetary systems. The crystals, which are types of silica minerals called cristobalite and tridymite, can be seen close-up in the black-and-white insets (cristobalite is on the left, and tridymite on the right). The main picture is an artist's concept of a young star and its swirling disk of planet-forming materials. Cristobalite and tridymite are thought to be two of many planet ingredients. On Earth, they are normally found as tiny crystals in volcanic lava flows and meteorites from space. These minerals are both related to quartz. For example, if you were to heat the familiar quartz crystals often sold as mystical tokens, the quartz would transform into cristobalite and tridymite. Because cristobalite and tridymite require rapid heating and cooling to form, astronomers say they were most likely generated by shock waves traveling through the planetary disks. The insets are Scanning Electron Microscope pictures courtesy of George Rossman of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.

  12. Application of quartz crystal microbalance technology in tribological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The last fifteen years have seen considerable growth in the application of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to explore the tribological characteristics of materials. This article reviews some of the advances made in characterizing frictional properties of materials using the QCM, especially with di...

  13. Oxygen isotope equilibration systematics between quartz and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem, Israel); Beckinsale, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    The /sup 18/O//sup 16/O fractionation accompanying the hydrothermal crystallization of quartz from silicic acid at 265/sup 0/ to 465/sup 0/C has been studied in order to assess the influences of (a) rate of quartz formation, (b) the nature of the reaction mechanism, and (c) temperature. At 360/sup 0/ and 465/sup 0/C, there are no indications of rate effects influencing isotope partitioning, but at 265/sup 0/C (where fractionation factors show an unusally large scatter) the evidence is inconclusive in this respect. All reaction appears to occur through solution-precipitation processes, with the intermediate phases, cristobalite and silica K, giving identical fractionation factors (within experimental errors) to quartz samples formed at the same temperature. The temperature-dependence of fractionation in the range 265/sup 0/ to 465/sup 0/C is given by the equation 10/sup 3/ ln ..cap alpha..(SiO/sub 2/--H/sub 2/O) = 3.05 x 10/sup 6/T/sup -2/ - 2.09. The data are in good agreement with other experimental calibrations of the quartz-water fractionation.

  14. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  15. A new equation of state for α-quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Rudolph; Carpenter, John

    2015-06-01

    Quartz (SiO2) is often used as an optically transparent window for visar signals in shock experiments and is itself an active component of the experiments. Therefore, the shock response of quartz is an important input that must be known to high fidelity for precise measurement of other materials. We describe on-going work to develop a wide-range equation of state table that includes multiple phases and incorporates the latest high quality experimental and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The emphasis in this work is the proper description of α-quartz along its principal Hugoniot through Stishovite and liquid phases. While molecular dissociation occurs at high pressures and temperatures, we find that an additional dissociation model is unnecessary. Although SiO2 possesses a number of solid phases, we restrict our focus to α-quartz and Stishovite as these two provide the density change along the Hugoniot path. We compare the model to recently measured data on Sandia's Z-machine. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  16. Equivalent dose determination using a quartz isothermal TL signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, D.A.G.; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on further developments in the use of an isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) signal for determining the equivalent dose (De) in unheated sedimentary quartz. In order to minimise sensitivity change during the first measurement, the ITL signal is measured at 270 °C following a preheat...

  17. Characterization of silica quartz as raw material in photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussaa, S. Anas; Kheloufi, A.; Zaourar, N. Boutarek; Kefaifi, A.; Kerkar, F.

    2016-07-01

    Raw materials are essential for the functioning of modern societies, and access to these raw materials is vital to the world economy. Sustainable development, both globally level, raises important new challenges associated with access and efficient use of raw materials. High purity quartz, is consider as a critical raw material and it is a rare commodity that only forms under geological conditions where a narrow set of chemical and physical parameters is fulfilled. When identified and following special beneficiation techniques, high purity quartz obtains very attractive prices and is applied in high technology sectors that currently are under rapid expansion such as photovoltaic solar cells, silicon metal - oxide wafers in the semiconductor industry and long distance optical fibers that are used in communication networks. Crystalline silicon remains the principal material for photovoltaic technology. Metallurgical silicon is produced industrially by the reduction of silica with carbon in an electric arc furnace at temperatures higher than 2000 °C in the hottest parts, by a reaction that can be written ideally as: SiO2 + 2C = Si + 2CO. The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating the various physical and chemical proprieties of Hoggar quartz with different techniques: X Ray Fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optic Microscopy, Carbon Analyzer and Vickers Hardness. The results show finally that the quartz has got good result in purity but need enrichment for the photovoltaic application.

  18. Characterization of silica quartz as raw material in photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussaa, S. Anas, E-mail: sabiha.anas@gmail.com; Kheloufi, A.; Kefaifi, A.; Kerkar, F. [Division croissance cristalline et procédés métallurgiques CCPM Centre de recherche en technologie des semi-conducteurs pour l’énergétique (C.R.T.S.E) 02 Bd Frantz Fanon BP. 140 Alger 7 merveilles, Alger 16200 (Algeria); Zaourar, N. Boutarek [Laboratoire des technologies des matériaux, USTHB, B.P. 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Alger, Algérie 16111 (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    Raw materials are essential for the functioning of modern societies, and access to these raw materials is vital to the world economy. Sustainable development, both globally level, raises important new challenges associated with access and efficient use of raw materials. High purity quartz, is consider as a critical raw material and it is a rare commodity that only forms under geological conditions where a narrow set of chemical and physical parameters is fulfilled. When identified and following special beneficiation techniques, high purity quartz obtains very attractive prices and is applied in high technology sectors that currently are under rapid expansion such as photovoltaic solar cells, silicon metal - oxide wafers in the semiconductor industry and long distance optical fibers that are used in communication networks. Crystalline silicon remains the principal material for photovoltaic technology. Metallurgical silicon is produced industrially by the reduction of silica with carbon in an electric arc furnace at temperatures higher than 2000 °C in the hottest parts, by a reaction that can be written ideally as: SiO{sub 2} + 2C = Si + 2CO. The aim of this study has been to test experimental methods for investigating the various physical and chemical proprieties of Hoggar quartz with different techniques: X Ray Fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optic Microscopy, Carbon Analyzer and Vickers Hardness. The results show finally that the quartz has got good result in purity but need enrichment for the photovoltaic application.

  19. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock Compressed Quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geom- etry optimised system of a polar slab in a 3-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under repres...

  20. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year research project undertaken to better understand the nature and magnitude of mercury (Hg) fluxes in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). This project addresses the requirements of Action Plan 1 in the 2011 Oak Ridge Reservation-wide Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Five Year Review (FYR). The Action Plan is designed to address a twofold 2011 FYR issue: (1) new information suggests mobilization of mercury from the upper and lower EFPC streambeds and stream banks is the primary source of mercury export during high-flow conditions, and (2) the current Record of Decision did not address the entire hydrologic system and creek bank or creek bed sediments. To obtain a more robust watershed-scale understanding of mercury sources and processes in lower EFPC (LEFPC), new field and laboratory studies were coupled with existing data from multiple US Department of Energy programs to develop a dynamic watershed and bioaccumulation model. LEFPC field studies for the project focused primarily on quantification of streambank erosion and an evaluation of mercury dynamics in shallow groundwater adjacent to LEFPC and potential connection to the surface water. The approach to the stream bank study was innovative in using imagery from kayak floats’ surveys from the headwaters to the mouth of EFPC to estimate erosion, coupled with detailed bank soil mercury analyses. The goal of new field assessments and modeling was to generate a more holistic and quantitative understanding of the watershed and the sources, flux, concentration, transformation, and bioaccumulation of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg). Model development used a hybrid approach that dynamically linked a spreadsheet-based physical and chemical watershed model to a systems dynamics, mercury bioaccumulation model for key fish species. The watershed model tracks total Hg and MeHg fluxes and concentrations by examining upstream inputs, floodplain

  1. Unligated Okazaki Fragments Induce PCNA Ubiquitination and a Requirement for Rad59-Dependent Replication Fork Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Dang Nguyen

    Full Text Available Deficiency in DNA ligase I, encoded by CDC9 in budding yeast, leads to the accumulation of unligated Okazaki fragments and triggers PCNA ubiquitination at a non-canonical lysine residue. This signal is crucial to activate the S phase checkpoint, which promotes cell cycle delay. We report here that a pol30-K107 mutation alleviated cell cycle delay in cdc9 mutants, consistent with the idea that the modification of PCNA at K107 affects the rate of DNA synthesis at replication forks. To determine whether PCNA ubiquitination occurred in response to nicks or was triggered by the lack of PCNA-DNA ligase interaction, we complemented cdc9 cells with either wild-type DNA ligase I or a mutant form, which fails to interact with PCNA. Both enzymes reversed PCNA ubiquitination, arguing that the modification is likely an integral part of a novel nick-sensory mechanism and not due to non-specific secondary mutations that could have occurred spontaneously in cdc9 mutants. To further understand how cells cope with the accumulation of nicks during DNA replication, we utilized cdc9-1 in a genome-wide synthetic lethality screen, which identified RAD59 as a strong negative interactor. In comparison to cdc9 single mutants, cdc9 rad59Δ double mutants did not alter PCNA ubiquitination but enhanced phosphorylation of the mediator of the replication checkpoint, Mrc1. Since Mrc1 resides at the replication fork and is phosphorylated in response to fork stalling, these results indicate that Rad59 alleviates nick-induced replication fork slowdown. Thus, we propose that Rad59 promotes fork progression when Okazaki fragment processing is compromised and counteracts PCNA-K107 mediated cell cycle arrest.

  2. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  3. Mechanical and ultrastructural evaluation of quartz post-endodontic reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majori, M; Bedini, R; Altamura, C; Filippini, P; Caiazza, S

    2004-01-01

    Aesthetics is a very important element in dentistry, but requires the support of good mechanical performance. Quartz fiber used in post-endodontic reconstruction is an aesthetic material, although there is little research concerning its mechanical properties. This study evaluated the retentive property of post-endodontic reconstruction, composed of a quartz fiber post. Different thermal stresses were applied in vitro to post-endodontic reconstructions, in order to simulate oral thermal action on post-system dental structure linkage. We chose 30 human extracted teeth, endodontically treated and restored, and then divided them into three groups of 10 teeth. A different treatment was applied to each group before mechanical testing: in the 1st group no treatment was done (controls); in the 2nd group teeth were subjected, in a climatic chamber, to 10 thermo-cycles between 4 degrees C and 58 degrees C; in the 3rd group teeth were stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for 48 hr. The teeth then underwent tensile shear stress tests at break point using a computerized electronic dynamometer. After mechanical testing, two teeth from each group were longitudinally half-sectioned, sputter-coated in gold and observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The extracted quartz fiber post of each tooth also underwent SEM observation. Mechanical test results demonstrated that thermal cyclic variations could affect bond stability between dental structures and posts in quartz fiber reconstructions, whereas their bond strength seemed unaffected by humidity increases. Quartz fiber post SEM observation demonstrated a homogeneous structure and a regular fiber disposition. Dental root canal morphology SEM images always showed a different thickness in the cement layer. (Journal of Applied Biomaterials & Biomechanics 2004; 2: 156-61).

  4. Phototoxic maculopathy induced by quartz infrared heat lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Weiwei; Liang, Kang; Wang, Xiuying; Liu, Qinghuai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: A large proportion of the output of quartz infrared heat lamps is emitted as infrared radiation (IR). Retinal damage induced by IR-A and visible light on arc welders has been reported. However, case reports of retinal damage caused by quartz infrared heat lamps are rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of phototoxic maculopathy induced by quartz infrared heat lamps. Patient concerns: We report a female with a 1-month history of progressive blurred vision and dysmorphopsia in her right eye after improper staring at the tubes of a quartz infrared heater. Her best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 20/32. Optical coherence tomography revealed a defect from the ellipsoid zone to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch's complex layer with a diameter of 360mmat its widest. P1 amplitudes in the two central concentric rings were reduced as assessed by multifocal electroretinography. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with phototoxic maculopathy. Interventions: The patient was advised to cease all exposure to the infrared heater and was treated with peribulbar injections of methylprednisolone, oral Pancreatic Kininogenase, and oral Mecobalamin. Outcomes: Ten months later, her BCVA improved to 20/20. All examination results returned to normal except for a small residual defect in the interdigitation zone and RPE/Bruch's complex layer in her optical coherence tomography. Lessons: Light emitted by quartz infrared heat lamps may cause damage to the retina through photothermal and photochemical means. The public is insufficiently aware of the hazard potential of infrared heat lamps and other IR-A sources on human retina. PMID:28099337

  5. 用于微机电系统的叉形微铰链%Micro Fork Hinge for MEMS Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Flexible beams are often used for rotation in MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) devices to avoid the friction problems associated with hinge. However, the rotation angle of flexible beam is very limited and not enough for many applications. In this paper, we introduce a quasi hinge structure named as Fork Hinge, which has a larger equivalent rotation angle (e.g.10 times lager) and is more stable than the flexible hinge, while keeping its interesting properties. We develop an analytical model and simulate the Fork hinge behavior with FEM analysis. We find a good correlation with Fork Hinges fabricated using a SOI (Silicon on Insulator) wafer and DRIE (Deep Reactive Ion Etching).

  6. Optically stimulated exoelectron emission processes in quartz: comparison of experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to measure optically stimulated exoelectron emission (OSE) signals simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz samples. These experiments provide valuable information on the charge movement in quartz grains. Two...

  7. Properties and behavior of quartz for the silicon process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasly, Kurt

    2008-07-01

    This PhD-thesis is a result of the study on important properties of quartz as a raw material for the metallurgical production of ferrosilicon and silicon metal. This includes defining mechanical properties important for the size reduction experienced during transport and storage and thermo-mechanical properties of quartz that is important for how the quartz reacts to the high temperatures experienced as it is charged on the furnace. Additionally, softening properties of quartz have been briefly discussed in some of the papers. Another important goal has been to test analytical and experimental methods for investigating the various properties. The investigations of important factors for the mechanical properties of ores and industrial minerals have been carried out as a literature study. The mining operation and transport from mine to smelter has been discussed and several factors that are significant for achieving best possible mechanical properties of the quartz have been identified. The most important factors are related to production in the mine and processing plant, which should be carefully planned to minimize the amount of blast-induced damage in the rock and thus achieve the best possible mechanical strength of the raw material. The amount of fines can be minimized by controlling the handling of the raw materials during the transport and storage. It is especially important to avoid high drops, both high single drops and accumulated height of all the drops in total. Investigations of the thermo-mechanical properties of quartz have been carried out by using different experimental and characterization methods. The petrographic investigations of the raw materials by polarized light microscopy have been important. Thermo-mechanical investigations have been high-temperature microthermometry and shock heating of quartz samples in an induction furnace with subsequent investigations of the heated material. The subsequent investigation included polarized- and

  8. The role of quartz in the origin of optical activity on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgenii, K; Wolfram, T

    2000-10-01

    A thorough analysis of literature data on distribution of right and left quartz in many locations on the surface of Earth indicates that quartz enantiomorph crystals are distributed in equal amounts in all locations. Therefore optically active quartz crystals of one or the other enantiomorph could not serve as the source of homochirality in the evolution of biosphere. Hence the calculation of a PVED based on published 'small excess of left quartz crystals' on Earth lacks a sound physical basis.

  9. POET: Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Q; Seymour, K; You, H; Vuduc, R; Quinlan, D

    2007-01-29

    The excessive complexity of both machine architectures and applications have made it difficult for compilers to statically model and predict application behavior. This observation motivates the recent interest in performance tuning using empirical techniques. We present a new embedded scripting language, POET (Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning), for parameterizing complex code transformations so that they can be empirically tuned. The POET language aims to significantly improve the generality, flexibility, and efficiency of existing empirical tuning systems. We have used the language to parameterize and to empirically tune three loop optimizations-interchange, blocking, and unrolling-for two linear algebra kernels. We show experimentally that the time required to tune these optimizations using POET, which does not require any program analysis, is significantly shorter than that when using a full compiler-based source-code optimizer which performs sophisticated program analysis and optimizations.

  10. An optical device for laser tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyitiro, A.

    1984-01-31

    This invention is intended to improve on the design of an optical device which is used to execute high precision tuning of the optical elements in laser systems. A laser tuning scheme is given and the tuning method is described in detail. The tuning system includes a laser emission source in the visible spectral range and a semitransparent plate at an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the optical axis of the laser. When a test beam passes through the plate, a portion of the emission is reflected to a screen containing a reference mark. The remaining portion of the emission passes through the plate and is reflected from the rear dark mirror in the laser under tuning. The second beam is reflected from the plate to the other screen. The reference marks on the screens represent the optimum position of the optical elements of the laser system, which provides good laser tuning accuracy.

  11. Orientation of Planar Deformation Features (PDFs) in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhorst, F.; Deutsch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Differently oriented single crystal quartz was shocked experimentally at pressures of 20 to 32 GPa and pre-shock temperatures up to 630 C. Based on this systematic investigation, we can demonstrate that the orientation of planar deformation features in quartz is not only dependent on shock pressure but also on pre-shock temperature and shock direction. Moreover, the orientation of Planar Deformation Features (PDF's) is strongly influenced by the set-up in recovery experiments. PDF's in quartz are defined as optically recognizable, planar microstructures diagnostically produced by shock compression. PDF's differ from all kinds of microstructures found in volcanic environment and therefore, their presence is a primary criterion for recognizing impact craters and ejecta layers such as the K/T boundary. Because experiments have shown a pressure dependence of the orientation of PDF's, this property is used extensively for shock wave barometry in natural impact sites. However, the unreflected application of experimental results neglects that parameters such as pre-shock temperature, shock direction, or the experimental arrangement may influence the spatial distribution of PDF's. In order to test this assumption, shock experiments on single crystal quartz at pre-shock temperatures of 20, 275, 540, and 630 C, and with shock directions (1010) and (0001) were performed. Most of the recovery experiments were carried out by using a reverberation technique, whereas in only one experiment a single shock was produced (impedance method). In the former case 0.5 mm thin discs of single crystal quartz were used, in the latter a 15 mm thick cylinder. The orientation of PDF's was measured by means of a conventional universal stage and the results are given. Effects of the experimentation technique can be derived showing the orientation of PDF's in quartz shocked at 27.5 GPa. In comparison to the well defined peaks at (1012) found in samples from reverberation experiments, the impedance

  12. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year research project undertaken to better understand the nature and magnitude of mercury (Hg) fluxes in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). This project addresses the requirements of Action Plan 1 in the 2011 Oak Ridge Reservation-wide Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Five Year Review (FYR). The Action Plan is designed to address a twofold 2011 FYR issue: (1) new information suggests mobilization of mercury from the upper and lower EFPC streambeds and stream banks is the primary source of mercury export during high-flow conditions, and (2) the current Record of Decision did not address the entire hydrologic system and creek bank or creek bed sediments. To obtain a more robust watershed-scale understanding of mercury sources and processes in lower EFPC (LEFPC), new field and laboratory studies were coupled with existing data from multiple US Department of Energy programs to develop a dynamic watershed and bioaccumulation model. LEFPC field studies for the project focused primarily on quantification of streambank erosion and an evaluation of mercury dynamics in shallow groundwater adjacent to LEFPC and potential connection to the surface water. The approach to the stream bank study was innovative in using imagery from kayak floats’ surveys from the headwaters to the mouth of EFPC to estimate erosion, coupled with detailed bank soil mercury analyses. The goal of new field assessments and modeling was to generate a more holistic and quantitative understanding of the watershed and the sources, flux, concentration, transformation, and bioaccumulation of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg). Model development used a hybrid approach that dynamically linked a spreadsheet-based physical and chemical watershed model to a systems dynamics, mercury bioaccumulation model for key fish species. The watershed model tracks total Hg and MeHg fluxes and concentrations by examining upstream inputs, floodplain

  13. 30 CFR 90.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings to which a Part 90 miner is exposed contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain...

  14. 30 CFR 71.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Dust Standards § 71.101 Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz,...

  15. 30 CFR 70.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain the...

  16. Measurement of the dose in quartz in the presence of feldspar contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallinga, J.; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2002-01-01

    , without seriously affecting the quartz OSL signal. A single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol is proposed which, in our samples, allows accurate measurement of the dose in quartz in the presence of feldspar contamination. The protocol also has potential use for quartz dose determination in mixed...

  17. Status of fork-tailed and Leach's storm-petrel populations at St. Lazaria Island during the summer of 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purposes of this study were to (1) continue monitoring on Leach's forktail (Oceanadroma furcata) and on fork-tailed storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa); (2)...

  18. Using Caffeine as a Water Quality Indicator in the Ambient Monitoring Program for Third Fork Creek Watershed, Durham, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Porché L

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine has been suggested as a chemical indicator for domestic wastewater in freshwater systems, although it is not included in water quality monitoring programs. The Third Fork Creek watershed in Durham, NC, is highly urbanized, with a history of receiving untreated wastewater from leaking and overflowing sanitary sewers. The poor water quality originating in the Third Fork Creek watershed threatens its intended uses and jeopardizes drinking water, aquatic life, and recreational activities provided by Jordan Lake. Organic waste contaminants have been detected in both Third Fork Creek watershed and Jordan Lake; however, the sampling periods were temporary, resulting in a few samples collected during nonstorm periods. It is recommended that (1) the concentration of caffeine and other organic waste contaminants are determined during storm and nonstorm periods and (2) caffeine is monitored regularly with traditional water quality indicators to evaluate the health of Third Fork Creek watershed.

  19. Physical Habitat Characteristics on the North and South Forks of the Shenandoah River, VA in 2002-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The layers within this geodataset describe physical habitat characteristics in the North and South Fork Shenandoah rivers. They represent conditions during summer...

  20. Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Sajan D., E-mail: sajan.george@manipal.edu [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Ladiwala, Uma, E-mail: brainwave@cbs.ac.in [UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Kalina Campus, Mumbai 400 098 (India); Thomas, John; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Mathur, Deepak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Linear grooves have been laser-written on quartz surfaces using ultrashort (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm light. Measurements of water contact angle indicate that laser patterning makes the quartz surface more hydrophilic. Fibroblast cells were cultured on such laser-written surfaces; they were observed to align preferentially along the direction of the laser written grooves (width ∼2 μm. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that there are no chemical changes induced in the surface upon our laser writing. Most unexpectedly, there are also no chemical changes induced in the cells that are spatially aligned along the laser-written grooves. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that our laser-writing induces dramatic enhancement of surface roughness along the grooves, and the cells appear to respond to this. Thus, cell alignment seems to be in response to physical cues rather than chemical signals.

  1. Annealing Effect on Photovoltages of Quartz Single Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Lu; ZHAO Song-Qing; ZHAO Kun

    2010-01-01

    @@ We investigate the photovoltaic effects of quartz single crystals annealed at high temperatures in ambient atmosphere.The open-circuit photovoltages and surface morphologies strongly depend on the heating treatments.When the annealing temperature increases from room temperature to 900℃,the rms roughness of quartz single crystal wafers increases from 0.207 to 1.011 nm.In addition,the photovoltages decrease from 1.994#V at room temperature to 1.551 μ V after treated at 500℃,and then increase up to 9.8μV after annealed at 900℃.The inner mechanism of the present photovoltaic response and surface morphologies is discussed.

  2. Tuning innate immunity by translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Robert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-12-01

    In multicellular organisms, the epithelia is a contact surface with the surrounding environment and is exposed to a variety of adverse biotic (pathogenic) and abiotic (chemical) factors. Multi-layered pathways that operate on different time scales have evolved to preserve cellular integrity and elicit stress-specific response. Several stress-response programs are activated until a complete elimination of the stress is achieved. The innate immune response, which is triggered by pathogenic invasion, is rather harmful when active over a prolonged time, thus the response follows characteristic oscillatory trajectories. Here, we review different translation programs that function to precisely fine-tune the time at which various components of the innate immune response dwell between active and inactive. We discuss how different pro-inflammatory pathways are co-ordinated to temporally offset single reactions and to achieve an optimal balance between fighting pathogens and being less harmful for healthy cells.

  3. Using Caffeine as a Water Quality Indicator in the Ambient Monitoring Program for Third Fork Creek Watershed, Durham, North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine has been suggested as a chemical indicator for domestic wastewater in freshwater systems, although it is not included in water quality monitoring programs. The Third Fork Creek watershed in Durham, NC, is highly urbanized, with a history of receiving untreated wastewater from leaking and overflowing sanitary sewers. The poor water quality originating in the Third Fork Creek watershed threatens its intended uses and jeopardizes drinking water, aquatic life, and recreational activities...

  4. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  5. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... of red TL, which is found to be more than 100 Gy. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Evaluation of the approach to respirable quartz exposure control in U.S. coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high levels of respirable quartz can result in respiratory and other diseases in humans. The Mine Safety and Health Adminstration (MSHA) regulates exposure to respirable quartz in coal mines indirectly through reductions in the respirable coal mine dust exposure limit based on the content of quartz in the airborne respirable dust. This reduction is implemented when the quartz content of airborne respirable dust exceeds 5% by weight. The intent of this dust standard reduction is to restrict miners' exposure to respirable quartz to a time-weighted average concentration of 100 μg/m(3). The effectiveness of this indirect approach to control quartz exposure was evaluated by analyzing respirable dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors from 1995 through 2008. The performance of the current regulatory approach was found to be lacking due to the use of a variable property-quartz content in airborne dust-to establish a standard for subsequent exposures. In one situation, 11.7% (4370/37,346) of samples that were below the applicable respirable coal mine dust exposure limit exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In a second situation, 4.4% (895/20,560) of samples with 5% or less quartz content in the airborne respirable dust exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In these two situations, the samples exceeding 100 μg/m(3) quartz were not subject to any potential compliance action. Therefore, the current respirable quartz exposure control approach does not reliably maintain miner exposure below 100 μg/m(3) quartz. A separate and specific respirable quartz exposure standard may improve control of coal miners' occupational exposure to respirable quartz.

  7. Silicon compounds in solution during bacterial degradation of quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, Z.A.; Belkanova, N.P.; Karavayko, G.I.; Piskunov, V.P.

    A study was made of the form of silicon compounds in solution in the following systems: distilled water-exopolysaccharides of Bacillus mucilaginosus-monomeric silica; distilled water-suspension of B. mucilaginosus cells-quartz; culture fluids-growing B. mucilaginosus or Thiobacillus thioparus cultures-quartz. In control variants, which contained no exopolysaccharides or bacteria, all of the silicon in solution is demonstrable with the reaction with molybdic acid in the form of monosilicic acid and, perhaps, its lower oligomers. The presence of exopolysaccharides or bacteria leads to the appearance of three forms of silicon compounds: monomeric, polymeric as demonstrable by reaction with molybdic acid after alkaline hydrolysis, and bound, which is demonstrable only by the sintering method. The pH, concentrations of exopolysaccharides and silicon are factors that control the proportion of these forms of silica in the systems studied with exopolysaccharides and resting cells. An increase in the concentration of polysaccharides in the system, as well as changes in medium reaction in the alkaline direction, shift equilibrium toward the formation of the bound form of silica. The mechanism of microbiological degradation of quartz and the formation of silicon compounds is discussed.

  8. Improved electron probe microanalysis of trace elements in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, John J.; Lowers, Heather; Rusk, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Quartz occurs in a wide range of geologic environments throughout the Earth's crust. The concentration and distribution of trace elements in quartz provide information such as temperature and other physical conditions of formation. Trace element analyses with modern electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) instruments can achieve 99% confidence detection of ~100 ppm with fairly minimal effort for many elements in samples of low to moderate average atomic number such as many common oxides and silicates. However, trace element measurements below 100 ppm in many materials are limited, not only by the precision of the background measurement, but also by the accuracy with which background levels are determined. A new "blank" correction algorithm has been developed and tested on both Cameca and JEOL instruments, which applies a quantitative correction to the emitted X-ray intensities during the iteration of the sample matrix correction based on a zero level (or known trace) abundance calibration standard. This iterated blank correction, when combined with improved background fit models, and an "aggregate" intensity calculation utilizing multiple spectrometer intensities in software for greater geometric efficiency, yields a detection limit of 2 to 3 ppm for Ti and 6 to 7 ppm for Al in quartz at 99% t-test confidence with similar levels for absolute accuracy.

  9. Characterization of hydrothermal green quartz produced by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokihara, Cyro T.; Rela, Paulo R., E-mail: cteiti@ipen.br, E-mail: prela06@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schultz-Güttler, Rainer A., E-mail: rainersgut@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias

    2015-07-01

    A specific variety of quartz showing a green color in nature or induced artificially by radiation gamma ({sup 60}Co) is quite rare. Only two occurrences are known today, where this type of quartz can be found: Canada, at the Thunder Bay Amethyst Mine, Ontario and Brazil, at widely scattered geode occurrences along a 600 km stretch from Quarai at Brazils southern most tip to Uberlandia in Minas Gerais. These two occurrences have been formed by strong hydrothermal activities.That way much quartz crystals showed a very fast growth history facilitating the formation of growth defects (twinning, small angle tilting, mosaic growth, striations) and the uptake of water in form of micro inclusions, molecular water, silanol (Si-OH) and OH. In the present work the material analyzed is from hydrothermal regimes found in intrusions of basaltic rocks located in the Rio Grande do Sul state. To characterize these materials, colored green by gamma rays, analyses by ICP, electron microscopy, water loss techniques and UV-VIS or NIR-FTIR spectroscopic measurements have been made. Silanol complexes are formed, which by radiation due to gamma rays form the color center NBOHC (Non-bonding Oxygen Hole Center), showing absorption between 590 to 620 nm, responsible for the green color. The water content with up to 3200 ppm by weight exceeds the amount of charge balancing cations (Fe, Al, Li). There is no correlation between water content and cations as in other color varieties. (author)

  10. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  11. Turbo Charge CPU Utilization in Fork/Join Using the ManagedBlocker

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Fork/Join is a framework for parallelizing calculations using recursive decomposition, also called divide and conquer. These algorithms occasionally end up duplicating work, especially at the beginning of the run. We can reduce wasted CPU cycles by implementing a reserved caching scheme. Before a task starts its calculation, it tries to reserve an entry in the shared map. If it is successful, it immediately begins. If not, it blocks until the other thread has finished its calculation. Unfortunately this might result in a significant number of blocked threads, decreasing CPU utilization. In this talk we will demonstrate this issue and offer a solution in the form of the ManagedBlocker. Combined with the Fork/Join, it can keep parallelism at the desired level.

  12. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  13. Voltage-controlled narrowband and wide, variable-range four-segment quartz crystal oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Ruzaini; Satoh, Tomio; Akitsu, Tetsuya

    2012-03-01

    In this work, our goal is to develop a voltage-controlled variable-frequency quartz crystal oscillator with narrowband response, wide, variable frequency range and the capacity to oscillate across the series resonance frequency using a four-segment configuration of a quartz crystal oscillator. In conventional quartz oscillators, the quartz resonator is inserted in the feedback loop between the input and the output of the active circuit, providing sufficient gain and the phase relation. In the oscillator developed here, the quartz crystal resonator is inserted between the loop circuit and the ground potential. The performance of the voltage-controlled variable-frequency oscillator is demonstrated across the series resonance frequency.

  14. Gaussian Random Fields Methods for Fork-Join Network with Synchronization Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    research papers, under review in Mathematics of Operations Research (minor revision) and Annals of Applied Probability. One paper was on the finalist...2.00 1.00 Hongyuan Lu, Guodong Pang. Heavy Traffic Limits for A Fork-Join Network In the Halfin-Whitt Regime, Annals of Applied Probability (11 2014...fellowships for further studies in science , mathematics, engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating

  15. Nested Fork-Join Queuing Networks and Their Application to Mobility Airfield Operations Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Method. The accuracy of this approximation is similar to that of its single-class counterpart. A similar approach is used by Di Mascolo, Frein , Baynat and...et en Automatique , 1985. [9] Baccelli, F. and Z. Liu. "On the execution of parallel programs on multipro- cessor systems-a queuing theory approach...Le Chesnay, France: Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique , 1986. [16] Baccelli, F., and others. "Acyclic fork-join

  16. New species of Triplocania Roesler with forewing M3 forked (Psocodea: 'Psocoptera': Ptiloneuridae), from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Neto, Alberto Moreira; Rafael, José Albertino; Aldrete, Alfonso N García

    2014-07-16

    Four new Brazilian species of Triplocania with forewing M3 forked are described and illustrated based on male specimens, namely: Triplocania lamasi n.sp. (Mato Grosso: Brazil), Triplocania mariateresae n.sp. (Rio de Janeiro: Brazil), Triplocania newi n.sp. (Tocantins: Brazil) and Triplocania plaumanni n.sp. (Santa Catarina: Brasil). They differ from all the other species in the genus, in which the males are known, by the hypandrium and phallosome structures.

  17. Chromatin dynamics at the replication fork: there's more to life than histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Iestyn; Smith, Duncan J

    2013-04-01

    Before each division, eukaryotic cells face the daunting task of completely and accurately replicating a heterogeneous, chromatinized genome and repackaging both resulting daughters. Because replication requires strand separation, interactions between the DNA and its many associated proteins--including histones--must be transiently broken to allow the passage of the replication fork. Here, we will discuss the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure during replication, and the consequences of these processes for epigenetic inheritance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  19. Environmental Assessment: Landscape Multiple Areas at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes...vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous plants include little bluestem...Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops with remaining land used for pasture and hay, urban development, recreation, and wildlife

  20. An Archeological Survey in the Gypsum Breaks on the Elm Fork of the Red River,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hughes (1973). One of the known sites was reported by James Shaeffer in 1960. The Hughes survey was based on an earlier plan to dam Fish Creek, and he...limits. Artifacts recovered include Trinity, Ensor , Darl, Ellis, Gary, Meserve, Frio, and Abasolo projectile points, Clear Fork gouges, burins and...Marcos, Ensor , Palmillas and Trinity. From the material of these four sites an estimated range of dates was proposed at 2000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Eight

  1. Environmental Assessment: Replace Sanitary Sewer from Building 801 to Lagoons at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    for Grand Forks AFB include Marsh Milkweed , Bottlebrush Sedge, Prairie Cordgrass, Wooly Sedge, Awl- Fruit Sedge, Baltic Rush, Wool-Grass, Soft-stem...AFB has a humid continental climate that is characterized by frequent and drastic weather changes. The summers are short and humid with frequent...Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands and many are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands

  2. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The first part of my thesis is mainly focused on the effect of grain size distribution on compaction localization in porous sandstone. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, I conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (~25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. My results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies. The second part aimed to improve current knowledge on inelastic behavior, failure mode and brittle-ductile transition in another sedimentary rock, porous carbonates. A micritic Tavel (porosity of ~13%) and an allochemical Indiana (~18%) limestones were deformed under compaction in wet and dry conditions. At lower confining pressures, shear localization occurred in brittle faulting regime. Through transitional regime, the deformation switched to cataclastic flow regime at higher confining pressure. Specifically in the cataclastic regime, the (dry and wet) Tavel and dry Indiana failed by distributed cataclastic flow, while in contrast, wet Indiana failed as compaction localization. My results demonstrate that different failure modes and mechanical behaviors under different deformation regimes and water saturation are fundamental prior to any geophysical application in porous carbonates. The third part aimed to focus on investigating compaction on quartz aggregate starting at low (MPa) using X-ray diffraction. We report the diffraction peak evolution of quartz with increasing

  3. Creep of quartz by dislocation and grain boundary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, J. I.; Holyoke, C. W., III; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Wet polycrystalline quartz aggregates deformed at temperatures T of 600°-900°C and strain rates of 10-4-10-6 s-1 at a confining pressure Pc of 1.5 GPa exhibit plasticity at low T, governed by dislocation glide and limited recovery, and grain size-sensitive creep at high T, governed by diffusion and sliding at grain boundaries. Quartz aggregates were HIP-synthesized, subjecting natural milky quartz powder to T=900°C and Pc=1.5 GPa, and grain sizes (2 to 25 mm) were varied by annealing at these conditions for up to 10 days. Infrared absorption spectra exhibit a broad OH band at 3400 cm-1 due to molecular water inclusions with a calculated OH content (~4000 ppm, H/106Si) that is unchanged by deformation. Rate-stepping experiments reveal different stress-strain rate functions at different temperatures and grain sizes, which correspond to differing stress-temperature sensitivities. At 600-700°C and grain sizes of 5-10 mm, flow law parameters compare favorably with those for basal plasticity and dislocation creep of wet quartzites (effective stress exponents n of 3 to 6 and activation enthalpy H* ~150 kJ/mol). Deformed samples show undulatory extinction, limited recrystallization, and c-axis maxima parallel to the shortening direction. Similarly fine-grained samples deformed at 800°-900°C exhibit flow parameters n=1.3-2.0 and H*=135-200 kJ/mol corresponding to grain size-sensitive Newtonian creep. Deformed samples show some undulatory extinction and grain sizes change by recrystallization; however, grain boundary deformation processes are indicated by the low value of n. Our experimental results for grain size-sensitive creep can be compared with models of grain boundary diffusion and grain boundary sliding using measured rates of silicon grain boundary diffusion. While many quartz mylonites show microstructural and textural evidence for dislocation creep, results for grain size-sensitive creep may apply to very fine-grained (<10 mm) quartz mylonites.

  4. Continuous hydrologic simulation of runoff for the Middle Fork and South Fork of the Beargrass Creek basin in Jefferson County, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, G. Lynn; Downs, Aimee C.; Grace-Jarrett, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Pro-gram-FORTRAN (HSPF) was applied to an urban drainage basin in Jefferson County, Ky to integrate the large amounts of information being collected on water quantity and quality into an analytical framework that could be used as a management and planning tool. Hydrologic response units were developed using geographic data and a K-means analysis to characterize important hydrologic and physical factors in the basin. The Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN Expert System (HSPEXP) was used to calibrate the model parameters for the Middle Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for 3 years (June 1, 1991, to May 31, 1994) of 5-minute streamflow and precipitation time series, and 3 years of hourly pan-evaporation time series. The calibrated model parameters were applied to the South Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for confirmation. The model confirmation results indicated that the model simulated the system within acceptable tolerances. The coefficient of determination and coefficient of model-fit efficiency between simulated and observed daily flows were 0.91 and 0.82, respectively, for model calibration and 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for model confirmation. The model is most sensitive to estimates of the area of effective impervious land in the basin; the spatial distribution of rain-fall; and the lower-zone evapotranspiration, lower-zone nominal storage, and infiltration-capacity parameters during recession and low-flow periods. The error contribution from these sources varies with season and antecedent conditions.

  5. Mineralogy, morphology, and textural relationships in coatings on quartz grains in sediments in a quartz-sand aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Kent, Douglas B; Elbert, David C; Shi, Zhi; Davis, James A; Veblen, David R

    2011-06-01

    Mineralogical studies of coatings on quartz grains and bulk sediments from an aquifer on Western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA were carried out using a variety of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Previous studies demonstrated that coatings on quartz grains control the adsorption properties of these sediments. Samples for TEM characterization were made by a gentle mechanical grinding method and focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The former method can make abundant electron-transparent coating assemblages for comprehensive and quantitative X-ray analysis and the latter technique protects the coating texture from being destroyed. Characterization of the samples from both a pristine area and an area heavily impacted by wastewater discharge shows similar coating textures and chemical compositions. Major constituents of the coating include Al-substituted goethite and illite/chlorite clays. Goethite is aggregated into well-crystallized domains through oriented attachment resulting in increased porosity. Illite/chlorite clays with various chemical compositions were observed to be mixed with goethite aggregates and aligned sub-parallel to the associated quartz surface. The uniform spatial distribution of wastewater-derived phosphorus throughout the coating from the wastewater-contaminated site suggests that all of the coating constituents, including those adjacent to the quartz surface, are accessible to groundwater solutes. Both TEM characterization and chemical extraction results indicate there is a significantly greater amount of amorphous iron oxide in samples from wastewater discharge area compared to those from the pristine region, which might reflect the impact of redox cycling of iron under the wastewater-discharge area. Coating compositions are consistent with the moderate metal and oxy-metalloid adsorption capacities, low but significant cation exchange capacities, and control of iron(III) solubility by goethite observed in reactive transport

  6. Carbon in intimate contact with quartz reduces the biological activity of crystalline silica dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Tomatis, Maura; Doublier, Sophie; Grendene, Francesca; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Fubini, Bice

    2013-01-18

    To evaluate the effect of carbonaceous materials on the pathogenic activity of quartz dusts, mixtures of carbon soot (1 and 10%) and quartz (Min-U-Sil) were prepared and then milled so to attain an intimate association of carbon and the quartz surface. Both cellular and cell-free tests show that carbon associated to quartz completely inhibits the typical free radical generation of quartz dusts (through Fenton activity and homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond) and suppresses the oxidative stress and inflammation induced by quartz alone on MH-S murine macrophage cells (lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide release, and tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis). The cytotoxic response to quartz is also largely reduced. An extremely pure quartz milled with 10% of soot showed inactivating effects on the adverse reactions to quartz similar to Min-U-Sil quartz. None of these effects takes place when the same experiments are carried out with mechanically mixed samples, which suggests that carbon acts not just as a radical quencher but because of its association to the quartz surface.

  7. A secure and efficient cryptographic hash function based on NewFORK-256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshvardhan Tiwari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryptographic hash functions serve as a fundamental building block of information security and are used in numerous security applications and protocols such as digital signature schemes, construction of MAC and random number generation, for ensuring data integrity and data origin authentication. Researchers have noticed serious security flaws and vulnerabilities in most widely used MD and SHA family hash functions. As a result hash functions from FORK family with longer digest value were considered as good alternatives for MD5 and SHA-1, but recent attacks against these hash functions have highlighted their weaknesses. In this paper we propose a dedicated hash function MNF-256 based on the design principle of NewFORK-256. It takes 512 bit message blocks and generates 256 bit hash value. A random sequence is added as an additional input to the compression function of MNF-256. Three branch parallel structure and secure compression function make MNF-256 an efficient, fast and secure hash function. Various simulation results indicate that MNF-256 is immune to common cryptanalytic attacks and faster than NewFORK-256.

  8. Synergetic Surface and Chemical Durability Study of the Aesthetically Enhanced Natural Quartz by Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Rout, Prajna P.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, Barada K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2017-03-01

    The change in surface behavior of natural quartz stone before and after heat treatment with metal oxides such as: cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and copper oxide (Cu2O) under vacuum and open atmosphere has been investigated. The surface feature, bulk density and hardness value of quartz changed after heat treatment, converting to a high value product. Difference in crystallinity of quartz, pre- and post-heat treatment was obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The electron probe microanalysis results clearly explicated the diffusion of metal ion in quartz matrix exposed under vacuum atmosphere but as coating on the surface under open atmosphere. The structural transformation of quartz after heat treatment has been observed from the XRD data and well corroborated with the nanoindentation results. Durability of such quartz to chemical hazardous environment was observed. Thus, this communication demonstrates the change in physical and chemical characteristics of natural quartz stone after heat treatment under different atmosphere.

  9. Synergetic Surface and Chemical Durability Study of the Aesthetically Enhanced Natural Quartz by Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Rout, Prajna P.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, Barada K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2017-01-01

    The change in surface behavior of natural quartz stone before and after heat treatment with metal oxides such as: cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and copper oxide (Cu2O) under vacuum and open atmosphere has been investigated. The surface feature, bulk density and hardness value of quartz changed after heat treatment, converting to a high value product. Difference in crystallinity of quartz, pre- and post-heat treatment was obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The electron probe microanalysis results clearly explicated the diffusion of metal ion in quartz matrix exposed under vacuum atmosphere but as coating on the surface under open atmosphere. The structural transformation of quartz after heat treatment has been observed from the XRD data and well corroborated with the nanoindentation results. Durability of such quartz to chemical hazardous environment was observed. Thus, this communication demonstrates the change in physical and chemical characteristics of natural quartz stone after heat treatment under different atmosphere.

  10. Raman Spectrum Study on Quartz Exsolution in Omphacite of Eclogite and Its Tectonic Significances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lu; Jin Zhenmin; He Mouchun

    2003-01-01

    The studies on ultra-microstructure characteristics of quartz exsolution in eclogite and coesite in UHP eclogite of several localities are done with the appliance of laser Raman spectroscopy and Ustage. Research results show that the phase transformation of coesite-quartz in garnet and/or omphacite is a continuous process. Topological relationship is present between quartz exsolution in omphacite and its host mineral which shows orientations of two long axes of quartz exsolution parallel to (100) and (-101) of omphacite. At present, some scholars suggest that the quartz exsolution in omphacite of eclogite is the evidence of UHP metamorphism. However, temperature and pressure condition and the exsolution mechanism of oriented needlelike quartz in omphacite still remain unclear. Therefore, further study should be enhanced on experimental research on exsolution mechanism of super-silicate clinopyroxene, which could provide experimental quantitative constraint on quartz exsolution as UHP indicator.

  11. The effect of quartz on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of quartz particles on the flotation of pyrite depressed by serpentine has been investigated through flotation tests, adsorption tests, zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation. The results show that the presence of hydrophilic serpentine slimes on pyrite surface reduces collector adsorption and results in lower recovery of pyrite. The finer the serpentine slime is, the lower the pyrite recovery will be. Quartz particles do not interfere with pyrite flotation. However, the addition of quartz particles increases the adsorption of collector on pyrite surface and limits the detrimental effect of serpentine on pyrite flotation. The fine-grained quartz is more effective. Zeta potential measurements and DLVO calculation illustrate that the zeta potential of quartz is more negative than that of pyrite and the attraction force between serpentine and quartz is stronger than force between serpentine and pyrite, thus some serpentine slimes were transferred from pyrite surface to quartz in the process of attrition.

  12. Two-level tuning of fuzzy PID controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G I; Hu, B G; Gosine, R G

    2001-01-01

    Fuzzy PID tuning requires two stages of tuning; low level tuning followed by high level tuning. At the higher level, a nonlinear tuning is performed to determine the nonlinear characteristics of the fuzzy output. At the lower level, a linear tuning is performed to determine the linear characteristics of the fuzzy output for achieving overall performance of fuzzy control. First, different fuzzy systems are defined and then simplified for two-point control. Non-linearity tuning diagrams are constructed for fuzzy systems in order to perform high level tuning. The linear tuning parameters are deduced from the conventional PID tuning knowledge. Using the tuning diagrams, high level tuning heuristics are developed. Finally, different applications are demonstrated to show the validity of the proposed tuning method.

  13. Precision Corrections to Fine Tuning in SUSY

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, Matthew R; Shih, David

    2016-01-01

    Requiring that the contributions of supersymmetric particles to the Higgs mass are not highly tuned places upper limits on the masses of superpartners -- in particular the higgsino, stop, and gluino. We revisit the details of the tuning calculation and introduce a number of improvements, including RGE resummation, two-loop effects, a proper treatment of UV vs. IR masses, and threshold corrections. This improved calculation more accurately connects the tuning measure with the physical masses of the superpartners at LHC-accessible energies. After these refinements, the tuning bound on the stop is now also sensitive to the masses of the 1st and 2nd generation squarks, which limits how far these can be decoupled in Effective SUSY scenarios. We find that, for a fixed level of tuning, our bounds can allow for heavier gluinos and stops than previously considered. Despite this, the natural region of supersymmetry is under pressure from the LHC constraints, with high messenger scales particularly disfavored.

  14. Novel tune diagnostics for the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    In the Tevatron collider, protons and antiprotons share the same beam pipe. This poses a challenge in the measurement of tunes for both species simultaneously because of the possibility of signal contamination from the other species. The tune of each bunch is also very different because of beam-beam effects from parasitic crossing points. This means that the tune diagnostics must be able to differentiate between protons and anti-protons, it also has to measure tunes from each bunch. There are three different tune pickups used in the Tevatron: 1.7 GHz Schottky pickups, 21.4 MHz Schottky pickups and baseband pickups. These devices will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  15. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  17. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-05-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.9-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. (USGS station number 03373500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS AHPS site SHLI3). NWS AHPS forecast peak stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.Flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation (USGS rating no. 43.0) at USGS streamgage 03373500, East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (10 ft) to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve (35 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM), derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The areal extent of the 24-ft flood-inundation map was

  18. Chemically modulated graphene quantum dot for tuning the photoluminescence as novel sensory probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Hwang, Hee Min; Shin, Yonghun; Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Hanleem; Yang, Junghee; Bak, Sora; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    A band gap tuning of environmental-friendly graphene quantum dot (GQD) becomes a keen interest for novel applications such as photoluminescence (PL) sensor. Here, for tuning the band gap of GQD, a hexafluorohydroxypropanyl benzene (HFHPB) group acted as a receptor of a chemical warfare agent was chemically attached on the GQD via the diazonium coupling reaction of HFHPB diazonium salt, providing new HFHPB-GQD material. With a help of the electron withdrawing HFHPB group, the energy band gap of the HFHPB-GQD was widened and its PL decay life time decreased. As designed, after addition of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), the PL intensity of HFHPB-GQD sensor sharply increased up to approximately 200% through a hydrogen bond with DMMP. The fast response and short recovery time was proven by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. This HFHPB-GQD sensor shows highly sensitive to DMMP in comparison with GQD sensor without HFHPB and graphene. In addition, the HFHPB-GQD sensor showed high selectivity only to the phosphonate functional group among many other analytes and also stable enough for real device applications. Thus, the tuning of the band gap of the photoluminescent GQDs may open up new promising strategies for the molecular detection of target substrates. PMID:27991584

  19. Chemically modulated graphene quantum dot for tuning the photoluminescence as novel sensory probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Hwang, Hee Min; Shin, Yonghun; Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Hanleem; Yang, Junghee; Bak, Sora; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-12-01

    A band gap tuning of environmental-friendly graphene quantum dot (GQD) becomes a keen interest for novel applications such as photoluminescence (PL) sensor. Here, for tuning the band gap of GQD, a hexafluorohydroxypropanyl benzene (HFHPB) group acted as a receptor of a chemical warfare agent was chemically attached on the GQD via the diazonium coupling reaction of HFHPB diazonium salt, providing new HFHPB-GQD material. With a help of the electron withdrawing HFHPB group, the energy band gap of the HFHPB-GQD was widened and its PL decay life time decreased. As designed, after addition of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), the PL intensity of HFHPB-GQD sensor sharply increased up to approximately 200% through a hydrogen bond with DMMP. The fast response and short recovery time was proven by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. This HFHPB-GQD sensor shows highly sensitive to DMMP in comparison with GQD sensor without HFHPB and graphene. In addition, the HFHPB-GQD sensor showed high selectivity only to the phosphonate functional group among many other analytes and also stable enough for real device applications. Thus, the tuning of the band gap of the photoluminescent GQDs may open up new promising strategies for the molecular detection of target substrates.

  20. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  1. Effects of controlled burning of chaparral on streamflow and sediment characteristics, East Fork Sycamore Creek, central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldys, Stanley; Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of controlled burning of part of a chaparral-covered drainage basin on streamflow and sediment characteristics were studied in the upper reaches of the Sycamore Creek basin in central Arizona. A paired-watershed method was used to analyze data collected in two phases separated by the controlled burning of 45 percent of the East Fork Sycamore Creek drainage basin by the U.S. Forest Service on October 31, 1981. Statistically significant increases in streamflow in East Fork occurred from October 26, 1982, through August 25, 1984. Streamflow for August 26, 1984, through the end of data collection for the study on May 31, 1986, was generally at or less than preburn levels. An increase in the percentage of time that flow occurred in East Fork was noted for water years 1983 and 1984. No increase in the magnitude of instantaneous peak flows as a result of the burn was discernable at statistically significant levels. Suspended-sediment yields computed for data collected during water year 1983 were significantly greater in the East Fork drainage basin, 546 tons per square mile, than in the West Fork drainage basin, 22.6 tons per square mile. Suspended-sediment yields computed for East Fork and West Fork for water year 1985, 38.3 and 13.3 tons per square mile, respectively, were much closer in yield. These more uniform yields indicate a possible return to preburn conditions. Data collection did not begin until 11 months after the burn; therefore, the largest increases in streamflow and sediment yields, which commonly occur during the year after a burn, may not have been measured. During the second through fourth years after the burn, smaller increases in stream- flow and sediment yields were found in this study than were found in similar studies in this region.

  2. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  3. Tune variations in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilina, N. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Giovannozzi, M.; Lamont, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Sammut, N. [University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Steinhagen, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Todesco, E., E-mail: ezio.todesco@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wenninger, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The horizontal and vertical betatron tunes of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly depend on the strength of the quadrupole magnets, but are also affected by the quadrupole component in the main dipoles. In case of systematic misalignments, the sextupole component from the main dipoles and sextupole corrector magnets also affect the tunes due to the feed down effect. During the first years of operation of the LHC, the tunes have been routinely measured and corrected through either a feedback or a feed forward system. In this paper, the evolution of the tunes during injection, ramp and flat top are reconstructed from the beam measurements and the settings of the tune feedback loop and of the feed forward corrections. This gives the obtained precision of the magnetic model of the machine with respect to quadrupole and sextupole components. Measurements at the injection plateau show an unexpected large decay whose origin is not understood. This data is discussed together with the time constants and the dependence on previous cycles. We present results of dedicated experiments that show that this effect does not originate from the decay of the main dipole component. During the ramp, the tunes drift by about 0.022. It is shown that this is related to the precision of tracking the quadrupole field in the machine and this effect is reduced to about 0.01 tune units during flat top.

  4. Optimal geometry for a quartz multipurpose SPM sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Stirling

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a geometry for a piezoelectric SPM sensor that can be used for combined AFM/LFM/STM. The sensor utilises symmetry to provide a lateral mode without the need to excite torsional modes. The symmetry allows normal and lateral motion to be completely isolated, even when introducing large tips to tune the dynamic properties to optimal values.

  5. An Optimal Scheduling Algorithm for Fork-Join Task Graphs%一个调度Fork-Join任务图的最优算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆华; 阮幼林; 刘干; 蒋盛益; 杨世达

    2005-01-01

    The Fork-Join structure is one of the basic modeling structures for parallel processing. Although some algorithms are able to find an optimal schedule under certain conditions, they ignore to economize processors and minimize the total completion time. This paper presents a Task Duplication based Balance Scheduling(TDBS)algorithm which can generate an optimal schedule for fork-join task graph with a complexity of O(vq+vlogv), where v and q are the number of tasks and processors respectively. By considering workload and idle time slots of the used processors, TDBS algorithm tries to assign tasks to scheduled processors and maximize their utilization. Simulation results show that TDBS algorithm has better speedup and efficiency than other compared algorithms. Therefore,TDBS algorithm is a viable option for practical high performance applications.%Fork-Join任务图是一种并行处理的基本结构.虽然许多算法在任务满足某些条件时能产生最优调度,但往往没有考虑节省处理器个数和减少任务集的总完成时间,从而降低算法的加速比和效率.因此,提出一种基于任务复制的平衡调度算法,其时间复杂度为O(vq+vlogv),v和q分别表示任务集中任务的个数和使用的处理器个数.通过分析已用处理器的负载和空闲时间段,把任务尽量分配到已用的处理器上以均衡负载,从而提高其利用率.实验结果表明,该算法的加速比和总体效率优于其他算法.因此,该算法对于高性能应用程序的调度是一个较好的选择.

  6. A quartz Cherenkov detector for polarimetry at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauth, Annika

    2014-09-15

    At the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the use of polarised electron and positron beams is a key ingredient of the physics program. A measurement of the polarisation with a yet unprecedented precision of {sup δP}/{sub P}=0.25% is required. To achieve this, Compton polarimeter measurements in front of and behind the collision point are foreseen. In this thesis, a novel concept for a detector for ILC polarimetry is introduced to eliminate one of the dominating systematics limiting the previous best measurement of beam polarisation: a detector using quartz as Cherenkov medium could increase the tolerance against non-linear photodetector responses. The high refractive index of quartz results in a higher Cherenkov light yield compared to conventional Cherenkov gases. This could allow single-peak resolution in the Cherenkov photon spectra produced by the Compton electrons at the polarimeters. The detailed simulation studies presented in this work imply that such single-peak resolution is possible. Considerations for the choice of a suitable detector geometry are discussed. A four-channel prototype has been constructed and successfully operated in a first testbeam campaign at the DESY testbeam, confirming simulation predictions. Although further studies have to be considered to quantify all aspects of the detector response, the findings of the analysis of the data from the first testbeam are promising with regards to reaching the desired light yield. In the final part of this thesis, the application of a detector concept allowing single-peak resolution to the polarisation measurement at the ILC is examined. Two of the main sources of systematic uncertainties on the polarimeter measurements are detector non-linearities and misalignments. The performance of the suggested quartz detector concept in Monte Carlo studies promises a control of these systematics which meets the precision requirements for ILC polarimetry.

  7. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  8. Extensive authigenic quartz overgrowths in the gas-bearing Haynesville-Bossier Shale, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Patrick J.; Taylor, Kevin G.

    2017-07-01

    In sandstone reservoirs, despite grain rearrangement during compaction, significant pore volumes may be retained prior to the onset of late diagenetic quartz cementation. In mudstone reservoirs, grain rearrangement during compaction results in significant pore volume reduction prior to late diagenesis. Where quartz overgrowths have been previously reported in post-compaction mudstones they have been in volumetrically low concentrations and interpreted as anomalous occurrences. Quartz cementation alters rock brittleness resulting in changes to mechanical fracture properties. Quartz overgrowths reduce reservoir porosity and permeability. We present petrographic evidence of two phases of quartz cement in the Haynesville-Bossier Shale: (i) grain replacive and (ii) quartz overgrowths. Carbonate grain replacement is volumetrically low (primary granular framework surrounding engulfed detrital and early authigenic minerals would indicate that quartz overgrowths are also (iii) replacive. Pressure dissolution of detrital quartz silt grains and smectite-to-illite transformation are likely sources of silica for quartz cement. This study is the first to document large-scale, replacive, authigenic quartz overgrowth development within a producing mudstone.

  9. Fluid inclusions and microstructures in experimentally deformed quartz single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thust, A.; Tarantola, A.; Heilbronner, R.; Stünitz, H.

    2009-04-01

    The "H2O-weakening" effect that reduces the strength of quartz dramatically (e.g. Griggs & Blacic 1965) is still not understood. For example, Kronenberg & Tullis (1984) conclude that the weakening effect is pressure dependent while Paterson (1989) infers a glide and recovery control of water. Obviously, the spatial distribution and transport of H2O are important factors (Kronenberg et al. 1986, FitzGerald et al. 1991). We have carried out experiments on milky quartz in a Griggs deformation apparatus. Cylinders (6.5 mm in diameter, 12-13 mm in length) from a milky zone of a natural quartz single crystal have been cored in orientations (1) normal to one of the prism planes and (2) 45˚ to and 45˚ to (O+orientation). At 1 GPa confining pressure, 900˚ C and 10-6s-1, the flow strength is 150 MPa for samples with orientation (1). Further experiments are needed to establish the flow strength for orientation (2). FTIR measurements on double-polished thick sections (200-500 μm) in the undeformed quartz material yield an average H2O content of approximately 100 H/106Si. The water is heterogeneously distributed in the sample. Direct measurements on fluid inclusions yield a H2O content of more than 25 000 H/106Si. Thus, the H2O in the undeformed material is predominantly present in fluid inclusions of size from tens to hundred microns. Micro-thermometric measurements at low temperature indicate the presence of different salts in the fluid inclusions. The ice melting temperature, between -6.9 and -7.4˚ C, indicate an average salinity of 10.5 wt% NaCl. After deformation the distribution of H2O is more homogeneous throughout the sample. The majority of the big inclusions have disappeared and very small inclusions of several microns to sub-micron size have formed. FTIR measurements in zones of undulatory extinction and shear bands show an average H2O content of approximately 3000 H/106Si. Moreover, the larger fluid inclusions are characterized by a higher salinity (12 wt%) due

  10. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Operation and In Situ Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albyn, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) are commonly used to measure the rate of deposition of molecular species on a surface. The measurement is often used to select materials with a low outgassing rate for applications where the material has a line of sight to a contamination-sensitive surface. A quantitative, in situ calibration of the balance, or balances, using a pure material for which the enthalpy of sublimation is known, is described in this Technical Memorandum. Supporting calculations for surface dwell times of deposited materials and the effusion cell Clausing factor are presented along with examples of multiple QCM measurements of outgassing from a common source.

  11. Evidence for residual elastic strain in deformed natural quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Tamura,Nobumichi; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2009-01-30

    Residual elastic strain in naturally deformed, quartz-containing rocks can be measured quantitatively in a petrographic thin section with high spatial resolution using Laue microdiffraction with white synchrotron x-rays. The measurements with a resolution of one micrometer allow the quantitative determination of the deviatoric strain tensor as a function of position within the crystal investigated. The observed equivalent strain values of 800-1200 microstrains represent a lower bound of the actual preserved residual strain in the rock, since the stress component perpendicular to the cut sample surface plane is released. The measured equivalent strain translates into an equivalent stress in the order of {approx} 50 MPa.

  12. Anisotropic ionic transport in quartz: the effect of twin boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, Mark [Mineral Physics Group, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)). E-mail: mcal00@esc.cam.ac.uk; Dove, Martin T.; Salje, Ekhard K.H. [Mineral Physics Group, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2001-10-22

    Transport of Na{sup +} and Li{sup +} under the influence of an electric field in twinned quartz is simulated using molecular dynamics techniques. Comparison between bulk transport and transport along twin boundaries shows that the cations are trapped inside twin walls for weak fields along the crystallographic c-axis. Stronger fields lead to transport along twin walls with significantly lower mobility than in the bulk. With E along [110], transport in the wall is faster than in the bulk. We observe cation trapping preferentially in the twin walls when E is applied out of the plane of the wall. (author)

  13. The adsorption of methyl methacrylate and vinyl acetate polymers on α-quartz surface: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lijing; Yang, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate the adsorption of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), the commonly used surface coating materials, on α-quartz surface. The objective is to understand the interactions between quartz surface and polymers. The results clearly show adsorption of both polymers onto the quartz surface. Carbonyl group plays a significant role in the adsorption process. The adsorption energies of PMMA and PVA on α-quartz surface did not show significant difference, however, more hydrogen bonds were observed on the PVA/quartz system than PMMA/quartz. These observations might offer some insights on the polymer-quartz adhesion and its failure mechanism.

  14. A STUDY OF RAPID CAVITY TUNING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-07-12

    An FFAG moot likely requires rapid cavity tuning. The cavity must also have a very high gradient. To satisfy both the high power and rapid tuning requirements is a big challenge. Detailed investigation of the possibility is addressed. Included are general thoughts, dual-loop and simple loop analyses, and a study of using ferrite or PIN diodes. Also proposed is a phase control scheme, which may be a better solution if the needed components can be developed. Finally, an energy analysis reveals the difficult of high power tuning.

  15. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  16. Entropy-based Tuning of Musical Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Hinrichsen, Haye

    2012-01-01

    The human sense of hearing perceives a combination of sounds 'in tune' if the corresponding harmonic spectra are correlated, meaning that the neuronal excitation pattern in the inner ear exhibits some kind of order. Based on this observation it is suggested that musical instruments such as pianos can be tuned by minimizing the Shannon entropy of suitably preprocessed Fourier spectra. This method reproduces not only the correct stretch curve but also similar pitch fluctuations as in the case of high-quality aural tuning.

  17. ARTUS: The tune measurement system at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, A.; Brennan, M.; Connolly, R.; Michnoff, R.; DeLong, J.

    2000-11-01

    The super-conducting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with two separate rings and six combined interaction regions will provide collisions between equal and unequal heavy ion species up to Au ions in typically 60 bunches. The betatron tunes of the two beams are among the most important parameters to be measured. The tunes have to be acquired at any moment during accelerator operation and in particular during the acceleration process. At RHIC the tune measurement device (ARTUS) consists of a fast horizontal and vertical kicker magnet and a dedicated beam position monitor in each ring. The system layout is described and first experiences from operation is reported.

  18. Hydrology of the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah, before, during, and after underground coal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, C.B.; Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    From 1988-92 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining, studied the effects of underground coal mining and the resulting subsidence on the hydrologic system near the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah. The subsidence caused open fractures at land surface, debris slides, and rockfalls in the canyon above the mined area. Land surface subsided and moved several feet horizontally. The perennial stream and a tributary upstream from the mined area were diverted below the ground by surface fractures where the overburden thickness above the Wattis coal seam is 300 to 500 feet. The reach downstream was dry but flow resumed where the channel traversed the Star Point Sandstone, which forms the aquifer below the coal seams where ground-water discharge provides new base flow. Concentrations of dissolved constituents in the stream water sampled just downstream from the mined area increased from about 300 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to more than 1,500 mg/L, and the water changed from primarily a magnesium calcium bicarbonate to primarily a magnesium sulfate type. Monitored water levels in two wells completed in the perched aquifer(s) above the mine indicate that fractures from subsidence- related deformation drained the perched aquifer in the Blackhawk Formation. The deformation also could have contributed to the decrease in discharge of three springs above the mined area, but discharge from other springs in the area did not change ubstantially; thus, the relation between subsidence and spring discharge, if any, is not clear. No significant changes in the chemical character of water discharging from springs were detected, but the dissolved-solids concentration in water collected from a perched sandstone aquifer overlying the mined coal seams increased during mining activity.

  19. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  20. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Study on the Tuning of PEFP DTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Yong Suk [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A conventional 20 MeV drift tube linac(DTL) for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP) has been developed as a low energy section of 100 MeV accelerator. The DTL consists of four tanks with 152 cells supplied with 900 kW RF power from 350 MHz klystron through the ridge-loaded waveguide coupler. After the fabrication and assembling of the DTL, it should be tuned to meet the requirement of the resonant frequency and field profile. The tuning goal of the resonant frequency is 350 MHz at 40 .deg. C and that of the field flatness is {+-}1%. We performed the bead pull measurements under various combinations of slug tuners position and post couplers position. The final tuning can be obtained through several iterations of the tuner position adjustment and measurement. The methods and the results of the DTL tuning will be given in this presentation.

  2. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  3. Event generator tuning using Bayesian optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Ilten, Philip; Yang, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo event generators contain a large number of parameters that must be determined by comparing the output of the generator with experimental data. Generating enough events with a fixed set of parameter values to enable making such a comparison is extremely CPU intensive, which prohibits performing a simple brute-force grid-based tuning of the parameters. Bayesian optimization is a powerful method designed for such black-box tuning applications. In this article, we show that Monte Carlo event generator parameters can be accurately obtained using Bayesian optimization and minimal expert-level physics knowledge. A tune of the PYTHIA 8 event generator using $e^+e^-$ events, where 20 parameters are optimized, can be run on a modern laptop in just two days. Combining the Bayesian optimization approach with expert knowledge should enable producing better tunes in the future, by making it faster and easier to study discrepancies between Monte Carlo and experimental data.

  4. Dynamic Performance Tuning Supported by Program Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo César

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance analysis and tuning of parallel/distributed applications are very difficult tasks for non-expert programmers. It is necessary to provide tools that automatically carry out these tasks. These can be static tools that carry out the analysis on a post-mortem phase or can tune the application on the fly. Both kind of tools have their target applications. Static automatic analysis tools are suitable for stable application while dynamic tuning tools are more appropriate to applications with dynamic behaviour. In this paper, we describe KappaPi as an example of a static automatic performance analysis tool, and also a general environment based on parallel patterns for developing and dynamically tuning parallel/distributed applications.

  5. Influence of the preshock temperature on shock effects in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhorst, F.; Deutsch, A.

    1992-01-01

    Shock metamorphic features are the prime indicators for recognizing impact phenomena on Earth and other planetary bodies. Although the pressure dependence of shock features is well known, information about the influence of the preshock temperature is almost lacking. Especially in the case of large-scale impacts like Sudbury, it is expected that deep-seated crustal rocks were subjected to shock at elevated temperatures. Therefore, we continued to perform shock experiments at elevated temperatures on less than 0.5-mm thin disks of single crystal quartz cut parallel to the (1010) face. All recovered quartz samples were investigated by universal stage, spindle stage, and a newly developed density gradient technique. Errors of refractive index and density measurements are +/- 0.0005 and +/- 0.002 g/cu cm respectively. Our investigations indicate that shock metamorphic features are strongly dependent on the preshock temperature. This statement has far-reaching implications with respect to shock wave barometry that is based on data from recovery experiments at room temperature. These datasets might be applicable only to low-temperature target rocks. Moreover, this study demonstrates that shock recovery experiments are definitely required for understanding the complete pressure-temperature regime of shock metamorphism on planetary bodies.

  6. Mass production of CNTs using CVD multi-quartz tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Samy; Mohamed, Alaa [Dept. of Production Engineering and Printing Technology, Akhbar Elyom Academy, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become the backbone of modern industries, including lightweight and heavy-duty industrial applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is considered as the most common method used to synthesize high yield CNTs. This work aims to develop the traditional CVD for the mass production of more economical CNTs, meeting the growing CNT demands among consumers by increasing the number of three particular reactors. All reactors housing is connected by small channels to provide the heat exchange possibility between the chambers, thereby decreasing synthesis time and reducing heat losses inside the ceramic body of the furnace. The novel design is simple and cheap with a lower reacting time and heat loss compared with the traditional CVD design. Methane, hydrogen, argon, and catalyzed iron nanoparticles were used as a carbon source and catalyst during the synthesis process. In addition, CNTs were produced using only a single quartz tube for comparison. The produced samples were examined using XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and TGA. The results showed that the yield of CNTs increases by 287 % compared with those synthesized with a single quartz tube. Moreover, the total synthesis time of CNTs decreases by 37 % because of decreased heat leakage.

  7. A combined nanoplasmonic and electrodeless quartz crystal microbalance setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Elin M.; Langhammer, Christoph; Zoric, Igor; Kasemo, Bengt [Department of Applied Physics, Chemical Physics Group, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Edvardsson, Malin E. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Biological Physics Group, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2009-12-15

    We have developed an instrument combining localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing with electrodeless quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The two techniques can be run simultaneously, on the same sensor surface, and with the same time resolution and sensitivity as for the individual techniques. The electrodeless QCM eliminates the need to fabricate electrodes on the quartz crystal and gives a large flexibility in choosing the surface structure and coating for both QCM-D and LSPR. The performance is demonstrated for liquid phase measurements of lipid bilayer formation and biorecognition events, and for gas phase measurements of hydrogen uptake/release by palladium nanoparticles. Advantages of using the combined equipment for biomolecular adsorption studies include synchronized information about structural transformations and extraction of molecular (dry) mass and degree of hydration of the adlayer, which cannot be obtained with the individual techniques. In hydrogen storage studies the combined equipment, allows for synchronized measurements of uptake/release kinetics and quantification of stored hydrogen amounts in nanoparticles and films at practically interesting hydrogen pressures and temperatures.

  8. Infrared optical properties of $\\alpha$ quartz by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gangemi, Fabrizio; Carati, Andrea; Maiocchi, Alberto; Galgani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with theoretical estimates of the refractive--index curves for quartz, obtained by the Kubo formul\\ae\\ in the classical approximation, through MD simulations for the motions of the ions. Two objectives are considered. The first one is to understand the role of nonlinearities in situations where they are very large, as at the $\\alpha$--$\\beta$ structural phase transition. We show that on the one hand they don't play an essential role in connection with the form of the spectra in the infrared. On the other hand they play an essential role in introducing a chaoticity which involves a definite normal mode. This might explain why that mode is Raman active in the $\\alpha$ phase, but not in the $\\beta$ phase. The second objective concerns whether it is possible in a microscopic model to obtain normal mode frequencies, or peak frequencies in the optical spectra, that are in good agreement with the experimental data for quartz. Notwithstanding a lot of effort, we were unable to find results agr...

  9. Outbreak of silicosis in Spanish quartz conglomerate workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alonso, Aránzazu; Córdoba-Doña, Juan Antonio; Millares-Lorenzo, José Luis; Figueroa-Murillo, Estrella; García-Vadillo, Cristina; Romero-Morillo, José

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of an outbreak of occupational silicosis and the associated working conditions. Methods: Cases were defined as men working in the stone cutting, shaping, and finishing industry in the province of Cádiz, diagnosed with silicosis between July 2009 and May 2012, and were identified and diagnosed by the department of pulmonology of the University Hospital of Puerto Real (Cádiz). A census of workplaces using quartz conglomerates was carried out to determine total numbers of potentially exposed workers. A patient telephone survey on occupational exposures and a review of medical records for all participants were conducted. Results: Silicosis was diagnosed in 46 men with a median age of 33 years and a median of 11 years working in the manufacturing of countertops. Of these cases, 91.3% were diagnosed with simple chronic silicosis, with an abnormal high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) scan. One patient died during the study period. Employer non-compliance in prevention and control measures was frequently reported, as were environmental and individual protection failures. Conclusions: The use of new construction materials such as quartz conglomerates has increased silicosis incidence due to intensive occupational exposures, in the context of high demand fuelled by the housing boom. This widespread exposure poses a risk if appropriate preventive measures are not undertaken. PMID:24804337

  10. Reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex for microelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeze, D. A.; Forrest, R. D.; Carey, J. D.; Cox, D. C.; Robertson, I. D.; Weiss, B. L.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2002-10-01

    The reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex substrates was carried out using CF4/Ar and CF4/O2 gas mixtures in a combined radio frequency (rf)/microwave (μw) plasma. It was observed that the etch rate and the surface morphology of the etched regions depended on the gas mixture (CF4/Ar or CF4/O2), the relative concentration of CF4 in the gas mixture, the rf power (and the associated self-induced bias) and microwave power. An etch rate of 95 nm/min for quartz was achieved. For samples covered with a thin metal layer, ex situ high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that, during etching, surface roughness is produced on the surface beneath the thin metallic mask. Near vertical sidewalls with a taper angle greater than 80° and smooth etched surfaces at the nanometric scale were fabricated by carefully controlling the etching parameters and the masking technique. A simulation of the electrostatic field distribution was carried out to understand the etching process using these masks for the fabrication of high definition features.

  11. Tuning Leaky Nanocavity Resonances - Perturbation Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Shlafman, Michael; Salzman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Adiabatic frequency tuning of finite-lifetime-nanocavity electromagnetic modes affects also their quality-factor (Q). Perturbative Q change resulting from (real) frequency tuning, is a controllable parameter. Here, the influence of dielectric constant modulation (DCM) on cavity resonances is presented, by first order perturbation analysis for a 3D cavity with radiation losses. Semi-analytical expressions for DCM induced cavity mode frequency and Q changes are derived. The obtained results are in good agreement with numerical calculations.

  12. Varactor-tuned Substrate Integrated Evanescent Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Acar, Öncel; Dong, Yunfeng

    is considered. In contrast to other methods described in the literature, it avoids etching split ring resonators in the metal layer of the SIW. The filters presented here use varactors as tuning elements. The varactors (as well as DC decoupling circuits) are mounted on the surface of PCB bringing the lower......, fabricated and tested in order to validate the developed filter models as well as the implemented realization method. The filter structure as well as its tuning are shown in Figure 1....

  13. Gravity orientation tuning in macaque anterior thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Jean; Kim, Byounghoon; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2016-12-01

    Gravity may provide a ubiquitous allocentric reference to the brain's spatial orientation circuits. Here we describe neurons in the macaque anterior thalamus tuned to pitch and roll orientation relative to gravity, independently of visual landmarks. We show that individual cells exhibit two-dimensional tuning curves, with peak firing rates at a preferred vertical orientation. These results identify a thalamic pathway for gravity cues to influence perception, action and spatial cognition.

  14. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  15. Tuning Metamaterials by using Amorphous Magnetic Microwires

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Dominguez, V.; Garcia, M.A.; Marin, P.; Hernando, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the possibility of tuning the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials with magnetic fields by incorporating amorphous magnetic microwires. The large permeability of these wires at microwave frequencies allows tuning the resonance of the metamaterial by using magnetic fields of the order of tens of Oe. We describe here the physical basis of the interaction between a prototypical magnetic metamaterial with magnetic microwires and...

  16. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  17. Dynamics of the tuning process between singers

    CERN Document Server

    Urteaga, R

    2004-01-01

    We present a dynamical model describing a predictable human behavior like the tuning process between singers. The purpose, inspired in physiological and behavioral grounds of human beings, is sensitive to all Fourier spectrum of each sound emitted and it contemplates an asymmetric coupling between individuals. We have recorded several tuning exercises and we have confronted the experimental evidence with the results of the model finding a very well agreement between calculated and experimental sonograms.

  18. Anisotropy tuning with the Wilson flow

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, T; Mages, S; Schafer, A; Szabo, K K

    2012-01-01

    We use the Wilson flow to define the gauge anisotropy at a given physical scale. We demonstrate the use of the anisotropic flow by performing the tuning of the bare gauge anisotropy in the tree-level Symanzik action for several lattice spacings and target anisotropies. We use this method to tune the anisotropy parameters in full QCD, where we also exploit the diminishing effect of a well chosen smearing on the renormalization of the fermion anisotropy.

  19. Revisiting fine-tuning in the MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Graham G.; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Staub, Florian

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the amount of fine-tuning in constrained versions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), with different boundary conditions at the GUT scale. Specifically we study the fully constrained version as well as the cases of non-universal Higgs and gaugino masses. We allow for the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms which we show further relax the fine-tuning. Of particular importance is the possibility of a Higgsino mass term and we discuss possible origins for such a term in UV complete models. We point out that loop corrections typically lead to a reduction in the fine-tuning by a factor of about two compared to the estimate at tree-level, which has been overlooked in many recent works. Taking these loop corrections into account, we discuss the impact of current limits from SUSY searches and dark matter on the fine-tuning. Contrary to common lore, we find that the MSSM fine-tuning can be as small as 10 while remaining consistent with all experimental constraints. If, in addition, the dark matter abundance is fully explained by the neutralino LSP, the fine-tuning can still be as low as ˜ 20 in the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms. We also discuss future prospects of these models and find that the MSSM will remain natural even in the case of a non-discovery in the foreseeable future.

  20. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This `impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing `patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a `smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  1. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This 'impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing 'patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a 'smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  2. Water-quality trends and constituent-transport analysis for selected sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2016-07-20

    During the extended history of mining in the upper Clark Fork Basin in Montana, large amounts of waste materials enriched with metallic contaminants (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) and the metalloid trace element arsenic were generated from mining operations near Butte and milling and smelting operations near Anaconda. Extensive deposition of mining wastes in the Silver Bow Creek and Clark Fork channels and flood plains had substantial effects on water quality. Federal Superfund remediation activities in the upper Clark Fork Basin began in 1983 and have included substantial remediation near Butte and removal of the former Milltown Dam near Missoula. To aid in evaluating the effects of remediation activities on water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow and water-quality data in the upper Clark Fork Basin in the 1980s.Trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, copper, and zinc), and suspended sediment for seven sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site for water years 1996–2015. The most upstream site included in trend analysis is Silver Bow Creek at Warm Springs, Montana (sampling site 8), and the most downstream site is Clark Fork above Missoula, Montana (sampling site 22), which is just downstream from the former Milltown Dam. Water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. Trend analysis was done by using a joint time-series model for concentration and streamflow. To provide temporal resolution of changes in water quality, trend analysis was conducted for four sequential 5-year periods: period 1 (water years 1996–2000), period 2 (water years 2001–5), period 3 (water years 2006–10), and period 4 (water years 2011–15). Because of the substantial effect of the intentional breach of Milltown Dam on March 28, 2008, period 3 was subdivided into period 3A (October 1, 2005–March 27, 2008

  3. Human brain factor 1, a new member of the fork head gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.B.; Wiese, S.; Burfeind, P. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of cDNA clones that cross-hybridized with the fork head domain of the rat HNF-3 gene family revealed 10 cDNAs from human fetal brain and human testis cDNA libraries containing this highly conserved DNA-binding domain. Three of these cDNAs (HFK1, HFK2, and HFK3) were further analyzed. The cDNA HFK1 has a length of 2557 nucleotides and shows strong homology at the nucleotide level (91.2%) to brain factor 1 (BF-1) from rat. The HFK1 cDNA codes for a putative 476 amino acid protein. The homology to BF-1 from rat in the coding region at the amino acid level is 87.5%. The fork head homologous region includes 111 amino acids starting at amino acid 160 and has a 97.5% homology to BF-1. Southern hybridization revealed that HFK1 is highly conserved among mammalian species and possibly birds. Northern analysis with total RNA from human tissues and poly(A)-rich RNA from mouse revealed a 3.2-kb transcript that is present in human and mouse fetal brain and in adult mouse brain. In situ hybridization with sections of mouse embryo and human fetal brain reveals that HFK1 expression is restricted to the neuronal cells in the telencepthalon, with strong expression being observed in the developing dentate gyrus and hippocampus. HFK1 was chromosomally localized by in situ hybridization to 14q12. The cDNA clones HFK2 and HFK3 were analyzed by restriction analysis and sequencing. HFK2 and HFK3 were found to be closely related but different from HFK1. Therefore, it would appear that HFK1, HFK2, HFK3, and BF-1 form a new fork head related subfamily. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  4. In-Field Performance Testing of the Fork Detector for Quantitative Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); De Baere, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Vaccaro, S. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Schwalbach, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Sweden); Tobin, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the framework of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel

  5. Emplacement of cretaceous-tertiary boundary shocked quartz from chicxulub crater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, W; Claeys, P; Kieffer, S W

    1995-08-18

    Observations on shocked quartz in Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sediments compellingly tied to Chicxulub crater raise three problems. First, in North America shocked quartz occurs above the main K-T ejecta layer. Second, shocked quartz is more abundant west than east of Chicxulub. Third, shocked quartz reached distances requiring initial velocities up to 8 kilometers per second, corresponding to shock pressures that would produce melt, not the moderate-pressure shock lamellae observed. Shock devolatilization and the expansion of carbon dioxide and water from impacted wet carbonate, producing a warm, accelerating fireball after the initial hot fireball of silicate vapor, may explain all three problems.

  6. Changes in Quartz During Heating and the Possible Effects on Si Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringdalen, Eli

    2015-02-01

    In Si and FeSi production, the main Si source is SiO2, in the form of quartz. Reactions with SiO2 generate SiO gas that further reacts with SiC to Si. During heating, quartz will transform to other SiO2 modifications with cristobalite as the stable high-temperature phase. Transformation to cristobalite is a slow process. Its rate has been investigated for several industrial quartz sources and has been shown to vary considerably among the different quartz types. Other differences in behavior during heating between these quartz sources, such as softening temperature and volume expansion, have also been studied. The quartz-cristobalite ratio will affect the rate of reactions involving SiO2. The industrial consequences and other implications of the observed difference between quartz types are discussed. Initial studies of industrial quartz were published by Ringdalen et al. In the current work, a new experimental method has been developed, and an investigation of several new quartz sources has confirmed the earlier observed large variation between different sources. The repeatability of the data has been studied and the effect of gas atmosphere investigated. The results from the earlier work are included as a basis for the discussion.

  7. Grain size distribution of quartz isolated from Chinese loess/paleosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Grain size distribution of bulk loess-paleosol and quartz chemically extracted from the loess/paleosol shows that mean size of the bulk samples is always finer than that of the quartz. The original aeolian depositions have been modified to various degrees by post-depositional weathering and pedogenic processes. The grain size distribution of the isolated quartz should be close to that of the primary aeolian sediment because the chemical pretreatment excludes secondary produced minerals. Therefore, the grain size of the quartz may be considered to more clearly reflect the variations of winter monsoon intensity.

  8. South Fork Zumbro River Stage 1B, Rochester, Minnesota. Design Memorandum Number 2, Flood Control Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Softb AMuchy, lack G M S, Very Dense, Block /00 Bo. 970 =_ Loose, Black-Gray 001, Very Dense, Tan -Gray 20 Very SofC Block TeO of Bedrock 2 , •MI P/a...Env cae,•,+,"’ epd ~-TaP ay. Dwq. 86 -1034e /0 May 49S6 :WS 9743 1 Water I To- of Bedrok -970 3 A/oaes: J .960 I/ ..Fork Zunbro River eev. 974.3: 2. ft

  9. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  10. A study of cathodoluminescence and trace element compositional zoning in natural quartz from volcanic rocks: mapping titanium content in quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, William P; MacRae, Colin M; Wilson, Nick C; Torpy, Aaron; Lee, Cin-Ty A; Student, James J; Thomas, Jay B; Vicenzi, Edward P

    2012-12-01

    This article concerns application of cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy to volcanic quartz and its utility in assessing variation in trace quantities of Ti within individual crystals. CL spectroscopy provides useful details of intragrain compositional variability and structure but generally limited quantitative information on element abundances. Microbeam analysis can provide such information but is time-consuming and costly, particularly if large numbers of analyses are required. To maximize advantages of both approaches, natural and synthetic quartz crystals were studied using high-resolution hyperspectral CL imaging (1.2-5.0 eV range) combined with analysis via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Spectral intensities can be deconvolved into three principal contributions (1.93, 2.19, and 2.72 eV), for which intensity of the latter peak was found to correlate directly with Ti concentration. Quantitative maps of Ti variation can be produced by calibration of the CL spectral data against relatively few analytical points. Such maps provide useful information concerning intragrain zoning or heterogeneity of Ti contents with the sensitivity of LA-ICPMS analysis and spatial resolution of electron microprobe analysis.

  11. Monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins at replication forks and in assembled chromatin using isolation of proteins on nascent DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Couch, Frank B; Cortez, David

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the processes of DNA replication, chromatin assembly and maturation, and the replication stress response requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks. Detecting protein accumulation at replication forks or damaged sites has primarily relied on immunofluorescence imaging, which is limited in resolution and antibody sensitivity. Here we describe a procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) that permits a high-resolution spatiotemporal analysis of proteins at replication forks or on chromatin following DNA replication in cultured cells. iPOND relies on labeling of nascent DNA with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Biotin conjugation to EdU-labeled DNA using click chemistry facilitates a single-step streptavidin purification of proteins bound to the nascent DNA. iPOND permits an interrogation of any cellular process linked to DNA synthesis using a 3- to 4-d protocol.

  12. Bimetallic structure fabricated by laser interference lithography for tuning surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C H; Hong, M H; Cheung, H W; Zhang, F; Huang, Z Q; Tan, L S; Hor, T S A

    2008-07-07

    Tuning of surface plasmon resonance by gold and silver bimetallic thin film and bimetallic dot array is investigated. Laser interference lithography is applied to fabricate the nanostructures. A bimetallic dot structure is obtained by a lift-off procedure after gold and silver thin film deposition by an electron beam evaporator. Surface plasmon behaviors of these films and nanostructures are studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy. It is observed that for gold thin film on quartz substrate, the optical spectral peak is blue shifted when a silver thin film is coated over it. Compared to the plasmon band in single metal gold dot array, the bimetallic nanodot array shows a similar blue shift in its spectral peak. These shifts are both attributed to the interaction between gold and silver atoms. Electromagnetic interaction between gold and silver nanostructures is discussed using a simplified spring model.

  13. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  14. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1.

  15. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  16. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  17. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  18. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  19. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  20. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  1. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  2. Stream-Sediment Geochemistry in Mining-Impacted Drainages of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River, Custer County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Thomas P.; Box, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    This reconnaissance study was undertaken at the request of the USDA Forest Service, Region 4, to assess the geochemistry, in particular the mercury and selenium contents, of mining-impacted sediments in the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River in Custer County Idaho. The Yankee Fork has been the site of hard-rock and placer mining, primarily for gold and silver, starting in the 1880s. Major dredge placer mining from the 1930s to 1950s in the Yankee Fork disturbed about a 10-kilometer reach. Mercury was commonly used in early hard-rock mining and placer operations for amalgamation and recovery of gold. During the late 1970s, feasibility studies were done on cyanide-heap leach recovery of gold from low-grade ores of the Sunbeam and related deposits. In the mid-1990s a major open-pit bulk-vat leach operation was started at the Grouse Creek Mine. This operation shut down when gold values proved to be lower than expected. Mercury in stream sediments in the Yankee Fork ranges from below 0.02 ppm to 7 ppm, with the highest values associated with old mill locations and lode and placer mines. Selenium ranges from below the detection limit for this study of 0.2 ppm to 4 ppm in Yankee Fork sediment samples. The generally elevated selenium content in the sediment samples reflect the generally high selenium contents in the volcanic rocks that underlie the Yankee Fork and the presence of gold and silver selenides in some of the veins that were exploited in the early phases of mining.

  3. A one-kilogram quartz resonator as a mass standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, John; Howe, David

    2013-02-01

    The SI unit of mass, the kilogram, is defined by a single artifact, the International Prototype Kilogram. This artifact, the primary mass standard, suffers from long-term instabilities that are neither well understood nor easily monitored. A secondary mass standard consisting of a 1-kg quartz resonator in ultrahigh vacuum is proposed. The frequency stability of such a resonator is likely to be far higher than the mass stability of the primary mass standard. Moreover, the resonator would provide a link to the SI time-interval unit. When compared with a laboratory-grade atomic frequency standard or GPS time, the frequency of the resonator could be monitored, on a continuous basis, with 10(-15) precision in only a few days of averaging. It could also be coordinated, worldwide, with other resonator mass standards without the need to transport the standards.

  4. Respiratory Monitoring by Porphyrin Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Woo Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A respiratory monitoring system based on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor with a functional film was designed and investigated. Porphyrins 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulfophenyl-21H,23H-porphine (TSPP and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulfophenyl-21H, 23H-porphine manganese (III chloride (MnTSPP used as sensitive elements were assembled with a poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride (PDDA. Films were deposited on the QCM resonators using layer-by-layer method in order to develop the sensor. The developed system, in which the sensor response reflects lung movements, was able to track human respiration providing respiratory rate (RR and respiratory pattern (RP. The sensor system was tested on healthy volunteers to compare RPs and calculate RRs. The operation principle of the proposed system is based on the fast adsorption/desorption behavior of water originated from human breath into the sensor films deposited on the QCM electrode.

  5. Polishing of quartz by rapid etching in ammonium bifluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallin, Orjan; Danielsson, Rolf; Lindberg, Ulf; Thornell, Greger

    2007-07-01

    The etch rate and surface roughness of polished and lapped AT-cut quartz subjected to hot (90, 110, and 130 degrees C), concentrated (50, 65, 80 wt %) ammonium bi-fluoride have been investigated. Having used principal component analysis to verify experimental solidity and analyze data, we claim with confidence that this parameter space does not, as elsewhere stated, allow for a polishing effect or even a preserving setting. Etch rates were found to correlate well, and possibly logarithmically, with temperature except for the hottest etching applied to lapped material. Roughness as a function of temperature and concentration behaved well for the lapped material, but lacked systematic variation in the case of the polished material. At the lowest temperature, concentration had no effect on etch rate or roughness. Future efforts are targeted at temperatures and concentrations closer to the solubility limit.

  6. Manufacturing technology for high quality swept-culture growth quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balascio, J. F.; Lias, N. C.

    1983-09-01

    Relatively low impurity alpha-quartz has been grown from the hydroxide mineralizer system with the use of three types of nutrient: converted, special cultured and cultured. The converted nutrient resulted in the lowest total ppm level (2.6) and Al ppm level (0.5) in the as-grown crystals. Special cultured and cultured nutrients resulted in 1.7 ppm and 2.1 ppm of aluminum in crystals grown, respectively, from these nutrients. Infrared Q values ranged from 2.5x10 to the 6th power in these crystals. With respect to rho in the as-grown crystals, a ten minute etching of seeds in 7.0 molal ammonium bifluoride has resulted in the growth of the lowest etch channel density crystals (approx = 135/sq cm).

  7. Petrophysical evaluation methods: basal quartz formation, Manyberries Area , Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrocarbons, both oil and gas, have been discovered in the basal quartz formation in the Manyberries area of SE Alberta. Estimation of producible fluids and hydrocarbons in place has been difficult due to the very shaly nature of the reservoir rock. Calculations of water saturation with no corrections for clay conductivity underestimates the hydrocarbons in place. The Waxman-Smits evaluation technique, which provides a method to account for clay conductivities, was used to estimate water saturation based on total porosity. Work of other authors provides a technique to correlate total and effective porosities. This was used to estimate effective porosity and subsequently water saturation based on the effective porosity. Error analysis was undertaken to estimate the uncertainty in the calculated water saturations.

  8. Detection of sulfur dioxide using a piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, O.M. [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    1997-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide was detected and determined in air by a piezoelectric quartz crystal sensor coated with 4-aminoantipyrine/1-hydroxyetil-2-heptadecenyl imidazol (amine 220) solution (1:1 v/v in chloroform). The analytical response curve is linear over the concentration range from 0.70 to 5.0 ppm of SO{sub 2}. Good linearities (r = 0.9990, 0.9995 and 0.9968) and sensitivities (18.0, 33.4 and 50.7 Hz/ppm) were found, respectively for exposure times of 30, 60 and 90 seconds. The sensor can be used for more than six months without loss in sensitivity and presented good reversibility and reproducibility. Among some possible interferents tested, only nitrogen dioxide and moisture caused major frequency changes.

  9. Experimental microstylolites in quartz and modelling of natural stylolitic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gratier, Jean-Pierre; Hassani, Riad; Renard, Francois

    2008-01-01

    Experimental microstylolites have been observed at stressed contacts between quartz grains loaded for several weeks in the presence of an aqueous silica solution, at 350 8C and 50 MPa of differential stress. Stereoscopic analysis of pairs of SEM images yielded a digital elevation model of the surface of the microstylolites. Fourier analyses of these microstylolites reveal a self-affine roughness (with a roughness exponent H of 1.2). Coupled with observations of close interactions between dissolution pits and stylolitic peaks, these data illustrate a possible mechanism for stylolite formation. The complex geometry of stylolite surfaces is imposed by the interplay between the development of dissolution peaks in preferential locations (fast dissolution pits) and the mechanical properties of the solid-fluid-solid interfaces. Simple mechanical modeling expresses the crucial competition that could rule the development of microstylolites: (i) a stress-related process, modeled in terms of the stiffness of springs tha...

  10. Quartz crystal microbalance and photoacoustic measurements in dental photocuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marcenilda A.; Bastos, Ivan N.; Cella, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Photocured dental resins are used extensively in restorative procedures in dentistry. Inadequate curing reduces the lifetime of the dental restoration, and consequently it is essential to precisely measure the polymerisation kinetics. In this study, two techniques, Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS), were used to monitor the real-time cure and to obtain the optical absorption spectra of resins, respectively. From the PAS measurements, the precise peaks of absorption were identified, and were used as the appropriate wavelength of the photocuring light in the QCM monitoring. The combined use of these techniques allows reliable determination of the duration of the phases of physical and chemical changes that occur during photocuring. Two commercial dental resins were tested, and the results confirmed the advantages of using PAS and QCM to study polymerisation kinetics.

  11. Testing the isotropy of space using rotating quartz oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Anthony; Mizrachi, Eli; Anderegg, Loic; Müller, Holger; Hohensee, Michael; Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Violations of Lorentz invariance by matter and light can generate direction- and frame-dependent anisotropies in particles inertial masses and, hence, a measurable modulation of the oscillation frequency of rotating quartz crystal oscillators. This allows simple and low maintenance experiments that are ideally suited for long-term data taking. Using the Standard Model Extension (SME) as a parameterizing framework, we study the magnitude of this putative frequency modulation. A preliminary experiment with room-temperature SC-cut crystals yields a frequency resolution in the $10^{-15}$ range with $\\sim 120$ hours of data and a limit of $\\tilde c_Q=(-1.8 \\pm 2.2)\\times 10^{-14}$\\,GeV on the most weakly constrained neutron-sector $c-$coefficient of the SME. Future experiments with cryogenic oscillators promise additional improvements in accuracy, opening up the potential for improved tests of Lorentz symmetry in the neutron, proton, electron and photon sector.

  12. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  13. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  14. A paleomagnetic study of the Prince William terrane and Nixon Fork terrane, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, P. W.

    1984-12-01

    The mean paleomagnetic inclination of Paleocene volcanics from two regions on Kodiak Island in the Ghost Rocks Formation suggests that the Prince William terrance originated at mid latitudes, about 25 deg south of its expected Alaskan latitude in Paleocene time. The mean declinations of the two regions, however, differ by approximately 120 deg, suggesting they have rotated with respect to each other, perhaps during emplacement. It is suggested that, despite the lack of evidence for a major Tertiary suture zone between the Prince William terrane and central Alaska, the Prince William and perhaps adjacent terranes may have lain substantially south of their present position in the early Tertiary. Paleomagnetic data from early Ordovician to early Tertiary rocks of the Nixon Fork terrane, central Alaska, provide evidence toward a better understanding of the tectonic evolution of the continental margin of northwestern America. The Nixon fork terrane, a Paleozoic continental margin assemblage, is bordered on the south by proven allochthonous terranes and to the North by provinces with oceanic affinities far younger in age. Paleomagnetic analysis of the Ordovician limestone sections (Lower Ordovician Novi Mountain and Middle to Upper Ordovican Telsitna Formation) are interpreted as having three components of magnetization.

  15. Lentiform fork sign: a magnetic resonance finding in a case of acute metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Daniela; Borreggine, Carmela; Perfetto, Francesco; Bertozzi, Vincenzo; Trivisano, Marina; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Grilli, Gianpaolo; Macarini, Luca

    2014-06-01

    We report a 33 year-old woman addicted to chronic unspecified solvents abuse with stupor, respiratory disorders, tetraplegia and severe metabolic acidosis. On admission an unenhanced cranial CT scan showed symmetrical hypodensities of both lentiform nuclei. MR imaging performed 12 hours after stupor demonstrates bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis, bilateral external capsule, corona radiata and deep cerebellar hyperintensities with right cingulate cortex involvement. DWI reflected bilateral putaminal hyperintensities with restricted water diffusion as to citotoxic edema and development of vasogenic edema in the external capsule recalling a fork. On day twenty, after specific treatments MRI demonstrated a bilateral putaminal marginal enhancement. Bilateral putaminal necrosis is a characteristic but non-specific radiological finding of methanol poisoning. Lentiform Fork sign is a rare MRI finding reported in literature in 22 patients with various conditions characterized by metabolic acidosis. Vasogenic edema may be due to the differences in metabolic vulnerability between neurons and astrocytes. We postulate that metabolic acidosis could have an important role to generate this sign.

  16. The forked tongue and edge detection in snakes (Crotalus oreganus): an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M Rockwell; Young, Bruce A; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2008-02-01

    Many stimulus-detection systems are lateralized to allow for simultaneous comparison of paired stimuli. It has been hypothesized that the deeply forked tongue of snakes and some derived lizards functions as a chemical edge detector where cues gathered by each tine are kept separate to provide two points of lateral odor assessment by the central nervous system via vomeronasal input. While following a chemical trail, one time can be on the trail, the other off, and such differential information prompts the snake to turn back to the trail. The authors tested this hypothesis in rattlesnakes within a predatory context by unilaterally severing the vomeronasal nerves. If edge detection is used by snakes during prey trailing, then unilateral denervation should disrupt trailing ability. The authors found no change in the seven separate trailing parameters measured. Therefore, they found no support for the edge detection hypothesis as it applies to prey trailing behavior. Instead, the deeply forked tongue may represent a chemosensory specialization to increase odor-sampling area, with snakes and derived lizards detecting only the concentration of chemical trails. (c) 2008 APA.

  17. ETAA1 acts at stalled replication forks to maintain genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Thomas E; Luzwick, Jessica W; Kavanaugh, Gina; Carroll, Clinton; Dungrawala, Huzefa; Glick, Gloria G; Feldkamp, Michael D; Putney, Reid; Chazin, Walter J; Cortez, David

    2016-11-01

    The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hypersensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse. ETAA1 contains two RPA-interaction motifs that localize ETAA1 to stalled replication forks. It also interacts with several DNA damage response proteins including the BLM/TOP3α/RMI1/RMI2 and ATR/ATRIP complexes. It binds ATR/ATRIP directly using a motif with sequence similarity to the TOPBP1 ATR-activation domain; and like TOPBP1, ETAA1 acts as a direct ATR activator. ETAA1 functions in parallel to the TOPBP1/RAD9/HUS1/RAD1 pathway to regulate ATR and maintain genome stability. Thus, vertebrate cells contain at least two ATR-activating proteins.

  18. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. The ammonoids from the Three Forks Shale (Late Devonian of Montana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Korn

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The ammonoid fauna from the Late Devonian Three Forks Shale of Montana is revised. Six taxa were recognised, which belong to the genera Tornoceras, Pernoceras, Raymondiceras, Platyclymenia, Pleuroclymenia, and Carinoclymenia. The ammonoid assemblage suggests a stratigraphic position within the middle Famennian, most probably the Platyclymenia annulata Zone. The ammonoids display extreme septal crowding in intermediate as well as adult growth stages, which can be regarded as evidence for instable palaeoecological conditions during lifetime of the animals. Die Ammonoideenfauna aus dem oberdevonischen Three Forks Shale von Montana wird revidiert. Sechs Taxa werden unterschieden; sie gehören zu den Gattungen Tornoceras, Pernoceras, Raymondiceras, Platyclymenia, Pleuroclymenia und Carinoclymenia. Die Ammonoideen-Vergesellschaftung spricht für eine stratigraphische Position im mittleren Famennium, wahrscheinlich in der Platyclymenia annulata Zone. Die Ammonoideen zeigen auffällige Drängung der Septen in intermediären und adulten Wachstumsstadien, die als Hinweis auf instabile Lebensbedingungen für die Tiere gewertet werden kann. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600008

  20. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron t

  1. Retrospective dosimetry: Dose evaluation using unheated and heated quartz from a radioactive waste storage building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, M.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    and particularly in nuclear installations. These materials contain natural dosemeters Such as quartz. which usually is less sensitive than its heated counterpart. The potential of quartz extracted from mortar in a wall of a low-level radioactive-waste storage facility containing distributed sources of Co-60 and Cs...

  2. Microbially induced separation of quartz from hematite using sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasan, M R Sabari; Natarajan, K A

    2010-07-01

    Cells and metabolic products of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were successfully used to separate quartz from hematite through environmentally benign microbially induced flotation. Bacterial metabolic products such as extracellular proteins and polysaccharides were isolated from both unadapted and mineral-adapted bacterial metabolite and their basic characteristics were studied in order to get insight into the changes brought about on bioreagents during adaptation. Interaction between bacterial cells and metabolites with minerals like hematite and quartz brought about significant surface-chemical changes on both the minerals. Quartz was rendered more hydrophobic, while hematite became more hydrophilic after biotreatment. The predominance of bacterial polysaccharides on interacted hematite and of proteins on quartz was responsible for the above surface-chemical changes, as attested through adsorption studies. Surface-chemical changes were also observed on bacterial cells after adaptation to the above minerals. Selective separation of quartz from hematite was achieved through interaction with quartz-adapted bacterial cells and metabolite. Mineral-specific proteins secreted by quartz-adapted cells were responsible for conferment of hydrophobicity on quartz resulting in enhanced separation from hematite through flotation.

  3. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  4. Testing the application of quartz and feldspar luminescence dating to MIS 5 Japanese marine deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Christine; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Tokuyasu, Kayoko

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of both quartz and feldspar luminescence dating was tested on twenty-five samples from a marine succession now forming a coastal cliff at Oga Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. The quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal shows thermal instability and linear modulated...

  5. Retrospective dosimetry using Japanese brick quartz: A way forward despite an unstable fast decaying OSL signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fujita, Hiroki; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Quartz extracted from heated bricks has been previously suggested for use in dose estimation in accident dosimetry, but this technique has never been applied before to Japanese quartz which often has unusual OSL characteristics. In this study the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteri...

  6. Effectiveness of a Multidimensional Randomized Control Intervention to Reduce Quartz Exposure Among Construction Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurssen, E. van; Meijster, T; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Boessen, R.; Spaan, S.; Tielemans, E.; Heederik, D.; Pronk, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is little evidence with respect to the effectiveness of intervention programs that focus on the reduction of occupational quartz exposure in the construction industry. This article evaluates the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention which was aimed at reducing occupational quartz

  7. Effectiveness of a Multidimensional Randomized Control Intervention to Reduce Quartz Exposure Among Construction Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurssen, E. van; Meijster, T; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Boessen, R.; Spaan, S.; Tielemans, E.; Heederik, D.; Pronk, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is little evidence with respect to the effectiveness of intervention programs that focus on the reduction of occupational quartz exposure in the construction industry. This article evaluates the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention which was aimed at reducing occupational quartz ex

  8. The Suitability Of Local Quartz Sand In The Production Of Bath Crucibles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Okpanachi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of local quartz sand in the production of bath crucibles is a study that was carried out in order to impart overall strength on bath crucibles hence reduce breakages during fettling. Therefore this research constitutes a study to enhance the efficiency of production of bath crucibles by addition of quartz sand in slip preparation. The steps taken in the beneficiation of quartz sand for the production of bath crucibles are comminution which entails crushing and milling classification washing liquid dispersion sizing and reduction of iron content by magnetic separation. The slip contains materials like plastic clay feldspar kaolin talc sodium silicate water quartz sand etc. These were all milled in the ball mill for slip production casting and fettling glazing and sintering to get final bath crucibles as the end products. Quartz sand is used in a variety of products essentially as raw material for the foundry casting and glass industries and also in chemicals water filtration and ceramics the heat resistance nature of quartz sand makes it an excellent refractory substance for these industrial processes. Slip can be prepared for production of bath crucibles without the inclusion of quartz sand however the addition of quartz sand is needed to improve the mechanical performance of the slip in the production of bath crucibles.

  9. 75 FR 12468 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... With the next 10 Follow Quartz aileron pushrod bearings. hours time-in- Mountain Aerospace service (TIS... aileron Within 50 hours TIS Follow Quartz pushrod bearings. after the cleaning Mountain Aerospace and... Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department...

  10. Luminescence property of volcanic quartz and the use of red isothermal TL for dating tephras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Murray, A.S.; Huot, S.

    2007-01-01

    An optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) age obtained from a Japanese tephra using quartz phenocrysts severely underestimated the known age. The characteristics of the OSL signals were investigated in order to understand the cause of the underestimation; the main OSL component of volcanic quartz...

  11. Optical dating of single sand-sized grains of quartz: Sources of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements have been made of over 3000 sand-sized grains of quartz. Analysis at this scale highlights the variability in the luminescence sensitivity and the dose saturation characteristics of individual quartz grains. Using a new instrument capable of me...... intensity, dose saturation characteristics and instrument uncertainty in equivalent dose calculation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Discrete PID Tuning Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr DOLEŽEL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PID controllers are widely used in industry these days due to their useful properties such as simple tuning or robustness. While they are applicable to many control problems, they can perform poorly in some applications. Highly nonlinear system control with constrained manipulated variable can be mentioned as an example. The point of the paper is to string together convenient qualities of conventional PID control and progressive techniques based on Artificial Intelligence. Proposed control method should deal with even highly nonlinear systems. To be more specific, there is described new method of discrete PID controller tuning in this paper. This method tunes discrete PID controller parameters online through the use of genetic algorithm and neural model of controlled system in order to control successfully even highly nonlinear systems. After method description and some discussion, there is performed control simulation and comparison to one chosen conventional control method.

  13. Widespread auditory deficits in tune deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Lucker, Jay; Drayna, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate auditory function in individuals with deficits in musical pitch perception. We hypothesized that such individuals have deficits in nonspeech areas of auditory processing. We screened 865 randomly selected individuals to identify those who scored poorly on the Distorted Tunes test (DTT), a measure of musical pitch recognition ability. Those who scored poorly were given a comprehensive audiologic examination, and those with hearing loss or other confounding audiologic factors were excluded from further testing. Thirty-five individuals with tune deafness constituted the experimental group. Thirty-four individuals with normal hearing and normal DTT scores, matched for age, gender, handedness, and education, and without overt or reported psychiatric disorders made up the normal control group. Individual and group performance for pure-tone frequency discrimination at 1000 Hz was determined by measuring the difference limen for frequency (DLF). Auditory processing abilities were assessed using tests of pitch pattern recognition, duration pattern recognition, and auditory gap detection. In addition, we evaluated both attention and short- and long-term memory as variables that might influence performance on our experimental measures. Differences between groups were evaluated statistically using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests and t-tests as appropriate. The DLF at 1000 Hz in the group with tune deafness was significantly larger than that of the normal control group. However, approximately one-third of participants with tune deafness had DLFs within the range of performance observed in the control group. Many individuals with tune deafness also displayed a high degree of variability in their intertrial frequency discrimination performance that could not be explained by deficits in memory or attention. Pitch and duration pattern discrimination and auditory gap-detection ability were significantly poorer in the group with tune deafness

  14. Control of Montmorillonite Surface Coatings on Quartz Grains in Bentonite by Precursor Volcanic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Harrison, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenic tendencies of respirable-sized quartz grains may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the quartz as well as external factors. Surface coatings on quartz are of particular interest as they modify both physical and chemical properties of quartz grain surfaces and sequester the grain from contact with reactive lung fluids. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on the quartz that resisted removal by repeated vigorous washings and reaction with HCl. To understand the persistence of montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains of igneous origin, volcanic ash deposits of varying age and degree of alteration to montmorillonite were sampled in Utah, including the distal Lava Creek (c. 0.64 Ma) and Bishop Tuffs (c. 0.74 Ma), and SW Colorado (Conejos Fm, San Juan Volcanic Field) for comparison with commercial grade Cretaceous-age "western" and "southern" bentonites. Quartz grains, hand-picked from these samples, were analyzed using FE-SEM and HRTEM. Continuous coatings of volcanic glass occur on quartz grains from the distal volcanic ash samples. As glass alteration to montmorillonite becomes more extensive, quartz grain surfaces start to display patches of montmorillonite. These patches become continuous in extent on quartz grains from the bentonites. Late precipitation of opal- CT lepispheres is consistent with the alteration reaction for volcanic glass: Volcanic glass + H2O = montmorillonite + SiO2(am) + ions(aq). HRTEM of quartz grains reveals an amorphous surface layer, consistent with a volcanic glass coating. Our results indicate that persistent montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains in bentonites are related to precursor volcanic glass coatings on these grains. The absence of glass coatings on other mineral grains in bentonite (feldspar, biotite) may be a consequence of the presence of strong cleavage

  15. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  16. Flotation of quartz using N- (2-aminoethyl)-octadecanamide as collector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵世民

    2003-01-01

    The flotation behavior of quartz using N-(2-aminoethyl)-octadecanamide (AEOA) as a collector was investigated. Zeta potential and infrared spectra were conducted to investigate the mechanism of the interaction of the quartz surface with the collector molecules. The results show that electrostatic force and hydrogen bond play an important role in governing the mechanism of flotation in acidic and alkaline media. The recoveries of quartz are 99.0%-99.8% in the pH range of 3-11. The recovery of quartz is less dependent on AEOA concentration, mainly due to the formation of micellae in aqueous solution,and the adsorption density of AEOA on the quartz surface nearly remains constant.

  17. BDS tuning and luminosity monitoring in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, Barbara; Latina, Andrea; Marin, Eduardo; Pfingstner, Jurgen; Schulte, Daniel; Snuverink, Jochem; Tomas, Rogelio; Zamudio, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    The emittance preservation in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) is one of the major challenges in CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-­line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. Different tuning techniques have been applied to the CLIC BDS and in particular to the Final Focus System (FFS) in order to mitigate static and dynamic imperfections. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-­beam backgrounds processes at CLIC 3 TeV CM energy as fast luminosity signal. In particular the hadrons multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  18. Tuning Metamaterials by using Amorphous Magnetic Microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Dominguez, V; Garcia, M A; Marin, P; Hernando, A

    2017-08-24

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the possibility of tuning the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials with magnetic fields by incorporating amorphous magnetic microwires. The large permeability of these wires at microwave frequencies allows tuning the resonance of the metamaterial by using magnetic fields of the order of tens of Oe. We describe here the physical basis of the interaction between a prototypical magnetic metamaterial with magnetic microwires and electromagnetic waves plus providing detailed calculations and experimental results for the case of an array of Split Ring Resonators with Co-based microwires.

  19. The nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, P.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a piezoelectric vibration absorber, termed the nonlinear piezoelectric tuned vibration absorber (NPTVA), for the mitigation of nonlinear resonances of mechanical systems. The new feature of the NPTVA is that its nonlinear restoring force is designed according to a principle of similarity, i.e., the NPTVA should be an electrical analog of the nonlinear host system. Analytical formulas for the NPTVA parameters are derived using the homotopy perturbation method. Doing so, a nonlinear generalization of Den Hartog’s equal-peak tuning rule is developed for piezoelectric vibration absorbers.

  20. Java EE 7 performance tuning and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Oransa, Osama

    2014-01-01

    The book adopts a step-by-step approach, starting from building the basics and adding to it gradually by using different tools and examples. The book sequence is easy to follow and all topics are fully illustrated showing you how to make good use of different performance diagnostic tools. If you are an experienced Java developer, architect, team leader, consultant, support engineer, or anyone else who needs performance tuning in your Java applications, and in particular, Java enterprise applications, this book is for you. No prior experience of performance tuning is required.